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Sample records for lung volumes observed

  1. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; de Mey, Johan; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were

  2. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; Mey, Johan de; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. Material and methods: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were compared on the base of geometric volume, dimensions and extensions. Judgement of invasion of lymph node (LN) regions was evaluated using the ATS/LCSG classification of LN. Clinical relevance of the variation was studied through 3D-dosimetry of standard conformal plans: volume of critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagus, spinal cord) irradiated at toxic doses, 95% isodose volumes of GTVs, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and tumor control probabilities (TCP) were compared for evaluation of observer variability. Results: Before evaluation of observer variability, critical review of planning CT scan led to up- (two cases) and downstaging (one case) of patients as compared to the respective diagnostic scans. The defined GTVs showed an inter-observer variation with a ratio up to more than 7 between maximum and minimum geometric content. The dimensions of the primary tumor had inter-observer ranges of 4.2 (transversal), 7.9 (cranio-caudal) and 5.4 (antero-posterior) cm. Extreme extensions of the GTVs (left, right, cranial, caudal, anterior and posterior) varied with ranges of 2.8-7.3 cm due to inter-observer variation. After common review, only 63% of involved lymph node regions were delineated by the clinicians (i.e. 37% are false negative). Twenty-two percent of drawn in lymph node regions were accepted to be false positive after review. In the conformal plans, inter-observer ranges of irradiated normal tissue volume were on average 12%, with a maximum of 66%. The probability (in the population of all conformal plans) of irradiating at least 95% of the GTV with at least 95% of the nominal treatment dose decreased from 96 to 88% when swapping the matched GTV

  3. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  4. Planimetric determination of lung volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bieber, M.; Maurer, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The total volume of the lungs was determined by digital planimetry in 102 patients with emphysema and 33 normal controls aged between 30 and 79 years. The results were compared with the findings obtained from spirometric measurements. Mean values showed a significant relationship to age, body size and body surface. Planimetrically determined lung volume did not show a linear relationship with age, but increased after 60 years. Beyong 60 years, spirometric findings were lower because of an increase in the number of patients with emphysema. The results have shown that digital planimetry is a useful addition to spirometry. (orig.) [de

  5. Lung volume reduction for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallav L; Herth, Felix J; van Geffen, Wouter H; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2017-02-01

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited effects. Surgical resection of the most destroyed sections of the lung can improve pulmonary function and exercise capacity but its benefit is tempered by significant morbidity. This issue stimulated a search for novel approaches to lung volume reduction. Alternative minimally invasive approaches using bronchoscopic techniques including valves, coils, vapour thermal ablation, and sclerosant agents have been at the forefront of these developments. Insertion of endobronchial valves in selected patients could have benefits that are comparable with lung volume reduction surgery. Endobronchial coils might have a role in the treatment of patients with emphysema with severe hyperinflation and less parenchymal destruction. Use of vapour thermal energy or a sclerosant might allow focal treatment but the unpredictability of the inflammatory response limits their current use. In this Review, we aim to summarise clinical trial evidence on lung volume reduction and provide guidance on patient selection for available therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The complex relationship between lung tumor volume and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy: A prospective, observational prognostic factor study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 99.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, David L.; Fisher, Richard J.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Poulsen, Michael G.; Graham, Peter H.; Penniment, Michael G.; Vinod, Shalini K.; Krawitz, Hedley E.; Joseph, David J.; Wheeler, Greg C.; McClure, Bev E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that primary tumor volume is prognostic independent of T and N stages in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by definitive radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Multicenter prospective observational study. Patient eligibility: pathologically proven stage I–III non-small cell lung cancer planned for definitive radiotherapy (minimum 50 Gy in 20 fractions) using CT-based contouring. Volumes of the primary tumor and enlarged nodes were measured according to a standardized protocol. Survival was adjusted for the effect of T and N stage. Results: There were 509 eligible patients. Five-year survival rates for tumor volume grouped by quartiles were, for increasing tumor volume, 22%, 14%, 15% and 21%. Larger primary tumor volume was associated with shorter survival (HR = 1.060 (per doubling); 95% CI 1.01–1.12; P = 0.029). However, after adjusting for the effects of T and N stage, there was no evidence for an association (HR = 1.029, 95% CI, 0.96–1.10, P = 0.39). There was evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume was associated with an increased risk of dying, independently of T and N stage, in the first 18 months but not beyond. Conclusions: In patients treated by non-surgical means we were unable to show that lung tumor volume, overall, provides additional prognostic information beyond the T and N stage (TNM, 6th edition). There is evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume adversely affects outcome only within the first 18 months. Larger tumor size alone should not by itself exclude patients from curative (chemo)radiotherapy

  7. Lung volumes: measurement, clinical use, and coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Judd D; Dine, C Jessica

    2012-08-01

    Measurement of lung volumes is an integral part of complete pulmonary function testing. Some lung volumes can be measured during spirometry; however, measurement of the residual volume (RV), functional residual capacity (FRC), and total lung capacity (TLC) requires special techniques. FRC is typically measured by one of three methods. Body plethysmography uses Boyle's Law to determine lung volumes, whereas inert gas dilution and nitrogen washout use dilution properties of gases. After determination of FRC, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory vital capacity are measured, which allows the calculation of the RV and TLC. Lung volumes are commonly used for the diagnosis of restriction. In obstructive lung disease, they are used to assess for hyperinflation. Changes in lung volumes can also be seen in a number of other clinical conditions. Reimbursement for measurement of lung volumes requires knowledge of current procedural terminology (CPT) codes, relevant indications, and an appropriate level of physician supervision. Because of recent efforts to eliminate payment inefficiencies, the 10 previous CPT codes for lung volumes, airway resistance, and diffusing capacity have been bundled into four new CPT codes.

  8. Pseudo tumors of the lung after lung volume reduction surgery.

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    Oey, Inger F; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam; Entwisle, James J; Waller, David A

    2004-03-01

    We describe 2 patients who underwent lung volume reduction surgery, who postoperatively had computed tomographic scans that showed symptomatic mass lesions suggestive of malignancy and an inhaled foreign body. Investigations excluded these conditions with the remaining likely diagnosis of pseudotumor secondary to buttressing material. These potential sequelae of lung volume reduction surgery should be recognized in follow-up investigations.

  9. Lung volume recruitment in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Srour

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. OBJECTIVES: Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. METHODS: We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. RESULTS: There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9-190.3 and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72-311 over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001 and PCF (p = 0.042. CONCLUSION: Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  10. Low Tidal Volume Reduces Lung Inflammation Induced by Liquid Ventilation in Piglets With Severe Lung Injury.

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    Jiang, Lijun; Feng, Huizhen; Chen, Xiaofan; Liang, Kaifeng; Ni, Chengyao

    2017-05-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) is an alternative treatment for severe lung injury. High tidal volume is usually required for TLV to maintain adequate CO 2 clearance. However, high tidal volume may cause alveolar barotrauma. We aim to investigate the effect of low tidal volume on pulmonary inflammation in piglets with lung injury and under TLV. After the establishment of acute lung injury model by infusing lipopolysaccharide, 12 piglets were randomly divided into two groups, TLV with high tidal volume (25 mL/kg) or with low tidal volume (6 mL/kg) for 240 min, respectively. Extracorporeal CO 2 removal was applied in low tidal volume group to improve CO 2 clearance and in high tidal volume group as sham control. Gas exchange and hemodynamic status were monitored every 30 min during TLV. At the end of the study, pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic concentration of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by collecting lung tissue and blood samples from piglets. Arterial blood pressure, PaO 2 , and PaCO 2 showed no remarkable difference between groups during the observation period. Compared with high tidal volume strategy, low tidal volume resulted in 76% reduction of minute volume and over 80% reduction in peak inspiratory pressure during TLV. In addition, low tidal volume significantly diminished pulmonary mRNA expression and plasmatic level of IL-6 and IL-8. We conclude that during TLV, low tidal volume reduces lung inflammation in piglets with acute lung injury without compromising gas exchange. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Lung volume reduction for emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Pallav L.; Herth, Felix J.; van Geffen, Wouter H.; Deslee, Gaetan; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Advanced emphysema is a lung disease in which alveolar capillary units are destroyed and supporting tissue is lost. The combined effect of reduced gas exchange and changes in airway dynamics impairs expiratory airflow and leads to progressive air trapping. Pharmacological therapies have limited

  12. Estimation of lung volumes from chest radiographs using shape information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, R.J.; Brown, D.J.; Holmes, M.; Cumming, G.; Denison, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The cross-sectional shapes of the chest and its contained structures were assessed in post-mortem anatomical sections and from computerised tomographic scans in living subjects. These shapes are described by simple equations that can be used to increase the accuracy of measuring lung volumes from chest radiographs. Radiographic estimates of total lung capacity, using the equations, were compared with plethysmographic and single-breath helium dilution measurements in 35 normal subjects. After correction for posture effects the radiographic estimates of TLC, which measure the displacement volume of the lung, exceeded the plethysmographic estimates of contained gas volume by a mean of 720 ml, which was taken as the volume of tissue, blood, and water in the lungs. The single-breath dilution estimates of TLC fell short of the plethysmographic values by a mean of 480 ml, taken as the volume of contained gas that was inaccessible to helium in 10 seconds. The tomographic studies suggested that the radiographic technique of measuring lung displacement volumes has an accuracy of +- 210 ml. The method is rapid and simple to use and the intra- and inter-observer variabilities of <1% and <5% respectively. (author)

  13. Predictive equations for lung volumes from computed tomography for size matching in pulmonary transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konheim, Jeremy A; Kon, Zachary N; Pasrija, Chetan; Luo, Qingyang; Sanchez, Pablo G; Garcia, Jose P; Griffith, Bartley P; Jeudy, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Size matching for lung transplantation is widely accomplished using height comparisons between donors and recipients. This gross approximation allows for wide variation in lung size and, potentially, size mismatch. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) volumetry comparisons could offer more accurate size matching. Although recipient CT scans are universally available, donor CT scans are rarely performed. Therefore, predicted donor lung volumes could be used for comparison to measured recipient lung volumes, but no such predictive equations exist. We aimed to use 3D-CT volumetry measurements from a normal patient population to generate equations for predicted total lung volume (pTLV), predicted right lung volume (pRLV), and predicted left lung volume (pLLV), for size-matching purposes. Chest CT scans of 400 normal patients were retrospectively evaluated. 3D-CT volumetry was performed to measure total lung volume, right lung volume, and left lung volume of each patient, and predictive equations were generated. The fitted model was tested in a separate group of 100 patients. The model was externally validated by comparison of total lung volume with total lung capacity from pulmonary function tests in a subset of those patients. Age, gender, height, and race were independent predictors of lung volume. In the test group, there were strong linear correlations between predicted and actual lung volumes measured by 3D-CT volumetry for pTLV (r = 0.72), pRLV (r = 0.72), and pLLV (r = 0.69). A strong linear correlation was also observed when comparing pTLV and total lung capacity (r = 0.82). We successfully created a predictive model for pTLV, pRLV, and pLLV. These may serve as reference standards and predict donor lung volume for size matching in lung transplantation. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ... loss to improve pulmonary mechanics and compliance, thereby reducing the work of breathing. ... of obtaining similar functional advantages to surgical lung volume reduction, ...

  15. Quantitative study on lung volume and lung perfusion using SPECT and CT in thoracal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Goerich, J.; Strauss, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    22 patients with space occupying lesions in the thoracal region were investigated by computer tomography and by perfusion scintigraphy using SPECT. In order to evaluate the CT images quantitatively, the lung volume was determined using approximation method and compared with the perfusion in the SPECT study. For this, anatomically equivalent transaxial SPECT slices had been coordinated to the CT slices. Between the determined lung volumes and the activity in the ocrresponding layers, a statistically significant correlation was found. It could be shown that the stronger perfusion, frequently observed at the right side of the healthy lung, may be explained by an higher volume of the right pulmonary lobe. Whereas in benign displacing processes the relation activity to volume was similar to the one of the healthy lung, a strongly reduced perfusion together with inconspicuous lung volumes became apparent with malignant tumors. In addition to the great morphological evidence of CT and SPECT studies, additional informations regarding the dignity of displacing processes may be derived from the quantitative evaluation of both methods. (orig.) [de

  16. [Target volume margins for lung cancer: internal target volume/clinical target volume].

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    Jouin, A; Pourel, N

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to carry out a review of margins that should be used for the delineation of target volumes in lung cancer, with a focus on margins from gross tumour volume (GTV) to clinical target volume (CTV) and internal target volume (ITV) delineation. Our review was based on a PubMed literature search with, as a cornerstone, the 2010 European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) recommandations by De Ruysscher et al. The keywords used for the search were: radiotherapy, lung cancer, clinical target volume, internal target volume. The relevant information was categorized under the following headings: gross tumour volume definition (GTV), CTV-GTV margin (first tumoural CTV then nodal CTV definition), in field versus elective nodal irradiation, metabolic imaging role through the input of the PET scanner for tumour target volume and limitations of PET-CT imaging for nodal target volume definition, postoperative radiotherapy target volume definition, delineation of target volumes after induction chemotherapy; then the internal target volume is specified as well as tumoural mobility for lung cancer and respiratory gating techniques. Finally, a chapter is dedicated to planning target volume definition and another to small cell lung cancer. For each heading, the most relevant and recent clinical trials and publications are mentioned. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  17. Spirometry, Static Lung Volumes, and Diffusing Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A; Cain, Hilary C; Casaburi, Richard; Lee, Patty J; Iannone, Lynne; Leo-Summers, Linda S; Van Ness, Peter H

    2017-09-01

    Spirometric Z-scores from the Global Lung Initiative (GLI) rigorously account for age-related changes in lung function and are thus age-appropriate when establishing spirometric impairments, including a restrictive pattern and air-flow obstruction. However, GLI-defined spirometric impairments have not yet been evaluated regarding associations with static lung volumes (total lung capacity [TLC], functional residual capacity [FRC], and residual volume [RV]) and gas exchange (diffusing capacity). We performed a retrospective review of pulmonary function tests in subjects ≥40 y old (mean age 64.6 y), including pre-bronchodilator measures for: spirometry ( n = 2,586), static lung volumes by helium dilution with inspiratory capacity maneuver ( n = 2,586), and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( n = 2,508). Using multivariable linear regression, adjusted least-squares means (adj LS Means) were calculated for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity. The adj LS Means were expressed with and without height-cubed standardization and stratified by GLI-defined spirometry, including normal ( n = 1,251), restrictive pattern ( n = 663), and air-flow obstruction (mild, [ n = 128]; moderate, [ n = 150]; and severe, [ n = 394]). Relative to normal spirometry, restrictive-pattern had lower adj LS Means for TLC, FRC, RV, and hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P ≤ .001). Conversely, relative to normal spirometry, mild, moderate, and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for FRC and RV ( P < .001). However, only mild and moderate air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for TLC ( P < .001), while only moderate and severe air-flow obstruction had higher adj LS Means for RV/TLC ( P < .001) and lower adj LS Means for hemoglobin-adjusted single-breath diffusing capacity ( P < .001). Notably, TLC (calculated as FRC + inspiratory capacity) was not increased in severe air-flow obstruction ( P ≥ .11

  18. Lung volume reduction surgery in bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaplaouras, J; Heckmann, M; Reiss, I; Schaible, T; Waag, K L; Gortner, L

    2003-06-01

    We report on a female preterm infant of 29 wk gestational age, who developed acquired lobar emphysema after prolonged artificial ventilation secondary to respiratory disease syndrome and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The infant underwent atypical segmentectomy at the age of 12 mo because of life-threatening hypoxaemia with pulmonary hypertension and failure of conservative treatment. Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) dramatically improved the respiratory function and resulted in adequate weight gain and psychomotor development. In selected cases LVRS can be an option for lobar emphysema in premature infants with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  19. Update on Nonsurgical Lung Volume Reduction Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Alberto Neder

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR strategies for advanced COPD. Valve implants, coil implants, biological LVR (BioLVR, bronchial thermal vapour ablation, and airway stents are used to induce lung deflation with the ultimate goal of improving respiratory mechanics and chronic dyspnea. Patients presenting with severe air trapping (e.g., inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (TLC 225% predicted and thoracic hyperinflation (TLC > 150% predicted have the greatest potential to derive benefit from ELVR procedures. Pre-LVRS or ELVR assessment should ideally include cardiological evaluation, high resolution CT scan, ventilation and perfusion scintigraphy, full pulmonary function tests, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. ELVR procedures are currently available in selected Canadian research centers as part of ethically approved clinical trials. If a decision is made to offer an ELVR procedure, one-way valves are the first option in the presence of complete lobar exclusion and no significant collateral ventilation. When the fissure is not complete, when collateral ventilation is evident in heterogeneous emphysema or when emphysema is homogeneous, coil implants or BioLVR (in that order are the next logical alternatives.

  20. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storbeck, B.; Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F.; Weber, C.; University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  1. Lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, K R; Martinez, F J

    2000-12-01

    Over the past decades, extensive literature has been published regarding surgical therapies for advanced COPD. Lung-volume reduction surgery would be an option for a significantly larger number of patients than classic bullectomy or lung transplantation. Unfortunately, the initial enthusiasm has been tempered by major questions regarding the optimal surgical approach, safety, firm selection criteria, and confirmation of long-term benefits. In fact, the long-term follow-up reported in patients undergoing classical bullectomy should serve to caution against unbridled enthusiasm for the indiscriminate application of LVRS. Those with the worst long-term outcome despite favourable short-term improvements after bullectomy have consistently been those with the lowest pulmonary function and significant emphysema in the remaining lung who appear remarkably similar to those being evaluated for LVRS. With this in mind, the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute partnered with the Health Care Finance Administration to establish a multicenter, prospective, randomized study of intensive medical management, including pulmonary rehabilitation versus the same plus bilateral (by MS or VATS), known as the National Emphysema Treatment Trial. The primary objectives are to determine whether LVRS improves survival and exercise capacity. The secondary objectives will examine effects on pulmonary function and HRQL, compare surgical techniques, examine selection criteria for optimal response, identify criteria to determine those who are at prohibitive surgical risk, and examine long-term cost effectiveness. It is hoped that data collected from this novel, multicenter collaboration will place the role of LVRS in a clearer perspective for the physician caring for patients with advanced emphysema.

  2. Lung volume reduction surgery for diffuse emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agteren, Joseph Em; Carson, Kristin V; Tiong, Leong Ung; Smith, Brian J

    2016-10-14

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) performed to treat patients with severe diffuse emphysema was reintroduced in the nineties. Lung volume reduction surgery aims to resect damaged emphysematous lung tissue, thereby increasing elastic properties of the lung. This treatment is hypothesised to improve long-term daily functioning and quality of life, although it may be costly and may be associated with risks of morbidity and mortality. Ten years have passed since the last version of this review was prepared, prompting us to perform an update. The objective of this review was to gather all available evidence from randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) versus non-surgical standard therapy in improving health outcomes for patients with severe diffuse emphysema. Secondary objectives included determining which subgroup of patients benefit from LVRS and for which patients LVRS is contraindicated, to establish the postoperative complications of LVRS and its morbidity and mortality, to determine which surgical approaches for LVRS are most effective and to calculate the cost-effectiveness of LVRS. We identified RCTs by using the Cochrane Airways Group Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) register, in addition to the online clinical trials registers. Searches are current to April 2016. We included RCTs that studied the safety and efficacy of LVRS in participants with diffuse emphysema. We excluded studies that investigated giant or bullous emphysema. Two independent review authors assessed trials for inclusion and extracted data. When possible, we combined data from more than one study in a meta-analysis using RevMan 5 software. We identified two new studies (89 participants) in this updated review. A total of 11 studies (1760 participants) met the entry criteria of the review, one of which accounted for 68% of recruited participants. The quality of evidence ranged from low to moderate owing to an unclear risk

  3. Lung volumes and emphysema in smokers with interstitial lung abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washko, George R; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fernandez, Isis E; Nishino, Mizuki; Okajima, Yuka; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Ross, James C; Estépar, Raúl San José; Lynch, David A; Brehm, John M; Andriole, Katherine P; Diaz, Alejandro A; Khorasani, Ramin; D'Aco, Katherine; Sciurba, Frank C; Silverman, Edwin K; Hatabu, Hiroto; Rosas, Ivan O

    2011-03-10

    Cigarette smoking is associated with emphysema and radiographic interstitial lung abnormalities. The degree to which interstitial lung abnormalities are associated with reduced total lung capacity and the extent of emphysema is not known. We looked for interstitial lung abnormalities in 2416 (96%) of 2508 high-resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scans of the lung obtained from a cohort of smokers. We used linear and logistic regression to evaluate the associations between interstitial lung abnormalities and HRCT measurements of total lung capacity and emphysema. Interstitial lung abnormalities were present in 194 (8%) of the 2416 HRCT scans evaluated. In statistical models adjusting for relevant covariates, interstitial lung abnormalities were associated with reduced total lung capacity (-0.444 liters; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.596 to -0.292; Ppulmonary disease (COPD) (odds ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37 to 0.76; P<0.001). The effect of interstitial lung abnormalities on total lung capacity and emphysema was dependent on COPD status (P<0.02 for the interactions). Interstitial lung abnormalities were positively associated with both greater exposure to tobacco smoke and current smoking. In smokers, interstitial lung abnormalities--which were present on about 1 of every 12 HRCT scans--were associated with reduced total lung capacity and a lesser amount of emphysema. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Parker B. Francis Foundation; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00608764.).

  4. The effect of minimally invasive surgical repair on the lung volumes of patients with pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Aysen Taslak; Sahin, Bunyamin; Celenk, Cetin; Basoglu, Ahmet; Sengul, Bilal

    2014-04-01

    To assess the increase in lung volume after Nuss surgery in patients with pectus excavatum (PE) by using stereological methods and to evaluate the correlation between the lung volume and spirometry findings. Twenty patients, treated for PE between 2008 and 2010, were evaluated prospectively. They underwent preoperative chest radiography, computed thorax tomography (CTT), and spirometry. Thereafter, the Haller index was calculated for each patient. In the third postoperative month, CTT and spirometry were repeated.Lung volumes and volume fractions were evaluated using CTT images, applying the Cavalieri principle for stereological methods. Then the correlation between the pre- and postoperative values of the lung volumes with spirometry findings was determined. Volumes of the right and left lungs were calculated stereologically, using CTT images. Postoperative volume increase of ∼417.6 ± 747.6 mL was detected. The maximum volume increase was observed in the left lung. In the postoperative period, the total volume increase and the volume increase detected in the left lung were found to be statistically significant (p volume in 1 second, and forced expiratory flow 25 to 75% were 0.67, 0.68, and 0.61, respectively; the postoperative r figures were 0.43, 0.42, and 0.35, respectively. Although there was a strong correlation between the preoperative lung volume and spirometry findings (p volume and spirometry findings (p > 0.05). Postoperative pulmonary volume increase occurs in patients with PE after Nuss surgery. However, postoperative spirometry findings may not reflect morphological improvement because pain restricts thoracic movements. Therefore, in patients with PE, quantitative evaluation of the results of surgical repair is possible using the CTT images through a combination of stereological methods. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. October 2015 Phoenix pulmonary journal club: lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The October 2015 pulmonary journal club focused on the review of older studies evaluating lung volume reduction surgery and how this has transitioned toward the development of non-surgical modes of lung volume reduction. The physiology behind dyspnea in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a complex process. One of the proposed mechanisms has been hyperinflation associated with air trapping. In the mid 1990s studies by Cooper and Peterson (1 offered a promising approach in which lung volume reduction (LVR could improve ventilatory mechanics and improve dyspnea. As the procedure gained more popularity, additional larger scale trials were performed to support its validity. We reviewed 2 studies looking at lung volume reduction. The first was "The Effect of Lung Volume Reduction Surgery In Patients With Severe Emphysema” (2 . This was a smaller, randomized controlled trial (RCT that looked at 2 groups of 24 patients. Once group received LVR while the ...

  6. Radiological evaluation of lung volume among Koreans with silicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Byung Chull

    1975-01-01

    1. Radiological evaluation of lung volumes was carried out thirty Korean males patients with silicosis, and following results were obtained. 2. The mean radiological lung volume among those patients was 7,587 ml. 3. When compared with the group of normal Korean male adults ranging from 31 to 55 years of age, the mean lung volume was increased by 2,346 ml. 4. The lung volume of these patients was even slightly larger than that of the group of Korean athletes of all ages. 5. On the other hand, the vital capacity in patients with silicosis was markedly diminished, the mean vital capacity being 2,909 ml. 6. The patients with silicosis also revealed emphysematous changes in the lung as well as increased residual volumes. The vital capacity was smallest in the latest stage.

  7. Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using SPECT and prediction of postoperative respiratory function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andou, Akio; Shimizu, Nobuyosi; Maruyama, Shuichiro

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of lung volume by lung perfusion scanning using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and its usefulness for the prediction of respiratory function after lung resection were investigated. The lung volumes calculated in 5 patients by SPECT (threshold level 20%) using 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA), related very closely to the actually measured lung volumes. This results prompted us to calculate the total lung volume and the volume of the lobe to be resected in 18 patients with lung cancer by SPECT. Based on the data obtained, postoperative respiratory function was predicted. The predicted values of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume (FEV 1.0 ), and maximum vital volume (MVV) showed closer correlations with the actually measured postoperative values (FVC, FEV 1.0 , MVV : r=0.944, r=0.917, r=0.795 respectively), than the values predicted by the ordinary lung perfusion scanning. This method facilitates more detailed evaluation of local lung function on a lobe-by-lobe basis, and can be applied clinically to predict postoperative respiratory function. (author)

  8. Estimation of gas and tissue lung volumes by MRI: functional approach of lung imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qanadli, S D; Orvoen-Frija, E; Lacombe, P; Di Paola, R; Bittoun, J; Frija, G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of MRI for the determination of lung gas and tissue volumes. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent MRI of the thorax and pulmonary function tests [vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC)] in the supine position. MR examinations were performed at inspiration and expiration. Lung volumes were measured by a previously validated technique on phantoms. Both individual and total lung volumes and capacities were calculated. MRI total vital capacity (VC(MRI)) was compared with spirometric vital capacity (VC(SP)). Capacities were correlated to lung volumes. Tissue volume (V(T)) was estimated as the difference between the total lung volume at full inspiration and the TLC. No significant difference was seen between VC(MRI) and VC(SP). Individual capacities were well correlated (r = 0.9) to static volume at full inspiration. The V(T) was estimated to be 836+/-393 ml. This preliminary study demonstrates that MRI can accurately estimate lung gas and tissue volumes. The proposed approach appears well suited for functional imaging of the lung.

  9. Effect of increases in lung volume on clearance of aerosolized solute from human lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, J.D.; Luce, J.M.; Lazar, N.M.; Wu, J.N.; Lipavsky, A.; Murray, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    To study the effect of increases in lung volume on solute uptake, we measured clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA) at different lung volumes in 19 healthy humans. Seven subjects inhaled aerosols (1 micron activity median aerodynamic diam) at ambient pressure; clearance and functional residual capacity (FRC) were measured at ambient pressure (control) and at increased lung volume produced by positive pressure (12 cmH2O continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)) or negative pressure (voluntary breathing). Six different subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure; clearance and FRC were measured at ambient pressure and CPAP of 6, 12, and 18 cmH2O pressure. Six additional subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure or at CPAP of 12 cmH2O; clearance and FRC were determined at CPAP of 12 cmH2O. According to the results, Tc-DTPA clearance from human lungs is accelerated exponentially by increases in lung volume, this effect occurs whether lung volume is increased by positive or negative pressure breathing, and the effect is the same whether lung volume is increased during or after aerosol administration. The effect of lung volume must be recognized when interpreting the results of this method.

  10. Effect of increases in lung volume on clearance of aerosolized solute from human lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, J.D.; Luce, J.M.; Lazar, N.M.; Wu, J.N.; Lipavsky, A.; Murray, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    To study the effect of increases in lung volume on solute uptake, we measured clearance of /sup 99m/Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Tc-DTPA) at different lung volumes in 19 healthy humans. Seven subjects inhaled aerosols (1 micron activity median aerodynamic diam) at ambient pressure; clearance and functional residual capacity (FRC) were measured at ambient pressure (control) and at increased lung volume produced by positive pressure [12 cmH 2 O continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)] or negative pressure (voluntary breathing). Six different subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure; clearance and FRC were measured at ambient pressure and CPAP of 6, 12, and 18 cmH 2 O pressure. Six additional subjects inhaled aerosol at ambient pressure or at CPAP of 12 cmH 2 O; clearance and FRC were determined at CPAP of 12 cmH 2 O. According to the results, Tc-DTPA clearance from human lungs is accelerated exponentially by increases in lung volume, this effect occurs whether lung volume is increased by positive or negative pressure breathing, and the effect is the same whether lung volume is increased during or after aerosol administration. The effect of lung volume must be recognized when interpreting the results of this method

  11. Estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume from radioisotopic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Minoru

    1989-01-01

    Lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in man were estimated from the radioisotopic image using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Six healthy volunteers were studied in a supine position with normal and altered lung volumes by applying continuous negative body-surface pressure (CNP) and by positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). 99m Tc labeled human serum albumin was administered as an aerosol to image the lungs. The CNP caused the diaphragm to be lowered and it increased the mean lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT from 3.09±0.49 l for baseline to 3.67±0.62 l for 10 cmH 2 O (p 2 O (p 2 O), respectively. The PEEP also increased the lung tissue volume to 3.68±0.68 l for 10 cmH 2 O as compared with the baseline (p 2 O PEEP. The lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT showed a positive correlation with functional residual capacity measured by the He dilution method (r=0.91, p 99m Tc-labeled red blood cells. The L/H ratio decreased after either the CNP or PEEP, suggesting a decrease in the blood volume per unit lung volume. However, it was suggested that the total pulmonary blood volume increased slightly either on the CNP (+7.4% for 10 cmH 2 O, p 2 O,p<0.05) when we extrapolated the L/H ratio to the whole lungs by multiplying the lung tissue volume obtained by SPECT. We concluded that SPECT could offer access to the estimation of lung volume and pulmonary blood volume in vivo. (author)

  12. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compliance, thereby reducing the work of breathing. ... with the objective of obtaining similar functional advantages to surgical lung volume reduction, .... Any type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy that cannot be discontinued for 7 days.

  13. Lung lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hisao; Koba, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Tsukasa; Abe, Shosaku.

    1997-01-01

    We measured lung lobar volume by using helical computed tomography (HCT) in 23 patients with idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP), 7 patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD-IP), and 5 healthy volunteers HCT scanning was done at the maximal inspiratory level and the resting end-expiratory level. To measure lung lobar volume, we traced the lobar margin on HCT images with a digitizer and calculated the lobar volume with a personal computer. The lower lobar volume and several factors influencing it in chronic interstitial pneumonia were studied. At the maximal inspiratory level, the lower lobar volume as a percent of the whole lung volume was 46.8±4.13% (mean ± SD) in the volunteers, 39.5±6.19% in the patients with IIP, and 27.7±7. 86% in the patients with CVD-IP. The lower lobar volumes in the patients were significantly lower than in the volunteers. Patients with IIP in whom autoantibody tests were positive had lower lobar volumes that were very low and were similar to those of patients with CVD-IP. These data suggest that collagen vascular disease may develop in patients with interstitial pneumonia. The patients with IIP who had emphysematous changes on the CT scans had smaller decreases in total lung capacity and lower ratios of forced expiratory volume in one second to forced vital capacity than did those who had no emphysematous changes, those two groups did not differ in the ratio of lower lobar volume to whole lung volume. This suggests that emphysematous change is not factor influencing lower lobar volume in patients with chronic interstitial pneumonia. We conclude that chronic interstitial pneumonia together with very low values for lower lobar volume may be a pulmonary manifestation of collagen vascular disease. (author)

  14. Effects of vertical positioning on gas exchange and lung volumes in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Jean-Christophe M; Maggiore, Salvatore Maurizio; Mancebo, Jordi; Lemaire, François; Jonson, Bjorn; Brochard, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Supine position may contribute to the loss of aerated lung volume in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We hypothesized that verticalization increases lung volume and improves gas exchange by reducing the pressure surrounding lung bases. Prospective observational physiological study in a medical ICU. In 16 patients with ARDS we measured arterial blood gases, pressure-volume curves of the respiratory system recorded from positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP), and changes in lung volume in supine and vertical positions (trunk elevated at 45 degrees and legs down at 45 degrees ). Vertical positioning increased PaO(2) significantly from 94+/-33 to 142+/-49 mmHg, with an increase higher than 40% in 11 responders. The volume at 20 cmH(2)O measured on the PV curve from PEEP increased using the vertical position only in responders (233+/-146 vs. -8+/-9 1ml in nonresponders); this change was correlated to oxygenation change (rho=0.55). End-expiratory lung volume variation from supine to vertical and 1 h later back to supine, measured in 12 patients showed a significant increase during the 1-h upright period in responders (n=7) but not in nonresponders (n=5; 215+/-220 vs. 10+/-22 ml), suggesting a time-dependent recruitment. Vertical positioning is a simple technique that may improve oxygenation and lung recruitment in ARDS patients.

  15. High lung volume increases stress failure in pulmonary capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z.; Costello, M. L.; Tsukimoto, K.; Prediletto, R.; Elliott, A. R.; Mathieu-Costello, O.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We previously showed that when pulmonary capillaries in anesthetized rabbits are exposed to a transmural pressure (Ptm) of approximately 40 mmHg, stress failure of the walls occurs with disruption of the capillary endothelium, alveolar epithelium, or sometimes all layers. The present study was designed to test whether stress failure occurred more frequently at high than at low lung volumes for the same Ptm. Lungs of anesthetized rabbits were inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 20 cmH2O, perfused with autologous blood at 32.5 or 2.5 cmH2O Ptm, and fixed by intravascular perfusion. Samples were examined by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with those of a previous study in which the lung was inflated to a transpulmonary pressure of 5 cmH2O. There was a large increase in the frequency of stress failure of the capillary walls at the higher lung volume. For example, at 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the number of endothelial breaks per millimeter cell lining was 7.1 +/- 2.2 at the high lung volume compared with 0.7 +/- 0.4 at the low lung volume. The corresponding values for epithelium were 8.5 +/- 1.6 and 0.9 +/- 0.6. Both differences were significant (P less than 0.05). At 52.5 cmH2O Ptm, the results for endothelium were 20.7 +/- 7.6 (high volume) and 7.1 +/- 2.1 (low volume), and the corresponding results for epithelium were 32.8 +/- 11.9 and 11.4 +/- 3.7. At 32.5 cmH2O Ptm, the thickness of the blood-gas barrier was greater at the higher lung volume, consistent with the development of more interstitial edema. Ballooning of the epithelium caused by accumulation of edema fluid between the epithelial cell and its basement membrane was seen at 32.5 and 52.5 cmH2O Ptm. At high lung volume, the breaks tended to be narrower and fewer were oriented perpendicular to the axis of the pulmonary capillaries than at low lung volumes. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy measurements agreed well. Our findings provide a physiological

  16. Lung Volume Reduction in Pulmonary Emphysema from the Radiologist's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doellinger, F; Huebner, R H; Kuhnigk, J M; Poellinger, A

    2015-08-01

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of "collateral ventilation" has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results. Today, surgical and various minimal invasive methods of lung volume reduction are in use. Radiological and nuclear medical examinations are helpful in the evaluation of an appropriate lung area. Imaging can detect periinterventional complications. Reduction of lung

  17. [Lung volume reduction surgery for severe pulmonary emphysema in Iceland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsson, Sverrir I; Johannsson, Kristinn B; Guðjónsdóttir, Marta; Jónsson, Steinn; Beck, Hans J; Magnusson, Bjorn; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2011-12-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can benefit patients with severe emphysema. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of LVRS performed in Iceland. A prospective study of 16 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral LVRS through median sternotomy between January 1996 and December 2008. All patients had disabling dyspnea, lung hyperinflation, and emphysema with upper lobe predominance. Preoperatively all patients underwent pulmonary rehabilitation. Spirometry, lung volumes, arterial blood gases and exercise capacity were measured before and after surgery. Mean follow-up time was 8.7 years. Mean age was 59.2 ± 5.9 years. All patients had a history of heavy smoking. There was no perioperative mortality and survival was 100%, 93%, and 63% at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. The forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the forced vital capacity (FVC) improved significantly after surgery by 35% (plung capacity, residual volume and partial pressure of CO2 also showed statistically significant improvements but exercise capacity, O2 consumption and diffusing capacity of the lung for CO did not change. Prolonged air leak (≥ 7 days) was the most common complication (n=7). Five patients required reoperation, most commonly for sternal dehiscence (n=4). In this small prospective study, FEV1 and FVC increased and lung volumes and PaCO2 improved after LVRS. Long term survival was satisfactory although complications such as reoperations for sternal dehiscence were common and hospital stay therefore often prolonged.

  18. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in radiation treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Freedman, Gary; Fowble, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    actual CT data. The slopes of regression lines for the left and right lung are 0.6%/mm and 0.5%/mm, respectively which is statistically different with the p value of 0.01. A maximum heart PIV of >3.0% is observed in 80% of the patients. The heart PIV is inversely correlated with gantry angle and weakly correlated with CLD. Conclusions: The CT-simulator provides accurate volumetric information of the heart and lungs in the treatment fields. The lung PIV is directly correlated to the CLD (0.6%/mm and 0.5%/mm for the left and right lungs). Left and right lungs have different volumes and hence, different regression lines are recommended. An additional 12% lung volume could be irradiated in the supraclavicular field. Heart volume is not correlated with the CLD. The heart PIV is associated to the beam angle. Heart volume may not be accurately visualized in a tangential radiograph; however, this can be easily seen in a DRR with contour delineation and can be minimized with proper beam parameters iteratively with a virtual simulator. Lung and heart PIV along with dose volume histograms (DVH) are essential in reducing pulmonary and cardiac complications

  19. Lung and heart dose volume analyses with CT simulator in tangential field irradiation of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Indra J.; Cheng, Elizabeth C.; Fowble, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    breast are very different based on actual CT data. The slopes of regression lines for the left and right lung are 0.64%/mm and 0.54%/mm, respectively with a combined slope of 0.6%/mm. With the selection of proper beam parameters, the heart volume can be minimized. As expected, there is no correlation between heart PIV and the CLD. A maximum heart PIV of 5.6% is observed with one fourth of patients having a PIV of 0%. The heart PIV is inversely correlated with gantry angle as shown in Figure 2. Due to the radiation scatter in the body, the geometrical volume may be of limited importance and, hence, dose volume histogram (DVH) analyses were performed. A representative DVH of a patient whose lung and heart PIV were 14.4% and 4.0%, respectively is shown in Figure 3. Conclusions: The CT-simulator provides an accurate volumetric information of the heart and lungs in the treatment fields. The lung PIV is directly correlated to the CLD. Left and right lungs have different volumes and, hence, different regression lines are recommended. Heart volume is not correlated with the CLD. The heart PIV is associated to the beam angle. Heart volume may not be accurately visualized in a tangential radiograph; however, this can be easily seen in a DRR with contour delineation and can be minimized with proper beam parameters. Lung and heart PIV along with DVH are essential in reducing pulmonarv and cardiac complications

  20. Measurement of lung fluid volumes and albumin exclusion in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pou, N.A.; Roselli, R.J.; Parker, R.E.; Clanton, J.A.; Harris, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    A radioactive tracer technique was used to determine interstitial diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and albumin distribution volume in sheep lungs. 125 I- and/or 131 I-labeled albumin were injected intravenously and allowed to equilibrate for 24 h. 99m Tc-labeled DTPA and 51 Cr-labeled erythrocytes were injected and allowed to equilibrate (2 h and 15 min, respectively) before a lethal dose of thiamylal sodium. Two biopsies (1-3 g) were taken from each lung and the remaining tissue was homogenized for wet-to-dry lung weight and volume calculations. Estimates of distribution volumes from whole lung homogenized samples were statistically smaller than biopsy samples for extravascular water, interstitial 99m Tc-DTPA, and interstitial albumin. The mean fraction of the interstitium (Fe), which excludes albumin, was 0.68 +/- 0.04 for whole lung samples compared with 0.62 +/- 0.03 for biopsy samples. Hematocrit may explain the consistent difference. To make the Fe for biopsy samples match that for homogenized samples, a mean hematocrit, which was 82% of large vessel hematocrit, was required. Excluded volume fraction for exogenous sheep albumin was compared with that of exogenous human albumin in two sheep, and no difference was found at 24 h

  1. Measurement of lung volumes : usefulness of spiral CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Yeong; Kwak, Byung Kook; Lee, Sang Yoon; Kim, Soo Ran; Lee, Shin Hyung; Lee, Chang Joon; Park, In Won

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of spiral CT in the measurement of lung volumes. Fifteen healthy volunteers were studied by both spirometer and spiral CT at full inspiration and expiration in order to correlated their results, including total lung capacity (TLC), vital capacity (VC) and residual volume (RV). 3-D images were reconstructed from spiral CT, and we measured lung volumes at a corresponding CT window range ; their volumes were compared with the pulmonary function test (paired t-test). The window range corresponding to TLC was from -1000HU to -150HU (p=0.279, r=0.986), and for VC from -910HU to -800HU (p=0.366, r=0.954) in full-inspiratory CT. The optimal window range for RV in full-expiratory CT was from -1000HU to -450HU (p=0.757, r=0.777), and TLC-VC in full-inspiratory CT was also calculated (p=0.843, r=0.847). Spiral CT at full inspiration can used to lung volumes such as TLC, VC and RV

  2. Physiological Modeling of Responses to Upper vs Lower Lobe Lung Volume Reduction in Homogeneous Emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arschang eValipour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: In clinical trials, homogeneous emphysema patients have responded well to upper lobe volume reduction but not lower lobe volume reduction. Materials/Methods: To understand the physiological basis for this observation, a computer model was developed to simulate the effects of upper and lower lobe lung volume reduction on RV/TLC and lung recoil in homogeneous emphysema.Results: Patients with homogeneous emphysema received either upper or lower lobe volume reduction therapy based on findings of radionucleotide scintigraphy scanning. CT analysis of lobar volumes showed that patients undergoing upper (n=18; -265 mL/site and lower lobe treatment (n=11; -217 mL/site experienced similar reductions in lung volume. However, only upper lobe treatment improved FEV1 (+11.1±14.7% vs -4.4±15.8% and RV/TLC (-5.4± 8.1% vs -2.4±8.6%. Model simulations provided an unexpected explanation for this response. Increases in transpulmonary pressure subsequent to volume reduction increased RV/TLC in upper lobe alveoli, while caudal shifts in airway closure decreased RV/TLC in lower lobe alveoli. Upper lobe treatment, which eliminates apical alveoli with high RV/TLC values, lowers the average RV/TLC of the lung. Conversely, lower lobe treatment, which eliminates caudal alveoli with low RV/TLC values, has less effect. Conclusions: Lower lobe treatment in homogeneous emphysema is uniformly less effective than upper lobe treatment.

  3. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  4. Fetal lung volume measurement by MRI with high-speed imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Hisao; Kaku, Kenshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-08-01

    Although ultrasonography is widely used for fetal morphologic observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has gained popularity as a new prenatal diagnostic method with recent introduction of high-speed imaging systems. Infants with lung hypoplasia affecting respiratory function require intensive management starting immediately after birth. Therefore, accurate prenatal differential diagnosis and severity evaluation are extremely important for these fetuses. The aim of this study is to measure fetal lung volume using a computer-based, three-dimensional MRI imaging system and to evaluate the possibility of clinical applications of this procedure. A total of 96 fetuses were evaluated, all were morphologically abnormal, and MRI was done for advanced assessment from 24 to 39 weeks gestation. Three-directional views of fetal chest were imaged by Signa Horizon, 1.5 Tesla, version 5.6 (General Electronics) with the following conditions; coil: TORSO coil, sequence: SSFSE (single shot fast spin echo), slice thickness: 5 mm, and imaging speed: 2 seconds/slice. To calculate the lung volume and create three-dimensional image, the lung area in each slice was traced out, then multiplied using computer image processing. Simultaneously, the volumes of all slices were summed to give the volume of each lung. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) were used for statistical analyses. In all cases, clear images were obtained, and were adequate for three-dimensional evaluation of the fetal lung. Thirty-five fetuses had poor outcomes, such as intrauterine fetal death, neonatal death, and intensive respiratory care. Regression lines of lung volume versus gestational week were calculated for these fetuses with poor outcome and 61 other fetuses with good outcome. ANCOVA, with gestational week as a covariant, revealed a significant intergroup difference in the lung volume (p<0.001). Similarly, regression lines of lung volume versus fetal body weight estimated by

  5. Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction : An Expert Panel Recommendation - Update 2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herth, Felix J. F.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Criner, Gerard J.; Shah, Pallav L.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) technologies for emphysema is consistently growing. In the last couple of months, several endoscopic options (e.g., endo-or intrabronchial valves, coil implants, and thermal vapor ablation) that have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials

  6. Minimally invasive non-surgical lung volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Liming; Zhou Dayong; Shen Junkang

    2006-01-01

    Minimally invasive treatment with lung volume reduction is the promising future for severe pulmonary emphysema patients. With emerging and improving of new techniques and instruments, it would become an important choice for managing severe emphysema. A comprehensive review is here documented through the correlative techniques, instruments, new achievements and latest research work. (authors)

  7. Time for the Global Rollout of Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Shah, Pallav L.; Theron, Johan; Dheda, Keertan; Allwood, Brian W.; Herth, Felix J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remains one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality globally. The disease is generally managed with pharmacotherapy, as well as guidance about smoking cessation and pulmonary rehabilitation. Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) has been proposed

  8. Respiratory muscle activity related to flow and lung volume in preterm infants compared with term infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hutten, Gerard J.; van Eykern, Leo A.; Latzin, Philipp; Thamrin, Cindy; van Aalderen, Wim M.; Frey, Urs

    2010-01-01

    Infants with chronic lung disease (CLD) have a capacity to maintain functional lung volume despite alterations to their lung mechanics. We hypothesize that they achieve this by altering breathing patterns and dynamic elevation of lung volume, leading to differences in the relationship between

  9. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  10. Endobronchial Valves for Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction : Best Practice Recommendations from Expert Panel on Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Shah, Pallav L.; Herth, Felix J. F.; Valipour, Arschang

    Endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) is being adopted as a treatment option for carefully selected patients suffering from severe emphysema. ELVR with the one-way endobronchial Zephyr valves (EBV) has been demonstrated to improve pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in

  11. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Jung Seop, E-mail: ejs00@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Geewon, E-mail: rabkingdom@naver.com [Department of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ho Yun, E-mail: hoyunlee96@gmail.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jin Young, E-mail: indr71@hanmail.net [Division of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, Dongguk University Ilsan Medical Center, 814 Siksa-dong, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 410-773 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Sook-young, E-mail: sookyoung12.woo@samsung.com [Biostatistics Team, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Kyeongman, E-mail: kjeon@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Um, Sang-Won, E-mail: sangwonum@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Won-Jung, E-mail: wjkoh@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Gee Young, E-mail: suhgy@skku.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 81 Irwon-ro, Gangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-12-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV{sub 1}] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV{sub 1}/forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD.

  12. The relationships between tracheal index and lung volume parameters in mild-to-moderate COPD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Lee, Geewon; Lee, Ho Yun; Oh, Jin Young; Woo, Sook-young; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although elongated morphological changes in the trachea are known to be related to lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), whether the tracheal morphological changes are associated with airflow limitations or overinflation of the lung in the early stages of COPD has not yet been determined. Thus, our aim was to investigate the association of tracheal index (TI) with lung function parameters, including lung volume parameters, in COPD patients with mild-to-moderate airflow limitations. Materials and methods: A retrospective study was conducted in 193 COPD patients with GOLD grades 1–2 (post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV 1 ] ≥ 50% predicted with FEV 1 /forced vital capacity ratio ≤ 70%; age range, 40–81) and 193 age- and gender-matched subjects with normal lung function as a control group (age range, 40–82). Two independent observers measured TI at three anatomical levels on chest radiographs and CT scans. Results: Compared with the control group, TI was reduced significantly and “saber-sheath trachea” was observed more frequently in COPD patients. Patients with GOLD grade 2 disease had a lower TI than those with GOLD grade 1. TI had apparent inverse correlations with total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and residual volume, regardless of the anatomical level of the trachea. Even after adjustments for covariates, this association persisted. Conclusions: TI is reduced even in mild-to-moderate COPD patients, and TI measured on chest CT shows significant inverse relationships with all lung volume parameters assessed, suggesting that tracheal morphology may change during the early stages of COPD

  13. Comparison of actual tidal volume in neonatal lung model volume control ventilation using three ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, H; Endo, Y; Ejima, Y; Matsubara, M; Kurosawa, S

    2011-07-01

    In neonates, small changes in tidal volumes (V(T)) may lead to complications. Previous studies have shown a significant difference between ventilator-measured tidal volume and tidal volume delivered (actual V(T)). We evaluated the accuracy of three different ventilators to deliver small V(T) during volume-controlled ventilation. We tested Servo 300, 840 ventilator and Evita 4 Neoflow ventilators with lung models simulating normal and injured neonatal lung compliance models. Gas volume delivered from the ventilator into the test circuit (V(TV)) and actual V(T) to the test lung were measured using Ventrak respiration monitors at set V(T) (30 ml). The gas volume increase of the breathing circuit was then calculated. Tidal volumes of the SV300 and PB840 in both lung models were similar to the set V(T) and the actual tidal volumes in the injured model (20.7 ml and 19.8 ml, respectively) were significantly less than that in the normal model (27.4 ml and 23.4 ml). PB840 with circuit compliance compensation could not improve the actual V(T). V(TV) of the EV4N in the normal and the injured models (37.8 ml and 46.6 ml) were markedly increased compared with set V(T), and actual V(T) were similar to set V(T) in the normal and injured model (30.2 ml and 31.9 ml, respectively). EV4N measuring V(T) close to the lung could match actual V(T) to almost the same value as the set V(T) however the gas volume of the breathing circuit was increased. If an accurate value for the patient's actual V(T) is needed, this V(T) must be measured by a sensor located between the Y-piece and the tracheal tube.

  14. Body mass index and dynamic lung volumes in office workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasool, S.A.; Shirwany, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    To measure the association of body mass index (BMI) to lung volumes assessed by spirometer. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore, from February to August 2009. Methodology: Two hundred and twenty-five apparently healthy adult office workers of either gender aged > 20 years were recruited. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated as kg/m2. Subjects were categorized as normal (BMI=18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2); overweight (BMI=25 to 29.9 kg/m2); and obese Class 1 (BMI=30 to 34.9 kg/m2) on the basis of BMI. Lung volumes were measured by digital spirometer and were reported as percentage of predicted values for forced vital capacity (FVC%), forced expiratory volume in first second (FEV1%) and ratio of FEV1 to FVC (FEV1:FVC). Groups were compared using t-test and ANOVA, correlation was assessed by Pearson's 'r'. Results: Significant differences in lung volumes were found in different BMI categories. Obese subjects had significantly lower FVC% (p < 0.0001), as well as significantly lower FEV1% (p = 0.003) as compared to normal subjects. There were significant linear relationships between obesity and PFTs. BMI had significant negative linear association with FVC% in overweight (r = -0.197) and obese (r = - 0.488); and with FEV1% in obese subjects (r = -0.510). Gender and age had no significant effect on mean values of PFTs. Conclusion: Obese individuals in this sample had significant decline in lung volumes. (author)

  15. Growth Patterns of Fetal Lung Volumes in Healthy Fetuses and Fetuses With Isolated Left-Sided Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, Rodrigo; Britto, Ingrid Schwach Werneck; Sananes, Nicolas; Lee, Wesley; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh; Deter, Russell L

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate fetal lung growth using 3-dimensional sonography in healthy fetuses and those with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Right and total lung volumes were serially evaluated by 3-dimensional sonography in 66 healthy fetuses and 52 fetuses with left-sided CDH between 20 and 37 weeks' menstrual age. Functions fitted to these parameters were compared for 2 groups: (1) healthy versus those with CDH; and (2) fetuses with CHD who survived versus those who died. Fetal right and total lung volumes as well as fetal observed-to-expected right and total lung volume ratios were significantly lower in fetuses with CDH than healthy fetuses (Pvolume ratios did not vary with menstrual age in healthy fetuses or in those with CDH (independent of outcome). Lung volume rates were lower in fetuses with left-sided CDH compared to healthy fetuses, as well as in fetuses with CDH who died compared to those who survived. The observed-to-expected right and total lung volume ratios were relatively constant throughout menstrual age in fetuses with left-sided CDH, suggesting that the origin of their lung growth abnormalities occurred before 20 weeks and did not progress. The observed-to-expected ratios may be useful in predicting the outcome in fetuses with CDH independent of menstrual age. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Pneumothorax as a complication of lung volume recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J.A. Westermann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung volume recruitment involves deep inflation techniques to achieve maximum insufflation capacity in patients with respiratory muscle weakness, in order to increase peak cough flow, thus helping to maintain airway patency and improve ventilation. One of these techniques is air stacking, in which a manual resuscitator is used in order to inflate the lungs. Although intrathoracic pressures can rise considerably, there have been no reports of respiratory complications due to air stacking. However, reaching maximum insufflation capacity is not recommended in patients with known structural abnormalities of the lungs or chronic obstructive airway disease. We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who had poliomyelitis as a child, developed torsion scoliosis and post-polio syndrome, and had periodic but infrequent asthma attacks. After performing air stacking for 3 years, the patient suddenly developed a pneumothorax, indicating that this technique should be used with caution or not at all in patients with a known pulmonary pathology

  17. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  18. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  19. Low cost biological lung volume reduction therapy for advanced emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakeer M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa Bakeer,1 Taha Taha Abdelgawad,1 Raed El-Metwaly,1 Ahmed El-Morsi,1 Mohammad Khairy El-Badrawy,1 Solafa El-Sharawy2 1Chest Medicine Department, 2Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Background: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR, using biological agents, is one of the new alternatives to lung volume reduction surgery.Objectives: To evaluate efficacy and safety of biological BLVR using low cost agents including autologous blood and fibrin glue.Methods: Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: group A (seven patients in which autologous blood was used and group B (eight patients in which fibrin glue was used. The agents were injected through a triple lumen balloon catheter via fiberoptic bronchoscope. Changes in high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT volumetry, pulmonary function tests, symptoms, and exercise capacity were evaluated at 12 weeks postprocedure as well as for complications.Results: In group A, at 12 weeks postprocedure, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and residual volume/total lung capacity (% predicted (P-value: <0.001 and 0.038, respectively. In group B, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and (residual volume/total lung capacity % predicted (P-value: 0.005 and 0.004, respectively. All patients tolerated the procedure with no mortality.Conclusion: BLVR using autologous blood and locally prepared fibrin glue is a promising method for therapy of advanced emphysema in term of efficacy, safety as well as cost effectiveness. Keywords: BLVR, bronchoscopy, COPD, interventional pulmonology

  20. Dynamic volume perfusion CT in patients with lung cancer: Baseline perfusion characteristics of different histological subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Jingyun; Schmid-Bindert, Gerald; Fink, Christian; Sudarski, Sonja; Apfaltrer, Paul; Pilz, Lothar R.; Liu, Bo; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate dynamic volume perfusion CT (dVPCT) tumor baseline characteristics of three different subtypes of lung cancer in untreated patients. Materials and methods: 173 consecutive patients (131 men, 42 women; mean age 61 ± 10 years) with newly diagnosed lung cancer underwent dVPCT prior to biopsy. Tumor permeability, blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and mean transit time (MTT) were quantitatively assessed as well as tumor diameter and volume. Tumor subtypes were histologically determined and compared concerning their dVPCT results. dVPCT results were correlated to tumor diameter and volume. Results: Histology revealed adenocarcinoma in 88, squamous cell carcinoma in 54 and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in 31 patients. Tumor permeability was significantly differing between adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and SCLC (all p < 0.05). Tumor BF and BV were higher in adenocarcinomathan in SCLC (p = 0.001 and p = 0.0002 respectively). BV was also higher in squamous cell carcinoma compared to SCLC (p = 0.01). MTT was not differing between tumor subtypes. Regarding all tumors, tumor diameter did not correlate with any of the dVPCT parameters, whereas tumor volume was negatively associated with permeability, BF and BV (r = −0.22, −0.24, −0.24, all p < 0.05). In squamous cell carcinoma, tumor diameter und volume correlated with BV (r = 0.53 and r = −0.40, all p < 0.05). In SCLC, tumor diameter und volume correlated with MTT (r = 0.46 and r = 0.39, all p < 0.05). In adenocarcinoma, no association between morphological and functional tumor characteristics was observed. Conclusions: dVPCT parameters are only partially related to tumor diameter and volume and are significantly differing between lung cancer subtypes

  1. Lung volumes during sustained microgravity on Spacelab SLS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, G. Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    Gravity is known to influence the mechanical behavior of the lung and chest wall. However, the effect of sustained microgravity (microgravity) on lung volumes has not been reported. Pulmonary function tests were performed by four subjects before, during, and after 9 days of microgravity exposure. Ground measurements were made in standing and supine postures. Tests were performed using a bag-in-box-and-flowmeter system and a respiratory mass spectrometer. Measurements included functional residual capacity (FRC), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), residual volume (RV), inspiratory and expiratory vital capacities (IVC and EVC), and tidal volume (V9sub T)). Total lung capacity (TLC) was derived from the measured EVC and RV values. With preflight standing values as a comparison, FRC was significantly reduced by 15% (approximately 500 ml) in microgravity and 32% in the supine posture. ERV was reduced by 10 - 20% in microgravity and decreased by 64% in the supine posture. RV was significantly reduced by 18% (310 ml) in microgravity but did not significantly change in the supine posture compared with standing. IVC and EVC were slightly reduced during the first 24 h of microgravity but returned to 1-G standing values within 72 h of microgravity exposure. IVC and EVC in the supine posture were significantly reduced by 12% compared with standing. During microgravity, V(sub T) decreased by 15% (approximately 90 ml), but supine V(sub T) was unchanged compared with preflight standing values. TLC decreased by approximately 8% during microgravity and in the supine posture compared with preflight standing. The reductions in FRC, ERV, and RV during microgravity are probably due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm, an increase in intrathoracic blood volume, and more uniform alveolar expansion.

  2. [Lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema and bullous pulmonary emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pimpec-Barthes, F; Das Neves-Pereira, J-C; Cazes, A; Arame, A; Grima, R; Hubsch, J-P; Zukerman, C; Hernigou, A; Badia, A; Bagan, P; Delclaux, C; Dusser, D; Riquet, M

    2012-04-01

    The improvement of respiratory symptoms for emphysematous patients by surgery is a concept that has evolved over time. Initially used for giant bullae, this surgery was then applied to patients with diffuse microbullous emphysema. The physiological and pathological concepts underlying these surgical procedures are the same in both cases: improve respiratory performance by reducing the high intrapleural pressure. The functional benefit of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in the severe diffuse emphysema has been validated by the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) and the later studies which allowed to identify prognostic factors. The quality of the clinical, morphological and functional data made it possible to develop recommendations now widely used in current practice. Surgery for giant bullae occurring on little or moderately emphysematous lung is often a simpler approach but also requires specialised support to optimize its results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Acoustic phenomena observed in lung auscultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenbaum, V. I.; Tagil'Tsev, A. A.; Kulakov, Yu. V.

    2003-05-01

    The results of studying respiratory noise at the chest wall by the method of acoustic intensimetry reveal the presence of frequency components with different signs of the real and imaginary parts of the cross spectrum obtained for the responses of the receivers of vibratory displacement and dynamic force. An acoustic model is proposed to explain this difference on the basis of the hypothesis that the contributions of both air-borne and structure-borne sound are significant in the transmission of respiratory noise to the chest wall. It is shown that, when considered as an acoustic channel for the basic respiratory noise, the respiratory system of an adult subject has two resonances: in the frequency bands within 110 150 and 215 350 Hz. For adults in normal condition, the air-borne component of the basic respiratory noise predominates in the region 100 300 Hz in the lower parts of lungs. At forced respiration of healthy adults, the sounds of vesicular respiration are generated by the turbulent air flow in the 11th-through 13th-generation bronchi, and the transmission of these sounds to the chest wall in normal condition is mainly through air and is determined by the resonance of the vibratory system formed by the elasticity of air in the respiratory ducts of lungs and by the surface mass density of the chest wall. It is demonstrated that the distance from the chest wall to the sources of structure-borne additional respiratory noise, namely, wheezing with frequencies above 300 Hz, can be estimated numerically from the ratio between the real and imaginary parts of the cross spectrum on the assumption that the source is of the quadrupole type.

  4. Static inflation and deflation pressure–volume curves from excised lungs of marine mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H.; Ferrigno, Massimo; Moore, Colby; Early, Greg; Niemeyer, Misty; Lentell, Betty; Wenzel, Frederic; Joy, Ruth; Moore, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Excised lungs from eight marine mammal species [harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus), harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), gray seal (Halichoerus grypush), Atlantic white-sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), long-finned pilot whale (Globicephala melas) and harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena)] were used to determine the minimum air volume of the relaxed lung (MAV, N=15), the elastic properties (pressure–volume curves, N=24) of the respiratory system and the total lung capacity (TLC). Our data indicate that mass-specific TLC (sTLC, l kg–1) does not differ between species or groups (odontocete vs phocid) and agree with that estimated (TLCest) from body mass (Mb) by applying the equation: TLCest=0.135 Mb0.92. Measured MAV was on average 7% of TLC, with a range from 0 to 16%. The pressure–volume curves were similar among species on inflation but diverged during deflation in phocids in comparison with odontocetes. These differences provide a structural basis for observed species differences in the depth at which lungs collapse and gas exchange ceases. PMID:22031747

  5. SU-E-J-249: Correlation of Mean Lung Ventilation Value with Ratio of Total Lung Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, N; Qu, H; Xia, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Lung ventilation function measured from 4D-CT and from breathing correlated CT images is a novel concept to incorporate the lung physiologic function into treatment planning of radiotherapy. The calculated ventilation functions may vary from different breathing patterns, affecting evaluation of the treatment plans. The purpose of this study is to correlate the mean lung ventilation value with the ratio of the total lung volumes obtained from the relevant CTs. Methods: A ventilation map was calculated from the variations of voxel-to-voxel CT densities from two breathing phases from either 4D-CT or breathing correlated CTs. An open source image registration tool of Plastimatch was used to deform the inhale phase images to the exhale phase images. To calculate the ventilation map inside lung, the whole lung was delineated and the tissue outside the lung was masked out. With a software tool developed in house, the 3D ventilation map was then converted in the DICOM format associated with the planning CT images. The ventilation map was analyzed on a clinical workstation. To correlate ventilation map thus calculated with lung volume change, the total lung volume change was compared the mean ventilation from our method. Results: Twenty two patients who underwent stereotactic body irradiation for lung cancer was selected for this retrospective study. For this group of patients, the ratio of lung volumes for the inhale (Vin ) and exhale phase (Vex ) was shown to be linearly related to the mean of the local ventilation (Vent), Vin/Vex=1.+0.49*Vent (R2=0.93, p<0.01). Conclusion: The total lung volume change is highly correlated with the mean of local ventilation. The mean of local ventilation may be useful to assess the patient's lung capacity

  6. New approach to lung cancer screening with helical volume CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midorikawa, S.; Hashimoto, N.; Katakura, T.; Suzuki, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the relationship between reducing radiation dose to the patient and maintaining the clinical quality of the chest image in lung cancer screening by helical-volume CT (HVCT). The authors evaluated the changing relationship between radiation dose and clinical quality after changing the HVCY scanning conditions (such as stroke of patient transport and section thickness) as well as adding copper filters of various thickness and using high-voltage x-ray examination to complement CT examinations. The authors were able to reduce radiation dose by changing the HVCT scanning conditions (eg, stroke of 20 mm/sec, with a section thickness of 10 mm)

  7. Lung volumes during sustained microgravity on Spacelab SLS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Ann R.; Prisk, Gordon Kim; Guy, Harold J. B.; West, John B.

    1994-01-01

    Gravity is known to influence the topographical gradients of pulmonary ventilation, perfusion, and pleural pressures. The effect of sustained microgravity on lung volumes has not previously been investigated. Pulmonary function tests were performed by four subjects before, during, and after 9 days of microgravity exposure. Ground measurements were made in standing and supine postures. Tests were performed using a bag-in-box and flowmeter system and a respiratory mass spectrometer. Measurements of tidal volume (V(sub T)), expiratory reserve volume (ERV), inspiratory and expiratory vital capacities (IVC, EVC), functional residual capacity (FRC), and residual volume (RV) were made. During microgravity, V(sub T) decreased by 15%. IVC and EVC were slightly reduced during the first 24 hrs of microgravity and returned to 1 g standing values within 72 hrs after the onset of microgravity. FRC was reduced by 15% and ERV decreased by 10-20%. RV was significantly reduced by 18%. The reductions in FRC, ERV, and V(sub T) during microgravity are probably due to the cranial shift of the diaphragm and an increase in intrathoracic blood volume.

  8. Estimation of lung volume and pressure from electrocardiogram

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Gamal Eldin Fathy Amin

    2011-05-01

    The Electrocardiography (ECG) is a tool measuring the electrical excitation of the heart that is extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring of heart diseases. The ECG signal reflects not only the heart activity but also many other physiological processes. The respiratory activity is a prominent process that affects the ECG signal due to the close proximity of the heart and the lungs and, on the other hand, due to neural regulatory processes. In this paper, several means for the estimation of the respiratory process from the ECG signal are presented. The results show a strong correlation of the voltage difference between the R and S peak of the ECG and the lung\\'s volume and pressure. Correlation was also found for some features of the vector ECG, which is a two dimensional graph of two different ECG signals. The potential benefit of the multiparametric evaluation of the ECG signal is a reduction of the number of sensors connected to patients, which will increase the patients\\' comfort and reduce the costs associated with healthcare. In particular, it is relevant for sleep monitoring, where a reduction of the number of different sensors would facilitate a more natural sleeping environment and hence a higher sensitivity of the diagnosis. © 2011 IEEE.

  9. Fetal lung volume in congenital diaphragmatic hernia: association of prenatal MR imaging findings with postnatal chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debus, Angelika; Hagelstein, Claudia; Kilian, A Kristina; Weiss, Christel; Schönberg, Stefan O; Schaible, Thomas; Neff, K Wolfgang; Büsing, Karen A

    2013-03-01

    To assess whether chronic lung disease (CLD) in surviving infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with lung hypoplasia on the basis of the results of antenatal observed-to-expected fetal lung volume (FLV) ratio measurement at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The study received approval from the institutional review board, with waiver of informed consent for this retrospective review from patients who had previously given informed consent for prospective studies. The ratio of observed to expected FLV at MR imaging was calculated in 172 fetuses with CDH. At postpartum day 28, the need for supplemental oxygen implicated the diagnosis of CLD. At day 56, patients with CLD were assigned to one of three groups-those with mild, moderate, or severe CLD-according to their demand for oxygen. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the prognostic value of the individual observed-to-expected FLV ratio for association with postnatal development of CLD. Children with CLD were found to have significantly smaller observed-to-expected FLV ratios at MR imaging than infants without CLD (P CLD revealed significant differences in observed-to-expected FLV ratio between patients with mild CLD and those with moderate (P = .012) or severe (P = .007) CLD. For an observed-to-expected FLV ratio of 5%, 99% of patients with CDH developed CLD, compared with less than 5% of fetuses with an observed-to-expected FLV ratio of 50%. Perinatally, development and grade of CLD were further influenced by the need for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) (P CLD in surviving infants with CDH is associated with the prenatally determined observed-to-expected FLV ratio. Early neonatal therapeutic decisions can additionally be based on this ratio. Perinatally, ECMO requirement and gestational age at delivery are useful in further improving the estimated probability of CLD.

  10. Cross-sectional changes in lung volume measured by electrical impedance tomography are representative for the whole lung in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2014-01-01

    Electrical impedance tomography measures lung volume in a cross-sectional slice of the lung. Whether these cross-sectional volume changes are representative of the whole lung has only been investigated in adults, showing conflicting results. This study aimed to compare cross-sectional and whole lung

  11. Risk factors for radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic radiation therapy for lung tumours: clinical usefulness of the planning target volume to total lung volume ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueyama, Tomoko; Arimura, Takeshi; Takumi, Koji; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Higashi, Ryutaro; Ito, Soichiro; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Umanodan, Tomokazu; Nakajo, Masanori; Koriyama, Chihaya; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    To identify risk factors for symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) after stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) for lung tumours. We retrospectively evaluated 68 lung tumours in 63 patients treated with SRT between 2011 and 2015. RP was graded according to the National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. SRT was delivered at 7.0-12.0 Gy per each fraction, once daily, to a total of 48-64 Gy (median, 50 Gy). Univariate analysis was performed to assess patient- and treatment-related factors, including age, sex, smoking index (SI), pulmonary function, tumour location, serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 value (KL-6), dose-volume metrics (V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 and VS5), homogeneity index of the planning target volume (PTV), PTV dose, mean lung dose (MLD), contralateral MLD and V2, PTV volume, lung volume and the PTV/lung volume ratio (PTV/Lung). Performance of PTV/Lung in predicting symptomatic RP was also analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The median follow-up period was 21 months. 10 of 63 patients (15.9%) developed symptomatic RP after SRT. On univariate analysis, V10, V20, PTV volume and PTV/Lung were significantly associated with occurrence of RP  ≥Grade 2. ROC curves indicated that symptomatic RP could be predicted using PTV/Lung [area under curve (AUC): 0.88, confidence interval (CI: 0.78-0.95), cut-off value: 1.09, sensitivity: 90.0% and specificity: 72.4%]. PTV/Lung is a good predictor of symptomatic RP after SRT. Advances in knowledge: The cases with high PTV/Lung should be carefully monitored with caution for the occurrence of RP after SRT.

  12. Lung lesion doubling times: values and variability based on method of volume determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisenbud Quint, Leslie; Cheng, Joan; Schipper, Matthew; Chang, Andrew C.; Kalemkerian, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine doubling times (DTs) of lung lesions based on volumetric measurements from thin-section CT imaging. Methods: Previously untreated patients with ≥ two thin-section CT scans showing a focal lung lesion were identified. Lesion volumes were derived using direct volume measurements and volume calculations based on lesion area and diameter. Growth rates (GRs) were compared by tissue diagnosis and measurement technique. Results: 54 lesions were evaluated including 8 benign lesions, 10 metastases, 3 lymphomas, 15 adenocarcinomas, 11 squamous carcinomas, and 7 miscellaneous lung cancers. Using direct volume measurements, median DTs were 453, 111, 15, 181, 139 and 137 days, respectively. Lung cancer DTs ranged from 23-2239 days. There were no significant differences in GRs among the different lesion types. There was considerable variability among GRs using different volume determination methods. Conclusions: Lung cancer doubling times showed a substantial range, and different volume determination methods gave considerably different DTs

  13. Volume-Targeted Ventilation in the Neonate: Benchmarking Ventilators on an Active Lung Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Tobias J; Wald, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Mechanically ventilated neonates have been observed to receive substantially different ventilation after switching ventilator models, despite identical ventilator settings. This study aims at establishing the range of output variability among 10 neonatal ventilators under various breathing conditions. Relative benchmarking test of 10 neonatal ventilators on an active neonatal lung model. Neonatal ICU. Ten current neonatal ventilators. Ventilators were set identically to flow-triggered, synchronized, volume-targeted, pressure-controlled, continuous mandatory ventilation and connected to a neonatal lung model. The latter was configured to simulate three patients (500, 1,500, and 3,500 g) in three breathing modes each (passive breathing, constant active breathing, and variable active breathing). Averaged across all weight conditions, the included ventilators delivered between 86% and 110% of the target tidal volume in the passive mode, between 88% and 126% during constant active breathing, and between 86% and 120% under variable active breathing. The largest relative deviation occurred during the 500 g constant active condition, where the highest output machine produced 147% of the tidal volume of the lowest output machine. All machines deviate significantly in volume output and ventilation regulation. These differences depend on ventilation type, respiratory force, and patient behavior, preventing the creation of a simple conversion table between ventilator models. Universal neonatal tidal volume targets for mechanical ventilation cannot be transferred from one ventilator to another without considering necessary adjustments.

  14. Clinical and radiological outcome following pneumothorax after endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompelmann, D; Benjamin, N; Kontogianni, K; Herth, Fjf; Heussel, C P; Hoffmann, H; Eberhardt, R

    2016-01-01

    Valve implantation has evolved as a therapy for patients with advanced emphysema. Although it is a minimally invasive treatment, it is associated with complications, the most common being pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurs due to the rapid target lobe volume reduction and may be a predictor of clinical benefit despite this complication. The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory data analysis of patients who developed a pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema. This study performed a retrospective evaluation of pneumothorax management and the impact of pneumothorax on clinical outcomes in 70 patients following valve therapy in 381 consecutive patients. Pneumothorax rate following valve therapy was 18%. Pneumothorax management consisted of chest tube insertion, valve removal, and surgical intervention in 87% (61/70), 44% (31/70), and 19% (13/70) of the patients, respectively. Despite pneumothorax, patients experienced modest but significant improvements in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 55±148 mL, residual volume: -390±964 mL, total lung capacity: -348±876; all P pneumothorax, which was associated with relevant clinical improvement, was observed in only 21% (15/70) of the patients. Pneumothorax is a frequent severe complication following valve therapy that requires further intervention. Nevertheless, the pneumothorax does not impair the clinical status in the majority of patients. Patients with lobar atelectasis benefit after recovering from pneumothorax in terms of lung function parameters.

  15. Transpulmonary pressures and lung mechanics with glossopharyngeal insufflation and exsufflation beyond normal lung volumes in competitive breath-hold divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, Stephen H; O'Donnell, Carl R; Butler, James P; Lindholm, Peter; Jacobson, Francine; Ferrigno, Massimo

    2007-03-01

    Throughout life, most mammals breathe between maximal and minimal lung volumes determined by respiratory mechanics and muscle strength. In contrast, competitive breath-hold divers exceed these limits when they employ glossopharyngeal insufflation (GI) before a dive to increase lung gas volume (providing additional oxygen and intrapulmonary gas to prevent dangerous chest compression at depths recently greater than 100 m) and glossopharyngeal exsufflation (GE) during descent to draw air from compressed lungs into the pharynx for middle ear pressure equalization. To explore the mechanical effects of these maneuvers on the respiratory system, we measured lung volumes by helium dilution with spirometry and computed tomography and estimated transpulmonary pressures using an esophageal balloon after GI and GE in four competitive breath-hold divers. Maximal lung volume was increased after GI by 0.13-2.84 liters, resulting in volumes 1.5-7.9 SD above predicted values. The amount of gas in the lungs after GI increased by 0.59-4.16 liters, largely due to elevated intrapulmonary pressures of 52-109 cmH(2)O. The transpulmonary pressures increased after GI to values ranging from 43 to 80 cmH(2)O, 1.6-2.9 times the expected values at total lung capacity. After GE, lung volumes were reduced by 0.09-0.44 liters, and the corresponding transpulmonary pressures decreased to -15 to -31 cmH(2)O, suggesting closure of intrapulmonary airways. We conclude that the lungs of some healthy individuals are able to withstand repeated inflation to transpulmonary pressures far greater than those to which they would normally be exposed.

  16. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  17. Variation of gross tumor volume and clinical target volume definition for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Li Minghui; Chen Dongdu

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the variation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) definition for lung cancer between different doctors. Methods: Ten lung cancer patients with PET-CT simulation were selected from January 2008 to December 2009.GTV and CTV of these patients were defined by four professors or associate professors of radiotherapy independently. Results: The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were 1.66 and 1.65, respectively. The mean coefficients of variation for GTV and CTV were 0.20 and 0.17, respectively. System errors of CTV definition in three dimension were less than 5 mm, which was the largest in inferior and superior (0.48 cm, 0.37 cm, 0.32 cm; F=0.40, 0.60, 0.15, P=0.755, 0.618, 0.928). Conclusions: The variation of GTV and CTV definition for lung cancer between different doctors exist. The mean ratios of largest to smallest GTV and CTV were less than 1.7. The variation was in hilar and mediastinum lymphanode regions. System error of CTV definition was the largest (<5 mm) in cranio-caudal direction. (authors)

  18. The lung volume reduction coil for the treatment of emphysema : a new therapy in development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Lung volume reduction (LVR) coil treatment is a novel therapy for patients with severe emphysema. In this bilateral bronchoscopic treatment, approximately 10 LVR coils per lobe are delivered under fluoroscopic guidance in two sequential procedures. The LVR coil reduces lung volume by compressing the

  19. Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Coil Treatment of Patients With Severe Heterogeneous Emphysema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Klooster, Karin; Ernst, Armin; Herth, Felix J. F.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.

    Background: The lung volume reduction coil (LVR-coil), a new experimental device to achieve lung volume reduction by bronchoscopy in patients with severe emphysema, works in a manner unaffected by collateral airflow. We investigated the safety and efficacy of LVR-coil treatment in patients with

  20. Dependent lung opacity at thin-section CT: evaluation by spirometrically-gated CT of the influence of lung volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Nam; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Sohn, Choon Hee; Choi, Pil Jo; Webb, W. Richard

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of lung volume on dependent lung opacity seen at thin-section CT. In thirteen healthy volunteers, thin-section CT scans were performed at three levels (upper, mid, and lower portion of the lung) and at different lung volumes (10, 30, 50, and 100% vital capacity), using spirometric gated CT. Using a three-point scale, two radiologists determined whether dependent opacity was present, and estimated its degree. Regional lung attenuation at a level 2 cm above the diaphragm was determined using semiautomatic segmentation, and the diameter of a branch of the right lower posterior basal segmental artery was measured at each different vital capacity. At all three anatomic levels, dependent opacity occurred significantly more often at lower vital capacities (10, 30%) than at 100% vital capacity (p = 0.001). Visually estimated dependent opacity was significantly related to regional lung attenuation (p < 0.0001), which in dependent areas progressively increased as vital capacity decreased (p < 0.0001). The presence of dependent opacity and regional lung attenuation of a dependent area correlated significantly with increased diameter of a segmental arterial branch (r = 0.493 and p = 0.0002; r = 0.486 and p 0.0003, respectively). Visual estimation and CT measurements of dependent opacity obtained by semiautomatic segmentation are significantly influenced by lung volume and are related to vascular diameter

  1. Microstructural Consequences of Blast Lung Injury Characterized with Digital Volume Correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Arora

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on microstructural changes that occur within the mammalian lung when subject to blast and how these changes influence strain distributions within the tissue. Shock tube experiments were performed to generate the blast injured specimens (cadaveric Sprague-Dawley rats. Blast overpressures of 100 and 180 kPa were studied. Synchrotron tomography imaging was used to capture volumetric image data of lungs. Specimens were ventilated using a custom-built system to study multiple inflation pressures during each tomography scan. These data enabled the first digital volume correlation (DVC measurements in lung tissue to be performed. Quantitative analysis was performed to describe the damaged architecture of the lung. No clear changes in the microstructure of the tissue morphology were observed due to controlled low- to moderate-level blast exposure. However, significant focal sites of injury were observed using DVC, which allowed the detection of bias and concentration in the patterns of strain level. Morphological analysis corroborated the findings, illustrating that the focal damage caused by a blast can give rise to diffuse influence across the tissue. It is important to characterize the non-instantly fatal doses of blast, given the transient nature of blast lung in the clinical setting. This research has highlighted the need for better understanding of focal injury and its zone of influence (alveolar interdependency and neighboring tissue burden as a result of focal injury. DVC techniques show great promise as a tool to advance this endeavor, providing a new perspective on lung mechanics after blast.

  2. Quantification of Tumor Volume Changes During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Jana; Ford, Eric; Redmond, Kristin; Zhou, Jessica; Wong, John; Song, Danny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for lung cancer is limited by normal tissue toxicity. We evaluated sequential computed tomography (CT) scans to assess the possibility of adaptively reducing treatment volumes by quantifying the tumor volume reduction occurring during a course of radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent RT for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer with conventional fractionation; 15 received concurrent chemotherapy. Two repeat CT scans were performed at a nominal dose of 30 Gy and 50 Gy. Respiration-correlated four-dimensional CT scans were used for evaluation of respiratory effects in 17 patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on simulation and all individual phases of the repeat CT scans. Parenchymal tumor was evaluated unless the nodal volume was larger or was the primary. Subsequent image sets were spatially co-registered with the simulation data for evaluation. Results: The median GTV reduction was 24.7% (range, -0.3% to 61.7%; p 100 cm 3 vs. 3 , and hilar and/or mediastinal involvement vs. purely parenchymal or pleural lesions. A tendency toward a greater volume reduction with increasing dose was seen, although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated significant alterations in the GTV seen on repeat CT scans during RT. These observations raise the possibility of using an adaptive approach toward RT of non-small-cell lung cancer to minimize the dose to normal structures and more safely increase the dose directed at the target tissues.

  3. Incidental lung volume reduction following fulminant pulmonary hemorrhage in a patient with severe emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Juergen; Spengler, Werner; Horger, Marius; Boeckeler, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopic lung volume reduction is an emerging technique meant to improve lung function parameters, quality of life, and exercise tolerance in patients with severe lung emphysema. This is the first report of lung volume reduction by autologous blood in a patient with non-bullous lung emphysema. A 74-year-old woman with heterogeneous lung emphysema developed accidentally diffuse lobar bleeding immediately after valve placement. Due to persistent hemorrhage, the valves had to be removed shortly thereafter. Despite extraction of the valves, respiratory function of the patient improved rapidly indicated also by a drop in the COPD assessment test questionnaire, 3 months later. This was consistent with both improvement of lung function tests and six-minute walking test.

  4. Cross-sectional changes in lung volume measured by electrical impedance tomography are representative for the whole lung in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Burg, Pauline S.; Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Electrical impedance tomography measures lung volume in a cross-sectional slice of the lung. Whether these cross-sectional volume changes are representative of the whole lung has only been investigated in adults, showing conflicting results. This study aimed to compare cross-sectional and

  5. Ethical and equity issues in lung transplantation and lung volume reduction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanville, A R

    2006-01-01

    New medical and scientific disciplines are often developed in haste with rampant enthusiasm and scant regard for the balance between action and thoughtful deliberation. Driven by the desire to prolong life and provide a better quality of life for desperately sick individuals, the twin modalities of lung transplantation and lung volume reduction therapy have only just reached their majority. Both are invested with the capacity to help and to harm so it is right to consider carefully their ethical and equitable distribution. Much has been learned in the last 20 years to assist in these deliberations. First, how can we ensure equity of access to transplant services and equality of outcomes? How do we balance resource allocation of a precious and scarce resource with individual recipient needs? Does the concept of distributive justice prevail in our daily work in this field? How do we honour the donor and their family? How do we as practitioners avoid ethical dilemmas related to personal bias and justifiable reward for services rendered? Finally, how do we learn to incorporate ethical forethought and planning guided by experts in the area into everyday behaviour?

  6. Lung volume reduction surgery: an overview Cirurgia redutora de volume pulmonar: uma revisão

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Afonso da Silva Sardenberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to review the literature on the efficacy, safety and feasibility of lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS in patients with advanced emphysema. Studies on LVRS from January 1995 to December 2009 were included by using Pubmed (MEDLINE and Cochrane Library literature in English. Search words such as lung volume reduction surgery or lung reduction surgery, pneumoplasty or reduction pneumoplasty, COPD or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and surgery, were used. We also compared medical therapy and surgical technique. Studies consisting of randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials (randomized and nonrandomized, reviews and case series were analyzed. Questions regarding validity of the early clinical reports, incomplete follow-up bias, selection criteria and survival, confounded the interpretation of clinical data on LVRS. Patients with upper, lower and diffuse distribution of emphysema were included; we also analyzed as key points perioperative morbidity and mortality and lung function measurement as FEV1. Bullous emphysema was excluded from this review. Surgical approach included median sternotomy, unilateral or bilateral thoracotomy, and videothoracoscopy with stapled or laser ablation. Results of prospective randomized trials between medical management and LVRS are essential before final assessment can be established.O objetivo deste estudo é revisar a literatura acerca da eficácia, segurança e viabilidade da cirurgia redutora de volume pulmonar (CRVP em pacientes com enfisema pulmonar avançado. Estudos de CRVP de janeiro de 1995 a dezembro de 2009 foram incluídos através de pesquisa na Pubmed (MEDLINE e Cochrane Library, na literatura inglesa. Palavras de busca tais como lung volume reduction surgery ou lung reduction surgery, pneumoplasty ou reduction pneumoplasty, COPD ou chronic obstructive pulmonary disease e surgery foram utilizadas. Também realizamos comparação entre terapia médica e cir

  7. Lung protection: an intervention for tidal volume reduction in a teaching intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briva, Arturo; Gaiero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of feedback and education regarding the use of predicted body weight to adjust tidal volume in a lung-protective mechanical ventilation strategy. Methods The study was performed from October 2014 to November 2015 (12 months) in a single university polyvalent intensive care unit. We developed a combined intervention (education and feedback), placing particular attention on the importance of adjusting tidal volumes to predicted body weight bedside. In parallel, predicted body weight was estimated from knee height and included in clinical charts. Results One hundred fifty-nine patients were included. Predicted body weight assessed by knee height instead of visual evaluation revealed that the delivered tidal volume was significantly higher than predicted. After the inclusion of predicted body weight, we observed a sustained reduction in delivered tidal volume from a mean (standard error) of 8.97 ± 0.32 to 7.49 ± 0.19mL/kg (p < 0.002). Furthermore, the protocol adherence was subsequently sustained for 12 months (delivered tidal volume 7.49 ± 0.54 versus 7.62 ± 0.20mL/kg; p = 0.103). Conclusion The lack of a reliable method to estimate the predicted body weight is a significant impairment for the application of a worldwide standard of care during mechanical ventilation. A combined intervention based on education and repeated feedbacks promoted sustained tidal volume education during the study period (12 months). PMID:27925055

  8. Evaluation of Neonatal Lung Volume Growth by Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Melissa A; Walkup, Laura L; Tkach, Jean A; Higano, Nara S; Lim, Foong Yen; Haberman, Beth; Woods, Jason C; Kingma, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate postnatal lung volume in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and determine if a compensatory increase in lung volume occurs during the postnatal period. Using a novel pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging method for imaging neonatal lungs, the postnatal lung volumes in infants with CDH were determined and compared with prenatal lung volumes obtained via late gestation magnetic resonance imaging. Infants with left-sided CDH (2 mild, 9 moderate, and 1 severe) were evaluated. The total lung volume increased in all infants, with the contralateral lung increasing faster than the ipsilateral lung (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 3.0 mL/week vs 3.4 ± 2.1 mL/week, P = .005). In contrast to prenatal studies, the volume of lungs of infants with more severe CDH grew faster than the lungs of infants with more mild CDH (Spearman's ρ=-0.086, P = .01). Although the contralateral lung volume grew faster in both mild and moderate groups, the majority of total lung volume growth in moderate CDH came from increased volume of the ipsilateral lung (42% of total lung volume increase in the moderate group vs 32% of total lung volume increase in the mild group, P = .09). Analysis of multiple clinical variables suggests that increased weight gain was associated with increased compensatory ipsilateral lung volume growth (ρ = 0.57, P = .05). These results suggest a potential for postnatal catch-up growth in infants with pulmonary hypoplasia and suggest that weight gain may increase the volume growth of the more severely affected lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lung volume reduction of pulmonary emphysema: the radiologist task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Gianluca; Silva, Mario; Sverzellati, Nicola

    2016-03-01

    Several lung volume reduction (LVR) techniques have been increasingly evaluated in patients with advanced pulmonary emphysema, especially in the last decade. Radiologist plays a pivotal role in the characterization of parenchymal damage and, thus, assessment of eligibility criteria. This review aims to discuss the most common LVR techniques, namely LVR surgery, endobronchial valves, and coils LVR, with emphasis on the role of computed tomography (CT). Several trials have recently highlighted the importance of regional quantification of emphysema by computerized CT-based segmentation of hyperlucent parenchyma, which is strongly recommended for candidates to any LVR treatment. In particular, emphysema distribution pattern and fissures integrity are evaluated to tailor the choice of the most appropriate LVR technique. Furthermore, a number of CT measures have been tested for the personalization of treatment, according to imaging detected heterogeneity of parenchymal disease. CT characterization of heterogeneous parenchymal abnormalities provides criteria for selection of the preferable treatment in each patient and improves outcome of LVR as reflected by better quality of life, higher exercise tolerance, and lower mortality.

  10. The Effect of Compartmental Asymmetry on the Monitoring of Pulmonary Mechanics and Lung Volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Joseph C; Cortes-Puentes, Gustavo A; Adams, Alexander B; Dries, David J; Marini, John J

    2016-11-01

    Esophageal pressure measurement for computation of transpulmonary pressure (P tp ) has begun to be incorporated into clinical use for evaluating forces across the lungs. Gaps exist in our understanding of how esophageal pressure (and therefore P tp ), a value measured at a single site, responds when respiratory system compartments are asymmetrically affected by whole-lung atelectasis or unilateral injury as well as changes in chest wall compliance. We reasoned that P tp would track with aerated volume changes as estimated by functional residual capacity (FRC) and tidal volume. We examined this hypothesis in the setting of asymmetric lungs and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. This study was conducted in the animal laboratory of a university-affiliated hospital. Models of unilateral atelectasis and unilateral and bilateral lung injury exposed to intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) in 10 deeply sedated mechanically ventilated swine. Atelectasis was created by balloon occlusion of the left main bronchus. Unilateral lung injury was induced by saline lavage of isolated right lung. Diffuse lung injury was induced by saline lavage of both lungs. The peritoneum was insufflated with air to create a model of pressure-regulated IAH. We measured esophageal pressures, airway pressures, FRC by gas dilution, and oxygenation. FRC was reduced by IAH in normal lungs (P volume in the setting of thoracic asymmetry and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. However, used alone, it cannot distinguish the relative contributions of air-space distention and recruitment of lung units. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. [Normal lung volumes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Juan Pablo; Abbona, Horacio; Robles, Adriana; López, Ana María

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern, resulting from reduction of pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. Previous reports suggest that when both diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. We report 4 male patients of 64, 60, 73 and 70 years, all with heavy cigarette smoking history and progressive breathlessness. Three of them had severe limitation in their quality of life. All four showed advanced lung interstitial involvement, at high resolution CT scan, fibrotic changes predominantly in the subpleural areas of lower lung fields and concomitant emphysema in the upper lobes. Emphysema and pulmonary fibrosis was confirmed by open lung biopsy in one patient. The four patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange and poor exercise tolerance evaluated by 6 minute walk test. Severe pulmonary arterial hypertension was also confirmed in three patients. Normal lung volumes does not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  12. Overweight Is an Independent Risk Factor for Reduced Lung Volumes in Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte G W Seijger

    Full Text Available In this large observational study population of 105 myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1 patients, we investigate whether bodyweight is a contributor of total lung capacity (TLC independent of the impaired inspiratory muscle strength.Body composition was assessed using the combination of body mass index (BMI and fat-free mass index. Pulmonary function tests and respiratory muscle strength measurements were performed on the same day. Patients were stratified into normal (BMI < 25 kg/m(2 and overweight (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2 groups. Multiple linear regression was used to find significant contributors for TLC.Overweight was present in 59% of patients, and body composition was abnormal in almost all patients. In overweight patients, TLC was significantly (p = 2.40×10(-3 decreased, compared with normal-weight patients, while inspiratory muscle strength was similar in both groups. The decrease in TLC in overweight patients was mainly due to a decrease in expiratory reserve volume (ERV further illustrated by a highly significant (p = 1.33×10(-10 correlation between BMI and ERV. Multiple linear regression showed that TLC can be predicted using only BMI and the forced inspiratory volume in 1 second, as these were the only significant contributors.This study shows that, in DM1 patients, overweight further reduces lung volumes, as does impaired inspiratory muscle strength. Additionally, body composition is abnormal in almost all DM1 patients.

  13. Indirect measurement of lung density and air volume from electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebuya, Satoru; Mills, Gary H; Milnes, Peter; Brown, Brian H

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a method for estimating lung density, air volume and changes in fluid content from a non-invasive measurement of the electrical resistivity of the lungs. Resistivity in Ω m was found by fitting measured electrical impedance tomography (EIT) data to a finite difference model of the thorax. Lung density was determined by comparing the resistivity of the lungs, measured at a relatively high frequency, with values predicted from a published model of lung structure. Lung air volume can then be calculated if total lung weight is also known. Temporal changes in lung fluid content will produce proportional changes in lung density. The method was implemented on EIT data, collected using eight electrodes placed in a single plane around the thorax, from 46 adult male subjects and 36 adult female subjects. Mean lung densities (±SD) of 246 ± 67 and 239 ± 64 kg m(-3), respectively, were obtained. In seven adult male subjects estimates of 1.68 ± 0.30, 3.42 ± 0.49 and 4.40 ± 0.53 l in residual volume, functional residual capacity and vital capacity, respectively, were obtained. Sources of error are discussed. It is concluded that absolute differences in lung density of about 30% and changes over time of less than 30% should be detected using the current technology in normal subjects. These changes would result from approximately 300 ml increase in lung fluid. The method proposed could be used for non-invasive monitoring of total lung air and fluid content in normal subjects but needs to be assessed in patients with lung disease.

  14. Action of the isolated canine diaphragm on the lower ribs at high lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Troyer, André; Wilson, Theodore A

    2014-10-15

    The normal diaphragm has an inspiratory action on the lower ribs, but subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease commonly have an inward displacement of the lateral portions of the lower rib cage during inspiration. This paradoxical displacement, conventionally called 'Hoover's sign', has traditionally been attributed to the direct action of radially oriented diaphragmatic muscle fibres. In the present study, the inspiratory intercostal muscles in all interspaces in anaesthetized dogs were severed so that the diaphragm was the only muscle active during inspiration. The displacements of the lower ribs along the craniocaudal and laterolateral axes and the changes in pleural pressure (∆Ppl) and transdiaphragmatic pressure were measured during occluded breaths and mechanical ventilation at different lung volumes between functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity. From these data, the separate effects on rib displacement of ∆Ppl and of the force exerted by the diaphragm on the ribs were determined. Isolated spontaneous diaphragm contraction at FRC displaced the lower ribs cranially and outward, but this motion was progressively reversed into a caudal and inward motion as lung volume increased. However, although the force exerted by the diaphragm on the ribs decreased with increasing volume, it continued to displace the ribs cranially and outward. These observations suggest that Hoover's sign is usually caused by the decrease in the zone of apposition and, thus, by the dominant effect of ∆Ppl on the lower ribs, rather than an inward pull from the diaphragm. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  15. Lung volumes related to physical activity, physical fitness, aerobic capacity and body mass index in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailova A.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced lung volumes were associated with lower aerobic fitness, lower physical fitness and lower amount of weekly physical activity. Healthier body mass index was associated with higher aerobic fitness (relative VO2max in both female and male.

  16. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  17. Changes in lung volume and ventilation during surfactant treatment in ventilated preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2011-01-01

    The immediate and regional effects of exogenous surfactant in open lung high-frequency oscillatory ventilated (HFOV) preterm infants are unknown. To assess regional changes in lung volume, mechanics, and ventilation during and after surfactant administration in HFOV preterm infants with respiratory

  18. Transfer factor, lung volumes, resistance and ventilation distribution in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanck, Sylvia; Van Muylem, Alain; Schuermans, Daniel; Bautmans, Ivan; Thompson, Bruce; Vincken, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring of chronic lung disease requires reference values of lung function indices, including putative markers of small airway function, spanning a wide age range.We measured spirometry, transfer factor of the lung for carbon monoxide (TLCO), static lung volume, resistance and ventilation distribution in a healthy population, studying at least 20 subjects per sex and per decade between the ages of 20 and 80 years.With respect to the Global Lung Function Initiative reference data, our subjects had average z-scores for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1/FVC of -0.12, 0.04 and -0.32, respectively. Reference equations were obtained which could account for a potential dependence of index variability on age and height. This was done for (but not limited to) indices that are pertinent to asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease studies: forced expired volume in 6 s, forced expiratory flow, TLCO, specific airway conductance, residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC), and ventilation heterogeneity in acinar and conductive lung zones.Deterioration in acinar ventilation heterogeneity and lung clearance index with age were more marked beyond 60 years, and conductive ventilation heterogeneity showed the greatest increase in variability with age. The most clinically relevant deviation from published reference values concerned RV/TLC values, which were considerably smaller than American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society-endorsed reference values. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  19. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  20. Effect of Inhomogeneity correction for lung volume model in TPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Se Young; Lee, Sang Rok; Kim, Young Bum; Kwon, Young Ho

    2004-01-01

    The phantom that includes high density materials such as steel was custom-made to fix lung and bone in order to evaluation inhomogeneity correction at the time of conducting radiation therapy to treat lung cancer. Using this, values resulting from the inhomogeneous correction algorithm are compared on the 2 and 3 dimensional radiation therapy planning systems. Moreover, change in dose calculation was evaluated according to inhomogeneous by comparing with the actual measurement. As for the image acquisition, inhomogeneous correction phantom(Pig's vertebra, steel(8.21 g/cm 3 ), cork(0.23 g/cm 3 )) that was custom-made and the CT(Volume zoom, Siemens, Germany) were used. As for the radiation therapy planning system, Marks Plan(2D) and XiO(CMS, USA, 3D) were used. To compare with the measurement value, linear accelerator(CL/1800, Varian, USA) and ion chamber were used. Image, obtained from the CT was used to obtain point dose and dose distribution from the region of interest (ROI) while on the radiation therapy planning device. After measurement was conducted under the same conditions, value on the treatment planning device and measured value were subjected to comparison and analysis. And difference between the resulting for the evaluation on the use (or non-use) of inhomogeneity correction algorithm, and diverse inhomogeneity correction algorithm that is included in the radiation therapy planning device was compared as well. As result of comparing the results of measurement value on the region of interest within the inhomogeneity correction phantom and the value that resulted from the homogeneous and inhomogeneous correction, gained from the therapy planning device, margin of error of the measurement value and inhomogeneous correction value at the location 1 of the lung showed 0.8% on 2D and 0.5% on 3D. Margin of error of the measurement value and inhomogeneous correction value at the location 1 of the steel showed 12% on 2D and 5% on 3D, however, it is possible to

  1. Numerical simulation of volume-controlled mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan; Zhang, Bolun; Cai, Maolin; Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2017-09-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a key therapy for patients who cannot breathe adequately by themselves, and dynamics of mechanical ventilation system is of great significance for life support of patients. Recently, models of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 1 lung are used to simulate the respiratory system of patients. However, humans have 2 lungs. When the respiratory characteristics of 2 lungs are different, a single-lung model cannot reflect real respiratory system. In this paper, to illustrate dynamic characteristics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs, we propose a mathematical model of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs and conduct experiments to verify the model. Furthermore, we study the dynamics of mechanical ventilated respiratory system with 2 different lungs. This research study can be used for improving the efficiency and safety of volume-controlled mechanical ventilation system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The irradiation lung volume in tangential fields for the treatment of a breast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. T.; Kim, J. R.; Kang, H. J.; Sohn, J. H.; Kang, S. H.; Chun, M. S.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is one of the complications caused by radiation therapy that includes a portion of the lung tissue. The severity of radiation induced pulmonary dysfunction depends on the irradiated lung volume, total dose, dose rate and underlying pulmonary function. The lung volume was measured for 25 patients with breast cancer irradiated with tangential field from Jan. 1995 to Aug. 1996. Parameters that can predict the irradiated lung volume included; (1) the perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall at the center of the field (CLD); (2) the maximum perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential field edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall (MLD); (3) the greatest perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential edge to the posterior part of anterior chest wall on CT image at the center of the longitudinal field (GPD); (4) the length of the longitudinal field (L). The irradiated lung volume(RV), the entire both lung volume(EV) and the ipsilateral lung volume(IV) were measured using dose volume histogram. The RV is 61-279cc, the RV/EV is 2.9-13.0% and the RV/EN is 4.9-29.6%. The CLD, the MLD and the GPD are 1.9-3.3cm and 1.4-3.1cm respectively. The significant relations between the irradiated lung volume such as RV, RV/EV, RV/IV and parameters such as CLD, MLD, GPD, L, CLD x L, MLD x L and GPD x L are not found with little variances in parameters. The RV/IV of the left breast irradiation is significances. The significant relationship between the irradiated lung volume and predictors is not found with little variation on parameters. The irradiated lung volume in the tangential field is less than 10% of entire lung volume when CLD is less than 3cm. The RV/IV of the left tangential field is larger than that of the right but there was no significant differences in RV/EVs. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis has not occurred during minimum 6 months follow up. (author)

  3. Automatic segmentation of tumor-laden lung volumes from the LIDC database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2012-03-01

    The segmentation of the lung parenchyma is often a critical pre-processing step prior to application of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. Segmentation of the lung volume can dramatically decrease computation time and reduce the number of false positive detections by excluding from consideration extra-pulmonary tissue. However, while many algorithms are capable of adequately segmenting the healthy lung, none have been demonstrated to work reliably well on tumor-laden lungs. Of particular challenge is to preserve tumorous masses attached to the chest wall, mediastinum or major vessels. In this role, lung volume segmentation comprises an important computational step that can adversely affect the performance of the overall CAD algorithm. An automated lung volume segmentation algorithm has been developed with the goals to maximally exclude extra-pulmonary tissue while retaining all true nodules. The algorithm comprises a series of tasks including intensity thresholding, 2-D and 3-D morphological operations, 2-D and 3-D floodfilling, and snake-based clipping of nodules attached to the chest wall. It features the ability to (1) exclude trachea and bowels, (2) snip large attached nodules using snakes, (3) snip small attached nodules using dilation, (4) preserve large masses fully internal to lung volume, (5) account for basal aspects of the lung where in a 2-D slice the lower sections appear to be disconnected from main lung, and (6) achieve separation of the right and left hemi-lungs. The algorithm was developed and trained to on the first 100 datasets of the LIDC image database.

  4. Is a reduction in radiation lung volume and dose necessary with paclitaxel chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Alphonse G; Assaad, Sherif I; Niemierko, Andrzej; Floyd, Scott R; Powell, Simon N

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate and quantify the effect of irradiated lung volume, radiation dose, and paclitaxel chemotherapy on the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes. We previously reported the incidence of RP among 41 patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy. We recorded the central lung distance, a measure of the extent of lung included in the RT volume, in these patients. We used this measure and the historical and observed rates of RP in our series to model the lung tolerance to RT in patients receiving chemotherapy (CHT) both with and without paclitaxel. To evaluate the risk factors for the development of RP, we performed a case-control study comparing paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP with those who did not, and a second case-control study comparing patients receiving paclitaxel in addition to standard CHT/RT (n = 41) and controls receiving standard CHT/RT alone (n = 192). The actuarial rate of RP in the paclitaxel-treated group was 15.4% compared with 0.9% among breast cancer patients treated with RT and non-paclitaxel-containing CHT. Our mathematical model found that the effective lung tolerance for patients treated with paclitaxel was reduced by approximately 24%. No statistically significant difference was found with regard to the dose delivered to specific radiation fields, dose per fraction, central lung distance, or percentage of lung irradiated in the case-control study of paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP compared with those who did not. In the comparison of 41 patients receiving RT and CHT with paclitaxel and 192 matched controls receiving RT and CHT without paclitaxel, the only significant differences identified were the more frequent use of a supraclavicular radiation field and a decrease in the RT lung dose among the paclitaxel-treated patients. This finding indicates that the major factor associated with development

  5. Impact of obstructive sleep apnea on lung volumes and mechanical properties of the respiratory system in overweight and obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyrim, Arikin; Zhang, Yongping; Li, Nanfang; Zhao, Minghua; Wang, Yinchun; Yao, Xiaoguang; Keyoumu, Youledusi; Yin, Ting

    2015-07-25

    Even through narrowing of the upper-airway plays an important role in the generation of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the peripheral airways is implicated in pre-obese and obese OSA patients, as a result of decreased lung volume and increased lung elastic recoil pressure, which, in turn, may aggravate upper-airway collapsibility. A total of 263 male (n = 193) and female (n = 70) subjects who were obese to various degrees without a history of lung diseases and an expiratory flow limitation, but troubled with snoring or suspicion of OSA were included in this cross-sectional study. According to nocturnal-polysomnography the subjects were distributed into OSA and non-OSA groups, and were further sub-grouped by gender because of differences between males and females, in term of, lung volume size, airway resistance, and the prevalence of OSA among genders. Lung volume and respiratory mechanical properties at different-frequencies were evaluated by plethysmograph and an impulse oscillation system, respectively. Functional residual capacity (FRC) and expiratory reserve volume were significantly decreased in the OSA group compared to the non-OSA group among males and females. As weight and BMI in males in the OSA group were greater than in the non-OSA group (90 ± 14.8 kg vs. 82 ± 10.4 kg, p volumes decreases were independent from BMI and associated with the severity of OSA. This result was further confirmed by the female cohort. Significant increases in total respiratory resistance and decreases in respiratory conductance (Grs) were observed with increasing severity of OSA, as defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in both genders. The specific Grs (sGrs) stayed relatively constant between the two groups in woman, and there was only a weak association between AHI and sGrs among man. Multiple-stepwise-regression showed that reactance at 5 Hz was highly correlated with AHI in males and females or hypopnea index in females, independently

  6. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers, Department of Radiological Sciences, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Strange, Charlie [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Columbia, SC (United States); Tashkin, Donald P. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  7. Emphysema lung lobe volume reduction: effects on the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Matthew S.; Kim, Hyun J.; Abtin, Fereidoun G.; Galperin-Aizenberg, Maya; Pais, Richard; Da Costa, Irene G.; Ordookhani, Arash; Chong, Daniel; Ni, Chiayi; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Goldin, Jonathan G.; Strange, Charlie; Tashkin, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate volumetric and density changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral lobes following volume reduction of an emphysematous target lobe. The study included 289 subjects with heterogeneous emphysema, who underwent bronchoscopic volume reduction of the most diseased lobe with endobronchial valves and 132 untreated controls. Lobar volume and low-attenuation relative area (RA) changes post-procedure were measured from computed tomography images. Regression analysis (Spearman's rho) was performed to test the association between change in the target lobe volume and changes in volume and density variables in the other lobes. The target lobe volume at full inspiration in the treatment group had a mean reduction of -0.45 L (SE = 0.034, P < 0.0001), and was associated with volume increases in the ipsilateral lobe (rho = -0.68, P < 0.0001) and contralateral lung (rho = -0.16, P = 0.006), and overall reductions in expiratory RA (rho = 0.31, P < 0.0001) and residual volume (RV)/total lung capacity (TLC) (rho = 0.13, P = 0.03). When the volume of an emphysematous target lobe is reduced, the volume is redistributed primarily to the ipsilateral lobe, with an overall reduction. Image-based changes in lobar volumes and densities indicate that target lobe volume reduction is associated with statistically significant overall reductions in air trapping, consistent with expansion of the healthier lung. (orig.)

  8. Effects of different tidal volumes in pulmonary and extrapulmonary lung injury with or without intraabdominal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cíntia L; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Raquel S; Oliveira, Mariana G; Silva, Johnatas D; Maron-Gutierrez, Tatiana; Ornellas, Débora S; Morales, Marcelo M; Capelozzi, Vera L; Jamel, Nelson; Pelosi, Paolo; Rocco, Patricia R M; Garcia, Cristiane S N B

    2012-03-01

    We hypothesized that: (1) intraabdominal hypertension increases pulmonary inflammatory and fibrogenic responses in acute lung injury (ALI); (2) in the presence of intraabdominal hypertension, higher tidal volume reduces lung damage in extrapulmonary ALI, but not in pulmonary ALI. Wistar rats were randomly allocated to receive Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally (pulmonary ALI) or intraperitoneally (extrapulmonary ALI). After 24 h, animals were randomized into subgroups without or with intraabdominal hypertension (15 mmHg) and ventilated with positive end expiratory pressure = 5 cmH(2)O and tidal volume of 6 or 10 ml/kg during 1 h. Lung and chest wall mechanics, arterial blood gases, lung and distal organ histology, and interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, caspase-3 and type III procollagen (PCIII) mRNA expressions in lung tissue were analyzed. With intraabdominal hypertension, (1) chest-wall static elastance increased, and PCIII, IL-1β, IL-6, and caspase-3 expressions were more pronounced than in animals with normal intraabdominal pressure in both ALI groups; (2) in extrapulmonary ALI, higher tidal volume was associated with decreased atelectasis, and lower IL-6 and caspase-3 expressions; (3) in pulmonary ALI, higher tidal volume led to higher IL-6 expression; and (4) in pulmonary ALI, liver, kidney, and villi cell apoptosis was increased, but not affected by tidal volume. Intraabdominal hypertension increased inflammation and fibrogenesis in the lung independent of ALI etiology. In extrapulmonary ALI associated with intraabdominal hypertension, higher tidal volume improved lung morphometry with lower inflammation in lung tissue. Conversely, in pulmonary ALI associated with intraabdominal hypertension, higher tidal volume increased IL-6 expression.

  9. Tracking Regional Tissue Volume and Function Change in Lung Using Image Registration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunlin Cao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated the 24-hour redistribution and reabsorption of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid delivered to the lung during a bronchoscopic procedure in normal volunteers. In this work we utilize image-matching procedures to correlate fluid redistribution and reabsorption to changes in regional lung function. Lung CT datasets from six human subjects were used in this study. Each subject was scanned at four time points before and after BAL procedure. Image registration was performed to align images at different time points and different inflation levels. The resulting dense displacement fields were utilized to track tissue volume changes and reveal deformation patterns of local parenchymal tissue quantitatively. The registration accuracy was assessed by measuring landmark matching errors, which were on the order of 1 mm. The results show that quantitative-assessed fluid volume agreed well with bronchoscopist-reported unretrieved BAL volume in the whole lungs (squared linear correlation coefficient was 0.81. The average difference of lung tissue volume at baseline and after 24 hours was around 2%, which indicates that BAL fluid in the lungs was almost absorbed after 24 hours. Regional lung-function changes correlated with the presence of BAL fluid, and regional function returned to baseline as the fluid was reabsorbed.

  10. Converging stereotactic radiotherapy using kilovoltage X-rays: experimental irradiation of normal rabbit lung and dose-volume analysis with Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  11. Clinical and radiological outcome following pneumothorax after endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gompelmann D

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available D Gompelmann,1,2 N Benjamin,1 K Kontogianni,1 FJF Herth,1,2 CP Heussel,2–4 H Hoffmann,2,5 R Eberhardt1,2 1Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 2German Center for Lung Research, 3Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, 4Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, 5Thoracic Surgery, Thoraxklinik at University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Introduction: Valve implantation has evolved as a therapy for patients with advanced emphysema. Although it is a minimally invasive treatment, it is associated with complications, the most common being pneumothorax. Pneumothorax occurs due to the rapid target lobe volume reduction and may be a predictor of clinical benefit despite this complication. Objective: The objective of this study was to conduct an exploratory data analysis of patients who developed a pneumothorax following endoscopic valve therapy for emphysema. Materials and methods: This study performed a retrospective evaluation of pneumothorax management and the impact of pneumothorax on clinical outcomes in 70 patients following valve therapy in 381 consecutive patients. Results: Pneumothorax rate following valve therapy was 18%. Pneumothorax management consisted of chest tube insertion, valve removal, and surgical intervention in 87% (61/70, 44% (31/70, and 19% (13/70 of the patients, respectively. Despite pneumothorax, patients experienced modest but significant improvements in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 55±148 mL, residual volume: -390±964 mL, total lung capacity: -348±876; all P<0.05. Persistent lobar atelectasis 3 months after recovering from pneumothorax, which was associated with relevant clinical improvement, was observed in only 21% (15/70 of the patients. Conclusion: Pneumothorax is a frequent severe complication following valve therapy that requires further intervention

  12. Characterizing functional lung heterogeneity in COPD using reference equations for CT scan-measured lobar volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Come, Carolyn E; Diaz, Alejandro A; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Muralidhar, Nivedita; Hersh, Craig P; Zach, Jordan A; Schroeder, Joyce; Lynch, David A; Celli, Bartolome; Washko, George R

    2013-06-01

    CT scanning is increasingly used to characterize COPD. Although it is possible to obtain CT scan-measured lung lobe volumes, normal ranges remain unknown. Using COPDGene data, we developed reference equations for lobar volumes at maximal inflation (total lung capacity [TLC]) and relaxed exhalation (approximating functional residual capacity [FRC]). Linear regression was used to develop race-specific (non-Hispanic white [NHW], African American) reference equations for lobar volumes. Covariates included height and sex. Models were developed in a derivation cohort of 469 subjects with normal pulmonary function and validated in 546 similar subjects. These cohorts were combined to produce final prediction equations, which were applied to 2,191 subjects with old GOLD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) stage II to IV COPD. In the derivation cohort, women had smaller lobar volumes than men. Height positively correlated with lobar volumes. Adjusting for height, NHWs had larger total lung and lobar volumes at TLC than African Americans; at FRC, NHWs only had larger lower lobes. Age and weight had no effect on lobar volumes at TLC but had small effects at FRC. In subjects with COPD at TLC, upper lobes exceeded 100% of predicted values in GOLD II disease; lower lobes were only inflated to this degree in subjects with GOLD IV disease. At FRC, gas trapping was severe irrespective of disease severity and appeared uniform across the lobes. Reference equations for lobar volumes may be useful in assessing regional lung dysfunction and how it changes in response to pharmacologic therapies and surgical or endoscopic lung volume reduction.

  13. Adjusting tidal volume to stress index in an open lung condition optimizes ventilation and prevents overdistension in an experimental model of lung injury and reduced chest wall compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Carlos; Suárez-Sipmann, Fernando; Gutierrez, Andrea; Tusman, Gerardo; Carbonell, Jose; García, Marisa; Piqueras, Laura; Compañ, Desamparados; Flores, Susanie; Soro, Marina; Llombart, Alicia; Belda, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-13

    The stress index (SI), a parameter derived from the shape of the pressure-time curve, can identify injurious mechanical ventilation. We tested the hypothesis that adjusting tidal volume (VT) to a non-injurious SI in an open lung condition avoids hypoventilation while preventing overdistension in an experimental model of combined lung injury and low chest-wall compliance (Ccw). Lung injury was induced by repeated lung lavages using warm saline solution, and Ccw was reduced by controlled intra-abdominal air-insufflation in 22 anesthetized, paralyzed and mechanically ventilated pigs. After injury animals were recruited and submitted to a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) titration trial to find the PEEP level resulting in maximum compliance. During a subsequent four hours of mechanical ventilation, VT was adjusted to keep a plateau pressure (Pplat) of 30 cmH2O (Pplat-group, n = 11) or to a SI between 0.95 and 1.05 (SI-group, n = 11). Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain a 'normal' PaCO2 (35 to 65 mmHg). SI, lung mechanics, arterial-blood gases haemodynamics pro-inflammatory cytokines and histopathology were analyzed. In addition Computed Tomography (CT) data were acquired at end expiration and end inspiration in six animals. PaCO2 was significantly higher in the Pplat-group (82 versus 53 mmHg, P = 0.01), with a resulting lower pH (7.19 versus 7.34, P = 0.01). We observed significant differences in VT (7.3 versus 5.4 mlKg(-1), P = 0.002) and Pplat values (30 versus 35 cmH2O, P = 0.001) between the Pplat-group and SI-group respectively. SI (1.03 versus 0.99, P = 0.42) and end-inspiratory transpulmonary pressure (PTP) (17 versus 18 cmH2O, P = 0.42) were similar in the Pplat- and SI-groups respectively, without differences in overinflated lung areas at end- inspiration in both groups. Cytokines and histopathology showed no differences. Setting tidal volume to a non-injurious stress index in an open lung condition improves

  14. Effect of nasal continuous and biphasic positive airway pressure on lung volume in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Martijn; van der Burg, Pauline S.; Beuger, Sabine; de Jongh, Frans H.; Frerichs, Inez; van Kaam, Anton H.

    2013-01-01

    To monitor regional changes in end-expiratory lung volume (EELV), tidal volumes, and their ventilation distribution during different levels of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) and nasal biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP) in stable preterm infants. By using electrical

  15. A comparison of conventional surfactant treatment and partial liquid ventilation on the lung volume of injured ventilated small lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proquitté, Hans; Hartenstein, Sebastian; Wauer, Roland R; Schmalisch, Gerd; Koelsch, Uwe; Rüdiger, Mario

    2013-01-01

    As an alternative to surfactant therapy (ST), partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) has been considered as a treatment for acute lung injury (ALI) in newborns. The instilled PFC is much heavier than the instilled surfactant and the aim of this study was to investigate whether PLV, compared to ST, increases the end-expiratory volume of the lung (V L ). Fifteen newborn piglets (age <12 h, mean weight 678 g) underwent saline lung lavage to achieve a surfactant depletion. Thereafter animals were randomized to PLV (n = 8), receiving PFC PF5080 (3M, Germany) at 30 mL kg −1 , and ST (n = 7) receiving 120 mg Curosurf®. Blood gases, hemodynamics and static compliance were measured initially (baseline), immediately after ALI, and after 240 min mechanical ventilation with either technique. Subsequently all piglets were killed; the lungs were removed in toto and frozen in liquid N 2 . After freeze-drying the lungs were cut into lung cubes (LCs) with edge lengths of 0.7 cm, to calculate V L . All LCs were weighed and the density of the dried lung tissue was calculated. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups PLV and ST (means ± SD) were noted in body weight (676 ± 16 g versus 679 ± 17 g; P = 0.974) or lung dry weight (1.64 ± 0.29 g versus 1.79 ± 0.48 g; P = 0.48). Oxygenation index and ventilatory efficacy index did not differ significantly between both groups at any time. V L (34.28 ± 6.13 mL versus 26.22 ± 8.1 mL; P < 0.05) and the density of the dried lung tissue (48.07 ± 5.02 mg mL −1 versus 69.07 ± 5.30 mg mL −1 ; P < 0.001), however, differed significantly between the PLV and ST groups. A 4 h PLV treatment of injured ventilated small lungs increased V L by 30% and decreased lung density by 31% compared to ST treatment, indicating greater lung distension after PLV compared to ST. (paper)

  16. SU-G-BRC-08: Evaluation of Dose Mass Histogram as a More Representative Dose Description Method Than Dose Volume Histogram in Lung Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Eldib, A; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lin, M [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States); Li, J [Cyber Medical Inc, Xian, Shaanxi (China); Mora, G [Universidade de Lisboa, Codex, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) is widely used for plan evaluation in radiation treatment. The concept of dose-mass-histogram (DMH) is expected to provide a more representative description as it accounts for heterogeneity in tissue density. This study is intended to assess the difference between DVH and DMH for evaluating treatment planning quality. Methods: 12 lung cancer treatment plans were exported from the treatment planning system. DVHs for the planning target volume (PTV), the normal lung and other structures of interest were calculated. DMHs were calculated in a similar way as DVHs expect that the voxel density converted from the CT number was used in tallying the dose histogram bins. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) was calculated based on voxel volume and mass, respectively. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in relation to the EUD was calculated for the normal lung to provide quantitative comparison of DVHs and DMHs for evaluating the radiobiological effect. Results: Large differences were observed between DVHs and DMHs for lungs and PTVs. For PTVs with dense tumor cores, DMHs are higher than DVHs due to larger mass weighing in the high dose conformal core regions. For the normal lungs, DMHs can either be higher or lower than DVHs depending on the target location within the lung. When the target is close to the lower lung, DMHs show higher values than DVHs because the lower lung has higher density than the central portion or the upper lung. DMHs are lower than DVHs for targets in the upper lung. The calculated NTCPs showed a large range of difference between DVHs and DMHs. Conclusion: The heterogeneity of lung can be well considered using DMH for evaluating target coverage and normal lung pneumonitis. Further studies are warranted to quantify the benefits of DMH over DVH for plan quality evaluation.

  17. Volume doubling time of lung cancer detected in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia. Comparison with that in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cherry; Lee, Sang Min; Choe, Jooae; Chae, Eun Jin; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Seo, Joon Beom

    2018-01-01

    To assess the volume doubling time (VDT) of lung cancers in IIP compared with COPD. A total of 61 patients (32 with IIP and 29 with COPD) were identified. A radiologist performed three-dimensional manual segmentation for lung cancers. VDTs were calculated and compared between two groups. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with rapid tumour growth (VDT < 90 days). The median VDT of lung cancers in IIP (78.2 days) was significantly shorter than that in COPD (126.1 days; p=0.004). Squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) was the most frequent subtype, followed by small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in IIP. In COPD, SqCC was the most frequent subtype, followed by adenocarcinoma. Rapid tumour growth was observed in 20 cancers from IIP, and in nine cancers from COPD (p=0.021). SCLC was significantly correlated with rapid tumour growth (p=0.038). Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of IIP was the single independent predictor of rapid tumour growth (p = 0.016; odds ratio, 3.7). Lung cancers in IIP showed more rapid growth, with median VDT < 90 days. Therefore, a shorter follow-up interval (<90 days) may be necessary when CT surveillance is considered in IIP patients with suspected lung cancer. (orig.)

  18. Volume Adjustment of Lung Density by Computed Tomography Scans in Patients with Emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaker, S.B.; Dirksen, A.; Laursen, L.C.; Skovgaard, L.T.; Holstein-Rathlou, N.H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To determine how to adjust lung density measurements for the volume of the lung calculated from computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with emphysema. Material and Methods: Fifty patients with emphysema underwent 3 CT scans at 2-week intervals. The scans were analyzed with a software package that detected the lung in contiguous images and subsequently generated a histogram of the pixel attenuation values. The total lung volume (TLV), lung weight, percentile density (PD), and relative area of emphysema (RA) were calculated from this histogram. RA and PD are commonly applied measures of pulmonary emphysema derived from CT scans. These parameters are markedly influenced by changes in the level of inspiration. The variability of lung density due to within-subject variation in TLV was explored by plotting TLV against PD and RA. Results: The coefficients for volume adjustment for PD were relatively stable over a wide range from the 10th to the 80th percentile, whereas for RA the coefficients showed large variability especially in the lower range, which is the most relevant for quantitation of pulmonary emphysema. Conclusion: Volume adjustment is mandatory in repeated CT densitometry and is more robust for PD than for RA. Therefore, PD seems more suitable for monitoring the progression of emphysema

  19. Variable tidal volumes improve lung protective ventilation strategies in experimental lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieth, Peter M; Carvalho, Alysson R; Pelosi, Paolo; Hoehn, Catharina; Meissner, Christoph; Kasper, Michael; Hübler, Matthias; von Neindorff, Matthias; Dassow, Constanze; Barrenschee, Martina; Uhlig, Stefan; Koch, Thea; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama

    2009-04-15

    Noisy ventilation with variable Vt may improve respiratory function in acute lung injury. To determine the impact of noisy ventilation on respiratory function and its biological effects on lung parenchyma compared with conventional protective mechanical ventilation strategies. In a porcine surfactant depletion model of lung injury, we randomly combined noisy ventilation with the ARDS Network protocol or the open lung approach (n = 9 per group). Respiratory mechanics, gas exchange, and distribution of pulmonary blood flow were measured at intervals over a 6-hour period. Postmortem, lung tissue was analyzed to determine histological damage, mechanical stress, and inflammation. We found that, at comparable minute ventilation, noisy ventilation (1) improved arterial oxygenation and reduced mean inspiratory peak airway pressure and elastance of the respiratory system compared with the ARDS Network protocol and the open lung approach, (2) redistributed pulmonary blood flow to caudal zones compared with the ARDS Network protocol and to peripheral ones compared with the open lung approach, (3) reduced histological damage in comparison to both protective ventilation strategies, and (4) did not increase lung inflammation or mechanical stress. Noisy ventilation with variable Vt and fixed respiratory frequency improves respiratory function and reduces histological damage compared with standard protective ventilation strategies.

  20. Feasibility of repetitive lung function measurements by raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression during methacholine challenge in young infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loland, L.; Bisgaard, H.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of lung function measurements by the raised volume rapid thoracoabdominal compression (RVRTC) technique during bronchial methacholine challenge in young infants. METHOD: Four hundred two healthy infants were tested at 1 month of age....... The mean acceptability rating among parents was 8 on a scale from 1 to 10, with 13% rating test, with the actual lung function testing accounting for half the time. CONCLUSION: This very comprehensive experience with standardized measurements of lung...... was successfully measured in 87% by transcutaneous oxygen pressure. No serious adverse events were observed during testing or after discharge from the clinic. The methacholine dose range was appropriate as PD could be determined in the majority of infants. FEV(0.5) values in 21% of infants dropped > 40% during...

  1. Development and proof-of-concept of three-dimensional lung histology volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Lindsay; Alabousi, Mostafa; Wheatley, Andrew; Aladl, Usaf; Slipetz, Deborah; Hogg, James C.; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2012-03-01

    Most medical imaging is inherently three-dimensional (3D) but for validation of pathological findings, histopathology is commonly used and typically histopathology images are acquired as twodimensional slices with quantitative analysis performed in a single dimension. Histopathology is invasive, labour-intensive, and the analysis cannot be performed in real time, yet it remains the gold standard for the pathological diagnosis and validation of clinical or radiological diagnoses of disease. A major goal worldwide is to improve medical imaging resolution, sensitivity and specificity to better guide therapy and biopsy and to one day delay or replace biopsy. A key limitation however is the lack of tools to directly compare 3D macroscopic imaging acquired in patients with histopathology findings, typically provided in a single dimension (1D) or in two dimensions (2D). To directly address this, we developed methods for 2D histology slice visualization/registration to generate 3D volumes and quantified tissue components in the 3D volume for direct comparison to volumetric micro-CT and clinical CT. We used the elastase-instilled mouse emphysema lung model to evaluate our methods with murine lungs sectioned (5 μm thickness/10 μm gap) and digitized with 2μm in-plane resolution. 3D volumes were generated for wildtype and elastase mouse lung sections after semi-automated registration of all tissue slices. The 1D mean linear intercept (Lm) for wildtype (WT) (47.1 μm +/- 9.8 μm) and elastase mouse lung (64.5 μm +/- 14.0 μm) was significantly different (p<.001). We also generated 3D measurements based on tissue and airspace morphometry from the 3D volumes and all of these were significantly different (p<.0001) when comparing elastase and WT mouse lung. The ratio of the airspace-to-lung volume for the entire lung volume was also significantly and strongly correlated with Lm.

  2. Experimental estimation of regional lung water volume by histogram of pulmonary CT numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Shiro; Momoki, Shigeru; Asai, Toshihiko; Shimada, Takeshi; Tamano, Masahiro; Nakamoto, Takaaki; Yoshimura, Masaharu

    1989-01-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo experiments were made to assess the ability of pulmonary CT numbers to quantitatively determine regional water volume in cases of pulmonary congestion or edema associated with left heart failure. In vitro experiment revealed a good linear correlation between the volume of injected water and the determined CT number of polyethylene tube packed with sponge. In the subsequent in vivo experiment with 10 adult mongrel dogs, lung water volumes obtained by pulmonary CT numbers were found to be consistent with the actual volumes. Pulmonary CT numbers for water volume proved to become parameters to quantitatively evaluate pulmonary congestion or edema. (Namekawa, K)

  3. Entropy Production and the Pressure-Volume Curve of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Lucas Oliveira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate analytically the production of entropy during a breathing cycle in healthy and diseased lungs. First, we calculate entropy production in healthy lungs by applying the laws of thermodynamics to the well-known transpulmonary pressure-volume (P-V curves of the lung under the assumption that lung tissue behaves as an entropy spring-like rubber. The bulk modulus, $B$, of the lung is also derived from these calculations. Second, we extend this approach to elastic recoil disorders of the lung such as occur in pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema. These diseases are characterized by particular alterations in the P-V relationship. For example, in fibrotic lungs B increases monotonically with disease progression, while in emphysema the opposite occurs. These diseases can thus be mimicked simply by making appropriate adjustments to the parameters of the P-V curve. Using Clausius's formalism, we show that entropy production, Delta_S, is related to the hysteresis area, Delta_A, enclosed by the P-V curve during a breathing cycle, namely, Delta_S = Delta_A/T, where T is the body temperature. Although Delta_A is highly dependent on the disease, such formula applies to healthy as well as diseased lungs, regardless of the disease stage. Finally, we use ansatzs to predict analytically the entropy produced by the fibrotic and emphysematous lungs.

  4. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  5. Effectiveness and efficacy of minimally invasive lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertl, Daniela; Eisenmann, Alexander; Holzer, Ulrike; Renner, Anna-Theresa; Valipour, A

    2014-01-01

    Lung emphysema is a chronic, progressive and irreversible destruction of the lung tissue. Besides non-medical therapies and the well established medical treatment there are surgical and minimally invasive methods for lung volume reduction (LVR) to treat severe emphysema. This report deals with the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive methods compared to other treatments for LVR in patients with lung emphysema. Furthermore, legal and ethical aspects are discussed. No clear benefit of minimally invasive methods compared to surgical methods can be demonstrated based on the identified and included evidence. In order to assess the different methods for LVR regarding their relative effectiveness and safety in patients with lung emphysema direct comparative studies are necessary.

  6. Effectiveness and efficacy of minimally invasive lung volume reduction surgery for emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pertl, Daniela

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available [english] Lung emphysema is a chronic, progressive and irreversible destruction of the lung tissue. Besides non-medical therapies and the well established medical treatment there are surgical and minimally invasive methods for lung volume reduction (LVR to treat severe emphysema. This report deals with the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive methods compared to other treatments for LVR in patients with lung emphysema. Furthermore, legal and ethical aspects are discussed. No clear benefit of minimally invasive methods compared to surgical methods can be demonstrated based on the identified and included evidence. In order to assess the different methods for LVR regarding their relative effectiveness and safety in patients with lung emphysema direct comparative studies are necessary.

  7. Whole-lung volume and density in spirometrically-gated inspiratory and expiratory CT in systemic sclerosis: correlation with static volumes at pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camiciottoli, G; Diciotti, S; Bartolucci, M; Orlandi, I; Bigazzi, F; Matucci-Cerinic, M; Pistolesi, M; Mascalchi, M

    2013-03-01

    Spiral low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) permits to measure whole-lung volume and density in a single breath-hold. To evaluate the agreement between static lung volumes measured with LDCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) and the correlation between the LDCT volumes and lung density in restrictive lung disease. Patients with Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) with (n = 24) and without (n = 16) pulmonary involvement on sequential thin-section CT and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)(n = 29) underwent spirometrically-gated LDCT at 90% and 10% of vital capacity to measure inspiratory and expiratory lung volumes and mean lung attenuation (MLA). Total lung capacity and residual volume were measured the same day of CT. Inspiratory [95% limits of agreement (95% LoA)--43.8% and 39.2%] and expiratory (95% LoA -45.8% and 37.1%) lung volumes measured on LDCT and PFT showed poor agreement in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they were in substantial agreement (inspiratory 95% LoA -14.1% and 16.1%; expiratory 95% LoA -13.5% and 23%) in SSc patients without pulmonary involvement and in inspiratory scans only (95% LoA -23.1% and 20.9%) of COPD patients. Inspiratory and expiratory LDCT volumes, MLA and their deltas differentiated both SSc patients with or without pulmonary involvement from COPD patients. LDCT lung volumes and density were not correlated in SSc patients with pulmonary involvement, whereas they did correlate in SSc without pulmonary involvement and in COPD patients. In restrictive lung disease due to SSc there is poor agreement between static lung volumes measured using LDCT and PFT and the relationship between volume and density values on CT is altered.

  8. Very low tidal volume ventilation with associated hypercapnia--effects on lung injury in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Fuchs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ventilation using low tidal volumes with permission of hypercapnia is recommended to protect the lung in acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, the most lung protective tidal volume in association with hypercapnia is unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different tidal volumes with associated hypercapnia on lung injury and gas exchange in a model for acute respiratory distress syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this randomized controlled experiment sixty-four surfactant-depleted rabbits were exposed to 6 hours of mechanical ventilation with the following targets: Group 1: tidal volume = 8-10 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 40 mm Hg; Group 2: tidal volume = 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 80 mm Hg; Group 3: tidal volume = 3-4 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 120 mm Hg; Group 4: tidal volume = 2-3 ml/kg/PaCO(2 = 160 mm Hg. Decreased wet-dry weight ratios of the lungs, lower histological lung injury scores and higher PaO(2 were found in all low tidal volume/hypercapnia groups (group 2, 3, 4 as compared to the group with conventional tidal volume/normocapnia (group 1. The reduction of the tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg did not enhance lung protection. However, oxygenation and lung protection were maintained at extremely low tidal volumes in association with very severe hypercapnia and no adverse hemodynamic effects were observed with this strategy. CONCLUSION: Ventilation with low tidal volumes and associated hypercapnia was lung protective. A tidal volume below 4-5 ml/kg/PaCO(2 80 mm Hg with concomitant more severe hypercapnic acidosis did not increase lung protection in this surfactant deficiency model. However, even at extremely low tidal volumes in association with severe hypercapnia lung protection and oxygenation were maintained.

  9. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  10. Volume adjustment of lung density by computed tomography scans in patients with emphysema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaker, S B; Dirksen, A; Laursen, Lars Christian

    2004-01-01

    of pulmonary emphysema derived from CT scans. These parameters are markedly influenced by changes in the level of inspiration. The variability of lung density due to within-subject variation in TLV was explored by plotting TLV against PD and RA. RESULTS: The coefficients for volume adjustment for PD were...... relatively stable over a wide range from the 10th to the 80th percentile, whereas for RA the coefficients showed large variability especially in the lower range, which is the most relevant for quantitation of pulmonary emphysema. CONCLUSION: Volume adjustment is mandatory in repeated CT densitometry......PURPOSE: To determine how to adjust lung density measurements for the volume of the lung calculated from computed tomography (CT) scans in patients with emphysema. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty patients with emphysema underwent 3 CT scans at 2-week intervals. The scans were analyzed with a software...

  11. Does the IMRT technique allow improvement of treatment plans (e.g. lung sparing) for lung cancer patients with small lung volume: a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komosinska, K.; Kepka, L.; Gizynska, M.; Zawadzka, A.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated whether intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) may offer any advantages in comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for patients with small lung volume (SLV). Methods: Treatment planning was performed for 10 NSCLC patients with the smallest lung volume (mean: 2241 cc) among 200 patients from our database. For each patient 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were prepared. The goal was to deliver 66 Gy/33 fractions, with dose constraints: mean lung dose (MLD) < 20 Gy, V20 < 35%; spinal cord - Dmax < 45 Gy. When the plan could not meet these criteria, total dose was reduced. The 3D-CRT and IMRT plans were compared. We investigated: prescribed dose, coverage and conformity indices, MLD, V5-V65 in the lung. Results: In 4 out of 10 plans, 3D-CRT did not allow 66 Gy to be delivered, because of predicted pulmonary toxicity. These 4 cases included 3 for which we did not reach 66 Gy with IMRT; still, for these 3 plans the total dose was increased by an average of 9 Gy with IMRT in comparison with 3D-CRT. Coverage indices were similar for both techniques. Conformity indices were better for IMRT plans. MLD was lower in five IMRT and two 3D-CRT plans if equal doses were delivered. The decrease in MLD was seen for cases with large PTV and high PTV/lung volume ratio. Lung V5 was lower for all 3D-CRT plans, 47% vs. 57% for IMRT; V15 and above were larger for 3D-CRT Conclusion: In the planning study, IMRT seems to be a promising technique for cases with SLV, especially when associated with large PT V. (authors)

  12. Influence of stapling the intersegmental planes on lung volume and function after segmentectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Yoshida, Kumiko; Furukawa, Masashi; Yoshiyama, Koichi; Okabe, Kazunori

    2016-10-01

    Dividing the intersegmental planes with a stapler during pulmonary segmentectomy leads to volume loss in the remnant segment. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of segment division methods on preserved lung volume and pulmonary function after segmentectomy. Using image analysis software on computed tomography (CT) images of 41 patients, the ratio of remnant segment and ipsilateral lung volume to their preoperative values (R-seg and R-ips) was calculated. The ratio of postoperative actual forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) per those predicted values based on three-dimensional volumetry (R-FEV1 and R-FVC) was also calculated. Differences in actual/predicted ratios of lung volume and pulmonary function for each of the division methods were analysed. We also investigated the correlations of the actual/predicted ratio of remnant lung volume with that of postoperative pulmonary function. The intersegmental planes were divided by either electrocautery or with a stapler in 22 patients and with a stapler alone in 19 patients. Mean values of R-seg and R-ips were 82.7 (37.9-140.2) and 104.9 (77.5-129.2)%, respectively. The mean values of R-FEV1 and R-FVC were 103.9 (83.7-135.1) and 103.4 (82.2-125.1)%, respectively. There were no correlations between the actual/predicted ratio of remnant lung volume and pulmonary function based on the division method. Both R-FEV1 and R-FVC were correlated not with R-seg, but with R-ips. Stapling does not lead to less preserved volume or function than electrocautery in the division of the intersegmental planes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessments of risk following the inhalation of plutonium oxide using observed lung clearance patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsden, D.

    1977-10-01

    Dose commitments and risk estimates for the inhalation of plutonium oxide are calculated using the lung clearance patterns observed at AEE Winfrith. These risks are compared with published data on risks arising from a lung clearance based on the ICRP Lung Model. (author)

  14. Combining "open-lung" ventilation and arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist: influence of different tidal volumes on gas exchange in experimental lung failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muellenbach, Ralf M; Kredel, Markus; Kuestermann, Julian; Klingelhoefer, Michael; Schuster, Frank; Wunder, Christian; Kranke, Peter; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2009-08-01

    Although low-tidal ventilation may reduce mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), it can also result in severe respiratory acidosis and lung derecruitment. This study tested the hypothesis that combining "open-lung" ventilation and arteriovenous extracorporeal lung assist (av-ECLA) allows for maximal tidal volume (VT) reduction without the development of decompensated respiratory acidosis and impairment of oxygenation. After induction of ARDS in eight female pigs (56.1+/-3.2 kg), lung recruitment was performed and positive end-expiratory pressure was set 3 cmH2O above the lower inflection point of the pressure-volume curve. All animals were ventilated in the pressure-controlled ventilation mode (PCV) with VTs ranging from 0-8 ml/kg. At each VT, gas exchange and hemodynamic measurements were obtained with the av-ECLA circuit clamped and declamped. With each declamping, the gas flow through the membrane lung was set to 10 l of oxygen/min. The respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain normocapnia, but limited to 40/min. After lung recruitment, oxygenation remained significantly improved although VTs were minimized to 0 ml/kg (p<0.05). PaO2 was significantly improved during PCV and av-ECLA compared with PCV alone at VTs <4 ml/kg (p<0.05). With VT <6 ml/kg, severe acidosis could only be avoided if PCV was combined with av-ECLA. Due to sufficient CO2 elimination during av-ECLA, the VTs could be reduced to 0-2 ml/kg without the risk of decompensated respiratory acidosis. It was also shown that the "open-lung" strategy chosen was associated with sustained improvements in oxygenation, even though VTs were minimized.

  15. Target volume determination in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer-facts and questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, L.; Bujko, K.

    2003-01-01

    Although the precise target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy is required by ICRU Report 50 and 62, this task in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often controversial and strict accordance with ICRU requirements is hard to achieve. The Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) definition depends mainly on the imaging method used. We discuss the use of new imaging modalities, like PET, in GTV definition. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) definition remains a separate, and still unresolved problem, especially in the part concerning the Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI). Nowadays, there is no unified attitude among radiation oncologists regarding the necessity and extent of ENI. The common use of combined treatment modalities and the tendency to dose escalation, both increasing the potential toxicity, result in the more frequent use of involved-fields techniques. Problems relating to margins during Planning Target Volume (PTV) of lung cancer irradiation are also discussed. Another issue is the Interclinician variability in target volumes definition, especially when there is data indicating that the GTV, as defined by 3 D-treatment planning in NSCLC radiotherapy, may be highly prognostic for survival. We postulate that special attention should be paid to detailed precision of target volume determination in departmental and trial protocols. Careful analysis of patterns of failures from ongoing protocols will enable us to formulate the guidelines for target volume definition in radiotherapy for lung cancer. (author)

  16. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornblower, V D M; Yu, E; Fenster, A; Battista, J J; Malthaner, R A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo

  17. 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound volume measurement validation in an ex vivo and in vivo porcine model of lung tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornblower, V D M [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Yu, E [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Fenster, A [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Battista, J J [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada); Malthaner, R A [Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-01-07

    The purpose of this study was to validate the accuracy and reliability of volume measurements obtained using three-dimensional (3D) thoracoscopic ultrasound (US) imaging. Artificial 'tumours' were created by injecting a liquid agar mixture into spherical moulds of known volume. Once solidified, the 'tumours' were implanted into the lung tissue in both a porcine lung sample ex vivo and a surgical porcine model in vivo. 3D US images were created by mechanically rotating the thoracoscopic ultrasound probe about its long axis while the transducer was maintained in close contact with the tissue. Volume measurements were made by one observer using the ultrasound images and a manual-radial segmentation technique and these were compared with the known volumes of the agar. In vitro measurements had average accuracy and precision of 4.76% and 1.77%, respectively; in vivo measurements had average accuracy and precision of 8.18% and 1.75%, respectively. The 3D thoracoscopic ultrasound can be used to accurately and reproducibly measure 'tumour' volumes both in vivo and ex vivo.

  18. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents alveolar coagulation in patients without lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K.; Bresser, Paul; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom; Dzoljic, Misa; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alveolar fibrin deposition is a hallmark of acute lung injury, resulting from activation of coagulation and inhibition of fibrinolysis. Previous studies have shown that mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes may aggravate lung injury in patients with sepsis and acute lung injury.

  19. Lung volumes and maximal respiratory pressures in collegiate swimmers and runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordain, L; Tucker, A; Moon, D; Stager, J M

    1990-03-01

    To determine whether respiratory muscle strength is related to pulmonary volume differences in athletes and nonathletes, 11 intercollegiate female swimmers, 11 female cross-country runners, and two nonathletic control groups, matched to the athletes in height and age, were evaluated for pulmonary parameters including maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax) and maximal expiratory pressure (PEmax). Swimmers exhibited larger (p less than .05) vital capacities (VC), residual lung volumes (RV), inspiratory capacities (IC), and functional residual capacities (FRC) than both the runners or the controls but no difference (p greater than .05) in either PImax or inspiratory flow (FIV 25%-75%). Timed expiratory volumes (FEV 0.5 and FEV 1.0) were significantly (p less than .05) lower in the swimmers than in the controls. These data suggest that an adaptational growth may be responsible, in part, for the augmented static lung volumes demonstrated in swimmers.

  20. The role of three dimensional functional lung imaging in radiation treatment planning: the functional dose-volume histogram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Spencer, David P.; Sherouse, George W.; Bentel, Gunilla; Clough, Robert; Vann, Karen; Jaszczak, Ronald; Coleman, R. Edward; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: During thoracic irradiation (XRT), treatment fields are usually designed to minimize the volume of nontumor-containing lung included. Generally, functional heterogeneities within the lung are not considered. The three dimensional (3D) functional information provided by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scans might be useful in designing beams that minimize incidental irradiation of functioning lung tissue. We herein review the pretreatment SPECT scans in 86 patients (56 with lung cancer) to determine which are likely to benefit from this technology. Methods and Materials: Prior to thoracic XRT, SPECT lung perfusion scans were obtained following the intravenous injection of ∼4 mCi of 99m Tc-labeled macro-aggregated albumin. The presence of areas of decreased perfusion, their location relative to the tumor, and the potential clinical usefulness of their recognition, were scored. Patients were grouped and compared (two-tailed chi-square) based on clinical factors. Conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and functional DVHs (DV F Hs) are calculated based on the dose distribution throughout the computed tomography (CT)-defined lung and SPECT-defined perfused lung, respectively. Results: Among 56 lung cancer patients, decreases in perfusion were observed at the tumor, adjacent to the tumor, and separate from the tumor in 94%, 74%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Perfusion defects adjacent to the tumor were often large with centrally placed tumors. Hypoperfusion in regions separate from the tumor were statistically most common in patients with relatively poor pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Considering all SPECT defects adjacent to and separate from the tumor, corresponding CT abnormalities were seen in only ∼50% and 20% of patients, respectively, and were generally not as impressive. Following XRT, hypoperfusion at and separate from the tumor persisted, while defects adjacent to the

  1. Predicting Structure-Function Relations and Survival following Surgical and Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction Treatment of Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondoñedo, Jarred R; Suki, Béla

    2017-02-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (bLVR) are palliative treatments aimed at reducing hyperinflation in advanced emphysema. Previous work has evaluated functional improvements and survival advantage for these techniques, although their effects on the micromechanical environment in the lung have yet to be determined. Here, we introduce a computational model to simulate a force-based destruction of elastic networks representing emphysema progression, which we use to track the response to lung volume reduction via LVRS and bLVR. We find that (1) LVRS efficacy can be predicted based on pre-surgical network structure; (2) macroscopic functional improvements following bLVR are related to microscopic changes in mechanical force heterogeneity; and (3) both techniques improve aspects of survival and quality of life influenced by lung compliance, albeit while accelerating disease progression. Our model predictions yield unique insights into the microscopic origins underlying emphysema progression before and after lung volume reduction.

  2. Initial clinical observations of intra- and interfractional motion variation in MR-guided lung SBRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David H; Santhanam, Anand; Kishan, Amar U; Cao, Minsong; Lamb, James; Min, Yugang; O'Connell, Dylan; Yang, Yingli; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Lee, Percy; Low, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate variations in intra- and interfractional tumour motion, and the effect on internal target volume (ITV) contour accuracy, using deformable image registration of real-time two-dimensional-sagittal cine-mode MRI acquired during lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. Five lung tumour patients underwent free-breathing SBRT treatments on the ViewRay system, with dose prescribed to a planning target volume (defined as a 3-6 mm expansion of the 4DCT-ITV). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5 × 3.5 mm 2 pixels) were acquired through the centre of the tumour at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3-4 fractions of 21-32 min). Tumour gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were contoured on the first frame of the MR cine and tracked for the first 20 min of each treatment using offline optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. A ground truth ITV (MR-ITV 20 min ) was formed by taking the union of tracked GTV contours. Pseudo-ITVs were generated from unions of the GTV contours tracked over 10 s segments of image data (MR-ITV 10 s ). Differences were observed in the magnitude of median tumour displacement between days of treatments. MR-ITV 10 s areas were as small as 46% of the MR-ITV 20 min . An ITV offers a "snapshot" of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumour is imaged on a specific day. Real-time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that ITV size varies. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric effect of these results. Advances in knowledge: Five lung tumour patients underwent free-breathing MRI-guided SBRT treatments, and their tumours tracked using deformable registration of cine-mode MRI. The results indicate that variability of both intra- and interfractional breathing amplitude should be taken into account during planning of lung radiotherapy.

  3. Inspiratory and expiratory computed tomographic volumetry for lung volume reduction surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimura, Yuki; Chen, Fengshi; Sonobe, Makoto; Date, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomographic (CT) volumetry has been introduced into the field of thoracic surgery, and a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry provides useful data on regional pulmonary function as well as the volume of individual lung lobes. We report herein a case of a 62-year-old man with severe emphysema who had undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) to assess this technique as a tool for the evaluation of regional lung function and volume before and after LVRS. His postoperative pulmonary function was maintained in good condition despite a gradual slight decrease 2 years after LVRS. This trend was also confirmed by a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry. We confirm that a combination of inspiratory and expiratory 3D-CT volumetry might be effective for the preoperative assessment of LVRS in order to determine the amount of lung tissue to be resected as well as for postoperative evaluation. This novel technique could, therefore, be used more widely to assess local lung function.

  4. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  5. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  6. Normal expiratory flow rate and lung volumes in patients with combined emphysema and interstitial lung disease: a case series and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Karen L; Cockcroft, Donald W; Fladeland, Derek A; Fenton, Mark E

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. The present report describes 10 patients with progressive breathlessness, three of whom experienced severe limitation in their quality of life. All patients showed lung interstitial involvement and emphysema on computed tomography scan of the chest. The 10 patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange. Normal lung volumes do not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  7. Normal Expiratory Flow Rate and Lung Volumes in Patients with Combined Emphysema and Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Series and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Heathcote

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary function tests in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characteristically show a restrictive pattern including small lung volumes and increased expiratory flow rates resulting from a reduction in pulmonary compliance due to diffuse fibrosis. Conversely, an obstructive pattern with hyperinflation results in emphysema by loss of elastic recoil, expiratory collapse of the peripheral airways and air trapping. When the diseases coexist, pulmonary volumes are compensated, and a smaller than expected reduction or even normal lung volumes can be found. The present report describes 10 patients with progressive breathlessness, three of whom experienced severe limitation in their quality of life. All patients showed lung interstitial involvement and emphysema on computed tomography scan of the chest. The 10 patients showed normal spirometry and lung volumes with severe compromise of gas exchange. Normal lung volumes do not exclude diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in patients with concomitant emphysema. The relatively preserved lung volumes may underestimate the severity of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and attenuate its effects on lung function parameters.

  8. Assessment of early bronchiectasis in young children with cystic fibrosis is dependent on lung volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.L. Bard (Martin); K. Graniel (Karla); J. Park (Judy); N.H. de Klerk (Nicholas); P.D. Sly; C.P. Murray (Conor); H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); S. Stick

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: The aim of this study was to determine whether assessment of early CT scan-detected bronchiectasis in young children with cystic fibrosis (CF) depends on lung volume. Methods: This study, approved by the hospital ethics committee, included 40 young children with CF from a

  9. Lung volume reduction coil treatment for patients with severe emphysema : a European multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deslee, Gaetan; Klooster, Karin; Hetzel, Martin; Stanzel, Franz; Kessler, Romain; Marquette, Charles-Hugo; Witt, Christian; Blaas, Stefan; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Herth, Felix J. F.; Hetzel, Juergen; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background The lung volume reduction (LVR) coil is a minimally invasive bronchoscopic nitinol device designed to reduce hyperinflation and improve elastic recoil in severe emphysema. We investigated the feasibility, safety and efficacy of LVR coil treatment in a prospective multicentre cohort trial

  10. Mechanisms controlling the volume of pleural fluid and extravascular lung water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Miserocchi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Pleural and interstitial lung fluid volumes are strictly controlled and maintained at the minimum thanks to the ability of lymphatics to match the increase in filtration rate. In the pleural cavity, fluid accumulation is easily accommodated by retraction of lung and chest wall (high compliance of the pleural space; the increase of lymph flow per unit increase in pleural fluid volume is high due to the great extension of the parietal lymphatic. However, for the lung interstitium, the increase in lymph flow to match increased filtration does not need to be so great. In fact, increased filtration only causes a minor increase in extravascular water volume (<10% due to a marked increase in interstitial pulmonary pressure (low compliance of the extracellular matrix which, in turn, buffers further filtration. Accordingly, a less extended lymphatic network is needed. The efficiency of lymphatic control is achieved through a high lymphatic conductance in the pleural fluid and through a low interstitial compliance for the lung interstitium. Fluid volume in both compartments is so strictly controlled that it is difficult to detect initial deviations from the physiological state; thus, a great physiological advantage turns to be a disadvantage on a clinical basis as it prevents an early diagnosis of developing disease.

  11. Treatment of emphysema using bronchoscopic lung volume reduction coil technology : an update on efficacy and safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade several promising bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) treatments were developed and investigated. One of these treatments is BLVR treatment with coils. The advantage of this specific treatment is that it works independently of collateral flow, and also shows promise for

  12. Adaptive Support Ventilation May Deliver Unwanted Respiratory Rate-Tidal Volume Combinations in Patients with Acute Lung Injury Ventilated According to an Open Lung Concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dongelmans, Dave A.; Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P.; Binnekade, Jan M.; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: With adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate and tidal volume (V(T)) are a function of the Otis least work of breathing formula. We hypothesized that adaptive support ventilation in an open lung ventilator strategy would deliver higher V(T)s to patients with acute lung injury.

  13. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  14. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Spencer; Brophy, Mark; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V.; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Barron, John L.; Beauchemin, Steven S.; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development.

  15. A proposed framework for consensus-based lung tumour volume auto-segmentation in 4D computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Spencer; Rodrigues, George; Gaede, Stewart; Brophy, Mark; Barron, John L; Beauchemin, Steven S; Palma, David; Louie, Alexander V; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal

    2015-01-01

    This work aims to propose and validate a framework for tumour volume auto-segmentation based on ground-truth estimates derived from multi-physician input contours to expedite 4D-CT based lung tumour volume delineation. 4D-CT datasets of ten non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients were manually segmented by 6 physicians. Multi-expert ground truth (GT) estimates were constructed using the STAPLE algorithm for the gross tumour volume (GTV) on all respiratory phases. Next, using a deformable model-based method, multi-expert GT on each individual phase of the 4D-CT dataset was propagated to all other phases providing auto-segmented GTVs and motion encompassing internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) based on GT estimates (STAPLE) from each respiratory phase of the 4D-CT dataset. Accuracy assessment of auto-segmentation employed graph cuts for 3D-shape reconstruction and point-set registration-based analysis yielding volumetric and distance-based measures. STAPLE-based auto-segmented GTV accuracy ranged from (81.51  ±  1.92) to (97.27  ±  0.28)% volumetric overlap of the estimated ground truth. IGTV auto-segmentation showed significantly improved accuracies with reduced variance for all patients ranging from 90.87 to 98.57% volumetric overlap of the ground truth volume. Additional metrics supported these observations with statistical significance. Accuracy of auto-segmentation was shown to be largely independent of selection of the initial propagation phase. IGTV construction based on auto-segmented GTVs within the 4D-CT dataset provided accurate and reliable target volumes compared to manual segmentation-based GT estimates. While inter-/intra-observer effects were largely mitigated, the proposed segmentation workflow is more complex than that of current clinical practice and requires further development. (paper)

  16. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis......, in the controls, Pvolume...

  17. Effect of tidal volume on extravascular lung water content during one-lung ventilation for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery: a randomised, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qutub, Hatem; El-Tahan, Mohamed R; Mowafi, Hany A; El Ghoneimy, Yasser F; Regal, Mohamed A; Al Saflan, AbdulHadi A

    2014-09-01

    The use of low tidal volume during one-lung ventilation (OLV) has been shown to attenuate the incidence of acute lung injury after thoracic surgery. To test the effect of tidal volume during OLV for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery on the extravascular lung water content index (EVLWI). A randomised, double-blind, controlled study. Single university hospital. Thirty-nine patients scheduled for elective video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups (n = 13 per group) to ventilate the dependent lung with a tidal volume of 4, 6 or 8 ml  kg(-1) predicted body weight with I:E ratio of 1:2.5 and PEEP of 5 cm H2O. The primary outcomes were perioperative changes in EVLWI and EVLWI to intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBVI) ratio. Secondary outcomes included haemodynamics, oxygenation indices, incidences of postoperative acute lung injury, atelectasis, pneumonia, morbidity and 30-day mortality. A tidal volume of 4 compared with 6 and 8 ml  kg(-1) after 45 min of OLV resulted in an EVLWI of 4.1 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.5 to 4.7] compared with 7.7 (95% CI 6.7 to 8.6) and 8.6 (95% CI 7.5 to 9.7) ml  kg(-1), respectively (P tidal volume of 4 ml kg during OLV was associated with less lung water content than with larger tidal volumes of 6 to 8 ml kg(-1), although no patient developed acute lung injury. Further studies are required to address the usefulness of EVLWI as a marker for the development of postoperative acute lung injury after the use of a low tidal volume during OLV in patients undergoing pulmonary resection. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01762709.

  18. Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT: Utility for prediction of improved postoperative outcome in lung volume reduction surgery candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Daisuke; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Nogami, Munenobu; Onishi, Yumiko; Matsumoto, Keiko; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To directly compare the capabilities of perfusion scan, SPECT, co-registered SPECT/CT, and quantitatively and qualitatively assessed MDCT (i.e. quantitative CT and qualitative CT) for predicting postoperative clinical outcome for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) candidates. Materials and methods: Twenty-five consecutive candidates (19 men and six women, age range: 42-72 years) for LVRS underwent preoperative CT and perfusion scan with SPECT. Clinical outcome of LVRS for all subjects was also assessed by determining the difference between pre- and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) and 6-min walking distance (6MWD). All SPECT examinations were performed on a SPECT scanner, and co-registered to thin-section CT by using commercially available software. On planar imaging, SPECT and SPECT/CT, upper versus lower zone or lobe ratios (U/Ls) were calculated from regional uptakes between upper and lower lung fields in the operated lung. On quantitatively assessed CT, U/L for all subjects was assessed from regional functional lung volumes. On qualitatively assessed CT, planar imaging, SPECT and co-registered SPECT/CT, U/Ls were assessed with a 4-point visual scoring system. To compare capabilities of predicting clinical outcome, each U/L was statistically correlated with the corresponding clinical outcome. Results: Significantly fair or moderate correlations were observed between quantitatively and qualitatively assessed U/Ls obtained with all four methods and clinical outcomes (-0.60 ≤ r ≤ -0.42, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT has better correlation with clinical outcome in LVRS candidates than do planar imaging, SPECT or qualitatively assessed CT, and is at least as valid as quantitatively assessed CT.

  19. Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT: Utility for prediction of improved postoperative outcome in lung volume reduction surgery candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaka, Daisuke [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.j [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Nogami, Munenobu [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, 2-2, Minatojima Minamimachi Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Onishi, Yumiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Matsumoto, Keiko [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan); Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimogato, Chuo, Yamanashi, 409-3898 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Sugimura, Kazuro [Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0017 (Japan)

    2010-06-15

    Purpose: To directly compare the capabilities of perfusion scan, SPECT, co-registered SPECT/CT, and quantitatively and qualitatively assessed MDCT (i.e. quantitative CT and qualitative CT) for predicting postoperative clinical outcome for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) candidates. Materials and methods: Twenty-five consecutive candidates (19 men and six women, age range: 42-72 years) for LVRS underwent preoperative CT and perfusion scan with SPECT. Clinical outcome of LVRS for all subjects was also assessed by determining the difference between pre- and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) and 6-min walking distance (6MWD). All SPECT examinations were performed on a SPECT scanner, and co-registered to thin-section CT by using commercially available software. On planar imaging, SPECT and SPECT/CT, upper versus lower zone or lobe ratios (U/Ls) were calculated from regional uptakes between upper and lower lung fields in the operated lung. On quantitatively assessed CT, U/L for all subjects was assessed from regional functional lung volumes. On qualitatively assessed CT, planar imaging, SPECT and co-registered SPECT/CT, U/Ls were assessed with a 4-point visual scoring system. To compare capabilities of predicting clinical outcome, each U/L was statistically correlated with the corresponding clinical outcome. Results: Significantly fair or moderate correlations were observed between quantitatively and qualitatively assessed U/Ls obtained with all four methods and clinical outcomes (-0.60 {<=} r {<=} -0.42, p < 0.05). Conclusion: Co-registered perfusion SPECT/CT has better correlation with clinical outcome in LVRS candidates than do planar imaging, SPECT or qualitatively assessed CT, and is at least as valid as quantitatively assessed CT.

  20. Pulmonary blood volume and transit time in cirrhosis: relation to lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Burchardt, H; Øgard, CG

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In cirrhosis a systemic vasodilatation leads to an abnormal distribution of the blood volume with a contracted central blood volume. In addition, the patients have a ventilation/perfusion imbalance with a low diffusing capacity. As the size of the pulmonary blood volume (PBV) has...... in cirrhosis. The relation between PBV and PTT and the low diffusing capacity suggests the pulmonary vascular compartment as an important element in the pathophysiology of the lung dysfunction in cirrhosis....... not been determined separately we assessed PBV and pulmonary transit time (PTT) in relation to lung function in patients with cirrhosis and in controls. METHODS: Pulmonary and cardiac haemodynamics and transit times were determined by radionuclide techniques in 22 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis...

  1. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  2. The method of estimating the irradiated lung volume in primary breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Miguel Torres Teixeira; Marques, Iara Silva; Geraldo, Jony Marques

    1999-01-01

    Tangential breast fields irradiation usually includes some volume of lung and it is occasionally associated with pneumonitis. The estimation of the amount of lung irradiated can be determined measuring the central lung distance (CLD) by the port films, and it must be inferior to 2.5 cm. The purpose of this study was to determine through a linear regression analysis the relationship between CLD and the geometrical parameters of the treatment, and to develop an equation to predict this volume. The studied population consisted of 100 patients who received definitive radiation for clinical stage I and II breast cancer between January, 1996 and June, 1997. According to the contour of the breast and thorax was determined the angle of the tangential fields. In 71% of the patients the CLD measured by the portal films were superior to 2.5 cm, requiring a new beam arrangement. We develop a simple and convenient quantitative model to predict the irradiated lung volume based on portal films. We need further analysis in order to include variables and antomical variations. (author)

  3. Scintigraphic and MR perfusion imaging in preoperative evaluation for lung volume reduction surgery. Pilot study results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johkoh, Takeshi; Mueller, N.L.; Kavanagh, P.V

    2000-01-01

    To compare MR perfusion imaging with perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of patients with pulmonary emphysema being considered for lung volume reduction surgery. Six patients with pulmonary emphysema and two normal individuals were evaluated by MR perfusion imaging, perfusion scintigraphy, and selective bilateral pulmonary angiography. MR images were obtained with an enhanced fast gradient recalled echo with three-dimensional Fourier transformation technique (efgre 3D) (6.3/1.3; flip angle, 30 deg C; field of view, 45-48 cm; matrix, 256 x 160). The presence or absence of perfusion defects in each segment was evaluated by two independent observers. Using angiography as the gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of MR perfusion imaging in detecting focal perfusion abnormalities were 90%, 87%, and 89%, respectively, while those of perfusion scintigraphy were 71%, 76%, and 71%, respectively. The diagnostic accuracy of MR perfusion imaging was significantly higher than that of scintigraphy (p<0.001, McNemar test). There was good agreement between two observers for MR perfusion imaging (kappa statistic, 0.66) and only moderate agreement for perfusion scintigraphy (kappa statistic, 0.51). MR perfusion imaging is superior to perfusion scintigraphy in the evaluation of pulmonary parenchymal perfusion in patients with pulmonary emphysema. (author)

  4. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  5. Effect of lung-protective ventilation with lower tidal volumes on clinical outcomes among patients undergoing surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wan-Jie; Wang, Fei; Liu, Jing-Chen

    2015-02-17

    In anesthetized patients undergoing surgery, the role of lung-protective ventilation with lower tidal volumes is unclear. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate the effect of this ventilation strategy on postoperative outcomes. We searched electronic databases from inception through September 2014. We included RCTs that compared protective ventilation with lower tidal volumes and conventional ventilation with higher tidal volumes in anesthetized adults undergoing surgery. We pooled outcomes using a random-effects model. The primary outcome measures were lung injury and pulmonary infection. We included 19 trials (n=1348). Compared with patients in the control group, those who received lung-protective ventilation had a decreased risk of lung injury (risk ratio [RR] 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.17 to 0.78; I2=0%) and pulmonary infection (RR 0.46, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.83; I2=8%), and higher levels of arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (standardized mean difference 0.47, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.75; I2=65%). No significant differences were observed between the patient groups in atelectasis, mortality, length of hospital stay, length of stay in the intensive care unit or the ratio of arterial partial pressure of oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen. Anesthetized patients who received ventilation with lower tidal volumes during surgery had a lower risk of lung injury and pulmonary infection than those given conventional ventilation with higher tidal volumes. Implementation of a lung-protective ventilation strategy with lower tidal volumes may lower the incidence of these outcomes. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  6. The effect of patient position and field configuration on lung volume in the treatment of advanced carcinoma of the breast or lung volumes in breast techniques - a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The position of the patient together with the configuration of the treatment fields play an important role in the volume of lung irradiated in breast techniques. These factors are even more important when the staging of the disease is advanced. A comparison of lung volumes is made with the patient in three treatment positions, and the effect of beam angling is demonstrated. A method of calculating the approximated lung volume from port films is proposed, together with a comparative analysis of the data obtained. Clinical decisions affecting technical considerations are examined. 6 refs., 5 figs

  7. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo; Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  8. Tricuspid valve dysplasia with severe tricuspid regurgitation: fetal pulmonary artery size predicts lung viability in the presence of small lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, A T; Marino, B S; Dominguez, T; Tabbutt, S; Nicolson, S; Donaghue, D D; Spray, T L; Rychik, J

    2010-01-01

    Congenital tricuspid valve disease (Ebstein's anomaly, tricuspid valve dysplasia) with severe tricuspid regurgitation and cardiomegaly is associated with poor prognosis. Fetal echocardiography can accurately measure right atrial enlargement, which is associated with a poor prognosis in the fetus with tricuspid valve disease. Fetal lung volumetric assessments have been used in an attempt to predict viability of fetuses using ultrasonogram and prenatal MRI. We describe a fetus with tricuspid dysplasia, severe tricuspid regurgitation, right atrial enlargement and markedly reduced lung volumes. The early gestational onset of cardiomegaly with bilateral lung compression raised the possibility of severe lung hypoplasia with decreased broncho-alveolar development. Use of fetal echocardiography with measurement of pulmonary artery size combined with prenatal MRI scanning of lung volumes resulted in an improved understanding of this anomaly and directed the management strategy towards a successful Fontan circulation. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Impact of PET - CT motion correction in minimising the gross tumour volume in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Masoomi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective: To investigate the impact of respiratory motion on localization, and quantification lung lesions for the Gross Tumour Volume utilizing an in-house developed Auto3Dreg programme and dynamic NURBS-based cardiac-torso digitised phantom (NCAT. Methods: Respiratory motion may result in more than 30% underestimation of the SUV values of lung, liver and kidney tumour lesions. The motion correction technique adopted in this study was an image-based motion correction approach using, an in-house developed voxel-intensity-based and a multi-resolution multi-optimisation (MRMO algorithm. All the generated frames were co-registered to a reference frame using a time efficient scheme. The NCAT phantom was used to generate CT attenuation maps and activity distribution volumes for the lung regions. Quantitative assessment including Region of Interest (ROI, image fidelity and image correlation techniques, as well as semi-quantitative line profile analysis and qualitatively overlaying non-motion and motion corrected image frames were performed. Results: the largest transformation was observed in the Z-direction. The greatest translation was for the frame 3, end inspiration, and the smallest for the frame 5 which was closet frame to the reference frame at 67% expiration. Visual assessment of the lesion sizes, 20-60mm at 3 different locations, apex, mid and base of lung showed noticeable improvement for all the foci and their locations. The maximum improvements for the image fidelity were from 0.395 to 0.930 within the lesion volume of interest. The greatest improvement in activity concentration underestimation, post motion correction, was 7% below the true activity for the 20 mm lesion. The discrepancies in activity underestimation were reduced with increasing the lesion sizes. Overlay activity distribution on the attenuation map showed improved localization of the PET metabolic information to the anatomical CT images. Conclusion: The respiratory

  10. Expiratory flow limitation and operating lung volumes during exercise in older and younger adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Meskimen, Kayla; Harms, Craig A

    2017-06-01

    We determined the effect of aging on expiratory flow limitation (EFL) and operating lung volumes when matched for lung size. We hypothesized that older adults will exhibit greater EFL and increases in EELV during exercise compared to younger controls. Ten older (5M/5W; >60years old) and nineteen height-matched young adults (10M/9W) were recruited. Young adults were matched for%predicted forced vital capacity (FVC) (Y-matched%Pred FVC; n=10) and absolute FVC (Y-matched FVC; n=10). Tidal flow-volume loops were recorded during the incremental exercise test with maximal flow-volume loops measured pre- and post-exercise. Compared to younger controls, older adults exhibited more EFL at ventilations of 26, 35, 51, and 80L/min. The older group had higher end-inspiratory lung volume compared to Y-matched%Pred FVC group during submaximal ventilations. The older group increased EELV during exercise, while EELV stayed below resting in the Y-matched%Pred FVC group. These data suggest older adults exhibit more EFL and increase EELV earlier during exercise compared to younger adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Automatic delineation of functional lung volumes with 68Ga-ventilation/perfusion PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Pierre-Yves; Siva, Shankar; Callahan, Jason; Claudic, Yannis; Bourhis, David; Steinfort, Daniel P; Hicks, Rodney J; Hofman, Michael S

    2017-10-10

    Functional volumes computed from 68 Ga-ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT, which we have shown to correlate with pulmonary function test parameters (PFTs), have potential diagnostic utility in a variety of clinical applications, including radiotherapy planning. An automatic segmentation method would facilitate delineation of such volumes. The aim of this study was to develop an automated threshold-based approach to delineate functional volumes that best correlates with manual delineation. Thirty lung cancer patients undergoing both V/Q PET/CT and PFTs were analyzed. Images were acquired following inhalation of Galligas and, subsequently, intravenous administration of 68 Ga-macroaggreted-albumin (MAA). Using visually defined manual contours as the reference standard, various cutoff values, expressed as a percentage of the maximal pixel value, were applied. The average volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) were calculated, measuring the similarity of the automatic segmentation and the reference standard. Pearson's correlation was also calculated to compare automated volumes with manual volumes, and automated volumes optimized to PFT indices. For ventilation volumes, mean volume difference was lowest (- 0.4%) using a 15%max threshold with Pearson's coefficient of 0.71. Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.87-0.95). Nevertheless, limits of agreement in volume differences were large (- 31.0 and 30.2%) with differences ranging from - 40.4 to + 33.0%. For perfusion volumes, mean volume difference was lowest and Pearson's coefficient was highest using a 15%max threshold (3.3% and 0.81, respectively). Applying this cutoff, median DSC was 0.93 (0.88-0.93). Nevertheless, limits of agreement were again large (- 21.1 and 27.8%) with volume differences ranging from - 18.6 to + 35.5%. Using the 15%max threshold, moderate correlation was demonstrated with FEV1/FVC (r = 0.48 and r = 0.46 for ventilation and perfusion images, respectively

  12. Quantitative assessment of irradiated lung volume and lung mass in breast cancer patients treated with tangential fields in combination with deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, Karin Sigrid; Zurl, Brigitte; Stranzl, Heidi; Winkler, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of the amount of irradiated lung tissue volume and mass in patients with breast cancer treated with an optimized tangential-field technique with and without a deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique and its impact on the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP). Material and Methods: Computed tomography datasets of 60 patients in normal breathing (NB) and subsequently in DIBH were compared. With a Real-Time Position Management Respiratory Gating System (RPM), anteroposterior movement of the chest wall was monitored and a lower and upper threshold were defined. Ipsilateral lung and a restricted tangential region of the lung were delineated and the mean and maximum doses calculated. Irradiated lung tissue mass was computed based on density values. NTCP for lung was calculated using a modified Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. Results: Mean dose to the ipsilateral lung in DIBH versus NB was significantly reduced by 15%. Mean lung mass calculation in the restricted area receiving ≤ 20 Gy (M 20 ) was reduced by 17% in DIBH but associated with an increase in volume. NTCP showed an improvement in DIBH of 20%. The correlation of individual breathing amplitude with NTCP proved to be independent. Conclusion: The delineation of a restricted area provides the lung mass calculation in patients treated with tangential fields. DIBH reduces ipsilateral lung dose by inflation so that less tissue remains in the irradiated region and its efficiency is supported by a decrease of NTCP. (orig.)

  13. Analysis of the static pressure volume curve of the lung in experimentally induced pulmonary damage by CT-densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.; Karmrodt, J.; Herwelling, A.; Bletz, C.; David, S.; Heussel, C.P.; Markstaller, K.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To study quantitative changes of lung density distributions when recording in- and expiratory static pressure-volume curves by single slice computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: Static in- and expiratory pressure volume curves (0 to 1000 ml, increments of 100 ml) were obtained in random order in 10 pigs after induction of lung damage by saline lavage. Simultaneously, CT acquisitions (slice thickness 1 mm, temporal increment 2 s) were performed in a single slice (3 cm below the carina). In each CT image lung segmentation and planimetry of defined density ranges were achieved. The lung density ranges were defined as: hyperinflated (-1024 to -910 HU), normal aerated (-910 to -600 HU), poorly aerated (-600 to -300 HU), and non aerated (-300 to 200 HU) lung. Fractional areas of defined density ranges in percentage of total lung area were compared to recorded volume increments and airway pressures (atmospheric pressure, lower inflection point (LIP), LIP*0.5, LIP*1.5, peak airway pressure) of in- and expiratory pressure-volume curves. Results: Quantitative analysis of defined density ranges showed no differences between in- and expiratory pressure-volume curves. The amount of poorly aerated lung decreased and normal aerated lung increased constantly when airway pressure and volume were increased during inspiratory pressure-volume curves and vice versa during expiratory pressure-volume loops. Conclusion: Recruitment and derecruitment of lung atelectasis during registration of static in- and expiratory pressure-volume loops occurred constantly, but not in a stepwise manner. CT was shown to be an appropriate method to analyse these recruitment process. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  15. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deuk Hee; Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm 3 which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way

  16. WE-G-BRD-07: Investigation of Distal Lung Atelectasis Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Using Regional Lung Volume Changes Between Pre- and Post- Treatment CT Scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diot, Q; Kavanagh, B; Miften, M [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a quantitative method using lung deformations to differentiate between radiation-induced fibrosis and potential airway stenosis with distal atelectasis in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Twenty-four lung patients with large radiation-induced density increases outside the high dose region had their pre- and post-treatment CT scans manually registered. They received SBRT treatments at our institution between 2002 and 2009 in 3 or 5 fractions, to a median total dose of 54Gy (range, 30–60). At least 50 anatomical landmarks inside the lung (airway branches) were paired for the pre- and post-treatment scans to guide the deformable registration of the lung structure, which was then interpolated to the whole lung using splines. Local volume changes between the planning and follow-up scans were calculated using the deformation field Jacobian. Hyperdense regions were classified as atelectatic or fibrotic based on correlations between regional density increases and significant volume contractions compared to the surrounding tissues. Results: Out of 24 patients, only 7 demonstrated a volume contraction that was at least one σ larger than the remaining lung average. Because they did not receive high doses, these shrunk hyperdense regions were likely showing distal atelectasis resulting from radiation-induced airway stenosis rather than conventional fibrosis. On average, the hyperdense regions extended 9.2 cm farther than the GTV contours but not significantly more than 8.6 cm for the other patients (p>0.05), indicating that a large offset between the radiation and hyperdense region centers is not a good surrogate for atelectasis. Conclusion: A method based on the relative comparison of volume changes between different dates was developed to identify potential lung regions experiencing distal atelectasis. Such a tool is essential to study which lung structures need to be avoided to prevent

  17. Functional evaluation of lung by Xe-133 lung ventilation scintigraphy before and after lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in patients with pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurose, Taichi; Okumura, Yoshihiro; Sato, Shuhei

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the respiratory functions of patients with pulmonary emphysema who underwent lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) by the mean transit time (MTT) with Xe-133 lung ventilation scintigraphy, forced expiration volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), residual volume (RV), distance walked in 6 min (6-min walk), and the Hugh-Jones classification (H-J classification) before and after LVRS. In 69 patients with pulmonary emphysema (62 men, 7 women; age range, 47-75 years; mean age, 65.4 years±6.1, preoperative H-J classification, III (two were II)-V) who underwent LVRS, all preoperative and postoperative parameters (MTT 3 weeks after LVRS and the others 3 months after LVRS) were judged statistically by the Wilcoxon signed-ranks test and Odds ratio. Every postoperative parameter was improved with a significant difference (P<0.05) compared to preoperative parameters. MTT at 3 weeks after LVRS was not associated with %FEV1.0 and the H-J classification at 3 months after LVRS, but was associated with RV and a 6-min walk at 3 months after LVRS. MTT was useful for the clinical evaluation of aerobic capability after LVRS. (author)

  18. Effects of Dexmedetomidine Infusion on Inflammatory Responses and Injury of Lung Tidal Volume Changes during One-Lung Ventilation in Thoracoscopic Surgery: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Wu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One-lung ventilation in thoracic surgery provokes profound systemic inflammatory responses and injury related to lung tidal volume changes. We hypothesized that the highly selective a2-adrenergic agonist dexmedetomidine attenuates these injurious responses. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to receive dexmedetomidine or saline during thoracoscopic surgery. There is a trend of less postoperative medical complication including that no patients in the dexmedetomidine group developed postoperative medical complications, whereas four patients in the saline group did (0% versus 13.3%, p=0.1124. Plasma inflammatory and injurious biomarkers between the baseline and after resumption of two-lung ventilation were particularly notable. The plasma high-mobility group box 1 level decreased significantly from 51.7 (58.1 to 33.9 (45.0 ng.ml−1 (p<0.05 in the dexmedetomidine group, which was not observed in the saline group. Plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 [151.8 (115.1 to 235.2 (186.9 pg.ml−1, p<0.05] and neutrophil elastase [350.8 (154.5 to 421.9 (106.1 ng.ml−1, p<0.05] increased significantly only in the saline group. In addition, plasma interleukin-6 was higher in the saline group than in the dexmedetomidine group at postoperative day 1 [118.8 (68.8 versus 78.5 (58.8 pg.ml−1, p=0.0271]. We conclude that dexmedetomidine attenuates one-lung ventilation-associated inflammatory and injurious responses by inhibiting alveolar neutrophil recruitment in thoracoscopic surgery.

  19. Volumes, capacidades pulmonares e força muscular respiratória no pós-operatório de gastroplastia Lung volumes, lung capacities and respiratory muscle strength following gastroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise de Moraes Paisani

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A gastroplastia tem sido cada vez mais indicada no tratamento de obesos mórbidos, pacientes nos quais podemos identificar alteração pronunciada de volumes e capacidades pulmonares. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o comportamento dos volumes e capacidades pulmonares, força muscular respiratória, padrão respiratório e as possíveis complicações pulmonares pós-operatórias. MÉTODO: Vinte e um pacientes (três homens com média de idade de 39 ± 9,7 anos, média de índice de massa corpórea de 50,4 Kg/m², candidatos à gastroplastia, foram avaliados no pré-operatório, primeiro, terceiro e quinto dias de pós-operatório e submetidos a mensuração de volume corrente, capacidade vital, volume minuto, pressões máximas expiratória e inspiratória, e circunferências abdominal e torácica. Observou-se a ocorrência de complicações pulmonares pós-operatórias e mortalidade. RESULTADOS: No primeiro e terceiro dias de pós-operatório houve queda de 47% e 30,5% na capacidade vital, 18% e 12,5% no volume minuto, 28% e 21% no volume corrente, 47% e 32% no índice diafragmático, 51% e 26% na pressão inspiratória máxima, e 39,5% e 26% na pressão expiratória máxima, respectivamente (p BACKGROUND: Gastroplasty has been increasingly used in the treatment of morbidly obese patients, who typically present pronounced alterations in lung volume and capacity. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate post-gastroplasty lung volume, lung capacity, respiratory muscle strength and respiratory pattern, as well as any postoperative pulmonary complications. METHOD: 21 patients (3 of them men, with an average age of 39 ± 9.7 years and an average body mass index of 50.4 kg/m², all candidates for gastroplasty, were evaluated during the preoperative period and again on the first, third and fifth postoperative days. Tidal volume, vital capacity, minute volume, maximal expiratory pressure and maximal inspiratory pressure, as well as chest and waist circumferences, were

  20. Efficacy of lung volume optimization maneuver monitored by optoelectronic pletismography in the management of congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lista

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of left CDH with severe lung hypoplasia, managed applying open lung strategy in HFOV (pre-surgery period and in Assist-Control with Volume Guarantee (post-surgery period, guided by SpO2 changes, TcPO2 and TcPCO2 monitoring. Opto-electronic plethysmography was used to measure end-expiratory chest wall volume changes (ΔEEcw related to lung volume variations occurring during pressure changes. OEP confirmed the efficacy of using SpO2 and transcutaneous gas monitoring during this recruitment maneuver.

  1. Microbiological airway colonization in COPD patients with severe emphysema undergoing endoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trudzinski FC

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Franziska C Trudzinski,1 Frederik Seiler,1 Heinrike Wilkens,1 Carlos Metz,1 Annegret Kamp,1 Robert Bals,1 Barbara Gärtner,2 Philipp M Lepper,1 Sören L Becker2–4 1Department of Internal Medicine V – Pneumology, Allergology and Critical Care Medicine, ECLS Center Saar, University Medical Center Saarland and Saarland University, 2Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Saarland University, Homburg/Saar, Germany; 3Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, 4University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland Background: Endoscopic lung volume reduction (eLVR is a therapeutic option for selected patients with COPD and severe emphysema. Infectious exacerbations are serious events in these vulnerable patients; hence, prophylactic antibiotics are often prescribed postinterventionally. However, data on the microbiological airway colonization at the time of eLVR are scarce, and there are no evidence-based recommendations regarding a rational antibiotic regimen.Objective: The aim of this study was to perform a clinical and microbiological analysis of COPD patients with advanced emphysema undergoing eLVR with endobronchial valves at a single German University hospital, 2012–2017.Patients and methods: Bronchial aspirates were obtained prior to eLVR and sent for microbiological analysis. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial isolates was performed, and pathogen colonization was retrospectively compared with clinical parameters.Results: At least one potential pathogen was found in 47% (30/64 of patients. Overall, Gram-negative bacteria constituted the most frequently detected pathogens. The single most prevalent species were Haemophilus influenzae (9%, Streptococcus pneumoniae (6%, and Staphylococcus aureus (6%. No multidrug resistance was observed, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred in <5% of samples. Patients without microbiological airway colonization showed more severe airflow limitation, hyperinflation, and chronic hypercapnia compared

  2. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  3. Survival in pediatric lung transplantation: The effect of center volume and expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad S; Zhang, Wei; Taylor, Rachel A; Dean McKenzie, E; Mallory, George B; Schecter, Marc G; Morales, David L S; Heinle, Jeffrey S; Adachi, Iki

    2015-08-01

    Institutional operative volume has been shown to impact outcomes of various procedures including lung transplantation (LTx). We sought to determine whether this holds true with pediatric LTx by comparing outcomes of adult centers (with larger overall volume) to those of pediatric centers (with smaller volume but more pediatric-specific experience). A retrospective analysis of the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data was performed. Centers were categorized as either adult (LTx volume predominantly in adult patients), high-volume pediatric (HVP, ≥4 LTxs/year), or low-volume pediatric (LVP, HVP 3 [5%], LVP 8 [13%]). Although adult centers had larger overall LTx volume, their pediatric experiences were severely limited (median 1/year). In younger children, HVP centers were significantly better than LVP centers for patient survival (half-life: 7.3 vs 2.9 years, p = 0.002). Similarly, in older children and adolescents, HVP centers were significantly better than adult centers for patient survival (half-life: 4.6 vs 2.5 years, p = 0.001). Of note, even LVP centers tended to have longer patient survival than adult centers (p = 0.064). Multivariable analysis identified adult centers as an independent risk factor for graft failure (hazard ratio: 1.5, p < 0.001) as with LVP (hazard ratio: 1.3, p = 0.0078). Despite larger overall clinical volume, outcomes among pediatric LTx recipients in adult centers are not superior to those of pediatric centers. Not only center volume but pediatric-specific experience has an impact on outcomes in pediatric LTx. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Prediction of the efficiency of endoscopic lung volume reduction by valves in severe emphysema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquillon, V; Briault, A; Reymond, E; Arbib, F; Jankowski, A; Ferretti, G; Pison, C

    2016-11-01

    In severe emphysema, endoscopic lung volume reduction with valves is an alternative to surgery with less morbidity and mortality. In 2015, selection of patients who will respond to this technique is based on emphysema heterogeneity, a complete fissure visible on the CT-scan and absence of collateral ventilation between lobes. Our case report highlights that individualized prediction is possible. A 58-year-old woman had severe, disabling pulmonary emphysema. A high resolution thoracic computed tomography scan showed that the emphysema was heterogeneous, predominantly in the upper lobes, integrity of the left greater fissure and no collateral ventilation with the left lower lobe. A valve was inserted in the left upper lobe bronchus. At one year, clinical and functional benefits were significant with complete atelectasis of the treated lobe. The success of endoscopic lung volume reduction with a valve can be predicted, an example of personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of different seated positions on lung volume and oxygenation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamonica, J; Lerolle, N; Sargentini, C; Hubert, S; Beduneau, G; Di Marco, F; Mercat, A; Diehl, J L; Richard, J C M; Bernardin, G; Brochard, L

    2013-06-01

    Lung volume available for ventilation is markedly decreased during acute respiratory distress syndrome. Body positioning may contribute to increase lung volume and partial verticalization is simple to perform. This study evaluated whether verticalization had parallel effects on oxygenation and end expiratory lung volume (EELV). Prospective multicenter study in 40 mechanically ventilated patients with ALI/ARDS in five university hospital MICUs. We evaluated four 45-min successive trunk position epochs (supine slightly elevated at 15°; semi recumbent with trunk elevated at 45°; seated with trunk elevated at 60° and legs down at 45°; back to supine). Arterial blood gases, EELV measured using the nitrogen washin/washout, and static compliance were measured. Responders were defined by a PaO₂/FiO₂ increase >20 % between supine and seated position. Results are median [25th-75th percentiles]. With median PEEP = 10 cmH₂O, verticalization increased lung volume but only responders (13 patients, 32 %) had a significant increase in EELV/PBW (predicted body weight) compared to baseline. This increase persisted at least partially when patients were positioned back to supine. Responders had a lower EELV/PBW supine [14 mL/kg (13-15) vs. 18 mL/kg (15-27) (p = 0.005)] and a lower compliance [30 mL/cmH₂O (22-38) vs. 42 (30-46) (p = 0.01)] than non-responders. Strain decreased with verticalization for responders. EELV/PBW increase and PaO₂/FiO₂ increase were not correlated. Verticalization is easily achieved and improves oxygenation in approximately 32 % of the patients together with an increase in EELV. Nonetheless, effect of verticalization on EELV/PBW is not predictable by PaO₂/FiO₂ increase, its monitoring may be helpful for strain optimization.

  6. Evaluation of patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery: Ancillary information available from computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Desai, Sujal R.; Wells, Athol U.; Koyama, Hiroshi; Eastick, Sian; Schmidt, Maria A.; Charrier, Clare L.; Gatehouse, Peter D.; Goldstraw, Peter; Pepper, John R.; Geddes, Duncan M.; Hansell, David M.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: A number of imaging techniques have been used for the pre-operative assessment of patients for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). We evaluated whether data currently acquired from perfusion scintigrams and cine MR of the diaphragm are obtainable from high resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients taking part in a randomized controlled trial of LVRS against maximal medical therapy were evaluated. HRCT examinations (n= 30) were scored for (i) the extent and distribution of emphysema; (ii) the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature; and (iii) diaphragmatic contour, apparent defects and herniation. On scintigraphy, (n28), perfusion of the lower thirds of both lungs, as a proportion of total lung perfusion (LZ/T PERF ), was expressed as a percentage of predicted values (derived from 10 normal control subjects). On cine MR (n= 25) hemidiaphragmatic excursion and coordination were recorded. RESULTS: Extensive emphysema was present on HRCT (60% ± 13.2%). There was strong correlation between the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature on HRCT and on perfusion scanning (r s = 0.85, P< 0.00005). Hemidiaphragmatic incoordination on MR was weakly associated with hemidiaphragmatic eventration on HRCT (P0.04). CONCLUSION: The strong correlation between lung perfusion assessed by HRCT and lung perfusion on scintigraphy suggests that perfusion scintigraphy is superfluous in the pre-operative evaluation of patients with emphysema for LVRS. Cleverley, J.R. (2000)

  7. [Treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome using pressure and volume controlled ventilation with lung protective strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ying; Wan, Yong; Wang, Da-qing; Su, Xiao-lin; Li, Jun-ying; Chen, Jing

    2004-07-01

    To investigate the significance and effect of pressure controlled ventilation (PCV) as well as volume controlled ventilation (VCV) by lung protective strategy on respiratory mechanics, blood gas analysis and hemodynamics in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Fifty patients with ARDS were randomly divided into PCV and VCV groups with permissive hypercapnia and open lung strategy. Changes in respiratory mechanics, blood gas analysis and hemodynamics were compared between two groups. Peak inspiration pressure (PIP) in PCV group was significantly lower than that in VCV group, while mean pressure of airway (MPaw) was significantly higher than that in VCV after 24 hours mechanical ventilation. After 24 hours mechanical ventilation, there were higher central venous pressure (CVP) and slower heart rate (HR) in two groups, CVP was significantly higher in VCV compared with PCV, and PCV group had slower HR than VCV group, the two groups had no differences in mean blood pressure (MBP) at various intervals. All patients showed no ventilator-induced lung injury. Arterial blood oxygenations were obviously improved in two groups after 24 hours mechanical ventilation, PCV group had better partial pressure of oxygen in artery (PaO2) than VCV group. Both PCV and VCV can improve arterial blood oxygenations, prevent ventilator-induced lung injury, and have less disturbance in hemodynamic parameters. PCV with lung protective ventilatory strategy should be early use for patients with ARDS.

  8. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  9. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P 15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P 3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe tumors; higher interfraction amplitude variability indicated tumors in contact

  10. Lung Volume Reduction Coil Treatment in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients with Homogeneous Emphysema : A Prospective Feasibility Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Franz, Ina; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Background: In patients with heterogeneous emphysema, surgical and bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (LVR) treatments are available. However, for patients with homogeneous emphysema these treatments are hardly investigated and seem less effective. Bronchoscopic LVR coil treatment has been shown to

  11. Bronchoscopic lung-volume reduction with Exhale airway stents for emphysema (EASE trial) : randomised, sham-controlled, multicentre trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, P. L.; Slebos, D-J; Cardoso, P. F. G.; Cetti, E.; Voelker, K.; Levine, B.; Russell, M. E.; Goldin, J.; Brown, M.; Cooper, J. D.; Sybrecht, G. W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Airway bypass is a bronchoscopic lung-volume reduction procedure for emphysema whereby transbronchial passages into the lung are created to release trapped air, supported with paclitaxel-coated stents to ease the mechanics of breathing. The aim of the EASE (Exhale airway stents for

  12. Does early tetralogy of Fallot total correction give better final lung volumes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Hasan Allah; Miri, Seyed Reza; Bakhshandeh, Hooman; Mirmesdagh, Yalda; Paziraee, Nazita

    2013-06-01

    Pulmonary blood flow may affect lung development in adulthood. Early total correction of tetralogy of Fallot may affect development of final lung volumes. We evaluated the effect of age at total correction on lung volumes years after the operation. In a retrospective cohort study on patients with totally corrected tetralogy of Fallot (mean age, 13.40 years at the time of follow-up), forced vital capacity, slow vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, and other parameters were measured 154.8 ± 46.25 months after the operation. Comparison were made of 3 groups: ≤2-, 2-8-, and >8-years old at the time of total correction surgery. Among 322 enrolled patients, the mean values of the follow-up spirometry results in ≤2-, 2-8-, >8-year-olds and the percentage of predicted values were respectively: vital capacity: 4.46 ± 0.57 L (107% ± 10.96%), 3.89 ± 0.58 L (91.10% ± 12.25%), 3.25 ± 0.48 L (82.35% ± 10.62%), p volume in 1 s: 4.22 ± 0.63 L (104.84% ± 13.64%), 3.66 ± 0.58 L (90.61% ± 12.59%), 3.02 ± 0.48 L (84.31% ± 12%), p volumes and capacities. It is better to consider total correction for all tetralogy of Fallot patients below 2-years old, or at least below 8-years old, if it is technically possible.

  13. Mild hypothermia attenuates changes in respiratory system mechanics and modifies cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, P; Senkeřík, M; Pařízková, R; Bareš, D; Zivný, P; Zivná, H; Cerný, V

    2010-01-01

    Hypothermia was shown to attenuate ventilator-induced lung injury due to large tidal volumes. It is unclear if the protective effect of hypothermia is maintained under less injurious mechanical ventilation in animals without previous lung injury. Tracheostomized rats were randomly allocated to non-ventilated group (group C) or ventilated groups of normothermia (group N) and mild hypothermia (group H). After two hours of mechanical ventilation with inspiratory fraction of oxygen 1.0, respiratory rate 60 min(-1), tidal volume 10 ml x kg(-1), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) 2 cm H2O or immediately after tracheostomy in non-ventilated animals inspiratory pressures were recorded, rats were sacrificed, pressure-volume (PV) curve of respiratory system constructed, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and aortic blood samples obtained. Group N animals exhibited a higher rise in peak inspiratory pressures in comparison to group H animals. Shift of the PV curve to right, higher total protein and interleukin-6 levels in BAL fluid were observed in normothermia animals in comparison with hypothermia animals and non-ventilated controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha was lower in the hypothermia group in comparison with normothermia and non-ventilated groups. Mild hypothermia attenuated changes in respiratory system mechanics and modified cytokine concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid during low lung volume ventilation in animals without previous lung injury.

  14. Single-Lung Transplant Results in Position Dependent Changes in Regional Ventilation: An Observational Case Series Using Electrical Impedance Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollengode Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung transplantation is the optimal treatment for end stage lung disease. Donor shortage necessitates single-lung transplants (SLT, yet minimal data exists regarding regional ventilation in diseased versus transplanted lung measured by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT. Method. We aimed to determine regional ventilation in six SLT outpatients using EIT. We assessed end expiratory volume and tidal volumes. End expiratory lung impedance (EELI and Global Tidal Variation of Impedance were assessed in supine, right lateral, left lateral, sitting, and standing positions in transplanted and diseased lungs. A mixed model with random intercept per subject was used for statistical analysis. Results. EELI was significantly altered between diseased and transplanted lungs whilst lying on right and left side. One patient demonstrated pendelluft between lungs and was therefore excluded for further comparison of tidal variation. Tidal variation was significantly higher in the transplanted lung for the remaining five patients in all positions, except when lying on the right side. Conclusion. Ventilation to transplanted lung is better than diseased lung, especially in lateral positions. Positioning in patients with active unilateral lung pathologies will be implicated. This is the first study demonstrating changes in regional ventilation, associated with changes of position between transplanted and diseased lung.

  15. Relation of exercise capacity with lung volumes before and after 6-minute walk test in subjects with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibmer, Thomas; Rüdiger, Stefan; Kropf-Sanchen, Cornelia; Stoiber, Kathrin M; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Schumann, Christian

    2014-11-01

    There is growing evidence that exercise-induced variation in lung volumes is an important source of ventilatory limitation and is linked to exercise intolerance in COPD. The aim of this study was to compare the correlations of walk distance and lung volumes measured before and after a 6-min walk test (6MWT) in subjects with COPD. Forty-five subjects with stable COPD (mean pre-bronchodilator FEV1: 47 ± 18% predicted) underwent a 6MWT. Body plethysmography was performed immediately pre- and post-6MWT. Correlations were generally stronger between 6-min walk distance and post-6MWT lung volumes than between 6-min walk distance and pre-6MWT lung volumes, except for FEV1. These differences in Pearson correlation coefficients were significant for residual volume expressed as percent of total lung capacity (-0.67 vs -0.58, P = .043), percent of predicted residual volume expressed as percent of total lung capacity (-0.68 vs -0.59, P = .026), inspiratory vital capacity (0.65 vs 0.54, P = .019), percent of predicted inspiratory vital capacity (0.49 vs 0.38, P = .037), and percent of predicted functional residual capacity (-0.62 vs -0.47, P = .023). In subjects with stable COPD, lung volumes measured immediately after 6MWT are more closely related to exercise limitation than baseline lung volumes measured before 6MWT, except for FEV1. Therefore, pulmonary function testing immediately after exercise should be included in future studies on COPD for the assessment of exercise-induced ventilatory constraints to physical performance that cannot be adequately assessed from baseline pulmonary function testing at rest. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  16. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules.......In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  17. The Impact of Heart Irradiation on Dose-Volume Effects in the Rat Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luijk, Peter van; Faber, Hette; Meertens, Harm; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Kampinga, Harm H.; Coppes, Robert P. Ph.D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that heart irradiation increases the risk of a symptomatic radiation-induced loss of lung function (SRILF) and that this can be well-described as a modulation of the functional reserve of the lung. Methods and Materials: Rats were irradiated with 150-MeV protons. Dose-response curves were obtained for a significant increase in breathing frequency after irradiation of 100%, 75%, 50%, or 25% of the total lung volume, either including or excluding the heart from the irradiation field. A significant increase in the mean respiratory rate after 6-12 weeks compared with 0-4 weeks was defined as SRILF, based on biweekly measurements of the respiratory rate. The critical volume (CV) model was used to describe the risk of SRILF. Fits were done using a maximum likelihood method. Consistency between model and data was tested using a previously developed goodness-of-fit test. Results: The CV model could be fitted consistently to the data for lung irradiation only. However, this fitted model failed to predict the data that also included heart irradiation. Even refitting the model to all data resulted in a significant difference between model and data. These results imply that, although the CV model describes the risk of SRILF when the heart is spared, the model needs to be modified to account for the impact of dose to the heart on the risk of SRILF. Finally, a modified CV model is described that is consistent to all data. Conclusions: The detrimental effect of dose to the heart on the incidence of SRILF can be described by a dose dependent decrease in functional reserve of the lung

  18. Observation of Interfractional Variations in Lung Tumor Position Using Respiratory Gated and Ungated Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jenghwa; Mageras, Gig S.; Yorke, Ellen; De Arruda, Fernando; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Hertanto, Agung; Pham, Hai; Seppi, Edward; Pevsner, Alex; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) to measure interfractional variation in lung tumor position. Methods and Materials: Eight non-small-cell lung cancer patients participated in the study, 4 with respiratory gating and 4 without. All patients underwent MV CBCT scanning at weekly intervals. Contoured planning CT and MV CBCT images were spatially registered based on vertebral anatomy, and displacements of the tumor centroid determined. Setup error was assessed by comparing weekly portal orthogonal radiographs with digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from planning CT images. Hypothesis testing was performed to test the statistical significance of the volume difference, centroid displacement, and setup uncertainty. Results: The vertebral bodies and soft tissue portions of tumor within lung were visible on the MV CBCT scans. Statistically significant systematic volume decrease over the course of treatment was observed for 1 patient. The average centroid displacement between simulation CT and MV CBCT scans were 2.5 mm, -2.0 mm, and -1.5 mm with standard deviations of 2.7 mm, 2.7 mm, and 2.6 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions. The mean setup errors were smaller than the centroid shifts, while the standard deviations were comparable. In most cases, the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined on the MV CBCT was located on average at least 5 mm inside a 10 mm expansion of the GTV defined on the planning CT scan. Conclusions: The MV CBCT technique can be used to image lung tumors and may prove valuable for image-guided radiotherapy. Our conclusions must be verified in view of the small patient number

  19. Effects of tidal volume on work of breathing during lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H; Campbell, Andre R; Dicker, Rochelle A; Katz, Jeffrey A; Mackersie, Robert C

    2006-01-01

    To assess the effects of step-changes in tidal volume on work of breathing during lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Prospective, nonconsecutive patients with ALI/ARDS. Adult surgical, trauma, and medical intensive care units at a major inner-city, university-affiliated hospital. Ten patients with ALI/ARDS managed clinically with lung-protective ventilation. Five patients were ventilated at a progressively smaller tidal volume in 1 mL/kg steps between 8 and 5 mL/kg; five other patients were ventilated at a progressively larger tidal volume from 5 to 8 mL/kg. The volume mode was used with a flow rate of 75 L/min. Minute ventilation was maintained constant at each tidal volume setting. Afterward, patients were placed on continuous positive airway pressure for 1-2 mins to measure their spontaneous tidal volume. Work of breathing and other variables were measured with a pulmonary mechanics monitor (Bicore CP-100). Work of breathing progressively increased (0.86 +/- 0.32, 1.05 +/- 0.40, 1.22 +/- 0.36, and 1.57 +/- 0.43 J/L) at a tidal volume of 8, 7, 6, and 5 mL/kg, respectively. In nine of ten patients there was a strong negative correlation between work of breathing and the ventilator-to-patient tidal volume difference (R = -.75 to -.998). : The ventilator-delivered tidal volume exerts an independent influence on work of breathing during lung-protective ventilation in patients with ALI/ARDS. Patient work of breathing is inversely related to the difference between the ventilator-delivered tidal volume and patient-generated tidal volume during a brief trial of unassisted breathing.

  20. Lung and chest wall impedances in the dog: effects of frequency and tidal volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnas, G M; Stamenović, D; Lutchen, K R; Mackenzie, C F

    1992-01-01

    Dependences of the mechanical properties of the respiratory system on frequency (f) and tidal volume (VT) in the normal ranges of breathing are not clear. We measured, simultaneously and in vivo, resistance and elastance of the total respiratory system (Rrs and Ers), lungs (RL and EL), and chest wall (Rcw and Ecw) of five healthy anesthetized paralyzed dogs during sinusoidal volume oscillations at the trachea (50-300 ml, 0.2-2 Hz) delivered at a constant mean lung volume. Each dog showed the same f and VT dependences. The Ers and Ecw increased with increasing f to 1 Hz and decreased with increasing VT up to 200 ml. Although EL increased slightly with increasing f, it was independent of VT. The Rcw decreased from 0.2 to 2 Hz at all VT and decreased with increasing VT. Although the RL decreased from 0.2 to 0.6 Hz and was independent of VT, at higher f RL tended to increase with increasing f and VT (i.e., as peak flow increased). Finally, the f and VT dependences of Rrs were similar to those of Rcw below 0.6 Hz but mirrored RL at higher f. These data capture the competing influences of airflow nonlinearities vs. tissue nonlinearities on f and VT dependence of the lung, chest wall, and total respiratory system. More specifically, we conclude that 1) VT dependences in Ers and Rrs below 0.6 Hz are due to nonlinearities in chest wall properties, 2) above 0.6 Hz, the flow dependence of airways resistance dominates RL and Rrs, and 3) lung tissue behavior is linear in the normal range of breathing.

  1. Clinical utility of computed tomographic lung volumes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Sang-Min; Seo, Joon Beom; Lee, Sei Won; Huh, Jin Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do

    2014-01-01

    Published data concerning the utility of computed tomography (CT)-based lung volumes are limited to correlation with lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of the CT expiratory-to-inspiratory lung volume ratio (CT Vratio) by assessing the relationship with clinically relevant outcomes. A total of 75 stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients having pulmonary function testing and volumetric CT at full inspiration and expiration were retrospectively evaluated. Inspiratory and expiratory CT lung volumes were measured using in-house software. Correlation of the CT Vratio with patient-centered outcomes, including the modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea score, the 6-min walk distance (6MWD), the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) score, and multidimensional COPD severity indices, such as the BMI, airflow obstruction, dyspnea, and exercise capacity index (BODE) and age, dyspnea, and airflow obstruction (ADO), were analyzed. The CT Vratio correlated significantly with BMI (r = -0.528, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio was also significantly associated with MMRC dyspnea (r = 0.387, p = 0.001), 6MWD (r = -0.459, p < 0.001), and SGRQ (r = 0.369, p = 0.001) scores. Finally, the CT Vratio had significant correlations with the BODE and ADO multidimensional COPD severity indices (r = 0.605, p < 0.001; r = 0.411, p < 0.001). The CT Vratio had significant correlations with patient-centered outcomes and multidimensional COPD severity indices. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Static lung volume should be used to confirm restrictive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasam SA

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Shweta A Rasam, Nitin V Vanjare Department of Pulmonary Function Laboratory, Chest Research Foundation, Pune, Maharashtra, IndiaWe read the study by Hee Jin Park et al1 with great interest. The authors have investigated the prevalence of comorbidities in Korean chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD population. We raise our concern regarding the definition of COPD in this study. The study defines COPD as airflow limitation (only pre-spirometry forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity [FEV1/FVC] <70% in subjects aged ≥40 years. To differentiate, between asthma and COPD, it is essential to do a post bronchodilator spirometry. It would have been wise to report the findings as prevalence of comorbidities in obstructive airway diseases rather than specifically calling it as COPD.View original paper by Park and colleagues.

  3. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  4. Lobar analysis of collapsibility indices to assess functional lung volumes in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Mariko; Iwano, Shingo; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Matsuo, Keiji; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Naganawa, Shinji

    2014-01-01

    We investigated correlations between lung volume collapsibility indices and pulmonary function test (PFT) results and assessed lobar differences in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, using paired inspiratory and expiratory three dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) images. We retrospectively assessed 28 COPD patients who underwent paired inspiratory and expiratory CT and PFT exams on the same day. A computer-aided diagnostic system calculated total lobar volume and emphysematous lobar volume (ELV). Normal lobar volume (NLV) was determined by subtracting ELV from total lobar volume, both for inspiratory phase (NLVI) and for expiratory phase (NLVE). We also determined lobar collapsibility indices: NLV collapsibility ratio (NLVCR) (%)=(1-NLVE/NLVI)×100%. Associations between lobar volumes and PFT results, and collapsibility indices and PFT results were determined by Pearson correlation analysis. NLVCR values were significantly correlated with PFT results. Forced expiratory volume in 1 second, measured as percent of predicted results (FEV1%P) was significantly correlated with NLVCR values for the lower lobes (Pvolume, measured as percent of predicted (DLCO/VA%P) results were strongly correlated with ELVI for the upper lobes (Ppulmonary function in COPD patients.

  5. Cone-Beam CT Localization of Internal Target Volumes for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy of Lung Lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiheng; Wu, Q. Jackie; Marks, Lawrence B.; Larrier, Nicole; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we investigate a technique of matching internal target volumes (ITVs) in four-dimensional (4D) simulation computed tomography (CT) to the composite target volume in free-breathing on-board cone-beam (CB) CT. The technique is illustrated by using both phantom and patient cases. Methods and Materials: A dynamic phantom with a target ball simulating respiratory motion with various amplitude and cycle times was used to verify localization accuracy. The dynamic phantom was scanned using simulation CT with a phase-based retrospective sorting technique. The ITV was then determined based on 10 sets of sorted images. The size and epicenter of the ITV identified from 4D simulation CT images and the composite target volume identified from on-board CBCT images were compared to assess localization accuracy. Similarly, for two clinical cases of patients with lung cancer, ITVs defined from 4D simulation CT images and CBCT images were compared. Results: For the phantom, localization accuracy between the ITV in 4D simulation CT and the composite target volume in CBCT was within 1 mm, and ITV was within 8.7%. For patient cases, ITVs on simulation CT and CBCT were within 8.0%. Conclusion: This study shows that CBCT is a useful tool to localize ITV for targets affected by respiratory motion. Verification of the ITV from 4D simulation CT using on-board free-breathing CBCT is feasible for the target localization of lung tumors

  6. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  7. FCT (functional computed tomography) evaluation of the lung volumes at different PEEP (positive-end expiratory pressure) ventilation pattern, in mechanical ventilated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papi, M.G.; Di Segni, R.; Mazzetti, G.; Staffa, F.; Conforto, F.; Calimici, R.; Salvi, A.; Matteucci, G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate with FCT (functional computed tomography) total lung volume and fractional lung volumes at different PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) values in acute mechanically ventilated patients. Methods Nine ICU (intensive care unity) patients (1 lung pneumonia, 2 polytrauma, 2 sepsis, 3 brain surgery, 1 pulmonary embolism); mean age 48 ± 15 years, 6 male, 3 female; GE 16 MDCT scan was performed with acquisition from apex to diaphragma in seven seca at different PEEP values. Raw CT data were analysed by an advantage workstation to obtain volume density masks and histograms of both lungs and each lung and these density ranges were applied: - 1000 - 950 hyper-ventilated lung, -900 - 650 well aerated lung, -950 - 500 all aerated lung, -500 + 200 lung tissue. Total and fractional lung volumes, Hounsfield unit (HU) were calculated and compared at different PEEP values (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H 2 O). In four patients lung volumes were compared between the more and the less involved lung at increased PEEP. Statistic analysis: comparison means-medians tests. Results Data calculated at five PEEP showed unexpected decrease of total lung volume and increase of lung density (HU); proportionally no significant improvement of oxigenation. (orig.)

  8. FCT (functional computed tomography) evaluation of the lung volumes at different PEEP (positive-end expiratory pressure) ventilation pattern, in mechanical ventilated patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papi, M.G.; Di Segni, R.; Mazzetti, G.; Staffa, F. [Dept. of Radiology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy); Conforto, F.; Calimici, R.; Salvi, A. [Dept. of Anesthesiology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy); Matteucci, G. [Dept. of Pneumology, S. Giovanni HS, Rome (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate with FCT (functional computed tomography) total lung volume and fractional lung volumes at different PEEP (positive end expiratory pressure) values in acute mechanically ventilated patients. Methods Nine ICU (intensive care unity) patients (1 lung pneumonia, 2 polytrauma, 2 sepsis, 3 brain surgery, 1 pulmonary embolism); mean age 48 {+-} 15 years, 6 male, 3 female; GE 16 MDCT scan was performed with acquisition from apex to diaphragma in seven seca at different PEEP values. Raw CT data were analysed by an advantage workstation to obtain volume density masks and histograms of both lungs and each lung and these density ranges were applied: - 1000 - 950 = hyper-ventilated lung, -900 - 650 well aerated lung, -950 - 500 all aerated lung, -500 + 200 lung tissue. Total and fractional lung volumes, Hounsfield unit (HU) were calculated and compared at different PEEP values (0, 5, 10, 15 cm H{sub 2}O). In four patients lung volumes were compared between the more and the less involved lung at increased PEEP. Statistic analysis: comparison means-medians tests. Results Data calculated at five PEEP showed unexpected decrease of total lung volume and increase of lung density (HU); proportionally no significant improvement of oxigenation. (orig.)

  9. Planimetric determination of lung volume and its significance in the radiological diagnosis of pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, H.J.; Bieber, M.

    1983-01-01

    The volume of the lungs of 102 patients with emphysema and of 33 normal individuals, aged between 30 and 79 years, was determined with the use of a digital planimeter from routine chest X-rays in two planes. Contrary to the values obtained by a helium dilution method, the volumes, as determined by planimetry, did not show a linear relationship with age, but showed an increase after the age of 60. This agrees with the results of total body plethysmography, carried out by Amrein et al. The planimetric method of Harris, Pratt and Kilburn is a simple and rapid method for demonstrating, even in the presence of regional ventilatory abnormalities, total volume with sufficient accuracy, which complements and quantifies the radiological diagnosis of emphysema. (orig.) [de

  10. Lung volumes and airway resistance in patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Kenia; D'Aquino, Luiz Carlos; Soares, Maria Raquel; Gimenez, Andrea; Pereira, Carlos Alberto de Castro

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with proportional reductions in FVC and FEV1 on spirometry show no reduction in TLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role that measuring lung volumes and airway resistance plays in the correct classification of patients with a possible restrictive pattern on spirometry. This was a prospective study involving adults with reduced FVC and FEV1, as well as an FEV1/FV(C) ratio within the predicted range. Restrictive lung disease (RLD) was characterized by TLC below the 5th percentile, as determined by plethysmography. Obstructive lung disease (OLD) was characterized by high specific airway resistance, significant changes in post-bronchodilator FEV1, or an FEF25-75% espirometria não têm CPT reduzida. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o papel da medida dos volumes pulmonares e da resistência das vias aéreas para a classificação correta de pacientes com possível restrição à espirometria. Estudo prospectivo de adultos com CVF e VEF1 reduzidos e relação VEF1/CV(F) na faixa prevista. Distúrbio ventilatório restritivo (DVR) foi definido por CPT espirometria. A obstrução ao fluxo aéreo é comum nesses casos.

  11. Poster - 36: Effect of Planning Target Volume Coverage on the Dose Delivered in Lung Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekker, Chris; Wierzbicki, Marcin [McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: In lung radiotherapy, breathing motion may be encompassed by contouring the internal target volume (ITV). Remaining uncertainties are included in a geometrical expansion to the planning target volume (PTV). In IMRT, the treatment is then optimized until a desired PTV fraction is covered by the appropriate dose. The resulting beams often carry high fluence in the PTV margin to overcome low lung density and to generate steep dose gradients. During treatment, the high density tumour can enter the PTV margin, potentially increasing target dose. Thus, planning lung IMRT with a reduced PTV dose may still achieve the desired ITV dose during treatment. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out with 25 IMRT plans prescribed to 63 Gy in 30 fractions. The plans were re-normalized to cover various fractions of the PTV by different isodose lines. For each case, the isocentre was moved using 125 shifts derived from all 3D combinations of 0 mm, (PTV margin - 1 mm), and PTV margin. After each shift, the dose was recomputed to approximate the delivered dose. Results and Conclusion: Our plans typically cover 95% of the PTV by 95% of the dose. Reducing the PTV covered to 94% did not significantly reduce the delivered ITV doses for (PTV margin - 1 mm) shifts. Target doses were reduced significantly for all other shifts and planning goals studied. Thus, a reduced planning goal will likely deliver the desired target dose as long as the ITV rarely enters the last mm of the PTV margin.

  12. [Interpretation and use of routine pulmonary function tests: Spirometry, static lung volumes, lung diffusion, arterial blood gas, methacholine challenge test and 6-minute walk test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokov, P; Delclaux, C

    2016-02-01

    Resting pulmonary function tests (PFT) include the assessment of ventilatory capacity: spirometry (forced expiratory flows and mobilisable volumes) and static volume assessment, notably using body plethysmography. Spirometry allows the potential definition of obstructive defect, while static volume assessment allows the potential definition of restrictive defect (decrease in total lung capacity) and thoracic hyperinflation (increase in static volumes). It must be kept in mind that this evaluation is incomplete and that an assessment of ventilatory demand is often warranted, especially when facing dyspnoea: evaluation of arterial blood gas (searching for respiratory insufficiency) and measurement of the transfer coefficient of the lung, allowing with the measurement of alveolar volume to calculate the diffusing capacity of the lung for CO (DLCO: assessment of alveolar-capillary wall and capillary blood volume). All these pulmonary function tests have been the subject of an Americano-European Task force (standardisation of lung function testing) published in 2005, and translated in French in 2007. Interpretative strategies for lung function tests have been recommended, which define abnormal lung function tests using the 5th and 95th percentiles of predicted values (lower and upper limits of normal values). Thus, these recommendations need to be implemented in all pulmonary function test units. A methacholine challenge test will only be performed in the presence of an intermediate pre-test probability for asthma (diagnostic uncertainty), which is an infrequent setting. The most convenient exertional test is the 6-minute walk test that allows the assessment of walking performance, the search for arterial desaturation and the quantification of dyspnoea complaint. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Lung Volume Reduction Surgery for Respiratory Failure in Infants With Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Bongyeon; Park, Samina; Park, In Kyu; Kim, Young Tae; Park, June Dong; Park, Sung-Hye; Kang, Chang Hyun

    2018-04-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) can be performed in patients with severe emphysematous disease. However, LVRS in pediatric patients has not yet been reported. Here, we report our experience with 2 cases of pediatric LVRS. The first patient was a preterm infant girl with severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, pulmonary hypertension, and hypothyroidism. The emphysematous portion of the right lung was removed via sternotomy and right hemiclamshell incision. The patient was discharged on full-time home ventilator support for 3 months after the surgery. Since then, her respiratory function has improved continuously. She no longer needs oxygen supplementation or ventilator care. Her T-cannula was removed recently. The second patient was also a preterm infant girl with bronchopulmonary dysplasia. She was born with pulmonary hypertension and multiple congenital anomalies, including an atrial septal defect. Despite receiving the best supportive care, she could not be taken off the mechanical ventilator because of severe hypercapnia. We performed LVRS on the right lung via thoracotomy. She was successfully weaned off the mechanical ventilator 1 month after the surgery. She was discharged without severe complications at 3 months after the operation. At present, she is growing well with the help of intermittent home ventilator support. She can now tolerate an oral diet. Our experience shows that LVRS can be considered as a treatment option for pediatric patients with severe emphysematous lung. It is especially helpful for discontinuing prolonged mechanical ventilator care for patients with respiratory failure. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Obesity disproportionately impacts lung volumes, airflow and exhaled nitric oxide in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Hui-Ju; Chang, Su-Wei; Chung, Ren-Hua; Hsu, Jing-Ya; Tsai, Ming-Han; Liao, Sui-Ling; Hua, Man-Chin; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Tseng, Yu-Lun; Lin, Wan-Chen; Chang, Su-Ching; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-01-01

    The current literature focusing on the effect of obesity and overweight on lung function and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children, particularly among healthy children of non-European descent, remains controversial. Furthermore, whether the relationship of obesity and overweight with lung function and FeNO in children is modified by atopy is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of excess weight on lung function parameters and FeNO among Asian children, with a particular focus on exploring the potential effect modification by atopy. We investigated the effect of excess weight on lung function and FeNO in a population sample of 1,717 children aged 5 to 18 years and explored the potential modifying effect of atopy. There were positive associations of body mass index (BMI) z-score with forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), and forced expiratory flow at 25-75% (FEF25-75) (all Pchildren from the general population, independent of atopic status. Excess weight inversely affects FeNO in atopic but not in non-atopic children.

  15. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Aline Soares; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; de Oliveira, Mayron Faria; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 − (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. Methods: This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Results: Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p < 0.05). There was a greater reduction in FRC than in RV, resulting in the expiratory reserve volume being lower in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group. There were relatively proportional reductions in FRC and TLC in the two groups; therefore, IC was also comparable. Consequently, the inspiratory fraction was higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group (0.42 ± 0.10 vs. 0.36 ± 0.10; p < 0.05). Although the tidal volume/IC ratio was higher in the COPD+CHF group, the relative inspiratory reserve was remarkably similar between the two groups (0.35 ± 0.09 vs. 0.44 ± 0.14; p < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the restrictive effects of CHF, patients with COPD+CHF have relatively higher inspiratory limits (a greater inspiratory fraction). However, those patients use only a part of those limits, probably in order to avoid critical reductions in inspiratory reserve and increases in elastic recoil. PMID:27832235

  16. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen and Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2–10 ml, 20–100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error ±SD was 3.5 ± 2.6% (2–10 ml) and 5.9 ± 0.7% (20–60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F i O 2 caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F i O 2 = 1.0). The relative error ±SD of the leak measurements was −0.2 ± 11.9%. For leaks >19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F i O 2 >0.4 and for leaks >19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed

  17. Assessment of volume and leak measurements during CPAP using a neonatal lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H S; Roehr, C C; Proquitté, H; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2008-01-01

    Although several commercial devices are available which allow tidal volume and air leak monitoring during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in neonates, little is known about their measurement accuracy and about the influence of air leaks on volume measurement. The aim of this in vitro study was the validation of volume and leak measurement under CPAP using a commercial ventilatory device, taking into consideration the clinical conditions in neonatology. The measurement accuracy of the Leoni ventilator (Heinen & Löwenstein, Germany) was investigated both in a leak-free system and with leaks simulated using calibration syringes (2-10 ml, 20-100 ml) and a mechanical lung model. Open tubes of variable lengths were connected for leak simulation. Leak flow was measured with the flow-through technique. In a leak-free system the mean relative volume error +/-SD was 3.5 +/- 2.6% (2-10 ml) and 5.9 +/- 0.7% (20-60 ml), respectively. The influence of CPAP level, driving flow, respiratory rate and humidification of the breathing gas on the volume error was negligible. However, an increasing F(i)O(2) caused the measured tidal volume to increase by up to 25% (F(i)O(2) = 1.0). The relative error +/- SD of the leak measurements was -0.2 +/- 11.9%. For leaks > 19%, measured tidal volume was underestimated by more than 10%. In conclusion, the present in vitro study showed that the Leoni allowed accurate volume monitoring under CPAP conditions similar to neonates. Air leaks of up to 90% of patient flow were reliably detected. For an F(i)O(2) > 0.4 and for leaks > 19%, a numerical correction of the displayed volume should be performed.

  18. Lung function in North American Indian children: reference standards for spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, M A; Olson, D; Bonn, B A; Creelman, T; Buist, A S

    1982-02-01

    Reference standards of lung function was determined in 176 healthy North American Indian children (94 girls, 82 boys) 7 to 18 yr of age. Spirometry, maximal expiratory flow volume curves, and peak expiratory flow rate were measured using techniques and equipment recommended by the American Thoracic Society. Standing height was found to be an accurate predictor of lung function, and prediction equations for each lung function variable are presented using standing height as the independent variable. Lung volumes and expiratory flow rates in North American Indian children were similar to those previously reported for white and Mexican-American children but were greater than those in black children. In both boys and girls, lung function increased in a curvilinear fashion. Volume-adjusted maximal expiratory flow rates after expiring 50 or 75% of FVC tended to decrease in both sexes as age and height increased. Our maximal expiratory flow volume curve data suggest that as North American Indian children grow, lung volume increases at a slightly faster rate than airway size does.

  19. A Pilot Study on the Feasibility of Interventional Lung Volume Reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wansheng; Dong Yonghua; Liu Bin; Zhu Chi; Yu Yongqiang

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of lung volume reduction by transbronchial alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion with the aid of balloon-tipped catheter occlusion. Twenty-six healthy adult rabbits were divided into four treatment groups: alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion (n = 8), lipiodol infusion (n = 8), alcohol infusion (n = 5), or bronchial lumen occlusion (n = 5). After selective lobar or segmental bronchial catheterization using a balloon-tipped occlusion catheter, the corresponding drug infusion was performed. Bone cement was used to occlude the bronchial lumen in the occlusion group. The animals were followed up for 10 weeks by chest X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and then the whole lungs were harvested for histological examination. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension or lipiodol could be stably retained in alveoli in the first two groups based on chest X-ray and CT, but obvious collapse only occurred in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension or the bronchial lumen occlusion group. Histological examination revealed damage and disruption of the alveolar epithelium and fibrosis in related lung tissue in the group receiving alcohol and lipiodol suspension. Similar changes were seen in the bronchial lumen occlusion group, apart from obvious marginal emphysema of the target areas in two animals. Interstitial pneumonia and dilated alveoli existed in some tissue in target areas in the lipiodol group, in which pulmonary fibrosis obliterating alveoli also occurred. Chronic alveolitis and pleural adhesion in target areas occurred in the group infused with alcohol alone, whereas visceral pleura of the other three groups was regular and no pleural effusion or adhesion was found. Alcohol and lipiodol suspension that is stably retained in alveoli can result in significant lung volume reduction. Through alcohol and lipiodol suspension infusion, obstructive emphysema or pneumonia arising from bronchial lumen

  20. On the Potential Role of MRI Biomarkers of COPD to Guide Bronchoscopic Lung Volume Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Colin J; Capaldi, Dante P I; Di Cesare, Robert; McCormack, David G; Parraga, Grace

    2018-02-01

    In patients with severe emphysema and poor quality of life, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR) may be considered and guided based on lobar emphysema severity. In particular, x-ray computed tomography (CT) emphysema measurements are used to identify the most diseased and the second-most diseased lobes as BLVR targets. Inhaled gas magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also provides chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) biomarkers of lobar emphysema and ventilation abnormalities. Our objective was to retrospectively evaluate CT and MRI biomarkers of lobar emphysema and ventilation in patients with COPD eligible for BLVR. We hypothesized that MRI would provide complementary biomarkers of emphysema and ventilation that help determine the most appropriate lung lobar targets for BLVR in patients with COPD. We retrospectively evaluated 22 BLVR-eligible patients from the Thoracic Imaging Network of Canada cohort (diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide = 37 ± 12% predicted , forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 34 ± 7% predicted , total lung capacity = 131 ± 17% predicted , and residual volume = 216 ± 36% predicted ). Lobar CT emphysema, measured using a relative area of concept retrospective analysis, quantitative MRI ventilation and CT emphysema measurements provided different BLVR targets in over 30% of the patients. The presence of large MRI ventilation defects in lobes next to CT-targeted lobes might also change the decision to proceed or to guide BLVR to a different lobar target. Copyright © 2018 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormalities in lung volumes and airflow in children with newly diagnosed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peradzyńska, Joanna; Krenke, Katarzyna; Szylling, Anna; Kołodziejczyk, Beata; Gazda, Agnieszka; Rutkowska-Sak, Lidia; Kulus, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) of childhood are rare inflammatory disorders, involving various organs and tissues including respiratory system. Pulmonary involvement in patients with CTDs is uncommon but may cause functional impairment. Data on prevalence and type of lung function abnormalities in children with CTDs are scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to asses pulmonary functional status in children with newly diagnosed CTD and follow the results after two years of the disease course. There were 98 children (mean age: 13 ± 3; 76 girls), treated in Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Institute of Rheumatology, Warsaw and 80 aged-matched, healthy controls (mean age 12.7 ± 2.4; 50 girls) included into the study. Study procedures included medical history, physical examination, chest radiograph and PFT (spirometry and whole body-plethysmography). Then, the assessment of PFT was performed after 24 months. FEV₁, FEV₁/FVC and MEF50 were significantly lower in CTD as compared to control group, there was no difference in FVC and TLC. The proportion of patients with abnormal lung function was significantly higher in the study group, 41 (42%) vs 9 (11%). 24-months observation didn't reveal progression in lung function impairment. Lung function impairment is relatively common in children with CTDs. Although restrictive ventilatory pattern is considered typical feature of lung involvement in CTDs, airflow limitation could also be an initial abnormality.

  2. Volume Oscillations Delivered to a Lung Model Using 4 Different Bubble CPAP Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Jonathan A; Richardson, C Peter; DiBlasi, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    High-frequency pressure oscillations created by gas bubbling through an underwater seal during bubble CPAP may enhance ventilation and aid in lung recruitment in premature infants. We hypothesized that there are no differences in the magnitude of oscillations in lung volume (ΔV) in a preterm neonatal lung model when different bubble CPAP systems are used. An anatomically realistic replica of an infant nasal airway model was attached to a Silastic test lung sealed within a calibrated plethysmograph. Nasal prongs were affixed to the simulated neonate and supported using bubble CPAP systems set at 6 cm H2O. ΔV was calculated using pressure measurements obtained from the plethysmograph. The Fisher & Paykel Healthcare bubble CPAP system provided greater ΔV than any of the other devices at all of the respective bias flows (P CPAP systems. The magnitude of ΔV increased at bias flows of > 4 L/min in the Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Airways Development, and homemade systems, but appeared to decrease as bias flow increased with the Babi.Plus system. The major finding of this study is that bubble CPAP can provide measureable ventilation effects in an infant lung model. We speculate that the differences noted in ΔV between the different devices are a combination of the circuit/nasal prong configuration, bubbler configuration, and frequency of oscillations. Additional testing is needed in spontaneously breathing infants to determine whether a physiologic benefit exists when using the different bubble CPAP systems. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  3. Minimally invasive lung volume reduction treated with bronchi occlusion emphysema model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Dayong; Shen Liming; Shen Junkang; Jin Yiqi; Chen Lei; Huang Xianchen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of the coil-and-glue method for the reduction of lung volume in rabbit emphysema model. Methods: Sixteen rabbits of emphysema model were divided into the occlusion group(n=10), in which both anterior bronchi were occluded using the coil-and- glue method, and the control group (n=6). The maximal static pressure of airway (P max ), peak expiratory flow (PEF), end-expiratory volume (EEV) and pressure of oxygen (PO 2 ) were measured at ante- emphysema, post-emphysema, 1 week and 4 week after occlusion respectively. The expectoration (or migration) of coil and collapse of lung were also investigated. Results: P max was (20.0±1.3) and (17.1± 1.4) cm H 2 O (1 cm H 2 O=0.098 kPa) in the occlusion group at ante-emphysema and post-emphysema respectively. P max was (19.2±1.4) cm H 2 O in the occlusion group in the 1 week after the occlusion, while (17.1±1.5)cm H 2 O in the control group (F=6.68, P max was (19.2±1.4) cm H 2 O in the occlusion group, while (16.6±1.2) cm H 2 O in the control group (F=12.10, P max , in the 1 week and 4 week after occlusion were higher than those at post-emphysema (P<0.01, respectively); EEV at post-emphysema was higher than that at ante-emphysema (P<0.01). Conclusion: Coil-and-glue occlusion method for lung volume reduction in rabbit emphysema model can improve the pulmonary function, which can be relatively long lasting. (authors)

  4. Pulmonary Perfusion Changes as Assessed by Contrast-Enhanced Dual-Energy Computed Tomography after Endoscopic Lung Volume Reduction by Coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lador, Frédéric; Hachulla, Anne-Lise; Hohn, Olivia; Plojoux, Jérôme; Ronot, Maxime; Montet, Xavier; Soccal, Paola M

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic lung volume reduction by coils (LVRC) is a recent treatment approach for severe emphysema. Furthermore, dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) now offers a combined assessment of lung morphology and pulmonary perfusion. The aim of our study was to assess the impact of LVRC on pulmonary perfusion with DECT. Seventeen patients (64.8 ± 6.7 years) underwent LVRC. DECT was performed prior to and after LVRC. For each patient, lung volumes and emphysema quantification were automatically calculated. Then, 6 regions of interest (ROIs) on the iodine perfusion map were drawn in the anterior, mid, and posterior right and left lungs at 4 defined levels. The ROI values were averaged to obtain lung perfusion as assessed by the lung's iodine concentration (CLung, μg·cm-3). The CLung values were normalized using the left atrial iodine concentration (CLA) to take into account differences between successive DECT scans. The 6-min walk distance (6MWD) improved significantly after the procedure (p = 0.0002). No lung volume changes were observed between successive DECT scans for any of the patients (p = 0.32), attesting the same suspended inspiration. After LVRC, the emphysema index was significantly reduced in the treated lung (p = 0.0014). Lung perfusion increased significantly adjacent to the treated areas (CLung/CLA from 3.4 ± 1.7 to 5.6 ± 2.2, p < 0.001) and in the ipsilateral untreated areas (from 4.1 ± 1.4 to 6.6 ± 1.7, p < 0.001), corresponding to a mean 65 and 61% increase in perfusion, respectively. No significant difference was observed in the contralateral upper and lower areas (from 4.4 ± 1.9 to 4.8 ± 2.1, p = 0.273, and from 4.9 ± 2.0 to 5.2 ± 1.7, p = 0.412, respectively). A significant correlation between increased 6MWD and increased perfusion was found (p = 0.0027, R2 = 0.3850). Quantitative analysis based on DECT acquisition revealed that LVRC results in a significant increase in perfusion in the coil-free areas adjacent to the treated ones, as

  5. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  6. High spatiotemporal resolution measurement of regional lung air volumes from 2D phase contrast x-ray images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Andrew F T; Fouras, Andreas; Islam, M Sirajul; Wallace, Megan J; Hooper, Stuart B; Kitchen, Marcus J

    2013-04-01

    Described herein is a new technique for measuring regional lung air volumes from two-dimensional propagation-based phase contrast x-ray (PBI) images at very high spatial and temporal resolution. Phase contrast dramatically increases lung visibility and the outlined volumetric reconstruction technique quantifies dynamic changes in respiratory function. These methods can be used for assessing pulmonary disease and injury and for optimizing mechanical ventilation techniques for preterm infants using animal models. The volumetric reconstruction combines the algorithms of temporal subtraction and single image phase retrieval (SIPR) to isolate the image of the lungs from the thoracic cage in order to measure regional lung air volumes. The SIPR algorithm was used to recover the change in projected thickness of the lungs on a pixel-by-pixel basis (pixel dimensions ≈ 16.2 μm). The technique has been validated using numerical simulation and compared results of measuring regional lung air volumes with and without the use of temporal subtraction for removing the thoracic cage. To test this approach, a series of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups mechanically ventilated at different frequencies was employed. Regional lung air volumes measured from PBI images of newborn rabbit pups showed on average an improvement of at least 20% in 16% of pixels within the lungs in comparison to that measured without the use of temporal subtraction. The majority of pixels that showed an improvement was found to be in regions occupied by bone. Applying the volumetric technique to sequences of PBI images of newborn rabbit pups, it is shown that lung aeration at birth can be highly heterogeneous. This paper presents an image segmentation technique based on temporal subtraction that has successfully been used to isolate the lungs from PBI chest images, allowing the change in lung air volume to be measured over regions as small as the pixel size. Using this technique, it is possible to measure

  7. Analysis of decrease in lung perfusion blood volume with occlusive and non-occlusive pulmonary embolisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yohei; Yoshimura, Norihiko; Hori, Yoshiro; Horii, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Motohiko; Noto, Yoshiyuki; Aoyama, Hidefumi

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The proportion of preserved PE lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). • HUs of the iodine map were significantly higher in the non-occlusive group than in the occlusive group. • There was no significant difference in HUs between the non-occlusive and corresponding normal group. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) with non-occlusive pulmonary embolism (PE) differs quantitatively and visually from that with occlusive PE and to investigate if lung PBV with non-occlusive PE remains the same as that without PE. Materials and methods: Totally, 108 patients suspected of having acute PE underwent pulmonary dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DECTA) between April 2011 and January 2012. Presence of PE on DECTA was evaluated by one radiologist. Two radiologists visually evaluated the PE distribution (segmental or subsegmental) and its nature (occlusive or non-occlusive) on DECTA and classified perfusion in lung PBV as “decreased,” “slightly decreased,” and “preserved”. Two radiologists used a lung PBV application to set a region of interest (ROI) in the center of the lesion and measured HU values of an iodine map. In the same slice as the ROI of the lesion and close to the lesion, another ROI was set in the normal perfusion area without PE, and HUs were measured. The proportion of lesions was compared between the occlusive and non-occlusive groups. HUs were compared among the occlusive, non-occlusive, and corresponding normal groups. Results: Twenty-five patients had 80 segmental or subsegmental lesions. There were 37 and 43 lesions in the occlusive and non-occlusive groups, respectively. The proportion of decreased lesions was 73.0% (27/37) in the occlusive group, while that of preserved lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). There was a significant difference in the proportion of lesions (P < 0.001) between the two groups. HUs of the

  8. Retrieving mesospheric water vapour from observations of volume scattering radiances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergados

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the possibility for a theoretical approach in the estimation of water vapour mixing ratios in the vicinity of polar mesospheric clouds (PMC using satellite observations of Volume Scattering Radiances (VSR obtained at the wavelength of 553 nm. The PMC scattering properties perturb the underlying molecular Rayleigh scattered solar radiance of the background atmosphere. As a result, the presence of PMC leads to an enhancement in the observed VSR at the altitude of the layer; the PMC VSRs are superimposed on the exponentially decreasing with height Rayleigh VSR, of the PMC-free atmosphere. The ratio between the observed and the Rayleigh VSR of the background atmosphere is used to simulate the environment in which the cloud layer is formed. In addition, a microphysical model of ice particle formation is employed to predict the PMC VSRs. The initial water vapour profile is perturbed until the modelled VSRs match the observed, at which point the corresponding temperature and water vapour profiles can be considered as a first approximation of those describing the atmosphere at the time of the observations. The role of temperature and water vapour in the cloud formation is examined by a number of sensitivity tests suggesting that the water vapour plays a dominant role in the cloud formation in agreement with experimental results. The estimated water vapour profiles are compared with independent observations to examine the model capability in the context of this study. The results obtained are in a good agreement at the peak of the PMC layer although the radiance rapidly decreases with height below the peak. This simplified scenario indicates that the technique employed can give a first approximation estimate of the water vapour mixing ratio, giving rise to the VSR observed in the presence of PMC.

  9. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  10. Relationship of end-expiratory pressure, lung volume, and /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, J.A.; van der Zee, H.; Line, B.R.; Malik, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the dose-response effect of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) and increased lung volume on the pulmonary clearance rate of aerosolized technetium-99m-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (99mTc-DTPA). Clearance of lung radioactivity was expressed as percent decrease per minute. Base-line clearance was measured while anesthetized sheep (n = 20) were ventilated with 0 cmH 2 O end-expiratory pressure. Clearance was remeasured during ventilation at 2.5, 5, 10, 15, or 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. Further studies showed stepwise increases in functional residual capacity (FRC) (P less than 0.05) measured at 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 15, and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP. At 2.5 cmH 2 O PEEP, the clearance rate was not different from that at base line (P less than 0.05), although FRC was increased from base line. Clearance rate increased progressively with increasing PEEP at 5, 10, and 15 cmH 2 O (P less than 0.05). Between 15 and 20 cmH 2 O PEEP, clearance rate was again unchanged, despite an increase in FRC. The pulmonary clearance of aerosolized /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA shows a sigmoidal response to increasing FRC and PEEP, having both threshold and maximal effects. This relationship is most consistent with the hypothesis that alveolar epithelial permeability is increased by lung inflation

  11. Emphysema. Imaging for endoscopic lung volume reduction; Lungenemphysem. Bildgebung bei endoskopischer Lungenvolumenreduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storbeck, B. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Schroeder, T.H. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Oldigs, M.; Rabe, K.F. [LungenClinic Grosshansdorf (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology; Weber, C. [Amalie Sieveking-Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by two entities, the more airway-predominant type (''bronchitis'') on the one hand, and emphysema-predominant type on the other. Imaging via high-resolution computed tomography plays an important role in phenotyping COPD. For patients with advanced lung emphysema, new endoscopic lung volume reduction therapies (ELVR) have been developed. Proper selection of suitable patients requires thin-section reconstruction of volumetric CT image data sets also in coronal and sagittal orientation are required. In the current manuscript we will describe emphysema subtypes (centrilobular, paraseptal, panlobular), options for quantifying emphysema and this importance of regional distribution (homogeneous or heterogeneous, target area) as this is crucial for patient selection. Analysis of the interlobular fissures is obligatory despite the lack of standardization, as incomplete fissures indicate collateral ventilation (CV) via parenchymal bridges, which is an important criterion in choosing endoscopic methods of LVR. Every radiologist should be familiar with modern LVR therapies such as valves and coils, and furthermore should know what a lung doctor expects from radiologic evaluation (before and after ELVR). Finally we present a checklist as a quick reference for all steps concerning imaging for ELVR.

  12. Automated lung tumor segmentation for whole body PET volume based on novel downhill region growing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballangan, Cherry; Wang, Xiuying; Eberl, Stefan; Fulham, Michael; Feng, Dagan

    2010-03-01

    We propose an automated lung tumor segmentation method for whole body PET images based on a novel downhill region growing (DRG) technique, which regards homogeneous tumor hotspots as 3D monotonically decreasing functions. The method has three major steps: thoracic slice extraction with K-means clustering of the slice features; hotspot segmentation with DRG; and decision tree analysis based hotspot classification. To overcome the common problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots in automated lung tumor segmentation, DRG employs the tumors' SUV monotonicity features. DRG also uses gradient magnitude of tumors' SUV to improve tumor boundary definition. We used 14 PET volumes from patients with primary NSCLC for validation. The thoracic region extraction step achieved good and consistent results for all patients despite marked differences in size and shape of the lungs and the presence of large tumors. The DRG technique was able to avoid the problem of leakage into adjacent hotspots and produced a volumetric overlap fraction of 0.61 +/- 0.13 which outperformed four other methods where the overlap fraction varied from 0.40 +/- 0.24 to 0.59 +/- 0.14. Of the 18 tumors in 14 NSCLC studies, 15 lesions were classified correctly, 2 were false negative and 15 were false positive.

  13. Lung cancer detection with digital chest tomosynthesis: first round results from the SOS observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Viti, Andrea; Tavella, Chiara; Priotto, Roberto; Ghirardo, Donatella; Grosso, Maurizio; Terzi, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Baseline results of the Studio OSservazionale (SOS), observational study, a single-arm observational study of digital chest tomosynthesis for lung cancer detection in an at-risk population demonstrated a detection rate of lung cancer comparable to that of studies that used low dose CT scan (LDCT). We present the results of the first round. Totally 1,703 out of 1,843 (92%) subjects who had a baseline digital chest tomosynthesis underwent a first round reevaluation after 1 year. At first round chest digital tomosynthesis, 13 (0.7%) subjects had an indeterminate nodule larger than 5 mm and underwent low-dose CT scan for nodule confirmation. PET/CT study was obtained in 10 (0.5%) subjects and 2 subjects had a low-dose CT follow up. Surgery, either video-assisted thoracoscopic or open surgery for indeterminate pulmonary nodules was performed in 10 (0.2%) subjects. A lung cancer was diagnosed and resected in five patients. The lung cancer detection rate at first round was 0.3% (5/1,703). The detection rate of lung cancer at first round for tomosynthesis is comparable to rates reported for CT. In addition, results of first round digital chest tomosynthesis confirm chest tomosynthesis as a possible first-line lung cancer-screening tool.

  14. Volume-monitored chest CT: a simplified method for obtaining motion-free images near full inspiratory and end expiratory lung volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Kathryn S. [The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Long, Frederick R. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, The Children' s Radiological Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Flucke, Robert L. [Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Columbus, OH (United States); Castile, Robert G. [The Research Institute at Nationwide Children' s Hospital, Center for Perinatal Research, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Lung inflation and respiratory motion during chest CT affect diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility. To describe a simple volume-monitored (VM) method for performing reproducible, motion-free full inspiratory and end expiratory chest CT examinations in children. Fifty-two children with cystic fibrosis (mean age 8.8 {+-} 2.2 years) underwent pulmonary function tests and inspiratory and expiratory VM-CT scans (1.25-mm slices, 80-120 kVp, 16-40 mAs) according to an IRB-approved protocol. The VM-CT technique utilizes instruction from a respiratory therapist, a portable spirometer and real-time documentation of lung volume on a computer. CT image quality was evaluated for achievement of targeted lung-volume levels and for respiratory motion. Children achieved 95% of vital capacity during full inspiratory imaging. For end expiratory scans, 92% were at or below the child's end expiratory level. Two expiratory exams were judged to be at suboptimal volumes. Two inspiratory (4%) and three expiratory (6%) exams showed respiratory motion. Overall, 94% of scans were performed at optimal volumes without respiratory motion. The VM-CT technique is a simple, feasible method in children as young as 4 years to achieve reproducible high-quality full inspiratory and end expiratory lung CT images. (orig.)

  15. Relationship of airway dimensions with airflow limitation or lung volumes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaru Hasegawa

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We have recently developed new software to obtain longitudinal images and accurate short axis images of airways with an inner diameter > 2 mm located anywhere in the lung, using curved multiplanar reconstruction. Using this software, we demonstrated in patients with COPD that FEV1 (%predicted was highly correlated with airway dimensions and the correlation coefficients improved as the airway became smaller in size (3. In this study, our aims are to further confirm the significant relationship between airway dimensions and airflow limitation in larger number of subjects, and to examine the relationship of airway dimensions with lung volumes in 95 patients with COPD (stage 0, 10; stage I, 23; stage II, 35; stage III, 24; stage IV, 3. We analyzed the airway dimensions from the 3rd to the 6th generations of the apical bronchus (B1 of the right upper lobe and the anterior basal bronchus (B8 of the right lower lobe. Lung volumes were measured by the helium closed circuit method. Both airway luminal area (Ai and wall area percent (WA% of all the generations, except a few, from the two bronchi were significantly correlated with RV and RV/TLC, but not with TLC or FRC. More importantly, the correlation coefficients (r between airway dimensions and RV/TLC improved as the airways became smaller in size from the 3rd to 6th generations in both bronchi (r = –0.483, –0482, –0.553, –0.624 for Ai of B8; r = 0.316, 0.380, 0.499, 0.551 for WA% of B8. These findings provide further evidence that distal (small airways rather than proximal (large airways are the determinants for airflow limitation in COPD.

  16. Evaluation of pulmonary disease using static lung volumes in primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Bush, Andrew; Pioggia, Giovanni; Caramella, Davide; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Di Cicco, Maria; Zangani, Marta; Chinellato, Iolanda; Maggi, Fabrizio; Tezza, Giovanna; Macchia, Pierantonio; Boner, Attilio

    2012-11-01

    In primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) lung damage is usually evaluated by high-resolution CT (HRCT). To evaluate whether HRCT abnormalities and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection were better predicted by spirometry or plethysmography. A cross-sectional study performed in consecutive patients with PCD who underwent sputum culture, spirometry, plethysmography and HRCT within 48 h. Principal component analysis and soft computing were used for data evaluation. Fifty patients (26 children) were studied. P aeruginosa infection was found in 40% of the patients and bronchiectasis in 88%. There was a correlation between infection with P aeruginosa and extent of bronchiectasis (p=0.009; r =0.367) and air-trapping (p=0.03; r =0.315). Moreover, there was an association between infection with P aeruginosa and residual volume (RV) values >150% (p=0.04) and RV/total lung capacity (TLC) ratio >140% (p=0.001), but not between infection with P aeruginosa and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))<80%, or forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF(25-75%))<70% or FEV(1)/FVC<70% (<80% in children). Severity of the total lung impairment on chest HRCT directly correlated with RV when expressed as per cent predicted (p=0.003; r =0.423), and RV/TLC (p<0.001; r =0.513) or when expressed as z scores (p=0.002, r =0.451 and p<0.001, r =0.536 respectively). Principal component analysis on plethysmographic but not on spirometry data allowed recognition of different severities of focal air trapping, atelectasis and extent of bronchiectasis. Plethysmography better predicts HRCT abnormalities than spirometry. Whether it might be a useful test to define populations of patients with PCD who should or should not have HRCT scans requires further longitudinal studies.

  17. Impact of endobronchial coiling on segmental bronchial lumen in treated and untreated lung lobes: Correlation with changes in lung volume, clinical and pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloth, C; Thaiss, W M; Hetzel, J; Ditt, H; Grosse, U; Nikolaou, K; Horger, M

    2016-07-01

    To assess the impact of endobronchial coiling on the segment bronchus cross-sectional area and volumes in patients with lung emphysema using quantitative chest-CT measurements. Thirty patients (female = 15; median age = 65.36 years) received chest-CT before and after endobronchial coiling for lung volume reduction (LVR) between January 2010 and December 2014. Thin-slice (0.6 mm) non-enhanced image data sets were acquired both at end-inspiration and end-expiration using helical technique and 120 kV/100-150 mAs. Clinical response was defined as an increase in the walking distance (Six-minute walk test; 6MWT) after LVR-therapy. Additionally, pulmonary function test (PFT) measurements were used for clinical correlation. In the treated segmental bronchia, the cross-sectional lumen area showed significant reduction (p  0.05). In the ipsilateral lobes, the lumina showed no significant changes. In the contralateral lung, we found tendency towards increased cross-sectional area in inspiration (p = 0.06). Volumes of the treated segments correlated with the treated segmental bronchial lumina in expiration (r = 0.80, p volume of the treated lobe in responders only. Endobronchial coiling causes significant decrease in the cross-sectional area of treated segment bronchi in inspiration and a slight increase in expiration accompanied by a volume reduction. • Endobronchial coiling has indirect impact on cross-sectional area of treated segment bronchi • Volume changes of treated lobes correlate with changes in bronchial cross-sectional area • Coil-induced effects reflect their stabilizing and stiffening impact on lung parenchyma • Endobronchial coiling reduces bronchial collapsing compensating the loss of elasticity.

  18. The risk of lung cancer among cooking adults: a meta-analysis of 23 observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng-Li; Zhang, Chao; Yu, Jia-Jie; Xu, Chang; Tang, Li; Sun, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Cooking has been regarded as a potential risk factor for lung cancer. We aim to investigate the evidence of cooking oil fume and risk of lung cancer. Medline and Embase were searched for eligible studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to summarize the evidences of case-control or cohort studies, with subgroup analysis for the potential discrepancy. Sensitivity analysis was employed to test the robustness. We included 23 observational studies, involving 9411 lung cancer cases. Our meta-analysis found that, for cooking female, the pooled OR of cooking oil fume exposure was 1.98 (95% CI 1.54, 2.54, I 2  = 79%, n = 15) among non-smoking population and 2.00 (95% CI 1.46, 2.74, I 2  = 75%, n = 10) among partly smoking population. For cooking males, the pooled OR of lung cancer was 1.15 (95% CI 0.71, 1.87; I 2  = 80%, n = 4). When sub grouped by ventilation condition, the pooled OR for poor ventilation was 1.20 (95% CI 1.10, 1.31, I 2  = 2%) compared to good ventilation. For different cooking methods, our results suggested that stir frying (OR = 1.89, 95% CI 1.23, 2.90; I 2  = 66%) was associated with increased risk of lung cancer while not for deep frying (OR = 1.41, 95% CI 0.87, 2.29; I 2  = 5%). Sensitivity analysis suggested our results were stable. Cooking oil fume is likely to be a risk factor for lung cancer for female, regardless of smoking status. Poor ventilation may increase the risk of lung cancer. Cooking methods may have different effect on lung cancer that deep frying may be healthier than stir frying.

  19. Clinical evaluation of 99mTc-Technegas SPECT in thoracoscopic lung volume reduction surgery in patients with pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Teruhiko; Sasaki, Yoshiaki; Shinkai, Takayuki

    2000-01-01

    99m Tc-Technegas (Tcgas) SPECT is useful for evaluating the patency of the airway and highly sensitive in detecting regional pulmonary function in pulmonary emphysema. The aim of this study is to evaluate regional ventilation impairment by this method pre and post thoracoscopic lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) in patients with pulmonary emphysema. There were 11 patients with pulmonary emphysema. The mean age of patients was 64.1 years. All patients were males. LVRS was performed bilaterally in 8 patients and unilaterally in 3 patients. Post inhalation of Tcgas in the sitting position, the subjects were placed in the supine position and SPECT was performed. Distribution of Tcgas on axial images was classified into 4 types, homogeneous, inhomogeneous, hot spot, and defect. Three slices of axial SPECT images, the upper, middle and lower fields were selected, and changes in deposition patterns post LVRS were scored (Tcgas score). Post LVRS, dyspnea on exertion and pulmonary function tests were improved. Pre LVRS, inhomogeneous distribution, hot spots and defects were observed in all patients. Post LVRS, improvement in distribution was obtained not only in the surgical field and other fields, but also in the contralateral lung of unilaterally operated patients. In 5 patients some fields showed deterioration. The Tcgas score correlated with improvements in FEV 1.0 , FEV 1.0 % and %FEV 1.0 . Tcgas SPECT is useful for evaluating changes in regional pulmonary function post LVRS. (author)

  20. Prenatal MRI fetal lung volumes and percent liver herniation predict pulmonary morbidity in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Irving J; Olutoye, Oluyinka O; Cass, Darrell L; Fallon, Sara C; Lazar, David A; Cassady, Christopher I; Mehollin-Ray, Amy R; Welty, Stephen E; Ruano, Rodrigo; Belfort, Michael A; Lee, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prenatal imaging parameters are predictive of postnatal CDH-associated pulmonary morbidity. The records of all neonates with CDH treated from 2004 to 2012 were reviewed. Patients requiring supplemental oxygen at 30 days of life (DOL) were classified as having chronic lung disease (CLD). Fetal MRI-measured observed/expected total fetal lung volume (O/E-TFLV) and percent liver herniation (%LH) were recorded. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and multivariate regression were applied to assess the prognostic value of O/E-TFLV and %LH for development of CLD. Of 172 neonates with CDH, 108 had fetal MRIs, and survival was 76%. 82% (89/108) were alive at DOL 30, 46 (52%) of whom had CLD. Neonates with CLD had lower mean O/E-TFLV (30 vs.42%; p=0.001) and higher %LH (21.3±2.8 vs.7.1±1.8%; p20% (AUC=0.78; p20% were highly associated with indicators of long-term pulmonary sequelae. On multivariate analysis, %LH was the strongest predictor of CLD in patients with CDH (OR: 10.96, 95%CI: 2.5-48.9, p=0.002). Prenatal measurement of O/E-TFLV and %LH is predictive of CDH pulmonary morbidity and can aid in establishing parental expectations of postnatal outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biologic lung volume reduction in advanced upper lobe emphysema: phase 2 results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criner, Gerard J; Pinto-Plata, Victor; Strange, Charlie; Dransfield, Mark; Gotfried, Mark; Leeds, William; McLennan, Geoffrey; Refaely, Yael; Tewari, Sanjiv; Krasna, Mark; Celli, Bartolome

    2009-05-01

    Biologic lung volume reduction (BioLVR) is a new endobronchial treatment for advanced emphysema that reduces lung volume through tissue remodeling. Assess the safety and therapeutic dose of BioLVR hydrogel in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Open-labeled, multicenter phase 2 dose-ranging studies were performed with BioLVR hydrogel administered to eight subsegmental sites (four in each upper lobe) involving: (1) low-dose treatment (n = 28) with 10 ml per site (LD); and (2) high-dose treatment (n = 22) with 20 ml per site (HD). Safety was assessed by the incidence of serious medical complications. Efficacy was assessed by change from baseline in pulmonary function tests, dyspnea score, 6-minute walk distance, and health-related quality of life. After treatment there were no deaths and four serious treatment-related complications. A reduction in residual volume to TLC ratio at 12 weeks (primary efficacy outcome) was achieved with both LD (-6.4 +/- 9.3%; P = 0.002) and HD (-5.5 +/- 9.4%; P = 0.028) treatments. Improvements in pulmonary function in HD (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +15.6%; P = 0.002; DeltaFVC = +9.1%; P = 0.034) were greater than in LD patients (6 mo: DeltaFEV(1) = +6.7%; P = 0.021; DeltaFVC = +5.1%; P = 0.139). LD- and HD-treated groups both demonstrated improved symptom scores and health-related quality of life. BioLVR improves physiology and functional outcomes up to 6 months with an acceptable safety profile in upper lobe predominant emphysema. Overall improvement was greater and responses more durable with 20 ml per site than 10 ml per site dosing. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00435253 and NCT 00515164).

  2. Radionuclide-determined changes in pulmonary blood volume and thallium lung uptake in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.A.; Okada, R.D.; Boucher, C.A.; Strauss, H.W.; Pohost, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Exercise-induced increases in radionuclide-determined pulmonary blood volume (PBV) and thallium lung uptake have been described in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and have been shown to correlate with transient exercise-induced left ventricular dysfunction. To compare these 2 techniques in the same patients, 74 patients (59 with and 15 without significant CAD) underwent supine bicycle exercise twice on the same day--first for thallium myocardial and lung imaging and then for technetium-99m gated blood pool imaging for the PBV ratio determination. Thallium activity of lung and myocardium was determined to calculate thallium lung/heart ratio. Relative changes in PBV from rest to exercise were expressed as a ratio of pulmonary counts (exercise/rest). Previously reported normal ranges for thallium lung/heart ratio and PBV ratio were used. The PBV ratio and thallium lung/heart ratio were abnormal in 71 and 36%, respectively, of patients with CAD (p less than 0.01). Both ratios were normal in all patients without CAD. Although the resting ejection fractions did not differ significantly in patients with normal versus those with abnormal PBV ratios or thallium lung/heart ratios, abnormal PBV ratios and thallium lung/heart ratios were associated with an exercise-induced decrease in ejection fraction. Propranolol use was significantly higher in patients with abnormal than in those with normal thallium lung/heart ratios (p less than 0.01). No significant difference in propranolol use was present in patients with abnormal or normal PBV ratios. In conclusion: (1) the prevalence of an abnormal thallium lung/heart ratio is less than that of the PBV ratio in patients with CAD; (2) both tests are normal in normal control subjects; (3) propranolol does not cause abnormal results in normal control subjects; however, propranolol may influence lung thallium uptake in patients with CAD; and (4) when both tests are abnormal, there is a high likelihood of multivessel disease

  3. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving ≥20, ≥30, ≥40, ≥50, and ≥60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R 2 = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm 3 was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm 3 receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to 3 , if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  4. Observer variability of lung function measurements in 2-6-yr-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klug, B; Nielsen, K G; Bisgaard, H

    2000-01-01

    by the interrupter technique measurements in young children are subject to influence by the observer, and the random variability between observers appears to be particularly great for respiratory resistance assessed by the interrupter technique. The authors suggest that the between-observer variability should......The aim of this study was to assess the within-observer and between-observer variability of lung function measurements in children aged 2-6 yrs. Two observers examined 22 asthmatic children independently according to a predefined protocol. Each observer obtained duplicate measurements...... observers. The ratio SDw between observers/mean SDw within observers was 0.94, 1.25, 1.35 and 2.86 for Xrs,5, Rrs,5, sRaw and Rint, respectively, indicating greater between-observer variability of the latter. The systematic difference between observers assessed by the difference between observer means...

  5. Computer-Aided Detection of Malignant Lung Nodules on Chest Radiographs: Effect on Observers' Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min; Lee, Hyun Ju; Jin, Kwang Nam

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of computer-aided detection (CAD) system on observer performance in the detection of malignant lung nodules on chest radiograph. Two hundred chest radiographs (100 normal and 100 abnormal with malignant solitary lung nodules) were evaluated. With CT and histological confirmation serving as a reference, the mean nodule size was 15.4 mm (range, 7-20 mm). Five chest radiologists and five radiology residents independently interpreted both the original radiographs and CAD output images using the sequential testing method. The performances of the observers for the detection of malignant nodules with and without CAD were compared using the jackknife free-response receiver operating characteristic analysis. Fifty-nine nodules were detected by the CAD system with a false positive rate of 1.9 nodules per case. The detection of malignant lung nodules significantly increased from 0.90 to 0.92 for a group of observers, excluding one first-year resident (p = 0.04). When lowering the confidence score was not allowed, the average figure of merit also increased from 0.90 to 0.91 (p = 0.04) for all observers after a CAD review. On average, the sensitivities with and without CAD were 87% and 84%, respectively; the false positive rates per case with and without CAD were 0.19 and 0.17, respectively. The number of additional malignancies detected following true positive CAD marks ranged from zero to seven for the various observers. The CAD system may help improve observer performance in detecting malignant lung nodules on chest radiographs and contribute to a decrease in missed lung cancer.

  6. Tidal volume and mortality in mechanically ventilated children: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jager, Pauline; Burgerhof, Johannes G M; van Heerde, Marc; Albers, Marcel J I J; Markhorst, Dick G; Kneyber, Martin C J

    2014-12-01

    To determine whether tidal volume is associated with mortality in critically ill, mechanically ventilated children. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases from inception until July 2013 and bibliographies of included studies without language restrictions. Randomized clinical trials and observational studies reporting mortality in mechanically ventilated PICU patients. Two authors independently selected studies and extracted data on study methodology, quality, and patient outcomes. Meta-analyses were performed using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model. Heterogeneity was quantified using I. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Score for cohort studies. Out of 142 citations, seven studies met the inclusion criteria, and additional two articles were identified from references of the found articles. One was excluded. These eight studies included 1,756 patients. Mortality rates ranged from 13% to 42%. There was no association between tidal volume and mortality when tidal volume was dichotomized at 7, 8, 10, or 12 mL/kg. Comparing patients ventilated with tidal volume less than 7 mL/kg and greater than 10 mL/kg or greater than 12 mL/kg and tidal volume less than 8 mL/kg and greater than 10 mL/kg or greater than 12 mL/kg also showed no association between tidal volume and mortality. Limiting the analysis to patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome did not change these results. Heterogeneity was observed in all pooled analyses. A relationship between tidal volume and mortality in mechanically ventilated children could not be identified, irrespective of the severity of disease. The significant heterogeneity observed in the pooled analyses necessitates future studies in well-defined patient populations to understand the effects of tidal volume on patient outcome.

  7. The prognostic value of irradiated lung volumes on the prediction of intra-/ post-operative mortality in patients after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy for esophageal cancer. A retrospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kup, Philipp Günther; Nieder, Carsten; Geinitz, Hans; Henkenberens, Christoph; Besserer, Angela; Oechsner, Markus; Schill, Sabine; Mücke, Ralph; Scherer, Vera; Combs, Stephanie E; Adamietz, Irenäus A; Fakhrian, Khashayar

    2015-01-01

    To assess the association between dosimetric factors of the lung and incidence of intra- and postoperative mortality among esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy (N-RCT) followed by surgery (S). Inclusion criteria were: age volume histogram (DVH) data. One-hundred thirty-five patients met our inclusion criteria. Median age was 62 years. N-RCT consisted of 36 - 50.4 Gy (median 45 Gy), 1.8 - 2 Gy per fraction. Concomitant chemotherapy consisted of 5-Fluoruracil (5-FU) and cisplatin in 113 patients and cisplatin and taxan-derivates in 15 patients. Seven patients received a single cytotoxic agent. In 130 patients an abdominothoracal and in 5 patients a transhiatal resection was performed. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the total lung DVH: mean dose, V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, V40, V45 and V50. The primary endpoint was the rate of intra- and postoperative mortality (from the start of N-RCT to 60 days after surgical resection). A total of ten postoperative deaths (7%) were observed: 3 within 30 days (2%) and 7 between 30 and 60 days after surgical intervention (5%); no patient died during the operation. In the univariate analysis, weight loss (≥10% in 6 months prior to diagnosis, risk ratio: 1.60, 95%CI: 0.856-2.992, p=0.043), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-performance status (ECOG 2 vs. 1, risk ratio: 1.931, 95%CI: 0.898-4.150, p=0.018) and postoperative pulmonary plus non-pulmonary complications (risk ratio: 2.533, 95%CI: 0.978-6.563, p=0.004) were significantly associated with postoperative mortality. There was no significant association between postoperative mortality and irradiated lung volumes. Lung V45 was the only variable which was significantly associated with higher incidence of postoperative pulmonary plus non-pulmonary complications (Exp(B): 1.285, 95%CI 1.029-1.606, p=0.027), but not with the postoperative pulmonary complications (Exp(B): 1.249, 95%CI 0.999-1.561, p=0.051). Irradiated lung

  8. Visual grading of emphysema severity in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederlund, K.; Bergstrand, L.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B.; Aspelin, P.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate which of three types of CT imaging yielded the best results in estimating the degree of emphysema in patients undergoing evaluation for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS), whether there was any difference in this regard between the cranial and caudal part of the lung, and whether the degree of emphysema had an impact on the estimation. Material and Methods: Four radiologists visually classified different degrees of emphysema on three different types of CT images into four groups. The degree of emphysema was calculated by a computer. The three types of images were as follows: HRCT images (2-mm slice thickness); spiral CT images (10-mm slice thickness); and density-masked images (spiral CT images printed with pixels below 960 HU, depicted in white). Results: The conventionally presented images from HRCT and spiral CT yielded the same results (60% respective 62% correct classifications) in assessing the degree of emphysema irrespective of localisation. Significantly improved results were obtained when the spiral CT images were presented as density-masked images (74%). Conclusion: There was no difference between HRCT and spiral CT in assessing the degree of emphysema in candidates for LVRS. Improvement can be achieved by the use of density-masked images

  9. Pulmonary compliance and lung volume varies with ecomorphology in anuran amphibians: implications for ventilatory-assisted lymph flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedrick, Michael S; Hillman, Stanley S; Drewes, Robert C; Withers, Philip C

    2011-10-01

    Vertical movement of lymph from ventral regions to the dorsally located lymph hearts in anurans is accomplished by specialized skeletal muscles working in concert with lung ventilation. We hypothesize that more terrestrial species with greater lymph mobilization capacities and higher lymph flux rates will have larger lung volumes and higher pulmonary compliance than more semi-aquatic or aquatic species. We measured in situ mean and maximal compliance (Δvolume/Δpressure), distensibility (%Δvolume/Δpressure) and lung volume over a range of physiological pressures (1.0 to 4.0 cmH(2)O) for nine species of anurans representing three families (Bufonide, Ranidae and Pipidae) that span a range of body masses and habitats from terrestrial to aquatic. We further examined the relationship between these pulmonary variables and lymph flux for a semi-terrestrial bufonid (Rhinella marina), a semi-aquatic ranid (Lithobates catesbeianus) and an aquatic pipid (Xenopus laevis). Allometric scaling of pulmonary compliance and lung volume with body mass showed significant differences at the family level, with scaling exponents ranging from ∼0.75 in Bufonidae to ∼1.3 in Pipidae. Consistent with our hypothesis, the terrestrial Bufonidae species had significantly greater pulmonary compliance and greater lung volumes compared with semi-aquatic Ranidae and aquatic Pipidae species. Pulmonary distensibility ranged from ∼20 to 35% cmH(2)O(-1) for the three families but did not correlate with ecomorphology. For the three species for which lymph flux data are available, R. marina had a significantly higher (Pvolume (242.1±5.5 ml kg(-1)) compared with L. catesbeianus (54.5±0.12 ml cmH(2)O(-1) kg(-1) and 139.3±0.5 ml kg(-1)) and X. laevis (30.8±0.7 ml cmH(2)O(-1) kg(-1) and 61.3±2.5 ml kg(-1)). Lymph flux rates were also highest for R. marina, lowest for X. laevis and intermediate in L. catesbeianus. Thus, there is a strong correlation between pulmonary compliance, lung volume and

  10. Accuracy of near-patient vs. inbuilt spirometry for monitoring tidal volumes in an in-vitro paediatric lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenroth, S; Thomas, J; Cannizzaro, V; Weiss, M; Schmidt, A R

    2018-03-01

    Spirometric monitoring provides precise measurement and delivery of tidal volumes within a narrow range, which is essential for lung-protective strategies that aim to reduce morbidity and mortality in mechanically-ventilated patients. Conventional anaesthesia ventilators include inbuilt spirometry to monitor inspiratory and expiratory tidal volumes. The GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilator allows additional near-patient spirometry via a sensor interposed between the proximal end of the tracheal tube and the respiratory tubing. Near-patient and inbuilt spirometry of two different GE Aisys CS 2 anaesthesia ventilators were compared in an in-vitro study. Assessments were made of accuracy and variability in inspiratory and expiratory tidal volume measurements during ventilation of six simulated paediatric lung models using the ASL 5000 test lung. A total of 9240 breaths were recorded and analysed. Differences between inspiratory tidal volumes measured with near-patient and inbuilt spirometry were most significant in the newborn setting (p tidal volume measurements with near-patient spirometry were consistently more accurate than with inbuilt spirometry for all lung models (p tidal volumes decreased with increasing tidal volumes, and was smaller with near-patient than with inbuilt spirometry. The variability in measured tidal volumes was higher during expiration, especially with inbuilt spirometry. In conclusion, the present in-vitro study shows that measurements with near-patient spirometry are more accurate and less variable than with inbuilt spirometry. Differences between measurement methods were most significant in the smallest patients. We therefore recommend near-patient spirometry, especially for neonatal and paediatric patients. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  11. Lung volume recruitment acutely increases respiratory system compliance in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Molgat-Seon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine whether lung volume recruitment (LVR acutely increases respiratory system compliance (Crs in individuals with severe respiratory muscle weakness (RMW. Individuals with RMW resulting from neuromuscular disease or quadriplegia (n=12 and healthy controls (n=12 underwent pulmonary function testing and the measurement of Crs at baseline, immediately after, 1 h after and 2 h after a single standardised session of LVR. The LVR session involved 10 consecutive supramaximal lung inflations with a manual resuscitation bag to the highest tolerable mouth pressure or a maximum of 50 cmH2O. Each LVR inflation was followed by brief breath-hold and a maximal expiration to residual volume. At baseline, individuals with RMW had lower Crs than controls (37±5 cmH2O versus 109±10 mL·cmH2O−1, p0.05. LVR had no significant effect on measures of pulmonary function at any time point in either group (all p>0.05. During inflations, mean arterial pressure decreased significantly relative to baseline by 10.4±2.8 mmHg and 17.3±3.0 mmHg in individuals with RMW and controls, respectively (both p<0.05. LVR acutely increases Crs in individuals with RMW. However, the high airway pressures during inflations cause reductions in mean arterial pressure that should be considered when applying this technique.

  12. Impact of 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT imaging on target volume delineation in SBRT patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Multi-reader comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirindel, Alin; Adebahr, Sonja; Schuster, Daniel; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Schanne, Daniel H; Nemer, Ursula; Mix, Michael; Meyer, Philipp; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Brunner, Thomas; Nestle, Ursula

    2015-06-01

    Evaluation of the effect of co-registered 4D-(18)FDG-PET/CT for SBRT target delineation in patients with central versus peripheral lung tumors. Analysis of internal target volume (ITV) delineation of central and peripheral lung lesions in 21 SBRT-patients. Manual delineation was performed by 4 observers in 2 contouring phases: on respiratory gated 4DCT with diagnostic 3DPET available aside (CT-ITV) and on co-registered 4DPET/CT (PET/CT-ITV). Comparative analysis of volumes and inter-reader agreement. 11 cases of peripheral and 10 central lesions were evaluated. In peripheral lesions, average CT-ITV was 6.2 cm(3) and PET/CT-ITV 8.6 cm(3), resembling a mean change in hypothetical radius of 2 mm. For both CT-ITVs and PET/CT-ITVs inter reader agreement was good and unchanged (0.733 and 0.716; p=0.58). All PET/CT-ITVs stayed within the PTVs derived from CT-ITVs. In central lesions, average CT-ITVs were 42.1 cm(3), PET/CT-ITVs 44.2 cm(3), without significant overall volume changes. Inter-reader agreement improved significantly (0.665 and 0.750; p1 ml in average for all observers. The addition of co-registered 4DPET data to 4DCT based target volume delineation for SBRT of centrally located lung tumors increases the inter-observer agreement and may help to avoid geographic misses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Aline Soares de; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Oliveira, Mayron Faria de; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 - (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p grupo DPOC+ICC; 23 homens/1 mulher) e 32 (28 homens/4 mulheres) com DPOC isolada foram submetidos à espirometria forçada e lenta e pletismografia de corpo inteiro. Os pacientes do grupo DPOC+ICC apresentaram maior VEF1, VEF1/CVF e VEF1/capacidade vital lenta; porém, todos os principais volumes "estáticos" - VR, capacidade residual funcional (CRF) e CPT - foram menores que aqueles do grupo DPOC (p grupo DPOC+ICC que no grupo DPOC. Houve redução relativamente proporcional da CRF e da CPT nos dois grupos; logo, a CI também foi similar. Consequentemente, a fração inspiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC foi maior que no grupo DPOC (0,42 ± 0,10 vs. 0,36 ± 0,10; p grupo DPOC+ICC, a reserva inspiratória relativa foi notadamente similar entre os grupos (0,35 ± 0,09 vs. 0,44 ± 0,14; p < 0,05). Apesar dos efeitos restritivos da ICC, pacientes com DPOC+ICC apresentam elevações relativas dos limites inspiratórios (maior fração inspiratória). Entretanto, esses pacientes utilizam apenas parte desses limites, com o provável intuito de evitar reduções críticas da reserva inspiratória e maior trabalho elástico.

  14. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorates left ventricular dysfunction in mechanically ventilated rats following LPS-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherpanath, Thomas G V; Smeding, Lonneke; Hirsch, Alexander; Lagrand, Wim K; Schultz, Marcus J; Groeneveld, A B Johan

    2015-10-07

    High tidal volume ventilation has shown to cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), possibly contributing to concomitant extrapulmonary organ dysfunction. The present study examined whether left ventricular (LV) function is dependent on tidal volume size and whether this effect is augmented during lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-induced lung injury. Twenty male Wistar rats were sedated, paralyzed and then randomized in four groups receiving mechanical ventilation with tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg or 19 ml/kg with or without intrapulmonary administration of LPS. A conductance catheter was placed in the left ventricle to generate pressure-volume loops, which were also obtained within a few seconds of vena cava occlusion to obtain relatively load-independent LV systolic and diastolic function parameters. The end-systolic elastance / effective arterial elastance (Ees/Ea) ratio was used as the primary parameter of LV systolic function with the end-diastolic elastance (Eed) as primary LV diastolic function. Ees/Ea decreased over time in rats receiving LPS (p = 0.045) and high tidal volume ventilation (p = 0.007), with a lower Ees/Ea in the rats with high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS compared to the other groups (p tidal volume ventilation without LPS (p = 0.223). A significant interaction (p tidal ventilation and LPS for Ees/Ea and Eed, and all rats receiving high tidal volume ventilation plus LPS died before the end of the experiment. Low tidal volume ventilation ameliorated LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction while preventing death following LPS-induced lung injury in mechanically ventilated rats. Our data advocates the use of low tidal volumes, not only to avoid VILI, but to avert ventilator-induced myocardial dysfunction as well.

  15. Effects of a Multidisciplinary Approach to Improve Volume of Diagnostic Material in CT-Guided Lung Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Philip E; Sales, Catherine M; Hodges, Dalton C; Sales, Elizabeth W

    2015-01-01

    Recent publications have emphasized the importance of a multidisciplinary strategy for maximum conservation and utilization of lung biopsy material for advanced testing, which may determine therapy. This paper quantifies the effect of a multidisciplinary strategy implemented to optimize and increase tissue volume in CT-guided transthoracic needle core lung biopsies. The strategy was three-pronged: (1) once there was confidence diagnostic tissue had been obtained and if safe for the patient, additional biopsy passes were performed to further increase volume of biopsy material, (2) biopsy material was placed in multiple cassettes for processing, and (3) all tissue ribbons were conserved when cutting blocks in the histology laboratory. This study quantifies the effects of strategies #1 and #2. This retrospective analysis comparing CT-guided lung biopsies from 2007 and 2012 (before and after multidisciplinary approach implementation) was performed at a single institution. Patient medical records were reviewed and main variables analyzed include biopsy sample size, radiologist, number of blocks submitted, diagnosis, and complications. The biopsy sample size measured was considered to be directly proportional to tissue volume in the block. Biopsy sample size increased 2.5 fold with the average total biopsy sample size increasing from 1.0 cm (0.9-1.1 cm) in 2007 to 2.5 cm (2.3-2.8 cm) in 2012 (Pstrategy to CT-guided lung biopsies was effective in significantly increasing tissue volume and number of blocks available for advanced diagnostic testing.

  16. Utilizing Forced Vital Capacity to Predict Low Lung Compliance and Select Intraoperative Tidal Volume During Thoracic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoftman, Nir; Eikermann, Eric; Shin, John; Buckley, Jack; Navab, Kaveh; Abtin, Fereidoun; Grogan, Tristan; Cannesson, Maxime; Mahajan, Aman

    2017-12-01

    Tidal volume selection during mechanical ventilation utilizes dogmatic formulas that only consider a patient's predicted body weight (PBW). In this study, we investigate whether forced vital capacity (FVC) (1) correlates better to total lung capacity (TLC) than PBW, (2) predicts low pulmonary compliance, and (3) provides an alternative method for tidal volume selection. One hundred thirty thoracic surgery patients had their preoperative TLC calculated via 2 methods: (1) pulmonary function test (PFT; TLCPFT) and (2) computed tomography 3D reconstruction (TLCCT). We compared the correlation between TLC and PBW with the correlation between TLC and FVC to determine which was stronger. Dynamic pulmonary compliance was then calculated from intraoperative ventilator data and logistic regression models constructed to determine which clinical measure best predicted low compliance. Ratios of tidal volume/FVC plotted against peak inspiratory pressure were utilized to construct a new model for tidal volume selection. Calculated tidal volumes generated by this model were then compared with those generated by the standard lung-protective formula Vt = 7 cc/kg. The correlation between FVC and TLC (0.82 for TLCPFT and 0.76 for TLCCT) was stronger than the correlation between PBW and TLC (0.65 for TLCPFT and 0.58 for TLCCT). Patients with very low compliance had significantly smaller lung volumes (forced expiratory volume at 1 second, FVC, TLC) and lower diffusion capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide when compared with patients with normal compliance. An FVC cutoff of 3470 cc was 100% sensitive and 51% specific for predicting low compliance. The proposed equation Vt = FVC/8 significantly reduced calculated tidal volume by a mean of 22.5% in patients with low pulmonary compliance without affecting the mean tidal volume in patients with normal compliance (mean difference 0.9%). FVC is more strongly correlated to TLC than PBW and a cutoff of about 3.5 L can be utilized to predict

  17. Hydrostatic Pressurization of Lung Surfactant Microbubbles: Observation of a Strain-Rate Dependent Elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alec N; Borden, Mark A

    2017-11-28

    The microbubble offers a unique platform to study lung surfactant mechanics at physiologically relevant geometry and length scale. In this study, we compared the response of microbubbles (∼15 μm initial radius) coated with pure dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) versus naturally derived lung surfactant (SURVANTA) when subjected to linearly increasing hydrostatic pressure at different rates (0.5-2.3 kPa/s) at room temperature. The microbubbles contained perfluorobutane gas and were submerged in buffered saline saturated with perfluorobutane at atmospheric pressure. Bright-field microscopy showed that DPPC microbubbles compressed spherically and smoothly, whereas SURVANTA microbubbles exhibited wrinkling and smoothing cycles associated with buckling and collapse. Seismograph analysis showed that the SURVANTA collapse amplitude was constant, but the collapse rate increased with the pressurization rate. An analysis of the pressure-volume curves indicated that the dilatational elasticity increased during compression for both shell types. The initial dilatational elasticity for SURVANTA was nearly twice that of DPPC at higher pressurization rates (>1.5 kPa/s), producing a pressure drop of up to 60 kPa across the film prior to condensation of the perfluorobutane core. The strain-rate dependent stiffening of SURVANTA shells likely arises from their composition and microstructure, which provide enhanced in-plane monolayer rigidity and lateral repulsion from surface-associated collapse structures. Overall, these results provide new insights into lung surfactant mechanics and collapse behavior during compression.

  18. Intravenous superoxide dismutase as a protective agent to prevent impairment of lung function induced by high tidal volume ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nan-Chun; Liao, Fan-Ting; Cheng, Hao-Min; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Yang, Yu-Chun; Wang, Jiun-Jr

    2017-07-26

    Positive-pressure mechanical ventilation is essential in assisting patients with respiratory failure in the intensive care unit and facilitating oxygenation in the operating room. However, it was also recognized as a primary factor leading to hospital-acquired pulmonary dysfunction, in which pulmonary oxidative stress and lung inflammation had been known to play important roles. Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an important antioxidant, and possesses anti-inflammatory capacity. In this study, we aimed to study the efficacy of Cu/Zn SOD, administered intravenously during high tidal volume (HTV) ventilation, to prevent impairment of lung function. Thirty-eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: 5 h ventilation with (A) low tidal volume (LTV; 8 mL/kg; n = 10), (B) high tidal volume (HTV; 18 mL/kg; n = 14), or (C) HTV and intravenous treatment of Cu/Zn SOD at a dose of 1000 U/kg/h (HTV + SOD; n = 14). Lung function was evaluated both at baseline and after 5-h ventilation. Lung injury was assessed by histological examination, lung water and protein contents in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Pulmonary oxidative stress was examined by concentrations of methylguanidine (MG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in BALF, and antioxidative activity by protein expression of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) in the lung. Severity of lung inflammation was evaluated by white blood cell and differential count in BALF, and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and mRNA expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the lung. We also examined protein expression of surfactant protein (SP)-A and D and we measured hourly changes in serum nitric oxide (NO) level. Five hours of LTV ventilation did not induce a major change in lung function, whereas 5 h of HTV ventilation induced apparent combined restrictive and

  19. An evaluation of the feasibility of assessment of volume perfusion for the whole lung by 128-slice spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haitao [Imaging Center of Taian Central Hospital, Taian, Shandong (China); Gao, Fei; Li, Ning; Liu, Cheng [Shandong Univ., Shandong Medical Imaging Research Inst., CT Room, Shandong (China)], e-mail: liucheng491025@sina.com

    2013-10-15

    Background: Lung perfusion based on dynamic scanning cannot provide a quantitative assessment of the whole lung because of the limited coverage of the current computed tomography (CT) detector designs. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of dynamic volume perfusion CT (VPCT) of the whole lung using a 128-slice CT for the quantitative assessment and visualization of pulmonary perfusion. Material and Methods: Imaging was performed in a control group of 17 subjects who had no signs of disturbance of pulmonary function or diffuse lung disease, and 15 patients (five patients with acute pulmonary embolism and 10 with emphysema) who constituted the abnormal lung group. Dynamic VPCT was performed in all subjects, and pulmonary blood flow (PBF), pulmonary blood volume (PBV), and mean transit time (MTT) were calculated from dynamic contrast images with a coverage of 20.7 cm. Regional and volumetric PBF, PBV, and MTT were statistically evaluated and comparisons were made between the normal and abnormal lung groups. Results: Regional PBF (94.2{+-}36.5, 161.8 {+-}29.6, 185.7 {+-}38.1 and 125.5 {+-}46.1, 161.9 {+-}31.4, 169.3 {+-}51.7), PBV (6.7 {+-}2.8, 10.9 {+-}3.0, 12.9 {+-}4.5 and 9.9 {+-}4.6, 10.3 {+-}2.9, 11.9 {+-}4.5), and MTT (5.8 {+-}2.4, 4.5 {+-}1.3, 4.7 {+-}2.1 and 5.6 {+-}2.3, 4.3 {+-}1.5, 4.9 {+-}1.5) demonstrated significant differences in the gravitational and isogravitational directions in the normal lung group (P < 0.05). The PBF (154.2 {+-}30.6 vs. 94.9 {+-}15.9) and PBV (11.1 {+-}4.0 vs. 6.6 {+-}1.7) by dynamic VPCT showed significant differences between normal and abnormal lungs (P < 0.05), notwithstanding the four large lungs that had coverage > 20.7 cm. Conclusion: Dynamic VPCT of the whole lung is feasible for the quantitative assessment of pulmonary perfusion by 128-slice CT, and may in future permit the evaluation of both morphological and functional features of the whole lung in a single examination.

  20. Distress in suspected lung cancer patients following rapid and standard diagnostic programs: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocken, Pepijn; van der Heijden, Erik H F M; Oud, Karen T M; Bootsma, Gerben; Groen, Harry J M; Donders, A Rogier T; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Prins, Judith B

    2015-04-01

    Timeliness may influence emotional distress during the diagnostic phase of suspected lung cancer patients. We performed a prospective observational study to compare distress and quality of life (QoL) in two medical centres with a Rapid Outpatient Diagnostic Program (RODP) and two using conventional Stepwise Diagnostic Approach (SDA) on the basis of trained nurse-led care. Outpatients with radiological suspicion of lung cancer completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer 30-item Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and its 13-item Lung Cancer specific module (QLQ-LC13) upon first visit, 2 days later, thereafter weekly for 5 weeks and after 3 months. The 72 SDA patients and 121 RODP patients had a mean pre-diagnostic HADS-total score of 13.5 (SD 7.6); 63.4% had a score ≥10. Baseline QLQ-C30 global QoL was 61.6 (SD 22.7) exceeding reference values for lung cancer patients. Generalized least square models showed a significant centre by time interaction effect: during the first 6 weeks, HADS-total scores decreased in RODP patients (13.8-11.9) but sustained in SDA patients (13.1-13.6), whereas QoL showed no relevant changes. Times to diagnosis and discussion of therapy plan for RODP patients were 7 and 11 days shorter, respectively. Suspected lung cancer patients had high baseline distress levels. A decrease over time was found in RODP compared with SDA patients. QoL did not change relevantly. Albeit observational, these data indicate that patients experience less distress in rapid diagnostic programs than in stepwise diagnostic evaluation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. SU-F-T-150: Comparing Normal Tissue Irradiated Volumes for Proton Vs. Photon Treatment Plans On Lung Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, A; Mohan, R; Liao, Z [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to compare the “irradiated volume” (IRV) of normal tissues receiving 5, 20, 50, 80 and 90% or higher of the prescription dose with passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) vs. IMRT of lung cancer patients. The overall goal of this research is to understand the factors affecting outcomes of a randomized PSPT vs. IMRT lung trial. Methods: Thirteen lung cancer patients, selected randomly, were analyzed. Each patient had PSPT and IMRT 74 Gy (RBE) plans meeting the same normal tissue constraints generated. IRVs were created for pairs of IMRT and PSPT plans on each patient. The volume of iGTV, (respiratory motion-incorporated GTV) was subtracted from each IRV to create normal tissue irradiated volume IRVNT. The average of IRVNT DVHs over all patients was also calculated for both modalities and inter-compared as were the selected dose-volume indices. Probability (p value) curves were calculated based on the Wilcoxon matched-paired signed-rank test to determine the dose regions where the statistically significant differences existed. Results: As expected, the average 5, 20 and 50% IRVNT’s for PSPT was found to be significantly smaller than for IMRT (p < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.001 respectively). However, the average 90% IRVNT for PSPT was greater than for IMRT (p = 0.003) presumably due to larger penumbra of protons and the long range of protons in lower density media. The 80% IRVNT for PSPT was also larger but not statistically distinguishable (p = .224). Conclusion: PSPT modality has smaller irradiated volume at lower doses, but larger volume at high doses. A larger cohort of lung patients will be analyzed in the future and IRVNT of patients treated with PSPT and IMRT will be compared to determine if the irradiated volumes (the magnitude of “dose bath”) correlate with outcomes.

  2. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  3. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-01-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy. (orig.)

  4. High frequency oscillatory ventilation with lung volume optimization in very low birth weight newborns – a nine-year experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nona

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the clinical outcome of very low birth weight newborns, submitted to high frequency oscillatory ventilation with a strategy of early lung volume optimization. Methods: Descriptive prospective study in a nine-year period, between 1999 January 1st to 2008 January 1st. All the very low birth weight newborns were born in Dr. Alfredo da Costa Maternity, Lisbon, Portugal, were admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and submitted to high frequency oscillatory ventilation with early lung volume optimization; these newborns were followed-up since birth and their charts were analyzed periodically until hospital discharge. Rresults: From a total population of 730 very low birth weight inborns, 117 babies died (16% and 613 survived (84%. The median of birth weight was 975 g and the gestational age median was 28 weeks. For the survivors, the median ventilation and oxygenation times were 3 and 18 days, respectively. The incidence of chronic lung disease was 9.5%, with nine newborns discharged on oxygen therapy. The incidence of intraventricular hemorrhage III – IV (total population group was 11.5% and the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity grade 3 or higher was 8.0%. Cconclusions: High frequency oscillatory ventilation with early lung volume optimization strategy reduced the need of respiratory support, and improved pulmonary and global outcomes in very low birth weight infants with respiratory distress syndrome.

  5. [The importance of lung volumes in the investigation of heavy smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Saad, H; Ben Amor, L; Ben Mdalla, S; Ghannouchi, I; Ben Essghair, M; Sfaxi, R; Garrouche, A; Rouatbi, N; Rouatbi, S

    2014-01-01

    Lung hyperinflation (LH) has become a major concern in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To evaluate the role of lung volumes in the positive diagnosis of COPD and in the assessment of airway obstruction reversibility. Three hundred and sixty-six male smokers over the age of 35 with more than 40 pack-years exposure were included in the study. Plethysmographic data were determined before/after taking a bronchodilator (BBD, ABD). Applied definitions: airflow obstruction: BBD FEV1/FVCvolume (RV)>upper limit of normal. Expressions of reversibility: Δvariable=(ABD-BBD) values; Δinit%=Δvariable/BBD value and Δref%=Δvariable/reference value. A 12%init and a 0.2L increase in either FEV1 or FVC or a 10%ref or - 300 mL decrease in RV were considered as clinically significant. Over the 85 smokers without airflow obstruction, 68% had LH. In the hyperinflated group (n=314), and compared to changes in FEV1 and FVC, these RV changes detected more respondents (54% for FEV1 and FVC vs. 65% for RV, P=0.002). This was not the case for the group free from LH (n=52) (23% for FEV1 and FVC vs. 35% for RV, P=0.09). In the 58 hyperinflated groups free from airflow obstruction, and compared to changes in FEV1 and FVC, changes in RV detected more respondents (24% for FEV1 and FVC vs. 71% for RV, P=0.0001). In heavy smokers, it seems essential to include LH as a criterion for a positive diagnosis of COPD and of reversibility evaluation. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Lung volume and expiratory flow rates from pre- to post-puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joshua R; Emerson, Sam R; Kurti, Stephanie P; Gandhi, Kirti; Harms, Craig A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose was to determine if the airways and lungs grow disproportionately from pre- to post-puberty in boys and girls. We hypothesized that the airways grow at a slower rate than lung volume (i.e. dysanapsis growth) during puberty and boys would exhibit more dysanaptic growth compared to girls. Twenty-one pre-pubescent children [11 boys (pre 10.1 ± 0.5 years, post 15.3 ± 0.5 years); 10 girls (pre 9.4 ± 1.0 years, post 14.1 ± 1.0 years)] performed pulmonary function tests (PFTs) ~5 years ago from an original cohort of 40 children. These 21 children performed PFTs, which included forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow at 50 % FVC (FEF50). Static pressure at 50 % of FVC [Pst(L)50 %] was estimated based on age. Dysanapsis ratio (DR) was calculated [FEF50 × FVC(-1) × Pst(L) 50 % (-1) ]. Maturation status was determined via Tanner stages. Stage of maturation was not different (p > 0.05) between boys and girls (4.2 ± 0.6 stage vs. 3.7 ± 0.7 stage, respectively). FVC and FEF50 increased (p 0.05) from pre- to post-puberty. FEF50 and FVC significantly increased and DR decreased (p puberty for both sexes. Post-puberty, boys had a significantly larger FVC, but FEF50, DR, and FEF50/FVC were not different (p > 0.05) compared to girls. These data suggest that dysanaptic growth occurs during puberty and that it is not different between boys and girls.

  7. Tidal Volume Single Breath Washout of Two Tracer Gases - A Practical and Promising Lung Function Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Fuchs, Oliver; Riedel, Thomas; Gustafsson, Per; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    Background Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI), which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM) and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW) of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and helium (He) using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM). Methods The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC), were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. Results USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60). MM from USFM reflected SF6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. Conclusion The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing. PMID:21423739

  8. Scintigraphy at 3 months after single lung transplantation and observations of primary graft dysfunction and lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmaati, Esther Okeke; Iversen, Martin; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2012-01-01

    procedure 3 months after single lung transplantation (SLTX). A total of 41 patients were included in the study: 20 women and 21 men with the age span of patients at transplantation being 38-66 years (mean ± SD: 54.2 ± 6.0). Patient records also included lung function tests and chest X-ray images. We found......Scintigraphy has been used as a tool to detect dysfunction of the lung before and after transplantation. The aims of this study were to evaluate the development of the ventilation-perfusion relationships in single lung transplant recipients in the first year, at 3 months after transplantation...

  9. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  10. Detection of lung cancer on the chest radiograph: a study on observer performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quekel, Lorentz G.B.A.; Kessels, Alphons G.H.; Goei, Reginald; Engelshoven, Joseph M.A. van

    2001-01-01

    Study objectives: to study the validity and observers consistency in the detection of lung cancer on the chest radiograph. Materials and methods: the chest radiographs of 100 clinical cases were interpreted by 14 observers. The radiographs were obtained from 30 patients with initially missed but histopathologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 35 patients with other cardiopulmonary diseases and 35 patients with no abnormalities. The observers consisted of ten experienced radiologists, two-experienced chest physicians and two residents in radiology. All observers were unaware of the study design. The validity and observer consistency was determined for each observer. Results: the mean sensitivity and specificity of the ten radiologists were 0.36 and 0.90. For the two chest physicians, the mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.29 and 0.96. For the two residents in radiology, mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.25 and 0.94. The mean interobserver kappa and mean intraobserver kappa for the radiologists were 0.38 and 0.54. For the two chest physicians, the mean interobserver kappa was 0.43, while the intraobserver kappa was 0.59. For the two residents in radiology, mean interobserver kappa was 0.35 and the intraobserver kappa was 0.42. There was no significant relation between the consistency parameters and validity parameters. The interobserver and intraobserver kappa values showed good correlation. Conclusion: the validity of the chest radiograph and observers consistency in the detection of nodular lung cancer varies widely. The level of experience is likely to influence the diagnostic performance

  11. Quantification of gross tumour volume changes between simulation and first day of radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishan, Amar U; Cui, Jing; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E; Purdy, James A; Chen, Allen M

    2014-10-01

    To quantify changes in gross tumour volume (GTV) between simulation and initiation of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck. Initial cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans from 12 patients with lung cancer and 12 with head/neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with image guidance were rigidly registered to the simulation CT scans. The GTV was demarcated on both scans. The relationship between percent GTV change and variables including time interval between simulation and start, tumour (T) stage, and absolute weight change was assessed. For lung cancer patients, the GTV increased a median of 35.06% (range, -16.63% to 229.97%) over a median interval of 13 days (range, 7-43), while for HNSCC patients, the median GTV increase was 16.04% (range, -8.03% to 47.41%) over 13 days (range, 7-40). These observed changes are statistically significant. The magnitude of this change was inversely associated with the size of the tumour on the simulation scan for lung cancer patients (P lung cancer cases) did not correlate with degree of GTV change (P > 0.1). While the observed changes in GTV were moderate from the time of simulation to start of radiotherapy, these findings underscore the importance of image guidance for target localisation and verification, particularly for smaller tumours. Minimising the delay between simulation and treatment initiation may also be beneficial. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  12. Can simulation measurements be used to predict the irradiated lung volume in the tangential fields in patients treated for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornstein, B.A.; Cheng, C.W.; Rhodes, L.M.; Rashid, H.; Stomper, P.C.; Siddon, R.L.; Harris, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    A simple method of estimating the amount of lung irradiated in patients with breast cancer would be of use in minimizing lung complications. To determine whether simple measurements taken at the time of simulation can be used to predict the lung volume in the radiation field, we performed CT scans as part of treatment planning in 40 cases undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Parameters measured from simulator films included: (a) the perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential field edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall at the center of the field (CLD); (b) the maximum perpendicular distance from the posterior tangential field edge to the posterior part of the anterior chest wall (MLD); and (c) the length of lung (L) as measured at the posterior tangential field edge on the simulator film. CT scans of the chest were performed with the patient in the treatment position with 1 cm slice intervals, covering lung apex to base. The ipsilateral total lung area and the lung area included within the treatment port were calculated for each CT scan slice, multiplied by the slice thickness, and then integrated over all CT scan slices to give the volumes. The best predictor of the percent of ipsilateral lung volume treated by the tangential fields was the CLD. Employing linear regression analysis, a coefficient of determination r2 = 0.799 was calculated between CLD and percent treated ipsilateral lung volume on CT scan. In comparison, the coefficients for the other parameters were r2 = 0.784 for the MLD, r2 = 0.071 for L, and r2 = 0.690 for CLD x L. A CLD of 1.5 cm predicted that about 6% of the ipsilateral lung would be included in the tangential field, a CLD of 2.5 cm about 16%, and a CLD of 3.5 cm about 26% of the ipsilateral lung, with a mean 90% prediction interval of +/- 7.1% of ipsilateral lung volume

  13. Assessment of interpatient heterogeneity in tumor radiosensitivity for nonsmall cell lung cancer using tumor-volume variation data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V., E-mail: chvetsov2@gmail.com; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Mayr, Nina [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Yartsev, Slav [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 790 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario 46A 4L6 (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In our previous work, the authors showed that a distribution of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients could be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for head and neck cancer. In this research study, the authors show that this algorithm can be applied to other tumors, specifically in nonsmall cell lung cancer. This new application includes larger patient volumes and includes comparison of data sets obtained at independent institutions. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage computed tomography. Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} and clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T{sub 1/2} have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population model of tumor response and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Nonsmall cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractionsS{sub 2} for nonsmall cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Conclusions: The data obtained

  14. The safety of dipyridamole in patients undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy prior to lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, M.R.; Angelides, S.; Parker, M.K.; Silva, I. da; Freeman, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) are at high risk of peri-operative cardiac complications, and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) is commonly used for risk stratification. This study prospectively assessed the safety of dipyridamole in these patients and compared the incidence of side-effects (particularly dyspnoea) with that in patients undergoing dipyridamole MPS prior to elective non-cardiothoracic surgery. Fifty patients were enrolled: 25 in the LVRS cohort (13 males, 12 females), with a mean age of 65 years and a mean FEV 1 of 0.79 l, and 25 (with no history of asthma or COPD) in the control cohort (14 males, 11 females), with a mean age of 66 years. Fourteen patients (56%) in each group developed side-effects. Dyspnoea was reported by five patients (20%) in the LVRS and two patients (8%) in the control cohort (P=NS). One patient in each cohort developed severe hypotension and bradycardia. Eight (32%) other patients developed minor side-effects in the LVRS cohort compared with 11 (44%) in the control group. All side-effects responded promptly to intravenous aminophylline. In summary, there was a statistically non-significant increase in the incidence of dyspnoea in patients with end-stage COPD and all side-effects responded to aminophylline. Thus, dipyridamole can be used safely in these patients. (orig.)

  15. A prospective study of whether radiation pneumonitis is influenced by low-dose irradiated lung volume in primary lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibe, Yuzuru; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Masuda, Noriyuki; Yoshimura, Hirokuni

    2007-01-01

    The current study prospectively investigated the optimal dose-volume condition in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease compared to those without chronic pulmonary disease. Cases of primary lung cancer treated with intended curative radiation therapy were registered in the current study. Their fraction size was limited to 2-3 Gy, so-called standard fractionation. They were prescribed a total dose of 60 Gy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; n=17) and a total dose of 54 Gy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC; n=4). Of the 21 patients enrolled in this study, 4 had chronic pulmonary disease (study arm), and the others had no chronic pulmonary disease (control arm). Seven received chemotherapy. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in 5. Of the four patients in the study arm, two (50%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis; only 3 of the 17 patients in the control arm (17.6%) experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis. Furthermore, the median V 20 of patients who experienced symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm was 14%, which was higher than that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the study arm, 5.8%. On the other hand, in the control arm, the median V 20 of patients with symptomatic radiation pneumonitis was 14.2%, about the same as that of patients with no symptomatic radiation pneumonitis in the control arm, 15.1%. The current study suggested that, as much as 15% of V 20 , might play an important role in cases of lung cancer with chronic pulmonary disease. (author)

  16. Increased expression of AQP 1 and AQP 5 in rat lungs ventilated with low tidal volume is time dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fabregat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND GOALS: Mechanical ventilation (MV can induce or worsen pulmonary oedema. Aquaporins (AQPs facilitate the selective and rapid bi-directional movement of water. Their role in the development and resolution of pulmonary oedema is controversial. Our objectives are to determine if prolonged MV causes lung oedema and changes in the expression of AQP 1 and AQP 5 in rats. METHODS: 25 male Wistar rats were subjected to MV with a tidal volume of 10 ml/kg, during 2 hours (n = 12 and 4 hours (n = 13. Degree of oedema was compared with a group of non-ventilated rats (n = 5. The expression of AQP 1 and AQP 5 were determined by western immunoblotting, measuring the amount of mRNA (previously amplified by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical staining of AQPs 1 and 5 in lung samples from all groups. RESULTS: Lung oedema and alveolar-capillary membrane permeability did not change during MV. AQP-5 steady state levels in the western blot were increased (p<0.01 at 2 h and 4 h of MV. But in AQP-1 expression these differences were not found. However, the amount of mRNA for AQP-1 was increased at 2 h and 4 h of MV; and for AQP 5 at 4 h of MV. These findings were corroborated by representative immunohistochemical lung samples. CONCLUSION: In lungs from rats ventilated with a low tidal volume the expression of AQP 5 increases gradually with MV duration, but does not cause pulmonary oedema or changes in lung permeability. AQPs may have a protective effect against the oedema induced by MV.

  17. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  18. Effects of body position and extension of the neck and extremities on lung volume measured via computed tomography in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Drees, Randi; Sladky, Kurt K; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Kircher, Patrick R

    2013-10-15

    To determine the effects of body position and extension of the neck and extremities on CT measurements of ventilated lung volume in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). Prospective crossover-design study. 14 adult red-eared slider turtles. CT was performed on turtles in horizontal ventral recumbent and vertical left lateral recumbent, right lateral recumbent, and caudal recumbent body positions. In sedated turtles, evaluations were performed in horizontal ventral recumbent body position with and without extension of the neck and extremities. Lung volumes were estimated from helical CT images with commercial software. Effects of body position, extremity and neck extension, sedation, body weight, and sex on lung volume were analyzed. Mean ± SD volume of dependent lung tissue was significantly decreased in vertical left lateral (18.97 ± 14.65 mL), right lateral (24.59 ± 19.16 mL), and caudal (9.23 ± 12.13 mL) recumbent positions, compared with the same region for turtles in horizontal ventral recumbency (48.52 ± 20.08 mL, 50.66 ± 18.08 mL, and 31.95 ± 15.69 mL, respectively). Total lung volume did not differ among positions because of compensatory increases in nondependent lung tissue. Extension of the extremities and neck significantly increased total lung volume (127.94 ± 35.53 mL), compared with that in turtles with the head, neck, and extremities withdrawn into the shell (103.24 ± 40.13 mL). Vertical positioning of red-eared sliders significantly affected lung volumes and could potentially affect interpretation of radiographs obtained in these positions. Extension of the extremities and neck resulted in the greatest total lung volume.

  19. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N

    2008-01-01

    were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. RESULTS......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  20. Relationship between dose-volume parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Shibata, Toru [Kagawa University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kagawa (Japan); Go, Tetsuhiko; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Yokomise, Hiroyasu [Kagawa University, Department of General Thoracic, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This study evaluated the relationship between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) followed by surgery for lung cancer. We also examined a new DVH parameter, because the unresected lung should be more spared than the later resected lung. Data from 43 non-small cell lung cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. The DVH parameters of the lung were calculated from the total bilateral lung volume minus (1) the gross tumor volume (DVHg) or (2) the later resected lung volume (DVHr). Radiation pneumonitis (RP) and fistula, including bronchopleural and pulmonary fistula, were graded as the pulmonary complications. Factors affecting the incidences of grade 2 or higher RP (≥G2 RP) and fistula were analyzed. Sixteen patients (37 %) experienced ≥G2 RP and a V20 value of the total lung minus the later resected lung (V20r) ≥ 12 % was a significant factor affecting the incidence of ≥G2 RP (p = 0.032). Six patients (14 %) developed a fistula and a V35 value of the total lung minus the gross tumor (V35g) ≥ 19 % and a V40g ≥ 16 % were significant factors affecting the incidence of fistula (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively). These DVH parameters may be related to the incidences of ≥G2 RP and fistula. (orig.) [German] In dieser Studie wurde die Beziehung zwischen Dosis-Volumen-Histogramm-(DVH-)Parametern und pulmonalen Komplikationen nach neoadjuvanter Radiochemotherapie (NARCT) und nachfolgender Operation beim Lungenkarzinom untersucht. Zudem wurde ein neuer DVH-Parameter untersucht, da das nichtresezierte Lungengewebe mehr geschont werden sollte als reseziertes Gewebe. Daten von 43 Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Die DVH-Parameter der Lunge wurden aus dem gesamten beidseitigen Lungenvolumen minus (1) das makroskopische Tumorvolumen (DVHg) oder (2) das resezierte Lungenvolumen (DVHr) ermittelt. Strahlenpneumonitis (RP) und Fisteln

  1. Assessment of bronchodilator response through changes in lung volumes in chronic airflow obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Figueroa-Casas

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Although FEV1 improvement is routinely used to define bronchodilator (BD response, it correlates poorly with clinical effects. Changes in lung volumes (LV have shown better correlation with exercise tolerance and might be more sensitive to detect BD effects. We assessed the additional contribution of measuring LV before and after BD to detect acute improvement in lung function not demonstrated by FEV1, and the influence of the response criteria selected on this contribution. We analyzed 98 spirometries and plethismographies performed pre and post BD in patients with airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC 10% of baseline (D>5 anD>15% were also analyzed. FEV1 identified as responders 32% of patients. Greater proportions were uncovered by slow vital capacity (51%, p5 anD>15%. Mean change and proportions of responders for each LV varied significantly (pSi bien el aumento del VEF1 es habitualmente utilizado para definir respuesta a broncodilatadores (BD, su correlación con efectos clínicos es pobre. Los cambios en volúmenes pulmonares (VP han demostrado mejor correlación con tolerancia al ejercicio y podrían ser más sensibles para detectar efectos de los BD. Nosotros evaluamos la contribución adicional de medir VP antes y después de BD para detectar mejoría funcional aguda no demostrada por cambios del VEF1, y la influencia del criterio de respuesta seleccionado en esta contribución. Se analizaron 98 espirometrías y pletismografías realizadas pre y post BD en pacientes con obstrucción al flujo aéreo (VEF1/CVF 10% del basal (D>5 y 15% fueron también analizados. El VEF1 identificó como respondedores a 32% de los pacientes. Proporciones mayores fueron identificadas por capacidad vital lenta (51%, p5 y 15%. El cambio promedio y las proporciones de respondedores para cada VP variaron significativamente (p<0.05 según que el cambio fuese expresado como porcentaje del basal o del valor predicho. Una proporción considerable de pacientes con obstrucci

  2. Ventilatory protective strategies during thoracic surgery: effects of alveolar recruitment maneuver and low-tidal volume ventilation on lung density distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Schilling, Thomas; Schütze, Hartmut; Senturk, Mert; Hachenberg, Thomas; Hedenstierna, Göran

    2011-05-01

    The increased tidal volume (V(T)) applied to the ventilated lung during one-lung ventilation (OLV) enhances cyclic alveolar recruitment and mechanical stress. It is unknown whether alveolar recruitment maneuvers (ARMs) and reduced V(T) may influence tidal recruitment and lung density. Therefore, the effects of ARM and OLV with different V(T) on pulmonary gas/tissue distribution are examined. Eight anesthetized piglets were mechanically ventilated (V(T) = 10 ml/kg). A defined ARM was applied to the whole lung (40 cm H(2)O for 10 s). Spiral computed tomographic lung scans were acquired before and after ARM. Thereafter, the lungs were separated with an endobronchial blocker. The pigs were randomized to receive OLV in the dependent lung with a V(T) of either 5 or 10 ml/kg. Computed tomography was repeated during and after OLV. The voxels were categorized by density intervals (i.e., atelectasis, poorly aerated, normally aerated, or overaerated). Tidal recruitment was defined as the addition of gas to collapsed lung regions. The dependent lung contained atelectatic (56 ± 10 ml), poorly aerated (183 ± 10 ml), and normally aerated (187 ± 29 ml) regions before ARM. After ARM, lung volume and aeration increased (426 ± 35 vs. 526 ± 69 ml). Respiratory compliance enhanced, and tidal recruitment decreased (95% vs. 79% of the whole end-expiratory lung volume). OLV with 10 ml/kg further increased aeration (atelectasis, 15 ± 2 ml; poorly aerated, 94 ± 24 ml; normally aerated, 580 ± 98 ml) and tidal recruitment (81% of the dependent lung). OLV with 5 ml/kg did not affect tidal recruitment or lung density distribution. (Data are given as mean ± SD.) The ARM improves aeration and respiratory mechanics. In contrast to OLV with high V(T), OLV with reduced V(T) does not reinforce tidal recruitment, indicating decreased mechanical stress.

  3. Poor man medical pneumoplasty: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction with hot saline versus dissolved doxycycline as a neoteric remedy of pulmonary emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Abumossalam

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction by hot saline and dissolved doxycycline comes into sight to be a safe and feasible profile with an acceptable outcome that presents an attractive substitute to COPD patients who are physiologically friable.

  4. Volume-Dependent Expression of In-Field and Out-of-Field Effects in the Proton-Irradiated Rat Lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coppes, Robert P.; Muijs, Christina T.; Faber, Hette; Gross, Sascha; Schippers, Jacobus M.; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; van Luijk, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether occurance of early radiation effects in lung tissue depends on local close only. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five percent. 50%, 66%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using single fractions of 150-MeV protons. For all volumes, in-field and out-of-field

  5. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents pulmonary inflammation in patients without preexisting lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, Esther K.; Choi, Goda; Dessing, Mark C.; Bresser, Paul; Lutter, Rene; Dzoljic, Misa; van der Poll, Tom; Vroom, Margreeth B.; Hollmann, Markus; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes aggravates lung injury in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The authors sought to determine the effects of short-term mechanical ventilation on local inflammatory responses in patients without

  6. Clear Direction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  7. Perceptual Mistakes. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  8. Personality Projections. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  9. Context and Content. The Montessori Observer. Volume 30, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2009

    2009-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  10. Scientific Education. The Montessori Observer. Volume 29, Number 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  11. Nomenclature. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature article,…

  12. Power Struggles. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  13. Distraction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 31, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  14. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I; Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted

  15. The Effects of Hemodynamic Alterations on Lung Volumes in Fetuses with Tetralogy of Fallot: An MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Berger, Rudolf; Mlczoch, Elisabeth; Sternal, Daniel; Mailath-Pokorny, Mariella; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Weber, Michael; Salzer-Muhar, Ulrike

    2015-08-01

    This study assessed whether the presence of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) affects fetal lung development and whether these fetuses are at risk of pulmonary hypoplasia (PH). Furthermore, we investigated whether the degree of the concomitant pulmonary valve (PV) stenosis or a stenosis in the branch pulmonary arteries correlates with the fetal lung volume. Lung volumetry was performed in 16 fetuses with TOF who underwent MRI between gestational weeks 21 and 35 and in 22 controls. Fetal biometric data and the diameters of the PVs were evaluated by ultrasound. PV and branch pulmonary artery diameters were standardized (z-scores), and fetal lung volume/fetal body weight (FLV/FBW) ratios (ml/g) were calculated. The mean FLV/FBW ratio (0.031 ± 0.009 ml/g) in the TOF group was statistically significantly lower than in the control group (0.041 ± 0.009 ml/g; P = 0.003). None of the fetuses with TOF met the criterion for PH. FLV did not correlate with the degree of PV stenosis, but rather with the presence of a significant stenosis in at least one branch pulmonary artery. The presence of TOF moderately affects fetal lung growth, which is apparently not dependent on the degree of the PV stenosis. However, only an additional stenosis in at least one branch pulmonary artery was associated with a small FLV, but not with PH. Thus, reduced pulmonary blood flow may be offset by additional factors, such as the ability to establish a sufficient collateral system and to alter structural vascular size and, thus, pulmonary vascular resistance.

  16. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  17. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  18. Measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume using computed tomography: reliability by intra- and inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Segelsjoe, Monica; Magnusson, Anders; Andersson, Anna; Biglarnia, Ali-Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background Unlike other solid organ transplants, pancreas allografts can undergo a substantial decrease in baseline volume after transplantation. This phenomenon has not been well characterized, as there are insufficient data on reliable and reproducible volume assessments. We hypothesized that characterization of pancreatic volume by means of computed tomography (CT) could be a useful method for clinical follow-up in pancreas transplant patients. Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of pancreatic volume assessment using CT scan in transplanted patients. Material and Methods CT examinations were performed on 21 consecutive patients undergoing pancreas transplantation. Volume measurements were carried out by two observers tracing the pancreatic contours in all slices. The observers performed the measurements twice for each patient. Differences in volume measurement were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer variability. Results The intra-observer variability for the pancreatic volume measurements of Observers 1 and 2 was found to be in almost perfect agreement, with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 (0.77-0.96) and 0.99 (0.98-1.0), respectively. Regarding inter-observer validity, the ICCs for the first and second measurements were 0.90 (range, 0.77-0.96) and 0.95 (range, 0.85-0.98), respectively. Conclusion CT volumetry is a reliable and reproducible method for measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume

  19. Measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume using computed tomography: reliability by intra- and inter-observer variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Segelsjoe, Monica; Magnusson, Anders [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Section of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: eva.lundqvist.8954@student.uu.se; Andersson, Anna; Biglarnia, Ali-Reza [Dept. of Surgical Sciences, Section of Transplantation Surgery, Uppsala Univ. Hospital, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2012-11-15

    Background Unlike other solid organ transplants, pancreas allografts can undergo a substantial decrease in baseline volume after transplantation. This phenomenon has not been well characterized, as there are insufficient data on reliable and reproducible volume assessments. We hypothesized that characterization of pancreatic volume by means of computed tomography (CT) could be a useful method for clinical follow-up in pancreas transplant patients. Purpose To evaluate the feasibility and reliability of pancreatic volume assessment using CT scan in transplanted patients. Material and Methods CT examinations were performed on 21 consecutive patients undergoing pancreas transplantation. Volume measurements were carried out by two observers tracing the pancreatic contours in all slices. The observers performed the measurements twice for each patient. Differences in volume measurement were used to evaluate intra- and inter-observer variability. Results The intra-observer variability for the pancreatic volume measurements of Observers 1 and 2 was found to be in almost perfect agreement, with an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 (0.77-0.96) and 0.99 (0.98-1.0), respectively. Regarding inter-observer validity, the ICCs for the first and second measurements were 0.90 (range, 0.77-0.96) and 0.95 (range, 0.85-0.98), respectively. Conclusion CT volumetry is a reliable and reproducible method for measurement of transplanted pancreatic volume.

  20. Low tidal volume and high positive end-expiratory pressure mechanical ventilation results in increased inflammation and ventilator-associated lung injury in normal lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Caron M; Xu, Da-Zhong; Lu, Qi; Cheng, Yunhui; Pisarenko, Vadim; Doucet, Danielle; Brown, Margaret; Aisner, Seena; Zhang, Chunxiang; Deitch, Edwin A; Delphin, Ellise

    2010-06-01

    Protective mechanical ventilation with low tidal volume (Vt) and low plateau pressure reduces mortality and decreases the length of mechanical ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanical ventilation that will protect normal lungs during major surgical procedures of long duration may improve postoperative outcomes. We performed an animal study comparing 3 ventilation strategies used in the operating room in normal lungs. We compared the effects on pulmonary mechanics, inflammatory mediators, and lung tissue injury. Female pigs were randomized into 3 groups. Group H-Vt/3 (n = 6) was ventilated with a Vt of 15 mL/kg predicted body weight (PBW)/positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 3 cm H(2)O, group L-Vt/3 (n = 6) with a Vt of 6 mL/kg PBW/PEEP of 3 cm H(2)O, and group L-Vt/10 (n = 6) with a Vt of 6 mL/kg PBW/PEEP of 10 cm H(2)O, for 8 hours. Hemodynamics, airway mechanics, arterial blood gases, and inflammatory markers were monitored. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for inflammatory markers and protein concentration. The right lower lobe was assayed for mRNA of specific cytokines. The right lower lobe and right upper lobe were evaluated histologically. In contrast to groups H-Vt/3 and L-Vt/3, group L-Vt/10 exhibited a 6-fold increase in inflammatory mediators in BAL (P ventilation with high PEEP resulted in increased production of inflammatory markers. Low PEEP resulted in lower levels of inflammatory markers. High Vt/low PEEP resulted in less histologic lung injury.

  1. Adaptive support ventilation may deliver unwanted respiratory rate-tidal volume combinations in patients with acute lung injury ventilated according to an open lung concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dongelmans, Dave A; Paulus, Frederique; Veelo, Denise P; Binnekade, Jan M; Vroom, Margreeth B; Schultz, Marcus J

    2011-05-01

    With adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate and tidal volume (V(T)) are a function of the Otis least work of breathing formula. We hypothesized that adaptive support ventilation in an open lung ventilator strategy would deliver higher V(T)s to patients with acute lung injury. Patients with acute lung injury were ventilated according to a local guideline advising the use of lower V(T) (6-8 ml/kg predicted body weight), high concentrations of positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. Ventilation parameters were recorded when the ventilator was switched to adaptive support ventilation, and after recruitment maneuvers. If V(T) increased more than 8 ml/kg predicted body weight, airway pressure was limited to correct for the rise of V(T). Ten patients with a mean (±SD) Pao(2)/Fio(2) of 171 ± 86 mmHg were included. After a switch from pressure-controlled ventilation to adaptive support ventilation, respiratory rate declined (from 31 ± 5 to 21 ± 6 breaths/min; difference = 10 breaths/min, 95% CI 3-17 breaths/min, P = 0.008) and V(T) increased (from 6.5 ± 0.8 to 9.0 ± 1.6 ml/kg predicted body weight; difference = 2.5 ml, 95% CI 0.4-4.6 ml/kg predicted body weight, P = 0.02). Pressure limitation corrected for the rise of V(T), but minute ventilation declined, forcing the user to switch back to pressure-controlled ventilation. Adaptive support ventilation, compared with pressure-controlled ventilation in an open lung strategy setting, delivers a lower respiratory rate-higher V(T) combination. Pressure limitation does correct for the rise of V(T), but leads to a decline in minute ventilation.

  2. Metabolically active tumour volume segmentation from dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET studies in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, Lieke L; Frings, Virginie; Hoekstra, Otto S; Kenny, Laura M; Aboagye, Eric O; Boellaard, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with (18)F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ([(18)F]FLT) can be used to assess tumour proliferation. A kinetic-filtering (KF) classification algorithm has been suggested for segmentation of tumours in dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET data. The aim of the present study was to evaluate KF segmentation and its test-retest performance in [(18)F]FLT PET in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Nine NSCLC patients underwent two 60-min dynamic [(18)F]FLT PET scans within 7 days prior to treatment. Dynamic scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) as well as with ordered subsets expectation maximisation (OSEM). Twenty-eight lesions were identified by an experienced physician. Segmentation was performed using KF applied to the dynamic data set and a source-to-background corrected 50% threshold (A50%) was applied to the sum image of the last three frames (45- to 60-min p.i.). Furthermore, several adaptations of KF were tested. Both for KF and A50% test-retest (TRT) variability of metabolically active tumour volume and standard uptake value (SUV) were evaluated. KF performed better on OSEM- than on FBP-reconstructed PET images. The original KF implementation segmented 15 out of 28 lesions, whereas A50% segmented each lesion. Adapted KF versions, however, were able to segment 26 out of 28 lesions. In the best performing adapted versions, metabolically active tumour volume and SUV TRT variability was similar to those of A50%. KF misclassified certain tumour areas as vertebrae or liver tissue, which was shown to be related to heterogeneous [(18)F]FLT uptake areas within the tumour. For [(18)F]FLT PET studies in NSCLC patients, KF and A50% show comparable tumour volume segmentation performance. The KF method needs, however, a site-specific optimisation. The A50% is therefore a good alternative for tumour segmentation in NSCLC [(18)F]FLT PET studies in multicentre studies. Yet, it was observed that KF has the potential to subsegment

  3. Lung volumes, pulmonary ventilation, and hypoxia following rapid decompression to 60,000 ft (18,288 m).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Desmond M; D'Oyly, Timothy J; McGown, Amanda S; Lee, Vivienne M

    2013-06-01

    Rapid decompressions (RD) to 60,000 ft (18,288 m) were undertaken by six subjects to provide evidence of satisfactory performance of a contemporary, partial pressure assembly life support system for the purposes of flight clearance. A total of 12 3-s RDs were conducted with subjects breathing 56% oxygen (balance nitrogen) at the base (simulated cabin) altitude of 22,500 ft (6858 m), switching to 100% oxygen under 72 mmHg (9.6 kPa) of positive pressure at the final (simulated aircraft) altitude. Respiratory pressures, flows, and gas compositions were monitored continuously throughout. All RDs were completed safely, but one subject experienced significant hypoxia during the minute at final altitude, associated with severe hemoglobin desaturation to a low of 53%. Accurate data on subjects' lung volumes were obtained and individual responses post-RD were reviewed in relation to patterns of pulmonary ventilation. The occurrence of severe hypoxia is explained by hypoventilation in conjunction with unusually large lung volumes (total lung capacity 10.18 L). Subjects' lung volumes and patterns of pulmonary ventilation are critical, but idiosyncratic, determinants of alveolar oxygenation and severity of hypoxia following RD to 60,000 ft (18,288 m). At such extreme altitudes even vaporization of water condensate in the oxygen mask may compromise oxygen delivery. An altitude ceiling of 60,000 ft (18,288 m) is the likely threshold for reliable protection using partial pressure assemblies and aircrew should be instructed to take two deep 'clearing' breaths immediately following RD at such extreme pressure breathing altitudes.

  4. Design of the Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema Palliation Trial (VENT: a non-surgical method of lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppen Marc

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung volume reduction surgery is effective at improving lung function, quality of life, and mortality in carefully selected individuals with advanced emphysema. Recently, less invasive bronchoscopic approaches have been designed to utilize these principles while avoiding the associated perioperative risks. The Endobronchial Valve for Emphysema PalliatioN Trial (VENT posits that occlusion of a single pulmonary lobe through bronchoscopically placed Zephyr® endobronchial valves will effect significant improvements in lung function and exercise tolerance with an acceptable risk profile in advanced emphysema. Methods The trial design posted on Clinical trials.gov, on August 10, 2005 proposed an enrollment of 270 subjects. Inclusion criteria included: diagnosis of emphysema with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 100%; residual volume > 150% predicted, and heterogeneous emphysema defined using a quantitative chest computed tomography algorithm. Following standardized pulmonary rehabilitation, patients were randomized 2:1 to receive unilateral lobar placement of endobronchial valves plus optimal medical management or optimal medical management alone. The co-primary endpoint was the mean percent change in FEV1 and six minute walk distance at 180 days. Secondary end-points included mean percent change in St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score and the mean absolute changes in the maximal work load measured by cycle ergometry, dyspnea (mMRC score, and total oxygen use per day. Per patient response rates in clinically significant improvement/maintenance of FEV1 and six minute walk distance and technical success rates of valve placement were recorded. Apriori response predictors based on quantitative CT and lung physiology were defined. Conclusion If endobronchial valves improve FEV1 and health status with an acceptable safety profile in advanced emphysema, they would offer a novel intervention for this progressive and

  5. Lung Volume Reduction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD AND#8211; An Updated Review of Surgical and Endoscopic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dixit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional medical management of emphysema using bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory agents has a limited benefit in patients having advanced hyperinflation of lungs due to destruction of elastic tissue. The natural course of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD has been shown to be altered by only smoking cessation and oxygen therapy so far. The lung volume reduction surgery is viewed as another modality to change the natural history of emphysema in recent years. For patients with more generalized emphysema, resection of lung parenchyma improves elastic recoil and chest wall mechanics. An extensive literature search has demonstrated that carefully selected patients of emphysema (i.e. upper lobe predominant disease, low exercise capacity and Forced Expiratory Volume in First Second (FEV1 and DLco and #8804; 20% of predicted receive benefits in terms of symptomatic improvement and physiologic response following Lung Volume Reduction Surgery (LVRS. The resurgent interest in LVRS and National Emphysema Treatment Trial findings for emphysema have stimulated a range of innovative methods, to improve the outcome and reduce complications associated with current LVRS techniques. These novel approaches include surgical resection with compression/banding devices, endobronchial blockers, sealants, obstructing devices and valves and endobronchial bronchial bypass approaches. Experimental data and preliminary results are becoming available for some of these approaches. Most of the published studies so far have been uncontrolled and unblinded. Overall, extensive research in the near future will help to determine the potential clinical applicability of these new approaches to the treatment of emphysema symptoms. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(4.000: 249-257

  6. Regional pressure volume curves by electrical impedance tomography in a model of acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, P. W.; Böhm, S. H.; Vazquez de Anda, G.; Amato, M. B.; Lachmann, B.; Postmus, P. E.; de Vries, P. M.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A new noninvasive method, electrical impedance tomography (EIT), was used to make pressure-impedance (PI) curves in a lung lavage model of acute lung injury in pigs. The lower inflection point (LIP) and the upper deflection point (UDP) were determined from these curves and from the

  7. Effects of smoking and irradiated volume on inflammatory response in the lung of irradiated breast cancer patients evaluated with bronchoalveolar lavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjermer, L.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Nilsson, K.; Angstroem, T.H.; Henriksson, R.

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the effects of irradiation on normal tissues in humans have been hard to obtain because most tissues are inaccessible and/or direct responses are difficult to quantify in a nondestructive manner. Pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disease are adverse effects seen in varying intensity in patients treated with radiotherapy for carcinomas of the thorax, e.g., breast cancer. In the present study the aim was to evaluate the inflammatory reaction in the underlying parenchyma following postoperative irradiation with bronchoalveolar lavage technique. Twenty-one patients with breast cancer stage T1N0M0 received radiotherapy with photons to a target dose of 56 Gy following breast conservative surgery. Nineteen healthy controls were also included. The results showed a clear elevation of neutrophils, mast cells, eosinophils, and lymphocytes in the total irradiated groups, compared to controls. When subclassifying the material according to smoking habit, it was obvious that the smokers displayed a significantly decreased inflammatory reaction, i.e., reduced levels of mast cells and lymphocytes, compared to both nonsmoking controls and patients. Eosinophils were seen in an elevated number in all irradiated patients. Radiological signs of pneumonitis were observed in three patients, all in the nonsmoking group. No correlation was found between the volume of lung irradiated and the inflammatory response. It is concluded that bronchoalveolar lavage is a suitable and sensitive method for investigating radiotherapy-induced reactions in the human lung. Furthermore, ongoing smoking during the treatment depressed the inflammatory response in the lung parenchyma induced by irradiation. The present study as well as earlier observations justify further studies concerning the possibility of interaction of smoking with cancer treatment

  8. Right ventricular function during one-lung ventilation: effects of pressure-controlled and volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shehri, Abdullah M; El-Tahan, Mohamed R; Al Metwally, Roshdi; Qutub, Hatem; El Ghoneimy, Yasser F; Regal, Mohamed A; Zien, Haytham

    2014-08-01

    To test the effects of pressure-controlled (PCV) and volume-controlled (VCV) ventilation during one-lung ventilation (OLV) for thoracic surgery on right ventricular (RV) function. A prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover study. A single university hospital. Fourteen pairs of consecutive patients scheduled for elective thoracotomy. Patients were assigned randomly to ventilate the dependent lung with PCV or VCV mode, each in a randomized crossover order using tidal volume of 6 mL/kg, I: E ratio 1: 2.5, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 cm H2O and respiratory rate adjusted to maintain normocapnia. Intraoperative changes in RV function (systolic and early diastolic tricuspid annular velocity (TAV), end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV) and fractional area changes (FAC)), airway pressures, compliance and oxygenation index were recorded. The use of PCV during OLV resulted in faster systolic (10.1±2.39 vs. 5.8±1.67 cm/s, respectively), diastolic TAV (9.2±1.99 vs. 4.6±1.42 cm/s, respectively) (prights reserved.

  9. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Myoung Nam

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a home-made histographic analysis system using a lung volume controller. Our study involved ten healthy volunteers, ten emphysema patients, and two idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. Using a home-made lung volume controller, images were obtained in the upper, middle, and lower lung zones at 70%, 50%, and 20% of vital capacity. Electron beam tomography was used and scanning parameters were single slice mode, 10-mm slice thickness, 0.4-second scan time, and 35-cm field of view. Usinga home-made semi-automated program, pulmonary parenchyma was isolated and a histogrm then obtained. Seven histographic parameters, namely mean density (MD), density at maximal frequency (DMF), maximal ascending gradient (MAG),maximal ascending gradient density (MAGD), maximal sescending gradient (MDG), maximal descending gradient density (MDGD), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from the histogram. We compared normal controls with abnormal groups including emphysema and IPF patients at the same respiration levels. A normal histographic zone with ± 1 standard deviation was obtained. Histographic curves of normal controls shifted toward the high density level, and the width of the normal zone increased as the level of inspiration decreased. In ten normal controls, MD, DMF, MAG, MAGD, MDG, MDGD, and FWHM readings at a 70% inspiration level were lower than those at 20% (p less than0.05). At the same level of inspiration, histograms of emphysema patients were locatedat a lower density area than those of normal controls. As inspiration status decreased, histograms of emphysema patients showed diminished shift compared with those of normal controls. At 50% and 20% inspiration levels, the MD, DMF, and MAGD readings of emphysema patients were significantly lower than those of normal controls (p less than 0.05). Compared with those of normal controls, histogrms of the two IPF patients obtained at three inspiration levels were

  10. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Nam [The University of Iowa (United States)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a home-made histographic analysis system using a lung volume controller. Our study involved ten healthy volunteers, ten emphysema patients, and two idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. Using a home-made lung volume controller, images were obtained in the upper, middle, and lower lung zones at 70%, 50%, and 20% of vital capacity. Electron beam tomography was used and scanning parameters were single slice mode, 10-mm slice thickness, 0.4-second scan time, and 35-cm field of view. Usinga home-made semi-automated program, pulmonary parenchyma was isolated and a histogrm then obtained. Seven histographic parameters, namely mean density (MD), density at maximal frequency (DMF), maximal ascending gradient (MAG),maximal ascending gradient density (MAGD), maximal sescending gradient (MDG), maximal descending gradient density (MDGD), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from the histogram. We compared normal controls with abnormal groups including emphysema and IPF patients at the same respiration levels. A normal histographic zone with {+-} 1 standard deviation was obtained. Histographic curves of normal controls shifted toward the high density level, and the width of the normal zone increased as the level of inspiration decreased. In ten normal controls, MD, DMF, MAG, MAGD, MDG, MDGD, and FWHM readings at a 70% inspiration level were lower than those at 20% (p less than0.05). At the same level of inspiration, histograms of emphysema patients were locatedat a lower density area than those of normal controls. As inspiration status decreased, histograms of emphysema patients showed diminished shift compared with those of normal controls. At 50% and 20% inspiration levels, the MD, DMF, and MAGD readings of emphysema patients were significantly lower than those of normal controls (p less than 0.05). Compared with those of normal controls, histogrms of the two IPF patients obtained at three inspiration levels were

  11. Factors affecting the lung perfused blood volume in patients with intrapulmonary clots after anti-coagulation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Munemasa, E-mail: radokada@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Masuda, Yu [4th Grade of 6-year Medicine Doctor Program, Department of Medicine, Yamaguchi University Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Nakashima, Yoshiteru [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Oosaki 77, Hofu, Yamaguchi 747-8511 (Japan); Nomura, Takafumi; Nakao, Sei [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan); Suga, Kazuyoshi [Department of Radiology, St Hills Hospital, Imamurakita 3-7-18, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-0155 (Japan); Kido, Shoji [Computer-aided Diagnosis and Biomedical Imaging Research Biomedical Engineering, Applied Medical Engineering Science Graduate School of Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Tokiwadai 2-16-1, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8611 (Japan); Matsunaga, Naofumi [Department of Radiology, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine 1-1-1 Minamikogushi, Ube, Yamaguchi 755-8505 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Dual-energy CT can provide morphological and functional lung images in the same examination. • The subsequent dual-energy CT demonstrates the increased whole lung perfused blood volume (V{sub 120}) despite the residual intrapulmonary clots after treatment in one examination. • The increased whole lung perfusion (V{sub 120}) and a decreased low perfusion volume (V{sub 5}) result in the improvement in the low perfusion rate (%V{sub 5}) in the patients with acute pulmonary embolism after treatment. - Abstract: Objectives: Factors affecting the improvement in the lung perfused blood volume (LPBV) were evaluated based on the presence of intrapulmonary clots (IPCs) after anti-coagulation therapy using 64-slice dual-energy CT. Materials and methods: 96 patients exhibiting venous thromboembolism underwent initial and repeated LPBV examinations between December 2008 and July 2014. Fifteen patients were excluded due to pulmonary comorbidities, and a total of 81 patients were included in this study. Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) was diagnosed in 46 of the patients (56.7%). LPBV images were three-dimensionally reconstructed with two threshold ranges: 1–120 HU (V{sub 120}) and 1–5 HU (V{sub 5}), and the relative value of V{sub 5} per V{sub 120} expressed as %V{sub 5}. These values were subsequently compared with indicators of the severity of PE, such as the D-dimer level, heart rate and CT measurements. This study was approved by the local ethics committee. Results: In patients with IPCs, the D-dimer, V{sub 5} and %V{sub 5}values were significantly larger (p ≤ 0.01) in the initial LPBV, although these differences disappeared in subsequent LPBV after treatment. The right ventricular (RV) diameter, RV/left ventricular (RV/LV) diameter ratio and %V{sub 5} values were also significantly reduced, whereas the V{sub 5} value did not significantly decrease (p = 0.07), but V{sub 120} value significantly increased (p < 0.001) after treatment. However, in

  12. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and positive end-expiratory pressure prevents pulmonary inflammation in patients without preexisting lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolthuis, Esther K; Choi, Goda; Dessing, Mark C; Bresser, Paul; Lutter, Rene; Dzoljic, Misa; van der Poll, Tom; Vroom, Margreeth B; Hollmann, Markus; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes aggravates lung injury in patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome. The authors sought to determine the effects of short-term mechanical ventilation on local inflammatory responses in patients without preexisting lung injury. Patients scheduled to undergo an elective surgical procedure (lasting > or = 5 h) were randomly assigned to mechanical ventilation with either higher tidal volumes of 12 ml/kg ideal body weight and no positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) or lower tidal volumes of 6 ml/kg and 10 cm H2O PEEP. After induction of anesthesia and 5 h thereafter, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and/or blood was investigated for polymorphonuclear cell influx, changes in levels of inflammatory markers, and nucleosomes. Mechanical ventilation with lower tidal volumes and PEEP (n = 21) attenuated the increase of pulmonary levels of interleukin (IL)-8, myeloperoxidase, and elastase as seen with higher tidal volumes and no PEEP (n = 19). Only for myeloperoxidase, a difference was found between the two ventilation strategies after 5 h of mechanical ventilation (P volumes and PEEP may limit pulmonary inflammation in mechanically ventilated patients without preexisting lung injury. The specific contribution of both lower tidal volumes and PEEP on the protective effects of the lung should be further investigated.

  13. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  14. SU-E-J-79: Internal Tumor Volume Motion and Volume Size Assessment Using 4D CT Lung Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurkovic, I [University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Stathakis, S; Li, Y; Patel, A; Vincent, J; Papanikolaou, N; Mavroidis, P [Cancer Therapy and Research Center University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess internal tumor volume change through breathing cycle and associated tumor motion using the 4DCT data. Methods: Respiration induced volume change through breathing cycle and associated motion was analyzed for nine patients that were scanned during the different respiratory phases. The examined datasets were the maximum and average intensity projections (MIP and AIP) and the 10 phases of the respiratory cycle. The internal target volume (ITV) was delineated on each of the phases and the planning target volume (PTV) was then created by adding setup margins to the ITV. Tumor motion through the phases was assessed using the acquired 4DCT dataset, which was then used to determine if the margins used for the ITV creation successfully encompassed the tumor in three dimensions. Results: Results showed that GTV motion along the superior inferior axes was the largest in all the cases independent of the tumor location and/or size or the use of abdomen compression. The extent of the tumor motion was found to be connected with the size of the GTV. The smallest GTVs exhibited largest motion vector independent of the tumor location. The motion vector size varied through the phases depending on the tumor size and location and it was smallest for phases 20 and 30. The smaller the volume of the delineated GTV, the greater its volume difference through the different respiratory phases was. The average GTV volume change was largest for the phases 60 and 70. Conclusion: Even if GTV is delineated using both AIP and MIP datasets, its motion extent will exceed the used margins especially for the very small GTV volumes. When the GTV size is less than 10 cc it is recommended to use fusion of the GTVs through all the phases to create the planning ITV.

  15. Pulmonary vascular volume ratio measured by cardiac computed tomography in children and young adults with congenital heart disease: comparison with lung perfusion scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Park, Sang Hyub

    2017-11-01

    Lung perfusion scintigraphy is regarded as the gold standard for evaluating differential lung perfusion ratio in congenital heart disease. To compare cardiac CT with lung perfusion scintigraphy for estimated pulmonary vascular volume ratio in patients with congenital heart disease. We included 52 children and young adults (median age 4 years, range 2 months to 28 years; 31 males) with congenital heart disease who underwent cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy without an interim surgical or transcatheter intervention and within 1 year. We calculated the right and left pulmonary vascular volumes using threshold-based CT volumetry. Then we compared right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT with right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy by using paired t-test and Bland-Altman analysis. The right pulmonary vascular volume percentages at cardiac CT (66.3 ± 14.0%) were significantly smaller than the right lung perfusion percentages at lung perfusion scintigraphy (69.1 ± 15.0%; P=0.001). Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of -2.8 ± 5.8% and 95% limits of agreement (-14.1%, 8.5%) between these two variables. Cardiac CT, in a single examination, can offer pulmonary vascular volume ratio in addition to pulmonary artery anatomy essential for evaluating peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis in patients with congenital heart disease. However there is a wide range of agreement between cardiac CT and lung perfusion scintigraphy.

  16. Gross tumor volume dependency on phase sorting methods of four-dimensional computed tomography images for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Yong; Lim, Sang Wook; Ma, Sun Young; Yu, Je Sang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To see the gross tumor volume (GTV) dependency according to the phase selection and reconstruction methods, we measured and analyzed the changes of tumor volume and motion at each phase in 20 cases with lung cancer patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images in 20 cases of 19 patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. The 4D-CT images were reconstructed by the maximum intensity projection (MIP) and the minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) method after sorting phase as 40%–60%, 30%–70%, and 0%–90%. We analyzed the relationship between the range of motion and the change of GTV according to the reconstruction method. The motion ranges of GTVs are statistically significant only for the tumor motion in craniocaudal direction. The discrepancies of GTV volume and motion between MIP and Min-IP increased rapidly as the wider ranges of duty cycles are selected. As narrow as possible duty cycle such as 40%–60% and MIP reconstruction was suitable for lung cancer if the respiration was stable. Selecting the reconstruction methods and duty cycle is important for small size and for large motion range tumors.

  17. Impact of spinal anaesthesia on peri-operative lung volumes in obese and morbidly obese female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regli, A; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Reber, A; Schneider, M C

    2006-03-01

    Although obesity predisposes to postoperative pulmonary complications, data on the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and peri-operative respiratory performance are limited. We prospectively studied the impact of spinal anaesthesia, obesity and vaginal surgery on lung volumes measured by spirometry in 28 patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and in 13 patients with BMI > or = 40 kg.m(-2). Vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, mid-expiratory and peak expiratory flows were measured during the pre-operative visit (baseline), after effective spinal anaesthesia with premedication, and after the operation at 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h (after mobilisation). Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters. Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters; mean (SD) vital capacities were - 19% (6.4) in patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and - 33% (9.0) in patients with BMI > 40 kg.m(-2). The decrease of lung volumes remained constant for 2 h, whereas 3 h after the operation and after mobilisation, spirometric parameters significantly improved in all patients. This study showed that both spinal anaesthesia and obesity significantly impaired peri-operative respiratory function.

  18. Association Between Use of Lung-Protective Ventilation With Lower Tidal Volumes and Clinical Outcomes Among Patients Without Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Cardoso, Sérgio Oliveira; Manetta, José Antônio; Pereira, Victor Galvão Moura; Espósito, Daniel Crepaldi; Pasqualucci, Manoela de Oliveira Prado; Damasceno, Maria Cecília Toledo; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2012-01-01

    Context Lung-protective mechanical ventilation with the use of lower tidal volumes has been found to improve outcomes of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). It has been suggested that use of lower tidal volumes also benefits patients who do not have ARDS. Objective To determine

  19. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  20. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gi tte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Sp echt, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (±0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (±0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (±0.19) and 0.72cm (±0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos

  1. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  2. Relationship between CT visual score and lung volume which is measured by helium dilution method and body plethysmographic method in patients with pulmonary emphysema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoshima, Hideo; Ishibashi, Masayoshi; Senju, Syoji; Tanaka, Hideki; Aritomi, Takamichi; Watanabe, Kentaro; Yoshida, Minoru

    1997-01-01

    We examined the relationship between CT visual score and pulmonary function studies in patients with pulmonary emphysema. Lung volume was measured using helium dilution method and body plethysmographic method. Although airflow obstruction and overinflation measured by helium dilution method did not correlate with CT visual score, CO diffusing capacity per alveolar volume (DL CO /V A ) showed significant negative correlation with CT visual score (r=-0.49, p CO /V A reflect pathologic change in pulmonary emphysema. Further, both helium dilution method and body plethysmographic method are required to evaluate lung volume of pulmonary emphysema because of its ventilatory unevenness. (author)

  3. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S; Van Duyse, B; Schelfhout, J; De Neve, W

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  4. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, G.L.; Blankenship, W.J.; Burdine, J.A. Jr.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133 Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S []ontaneous pulmonary vascular occlusive disease which occurs in infants and pulmonary emboli in children are easily detected using radionuclides. The pathophysiologic defects of pulmonary agenesis, bronchopulmonary sequestration, and foreign body aspiration may be demonstrated by these techniques. These techniques also appear to be useful in following patients with bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital emphysema, and postinfection pulmonary abnormalities. (auth)

  5. Focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose irradiation down-regulated organ development-related functions and up-regulated the immune response in mouse pulmonary tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jin, Hee; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kang, Ga-Young; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2016-01-27

    Despite the emergence of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for treatment of medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer patients, the molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose radiation have not been fully characterized. This study was designed to identify molecular changes induced by focal high-dose irradiation using a mouse model of SBRT. Central areas of the mouse left lung were focally-irradiated (3 mm in diameter) with a single high-dose of radiation (90 Gy). Temporal changes in gene expression in the irradiated and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions were analyzed by microarray. For comparison, the long-term effect (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation on a diffuse region of lung was also measured. The majority of genes were down-regulated in the focally-irradiated lung areas at 2 to 3 weeks after irradiation. This pattern of gene expression was clearly different than gene expression in the diffuse region of lungs exposed to low-dose radiation. Ontological and pathway analyses indicated these down-regulated genes were mainly associated with organ development. Although the number was small, genes that were up-regulated after focal irradiation were associated with immune-related functions. The temporal patterns of gene expression and the associated biological functions were also similar in non-irradiated neighboring lung regions, although statistical significance was greatly reduced when compared with those from focally-irradiated areas of the lung. From network analysis of temporally regulated genes, we identified inter-related modules associated with diverse functions, including organ development and the immune response, in both the focally-irradiated regions and non-irradiated neighboring lung regions. Focal exposure of lung tissue to high-dose radiation induced expression of genes associated with organ development and the immune response. This pattern of gene expression was also observed in non

  6. Initial observations of cell-mediated drug delivery to the deep lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arun; Glaum, Mark; El-Badri, Nagwa; Mohapatra, Shyam; Haller, Edward; Park, Seungjoo; Patrick, Leslie; Nattkemper, Leigh; Vo, Dawn; Cameron, Don F

    2011-01-01

    Using current methodologies, drug delivery to small airways, terminal bronchioles, and alveoli (deep lung) is inefficient, especially to the lower lungs. Urgent lung pathologies such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and post-lung transplantation complications are difficult to treat, in part due to the methodological limitations in targeting the deep lung with high efficiency drug distribution to the site of pathology. To overcome drug delivery limitations inhibiting the optimization of deep lung therapy, isolated rat Sertoli cells preloaded with chitosan nanoparticles were use to obtain a high-density distribution and concentration (92%) of the nanoparticles in the lungs of mice by way of the peripheral venous vasculature rather than the more commonly used pulmonary route. Additionally, Sertoli cells were preloaded with chitosan nanoparticles coupled with the anti-inflammatory compound curcumin and then injected intravenously into control or experimental mice with deep lung inflammation. By 24 h postinjection, most of the curcumin load (∼90%) delivered in the injected Sertoli cells was present and distributed throughout the lungs, including the perialveloar sac area in the lower lungs. This was based on the high-density, positive quantification of both nanoparticles and curcumin in the lungs. There was a marked positive therapeutic effect achieved 24 h following curcumin treatment delivered by this Sertoli cell nanoparticle protocol (SNAP). Results identify a novel and efficient protocol for targeted delivery of drugs to the deep lung mediated by extratesticular Sertoli cells. Utilization of SNAP delivery may optimize drug therapy for conditions such as ARDS, status asthmaticus, pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer, and complications following lung transplantation where the use of high concentrations of anti-inflammatory drugs is desirable, but often limited by risks of systemic drug toxicity.

  7. Serial megavoltage CT imaging during external beam radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: Observations on tumor regression during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Ramsey, Chester; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Forbes, Alan; Wagner, Thomas H.; Langen, Katja M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to obtain soft-tissue imaging in the treatment room, such as with megavoltage CT imaging, enables the observation of tumor regression during a course of external beam radiation therapy. In this current study, we report on the most extensive study looking at the rate of regression of non-small-cell lung cancers during a course of external beam radiotherapy by analyzing serial megavoltage CT images obtained on 10 patients. Methods and Materials: The analysis is performed on 10 patients treated with the Helical Tomotherapy Hi*Art device. All 10 patients had non-small-cell lung cancer. A total of 274 megavoltage CT sets were obtained on the 10 patients (average, 27 scans per patient; range, 9-35). All patients had at least a scan at beginning and at the end of treatment. The frequency of scanning was determined by the treating physician. The treatment was subsequently delivered with the Tomotherapy Hi*Art system. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were later contoured on each megavoltage CT scan, and tumor volumes were calculated. Although some patients were treated to draining nodal areas in addition to the primary tumor, only the primary GTVs were tracked. Response to treatment was quantified by the relative decrease in tumor volume over time, i.e., elapsed days from the first day of therapy. The individual GTVs ranged from 5.9 to 737.2 cc in volume at the start of treatment. In 6 of the 10 patients, dose recalculations were also performed to document potential variations in delivered doses within the tumors. The megavoltage CT scans were used, and the planned treatment was recalculated on the daily images. The hypothesis was that dose deposited in the target would increase throughout the course of radiotherapy because of tumor shrinkage and subsequent decreasing attenuation. Specifically, the dose received by 95% of the GTV (D 95 ) was monitored over time for each of the 6 patients treated at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando. Results: Regression

  8. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Andreas; Loring, Stephen H; Johnson, Shawn P; Haulena, Martin; Trites, Andrew W; Fravel, Vanessa A; Van Bonn, William G

    2014-01-01

    We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander's hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus). We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW) of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL) as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised in an aquatic facility. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance.

  9. Inflation and deflation pressure-volume loops in anesthetized pinnipeds confirms compliant chest and lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eFahlman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We examined structural properties of the marine mammal respiratory system, and tested Scholander’s hypothesis that the chest is highly compliant by measuring the mechanical properties of the respiratory system in five species of pinniped under anesthesia (Pacific harbor seal, Phoca vitulina; northern elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris; northern fur seal Callorhinus ursinus; California sea lion, Zalophus californianus; and Steller sea lion, Eumetopias jubatus. We found that the chest wall compliance (CCW of all five species was greater than lung compliance (airways and alveoli, CL as predicted by Scholander, which suggests that the chest provides little protection against alveolar collapse or lung squeeze. We also found that specific respiratory compliance was significantly greater in wild animals than in animals raised under human care. While differences in ages between the two groups may affect this incidental finding, it is also possible that lung conditioning in free-living animals may increase pulmonary compliance and reduce the risk of lung squeeze during diving. Overall, our data indicate that compliance of excised pinniped lungs provide a good estimate of total respiratory compliance.

  10. Heliox allows for lower minute volume ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury.

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    Charlotte J Beurskens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helium is a noble gas with a low density, allowing for lower driving pressures and increased carbon dioxide (CO2 diffusion. Since application of protective ventilation can be limited by the development of hypoxemia or acidosis, we hypothesized that therefore heliox facilitates ventilation in an animal model of ventilator-induced lung injury. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats (N=8 per group were mechanically ventilated with heliox (50% oxygen; 50% helium. Controls received a standard gas mixture (50% oxygen; 50% air. VILI was induced by application of tidal volumes of 15 mL kg(-1; lung protective ventilated animals were ventilated with 6 mL kg(-1. Respiratory parameters were monitored with a pneumotach system. Respiratory rate was adjusted to maintain arterial pCO2 within 4.5-5.5 kPa, according to hourly drawn arterial blood gases. After 4 hours, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF was obtained. Data are mean (SD. RESULTS: VILI resulted in an increase in BALF protein compared to low tidal ventilation (629 (324 vs. 290 (181 μg mL(-1; p<0.05 and IL-6 levels (640 (8.7 vs. 206 (8.7 pg mL(-1; p<0.05, whereas cell counts did not differ between groups after this short course of mechanical ventilation. Ventilation with heliox resulted in a decrease in mean respiratory minute volume ventilation compared to control (123 ± 0.6 vs. 146 ± 8.9 mL min(-1, P<0.001, due to a decrease in respiratory rate (22 (0.4 vs. 25 (2.1 breaths per minute; p<0.05, while pCO2 levels and tidal volumes remained unchanged, according to protocol. There was no effect of heliox on inspiratory pressure, while compliance was reduced. In this mild lung injury model, heliox did not exert anti-inflammatory effects. CONCLUSIONS: Heliox allowed for a reduction in respiratory rate and respiratory minute volume during VILI, while maintaining normal acid-base balance. Use of heliox may be a useful approach when protective tidal volume ventilation is limited by the development of

  11. Comparison of distinctive models for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index in patients prior to endoscopic lung volume reduction

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    Theilig D

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dorothea Theilig,1 Felix Doellinger,1 Alexander Poellinger,1 Vera Schreiter,1 Konrad Neumann,2 Ralf-Harto Hubner31Department of Radiology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 2Institute of Biometrics and Clinical Epidemiology, Charité Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 3Department of Pneumology, Charité Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, GermanyBackground: The degree of interlobar emphysema heterogeneity is thought to play an important role in the outcome of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR therapy of patients with advanced COPD. There are multiple ways one could possibly define interlobar emphysema heterogeneity, and there is no standardized definition.Purpose: The aim of this study was to derive a formula for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index (HI when evaluating a patient for ELVR. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify a threshold for relevant interlobar emphysema heterogeneity with regard to ELVR.Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed 50 patients who had undergone technically successful ELVR with placement of one-way valves at our institution and had received lung function tests and computed tomography scans before and after treatment. Predictive accuracy of the different methods for HI calculation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, assuming a minimum difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 100 mL to indicate a clinically important change.Results: The HI defined as emphysema score of the targeted lobe (TL minus emphysema score of the ipsilateral nontargeted lobe disregarding the middle lobe yielded the best predicative accuracy (AUC =0.73, P=0.008. The HI defined as emphysema score of the TL minus emphysema score of the lung without the TL showed a similarly good predictive accuracy (AUC =0.72, P=0.009. Subgroup

  12. Comparison of distinctive models for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index in patients prior to endoscopic lung volume reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilig, Dorothea; Doellinger, Felix; Poellinger, Alexander; Schreiter, Vera; Neumann, Konrad; Hubner, Ralf-Harto

    2017-01-01

    The degree of interlobar emphysema heterogeneity is thought to play an important role in the outcome of endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR) therapy of patients with advanced COPD. There are multiple ways one could possibly define interlobar emphysema heterogeneity, and there is no standardized definition. The aim of this study was to derive a formula for calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity index (HI) when evaluating a patient for ELVR. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify a threshold for relevant interlobar emphysema heterogeneity with regard to ELVR. We retrospectively analyzed 50 patients who had undergone technically successful ELVR with placement of one-way valves at our institution and had received lung function tests and computed tomography scans before and after treatment. Predictive accuracy of the different methods for HI calculation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis, assuming a minimum difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 100 mL to indicate a clinically important change. The HI defined as emphysema score of the targeted lobe (TL) minus emphysema score of the ipsilateral nontargeted lobe disregarding the middle lobe yielded the best predicative accuracy (AUC =0.73, P =0.008). The HI defined as emphysema score of the TL minus emphysema score of the lung without the TL showed a similarly good predictive accuracy (AUC =0.72, P =0.009). Subgroup analysis suggests that the impact of interlobar emphysema heterogeneity is of greater importance in patients with upper lobe predominant emphysema than in patients with lower lobe predominant emphysema. This study reveals the most appropriate ways of calculating an interlobar emphysema heterogeneity with regard to ELVR.

  13. Intraoperative protective mechanical ventilation for prevention of postoperative pulmonary complications: a comprehensive review of the role of tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure, and lung recruitment maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldner, Andreas; Kiss, Thomas; Serpa Neto, Ary; Hemmes, Sabrine N T; Canet, Jaume; Spieth, Peter M; Rocco, Patricia R M; Schultz, Marcus J; Pelosi, Paolo; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are associated with increased morbidity, length of hospital stay, and mortality after major surgery. Intraoperative lung-protective mechanical ventilation has the potential to reduce the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. This review discusses the relevant literature on definition and methods to predict the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complication, the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury with emphasis on the noninjured lung, and protective ventilation strategies, including the respective roles of tidal volumes, positive end-expiratory pressure, and recruitment maneuvers. The authors propose an algorithm for protective intraoperative mechanical ventilation based on evidence from recent randomized controlled trials.

  14. Computer-aided Detection of Lung Cancer on Chest Radiographs: Effect on Observer Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hoop, Bartjan; de Boo, Diederik W.; Gietema, Hester A.; van Hoorn, Frans; Mearadji, Banafsche; Schijf, Laura; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess how computer-aided detection (CAD) affects reader performance in detecting early lung cancer on chest radiographs. Materials and Methods: In this ethics committee-approved study, 46 individuals with 49 computed tomographically (CT)-detected and histologically proved lung cancers

  15. Effect of lung volume on airway luminal area assessed by computed tomography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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    Kenta Kambara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although airway luminal area (Ai is affected by lung volume (LV, how is not precisely understood. We hypothesized that the effect of LV on Ai would differ by airway generation, lung lobe, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD severity. METHODS: Sixty-seven subjects (15 at risk, 18, 20, and 14 for COPD stages 1, 2, and 3 underwent pulmonary function tests and computed tomography scans at full inspiration and expiration (at functional residual capacity. LV and eight selected identical airways were measured in the right lung. Ai was measured at the mid-portion of the 3(rd, the segmental bronchus, to 6(th generation of the airways, leading to 32 measurements per subject. RESULTS: The ratio of expiratory to inspiratory LV (LV E/I ratio and Ai (Ai E/I ratio was defined for evaluation of changes. The LV E/I ratio increased as COPD severity progressed. As the LV E/I ratio was smaller, the Ai E/I ratio was smaller at any generation among the subjects. Overall, the Ai E/I ratios were significantly smaller at the 5(th (61.5% and 6(th generations (63.4% and than at the 3(rd generation (73.6%, p<0.001 for each, and also significantly lower in the lower lobe than in the upper or middle lobe (p<0.001 for each. And, the Ai E/I ratio decreased as COPD severity progressed only when the ratio was corrected by the LV E/I ratio (at risk v.s. stage 3 p<0.001, stage 1 v.s. stage 3 p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: From full inspiration to expiration, the airway luminal area shrinks more at the distal airways compared with the proximal airways and in the lower lobe compared with the other lobes. Generally, the airways shrink more as COPD severity progresses, but this phenomenon becomes apparent only when lung volume change from inspiration to expiration is taken into account.

  16. Effects of short-term pressure-controlled ventilation on gas exchange, airway pressures, and gas distribution in patients with acute lung injury/ARDS: comparison with volume-controlled ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prella, Maura; Feihl, François; Domenighetti, Guido

    2002-10-01

    The potential clinical benefits of pressure-controlled ventilation (PCV) over volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in patients with acute lung injury (ALI) or ARDS still remain debated. We compared PCV with VCV in patients with ALI/ARDS with respect to the following physiologic end points: (1) gas exchange and airway pressures, and (2) CT scan intrapulmonary gas distribution at end-expiration. Prospective, observational study. A multidisciplinary ICU in a nonuniversity, acute-care hospital. Ten patients with ALI or ARDS (9 men and 1 woman; age range, 17 to 80 years). Sequential ventilation in PCV and VCV with a constant inspiratory/expiratory ratio, tidal volume, respiratory rate, and total positive end-expiratory pressure; measurement of gas exchange and airway pressures; and achievement of CT sections at lung base, hilum, and apex for the quantitative analysis of lung densities and of aerated vs nonaerated zones. PaO(2), PaCO(2), and PaO(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio levels did not differ between PCV and VCV. Peak airway pressure (Ppeak) was significantly lower in PCV compared with VCV (26 +/- 2 cm H(2)O vs 31 +/- 2 cm H(2)O; p mean +/- SEM). The surface areas of the nonaerated zones as well as the total areas at each section level were unchanged in PCV compared with VCV, except at the apex level, where there was a significantly greater nonaerated area in VCV (11 +/- 2 cm(2) vs 9 +/- 2 cm(2); p mean CT number of each lung (20 lungs from 10 patients) was similar in the two modes, as were the density values at the basal and apical levels; the hilum mean CT number was - 442 +/- 28 Hounsfield units (HU) in VCV and - 430 +/- 26 HU in PCV (p lower Ppeaks through the precise titration of the lung distending pressure, and might be applied to avoid regional overdistension by means of a more homogeneous gas distribution.

  17. The effect of surgery on lung volume and conventional monitoring parameters in ventilated newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proquitté, H; Freiberger, O; Yilmaz, S; Bamberg, C; Degenhardt, P; Roehr, C C; Wauer, R R; Schmalisch, G

    2010-05-01

    In newborn infants, thoraco-abdominal surgery is a serious intervention with respect to gas exchange and lung mechanics. This prospective clinical study compared surgery-induced changes in functional residual capacity (FRC) and ventilation inhomogeneity (VI) indices with changes in conventional monitoring parameters. Of 29 ventilated newborns (mean weight 2,770+/-864 g at surgery), 13, nine and seven underwent thoracic, abdominal or congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) surgery, respectively. The multiple breath washout (MBWO) technique using heptafluoropropane as tracer gas (Babylog 8000; Dräger, Lübeck, Germany) was performed ventilatory monitoring parameters. FRC decreased in non-CDH infants, while FRC increased and VI indices decreased in CDH infants. Despite improvements, the differences in FRC and VI between CDH and non-CDH infants indicated persistent impaired lung function in CHD infants. MBWO can be advantageously used to measure the effect of surgery on the lung. While FRC and VI indices changed following surgery, conventional monitoring parameters did not.

  18. Quantification and Minimization of Uncertainties of Internal Target Volume for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Henan Cancer Hospital, the Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Henan (China); Cai Jing; Kelsey, Chris R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Yin Fangfang, E-mail: fangfang.yin@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To quantify uncertainties in delineating an internal target volume (ITV) and to understand how these uncertainties may be individually minimized for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with NSCLC who were undergoing SBRT were imaged with free-breathing 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) and 10-phase 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV){sub 3D} and ITV{sub 10Phase} (ITV3). The maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT was also calculated from 10-phase 4DCT for contouring ITV{sub MIP} (ITV1). Then, ITV{sub COMB} (ITV2), ITV{sub 10Phase+GTV3D} (ITV4), and ITV{sub 10Phase+ITVCOMB} (ITV5) were generated by combining ITV{sub MIP} and GTV{sub 3D}, ITV{sub 10phase} and GTV{sub 3D}, and ITV{sub 10phase} and ITV{sub COMB}, respectively. All 6 volumes (GTV{sub 3D} and ITV1 to ITV5) were delineated in the same lung window by the same radiation oncologist. The percentage of volume difference (PVD) between any 2 different volumes was determined and was correlated to effective tumor diameter (ETD), tumor motion ranges, R{sub 3D}, and the amplitude variability of the recorded breathing signal (v) to assess their volume variations. Results: The mean (range) tumor motion (R{sub SI}, R{sub AP}, R{sub ML}, and R{sub 3D}) and breathing variability (v) were 7.6 mm (2-18 mm), 4.0 mm (2-8 mm), 3.3 mm (0-7.5 mm), 9.9 mm (4.1-18.7 mm), and 0.17 (0.07-0.37), respectively. The trend of volume variation was GTV{sub 3D} volumes were 11.1 {+-} 9.3 cc, 13.2 {+-} 10.5 cc, 14.9 {+-} 11.0 cc, 14.7 {+-} 11.4 cc, 15.9 {+-} 11.7 cc, and 16.4 {+-} 11.8 cc, respectively. All comparisons between the target volumes showed statistical significance (P{<=}.001), except for ITV2 and ITV3 (P=.594). The PVDs for all volume pairs correlated negatively with ETD (r{<=}-0.658, P{<=}.006) and positively with

  19. Earth observation space programmes, SAFISY activities, strategies of international organisations, legal aspects. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume is separated in four sessions. First part is on earth observation space programmes (international earth observation projects and international collaboration, the ERS-1, SPOT and PRIRODA programmes, the first ESA earth observation polar platform and its payload, the future earth observation remote sensing techniques and concepts). The second part is on SAFISY activities (ISY programmes, education and applications, demonstrations and outreach projects). The third part is on programme and strategies of international organisations with respect to earth observation from space. The fourth part is on legal aspects of the use of satellite remote sensing data in Europe. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  20. Comparação entre os volumes pulmonares irradiados com técnica bidimensional e tridimensional conformada na radioterapia de pacientes com tumores de pulmão localmente avançados Comparison between irradiated lung volumes with two-dimensional and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques for locally advanced lung cancer

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    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar e quantificar os volumes pulmonares irradiados utilizando planejamentos bidimensional (2D e tridimensional (3D conformado na radioterapia de tumores de pulmão. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Em 27 pacientes portadores de câncer de pulmão foi feito planejamento 3D e outro correspondente em 2D. As doses prescritas variaram de 45 a 66 Gy. Foram avaliadas as doses no volume alvo planejado (PTV, volume tumoral macroscópico (GTV e pulmões (volume de pulmão que recebe 20 Gy ou 30 Gy - V20 e V30, respectivamente, e dose média. Os órgãos de risco adjacentes (medula espinhal, esôfago e coração receberam doses abaixo dos limites de tolerância. RESULTADOS: O GTV variou de 10,5 a 1.290,0 cm³ (média de 189,65 cm³. Nos planejamentos 2D foi utilizado, em média, um total de 59,33 campos, e nos planejamentos 3D, 75,65 campos. Em todas as situações analisadas houve significante (p OBJECTIVE: To compare and quantify irradiated lung volumes using two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D conformal planning for radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 2D and 3D conformal radiotherapy plannings were performed for 27 patients with lung cancer. Prescribed doses ranged from 45 to 66 Gy. The analysis covered the doses to planning target volume (PTV, gross tumor volume (GTV and lungs (lung volume receiving 20 Gy or 30 Gy - V20 and V30, respectively, and mean dose. The doses to adjacent organs at risk (spinal cord, esophagus and heart were maintained below the tolerance limits. RESULTS: GTV ranged from 10.5 to 1,290.0 cm³ (mean, 189.65 cm³. On average, a total of 59.33 fields were utilized in the 2D planning and 75.65 fields in the 3D planning. Lung volumes were significantly preserved (P < 0.05 with the 3D conformal planning in all the evaluated cases, with about 15% decrease in the irradiated lung volumes. Lungs without tumor were most benefited from this technique. CONCLUSION: 3D radiotherapy allowed a better

  1. An evaluation of an automated 4D-CT contour propagation tool to define an internal gross tumour volume for lung cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaede, Stewart; Olsthoorn, Jason; Louie, Alexander V.; Palma, David; Yu, Edward; Yaremko, Brian; Ahmad, Belal; Chen, Jeff; Bzdusek, Karl; Rodrigues, George

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate an automated 4D-CT contouring propagation tool by its impact on the inter- and intra-physician variability in lung tumour delineation. Materials and methods: In a previous study, six radiation oncologists contoured the gross tumour volume (GTV) and nodes on 10 phases of the 4D-CT dataset of 10 lung cancer patients to examine the intra- and inter-physician variability. In this study, a model-based deformable image registration algorithm was used to propagate the GTV and nodes on each phase of the same 4D-CT datasets. A blind review of the contours was performed by each physician and edited. Inter- and intra-physician variability for both the manual and automated methods was assessed by calculating the centroid motion of the GTV using the Pearson correlation coefficient and the variability in the internal gross tumour volume (IGTV) overlap using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Results: The time for manual delineation was (42.7 ± 18.6) min versus (17.7 ± 5.4) min when the propagation tool was used. A significant improvement in the mean Pearson correlation coefficient was also observed. There was a significant decrease in mean DSC in only 1 out of 10 primary IGTVs and 2 out of 10 nodal IGTVs. Intra-physician variability was not significantly impacted (DSC > 0.742). Conclusions: Automated 4D-CT propagation tools can significantly decrease the IGTV delineation time without significantly decreasing the inter- and intra-physician variability.

  2. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National Univ. Hwasun Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion.

  3. Metabolic tumor volume measured by F 18 FDG PET/CT can further stratify the prognosis of patients with stage IV Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Su Woong; Kim, Ja Hae; Chong, Ar I; Kwon, Seong Young; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Bom, Hee Seung

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to further stratify prognostic factors in patients with stage IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by measuring their metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using F 18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). The subjects of this retrospective study were 57 patients with stage IV NSCLC. MTV, total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) were measured on F 18 FDG PET/CT in both the primary lung lesion as well as metastatic lesions in torso. Optimal cutoff values of PET parameters were mea measured by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve anal analysis. Kaplan Meier survival (PET). The univariate and multivariate cox proportional hazards models were used to select the significant prognostic factors. Univariate analysis showed that both MTV and TLG of primary lung lesion (MTV lung and TLG lung) were significant factors for prediction of PFS ( <0.001 =0.038, respectively). Patients showing lower values of MTV lung and TLG lung than the cutoff values had significantly longer mean PFS than those with higher values. hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of MTV lung and TLG lung measured by univariate analysis were 6.4 (2.5 16.3) and 2.4 (1.0 5.5), respectively. multivariate analysis revealed that MTV lung was the only significant factor for prediction of prognosis. Hazard ratio was 13,5 (1.6 111.1, =0,016). patients with stage IV NSCLC could be further stratified into subgroups of significantly better and worse prognosis by MTV of primary lung lesion

  4. EFFECTS OF A BASKETBALL ACTIVITY ON LUNG CAPILLARY BLOOD VOLUME AND MEMBRANE DIFFUSING CAPACITY, MEASURED BY NO/CO TRANSFER IN CHILDREN

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    Rim Dridi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In both children and adults, acute exercise increases lung capillary blood volume (Vc and membrane factor (DmCO. We sought to determine whether basketball training affected this adaptation to exercise in children. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of two years sport activity on the components of pulmonary gas transfer in children. Over a 2-yr period, we retested 60 nine year old boys who were initially separated in two groups: 30 basketball players (P (9.0 ± 1.0 yrs; 35.0 ± 5.2 kg; 1.43 ± 0.05 m, and matched non players controls (C (8.9 ± 1.0 yrs; 35.0 ± 6.0 kg; 1.44 ± 0.06 m who did not perform any extracurricular activity, Vc and DmCO were measured by the NO/CO transfer method at rest and during sub-maximal exercise. Maximal aerobic power and peak power output was 12% higher in the trained group compared to matched controls (p < 0.05. Nitric oxide lung transfer (TLNO per unit lung volume and thus, DmCO per unit of lung volume (VA were higher at rest and during exercise in the group which had undergone regular basketball activity compared to matched controls (p < 0.05. Neither lung capillary blood volume nor total lung transfer for carbon monoxide (TLCO were significantly different between groups. These results suggest that active sport can alter the properties of the lung alveolo-capillary membrane by improving alveolar membrane conductance in children

  5. Effect of immersion on lung capacities and volumes: implications for the densitometric estimation of relative body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, R T; Hamdorf, P A

    1989-01-01

    Immersion of 18 male subjects in water caused a 20.4% (787 ml) increase (P less than 0.05) in the mean inspiratory capacity (IC) whereas there were no changes (P greater than 0.05) in tidal volume (VT) and the frequency of respiration. All the means for the other pulmonary variables decreased (P less than 0.05) by varying amounts: total lung capacity (TLC) = 8.4% (599 ml), vital capacity (VC) = 5.5% (308 ml), functional residual capacity (FRC) = 42.6% (1386 ml), expiratory reserve volume (ERV) = 61.9% (1095 ml) and residual volume (RV) = 19.7% (292 ml). Variation of only the RV in the body density (BD) formula from which the percentage body fat (%BF) is estimated resulted in a significantly (P less than 0.05) lower mean of 15.2% BF for the RV in air (means = 1482 ml) compared with that of 17.1% BF for the RV in water (means = 1190 ml). All but one of the subjects exhibited a smaller RV in water than in air; the six largest differences were equivalent to 2.4-5.1% BF. These results indicate that the net effect of the hydrostatic pressure (decreases RV), pulmonary vascular engorgement (decreases RV) and diminished compliance (increases RV) is to reduce the ventilated RV. It is therefore advisable to measure the RV when the subject is immersed in order to minimize error in the determination of BD and hence the estimation of % BF.

  6. ESTRO ACROP guidelines for target volume definition in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Ricardi, Umberto; Geets, Xavier; Belderbos, Jose; Pöttgen, Christoph; Dziadiuszko, Rafal; Peeters, Stephanie; Lievens, Yolande; Hurkmans, Coen; Slotman, Ben; Ramella, Sara; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; McDonald, Fiona; Manapov, Farkhad; Putora, Paul Martin; LePéchoux, Cécile; Van Houtte, Paul

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) plays a major role in the curative treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the ACROP committee was asked by the ESTRO to provide recommendations on target volume delineation for standard clinical scenarios in definitive (chemo)radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant RT for locally advanced NSCLC. The guidelines given here are a result of the evaluation of a structured questionnaire followed by a consensus discussion, voting and writing procedure within the committee. Hence, we provide advice for methods and time-points of diagnostics and imaging before the start of treatment planning and for the mandatory and optional imaging to be used for planning itself. Concerning target volumes, recommendations are given for GTV delineation of primary tumour and lymph nodes followed by issues related to the delineation of CTVs for definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy. In the context of PTV delineation, recommendations about the management of geometric uncertainties and target motion are given. We further provide our opinions on normal tissue delineation and organisational and responsibility questions in the process of target volume delineation. This guideline intends to contribute to the standardisation and optimisation of the process of RT treatment planning for clinical practice and prospective studies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lung cancer development in patients with connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Inui, Naoki; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nishimoto, Koji; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Iwashita, Toshihide; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occasionally develop lung cancer (LC). However, in connective tissue disease (CTD)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD), there are few data regarding the LC development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of LC development in patients with CTD-ILD. A retrospective review of our database of 562 patients with ILD between 2000 and 2014 identified 127 patients diagnosed with CTD-ILD. The overall and cumulative incidences of LC were calculated. In addition, the risk factors and prognostic impact of LC development were evaluated. The median age at the ILD diagnosis was 63 years (range 37-84 years), and 73 patients (57.5%) were female. The median follow-up period from the ILD diagnosis was 67.4 months (range 10.4-322.1 months). During the period, 7 out of the 127 patients developed LC (overall incidence 5.5%). The cumulative incidences at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.0%, 1.8%, and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of LC development was significantly higher in patients with higher smoking pack-year (odds ratio [OR] 1.028; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.008-1.049; P = 0.007) and emphysema on chest high-resolution computed tomography (OR 14.667; 95% CI 2.871-74.926; P = 0.001). The median overall survival time after developing LC was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.9-9.1 months), and the most common cause of death was LC, not ILD. According to the Cox proportional hazard model analysis with time-dependent covariates, patients who developed LC showed significantly poorer prognosis than those who did not (hazard ratio 87.86; 95% CI 19.56-394.67; P < 0.001). In CTD-ILD, clinicians should be careful with the risk of LC development in patients with a heavy smoking history and subsequent emphysema. Although not so frequent, the complication could be a poor prognostic determinant.

  8. Identification of radiation response genes and proteins from mouse pulmonary tissues after high-dose per fraction irradiation of limited lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hee; Jeon, Seulgi; Kang, Ga-Young; Lee, Hae-June; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2017-02-01

    The molecular effects of focal exposure of limited lung volumes to high-dose per fraction irradiation (HDFR) such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) have not been fully characterized. In this study, we used such an irradiation system and identified the genes and proteins after HDFR to mouse lung, similar to those associated with human therapy. High focal radiation (90 Gy) was applied to a 3-mm volume of the left lung of C57BL6 mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. As well as histological examination for lungs, a cDNA micro array using irradiated lung tissues and a protein array of sera were performed until 4 weeks after irradiation, and radiation-responsive genes and proteins were identified. For comparison, the long-term effects (12 months) of 20 Gy radiation wide-field dose to the left lung were also investigated. The genes ermap, epb4.2, cd200r3 (up regulation) and krt15, hoxc4, gdf2, cst9, cidec, and bnc1 (down-regulation) and the proteins of AIF, laminin, bNOS, HSP27, β-amyloid (upregulation), and calponin (downregulation) were identified as being responsive to 90 Gy HDFR. The gdf2, cst9, and cidec genes also responded to 20 Gy, suggesting that they are universal responsive genes in irradiated lungs. No universal proteins were identified in both 90 Gy and 20 Gy. Calponin, which was downregulated in protein antibody array analysis, showed a similar pattern in microarray data, suggesting a possible HDFR responsive serum biomarker that reflects gene alteration of irradiated lung tissue. These genes and proteins also responded to the lower doses of 20 Gy and 50 Gy HDFR. These results suggest that identified candidate genes and proteins are HDFR-specifically expressed in lung damage induced by HDFR relevant to SBRT in humans.

  9. Comparison of extravascular lung water volume with radiographic findings in dogs with experimentally increased permeability pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, A.; Okumura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Hagio, M.; Fujinaga, T.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between extravascular lung water volume (ELWV) and chest radiographical findings was studied in general-anesthetized beagles. The dogs were experimentally injected with oleic acid to increase pulmonary vascular permeability. When the ELWV value in the dogs increased more than approximately 37% from the control value, their chest radiographs began to show signs of pulmonary edema. At this time, the chest X-ray density increased to 10% above the control level. PaO2 decreased, and PaCO2 increased after the administration of oleic acid. This clearly showed that the pulmonary gas exchange function was reduced following increasing ELWV. This comparison showed that probably the thermal-sodium double indicator dilution measurement of ELWV can detect slight hyperpermeability pulmonary edema that does not show on chest radiographs. The chest radiograph was therefore not suitable for the detection of slight pulmonary edema, because it did not show any changes in the early stages in hyperpermeability pulmonary edema

  10. Visual classification of emphysema heterogeneity compared with objective measurements: HRCT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B.; Bergstrand, L.; Tylen, U.; Aspelin, P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether spiral CT is superior to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in evaluating the radiological morphology of emphysema, and whether the combination of both CT techniques improves the evaluation in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). The material consisted of HRCT (with 2-mm slice thickness) and spiral CT (with 10-mm slice thickness) of 94 candidates for LVRS. Selected image pairs from these examinations were evaluated. Each image pair consisted of one image from the cranial part of the lung and one image from the caudal part. The degree of emphysema in the two images was calculated by computer. The difference between the images determined the degree of heterogeneity. Five classes of heterogeneity were defined. The study was performed by visual classification of 95 image pairs (spiral CT) and 95 image pairs (HRCT) into one of five different classes of emphysema heterogeneity. This visual classification was compared with the computer-based classification. Spiral CT was superior to HRCT with 47% correct classifications of emphysema heterogeneity compared with 40% for HRCT-based classification (p<0.05). The combination of the techniques did not improve the evaluation (42%). Spiral CT is superior to HRCT in determining heterogeneity of emphysema visually, and should be included in the pre-operative CT evaluation of LVRS candidates. (orig.)

  11. Visual classification of emphysema heterogeneity compared with objective measurements: HRCT vs spiral CT in candidates for lung volume reduction surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederlund, K.; Hoegberg, S.; Rasmussen, E.; Svane, B. [Department of Thoracic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstrand, L. [Department of Radiology, Danderyds Hospital, Danderyd (Sweden); Tylen, U. [Deparment of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenberg (Sweden); Aspelin, P. [Department of Radiology, Huddinge University Hospital, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2002-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether spiral CT is superior to high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) in evaluating the radiological morphology of emphysema, and whether the combination of both CT techniques improves the evaluation in patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). The material consisted of HRCT (with 2-mm slice thickness) and spiral CT (with 10-mm slice thickness) of 94 candidates for LVRS. Selected image pairs from these examinations were evaluated. Each image pair consisted of one image from the cranial part of the lung and one image from the caudal part. The degree of emphysema in the two images was calculated by computer. The difference between the images determined the degree of heterogeneity. Five classes of heterogeneity were defined. The study was performed by visual classification of 95 image pairs (spiral CT) and 95 image pairs (HRCT) into one of five different classes of emphysema heterogeneity. This visual classification was compared with the computer-based classification. Spiral CT was superior to HRCT with 47% correct classifications of emphysema heterogeneity compared with 40% for HRCT-based classification (p<0.05). The combination of the techniques did not improve the evaluation (42%). Spiral CT is superior to HRCT in determining heterogeneity of emphysema visually, and should be included in the pre-operative CT evaluation of LVRS candidates. (orig.)

  12. 4-D segmentation and normalization of 3He MR images for intrasubject assessment of ventilated lung volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrella, Benjamin; Tustison, Nicholas J.; Altes, Talissa A.; Avants, Brian B.; Mugler, John P., III; de Lange, Eduard E.

    2012-03-01

    Although 3He MRI permits compelling visualization of the pulmonary air spaces, quantitation of absolute ventilation is difficult due to confounds such as field inhomogeneity and relative intensity differences between image acquisition; the latter complicating longitudinal investigations of ventilation variation with respiratory alterations. To address these potential difficulties, we present a 4-D segmentation and normalization approach for intra-subject quantitative analysis of lung hyperpolarized 3He MRI. After normalization, which combines bias correction and relative intensity scaling between longitudinal data, partitioning of the lung volume time series is performed by iterating between modeling of the combined intensity histogram as a Gaussian mixture model and modulating the spatial heterogeneity tissue class assignments through Markov random field modeling. Evaluation of the algorithm was retrospectively applied to a cohort of 10 asthmatics between 19-25 years old in which spirometry and 3He MR ventilation images were acquired both before and after respiratory exacerbation by a bronchoconstricting agent (methacholine). Acquisition was repeated under the same conditions from 7 to 467 days (mean +/- standard deviation: 185 +/- 37.2) later. Several techniques were evaluated for matching intensities between the pre and post-methacholine images with the 95th percentile value histogram matching demonstrating superior correlations with spirometry measures. Subsequent analysis evaluated segmentation parameters for assessing ventilation change in this cohort. Current findings also support previous research that areas of poor ventilation in response to bronchoconstriction are relatively consistent over time.

  13. Lung volume reduction in pulmonary emphysema from the radiologist's perspective; Lungenvolumenreduktion beim Lungenemphysem aus der Sicht des Radiologen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doellinger, F.; Poellinger, A. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Huebner, R.H. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Internal Medicine/Infectious and Respiratory Diseases; Kuhnigk, J.M. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen (Germany). Inst. for Medical Image Computing

    2015-08-15

    Pulmonary emphysema causes decrease in lung function due to irreversible dilatation of intrapulmonary air spaces, which is linked to high morbidity and mortality. Lung volume reduction (LVR) is an invasive therapeutical option for pulmonary emphysema in order to improve ventilation mechanics. LVR can be carried out by lung resection surgery or different minimally invasive endoscopical procedures. All LVR-options require mandatory preinterventional evaluation to detect hyperinflated dysfunctional lung areas as target structures for treatment. Quantitative computed tomography can determine the volume percentage of emphysematous lung and its topographical distribution based on the lung's radiodensity. Modern techniques allow for lobebased quantification that facilitates treatment planning. Clinical tests still play the most important role in post-interventional therapy monitoring, but CT is crucial in the detection of postoperative complications and foreshadows the method's high potential in sophisticated experimental studies. Within the last ten years, LVR with endobronchial valves has become an extensively researched minimally-invasive treatment option. However, this therapy is considerably complicated by the frequent occurrence of functional interlobar shunts. The presence of ''collateral ventilation'' has to be ruled out prior to valve implantations, as the presence of these extraanatomical connections between different lobes may jeopardize the success of therapy. Recent experimental studies evaluated the automatic detection of incomplete lobar fissures from CT scans, because they are considered to be a predictor for the existence of shunts. To date, these methods are yet to show acceptable results.

  14. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S 2 in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S 2 and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S 2 for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S 2 reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S 2 can be reconstructed from the tumor volume variation curves measured

  15. Differences in the dose-volume metrics with heterogeneity correction status and its influence on local control in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueki, Nami; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Shibuya, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dose-volume metrics under different heterogeneity corrections and the factors associated with local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Eighty-three patients who underwent SBRT for pathologically proven stage I NSCLC were reviewed retrospectively. The prescribed dose was 48 Gy in four fractions at the isocenter (IC) under heterogeneity correction with the Batho power law (BPL). The clinical plans were recalculated with Eclipse (Varian) for the same monitor units under the BPL and anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and with no heterogeneity correction (NC). The dose at the IC, dose that covers 95% of the volume (D95), minimum dose (Min), and mean dose (Mean) of the planning target volume (PTV) were compared under each algorithm and between patients with local lesion control (LC) and LR. The IC doses under NC were significantly lower than those under the BPL and AAA. Under the BPL, the mean PTV D95, Min and Mean were 8.0, 9.4 and 7.4% higher than those under the AAA, and 9.6, 9.2 and 4.6% higher than those under NC, respectively. Under the AAA, all dose-volumetric parameters were significantly lower in T1a patients than in those with T1b and T2a. With a median follow-up of 35.9 months, LR occurred in 18 patients. Between the LC and LR groups, no significant differences were observed for any of the metrics. Even after stratification according to T-stage, no significant difference was observed between LC and LR. (author)

  16. Breast metastasis and lung large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: first clinical observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Verrico, Monica; Di Cristofano, Claudio; Moretti, Valentina; Strudel, Martina; Zoratto, Federica; Minozzi, Marina; Tomao, Silverio

    2017-09-01

    The lung large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is a very rare aggressive neuroendocrine tumor with a high propensity to metastasize and very poor prognosis. We report an atypical presentation of lung LCNEC was diagnosed from a metastatic nodule on the breast. Our patient is a 59-years-old woman that presented in March 2014 nonproductive cough. A CT scan showed multiple brain, lung, adrenal gland and liver secondary lesions; moreover, it revealed a breast right nodule near the chest measuring 1.8 cm. The breast nodule and lung lesions were biopsied and their histology and molecular diagnosis were LCNEC of the lung. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case of breast metastasis from LCNEC of the lung. Furthermore, breast metastasis from extramammary malignancy is uncommon and its diagnosis is difficult but important for proper management and prediction of prognosis. Therefore, a careful clinical history with a thorough clinical examination is needed to make the correct diagnosis. Moreover, metastasis to the breast should be considered in any patient with a known primary malignant tumor history who presents with a breast lump. Anyhow, pathological examination should be performed to differentiate the primary breast cancer from metastatic tumor. Therefore, an accurate diagnosis of breast metastases may not only avoid unnecessary breast resection, more importantly it is crucial to determine an appropriate and systemic treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. A technique of using gated-CT images to determine internal target volume (ITV) for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jianyue; Ajlouni, Munther; Chen Qing; Yin, Fang-Fang; Movsas, Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To develop and evaluate a technique and procedure of using gated-CT images in combination with PET image to determine the internal target volume (ITV), which could reduce the planning target volume (PTV) with adequate target coverage. Patients and methods: A skin marker-based gating system connected to a regular single slice CT scanner was used for this study. A motion phantom with adjustable motion amplitude was used to evaluate the CT gating system. Specifically, objects of various sizes/shapes, considered as virtual tumors, were placed on the phantom to evaluate the number of phases of gated images required to determine the ITV while taking into account tumor size, shape and motion. A procedure of using gated-CT and PET images to define ITV for patients was developed and was tested in patients enrolled in an IRB approved protocol. Results: The CT gating system was capable of removing motion artifacts for target motion as large as 3-cm when it was gated at optimal phases. A phantom study showed that two gated-CT scans at the end of expiration and the end of inspiration would be sufficient to determine the ITV for tumor motion less than 1-cm, and another mid-phase scan would be required for tumors with 2-cm motion, especially for small tumors. For patients, the ITV encompassing visible tumors in all sets of gated-CT and regular spiral CT images seemed to be consistent with the target volume determined from PET images. PTV expanded from the ITV with a setup uncertainty margin had less volume than PTVs from spiral CT images with a 10-mm generalized margin or an individualized margin determined at fluoroscopy. Conclusions: A technique of determining the ITV using gated-CT images was developed and was clinically implemented successfully for fractionated stereotactic lung radiotherapy

  18. SU-E-I-90: Characterizing Small Animal Lung Properties Using Speckle Observed with An In-Line X-Ray Phase Contrast Benchtop System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garson, A; Gunsten, S; Guan, H; Brody, S; Anastasio, M [Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vasireddi, S [MetroHealth Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We demonstrate a novel X-ray phase-contrast (XPC) method for lung imaging representing a paradigm shift in the way small animal functional imaging is performed. In our method, information regarding airway microstructure that is encoded within speckle texture of a single XPC radiograph is decoded to produce 2D parametric images that will spatially resolve changes in lung properties such as microstructure sizes and air volumes. Such information cannot be derived from conventional lung radiography or any other 2D imaging modality. By computing these images at different points within a breathing cycle, dynamic functional imaging will be readily achieved without the need for tomography. Methods: XPC mouse lung radiographs acquired in situ with an in-line X-ray phase contrast benchtop system. The lung air volume is varied and controlled with a small animal ventilator. XPC radiographs will be acquired for various lung air volume levels representing different phases of the respiratory cycle. Similar data will be acquired of microsphere-based lung phantoms containing hollow glass spheres with known distributions of diameters. Image texture analysis is applied to the data to investigate relationships between texture characteristics and airspace/microsphere physical properties. Results: Correlations between Fourier-based texture descriptors (FBTDs) and regional lung air volume indicate that the texture features in 2D radiographs reveal information on 3D properties of the lungs. For example, we find for a 350 × 350 πm2 lung ROI a linear relationship between injected air volume and FBTD value with slope and intercept of 8.9×10{sup 5} and 7.5, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate specific image texture measures related to lung speckle features are correlated with physical characteristics of refracting elements (i.e. lung air spaces). Furthermore, we present results indicating the feasibility of implementing the technique with a simple imaging system design, short

  19. Respiratory-Gated Helical Computed Tomography of Lung: Reproducibility of Small Volumes in an Ex Vivo Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, Juergen; Dinkel, Julien; Bolte, Hendrik; Welzel, Thomas; Hoffmann, Beata M.Sc.; Thierfelder, Carsten; Mende, Ulrich; Debus, Juergen; Heller, Martin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Motion-adapted radiotherapy with gated irradiation or tracking of tumor positions requires dedicated imaging techniques such as four-dimensional (4D) helical computed tomography (CT) for patient selection and treatment planning. The objective was to evaluate the reproducibility of spatial information for small objects on respiratory-gated 4D helical CT using computer-assisted volumetry of lung nodules in a ventilated ex vivo system. Methods and Materials: Five porcine lungs were inflated inside a chest phantom and prepared with 55 artificial nodules (mean diameter, 8.4 mm ± 1.8). The lungs were respirated by a flexible diaphragm and scanned with 40-row detector CT (collimation, 24 x 1.2 mm; pitch, 0.1; rotation time, 1 s; slice thickness, 1.5 mm; increment, 0.8 mm). The 4D-CT scans acquired during respiration (eight per minute) and reconstructed at 0-100% inspiration and equivalent static scans were scored for motion-related artifacts (0 or absent to 3 or relevant). The reproducibility of nodule volumetry (three readers) was assessed using the variation coefficient (VC). Results: The mean volumes from the static and dynamic inspiratory scans were equal (364.9 and 360.8 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.24). The static and dynamic end-expiratory volumes were slightly greater (371.9 and 369.7 mm 3 , respectively, p = 0.019). The VC for volumetry (static) was 3.1%, with no significant difference between 20 apical and 20 caudal nodules (2.6% and 3.5%, p = 0.25). In dynamic scans, the VC was greater (3.9%, p = 0.004; apical and caudal, 2.6% and 4.9%; p = 0.004), with a significant difference between static and dynamic in the 20 caudal nodules (3.5% and 4.9%, p = 0.015). This was consistent with greater motion-related artifacts and image noise at the diaphragm (p <0.05). The VC for interobserver variability was 0.6%. Conclusion: Residual motion-related artifacts had only minimal influence on volumetry of small solid lesions. This indicates a high reproducibility of

  20. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  1. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23

  2. Assessment of minute volume of lung in NPP workers for Korean reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. J.; Song, S. H.; Lee, J.; Jin, Y. W.; Yim, Y. K.; Kim, J. S. [KNETEC, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    To formulation of the reference Korean for radiation protection purpose, we measured the forced vital capacity(FVC), forced expiratory volume in second(FEVI), minute ventilation(MV) of Nuclear Power Plant workers using SP-1 Spirometry Unit(Schiller AG. 1998) and eatimated the liters of breathed for working and resting, also compared these data with ICRP 23.

  3. Measurement of regional extravascular lung density and of pulmonary blood volume with positron emitting isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larock, M.P.; Quaglia, L.; Lamotte, D.; De Landsheere, C.; Del Fiore, G.; Chevigne, M.; Peters, J.M.; Rigo, P. (Universite de Liege (Belgium))

    1982-01-01

    Studies of pulmonary blood volume changes with exercise can be performed after labelling of the blood pool by /sup 11/CO inhalation. Positron transaxial tomography permits the quantitative study of density distribution of the chest and of the pulmonary blood volume. This paper represents our preliminary experience with these techniques on models and control patients. We have first verified the linearity of transmission for density distribution below one. The tomographic examination first records a transmission image, then an emission image on the same section. We next normalize emission and transmission values on a region of unit density corresponding to blood: then we substract the emission from the transmission values to measure the extravascular pulmonary density. With crystal probes we record pulmonary blood volume variations before, during and after exercise. Peripheral hemodynamic variations explain the change recorded at the begining and at the end of exercise. Combination of these two techniques should help us to better study the importance of the acute changes in the ''formation'' of pulmonary oedema and its influence on regional pulmonary blood volume.

  4. Observer agreement in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases based on HRCT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, Viviane Baptista; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Jasinowodolinski, Dany; Verrastro, Carlos Gustavo Yuji; Torlai, Fabiola Goda

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to determine the interobserver and intraobserver agreement in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) based on HRCT scans and the impact of observer expertise, clinical data and confidence level on such agreement. Methods: two thoracic radiologists and two general radiologists independently reviewed the HRCT images of 58 patients with ILDs on two distinct occasions: prior to and after the clinical anamnesis. The radiologists selected up to three diagnostic hypotheses for each patient and defined the confidence level for these hypotheses. One of the thoracic and one of the general radiologists re-evaluated the same images up to three months after the first readings. In the coefficient analyses, the kappa statistic was used. Results: the thoracic and general radiologists, respectively, agreed on at least one diagnosis for each patient in 91.4% and 82.8% of the patients. The thoracic radiologists agreed on the most likely diagnosis in 48.3% (κ = 0.42) and 62.1% (κ = 0.58) of the cases, respectively, prior to and after the clinical anamnesis; likewise, the general radiologists agreed on the most likely diagnosis in 37.9% (κ 0.32) and 36.2% (κ = 0.30) of the cases. For the thoracic radiologist, the intraobserver agreement on the most likely diagnosis was 0.73 and 0.63 prior to and after the clinical anamnesis, respectively. That for the general radiologist was 0.38 and 0.42.The thoracic radiologists presented almost perfect agreement for the diagnostic hypotheses defined with the high confidence level. Conclusions: Interobserver and intraobserver agreement in the diagnosis of ILDs based on HRCT scans ranged from fair to almost perfect and was influenced by radiologist expertise, clinical history and confidence level. (author)

  5. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  6. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  7. Variations of target volume definition and daily target volume localization in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early-stage non–small cell lung cancer patients under abdominal compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chunhui, E-mail: chan@coh.org; Sampath, Sagus; Schultheisss, Timothy E.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to compare gross tumor volumes (GTV) in 3-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) simulation and daily cone beam CT (CBCT) with the internal target volume (ITV) in 4-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment of patients with early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) under abdominal compression. We retrospectively selected 10 patients with NSCLC who received image-guided SBRT treatments under abdominal compression with daily CBCT imaging. GTVs were contoured as visible gross tumor on the planning 3DCT and daily CBCT, and ITVs were contoured using maximum intensity projection (MIP) images of the planning 4DCT. Daily CBCTs were registered with 3DCT and MIP images by matching of bony landmarks in the thoracic region to evaluate interfractional GTV position variations. Relative to MIP-based ITVs, the average 3DCT-based GTV volume was 66.3 ± 17.1% (range: 37.5% to 92.0%) (p < 0.01 in paired t-test), and the average CBCT-based GTV volume was 90.0 ± 6.7% (daily range: 75.7% to 107.1%) (p = 0.02). Based on bony anatomy matching, the center-of-mass coordinates for CBCT-based GTVs had maximum absolute shift of 2.4 mm (left-right), 7.0 mm (anterior-posterior [AP]), and 5.2 mm (superior-inferior [SI]) relative to the MIP-based ITV. CBCT-based GTVs had average overlapping ratio of 81.3 ± 11.2% (range: 45.1% to 98.9%) with the MIP-based ITV, and 57.7 ± 13.7% (range: 35.1% to 83.2%) with the 3DCT-based GTV. Even with abdominal compression, both 3DCT simulations and daily CBCT scans significantly underestimated the full range of tumor motion. In daily image-guided patient setup corrections, automatic bony anatomy-based image registration could lead to target misalignment. Soft tissue-based image registration should be performed for accurate treatment delivery.

  8. Modified Chrispin-Norman chest radiography score for cystic fibrosis: observer agreement and correlation with lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jong, P.A. de; Achterberg, J.A.; Kessels, O.A.M.; Beek, F.J.; Ginneken, B. van; Hogeweg, L.; Terheggen-Lagro, S.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    To test observer agreement and two strategies for possible improvement (consensus meeting and reference images) for the modified Chrispin-Norman score for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Before and after a consensus meeting and after developing reference images three observers scored sets of 25 chest radiographs from children with CF. Observer agreement was tested for line, ring, mottled and large soft shadows, for overinflation and for the composite modified Chrispin-Norman score. Correlation with lung function was assessed. Before the consensus meeting agreement between observers 1 and 2 was moderate-good, but with observer 3 agreement was poor-fair. Scores correlated significantly with spirometry for observers 1 and 2 (-0.72< R<-0.42, P < 0.05), but not for observer 3. Agreement with observer 3 improved after the consensus meeting. Reference images improved agreement for overinflation and mottled and large shadows and correlation with lung function, but agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score did not improve further. Consensus meetings and reference images improve among-observer agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score, but good agreement was not achieved among all observers for the modified Chrispin-Norman score and for bronchial line and ring shadows. (orig.)

  9. Modified Chrispin-Norman chest radiography score for cystic fibrosis: observer agreement and correlation with lung function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, P.A. de; Achterberg, J.A.; Kessels, O.A.M.; Beek, F.J. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ginneken, B. van; Hogeweg, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terheggen-Lagro, S.W.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    To test observer agreement and two strategies for possible improvement (consensus meeting and reference images) for the modified Chrispin-Norman score for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Before and after a consensus meeting and after developing reference images three observers scored sets of 25 chest radiographs from children with CF. Observer agreement was tested for line, ring, mottled and large soft shadows, for overinflation and for the composite modified Chrispin-Norman score. Correlation with lung function was assessed. Before the consensus meeting agreement between observers 1 and 2 was moderate-good, but with observer 3 agreement was poor-fair. Scores correlated significantly with spirometry for observers 1 and 2 (-0.72observer 3. Agreement with observer 3 improved after the consensus meeting. Reference images improved agreement for overinflation and mottled and large shadows and correlation with lung function, but agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score did not improve further. Consensus meetings and reference images improve among-observer agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score, but good agreement was not achieved among all observers for the modified Chrispin-Norman score and for bronchial line and ring shadows. (orig.)

  10. Evaluation of lung volumes, vital capacity and respiratory muscle strength after cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcio Aparecido; Vidotto, Milena Carlos; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Almeida, Renato; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Sperandio, Evandro Fornias; Jardim, José Roberto; Gazzotti, Mariana Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that physiopathological changes to the respiratory system can occur following thoracic and abdominal surgery. Laminectomy is considered to be a peripheral surgical procedure, but it is possible that thoracic spinal surgery exerts a greater influence on lung function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pulmonary volumes and maximum respiratory pressures of patients undergoing cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal surgery. Prospective study in a tertiary-level university hospital. Sixty-three patients undergoing laminectomy due to diagnoses of tumors or herniated discs were evaluated. Vital capacity, tidal volume, minute ventilation and maximum respiratory pressures were evaluated preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Possible associations between the respiratory variables and the duration of the operation, surgical diagnosis and smoking status were investigated. Vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure presented reductions on the first postoperative day (20.9% and 91.6%, respectively) for thoracic surgery (P = 0.01), and maximum expiratory pressure showed reductions on the first postoperative day in cervical surgery patients (15.3%; P = 0.004). The incidence of pulmonary complications was 3.6%. There were reductions in vital capacity and maximum respiratory pressures during the postoperative period in patients undergoing laminectomy. Surgery in the thoracic region was associated with greater reductions in vital capacity and maximum inspiratory pressure, compared with cervical and lumbar surgery. Thus, surgical manipulation of the thoracic region appears to have more influence on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle action.

  11. Lung MRI at 1.5 and 3 Tesla: observer preference study and lesion contrast using five different pulse sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian; Puderbach, Michael; Biederer, Juergen; Fabel, Michael; Dietrich, Olaf; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Reiser, Maximilian F; Schönberg, Stefan O

    2007-06-01

    To compare the image quality and lesion contrast of lung MRI using 5 different pulse sequences at 1.5 T and 3 T. Lung MRI was performed at 1.5 T and 3 T using 5 pulse sequences which have been previously proposed for lung MRI: 3D volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE), true fast imaging with steady-state precession (TrueFISP), half-Fourier single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE), short tau inversion recovery (STIR), T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (TSE). In addition to 4 healthy volunteers, 5 porcine lungs were examined in a dedicated chest phantom. Lung pathology (nodules and infiltrates) was simulated in the phantom by intrapulmonary and intrabronchial injections of agarose. CT was performed in the phantom for correlation. Image quality of the sequences was ranked in a side-by-side comparison by 3 blinded radiologists regarding the delineation of pulmonary and mediastinal anatomy, conspicuity of pulmonary nodules and infiltrates, and presence of artifacts. The contrast of nodules and infiltrates (CNODULES and CINFILTRATES) defined by the ratio of the signal intensities of the lesion and adjacent normal lung parenchyma was determined. There were no relevant differences regarding the preference for the individual sequences between both field strengths. TSE was the preferred sequence for the visualization of the mediastinum at both field strengths. For the visualization of lung parenchyma the observers preferred TrueFISP in volunteers and TSE in the phantom studies. At both field strengths VIBE achieved the best rating for the depiction of nodules, whereas HASTE was rated best for the delineation of infiltrates. TrueFISP had the fewest artifacts in volunteers, whereas STIR showed the fewest artifacts in the phantom. For all but the TrueFISP sequence the lesion contrast increased from 1.5 T to 3 T. At both field strengths VIBE showed the highest CNODULES (6.6 and 7.1) and HASTE the highest CINFILTRATES (6.1 and 6.3). The imaging characteristics of different

  12. Pneumoperitoneum deteriorates intratidal respiratory system mechanics: an observational study in lung-healthy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Steffen; Biesemann, Andreas; Spaeth, Johannes; Schumann, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    Pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgery leads to atelectasis and impairment of oxygenation. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is supposed to counteract atelectasis. We hypothesized that the derecruiting effects of pneumoperitoneum would deteriorate the intratidal compliance profile in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. In 30 adult patients scheduled for surgery with pneumoperitoneum, respiratory variables were measured during mechanical ventilation. We calculated the dynamic compliance of the respiratory system (C RS ) and the intratidal volume-dependent C RS curve using the gliding-SLICE method. The C RS curve was then classified in terms of indicating intratidal recruitment/derecruitment (increasing profile) and overdistension (decreasing profile). During the surgical interventions, the PEEP level was maintained nearly constant at 7 cm H 2 O. Data are expressed as mean [confidence interval]. Baseline C RS was 60 [54-67] mL cm H 2 O -1 . Application of pneumoperitoneum decreased C RS to 40 [37-43] mL cm H 2 O -1 which partially recovered to 54 [50-59] mL cm H 2 O -1 (P < 0.001) after removal but remained below the value measured before pneumoperitoneum (P < 0.001). Baseline compliance profiles indicated intratidal recruitment/derecruitment in 48 % patients. After induction of pneumoperitoneum, intratidal recruitment/derecruitment was indicated in 93 % patients (P < 0.01), and after removal intratidal recruitment/derecruitment was indicated in 59 % patients. Compliance profiles showing overdistension were not observed. Analyses of the intratidal compliance profiles reveal that pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgery causes intratidal recruitment/derecruitment which partly persists after its removal. The analysis of the intratidal volume-dependent C RS profiles could be used to guide intraoperative PEEP adjustments during elevated intraabdominal pressure.

  13. Cyclic PaO2 oscillations assessed in the renal microcirculation: correlation with tidal volume in a porcine model of lung lavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Rainer; Möllmann, Christian; Ziebart, Alexander; Liu, Tanghua; David, Matthias; Hartmann, Erik K

    2017-07-11

    Oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen induced by varying shunt fractions occur during cyclic alveolar recruitment within the injured lung. Recently, these were proposed as a pathomechanism that may be relevant for remote organ injury following acute respiratory distress syndrome. This study examines the transmission of oxygen oscillations to the renal tissue and their tidal volume dependency. Lung injury was induced by repetitive bronchoalveolar lavage in eight anaesthetized pigs. Cyclic alveolar recruitment was provoked by high tidal volume ventilation. Oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen were measured in real-time in the macrocirculation by multi-frequency phase fluorimetry and in the renal microcirculation by combined white-light spectrometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry during tidal volume down-titration. Significant respiratory-dependent oxygen oscillations were detected in the macrocirculation and transmitted to the renal microcirculation in a substantial extent. The amplitudes of these oscillations significantly correlate to the applied tidal volume and are minimized during down-titration. In a porcine model oscillations of the arterial partial pressure of oxygen are induced by cyclic alveolar recruitment and transmitted to the renal microcirculation in a tidal volume-dependent fashion. They might play a role in organ crosstalk and remote organ damage following lung injury.

  14. Performance of Leak Compensation in All-Age ICU Ventilators During Volume-Targeted Neonatal Ventilation: A Lung Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itagaki, Taiga; Bennett, Desmond J; Chenelle, Christopher T; Fisher, Daniel F; Kacmarek, Robert M

    2017-01-01

    Volume-targeted ventilation is increasingly used in low birthweight infants because of the potential for reducing volutrauma and avoiding hypocapnea. However, it is not known what level of air leak is acceptable during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation when leak compensation is activated concurrently. Four ICU ventilators (Servo-i, PB980, V500, and Avea) were compared in available invasive volume-targeted ventilation modes (pressure control continuous spontaneous ventilation [PC-CSV] and pressure control continuous mandatory ventilation [PC-CMV]). The Servo-i and PB980 were tested with (+) and without (-) their proximal flow sensor. The V500 and Avea were tested with their proximal flow sensor as indicated by their manufacturers. An ASL 5000 lung model was used to simulate 4 neonatal scenarios (body weight 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 kg). The ASL 5000 was ventilated via an endotracheal tube with 3 different leaks. Two minutes of data were collected after each change in leak level, and the asynchrony index was calculated. Tidal volume (V T ) before and after the change in leak was assessed. The differences in delivered V T between before and after the change in leak were within ±5% in all scenarios with the PB980 (-/+) and V500. With the Servo-i (-/+), baseline V T was ≥10% greater than set V T during PC-CSV, and delivered V T markedly changed with leak. The Avea demonstrated persistent high V T in all leak scenarios. Across all ventilators, the median asynchrony index was 1% (interquartile range 0-27%) in PC-CSV and 1.8% (0-45%) in PC-CMV. The median asynchrony index was significantly higher in the Servo-i (-/+) than in the PB980 (-/+) and V500 in 1 and 2 kg scenarios during PC-CSV and PC-CMV. The PB980 and V500 were the only ventilators to acclimate to all leak scenarios and achieve targeted V T . Further clinical investigation is needed to validate the use of leak compensation during neonatal volume-targeted ventilation. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. The influence of target and patient characteristics on the volume obtained from cone beam CT in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Khan, Rao; D’Ambrosi, Rafael; Krobutschek, Krista; Nugent, Zoann; Lau, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of tumor and patient characteristics on the target volume obtained from cone beam CT (CBCT) in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: For a given cohort of 71 patients, the internal target volume (ITV) in CBCT obtained from four different datasets was compared with a reference ITV drawn on a four-dimensional CT (4DCT). The significance of the tumor size, location, relative target motion (RM) and patient’s body mass index (BMI) and gender on the adequacy of ITV obtained from CBCT was determined. Results: The median ITV-CBCT was found to be smaller than the ITV-4DCT by 11.8% (range: −49.8 to +24.3%, P < 0.001). Small tumors located in the lower lung were found to have a larger RM than large tumors in the upper lung. Tumors located near the central lung had high CT background which reduced the target contrast near the edges. Tumor location close to center vs. periphery was the only significant factor (P = 0.046) causing underestimation of ITV in CBCT, rather than RM (P = 0.323) and other factors. Conclusions: The current clinical study has identified that the location of tumor is a major source of discrepancy between ITV-CBCT and ITV-4DCT for lung SBRT

  16. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  17. Reproducibility of 'Intelligent' Contouring of Gross Tumor Volume in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer on PET/CT Images Using a Standardized Visual Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J.; Everitt, Sarah; Fimmell, Natalie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly used for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The methodology for contouring tumor margins remains controversial. We developed a rigorous visual protocol for contouring GTV that uses all available clinical information and studied its reproducibility in patients from a prospective PET/CT planning trial. Methods and Materials: Planning PET/CT scans from 6 consecutive patients were selected. Six 'observers' (two radiation oncologists, two nuclear medicine physicians, and two radiologists) contoured GTVs for each patient using a predefined protocol and subsequently recontoured 2 patients. For the estimated GTVs and axial distances, least-squares means for each observer and for each case were calculated and compared, using the F test and pairwise t-tests. In five cases, tumor margins were also autocontoured using standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoffs of 2.5 and 3.5 and 40% SUV max . Results: The magnitude of variation between observers was small relative to the mean (coefficient of variation [CV] = 3%), and the total variation (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 3%). For estimation of superior/inferior (SI), left/right (LR), and anterior/posterior (AP) borders of the GTV, differences between observers were also small (AP, CV = 2%, ICC = 0.4%; LR, CV = 6%, ICC = 2%; SI, CV 4%, ICC = 2%). GTVs autocontoured generated using SUV 2.5, 3.5, and 40% SUV max differed widely in each case. An SUV contour of 2.5 was most closely correlated with the mean GTV defined by the human observers. Conclusions: Observer variation contributed little to total variation in the GTV and axial distances. A visual contouring protocol gave reproducible results for contouring GTV in NSCLC.

  18. Pathomorphologic observation on treatment of radiation-induced lung damage in rats with

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Jiangfeng; Qi Haowen; Zhao Feng; Fan Fengyun; Shi Mei; Zhao Yiling; Meng Yulin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To inquire into the means of preventing lung damage induced by thoracic irradiation. Methods: SD rats were divided randomly into 3 groups: normal control, irradiated control (Group IC) and irradiated and fluvastatin (Flu)-treated group (Group F). The later two groups of rats were irradiated with X-rays at a dose of 20 Gy thoracically. Beginning from the seventh day before irradiation the rats in the Group F were treated with Flu at a dose of 20 mg per day by garaging until the end of the experiment. Animals from each group were sacrificed on days 5, 15, 30, 60 respectively after irradiation. Sections of lung were examined with light microscopy, electron microscopy and morphometry. Results: The rats in the Group IC suffered from typical radiation pneumonitis (P<0.01). Electron microscopy indicated type II pneumonocytes and capillary endothelial cells were injured in rats of Group IC on days 30, 60. There were increase of collagen and a great quantity of mast cells in irradiated control rats. In rats of the Group F there was slight reaction in the lung. Conclusion: Fluvastatin could reduce radiation pneumonitis and inhibit increase of collagen. The treatment and prevention of radiation-induced lung injury in rats with fluvastatin is effective

  19. Volume overload and adverse outcomes in chronic kidney disease: clinical observational and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Szu-Chun; Lai, Yi-Shin; Kuo, Ko-Lin; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-05-05

    Volume overload is frequently encountered and is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the relationship between volume overload and adverse outcomes in CKD is not fully understood. A prospective cohort of 338 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD was followed for a median of 2.1 years. The study participants were stratified by the presence or absence of volume overload, defined as an overhydration index assessed by bioimpedance spectroscopy exceeding 7%, the 90th percentile for the healthy population. The primary outcome was the composite of estimated glomerular filtration rate decline ≥50% or end-stage renal disease. The secondary outcome included a composite of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular causes. Animal models were used to simulate fluid retention observed in human CKD. We found that patients with volume overload were at a higher risk of the primary and secondary end points in the adjusted Cox models. Furthermore, overhydration appears to be more important than hypertension in predicting an elevated risk. In rats subjected to unilateral nephrectomy and a high-salt diet, the extracellular water significantly increased. This fluid retention was associated with an increase in blood pressure, proteinuria, renal inflammation with macrophage infiltration and tumor necrosis factor-α overexpression, glomerular sclerosis, and cardiac fibrosis. Diuretic treatment with indapamide attenuated these changes, suggesting that fluid retention might play a role in the development of adverse outcomes. Volume overload contributes to CKD progression and cardiovascular diseases. Further research is warranted to clarify whether the correction of volume overload would improve outcomes for CKD patients. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Tidal volume single breath washout of two tracer gases--a practical and promising lung function test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Singer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI, which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6 and helium (He using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM. METHODS: The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF(6 and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC, were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. RESULTS: USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60. MM from USFM reflected SF(6 and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. CONCLUSION: The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF(6 and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF(6 and He washout patterns during tidal breathing.

  1. Tidal volume single breath washout of two tracer gases--a practical and promising lung function test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Florian; Stern, Georgette; Thamrin, Cindy; Fuchs, Oliver; Riedel, Thomas; Gustafsson, Per; Frey, Urs; Latzin, Philipp

    2011-03-10

    Small airway disease frequently occurs in chronic lung diseases and may cause ventilation inhomogeneity (VI), which can be assessed by washout tests of inert tracer gas. Using two tracer gases with unequal molar mass (MM) and diffusivity increases specificity for VI in different lung zones. Currently washout tests are underutilised due to the time and effort required for measurements. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a simple technique for a new tidal single breath washout test (SBW) of sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) and helium (He) using an ultrasonic flowmeter (USFM). The tracer gas mixture contained 5% SF(6) and 26.3% He, had similar total MM as air, and was applied for a single tidal breath in 13 healthy adults. The USFM measured MM, which was then plotted against expired volume. USFM and mass spectrometer signals were compared in six subjects performing three SBW. Repeatability and reproducibility of SBW, i.e., area under the MM curve (AUC), were determined in seven subjects performing three SBW 24 hours apart. USFM reliably measured MM during all SBW tests (n = 60). MM from USFM reflected SF(6) and He washout patterns measured by mass spectrometer. USFM signals were highly associated with mass spectrometer signals, e.g., for MM, linear regression r-squared was 0.98. Intra-subject coefficient of variation of AUC was 6.8%, and coefficient of repeatability was 11.8%. The USFM accurately measured relative changes in SF(6) and He washout. SBW tests were repeatable and reproducible in healthy adults. We have developed a fast, reliable, and straightforward USFM based SBW method, which provides valid information on SF(6) and He washout patterns during tidal breathing.

  2. Impulse oscillometry at preschool age is a strong predictor of lung function by flow-volume spirometry in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauhkonen, Eero; Riikonen, Riikka; Törmänen, Sari; Koponen, Petri; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Helminen, Merja; Toikka, Jyri; Korppi, Matti

    2018-05-01

    The transition from early childhood wheezing to persistent asthma is linked to lung function impairment over time. Little is known how the methods used to study lung function at different ages correlate longitudinally. Sixty-four children with a history of hospitalization for bronchiolitis before 6 months of age were prospectively studied with impulse oscillometry (IOS) at the mean age of 6.3 years and these preschool IOS results were compared with flow-volume spirometry (FVS) measurements at mean age of 11.4 years. The baseline respiratory system resistance at 5 Hz (Rrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with all baseline FVS parameters except FVC. The post-bronchodilator (post-BD) Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with post-BD FEV 1 and FEV 1 /FVC. The bronchodilator-induced decrease in Rrs5 showed a modest statistically significant correlation with the percent increase in FEV 1 . Baseline and post-BD respiratory reactance at 5 Hz (Xrs5) showed a modest statistically significant correlation with baseline and post-BD FVS parameters except post-BD FEV 1 /FVC, respectively, and post-BD Xrs5 showed a strong correlation with post-BD FVC (ρ = 0.61) and post-BD FEV 1 (ρ = 0.59). In adjusted linear regression, preschool Xrs5 remained as a statistically significant independent predictor of FVS parameters in adolescence; the one-unit decrease in the Z-score of preschool post-BD Xrs5 predicted 9.6% lower post-BD FEV 1 , 9.3% lower post-BD FVC, and 9.7% lower post-BD MEF 50 when expressed as %-predicted parameters. Persistent post-BD small airway impairment in children with a history of bronchiolitis detected with IOS at preschool age predicted FVS results measured in early adolescence. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of Islamic fasting on lung volumes and capacities in the healthy persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Seyyed-Ali J; Kabir, Ali; Moghimi, Ali; Chehrei, Ali; Rad, Mohammad B

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate the changes in pulmonary volumes during and after Islamic fasting. It is a cohort study conducted on 117 healthy subjects selected on a random basis from employees, professors and students of Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, between December 1999 and January 2000. All of them underwent spirometry 10 days prior to Ramadan, 2 times during Ramadan, and one time 10 days post-Ramadan. In first visit, in addition to spirometry they underwent medical examination to make sure they are healthy. All of their spirometries and background information were collected. Repeated measurements analysis of variance method was used to compare the measurements. Approximately 69% of subjects were male and the mean age was 23.9 years. Mean fasting time was 27.8 days. The mean difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1%) was significant between the 4 visits (p=0.01). The mean FEV1% increased both during fasting and after Ramadan (p=0.017). The mean vital capacity and peak expiratory flow rate values increased during Ramadan significantly (p=0.043, pvolumes and might improve pulmonary function. This finding seems to be relevant to the changes in weight during Ramadan.

  4. The establishment of transmissible venereal tumor lung cancer model in canine and the observation of its biological characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhichao; Dong Weihua; Xiao Xiangsheng; Zhu Ruimin; Chen mofan; Wang Zhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish an allogeneic transplanted lung cancer model in canine by percutaneously injecting canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) cell suspension and to observe its biological characteristics. Methods: Under CT guidance fresh CTVT cell suspension was inoculated into the middle or posterior lobe of lungs through percutaneous puncturing needle in 12 beagle dogs. Cyclosporin was administrated orally to obtain immunosuppression. Tumor growth and metastasis were judged by chest CT scanning at regular intervals (every 1-2 weeks). The daily mental and physical condition of the dogs was observed. Autopsy and pathological examination were performed when the animals died naturally or at the tenth week after the procedure when the animals were sacrificed. Results: A total of 15 sites were inoculated in 12 dogs. The formation of tumor was observed in 2 dogs at the fifth week and in 9 dogs at the sixth week. Ten weeks after the inoculation the formation of tumor was detected in 10 inoculated points in 9 dogs, the inoculation success rate was 66.67%. The mean largest diameter of the tumor at 6, 8 and 10 weeks after the inoculation was (1.059 ± 0.113)cm, (1.827 ± 0.084)cm and (2.189 ± 0.153)cm, respectively. The largest diameter of the tumor nodule was 3.5 cm. Moderate to severe pleural effusion and mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis were found in all the dogs that showed the formation of the tumor. Conclusion: Percutaneous CTVT cell suspension injection can establish an allogeneic canine lung cancer model, which is helpful for the experimental studies related to lung cancer. (authors)

  5. Lung function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorichter, S.

    2009-01-01

    The term lung function is often restricted to the assessment of volume time curves measured at the mouth. Spirometry includes the assessment of lung volumes which can be mobilised with the corresponding flow-volume curves. In addition, lung volumes that can not be mobilised, such as the residual volume, or only partially as FRC and TLC can be measured by body plethysmography combined with the determination of the airway resistance. Body plethysmography allows the correct positioning of forced breathing manoeuvres on the volume-axis, e.g. before and after pharmacotherapy. Adding the CO single breath transfer factor (T LCO ), which includes the measurement of the ventilated lung volume using He, enables a clear diagnosis of different obstructive, restrictive or mixed ventilatory defects with and without trapped air. Tests of reversibility and provocation, as well as the assessment of inspiratory mouth pressures (PI max , P 0.1 ) help to classify the underlying disorder and to clarify treatment strategies. For further information and to complete the diagnostic of disturbances of the ventilation, diffusion and/or perfusion (capillar-)arterial bloodgases at rest and under physical strain sometimes amended by ergospirometry are recommended. Ideally, lung function measurements are amended by radiological and nuclear medicine techniques. (orig.) [de

  6. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction by endobronchial valve in advanced emphysema: the first Asian report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park TS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tai Sun Park,1 Yoonki Hong,2 Jae Seung Lee,1 Sang Young Oh,3 Sang Min Lee,3 Namkug Kim,3 Joon Beom Seo,3 Yeon-Mok Oh,1 Sang-Do Lee,1 Sei Won Lee1 1Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Clinical Research Center for Chronic Obstructive Airway Diseases, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; 2Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Korea; 3Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Purpose: Endobronchial valve (EBV therapy is increasingly being seen as a therapeutic option for advanced emphysema, but its clinical utility in Asian populations, who may have different phenotypes to other ethnic populations, has not been assessed.Patients and methods: This prospective open-label single-arm clinical trial examined the clinical efficacy and the safety of EBV in 43 consecutive patients (mean age 68.4±7.5, forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] 24.5%±10.7% predicted, residual volume 208.7%±47.9% predicted with severe emphysema with complete fissure and no collateral ventilation in a tertiary referral hospital in Korea.Results: Compared to baseline, the patients exhibited significant improvements 6 months after EBV therapy in terms of FEV1 (from 0.68±0.26 L to 0.92±0.40 L; P<0.001, 6-minute walk distance (from 233.5±114.8 m to 299.6±87.5 m; P=0.012, modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale (from 3.7±0.6 to 2.4±1.2; P<0.001, and St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (from 65.59±13.07 to 53.76±11.40; P=0.028. Nine patients (20.9% had a tuberculosis scar, but these scars did not affect target lobe volume reduction or pneumothorax frequency. Thirteen patients had adverse events, ten (23.3% developed pneumothorax, which included one death due to tension pneumothorax.Conclusion: EBV therapy was as effective and safe in Korean

  7. Precise determination of universal finite volume observables in the Gross-Neveu model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzec, T.

    2007-01-26

    The Gross-Neveu model is a quantum field theory in two space time dimensions that shares many features with quantum chromo dynamics. In this thesis the continuum model and its discretized versions are reviewed and a finite volume renormalization scheme is introduced and tested. Calculations in the limit of infinitely many fermion flavors as well as perturbative computations are carried out. In extensive Monte-Carlo simulations of the one flavor and the four flavor lattice models with Wilson fermions a set of universal finite volume observables is calculated to a high precision. In the one flavor model which is equivalent to the massless Thirring model the continuum extrapolated Monte-Carlo results are confronted with an exact solution of the model. (orig.)

  8. Precise determination of universal finite volume observables in the Gross-Neveu model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korzec, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Gross-Neveu model is a quantum field theory in two space time dimensions that shares many features with quantum chromo dynamics. In this thesis the continuum model and its discretized versions are reviewed and a finite volume renormalization scheme is introduced and tested. Calculations in the limit of infinitely many fermion flavors as well as perturbative computations are carried out. In extensive Monte-Carlo simulations of the one flavor and the four flavor lattice models with Wilson fermions a set of universal finite volume observables is calculated to a high precision. In the one flavor model which is equivalent to the massless Thirring model the continuum extrapolated Monte-Carlo results are confronted with an exact solution of the model. (orig.)

  9. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  10. Impact of Different Tidal Volume Levels at Low Mechanical Power on Ventilator-Induced Lung Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian Moraes

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tidal volume (VT has been considered the main determinant of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI. Recently, experimental studies have suggested that mechanical power transferred from the ventilator to the lungs is the promoter of VILI. We hypothesized that, as long as mechanical power is kept below a safe threshold, high VT should not be injurious. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of different VT levels and respiratory rates (RR on lung function, diffuse alveolar damage (DAD, alveolar ultrastructure, and expression of genes related to inflammation [interleukin (IL-6], alveolar stretch (amphiregulin, epithelial [club cell secretory protein (CC16] and endothelial [intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1] cell injury, and extracellular matrix damage [syndecan-1, decorin, and metalloproteinase (MMP-9] in experimental acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS under low-power mechanical ventilation. Twenty-eight Wistar rats received Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide intratracheally. After 24 h, 21 animals were randomly assigned to ventilation (2 h with low mechanical power at three different VT levels (n = 7/group: (1 VT = 6 mL/kg and RR adjusted to normocapnia; (2 VT = 13 mL/kg; and 3 VT = 22 mL/kg. In the second and third groups, RR was adjusted to yield low mechanical power comparable to that of the first group. Mechanical power was calculated as [(ΔP,L2/Est,L/2]× RR (ΔP,L = transpulmonary driving pressure, Est,L = static lung elastance. Seven rats were not mechanically ventilated (NV and were used for molecular biology analysis. Mechanical power was comparable among groups, while VT gradually increased. ΔP,L and mechanical energy were higher in VT = 22 mL/kg than VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg (p < 0.001 for both. Accordingly, DAD score increased in VT = 22 mL/kg compared to VT = 6 mL/kg and VT = 13 mL/kg [23(18.5–24.75 vs. 16(12–17.75 and 16(13.25–18, p < 0.05, respectively]. VT = 22 mL/kg was associated with higher

  11. Feasibility of omitting clinical target volume for limited-disease small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Shuhua; Shi, Anhui; Yu, Rong; Zhu, Guangying

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of omitting clinical target volume (CTV) for limited small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy. 89 patients were treated from January 1, 2008 to August 31, 2011, 54 cases were irradiated with target volume without CTV, and 35 cases were irradiated with CTV. Both arms were irradiated post chemotherapy tumor extent and omitted elective nodal irradiation; dose prescription was 95% PTV56-63 Gy/28-35 F/5.6-7 weeks. In the arm without CTV and arm with CTV, the local relapse rates were 16.7% and 17.1% (p = 0.586) respectively. In the arm without CTV, of the 9 patients with local relapse, 6 recurred in-field, 2 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. In the arm with CTV, of the 6 patients with local relapse, 4 recurred in-field, 1 recurred in margin, 1 recurred out of field. The distant metastases rates were 42.6% and 51.4% (p = 0.274) respectively. Grade 3-4 hematological toxicity and radiation esophagitis had no statistically significant, but grade 3-4 radiation pneumonia was observed in only 7.4% in the arm without CTV, compared 22.9% in the arm with CTV (p = 0.040). The median survival in the arm without CTV had not reached, compared with 38 months in the with CTV arm. The l- years, 2- years, 3- years survival rates of the arm without CTV and the arm with CTV were 81.0%, 66.2%, 61.5% and 88.6%, 61.7%, 56.6% (p = 0.517). The multivariate analysis indicated that the distant metastases (p = 0.000) and PCI factor (p = 0.004) were significantly related to overall survival. Target delineation omitting CTV for limited-disease small cell lung cancer received IMRT was feasible. The distant metastases and PCI factor were significantly related to overall survival

  12. Validation study of an interpolation method for calculating whole lung volumes and masses from reduced numbers of CT-images in ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, H; Moens, Y; Braun, C; Kneissl, S; Noreikat, K; Reske, A

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative computer tomographic analysis (qCTA) is an accurate but time intensive method used to quantify volume, mass and aeration of the lungs. The aim of this study was to validate a time efficient interpolation technique for application of qCTA in ponies. Forty-one thoracic computer tomographic (CT) scans obtained from eight anaesthetised ponies positioned in dorsal recumbency were included. Total lung volume and mass and their distribution into four compartments (non-aerated, poorly aerated, normally aerated and hyperaerated; defined based on the attenuation in Hounsfield Units) were determined for the entire lung from all 5 mm thick CT-images, 59 (55-66) per animal. An interpolation technique validated for use in humans was then applied to calculate qCTA results for lung volumes and masses from only 10, 12, and 14 selected CT-images per scan. The time required for both procedures was recorded. Results were compared statistically using the Bland-Altman approach. The bias ± 2 SD for total lung volume calculated from interpolation of 10, 12, and 14 CT-images was -1.2 ± 5.8%, 0.1 ± 3.5%, and 0.0 ± 2.5%, respectively. The corresponding results for total lung mass were -1.1 ± 5.9%, 0.0 ± 3.5%, and 0.0 ± 3.0%. The average time for analysis of one thoracic CT-scan using the interpolation method was 1.5-2 h compared to 8 h for analysis of all images of one complete thoracic CT-scan. The calculation of pulmonary qCTA data by interpolation from 12 CT-images was applicable for equine lung CT-scans and reduced the time required for analysis by 75%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Breathing pattern and chest wall volumes during exercise in patients with cystic fibrosis, pulmonary fibrosis and COPD before and after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, H; Weingard, B; Lo Mauro, A; Schena, E; Pedotti, A; Sybrecht, G W; Aliverti, A

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF), cystic fibrosis (CF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often cause chronic respiratory failure (CRF). In order to investigate if there are different patterns of adaptation of the ventilatory pump in CRF, in three groups of lung transplant candidates with PF (n=9, forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1))=37+/-3% predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC)=32+/-2% predicted), CF (n=9, FEV(1)=22+/-3% predicted, FVC=30+/-3% predicted) and COPD (n=21, FEV(1)=21+/-1% predicted, FVC=46+/-2% predicted), 10 healthy controls and 16 transplanted patients, total and compartmental chest wall volumes were measured by opto-electronic plethysmography during rest and exercise. Three different breathing patterns were found during CRF in PF, CF and COPD. Patients with COPD were characterised by a reduced duty cycle at rest and maximal exercise (34+/-1%, pvolume (0.75+/-0.10 and 0.79+/-0.07 litres) (pvolumes increased significantly in patients with COPD and CF but not in those with PF. End-inspiratory volumes did not increase in CF and PF. The breathing pattern of transplanted patients was similar to that of healthy controls. There are three distinct patterns of CRF in patients with PF, CF and COPD adopted by the ventilatory pump to cope with the underlying lung disease that may explain why patients with PF and CF are prone to respiratory failure earlier than patients with COPD. After lung transplantation the chronic adaptations of the ventilatory pattern to advanced lung diseases are reversible and indicate that the main contributing factor is the lung itself rather than systemic effects of the disease.

  14. Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure during one-lung ventilation of patients with pulmonary hyperinflation. Influence of low respiratory rate with unchanged minute volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, L L; Barvais, L; Sokolow, Y; Yernault, J C; d'Hollander, A A

    2002-01-01

    We measured lung mechanics and gas exchange during one-lung ventilation (OLV) of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, using three respiratory rates (RR) and unchanged minute volume. We studied 15 patients about to undergo lung surgery, during anaesthesia, and placed in the lateral position. Ventilation was with constant minute volume, inspiratory flow and FIO2. For periods of 15 min, RR of 5, 10, and 15 bpm were applied in a random sequence and recordings were made of lung mechanics and an arterial blood gas sample was taken. Data were analysed with the repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-test with Bonferroni correction. PaO2 changes were not significant. At the lowest RR, PaCO2 decreased (from 42 (SD 4) mm Hg at RR 15-41 (4) mm Hg at RR 10 and 39 (4) mm Hg at RR 5, P<0.01), and end-tidal carbon dioxide increased (from 33 (5) mm Hg at RR 15 to 35 (5) mm Hg at RR 10 and 36 (6) mm Hg at RR 5, P<0.01). Intrinsic positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEPi) was reduced even with larger tidal volumes (from 6 (4) cm H2O at RR 15-5 (4) cm H2O at RR 10, and 3 (3) cm H2O at RR 5, P<0.01), most probably caused by increased expiratory time at the lowest RR. A reduction in RR reduces PEEPi and hypercapnia during OLV in anaesthetized patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

  15. Comparative evaluation of hemodynamic and respiratory parameters during mechanical ventilation with two tidal volumes calculated by demi-span based height and measured height in normal lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mousavi Seresht

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Appropriate determination of tidal volume (VT is important for preventing ventilation induced lung injury. We compared hemodynamic and respiratory parameters in two conditions of receiving VTs calculated by using body weight (BW, which was estimated by measured height (HBW or demi-span based body weight (DBW. Materials and Methods : This controlled-trial was conducted in St. Alzahra Hospital in 2009 on American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I and II, 18-65-years-old patients. Standing height and weight were measured and then height was calculated using demi-span method. BW and VT were calculated with acute respiratory distress syndrome-net formula. Patients were randomized and then crossed to receive ventilation with both calculated VTs for 20 min. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters were analyzed with SPSS version 20.0 using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results : Forty nine patients were studied. Demi-span based body weight and thus VT (DTV were lower than Height based body weight and VT (HTV (P = 0.028, in male patients (P = 0.005. Difference was observed in peak airway pressure (PAP and airway resistance (AR changes with higher PAP and AR at 20 min after receiving HTV compared with DTV. Conclusions : Estimated VT based on measured height is higher than that based on demi-span and this difference exists only in females, and this higher VT results higher airway pressures during mechanical ventilation.

  16. Correlation between [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and volume perfusion CT in primary tumours and mediastinal lymph nodes of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauter, Alexander W.; Spira, Daniel; Schulze, Maximilian; Pfannenberg, Christina; Claussen, Claus D.; Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Hetzel, Juergen [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Oncology, Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Pulmonology, Tuebingen (Germany); Reimold, Matthias [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst [Siemens Healthcare, Computed Tomography, Forchheim (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between glucose metabolism as determined by [{sup 18}F]FDG PET/CT and tumour perfusion as quantified by volume perfusion CT in primary tumours and mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN) of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Enrolled in the study were 17 patients with NSCLC. [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake was quantified in terms of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub avg}. Blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and flow extraction product (K{sup trans}) were determined as perfusion parameters. The correlations between the perfusion parameters and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake values were subsequently evaluated. For the primary tumours, no correlations were found between perfusion parameters and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake. In MLN, there were negative correlations between BF and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.383), BV and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.406), and BV and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.377), but not between BF and SUV{sub max}, K{sup trans} and SUV{sub avg}, or K{sup trans} and SUV{sub max}. Additionally, in MLN with SUV{sub max} >2.5 there were negative correlations between BF and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.510), BV and SUV{sub avg} (r = -0.390), BF and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.536), as well as BV and SUV{sub max} (r = -0.346). Perfusion and glucose metabolism seemed to be uncoupled in large primary tumours, but an inverse correlation was observed in MLN. This information may help improve therapy planning and response evaluation. (orig.)

  17. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible

  18. Lung volumes identify an at-risk group in persons with prolonged secondhand tobacco smoke exposure but without overt airflow obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjomandi, Mehrdad; Zeng, Siyang; Geerts, Jeroen; Stiner, Rachel K; Bos, Bruce; van Koeverden, Ian; Keene, Jason; Elicker, Brett; Blanc, Paul D; Gold, Warren M

    2018-01-01

    Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) is associated with occult obstructive lung disease as evident by abnormal airflow indices representing small airway disease despite having preserved spirometry (normal forced expiratory volume in 1 s-to-forced vital capacity ratio, FEV 1 /FVC). The significance of lung volumes that reflect air trapping in the presence of preserved spirometry is unclear. To investigate whether lung volumes representing air trapping could determine susceptibility to respiratory morbidity in people with SHS exposure but without spirometric chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, we examined a cohort of 256 subjects with prolonged occupational SHS exposure and preserved spirometry. We elicited symptom prevalence by structured questionnaires, examined functional capacity (maximum oxygen uptake, VO 2max ) by exercise testing, and estimated associations of those outcomes with air trapping (plethysmography-measured residual volume-to-total lung capacity ratio, RV/TLC), and progressive air trapping with exertion (increase in fraction of tidal breathing that is flow limited on expiration during exercise (per cent of expiratory flow limitation, %EFL)). RV/TLC was within the predicted normal limits, but was highly variable spanning 22%±13% and 16%±8% across the increments of FEV 1 /FVC and FEV 1 , respectively. Respiratory complaints were prevalent (50.4%) with the most common symptom being ≥2 episodes of cough per year (44.5%). Higher RV/TLC was associated with higher OR of reporting respiratory symptoms (n=256; r 2 =0.03; p=0.011) and lower VO 2max (n=179; r 2 =0.47; p=0.013), and %EFL was negatively associated with VO 2max (n=32; r 2 =0.40; p=0.017). In those at risk for obstruction due to SHS exposure but with preserved spirometry, higher RV/TLC identifies a subgroup with increased respiratory symptoms and lower exercise capacity.

  19. Significant lung volume reduction with endobronchial valves in a patient despite the presence of microcollaterals masked by low-flow Chartis phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Y

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Yan Yin,1 Gang Hou,1 Felix J Herth,2 Xiao-bo Wang,1 Qiu-yue Wang,1 Jian Kang1 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: Satisfactory functional outcomes following bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR using endobronchial valves (EBVs depend on the absence of collateral ventilation (CV between the target and adjunct lobes. The Chartis system has proven to be useful for determining whether CV is present or absent, but this system can also erroneously indicate the absence of CV, which can lead to BLVR failure. Here, we describe low-flow Chartis phenotype in the target lobe resulted in difficult judgment of existence of CV. Consequently, BLVR with EBVs implanted into the right upper bronchus failed to reduce lung volume or induce atelectasis. Inserting another EBV into the right middle bronchus blocked the latent CV, which led to significant lung volume reduction in the right upper lobe (RUL and right middle lobe (RML and to improve the pulmonary function, 6-min walking distance, and St George respiratory questionnaire scores over a 2-week follow-up period. Low flow in the target lobe is a unique Chartis phenotype and represents the uncertainty of CV, which is a risk factor for the failure of BLVR using EBVs. Clinicians should be aware of this possibility and might be able to resolve the problem by blocking the RUL and RML between which the CV occurs. Keywords: COPD, bronchoscopic lung volume reduction, collateral ventilation, endobronchial valves, Chartis assessment

  20. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Yartsev, S [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  1. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements for the measurement of dual-input whole tumor computed tomography perfusion in patients with lung cancer: Influences of the size and inner-air density of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingle; Zhang, Zhiyong; Shan, Fei; Shi, Yuxin; Xing, Wei; Shi, Liangrong; Zhang, Xingwei

    2017-09-01

    This study was conducted to assess intra-observer and inter-observer agreements for the measurement of dual-input whole tumor computed tomography perfusion (DCTP) in patients with lung cancer. A total of 88 patients who had undergone DCTP, which had proved a diagnosis of primary lung cancer, were divided into two groups: (i) nodules (diameter ≤3 cm) and masses (diameter >3 cm) by size, and (ii) tumors with and without air density. Pulmonary flow, bronchial flow, and pulmonary index were measured in each group. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements for measurement were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficient, within-subject coefficient of variation, and Bland-Altman analysis. In all lung cancers, the reproducibility coefficient for intra-observer agreement (range 26.1-38.3%) was superior to inter-observer agreement (range 38.1-81.2%). Further analysis revealed lower agreements for nodules compared to masses. Additionally, inner-air density reduced both agreements for lung cancer. The intra-observer agreement for measuring lung cancer DCTP was satisfied, while the inter-observer agreement was limited. The effects of tumoral size and inner-air density to agreements, especially between two observers, should be emphasized. In future, an automatic computer-aided segment of perfusion value of the tumor should be developed. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Extravascular Lung Water Does Not Increase in Hypovolemic Patients after a Fluid-Loading Protocol Guided by the Stroke Volume Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ferrando

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Circulatory failure secondary to hypovolemia is a common situation in critical care patients. Volume replacement is the first option for the treatment of hypovolemia. A possible complication of volume loading is pulmonary edema, quantified at the bedside by the measurement of extravascular lung water index (ELWI. ELWI predicts progression to acute lung injury (ALI in patients with risk factors for developing it. The aim of this study was to assess whether fluid loading guided by the stroke volume variation (SVV, in patients presumed to be hypovolemic, increased ELWI or not. Methods. Prospective study of 17 consecutive postoperative, fully mechanically ventilated patients diagnosed with circulatory failure secondary to presumed hypovolemia were included. Cardiac index (CI, ELWI, SVV, and global end-diastolic volume index (GEDI were determined using the transpulmonary thermodilution technique during the first 12 hours after fluid loading. Volume replacement was done with a strict hemodynamic protocol. Results. Fluid loading produced a significant increase in CI and a decrease in SVV. ELWI did not increase. No correlation was found between the amount of fluids administered and the change in ELWI. Conclusion. Fluid loading guided by SVV in hypovolemic and fully mechanically ventilated patients in sinus rhythm does not increase ELWI.

  3. Effects of a preemptive alveolar recruitment strategy on arterial oxygenation during one-lung ventilation with different tidal volumes in patients with normal pulmonary function test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jong Dal; Kim, Sang Hun; Yu, Byung Sik; Kim, Hye Ji

    2014-08-01

    Hypoxemia during one-lung ventilation (OLV) remains a major concern. The present study compared the effect of alveolar recruitment strategy (ARS) on arterial oxygenation during OLV at varying tidal volumes (Vt) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). In total, 120 patients undergoing wedge resection by video assisted thoracostomy were randomized into four groups comprising 30 patients each: those administered a 10 ml/kg tidal volume with or without preemptive ARS (Group H and Group H-ARS, respectively) and those administered a 6 ml/kg tidal volume and a 8 cmH2O PEEP with or without preemptive ARS (Group L and Group L-ARS, respectively). ARS was performed using pressure-controlled ventilation with a 40 cmH2O plateau airway pressure and a 15 cmH2O PEEP for at least 10 breaths until OLV began. Preemptive ARS significantly improved the PaO2/FiO2 ratio compared to the groups that did not receive ARS (P volume combined with 8 cmH2O PEEP after preemptive ARS may reduce the risk of pulmonary injury caused by high tidal volume during one-lung ventilation in patients with normal pulmonary function.

  4. Work of breathing during lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a comparison between volume and pressure-regulated breathing modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallet, Richard H; Campbell, Andre R; Dicker, Rochelle A; Katz, Jeffrey A; Mackersie, Robert C

    2005-12-01

    Pressure-control ventilation (PCV) and pressure-regulated volume-control (PRVC) ventilation are used during lung-protective ventilation because the high, variable, peak inspiratory flow rate (V (I)) may reduce patient work of breathing (WOB) more than the fixed V (I) of volume-control ventilation (VCV). Patient-triggered breaths during PCV and PRVC may result in excessive tidal volume (V(T)) delivery unless the inspiratory pressure is reduced, which in turn may decrease the peak V (I). We tested whether PCV and PRVC reduce WOB better than VCV with a high, fixed peak V (I) (75 L/min) while also maintaining a low V(T) target. Fourteen nonconsecutive patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome were studied prospectively, using a random presentation of ventilator modes in a crossover, repeated-measures design. A target V(T) of 6.4 + 0.5 mL/kg was set during VCV and PRVC. During PCV the inspiratory pressure was set to achieve the same V(T). WOB and other variables were measured with a pulmonary mechanics monitor (Bicore CP-100). There was a nonsignificant trend toward higher WOB (in J/L) during PCV (1.27 + 0.58 J/L) and PRVC (1.35 + 0.60 J/L), compared to VCV (1.09 + 0.59 J/L). While mean V(T) was not statistically different between modes, in 40% of patients, V(T) markedly exceeded the lung-protective ventilation target during PRVC and PCV. During lung-protective ventilation, PCV and PRVC offer no advantage in reducing WOB, compared to VCV with a high flow rate, and in some patients did not allow control of V(T) to be as precise.

  5. Feasibility of Lung Volume Recruitment in Early Neuromuscular Weakness: A Comparison Between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Myotonic Dystrophy, and Postpolio Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminska, Marta; Browman, Franceen; Trojan, Daria A; Genge, Angela; Benedetti, Andrea; Petrof, Basil J

    2015-07-01

    Lung volume recruitment (LVR) is a cough assistance technique used in persons with neuromuscular disorders (NMDs), most typically in those requiring noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Whether it may be useful in persons with NMDs who have milder respiratory impairment is unknown. To assess the feasibility, impact on quality of life (QOL), and preliminary physiological effects of daily LVR in different categories of persons with NMDs who have an early stage of respiratory impairment. Feasibility study. Academic tertiary care center. Outpatients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (n = 8), postpolio syndrome (n = 10), and myotonic dystrophy (n = 6) who had restrictive respiratory defects but were not yet using NIV. Participants were asked to perform LVR up to 4 times daily and log their LVR use in a diary. Physiological measurements and questionnaires were completed at baseline and after 3 months. Compliance with LVR use was assessed, along with QOL and willingness to continue the treatment. Physiological measurements included forced vital capacity (FVC), lung insufflation capacity (LIC), and the LIC minus FVC difference. Of the 24 recruited subjects, 7 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 7 with postpolio syndrome, and 5 with myotonic dystrophy completed the study (n = 19). At baseline, mean values for FVC and spontaneous peak cough flow were 59.9% predicted and 373.1 L/min, respectively. For subjects completing the study, 74% were willing to continue long-term LVR use, and QOL scores were not adversely affected by LVR in any NMD subgroup. The LIC-FVC difference increased from baseline to follow-up by a mean of 0.243 L (P = .006) in all subjects (n = 19), suggesting a possible improvement in respiratory system mechanics. In patients with NMDs who have early restrictive respiratory defects but do not yet require NIV, regular use of LVR is feasible with no negative impact on QOL over a 3-month period and may have physiological benefits. Further work is needed to

  6. Autologous fibrin sealant reduces the incidence of prolonged air leak and duration of chest tube drainage after lung volume reduction surgery: a prospective randomized blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, C; Opitz, I; Zhai, W; Rousson, V; Russi, E W; Weder, W; Lardinois, D

    2008-10-01

    Prolonged air leak is reported in up to 50% of patients after lung volume reduction surgery. The effect of an autologous fibrin sealant on the intensity and duration of air leak and on the time to chest drain removal after lung volume reduction surgery was investigated in a randomized prospective clinical trial. Twenty-five patients underwent bilateral thoracoscopic lung volume reduction surgery. In each patient, an autologous fibrin sealant was applied along the staple lines on one side, whereas no additional measure was taken on the other side. Randomization of treatment was performed at the end of the resection on the first side. Air leak was assessed semiquantitatively by use of a severity score (0 = no leak; 4 = continuous severe leak) by two investigators blinded to the treatment. Mean value of the total severity scores for the first 48 hours postoperative was significantly lower in the treated group (4.7 +/- 7.7) than in the control group (16.0 +/- 10.1) (P drainage were also significantly reduced after application of the sealant (4.5% and 2.8 +/- 1.9 days versus 31.8% and 5.9 +/- 2.9 days) (P = .03 and P drainage.

  7. Quantitative assessment of lung volumes using multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Min; Hur, Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Sang Jin; Kim, Hyung Jung

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical value of the multi-detector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the quantitative assessment of lung volumes and to assess the relationship between the MDCT results and disease severity as determined by a pulmonary function test (PFT) in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients. We performed a PFT and MDCT on 39 COPD patients. Using the GOLD classifications, we divided the patients into three groups according to disease severity; stage I (mild, n = 10), stage II (moderate, n = 15), and stage III (severe, n = 14). Using the pulmo-CT software program, we measured the proportion of lung volumes with attenuation values below -910 and -950 HU. The mean FEV1 (% of predicted) and FEV1/FVC was 82.2 ± 2% and 66.2 ± 3% in stage I, 53.5 ± 11% and 52 ± 6% in stage II, and 32.3 ± 7% and 44.2% ± 13% in stage III, respectively. Differences in lung volume percentage at each of the thresholds (-910 and -950 HU) among the 3 stages were statistically significant (ρ < 0.01, ρ < 0.01) and correlated well with the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC (r = -0.803, r -0.766, r = -0.817, and r = -0.795, respectively). The volumetric measurement obtained by MDCT provides an accurate means of quantifying pulmonary emphysema

  8. 4D-CT-based target volume definition in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumours: Comparison with a conventional technique using individual margins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, Holger; Rhein, Bernhard; Haering, Peter; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric benefit of integration of 4D-CT in the planning target volume (PTV) definition process compared to conventional PTV definition using individual margins in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours. Material and methods: Two different PTVs were defined: PTV conv consisting of the helical-CT-based clinical target volume (CTV) enlarged isotropically for each spatial direction by the individually measured amount of motion in the 4D-CT, and PTV 4D encompassing the CTVs defined in the 4D-CT phases displaying the extremes of the tumour position. Tumour motion as well as volumetric and dosimetric differences and relations of both PTVs were evaluated. Results: Volumetric examinations revealed a significant reduction of the mean PTV by 4D-CT from 57.7 to 40.7 cm 3 (31%) (p 4D in PTV conv (r = -0.69, 90% confidence limits: -0.87 and -0.34, p = 0.007). Mean lung dose (MLD) was decreased significantly by 17% (p < 0.001). Conclusions: In SBRT of lung tumours the mere use of individual margins for target volume definition cannot compensate for the additional effects that the implementation of 4D-CT phases can offer.

  9. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing

  10. Inter-observer delineation uncertainty in radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Roed, Anders Peter

    was included in the study. In our clinical protocol the contrast enhanced PET/CT scan is primarily analysed by a specialist in nuclear medicine and a radiologists together. The PET positive volume is delineated by the specialist in nuclear medicine and only the CT scan and this contour is imported to Eclipse...

  11. Accuracy and inter-observer variability of 3D versus 4D cone-beam CT based image-guidance in SBRT for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, Reinhart A; Seubert, Benedikt; Stark, Silke; Homann, Vanessa; Müller, Gerd; Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the accuracy and inter-observer variability of image-guidance (IG) using 3D or 4D cone-beam CT (CBCT) technology in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Twenty-one consecutive patients treated with image-guided SBRT for primary and secondary lung tumors were basis for this study. A respiration correlated 4D-CT and planning contours served as reference for all IG techniques. Three IG techniques were performed independently by three radiation oncologists (ROs) and three radiotherapy technicians (RTTs). Image-guidance using respiration correlated 4D-CBCT (IG-4D) with automatic registration of the planning 4D-CT and the verification 4D-CBCT was considered gold-standard. Results were compared with two IG techniques using 3D-CBCT: 1) manual registration of the planning internal target volume (ITV) contour and the motion blurred tumor in the 3D-CBCT (IG-ITV); 2) automatic registration of the planning reference CT image and the verification 3D-CBCT (IG-3D). Image quality of 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT images was scored on a scale of 1–3, with 1 being best and 3 being worst quality for visual verification of the IGRT results. Image quality was scored significantly worse for 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: the worst score of 3 was given in 19 % and 7.1 % observations, respectively. Significant differences in target localization were observed between 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT based IG: compared to the reference of IG-4D, tumor positions differed by 1.9 mm ± 0.9 mm (3D vector) on average using IG-ITV and by 3.6 mm ± 3.2 mm using IG-3D; results of IG-ITV were significantly closer to the reference IG-4D compared to IG-3D. Differences between the 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT techniques increased significantly with larger motion amplitude of the tumor; analogously, differences increased with worse 3D-CBCT image quality scores. Inter-observer variability was largest in SI direction and was significantly larger in IG using 3D-CBCT compared to 4D-CBCT: 0.6 mm versus 1.5 mm

  12. Added value of lung perfused blood volume images using dual-energy CT for assessment of acute pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Munemasa; Kunihiro, Yoshie; Nakashima, Yoshiteru; Nomura, Takafumi; Kudomi, Shohei; Yonez