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Sample records for lung dose evaluation

  1. Evaluation of Enoxaparin Dosing as a Risk Factor for Bleeding in Lung Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofjan, Amelia K; Iuppa, Jennifer A; Bain, K Bennett; Deal, Eli N; Witt, Chad A; Hachem, Ramsey R; Yusen, Roger D

    2016-10-01

    Lung transplant recipients commonly develop complications that lead to anticoagulation. Standard FDA-approved enoxaparin dosing in this population results in a high incidence of above-goal anti-Xa levels, but its association with bleeding remains unclear. To evaluate the association between enoxaparin dosing and bleeding in lung transplant recipients and assess the relationship between dosing and anti-Xa levels. We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study of adult lung transplant recipients who received therapeutic enoxaparin between 2000 and 2012 at a tertiary academic center. We dichotomized enoxaparin dosing regimens into standard dose (FDA-approved doses with a 10% rounding margin) and reduced dose. Clinicians ordered anti-Xa levels as deemed clinically appropriate. The primary outcome was major bleeding or clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding. Of 222 patients treated with enoxaparin, 33 (14.9%) had bleeding events, of which half (17/33) were major. Bleeding occurred in 25/146 (17.1%) patients who received standard-dose enoxaparin versus 8/76 (10.5%) patients who received reduced-dose enoxaparin (P = 0.190). Multiple logistic regression demonstrated an independent association between standard-dose enoxaparin and bleeding, after adjusting for confounders (adjusted odds ratio = 3.04; 95% CI = 1.14-8.10). The median enoxaparin dose in patients with above-goal versus at-goal anti-Xa levels was 0.89 versus 0.76 mg/kg every 12 hours; P = 0.006. However, doses yielding at-goal anti-Xa levels had an interquartile range of 0.67 to 0.90 mg/kg, which overlapped with doses yielding above- and below-goal anti-Xa levels. Enoxaparin dose reduction and anti-Xa level monitoring can improve drug safety and facilitate individualized dose optimization in lung transplant recipients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Evaluation of dose according to the volume and respiratory range during SBRT in lung cancer

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    Lee, Deuk Hee [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Eun Tae; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kang, Se Seik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is effective technic in radiotherapy for low stage lung cancer. But lung cancer is affected by respiratory so accurately concentrate high dose to the target is very difficult. In this study, evaluated the target volume according to how to take the image. And evaluated the dose by photoluminescence glass dosimeter according to how to contour the volume and respiratory range. As a result, evaluated the 4D CT volume was 10.4 cm{sup 3} which was closest value of real size target. And in dose case is internal target volume dose was 10.82, 16.88, 21.90 Gy when prescribed dose was 10, 15, 20 Gy and it was the highest dose. Respiratory gated radiotherapy dose was more higher than internal target volume. But it made little difference by respiratory range. Therefore, when moving cancer treatment, acquiring image by 4D CT, contouring internal target volume and respiratory gated radiotherapy technic would be the best way.

  3. Dose-to-medium vs. dose-to-water: Dosimetric evaluation of dose reporting modes in Acuros XB for prostate, lung and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Rana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Acuros XB (AXB dose calculation algorithm is available for external beam photon dose calculations in Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS. The AXB can report the absorbed dose in two modes: dose-to-water (Dw and dose-to-medium (Dm. The main purpose of this study was to compare the dosimetric results of the AXB_Dm with that of AXB_Dw on real patient treatment plans. Methods: Four groups of patients (prostate cancer, stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT lung cancer, left breast cancer, and right breast cancer were selected for this study, and each group consisted of 5 cases. The treatment plans of all cases were generated in the Eclipse TPS. For each case, treatment plans were computed using AXB_Dw and AXB_Dm for identical beam arrangements. Dosimetric evaluation was done by comparing various dosimetric parameters in the AXB_Dw plans with that of AXB_Dm plans for the corresponding patient case. Results: For the prostate cancer, the mean planning target volume (PTV dose in the AXB_Dw plans was higher by up to 1.0%, but the mean PTV dose was within ±0.3% for the SBRT lung cancer. The analysis of organs at risk (OAR results in the prostate cancer showed that AXB_Dw plans consistently produced higher values for the bladder and femoral heads but not for the rectum. In the case of SBRT lung cancer, a clear trend was seen for the heart mean dose and spinal cord maximum dose, with AXB_Dw plans producing higher values than the AXB_Dm plans. However, the difference in the lung doses between the AXB_Dm and AXB_Dw plans did not always produce a clear trend, with difference ranged from -1.4% to 2.9%. For both the left and right breast cancer, the AXB_Dm plans produced higher maximum dose to the PTV for all cases. The evaluation of the maximum dose to the skin showed higher values in the AXB_Dm plans for all 5 left breast cancer cases, whereas only 2 cases had higher maximum dose to the skin in the AXB_Dm plans for the right breast cancer

  4. Evaluation of the systematic error in using 3D dose calculation in scanning beam proton therapy for lung cancer.

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    Li, Heng; Liu, Wei; Park, Peter; Matney, Jason; Liao, Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Zhang, Xiaodong; Li, Yupeng; Zhu, Ronald X

    2014-09-08

    The objective of this study was to evaluate and understand the systematic error between the planned three-dimensional (3D) dose and the delivered dose to patient in scanning beam proton therapy for lung tumors. Single-field and multifield optimized scanning beam proton therapy plans were generated for ten patients with stage II-III lung cancer with a mix of tumor motion and size. 3D doses in CT datasets for different respiratory phases and the time-weighted average CT, as well as the four-dimensional (4D) doses were computed for both plans. The 3D and 4D dose differences for the targets and different organs at risk were compared using dose-volume histogram (DVH) and voxel-based techniques, and correlated with the extent of tumor motion. The gross tumor volume (GTV) dose was maintained in all 3D and 4D doses, using the internal GTV override technique. The DVH and voxel-based techniques are highly correlated. The mean dose error and the standard deviation of dose error for all target volumes were both less than 1.5% for all but one patient. However, the point dose difference between the 3D and 4D doses was up to 6% for the GTV and greater than 10% for the clinical and planning target volumes. Changes in the 4D and 3D doses were not correlated with tumor motion. The planning technique (single-field or multifield optimized) did not affect the observed systematic error. In conclusion, the dose error in 3D dose calculation varies from patient to patient and does not correlate with lung tumor motion. Therefore, patient-specific evaluation of the 4D dose is important for scanning beam proton therapy for lung tumors.

  5. Probabilistic evaluation of target dose deterioration in dose painting by numbers for stage II/III lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Witte, Marnix; Meijer, Gert; Shakirin, Georgy; Steenhuijsen, Jacco; Schuring, Danny; van Herk, Marcel; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Non-small cell lung cancer is typically irradiated with 60-66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Local control could be improved by increasing dose to the more radiation-resistant areas (eg, based on the standardized uptake values of a pretreatment [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography s

  6. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

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    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Soh, Hendrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  7. SU-E-I-34: Evaluating Use of AEC to Lower Dose for Lung Cancer Screening CT Protocols

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    Arbique, G; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Guild, J; Duan, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Malguria, N; Omar, H; Brewington, C [Ut Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States); Zhang, D [Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The National Lung Screening Trial mandated manual low dose CT technique factors, where up to a doubling of radiation output could be used over a regular to large patient size range. Recent guidance from the AAPM and ACR for lung cancer CT screening recommends radiation output adjustment for patient size either through AEC or a manual technique chart. This study evaluated the use of AEC for output control and dose reduction. Methods: The study was performed on a multidetector helical CT scanner (Aquillion ONE, Toshiba Medical) equipped with iterative reconstruction (ADIR-3D), AEC was adjusted with a standard deviation (SD) image quality noise index. The protocol SD parameter was incrementally increased to reduce patient population dose while image quality was evaluated by radiologist readers scoring the clinical utility of images on a Likert scale. Results: Plots of effective dose vs. body size (water cylinder diameter reported by the scanner) demonstrate monotonic increase in patient dose with increasing patient size. At the initial SD setting of 19 the average CTDIvol for a standard size patient was ∼ 2.0 mGy (1.2 mSv effective dose). This was reduced to ∼1.0 mGy (0.5 mSv) at an SD of 25 with no noticeable reduction in clinical utility of images as demonstrated by Likert scoring. Plots of effective patient diameter and BMI vs body size indicate that these metrics could also be used for manual technique charts. Conclusion: AEC offered consistent and reliable control of radiation output in this study. Dose for a standard size patient was reduced to one-third of the 3 mGy CTDIvol limit required for ACR accreditation of lung cancer CT screening. Gary Arbique: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Cecelia Brewington: Research Grant, Toshiba America Medical Systems; Di Zhang: Employee, Toshiba America Medical Systems.

  8. {sup 99m}Tc-MAA overestimates the absorbed dose to the lungs in radioembolization: a quantitative evaluation in patients treated with {sup 166}Ho-microspheres

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    Elschot, Mattijs; Nijsen, Johannes F.W.; Lam, Marnix G.E.H.; Smits, Maarten L.J.; Prince, Jip F.; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Jong, Hugo W.A.M. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Radiation pneumonitis is a rare but serious complication of radioembolic therapy of liver tumours. Estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the lungs based on pretreatment diagnostic {sup 99m}Tc-macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) imaging should prevent this, with administered activities adjusted accordingly. The accuracy of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA-based lung absorbed dose estimates was evaluated and compared to absorbed dose estimates based on pretreatment diagnostic {sup 166}Ho-microsphere imaging and to the actual lung absorbed doses after {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. This prospective clinical study included 14 patients with chemorefractory, unresectable liver metastases treated with {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. {sup 99m}Tc-MAA-based and {sup 166}Ho-microsphere-based estimation of lung absorbed doses was performed on pretreatment diagnostic planar scintigraphic and SPECT/CT images. The clinical analysis was preceded by an anthropomorphic torso phantom study with simulated lung shunt fractions of 0 to 30 % to determine the accuracy of the image-based lung absorbed dose estimates after {sup 166}Ho radioembolization. In the phantom study, {sup 166}Ho SPECT/CT-based lung absorbed dose estimates were more accurate (absolute error range 0.1 to -4.4 Gy) than {sup 166}Ho planar scintigraphy-based lung absorbed dose estimates (absolute error range 9.5 to 12.1 Gy). Clinically, the actual median lung absorbed dose was 0.02 Gy (range 0.0 to 0.7 Gy) based on posttreatment {sup 166}Ho-microsphere SPECT/CT imaging. Lung absorbed doses estimated on the basis of pretreatment diagnostic {sup 166}Ho-microsphere SPECT/CT imaging (median 0.02 Gy, range 0.0 to 0.4 Gy) were significantly better predictors of the actual lung absorbed doses than doses estimated on the basis of {sup 166}Ho-microsphere planar scintigraphy (median 10.4 Gy, range 4.0 to 17.3 Gy; p < 0.001), {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT imaging (median 2.5 Gy, range 1.2 to 12.3 Gy; p < 0.001), and {sup 99m}Tc-MAA planar

  9. Comparison and Evaluation of the Effects of Rib and Lung Inhomogeneities on Lung Dose in Breast Brachytherapy using a Treatment Planning System and the MCNPX Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salehi Yazdi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study investigates to what extent the computed dose received by lung tissue in a commercially available treatment planning system (TPS for 192Ir high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy is accurate in view of tissue inhomogeneities and presence of ribs. Materials and Methods: A CT scan of the breast was used to construct a patient-equivalent phantom in the clinical treatment planning system. An implant involving 13 plastic catheters and 383 programmed source dwell positions were simulated using the MCNPX code. Results: The results were compared with the corresponding commercial TPS in the form of isodoses and cumulative dose–volume histogram in breast, lung and ribs. The comparison of Monte Carlo results and TPS calculation showed that the isodoses greater than 62% in the breast that were located rather close to the implant or away from the breast curvature surface and lung boundary were in good agreement. TPS calculations, however, overestimated dose in the lung for lower isodose contours and points that were lying near the breast-air boundary and relatively away from the implant. Discussion and Conclusions: Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breast, rib and lung, revealed an average overestimation of dose in lung in the TPS calculation.

  10. Lung cancer screening with CT: Evaluation of radiologists and different computer assisted detection software (CAD) as first and second readers for lung nodule detection at different dose levels

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    Christe, A., E-mail: andreas.christe@insel.ch [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional und Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Leidolt, L.; Huber, A.; Steiger, P. [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional und Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Szucs-Farkas, Z. [Radiology, Hospital Center of Biel (Switzerland); Roos, J.E. [Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Heverhagen, J.T.; Ebner, L. [Department of Diagnostic, Interventional und Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-12-01

    Objectives: To find the best pairing of first and second reader at highest sensitivity for detecting lung nodules with CT at various dose levels. Materials and methods: An anthropomorphic lung phantom and artificial lung nodules were used to simulate screening CT-examination at standard dose (100 mAs, 120 kVp) and 8 different low dose levels, using 120, 100 and 80 kVp combined with 100, 50 and 25 mAs. At each dose level 40 phantoms were randomly filled with 75 solid and 25 ground glass nodules (5–12 mm). Two radiologists and 3 different computer aided detection softwares (CAD) were paired to find the highest sensitivity. Results: Sensitivities at standard dose were 92%, 90%, 84%, 79% and 73% for reader 1, 2, CAD1, CAD2, CAD3, respectively. Combined sensitivity for human readers 1 and 2 improved to 97%, (p1 = 0.063, p2 = 0.016). Highest sensitivities – between 97% and 99.0% – were achieved by combining any radiologist with any CAD at any dose level. Combining any two CADs, sensitivities between 85% and 88% were significantly lower than for radiologists combined with CAD (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Combination of a human observer with any of the tested CAD systems provide optimal sensitivity for lung nodule detection even at reduced dose at 25 mAs/80 kVp.

  11. The mean lung dose (MLD). Predictive criterion for lung damage

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    Geyer, Peter; Appold, Steffen [Dresden University of Technology (TU Dresden), Clinic and Polyclinic for Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Carl Gustav Carus Medical Faculty, Dresden (Germany); Herrmann, Thomas

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to prove the validity of the mean lung dose (MLD), widely used in clinical practice to estimate the lung toxicity of a treatment plan, by reevaluating experimental data from mini pigs. A total of 43 mini pigs were irradiated in one of four dose groups (25, 29, 33, and 37 Gy). Two regimens were applied: homogeneous irradiation of the right lung or partial irradiation of both lungs - including parts with lower dose - but with similar mean lung doses. The animals were treated with five fractions with a linear accelerator applying a CT-based treatment plan. The clinical lung reaction (breathing frequency) and morphological changes in CT scans were examined frequently during the 48 weeks after irradiation. A clear dose-effect relationship was found for both regimens of the trial. However, a straightforward relationship between the MLD and the relative number of responders with respect to different grades of increased breathing frequency for both regimens was not found. A morphologically based parameter NTCP{sub lung} was found to be more suitable for this purpose. The dependence of this parameter on the MLD is markedly different for the two regimens. In clinical practice, the MLD can be used to predict lung toxicity of a treatment plan, except for dose values that could lead to severe side effects. In the latter mentioned case, limitations to the predictive value of the MLD are possible. Such severe developments of a radiation-induced pneumopathy are better predicted by the NTCP{sub lung} formalism. The predictive advantage of this parameter compared to the MLD seems to remain in the evaluation and comparison of widely differing dose distributions, like in the investigated trial. (orig.) [German] Es soll unter Reevaluation von Tierversuchsdaten am Minischwein geprueft werden, ob die in der klinischen Praxis zur Beurteilung der Lungentoxizitaet eines Bestrahlungsregims regelhaft verwendete mittlere Lungendosis (MLD) eine zuverlaessige

  12. Evaluation of dose-volume histogram parameters (V20 and mean dose) in lung cancer adaptive radiotherapy with design of composite lung volumes (ITV; Evaluacion de parametros del histograma dosis-volumen (V20 y dosis media) en radioterapia adaptada de cancer de pulmon con diseno de volumenes pulmonares compuestos (Internal Target Volume, ITV)

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    Monroy Anton, J. L.; Solar Tortosa, M.; Lopez Munoz, M.; Navarro Bergada, A.; Estornell gualde, M. A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.

    2013-07-01

    Physiological respiratory motion is a challenge in external radiotherapy for lung tumors. In adaptive radiotherapy, changing position of the target volume should be reflected in the simulation procedure and taken into account in the design of volumes for CTV/PTV proper coverage. This may be achieved through the design of an Internal Target Volume (ITV) as indicated in ICRU-62. However, the Dose-Volume Histogram (DVH) evaluation of the doses received by the healthy lung may vary in the case of designing a single lung volume, compared to the composite lung volume obtained with the fusion of normal breathing, inspiration and expiration (ITV{sub l}ung). (Author)

  13. Evaluation of chronic infectious interstitial pulmonary disease in children by low-dose CT-guided transthoracic lung biopsy

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    Heyer, Christoph M.; Lemburg, Stefan P.; Kagel, Thomas; Nicolas, Volkmar [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Mueller, Klaus-Michael [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Institute of Pathology, BG Clinics Bergmannsheil, Bochum (Germany); Nuesslein, Thomas G.; Rieger, Christian H.L. [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Pediatric Hospital, Bochum (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Children with chronic infectious interstitial lung disease often have to undergo open lung biopsy to establish a final diagnosis. Open lung biopsy is an invasive procedure with major potential complications. Transthoracic lung biopsy (TLB) guided by computed tomography (CT) is a less-invasive well-established procedure in adults. Detailing the role of low-dose CT-guided TLB in the enhanced diagnosis of chronic lung diseases related to infection in children. A group of 11 children (age 8 months to 16 years) underwent CT-guided TLB with a 20-gauge biopsy device. All investigations were done under general anaesthesia on a multidetector CT scanner (SOMATOM Volume Zoom, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) using a low-dose protocol (single slices, 120 kV, 20 mAs). Specimens were processed by histopathological, bacteriological, and virological techniques. All biopsies were performed without major complications; one child developed a small pneumothorax that resolved spontaneously. A diagnosis could be obtained in 10 of the 11 patients. Biopsy specimens revealed chronic interstitial alveolitis in ten patients. In five patients Chlamydia pneumoniae PCR was positive, in three Mycoplasma pneumoniae PCR was positive, and in two Cytomegalovirus PCR was positive. The average effective dose was 0.83 mSv. Low-dose CT-guided TLB can be a helpful tool in investigating chronic infectious inflammatory processes in children with minimal radiation exposure. It should be considered prior to any open surgical procedure performed for biopsy alone. In our patient group no significant complication occurred. A disadvantage of the method is that it does not allow smaller airways and vessels to be assessed. (orig.)

  14. The impact of iterative reconstruction in low-dose computed tomography on the evaluation of diffuse interstitial lung disease

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    Lim, Hyun Ju; Chung, Myung Jin; Shin, Kyung Eun; Hwang, Hye Sun; Lee, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Radiology nd Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To evaluate the impact of iterative reconstruction (IR) on the assessment of diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) using CT. An American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom (module 4 to assess spatial resolution) was scanned with 10-100 effective mAs at 120 kVp. The images were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), with blending ratios of 0%, 30%, 70% and 100%, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR), and their spatial resolution was objectively assessed by the line pair structure method. The patient study was based on retrospective interpretation of prospectively acquired data, and it was approved by the institutional review board. Chest CT scans of 23 patients (mean age 64 years) were performed at 120 kVp using 1) standard dose protocol applying 142-275 mA with dose modulation (high-resolution computed tomography [HRCT]) and 2) low-dose protocol applying 20 mA (low dose CT, LDCT). HRCT images were reconstructed with FBP, and LDCT images were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Matching images were randomized and independently reviewed by chest radiologists. Subjective assessment of disease presence and radiological diagnosis was made on a 10-point scale. In addition, semi-quantitative results were compared for the extent of abnormalities estimated to the nearest 5% of parenchymal involvement. In the phantom study, ASIR was comparable to FBP in terms of spatial resolution. However, for MBIR, the spatial resolution was greatly decreased under 10 mA. In the patient study, the detection of the presence of disease was not significantly different. The values for area under the curve for detection of DILD by HRCT, FBP, ASIR, and MBIR were as follows: 0.978, 0.979, 0.972, and 0.963. LDCT images reconstructed with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR tended to underestimate reticular or honeycombing opacities (-2.8%, -4.1%, and -5.3%, respectively) and overestimate ground glass opacities (+4.6%, +8.9%, and

  15. Uncertainties on lung doses from inhaled plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, Matthew; Birchall, Alan; Bull, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian uncertainties on lung doses have been calculated to determine lung cancer risk from occupational exposures to plutonium. These calculations used a revised version of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) published by the ICRP. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, which give probability distributions of doses, point estimates of doses (single estimates without uncertainty) were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66; these are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To infer the differences between the point estimates and Bayesian uncertainty analyses, this paper applies the methodology to former workers of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses are compared with the point estimates obtained for each worker. It is shown that mean posterior lung doses are around two- to fourfold higher than point estimates and that uncertainties on doses vary over a wide range, greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that uncertainties on the parameter values, rather than the model structure, are largely responsible for these effects. Of these it appears to be the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that have the greatest impact on estimates of lung doses from urine bioassay. Therefore, accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled plutonium and the absorption parameter values for these materials is important for obtaining reliable estimates of lung doses and hence risk from occupational exposures to plutonium.

  16. Evaluation of parameters of the HDV (V20 and dose average) in radiotherapy of lung cancer with lung volumes design adapted compounds (ITV); Evaluacion de parametros del HDV (V20 Y Dmed) en radioterapia adaptada de cancer de pulmon con diseno de volumenes pulmonares compuestos (ITV)

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    Monroy Anton, J. L.; Solar Tortosa, M.; Lopez Munoz, M.; Navarro Bergada, A.; Estornell Gualde, M. A.; Melchor Iniguez, M.

    2013-07-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the V20 parameters and dose average compared to a single lung volume designed with a CT study in normal breathing of the patient and the corresponding to a lung volume composed, designed from three studies of CT in different phases of the respiratory cycle. Check if there are important differences in these cases that determine the necessity of creating a composite lung volume to evaluate dose volume histogram. (Author)

  17. Quantitative evaluation of correlation of dose and FDG-PET uptake value with clinical chest wall complications in patients with lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, O; Confer, M; Algan, S; Matthiesen, C; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; Ali, I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate quantitatively the dosimetric factors that increase the risk of clinical complications of rib fractures or chest wall pain after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) to the lung. The correlations of clinical complications with standard-uptake values (SUV) and FDG-PET activity distributions from post-treatment PET-imaging were studied. Mean and maximum doses from treatment plans, FDG-PET activity values on post-SBRT PET scans and the presence of clinical complications were determined in fifteen patients undergoing 16 SBRT treatments for lung cancer. SBRT treatments were delivered in 3 to 5 fractions using 5 to 7 fields to prescription doses in the range from 39.0 to 60.0 Gy. The dose and FDG-PET activity values were extracted from regions of interest in the chest wall that matched anatomically. Quantitative evaluation of the correlation between dose deposition and FDG-PET activity was performed by calculating the Pearson correlation coefficient using pixel-by-pixel analysis of dose and FDG-PET activity maps in selected regions of interest associated with clinical complications. Overall, three of fifteen patients developed rib fractures with chest wall pain, and two patients developed pain symptoms without fracture. The mean dose to the rib cage in patients with fractures was 37.53 Gy compared to 33.35 Gy in patients without fractures. Increased chest wall activity as determined by FDG-uptake was noted in patients who developed rib fractures. Enhanced activity from PET-images correlated strongly with high doses deposited to the chest wall which could be predicted by a linear relationship. The local enhanced activity was associated with the development of clinical complications such as chest wall inflammation and rib fracture. This study demonstrates that rib fractures and chest wall pain can occur after SBRT treatments to the lung and is associated with increased activity on subsequent PET scans. The FDG-PET activity

  18. SU-E-T-322: Dosimetric Evaluation of Rib Dose in Peripheral Lung Tumors Treated with X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Based Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Following RTOG 0915 Guidelines

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    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Kumar, P; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate XVMC computed rib doses for peripherally located non-small-cell-lung tumors treated with SBRT following RTOG-0915 guidelines. Methods: Twenty patients with solitary peripherally located non-small-cell-lung tumors were treated using XVMC-based SBRT to 50–54Gy in 5−3 fractions, respectively, for PTV(V100%)=95%. Based on 4D-CT, ITV was delineated on MaximumIP images and organs-at-risk(OARs) including ribs were contoured on MeanIP images. Mean PTV(ITV+5mm uniform margin) was 46.1±38.7cc (range, 11.1–163.0cc). XVMC SBRT treatment plans were generated with a combination of non-coplanar 3D-conformal arcs/beams, and were delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) beam, following RTOG-0915 criteria. XVMC rib maximum dose and dose to <1cc, <5cc, <10cc were evaluated as a function of PTV, prescription dose and 3D-distance from tumor isocenter to the most proximal rib contour. Plans were re-computed using heterogeneity-corrected pencil-beam (PB-hete) algorithm utilizing identical beam geometry/MLC positions and MUs and subsequently compared to XVMC. Results: XVMC average maximum rib dose was 50.9±6.4Gy (range, 35.1–59.3Gy). XVMC mean rib dose to <1cc was 41.6±5.6Gy (range, 27.9–47.9Gy), <5cc was 31.2±7.3Gy (range, 10.6–43.1Gy), and <10cc was 21.2±8.7Gy (range, 1.1–36Gy), respectively. For the given prescription, correlation between PTV and rib doses to <5cc (p=0.005) and <10cc (p=0.018) was observed. 3D-distance from the tumor isocenter to the proximal rib contour strongly correlated with maximum rib dose (p=0.0001). PB-hete algorithm overestimated maximum rib dose and dose to <1cc, <5cc, and <10cc of ribs by 5%, 3%, 3%, and 3%, respectively. Conclusion: PB-hete overestimates ribs dose relative to XVMC. Since all the clinical XVMC plans were generated without compromising the target coverage (per RTOG-0915), almost all patient’s ribs doses were higher than the protocol guidelines. As expected, larger tumor

  19. Low-dose computed tomography screening for lung cancer : Results of the first screening round

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeweg, Nanda; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J.

    Evaluation of: National Lung Screening Trial Research Team, Church TR, Black WC, Aberle DR et al. Results of initial low-dose computed tomographic screening for lung cancer. N. Engl. J. Med. 368, 1980-1991 (2013). In 2011, the US NLST trial demonstrated that mortality from lung cancer can be reduced

  20. Microscopic dose to lung from inhaled alpha emitters in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diel, Joseph; Belosokhov, Maxim; Romanov, Sergey [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozersk, Chelyabinsk Region (Russian Federation); Guilmette, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS G761, RP-2, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Because of the short range of alpha particles in tissue, the degree of uniformity of irradiation of the lung varies greatly depending on the form of the inhaled material. Animal studies have shown that the degree of dose uniformity influences the risk of lung cancer. This study investigates the radiation dose distribution of plutonium in human lung. Numerical maps of tissue configuration and target cell locations are obtained from histological sections of human lung tissue stained to enhance the identification of putative cell types for parenchymal lung cancers, i.e. alveolar type II cells and Clara cells. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain dose distribution around individual particles, and these distributions are used to compute dose distribution in volumes of lung tissue. Lung dose is characterised both by the degree of non-uniformity of irradiation and the relative degree of irradiation of all tissue versus the special cells of interest. (authors)

  1. Lung cancer risk at low doses of alpha particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, W; Katz, R; Zhang, C X

    1986-10-01

    A survey of inhabitant exposures arising from the inhalation of 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, and lung cancer mortality has been carried out in two adjacent areas in Guangdong Province, People's Republic of China, designated as the "high background" and the "control" area. Annual exposure rates are 0.38 working level months (WLM) per year in the high background, and 0.16 WLM/yr in the control area. In 14 yr of continuous study, from 1970 to 1983, age-adjusted mortality rates were found to be 2.7 per 10(5) living persons of all ages in the high background area, and 2.9 per 10(5) living persons in the control area. From this data, we conclude that we are unable to determine excess lung cancers over the normal fluctuations below a cumulative exposure of 15 WLM. This conclusion is supported by lung cancer mortality data from Austrian and Finnish high-background areas. A theoretical analysis of epidemiological data on human lung cancer incidence from inhaled 222Rn and 220Rn progeny, which takes into account cell killing as competitive with malignant transformation, leads to the evaluation of a risk factor which is either a linear-exponential or a quadratic-exponential function of the alpha-particle dose. Animal lung cancer data and theoretical considerations can be supplied to support either hypothesis. Thus we conclude that at our current stage of knowledge both the linear-exponential and the quadratic-exponential extrapolation to low doses seem to be equally acceptable for Rn-induced lung cancer risk, possibly suggesting a linear-quadratic transformation function with an exponential cell-killing term, or the influence of risk-modifying factors such as repair or proliferation stimuli.

  2. Optimizing dose prescription in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumours using Monte Carlo dose calculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Hollander, Miranda; Ubbels, Jan F.; Bolt, Rene A.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To define a method of dose prescription employing Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours aiming at a dose as low as possible outside of the PTV. Methods and materials: Six typical T1 lung tumours - three small, three large - were construc

  3. Evaluation of the absorbed dose to the lungs due to Xe{sup 133} and Tc{sup 99m} (MAA); Evaluacion de la dosis absorbida en los pulmones debido al Xe{sup 133} y Tc{sup 99m} (MAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez A, M.; Murillo C, F.; Castillo D, C.; Sifuentes D, Y.; Sanchez S, P. [Universidad Nacional de Trujillo, Av. Juan Pablo II s/n, Trujillo (Peru); Rojas P, E. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470, Lima (Peru); Marquez P, F., E-mail: marvva@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas, Av. Angamos 2520, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    The absorbed dose in lungs of an adult patient has been evaluated using the biokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals containing Xe{sup 133} or Tc{sup 99m} (MAA). The absorbed dose was calculated using the MIRD formalism, and the Cristy-and Eckerman lungs model. The absorbed dose in the lungs due to {sup 133}Xe is 0.00104 mGy/MBq. Here, the absorbed dose due to remaining tissue, included in the {sup 133}Xe biokinetics is not significant. The absorbed dose in the lungs, due Tc{sup 99m} (MAA), is 0.065 mGy/MBq. Approximately, 4.6% of the absorbed dose is due to organs like liver, kidneys, bladder, and the rest of tissues, included in the Tc{sup 99m} biokinetics. Here, the absorbed dose is very significant to be overlooked. The dose contribution is mainly due to photons emitted by the liver. (Author)

  4. Dosimetric verification of dose calculation algorithm in the lung during total marrow irradiation using helical tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstanty, Ewelina; Malicki, Julian; Łagodowska, Katarzyna; Kowalik, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of proliferative diseases of the hematopoietic system involves, in most cases, chemotherapy combined with radiation therapy, which is intended to provide adequate immunosuppressant. Conventionally, total body irradiation (TBI) was used; however, total marrow irradiation (TMI) performed with helical tomotherapy (HT) has been proposed as an alternative, with the aim of delivering the highest dose in the target area (skeleton bone). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the dose calculation algorithm for the lung in TMI delivered with HT. Thermoluminescent detectors (TLD-100 Harshaw) were used to measure delivered doses. Doses were calculated for 95 selected points in the central lung (53 TLDs) and near the rib bones (42 TLDs) in the anthropomorphic phantom. A total of 12 Gy were delivered (6 fractions of 2 Gy/fraction). HT-TMI technique reduces the dose delivered to the lungs in a phantom model to levels that are much lower than those reported for TBI delivered by a conventional linear accelerator. The mean calculated lung dose was 5.6 Gy versus a mean measured dose of 5.7 ± 2.4 Gy. The maximum and minimum measured doses were, respectively, 11.3 Gy (chest wall) and 2.8 Gy (central lung). At most of the 95 points, the measured dose was lower than the calculated dose, with the largest differences observed in the region located between the target volume and the adjacent lung tissue. The mean measured dose was lower than the calculated dose in both primary locations: -3.7% in the 42 rib-adjacent detectors and -3.0% in the 53 central lung TLDs. Our study has shown that the measured doses may be lower than those calculated by the HT-TMI calculation algorithm. Although these differences between calculated and measured doses are not clinically relevant, this finding merits further investigation.

  5. Lung and Heart Dose Variability During Radiation Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Nuzhat; Guy, Christopher; Reshko, Leonid B; Hugo, Geoffrey D; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that positional and anatomic variations during radiation therapy induce changes in lung and heart volumes and associated radiation doses. In this longitudinal investigation, variations in lung and heart volumes and standard dose parameters of mean lung dose, lung V20Gy, mean heart dose, and heart V40Gy were analyzed on weekly 4-dimensional CT scans of 15 lung cancer patients during conventionally fractionated radiochemotherapy. Tumor, individual lung lobes, and heart were delineated on the mid-ventilation phase of weekly 4-dimensional CT scans. Lung lobes and heart were also contoured on individual breathing phases of pre-, mid-, and end-of-treatment scans. Planning dose was transferred to consecutive scans via rigid registration. Volume and dose variations were assessed relative to the initial planning scan. Interfraction lung volume variability relative to week 0 was twice as large as tidal volume variability (8.0% ± 5.3% vs 4.0% ± 3.3%, P=.003). Interfraction lung volume variation ranged between 0.8% and 17.1% for individual patient means. Lower lung lobes had larger volume variability compared with upper lobes (13.5% ± 8.1% vs 7.0% ± 5.0%, Pheart volume variation was 7.2% (range, 3.4%-12.6%). Average mean heart dose variation was 1.2 Gy (range, 0.1-3.0 Gy) and average heart V40Gy variation 1.4% (range, 0%-4.2%). Anatomic and positional variations during radiation therapy induce changes in radiation doses to lung and heart. Repeated lung and heart dose assessment will provide a better estimate of the actual delivered dose and will improve prediction models for normal tissue toxicity, if assessed in larger cohorts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quantification of Proton Dose Calculation Accuracy in the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, Clemens, E-mail: Grassberger.Clemens@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Proton Radiotherapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Daartz, Juliane; Dowdell, Stephen; Ruggieri, Thomas; Sharp, Greg; Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the accuracy of a clinical proton treatment planning system (TPS) as well as Monte Carlo (MC)–based dose calculation through measurements and to assess the clinical impact in a cohort of patients with tumors located in the lung. Methods and Materials: A lung phantom and ion chamber array were used to measure the dose to a plane through a tumor embedded in the lung, and to determine the distal fall-off of the proton beam. Results were compared with TPS and MC calculations. Dose distributions in 19 patients (54 fields total) were simulated using MC and compared to the TPS algorithm. Results: MC increased dose calculation accuracy in lung tissue compared with the TPS and reproduced dose measurements in the target to within ±2%. The average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target was 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients showed a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. For large tumors, MC also predicted consistently higher V5 and V10 to the normal lung, because of a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target could show large deviations, although this effect was highly patient specific. Range measurements showed that MC can reduce range uncertainty by a factor of ∼2: the average (maximum) difference to the measured range was 3.9 mm (7.5 mm) for MC and 7 mm (17 mm) for the TPS in lung tissue. Conclusion: Integration of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. In addition, the ability to confidently reduce range margins would benefit all patients by potentially lowering toxicity.

  7. Superposition dose calculation in lung for 10MV photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, P W; Murray, D C; Metcalfe, P E; Round, W H

    1990-06-01

    Currently available radiotherapy treatment planning systems employ scatter function models such as ETAR and Batho dSAR for dose calculation. Errors using these models for high energy photon irradiation occur in and beyond lung tissue for small fields. For larger fields, central axis dose is correctly predicted but penumbral broadening in lung is underestimated. The major source of error is the assumption that lateral electronic equilibrium is always established. A superposition algorithm has been developed for 10MV photons which calculates the dose by convolving the TERMA (Total Energy Released per unit MAss by primary photons) with a dose spread array formed using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code. TERMA and dose spread arrays are both generated using a 10 component photon energy spectrum. Dose in inhomogeneous media is calculated using dose spread arrays generated for different density media and by scaling dose spread arrays according to density variations. This method ensures that electronic disequilibrium is modelled in situations where it exists. Superposition results in a lung phantom for a 5 x 5 cm field agree with EGS4 Monte Carlo results to within 2% for p = 0.20 gcm-3 and p = 0.30 gcm-3 lung. Profiles generated by superposition for a 10 x 10 cm field at mid-lung and compared with film measurements show that penumbral broadening in low density material is also correctly predicted.

  8. Study of the heterogeneity effects of lung in the evaluation of absorbed dose in radiotherapy; Estudo dos efeitos da heterogeneidade de pulmao na avaliacao da dose absorvida em radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Luciana Tourinho

    2006-02-15

    The main objective of radiotherapy is to deliver the highest possible dose to the tumour, in order to destroy it, reducing as much as possible the doses to healthy tissues adjacent to the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to do a planning of the treatment. The more complex is the treatment, the more difficult the planning will be, demanding computation sophisticated methods in its execution, in order to consider the heterogeneities present in the human body. Additionally, with the appearing of new radiotherapeutic techniques, that used irradiation fields of small area, for instance, the intensity modulated radiotherapy, the difficulties for the execution of a reliable treatment planning, became still larger. In this work it was studied the influence of the lung heterogeneity in the planning of the curves of percentage depth dose, PDP, obtained with the Eclipse{sup R} planning system for different sizes of irradiation fields, using the correction algorithms for heterogeneities available in the planning system: modified Batho, general Batho and equivalent tissue-air ratio. A thorax phantom, manufactured in acrylic, containing a region made of cork to simulate the lung tissue, was used. The PDP curves generated by the planning system were compared to those obtained by Monte Carlo simulation and with the use of thermoluminescent, TL, dosimetry. It was verified that the algorithms used by the Eclipse{sup R} system for the correction of heterogeneity effects are not able to generate correct results for PDP curves in the case of small fields, occurring differences of up to 100%, when the 1x1 cm{sup 2} treatment field is considered. These differences can cause a considerable subdosage in the lung tissue, reducing the possibility of the patient cure. (author)

  9. Coronary artery calcification scoring in low-dose ungated CT screening for lung cancer: interscan agreement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.C.; Isgum, I.; Gondrie, M.J.; Mali, W.P.Th.; Ginneken, B. van; Prokop, M.; Graaf, Y. van der

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  10. Coronary Artery Calcification Scoring in Low-Dose Ungated CT Screening for Lung Cancer : Interscan Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Peter C. A.; Isgum, Ivana; Gondrie, Martijn J. A.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.; van Ginneken, Bram; Prokop, Mathias; van der Graaf, Yolanda

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. In previous studies detection of coronary artery calcification (CAC) with low-dose ungated MDCT performed for lung cancer screening has been compared with detection with cardiac CT. We evaluated the interscan agreement of CAC scores from two consecutive low-dose ungated MDCT examinations.

  11. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  12. Novel lung IMRT planning algorithms with nonuniform dose delivery strategy to account for respiratory motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Pengpeng; Mah, Dennis; Gewanter, Richard; Kutcher, Gerald

    2006-09-01

    To effectively deliver radiation dose to lung tumors, respiratory motion has to be considered in treatment planning. In this paper we first present a new lung IMRT planning algorithm, referred as the dose shaping (DS) method, that shapes the dose distribution according to the probability distribution of the tumor over the breathing cycle to account for respiratory motion. In IMRT planning a dose-based convolution method was generally adopted to compensate for random organ motion by performing 4-D dose calculations using a tumor motion probability density function. We modified the CON-DOSE method to a dose volume histogram based convolution method (CON-DVH) that allows nonuniform dose distribution to account for respiratory motion. We implemented the two new planning algorithms on an in-house IMRT planning system that uses the Eclipse (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) planning workstation as the dose calculation engine. The new algorithms were compared with (1) the conventional margin extension approach in which margin is generated based on the extreme positions of the tumor, (2) the dose-based convolution method, and (3) gating with 3 mm residual motion. Dose volume histogram, tumor control probability, normal tissue complication probability, and mean lung dose were calculated and used to evaluate the relative performance of these approaches at the end-exhale phase of the respiratory cycle. We recruited six patients in our treatment planning study. The study demonstrated that the two new methods could significantly reduce the ipsilateral normal lung dose and outperformed the margin extension method and the dose-based convolution method. Compared with the gated approach that has the best performance in the low dose region, the two methods we proposed have similar potential to escalate tumor dose, but could be more efficient because dose is delivered continuously.

  13. Radiation dose-volume effects in the lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marks, Lawrence B; Bentzen, Soren M; Deasy, Joseph O;

    2010-01-01

    The three-dimensional dose, volume, and outcome data for lung are reviewed in detail. The rate of symptomatic pneumonitis is related to many dosimetric parameters, and there are no evident threshold "tolerance dose-volume" levels. There are strong volume and fractionation effects....

  14. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. In the past, many attempts were made to detect the disease at an early stage and subsequently reduce its mortality. Chest X-ray was abandoned for this purpose. For several years low-dose computed tomography has been introduced as a potential tool for early screening in a high-risk population. As demonstrated in several papers, the task is not easy and researchers are faced with many difficulties. This paper reviews mainly the role of low-dose CT for early cancer screening. Results of past and current trials, controversies related to the high rate of lung nodules, cost-effectiveness, and delivered radiation dose to the patient are presented. Finally some limitations of low dose CT for lung cancer detection are explained.

  15. TH-A-19A-03: Impact of Proton Dose Calculation Method On Delivered Dose to Lung Tumors: Experiments in Thorax Phantom and Planning Study in Patient Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassberger, C; Daartz, J; Dowdell, S; Ruggieri, T; Sharp, G; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Evaluate Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation and the prediction of the treatment planning system (TPS) in a lung phantom and compare them in a cohort of 20 lung patients treated with protons. Methods: A 2-dimensional array of ionization chambers was used to evaluate the dose across the target in a lung phantom. 20 lung cancer patients on clinical trials were re-simulated using a validated Monte Carlo toolkit (TOPAS) and compared to the TPS. Results: MC increases dose calculation accuracy in lung compared to the clinical TPS significantly and predicts the dose to the target in the phantom within ±2%: the average difference between measured and predicted dose in a plane through the center of the target is 5.6% for the TPS and 1.6% for MC. MC recalculations in patients show a mean dose to the clinical target volume on average 3.4% lower than the TPS, exceeding 5% for small fields. The lower dose correlates significantly with aperture size and the distance of the tumor to the chest wall (Spearman's p=0.0002/0.004). For large tumors MC also predicts consistently higher V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} to the normal lung, due to a wider lateral penumbra, which was also observed experimentally. Critical structures located distal to the target can show large deviations, though this effect is very patient-specific. Conclusion: Advanced dose calculation techniques, such as MC, would improve treatment quality in proton therapy for lung cancer by avoiding systematic overestimation of target dose and underestimation of dose to normal lung. This would increase the accuracy of the relationships between dose and effect, concerning tumor control as well as normal tissue toxicity. As the role of proton therapy in the treatment of lung cancer continues to be evaluated in clinical trials, this is of ever-increasing importance. This work was supported by National Cancer Institute Grant R01CA111590.

  16. Impact of temporal probability in 4D dose calculation for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabhi, Ouided; Ma, Mingyu; Bayouth, John; Xia, Junyi

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainty in 4D dose calculation using three temporal probability distributions: uniform distribution, sinusoidal distribution, and patient-specific distribution derived from the patient respiratory trace. Temporal probability, defined as the fraction of time a patient spends in each respiratory amplitude, was evaluated in nine lung cancer patients. Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), along with deformable image registration, was used to compute 4D dose incorporating the patient's respiratory motion. First, the dose of each of 10 phase CTs was computed using the same planning parameters as those used in 3D treatment planning based on the breath-hold CT. Next, deformable image registration was used to deform the dose of each phase CT to the breath-hold CT using the deformation map between the phase CT and the breath-hold CT. Finally, the 4D dose was computed by summing the deformed phase doses using their corresponding temporal probabilities. In this study, 4D dose calculated from the patient-specific temporal probability distribution was used as the ground truth. The dosimetric evaluation matrix included: 1) 3D gamma analysis, 2) mean tumor dose (MTD), 3) mean lung dose (MLD), and 4) lung V20. For seven out of nine patients, both uniform and sinusoidal temporal probability dose distributions were found to have an average gamma passing rate > 95% for both the lung and PTV regions. Compared with 4D dose calculated using the patient respiratory trace, doses using uniform and sinusoidal distribution showed a percentage difference on average of -0.1% ± 0.6% and -0.2% ± 0.4% in MTD, -0.2% ± 1.9% and -0.2% ± 1.3% in MLD, 0.09% ± 2.8% and -0.07% ± 1.8% in lung V20, -0.1% ± 2.0% and 0.08% ± 1.34% in lung V10, 0.47% ± 1.8% and 0.19% ± 1.3% in lung V5, respectively. We concluded that four-dimensional dose computed using either a uniform or sinusoidal temporal probability distribution can

  17. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  18. Low-dose methotrexate inhibits lung metastasis and lengthens survival in rat osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomoda, Ryota; Seto, Masashi; Hioki, Yasunari; Sonoda, Jun; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2005-01-01

    Lung metastasis is the most crucial event affecting the treatment of osteosarcoma and is dependent on tumor angiogenesis. To improve the prognosis for patients with osteosarcoma, prevention of lung metastasis is essential. Low-dose methotrexate is a useful drug for treating a variety of diseases. Low-dose methotrexate reportedly plays a role in antiangiogenesis for the synovial blood vessels in rheumatoid arthritis. However, whether low-dose methotrexate is correlated with tumor angiogenesis and metastasis is unclear. We investigated the inhibitory effect of methotrexate on lung metastasis in a rat osteosarcoma cell line with high metastatic potential, S-SLM. Two weeks after inoculation of S-SLM cells into male Fischer 344 rats, low-dose methotrexate (1.2 mg/kg once or twice a week) or saline was intraperitonealy injected for 4 weeks and the antimetastatic effect was evaluated. Low-dose methotrexate significantly reduced the number of lung metastatic nodules and the wet weight of the lungs. Immunohistochemical staining showed a decrease in microvessel density in the metastatic nodules. We also evaluated the effect of methotrexate on the proliferation of endothelial cells and S-SLM osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Methotrexate significantly inhibited the proliferation of endothelial cells at a lower concentration than that of S-SLM osteosarcoma cells. These data suggest that low-dose methotrexate inhibited lung metastasis of osteosarcoma through its antiangiogenic activity. Our results indicate that low-dose methotrexate is a promising drug for tumor dormancy therapy in patients with osteosarcoma and lung metastasis.

  19. Analytical modelling of regional radiotherapy dose response of lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyu; Stroian, Gabriela; Kopek, Neil; AlBahhar, Mahmood; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam

    2012-06-01

    Knowledge of the dose-response of radiation-induced lung disease (RILD) is necessary for optimization of radiotherapy (RT) treatment plans involving thoracic cavity irradiation. This study models the time-dependent relationship between local radiation dose and post-treatment lung tissue damage measured by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Fifty-eight follow-up diagnostic CT scans from 21 non-small-cell lung cancer patients were examined. The extent of RILD was segmented on the follow-up CT images based on the increase of physical density relative to the pre-treatment CT image. The segmented RILD was locally correlated with dose distribution calculated by analytical anisotropic algorithm and the Monte Carlo method to generate the corresponding dose-response curves. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was fit to the dose-response curves at six post-RT time periods, and temporal change in the LKB parameters was recorded. In this study, we observed significant correlation between the probability of lung tissue damage and the local dose for 96% of the follow-up studies. Dose-injury correlation at the first three months after RT was significantly different from later follow-up periods in terms of steepness and threshold dose as estimated from the LKB model. Dependence of dose response on superior-inferior tumour position was also observed. The time-dependent analytical modelling of RILD might provide better understanding of the long-term behaviour of the disease and could potentially be applied to improve inverse treatment planning optimization.

  20. Mean Organ Doses Resulting From Non-Human Primate Whole Thorax Lung Irradiation Prescribed to Mid-Line Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Charlotte; Kazi, Abdul; Bennett, Alexander; MacVittie, Thomas; Prado, Karl

    2015-11-01

    Multi-organ dose evaluations and the effects of heterogeneous tissue dose calculations have been retrospectively evaluated following irradiation to the whole thorax and lung in non-human primates (NHP). A clinical-based approach was established to evaluate actual doses received in the heart and lungs during whole thorax lung irradiation. Anatomical structure and organ densities have been introduced in the calculations to show the effects of dose distribution through heterogeneous tissue. Mean organ doses received by non-human primates undergoing whole thorax lung irradiations were calculated using a treatment planning system that is routinely used in clinical radiation oncology. The doses received by non-human primates irradiated following conventional dose calculations have been retrospectively reconstructed using computerized tomography-based, heterogeneity-corrected dose calculations. The use of dose volume descriptors for irradiation to organs at risk and tissue exposed to radiation is introduced. Mean and partial-volume doses to lung and heart are presented and contrasted. The importance of exact dose definitions is highlighted, and the relevance of precise dosimetry to establish organ-specific dose response relationships in NHP models of acute and delayed effects of acute radiation exposure is emphasized.

  1. Optimization of extracranial stereotactic radiation therapy of small lung lesions using accurate dose calculation algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polednik Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare and to validate different dose calculation algorithms for the use in radiation therapy of small lung lesions and to optimize the treatment planning using accurate dose calculation algorithms. Methods A 9-field conformal treatment plan was generated on an inhomogeneous phantom with lung mimics and a soft tissue equivalent insert, mimicking a lung tumor. The dose distribution was calculated with the Pencil Beam and Collapsed Cone algorithms implemented in Masterplan (Nucletron and the Monte Carlo system XVMC and validated using Gafchromic EBT films. Differences in dose distribution were evaluated. The plans were then optimized by adding segments to the outer shell of the target in order to increase the dose near the interface to the lung. Results The Pencil Beam algorithm overestimated the dose by up to 15% compared to the measurements. Collapsed Cone and Monte Carlo predicted the dose more accurately with a maximum difference of -8% and -3% respectively compared to the film. Plan optimization by adding small segments to the peripheral parts of the target, creating a 2-step fluence modulation, allowed to increase target coverage and homogeneity as compared to the uncorrected 9 field plan. Conclusion The use of forward 2-step fluence modulation in radiotherapy of small lung lesions allows the improvement of tumor coverage and dose homogeneity as compared to non-modulated treatment plans and may thus help to increase the local tumor control probability. While the Collapsed Cone algorithm is closer to measurements than the Pencil Beam algorithm, both algorithms are limited at tissue/lung interfaces, leaving Monte-Carlo the most accurate algorithm for dose prediction.

  2. GTV-based prescription in SBRT for lung lesions using advanced dose calculation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacornerie, Thomas; Lisbona, Albert; Mirabel, Xavier; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-10-16

    The aim of current study was to investigate the way dose is prescribed to lung lesions during SBRT using advanced dose calculation algorithms that take into account electron transport (type B algorithms). As type A algorithms do not take into account secondary electron transport, they overestimate the dose to lung lesions. Type B algorithms are more accurate but still no consensus is reached regarding dose prescription. The positive clinical results obtained using type A algorithms should be used as a starting point. In current work a dose-calculation experiment is performed, presenting different prescription methods. Three cases with three different sizes of peripheral lung lesions were planned using three different treatment platforms. For each individual case 60 Gy to the PTV was prescribed using a type A algorithm and the dose distribution was recalculated using a type B algorithm in order to evaluate the impact of the secondary electron transport. Secondly, for each case a type B algorithm was used to prescribe 48 Gy to the PTV, and the resulting doses to the GTV were analyzed. Finally, prescriptions based on specific GTV dose volumes were evaluated. When using a type A algorithm to prescribe the same dose to the PTV, the differences regarding median GTV doses among platforms and cases were always less than 10% of the prescription dose. The prescription to the PTV based on type B algorithms, leads to a more important variability of the median GTV dose among cases and among platforms, (respectively 24%, and 28%). However, when 54 Gy was prescribed as median GTV dose, using a type B algorithm, the variability observed was minimal. Normalizing the prescription dose to the median GTV dose for lung lesions avoids variability among different cases and treatment platforms of SBRT when type B algorithms are used to calculate the dose. The combination of using a type A algorithm to optimize a homogeneous dose in the PTV and using a type B algorithm to prescribe the

  3. Low-dose lung cancer screening with photon-counting CT: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Rolf; Cork, Tyler E.; Sahbaee, Pooyan; Fuld, Matthew K.; Kappler, Steffen; Folio, Les R.; Bluemke, David A.; Pourmorteza, Amir

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using a whole-body photon-counting detector (PCD) CT scanner for low-dose lung cancer screening compared to a conventional energy integrating detector (EID) system. Radiation dose-matched EID and PCD scans of the COPDGene 2 phantom were acquired at different radiation dose levels (CTDIvol: 3.0, 1.5, and 0.75 mGy) and different tube voltages (120, 100, and 80 kVp). EID and PCD images were compared for quantitative Hounsfield unit (HU) accuracy, noise levels, and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) for detection of ground-glass nodules (GGN) and emphysema. The PCD HU accuracy was better than EID for water at all scan parameters. PCD HU stability for lung, GGN and emphysema regions were superior to EID and PCD attenuation values were more reproducible than EID for all scan parameters (all P  lung, GGN and emphysema ROIs changed significantly for EID with decreasing dose (all P  lung, ground-glass, and emphysema-equivalent foams at lower radiation dose settings with better reproducibility than EID. Additionally, PCD showed up to 10% less noise, and 11% higher CNR at 0.75 mGy for both 100 and 80 kVp. PCD technology may help reduce radiation exposure in lung cancer screening while maintaining diagnostic quality.

  4. STUDY ON LUNG DOSE FOR DIFFERENT ANIMALS BY INHALATION OF SHORT—LIVED RADON DAUGHTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李素云; 张升慧; 等

    1994-01-01

    The dose distribution in the lung is inhomogeneous.The dose to the basal cell layer of trachea and main bronchi is much higher than the dose to total lung both for rabbits at different ages and for different animals.A maximum value of the dose to lung tissue for rabbits at ages of 20-40d is observed.The dose decreases with increasing body weight.The relationship between the dose and body weight can be descreibed by a power function.The dose to total lung increases exponentially with the minute breathing volume per unit of lung weight.

  5. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae-Young; Chang, S.Y.; Lee, J.I.; Song, M.Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium lung deposition by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity. 3 refs., 6 tabs. (Author)

  6. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, J. I.; Song, M. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiating monitoring programme, measurement of uranium present in lung by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity. 8 refs., 14 tabs. (Author)

  7. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S.Y.; Lee, J.I.; Song, M.Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium present in lung by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity. 4 refs., 12 tabs. (Author)

  8. [Breast dose reduction in female CT screening for lung cancer using various metallic shields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kenta; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-20

    We evaluated the effectiveness of metallic shields that were used for reduction of the breast dose in thoracic computed tomography(CT). For the evaluation, we measured breast surface dose and image standard deviation(SD)in the lung area. The metallic shields were made from bismuth, zinc, copper, and iron. The bismuth shield has been marketed and used for dose reduction. The other three metallic shields were chosen because they have lower atomic numbers and a lower yield of characteristic X-rays. As a result, use of the metallic shields showed a lower breast dose than the decrement of the tube current in the same image SD. The insertion of a thin aluminum sheet between the shield and a phantom was also effective in reducing breast surface dose. We calculated the dose reduction rate to evaluate the effectiveness of these metallic shields. This dose reduction rate was defined as the ratio of the decrease in breast surface dose by metallic shields to the breast surface dose measured with the tube current decrement in the same image SD. The maximum dose reduction rate was 6.4% for the bismuth shield, and 12.0-13.3% for the other shields. These results indicate that the shields made from zinc, copper, and iron are more effective for dose reduction than the shield made form bismuth. The best dose reduction rate, 13.3%, has been achieved when the zinc shield placed 20 mm apart from a phantom with 0.2 mm aluminum was used.

  9. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  10. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 05: 10X-FFF VMAT for Lung SABR: an Investigation of Peripheral Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mader, J [University of Victoria (Australia); Mestrovic, A [University of Victoria (Australia); BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver Island Centre (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Flattening Filter Free (FFF) beams exhibit high dose rates, reduced head scatter, leaf transmission and leakage radiation. For VMAT lung SABR, treatment time can be significantly reduced using high dose rate FFF beams while maintaining plan quality and accuracy. Another possible advantage offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR is the reduction in peripheral dose. The focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the reduction of peripheral dose offered by FFF beams for VMAT lung SABR. The peripheral doses delivered by VMAT Lung SABR treatments using FFF and flattened beams were investigated for the Varian Truebeam linac. This study was conducted in three stages, (1): ion chamber measurement of peripheral dose for various plans, (2): validation of AAA, Acuros XB and Monte Carlo for peripheral dose using measured data, and (3): using the validated Monte Carlo model to evaluate peripheral doses for 6 VMAT lung SABR treatments. Three energies, 6X, 10X, and 10X-FFF were used for all stages. Measured data indicates that 10X-FFF delivers the lowest peripheral dose of the three energies studied. AAA and Acuros XB dose calculation algorithms were identified as inadequate, and Monte Carlo was validated for accurate peripheral dose prediction. The Monte Carlo-calculated VMAT lung SABR plans show a significant reduction in peripheral dose for 10X-FFF plans compared to the standard 6X plans, while no significant reduction was showed when compared to 10X. This reduction combined with shorter treatment time makes 10X-FFF beams the optimal choice for superior VMAT lung SABR treatments.

  11. Method for calculating dose when lung tissue lies in the treatment field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, S.C.; Keller, B.E.; Rubin, P.

    1976-07-01

    The absorbed dose in lung and beyond lung as a result of increased lung transmission of x and ..gamma.. irradiation is described. The correction factor used to calculate the absorbed dose is a function of beam energy, field area, lung density, and lung and soft tissue depth. Agreement between measurements and calculations in the Alderson phantom is within 3%. An example of how this technique can be used is described. (AIP)

  12. Dose verification of radiotherapy for lung cancer by using plastic scintillator dosimetry and a heterogeneous phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Behrens, C. F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2015-01-01

    Bone, air passages, cavities, and lung are elements present in patients, but challenging to properly correct for in treatment planning dose calculations. Plastic scintillator detectors (PSDs) have proven to be well suited for dosimetry in non-reference conditions such as small fields. The objective...... of this study was to investigate the performance of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) using a PSD and a specially designed thorax phantom with lung tumor inserts. 10 treatment plans of different complexity and phantom configurations were evaluated. Although the TPS agreed well with the measurements...

  13. Effects of CT dose and nodule characteristics on lung-nodule detectability in a cohort of 90 national lung screening trial patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Hoffman, John M.; Kim, H. J. Grace; Brown, Matthew S.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2016-03-01

    Lung cancer screening CT is already performed at low dose. There are many techniques to reduce the dose even further, but it is not clear how such techniques will affect nodule detectability. In this work, we used an in-house CAD algorithm to evaluate detectability. 90348 patients and their raw CT data files were drawn from the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) database. All scans were acquired at ~2 mGy CTDIvol with fixed tube current, 1 mm slice thickness, and B50 reconstruction kernel on a Sensation 64 scanner (Siemens Healthcare). We used the raw CT data to simulate two additional reduced-dose scans for each patient corresponding to 1 mGy (50%) and 0.5 mGy (25%). Radiologists' findings on the NLST reader forms indicated 65 nodules in the cohort, which we subdivided based on LungRADS criteria. For larger category 4 nodules, median sensitivities were 100% at all three dose levels, and mean sensitivity decreased with dose. For smaller nodules meeting the category 2 or 3 criteria, the dose dependence was less obvious. Overall, mean patient-level sensitivity varied from 38.5% at 100% dose to 40.4% at 50% dose, a difference of only 1.9%. However, the false-positive rate quadrupled from 1 per case at 100% dose to 4 per case at 25% dose. Dose reduction affected lung-nodule detectability differently depending on the LungRADS category, and the false-positive rate was very sensitive at sub-screening dose levels. Thus, care should be taken to adapt CAD for the very challenging noise characteristics of screening.

  14. Clinical evaluation of X-ray voxel Monte Carlo versus pencil beam-based dose calculation in stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung cancer under normal and deep inspiration breath hold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, V; Borzì, G R; Strolin, S; Bruzzaniti, V; Soriani, A; D'Alessio, D; Ambesi, F; Di Grazia, A M; Strigari, L

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the differences between dose distributions calculated with the pencil beam (PB) and X-ray voxel Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms for patients with lung cancer using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or HybridArc techniques. The 2 algorithms were compared in terms of dose-volume histograms, under normal and deep inspiration breath hold, and in terms of the tumor control probability (TCP). The dependence of the differences in tumor volume and location was investigated. Dosimetric validation was performed using Gafchromic EBT3 (International Specialty Products, ISP, Wayne, NJ). Forty-five Computed Tomography (CT) data sets were used for this study; 40 Gy at 8 Gy/fraction was prescribed with 5 noncoplanar 6-MV IMRT beams or 3 to 4 dynamic conformal arcs with 3 to 5 IMRT beams distributed per arc. The plans were first calculated with PB and then recalculated with MC. The difference between the mean tumor doses was approximately 10% ± 4%; these differences were even larger under deep inspiration breath hold. Differences between the mean tumor dose correlated with tumor volume and path length of the beams. The TCP values changed from 99.87% ± 0.24% to 96.78% ± 4.81% for both PB- and MC-calculated plans (P = .009). When a fraction of hypoxic cells was considered, the mean TCP values changed from 76.01% ± 5.83% to 34.78% ± 18.06% for the differently calculated plans (P < .0001). When the plans were renormalized to the same mean dose at the tumor, the mean TCP for oxic cells was 99.05% ± 1.59% and for hypoxic cells was 60.20% ± 9.53%. This study confirms that the MC algorithm adequately accounts for inhomogeneities. The inclusion of the MC in the process of IMRT optimization could represent a further step in the complex problem of determining the optimal treatment plan.

  15. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  16. Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy: evaluation of PTV coverage and dose conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hädinger, Ulrich; Thiele, Wibke; Wulf, Jörn

    2002-01-01

    During the past few years the concept of cranial stereotactic radiotherapy has been successfully extended to extracranial tumoral targets. In our department, hypofractionated treatment of tumours in lung, liver, abdomen, and pelvis is performed in the Stereotactic Body Frame (ELEKTA Instrument AB) since 1997. We present the evaluation of 63 consecutively treated targets (22 lung, 21 liver, 20 abdomen/pelvis) in 58 patients with respect to dose coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) as well as conformity of the dose distribution. The mean PTV coverage was found to be 96.3% +/- 2.3% (lung), 95.0% +/- 4.5% (liver), and 92.1% +/- 5.2% (abdomen/pelvis). For the so-called conformation number we obtained values of 0.73 +/- 0.09 (lung), 0.77 +/- 0.10 (liver), and 0.70 +/- 0.08 (abdomen/pelvis). The results show that highly conformal treatment techniques can be applied also in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. This is primarily due to the relatively simple geometrical shape of most of the targets. Especially lung and liver targets turned out to be approximately spherically/cylindrically shaped, so that the dose distribution can be easily tailored by rotational fields.

  17. Impact of dose calculation accuracy during optimization on lung IMRT plan quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Rodrigues, Anna; Li, Taoran; Yuan, Lulin; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Q Jackie

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose calculation accuracy and the use of an intermediate dose calculation step during the optimization of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) planning on the final plan quality for lung cancer patients. This study included replanning for 11 randomly selected free-breathing lung IMRT plans. The original plans were optimized using a fast pencil beam convolution algorithm. After optimization, the final dose calculation was performed using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA). The Varian Treatment Planning System (TPS) Eclipse v11, includes an option to perform intermediate dose calculation during optimization using the AAA. The new plans were created using this intermediate dose calculation during optimization with the same planning objectives and dose constraints as in the original plan. Differences in dosimetric parameters for the planning target volume (PTV) dose coverage, organs-at-risk (OARs) dose sparing, and the number of monitor units (MU) between the original and new plans were analyzed. Statistical significance was determined with a p-value of less than 0.05. All plans were normalized to cover 95% of the PTV with the prescription dose. Compared with the original plans, the PTV in the new plans had on average a lower maximum dose (69.45 vs. 71.96Gy, p = 0.005), a better homogeneity index (HI) (0.08 vs. 0.12, p = 0.002), and a better conformity index (CI) (0.69 vs. 0.59, p = 0.003). In the new plans, lung sparing was increased as the volumes receiving 5, 10, and 30 Gy were reduced when compared to the original plans (40.39% vs. 42.73%, p = 0.005; 28.93% vs. 30.40%, p = 0.001; 14.11%vs. 14.84%, p = 0.031). The volume receiving 20 Gy was not significantly lower (19.60% vs. 20.38%, p = 0.052). Further, the mean dose to the lung was reduced in the new plans (11.55 vs. 12.12 Gy, p = 0.024). For the esophagus, the mean dose, the maximum dose, and the volumes receiving 20 and 60 Gy were lower in

  18. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  19. Radiation dose is associated with prognosis of small cell lung cancer with superior vena cava syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Ning, Fang-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Le; Cheng, Yu-Feng; Dong, Xin-Jun; Liu, Chang-Min; Chen, Shao-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases develop superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Many SCLC patients with SVCS have relatively limited disease, requiring curative rather than palliative treatment. Besides chemotherapy, radiotherapy is important for treating SCLC with SVCS. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of radiotherapy dose on the prognosis of 57 patients with SCLC with SVCS treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The mean biological equivalent radiation dose was 71.5 Gy. We administered etoposide/cisplatin as sequential and concurrent chemotherapy. All patients received at least one cycle of concurrent chemotherapy. All patients had partial or complete response; SVCS-associated symptoms were reduced in 87.7% (50/57) of patients within 3-10 days after treatment. Radiation dose did not affect 2-year local control (74.2% vs. 80.8%). Patients who received high-dose radiation had a lower 2-year overall survival rate than those who received low-dose radiation (11.6 vs. 33%; P = 0.024). The high dose group median survival was 15.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2-19.0) compared with 18.7 months (95% CI: 13.9-23.6) in the low dose group. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 22/26 high dose patients (84.6%) and 21/31 low dose patients (67.7%). In the high dose group, 30.8% of patients had grade 3/4 esophagitis compared with 19.4% of low dose patients. Only 29.0% of low dose patients received < 4 cycles of chemotherapy in the first 12 weeks after treatment began compared with 46.2% of high dose patients. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a tolerable modality for treating stage IIIA/IIIB SCLC with SVCS. Moderate-dose radiotherapy is preferable. PMID:26064339

  20. SU-E-J-149: Establishing the Relationship Between Pre-Treatment Lung Ventilation, Dose, and Toxicity Outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, N; D' Souza, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sornsen de Koste, J; Senan, S [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, MB (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Recently, there has been an interest in incorporating functional information in treatment planning especially in thoracic tumors. The rationale is that healthy lung regions need to be spared from radiation if possible to help achieve better control on toxicity. However, it is still unclear whether high functioning regions need to be spared or have more capacity to deal with the excessive radiation as compared to the compromised regions of the lung. Our goal with this work is to establish the tools by which we can establish a relationship between pre-treatment lung function, dose, and radiographic outcomes of lung toxicity. Methods: Treatment planning was performed using a single phase of a 4DCT scan, and follow-up anatomical CT scans were performed every 3 months for most patients. In this study, we developed the pipeline of tools needed to analyze such a large dataset, while trying to establish a relationship between function, dose, and outcome. Pre-treatment lung function was evaluated using a recently published technique that evaluates Fractional Regional Ventilation (FRV). All images including the FRV map and the individual follow-up anatomical CT images were all spatially matched to the planning CT using a diffusion based Demons image registration algorithm. Change in HU value was used as a metric to capture the effects of lung toxicity. To validate the findings, a radiologist evaluated the follow-up anatomical CT images and scored lung toxicity. Results: Initial experience in 1 patient shows a relationship between the pre-treatment lung function, dose and toxicity outcome. The results are also correlated to the findings by the radiologist who was blinded to the analysis or dose. Conclusion: The pipeline we have established to study this enables future studies in large retrospective studies. However, the tools are dependent on the fidelity of 4DCT reconstruction for accurate evaluation of regional ventilation. Patent Pending for the technique

  1. CT imaging of congenital lung lesions: effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance and radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggerty, Jay E.; Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kunisaki, Shaun M. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Different iterative reconstruction techniques are available for use in pediatric computed tomography (CT), but these techniques have not been systematically evaluated in infants. To determine the effect of iterative reconstruction on diagnostic performance, image quality and radiation dose in infants undergoing CT evaluation for congenital lung lesions. A retrospective review of contrast-enhanced chest CT in infants (<1 year) with congenital lung lesions was performed. CT examinations were reviewed to document the type of lung lesion, vascular anatomy, image noise measurements and image reconstruction method. CTDI{sub vol} was used to calculate size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). CT findings were correlated with intraoperative and histopathological findings. Analysis of variance and the Student's t-test were used to compare image noise measurements and radiation dose estimates between groups. Fifteen CT examinations used filtered back projection (FBP; mean age: 84 days), 15 used adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR; mean age: 93 days), and 11 used model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR; mean age: 98 days). Compared to operative findings, 13/15 (87%), 14/15 (93%) and 11/11 (100%) lesions were correctly characterized using FBP, ASiR and MBIR, respectively. Arterial anatomy was correctly identified in 12/15 (80%) using FBP, 13/15 (87%) using ASiR and 11/11 (100%) using MBIR. Image noise was less for MBIR vs. ASiR (P < 0.0001). Mean SSDE was different among groups (P = 0.003; FBP = 7.35 mGy, ASiR = 1.89 mGy, MBIR = 1.49 mGy). Congenital lung lesions can be adequately characterized in infants using iterative CT reconstruction techniques while maintaining image quality and lowering radiation dose. (orig.)

  2. Erlotinib dosing-to-rash: A phase II intrapatient dose escalation and pharmacologic study of erlotinib in previously treated advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. mita (Alain); K. Papadopoulos (K.); M.J.A. de Jonge (Maja); G. Schwartz (G.); J. Verweij (Jaap); A. Ricart (A.); Q.S.C. Chu (Q. S C); A.W. Tolcher (A. W.); L. Wood (Lori); S.W. McCarthy (Stanley); M. Hamilton; K.K. Iwata (Kenneth); B. Wacker; K. de Witte (Karel); E.K. Rowinsky (Eric Keith)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: To evaluate the anticancer activity of erlotinib in patients with previously treated, advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose dose is increased to that associated with a maximal level of tolerable skin toxicity (i.e., target rash (TR)); to characterise the pharmacok

  3. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology Guideline for Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a nation-wide randomized controlled trial involving more than 50,000 current and former heavy smokers ages 55 to 74, compared the effects of two screening procedures (low-dose helical CT and standard chest radiography) on lung cancer mortality and found 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose CT. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology (KSTR) planned to establish an effective guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT to improve health of Korean people and to reduce harms from misuse of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT. KSTR guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT established based on objective medical evidences obtained by NLST.

  4. Once-daily dosing of amikacin for treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H; Sohn, Y M; Ko, J Y; Lee, S-Y; Jhun, B W; Park, H Y; Jeon, K; Kim, D H; Kim, S-Y; Choi, J E; Moon, I J; Shin, S J; Park, H J; Koh, W-J

    2017-07-01

    Tertiary referral centre, Samsung Medical Center, South Korea. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic parameters and toxicities of once-daily amikacin (AMK) dosing for lung disease due to Mycobacterium abscessus. A retrospective review of 48 patients with M. abscessus lung disease who received once-daily AMK for 4 weeks between January 2012 and June 2015. With a starting dose of 15 mg/kg/day and adjustment of AMK dose according to the peak serum level (Cmax), the Cmax target of 55-65 μg/ml was achieved in 31.3% (15/48) of patients in the first week, 68.8% (33/48) in week 2, 91.7% (44/48) in week 3 and 95.8% (46/48) in week 4. Transient nephrotoxicity developed in 6.3% (3/48) of patients and ototoxicity in 25.0% (6/24), which was determined by audiogram as hearing loss, asymptomatic in five patients and tinnitus in one. Multivariate analysis revealed that the highest drug concentration 12 h after administration was significantly associated with the development of toxicities (adjusted odds ratio 1.862, P = 0.047). Our results suggest that once-daily AMK for 4 weeks with a target Cmax of 55-65 μg/ml can be used in patients with M. abscessus lung disease, with careful monitoring of toxicity.

  5. Deformable image and dose registration evaluation using two commercial programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tuohy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the daily dose delivered to the patients using daily imaging.Methods: Thirty (n = 30 patients that were previously treated in our clinic (10 prostate, 10 SBRT lung and 10 abdomen were used in this study. The patients’ plans were optimized and calculated using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. The daily CBCT scans were retrieved and imported into the Velocity and RayStation software along with the corresponding planning CTs, structure sets and 3D dose distributions. In addition, the critical structures were contoured on each CBCT by the prescribing physician and were included in the evaluation of the daily delivered dose. After registering each CBCT scan to the planning CT using deformable registration, the dose volume histograms (DVH for the organs at risk (OAR and the respective planning target volumes (PTV were calculated in Velocity and Raystation.Results: For the prostate patients, we observed daily volume changes for the bladder, rectum and sigmoid. The DVH analysis for those patients showed variation in the sparing of the critical structures while PTV coverage showed no significant changes. Similar results were observed for patients with abdominal targets. In contrast, in SBRT lung patients, the DVH for the critical structures and the PTV were comparable to those from the initial treatment plan. By using daily CBCT dose reconstruction, we proved PTV coverage for prostate and abdominal targets is adequate. However, there is significant dosimetric change for the OAR. These changes were random with no apparent trending. For lung SBRT patients, the delivered daily dose for both PTV and OAR is comparable to the planned dose with no significant differences.Conclusion: Daily tracking of the delivered dose is feasible. The doses can be evaluated only if the OARs have been segmented taken into account any daily anatomical changes and not by deformation of the structures along.-------------------Cite this article as

  6. Clinical implementation and evaluation of the Acuros dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chenyu; Combine, Anthony G; Bednarz, Greg; Lalonde, Ronald J; Hu, Bin; Dickens, Kathy; Wynn, Raymond; Pavord, Daniel C; Saiful Huq, M

    2017-08-20

    The main aim of this study is to validate the Acuros XB dose calculation algorithm for a Varian Clinac iX linac in our clinics, and subsequently compare it with the wildely used AAA algorithm. The source models for both Acuros XB and AAA were configured by importing the same measured beam data into Eclipse treatment planning system. Both algorithms were validated by comparing calculated dose with measured dose on a homogeneous water phantom for field sizes ranging from 6 cm × 6 cm to 40 cm × 40 cm. Central axis and off-axis points with different depths were chosen for the comparison. In addition, the accuracy of Acuros was evaluated for wedge fields with wedge angles from 15 to 60°. Similarly, variable field sizes for an inhomogeneous phantom were chosen to validate the Acuros algorithm. In addition, doses calculated by Acuros and AAA at the center of lung equivalent tissue from three different VMAT plans were compared to the ion chamber measured doses in QUASAR phantom, and the calculated dose distributions by the two algorithms and their differences on patients were compared. Computation time on VMAT plans was also evaluated for Acuros and AAA. Differences between dose-to-water (calculated by AAA and Acuros XB) and dose-to-medium (calculated by Acuros XB) on patient plans were compared and evaluated. For open 6 MV photon beams on the homogeneous water phantom, both Acuros XB and AAA calculations were within 1% of measurements. For 23 MV photon beams, the calculated doses were within 1.5% of measured doses for Acuros XB and 2% for AAA. Testing on the inhomogeneous phantom demonstrated that AAA overestimated doses by up to 8.96% at a point close to lung/solid water interface, while Acuros XB reduced that to 1.64%. The test on QUASAR phantom showed that Acuros achieved better agreement in lung equivalent tissue while AAA underestimated dose for all VMAT plans by up to 2.7%. Acuros XB computation time was about three times faster than AAA for VMAT plans, and

  7. Technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime lung scintigraphy findings in low-dose amiodarone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, G Capa; Ertay, T; Tuna, B; Bekis, R; Tasci, C; Sayit, E; Yilmaz, O; Kargi, A; Durak, H

    2006-01-01

    Amiodarone (AD)-induced pulmonary toxicity is one of the major complications of long-term AD therapy. Technetium-99m-labeled D: ,L: -hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (Tc-99m HMPAO) scintigraphy has been used to assess lung injury. We designed this study to clarify lung uptake changes of Tc-99m HMPAO using low doses of AD (5 mg/kg/day) during long-term therapy in a rabbit model. Group 1 consisted of 7 rabbits fed with AD by gavage for 6 months. To investigate the effect of ketamine on Tc-99m HMPAO uptake, 5 rabbits were included in Group 2 as a control group. Tc-99m HMPAO scintigraphy was performed in both Group 1 and Group 2 at baseline and after 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks of AD intake. After 16, 20, and 24 weeks of drug intake, Tc-99m HMPAO scintigraphy was repeated only in group 1. One-min anterior images were acquired 30 min after the injection of 37 MBq of Tc-99m HMPAO. For semiquantitative evaluation, the mean count values were obtained and lung/background and liver/background ratios were calculated. Histopathologic evaluation was performed. No increase in lung and liver uptake of Tc-99m HMPAO was found 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks after drug intake. There was no significant increase in L/B and H/B ratios of Tc-99m HMPAO in Group 1 compared with Group 2. Both scintigraphic studies and histopathologic examinations showed nonspecific changes. Longitudinal studies investigating Tc-99m HMPAO lung uptake may be planned in patients carrying risk factors for AD-induced lung toxicity.

  8. Radiation dose reduction in computed tomography-guided lung interventions using an iterative reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, D.H.; Hiss, S.; Borggrefe, J.; Bunck, A.C.; Maintz, D.; Hackenbroch, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Mueller, D. [Clinical Science Philips Healthcare GmbH, Munich (Germany). Clinical Science; Hellmich, M. [Cologne University Hospital (Germany). Inst. of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Epidemiology

    2015-10-15

    To compare the radiation doses and image qualities of computed tomography (CT)-guided interventions using a standard-dose CT (SDCT) protocol with filtered back projection and a low-dose CT (LDCT) protocol with both filtered back projection and iterative reconstruction. Image quality and radiation doses (dose-length product and CT dose index) were retrospectively reviewed for 130 patients who underwent CT-guided lung interventions. SDCT at 120 kVp and automatic mA modulation and LDCT at 100 kVp and a fixed exposure were each performed for 65 patients. Image quality was objectively evaluated as the contrast-to-noise ratio and subjectively by two radiologists for noise impression, sharpness, artifacts and diagnostic acceptability on a four-point scale. The groups did not significantly differ in terms of diagnostic acceptability and complication rate. LDCT yielded a median 68.6 % reduction in the radiation dose relative to SDCT. In the LDCT group, iterative reconstruction was superior to filtered back projection in terms of noise reduction and subjective image quality. The groups did not differ in terms of beam hardening artifacts. LDCT was feasible for all procedures and yielded a more than two-thirds reduction in radiation exposure while maintaining overall diagnostic acceptability, safety and precision. The iterative reconstruction algorithm is preferable according to the objective and subjective image quality analyses.

  9. Degradation of proton depth dose distributions attributable to microstructures in lung-equivalent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titt, Uwe, E-mail: utitt@mdanderson.org; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Sell, Martin [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Oelfke, Uwe [Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg 69120, Germany and Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research, 123 Old Brompton Road, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the work reported here was to investigate the influence of sub-millimeter size heterogeneities on the degradation of the distal edges of proton beams and to validate Monte Carlo (MC) methods’ ability to correctly predict such degradation. Methods: A custom-designed high-resolution plastic phantom approximating highly heterogeneous, lung-like structures was employed in measurements and in Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the degradation of proton Bragg curves penetrating heterogeneous media. Results: Significant differences in distal falloff widths and in peak dose values were observed in the measured and the Monte Carlo simulated curves compared to pristine proton Bragg curves. Furthermore, differences between simulations of beams penetrating CT images of the phantom did not agree well with the corresponding experimental differences. The distal falloff widths in CT image-based geometries were underestimated by up to 0.2 cm in water (corresponding to 0.8–1.4 cm in lung tissue), and the peak dose values of pristine proton beams were overestimated by as much as ~35% compared to measured curves or depth-dose curves simulated on the basis of true geometry. The authors demonstrate that these discrepancies were caused by the limited spatial resolution of CT images that served as a basis for dose calculations and lead to underestimation of the impact of the fine structure of tissue heterogeneities. A convolution model was successfully applied to mitigate the underestimation. Conclusions: The results of this study justify further development of models to better represent heterogeneity effects in soft-tissue geometries, such as lung, and to correct systematic underestimation of the degradation of the distal edge of proton doses.

  10. Effect of lung and target density on small-field dose coverage and PTV definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, Patrick D., E-mail: higgi010@umn.edu; Ehler, Eric D.; Cho, Lawrence C.; Dusenbery, Kathryn E.

    2015-04-01

    We have studied the effect of target and lung density on block margin for small stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) targets. A phantom (50 × 50 × 50 cm{sup 3}) was created in the Pinnacle (V9.2) planning system with a 23-cm diameter lung region of interest insert. Diameter targets of 1.6, 2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were placed in the lung region of interest and centered at a physical depth of 15 cm. Target densities evaluated were 0.1 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, whereas the surrounding lung density was varied between 0.05 and 0.6 g/cm{sup 3}. A dose of 100 cGy was delivered to the isocenter via a single 6-MV field, and the ratio of the average dose to points defining the lateral edges of the target to the isocenter dose was recorded for each combination. Field margins were varied from none to 1.5 cm in 0.25-cm steps. Data obtained in the phantom study were used to predict planning treatment volume (PTV) margins that would match the clinical PTV and isodose prescription for a clinical set of 39 SBRT cases. The average internal target volume (ITV) density was 0.73 ± 0.17, average local lung density was 0.33 ± 0.16, and average ITV diameter was 2.16 ± 0.8 cm. The phantom results initially underpredicted PTV margins by 0.35 cm. With this offset included in the model, the ratio of predicted-to-clinical PTVs was 1.05 ± 0.32. For a given target and lung density, it was found that treatment margin was insensitive to target diameter, except for the smallest (1.6-cm diameter) target, for which the treatment margin was more sensitive to density changes than the larger targets. We have developed a graphical relationship for block margin as a function of target and lung density, which should save time in the planning phase by shortening the design of PTV margins that can satisfy Radiation Therapy Oncology Group mandated treatment volume ratios.

  11. SU-E-T-78: A Study of Dose Falloff Gradient in RapidArc Planning of Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, D; Srinivasan, S; Elasmar, H [Memorial Health Care System, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Johnson, E [Univ Kentucky Medical Ctr, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Rapid dose falloff beyond PTV is an important criterion for normal tissue sparing in SBRT. RTOG protocols use D2cm and R50% for plan quality evaluation. This study is aimed at analyzing the dose falloff gradient beyond the PTV extending into normal tissue structures and to ascertain the impact of PTV geometry and location on the dose falloff gradient in RapidArc planning of lung SBRT Methods: In this retrospective study, we analyzed 39 clinical RapidArc lung SBRT treatment plans that met RTOG-0915 criteria. Planning was done on Eclipse 8.9 for delivery on either Novalis NTx or TrueBeam STx equipped with HD MLCs. PTV volumes ranged between 5.3 and 113 cc (2.2 to 6 cm sphere equivalent diameter respectively) and their geographic locations were distributed in both lungs. 6X, 6X-FFF, 10X, and 10X-FFF energies were used for planning. All of these SBRT plans were planned using either 2 or 3 full or hemi arcs, with moderate couch kicks. Dose falloff gradients were obtained by generating 7 concentric 5 mm rings beyond PTV surface. Mean dose in each ring is used to evaluate percentage dose falloff gradient as a function of distance from the PTV surface. Results: The mean percentage dose falloff beyond PTV surface in all plans followed an exponential decay and the data was modeled with double exponential decay fit. Photon energy selection in the plan had a minimal impact on the mean percentage dose fall off beyond PTV surface. Conclusion: Dose falloff beyond PTV surface as a function of distance can be ascertained by the use of the double exponential decay fit coefficients in RapidArc planning of lung SBRT. This will help also in plan quality evaluation in addition to D2cm and R50% defined by RTOG.

  12. The effect of radiation dose reduction on computer-aided detection (CAD) performance in a low-dose lung cancer screening population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Stefano; Lo, Pechin; Kim, Grace; Brown, Matthew; Hoffman, John; Hsu, William; Wahi-Anwar, Wasil; Flores, Carlos; Lee, Grace; Noo, Frederic; Goldin, Jonathan; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT has recently been approved for reimbursement, heralding the arrival of such screening services worldwide. Computer-aided detection (CAD) tools offer the potential to assist radiologists in detecting nodules in these screening exams. In lung screening, as in all CT exams, there is interest in further reducing radiation dose. However, the effects of continued dose reduction on CAD performance are not fully understood. In this work, we investigated the effect of reducing radiation dose on CAD lung nodule detection performance in a screening population. The raw projection data files were collected from 481 patients who underwent low-dose screening CT exams at our institution as part of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). All scans were performed on a multidetector scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim Germany) according to the NLST protocol, which called for a fixed tube current scan of 25 effective mAs for standard-sized patients and 40 effective mAs for larger patients. The raw projection data were input to a reduced-dose simulation software to create simulated reduced-dose scans corresponding to 50% and 25% of the original protocols. All raw data files were reconstructed at the scanner with 1 mm slice thickness and B50 kernel. The lungs were segmented semi-automatically, and all images and segmentations were input to an in-house CAD algorithm trained on higher dose scans (75-300 mAs). CAD findings were compared to a reference standard generated by an experienced reader. Nodule- and patient-level sensitivities were calculated along with false positives per scan, all of which were evaluated in terms of the relative change with respect to dose. Nodules were subdivided based on size and solidity into categories analogous to the LungRADS assessment categories, and sub-analyses were performed. From the 481 patients in this study, 82 had at least one nodule (prevalence of 17%) and 399 did not (83%). A total of 118

  13. SU-E-T-50: A Multi-Institutional Study of Independent Dose Verification Software Program for Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, D [Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Kanagawa-prefecture (Japan); Takahashi, R; Kamima, T [The Cancer Institute Hospital of JFCR, Koutou-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Baba, H [The National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa-city, Chiba prefecture (Japan); Yamamoto, T; Kubo, Y [Otemae Hospital, Chuou-ku, Osaka-city (Japan); Ishibashi, S; Higuchi, Y [Sasebo City General Hospital, Sasebo, Nagasaki (Japan); Takahashi, H [St Lukes International Hospital, Chuou-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The accuracy of dose distribution depends on treatment planning system especially in heterogeneity-region. The tolerance level (TL) of the secondary check using the independent dose verification may be variable in lung SBRT plans. We conducted a multi-institutional study to evaluate the tolerance level of lung SBRT plans shown in the AAPM TG114. Methods: Five institutes in Japan participated in this study. All of the institutes used a same independent dose verification software program (Simple MU Analysis: SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP), which is Clarkson-based and CT images were used to compute radiological path length. Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm (AAA), Pencil Beam Convolution with modified Batho-method (PBC-B) and Adaptive Convolve (AC) were used for lung SBRT planning. A measurement using an ion-chamber was performed in a heterogeneous phantom to compare doses from the three different algorithms and the SMU to the measured dose. In addition to it, a retrospective analysis using clinical lung SBRT plans (547 beams from 77 patients) was conducted to evaluate the confidence limit (CL, Average±2SD) in dose between the three algorithms and the SMU. Results: Compared to the measurement, the AAA showed the larger systematic dose error of 2.9±3.2% than PBC-B and AC. The Clarkson-based SMU showed larger error of 5.8±3.8%. The CLs for clinical plans were 7.7±6.0 % (AAA), 5.3±3.3 % (AC), 5.7±3.4 % (PBC -B), respectively. Conclusion: The TLs from the CLs were evaluated. A Clarkson-based system shows a large systematic variation because of inhomogeneous correction. The AAA showed a significant variation. Thus, we must consider the difference of inhomogeneous correction as well as the dependence of dose calculation engine.

  14. Superficial dose evaluation of four dose calculation algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying; Yang, Xiaoyu; Yang, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaoping; Lv, Zhiping; Lei, Mingjun; Liu, Gui; Zhang, Zijian; Hu, Yongmei

    2017-08-01

    Accurate superficial dose calculation is of major importance because of the skin toxicity in radiotherapy, especially within the initial 2 mm depth being considered more clinically relevant. The aim of this study is to evaluate superficial dose calculation accuracy of four commonly used algorithms in commercially available treatment planning systems (TPS) by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and film measurements. The superficial dose in a simple geometrical phantom with size of 30 cm×30 cm×30 cm was calculated by PBC (Pencil Beam Convolution), AAA (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm), AXB (Acuros XB) in Eclipse system and CCC (Collapsed Cone Convolution) in Raystation system under the conditions of source to surface distance (SSD) of 100 cm and field size (FS) of 10×10 cm2. EGSnrc (BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc) program was performed to simulate the central axis dose distribution of Varian Trilogy accelerator, combined with measurements of superficial dose distribution by an extrapolation method of multilayer radiochromic films, to estimate the dose calculation accuracy of four algorithms in the superficial region which was recommended in detail by the ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement) and the ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection). In superficial region, good agreement was achieved between MC simulation and film extrapolation method, with the mean differences less than 1%, 2% and 5% for 0°, 30° and 60°, respectively. The relative skin dose errors were 0.84%, 1.88% and 3.90%; the mean dose discrepancies (0°, 30° and 60°) between each of four algorithms and MC simulation were (2.41±1.55%, 3.11±2.40%, and 1.53±1.05%), (3.09±3.00%, 3.10±3.01%, and 3.77±3.59%), (3.16±1.50%, 8.70±2.84%, and 18.20±4.10%) and (14.45±4.66%, 10.74±4.54%, and 3.34±3.26%) for AXB, CCC, AAA and PBC respectively. Monte Carlo simulation verified the feasibility of the superficial dose measurements by multilayer Gafchromic films. And the rank

  15. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  16. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Geoff; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Yoon, Sungwon [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Krishna, Ganesh [Palo Alto Medical Foundation, Mountain View, California 94040 (United States); Wilfley, Brian [Triple Ring Technologies, Inc., Newark, California 94560 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.Methods: Tomosynthetic angle as a function of tumor-to-detector distance was calculated. Monte Carlo Software (PCXMC) was used to calculate organ doses and effective dose for source-to-detector distances (SDDs) from 90 to 150 cm, patient locations with the tumor at 20 cm from the source to 20 cm from the detector, and FOVs centered on left lung and right lung as well as medial and distal peripheries of the lungs. These calculations were done for two systems, a SBDX system and a GE OEC-9800 C-arm fluoroscopic unit. To evaluate the dose effect of the system geometry, results from PCXMC were calculated using a scan of 300 mAs for both SBDX and fluoroscopy. The Rose Criterion was used to find the fluence required for a tumor SNR of 5, factoring in scatter, air-gap, system geometry, and patient position for all models generated with PCXMC. Using the calculated fluence for constant tumor SNR, the results from PCXMC were used to compare the patient dose for a given SNR between SBDX and fluoroscopy.Results: Tomographic angle changes with SDD only in the region near the detector. Due to their geometry, the source array and detector have a peak tomographic angle for any given SDD at a source to tumor distance that is 69.7% of the SDD assuming constant source and detector size. Changing the patient location in order to increase tomographic angle has a significant effect on organ dose distribution due to geometrical considerations. With SBDX and fluoroscopy geometries, the dose to organs typically changes in an opposing manner with changing patient

  17. Statins dose-dependently exert a chemopreventive effect against lung cancer in COPD patients: a population-based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Ping; Hao, Wen-Rui; Kao, Pai-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Chen, Chun-Chao; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with increased lung cancer risk. We evaluated the association of statin use with lung cancer risk in COPD patients and identified which statins possess the highest chemopreventive potential. Results After adjustment for age, sex, CCI, diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, urbanization level, and monthly income according to propensity scores, lung cancer risk in the statin users was lower than that in the statin nonusers (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.37). Of the individual statins, lovastatin and fluvastatin did not reduce lung cancer risk significantly. By contrast, lung cancer risk in patients using rosuvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, and pravastatin was significantly lower than that in statin nonusers (aHRs = 0.41, 0.44, 0.52, and 0.58, respectively). Statins dose-dependently reduced lung cancer risk in all subgroups and the main model with additional covariates (nonstatin drug use). MATERIALS AND METHODS The study cohort comprised all patients diagnosed with COPD at health care facilities in Taiwan (n = 116,017) between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2012. Our final study cohort comprised 43,802 COPD patients: 10,086 used statins, whereas 33,716 did not. Patients were followed up to assess lung cancer risk or protective factors. In addition, we also considered demographic characteristics, namely age, sex, comorbidities (diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and Charlson comorbidity index [CCI]), urbanization level, monthly income, and nonstatin drug use. The index date of statin use was the COPD confirmation date. To examine the dose–response relationship, we categorized statin use into four groups in each cohort: 365 cumulative defined daily doses (cDDDs). Patients receiving Statins dose-dependently exert a significant chemopreventive effect against lung cancer in COPD patients. Rosuvastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin exhibited the highest chemopreventive potential. PMID:27517752

  18. Structural and functional changes in the minipig lung following irradiation of different lung volumes at a constant mean lung dose; Strukturelle und funktionelle Veraenderungen an der Lunge von Minischweinen nach Bestrahlung unterschiedlich grosser Lungenvolumina mit gleicher mittlerer Lungendosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusche, S.; Herrmann, T.; Appold, S.; Hoelscher, T.; Bruechner, K.; Geyer, P.; Baumann, M.; Kumpf, R.

    2004-07-01

    Minipigs were subjected to irradiation of different lung volumes at approximately the same mean lung dose (D{sub m}ean) and examined for structural and morphological changes of the lung. The outcome confirmed earlier findings on the pig lung. While no significant differences between irradiation groups was found in terms of functional lung changes, there was a clear correlation between functional changes observed and the mean lung dose. This is in good agreement with data from clinical studies. It follows that the mean lung dose is of predictive value in considering functional lung damage in the assessment of different irradiation regimes. By contrast structural damage was found to correlate with applied dose. [German] Es wurden an Minischweinen unterschiedliche grosse Lungenvolumina mit vergleichbaren mittleren Lungendosen (mean lung dose, D{sub mean}) bestrahlt und die funktionellen und morphologischen Veraenderungen bestimmt. Die Untersuchungen zu funktionellen und morphologischen Veaenderungen bestaetigen fruehere Untersuchungen an der Schweinelunge. Hinsichtlich funktioneller Lungenveraenderungen fand sich kein signifikanter Unterschied zwischen den Bestrahlungsarmen, aber es konnte eine eindeutige Korrelation dieser Veraenderungen mit der mittleren Lungendosis D{sub mean} nachgewiesen werden. Dies steht in gutem Einklang mit Daten aus klinischen Untersuchungen. Somit bestaetigt sich, dass die mean lung dose eine praediktive Bedeutung zur Abschaetzung funktionaler Schaeden der Lunge bei der Beurteilung unterschiedlicher Bestrahlungsplaene hat. Die strukturellen Schaeden korrelieren hingegen mit der applizierten Dosis. (orig.)

  19. 20 percent lower lung cancer mortality with low-dose CT vs chest X-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have found a 20 percent reduction in deaths from lung cancer among current or former heavy smokers who were screened with low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) versus those screened by chest X-ray.

  20. Dose-dependence of the time of appearance of lung damage in mice given thoracic irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, C.H.; Steel, G.G. (Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (UK). Surrey Branch)

    1982-09-01

    Male CBA mice were given X-radiation to the thorax in the range 7 to 23 Gy and their response was quantified by measuring ventilation rate and carbon monoxide uptake at intervals up to 2 years thereafter; their survival was also documented. The two functional end-points were similarly sensitive indicators of lung damage. Radiation damage was not observed below 10 Gy. As radiation dose was raised above this level there was a rapid shortening of the time to the appearance of damage and subsequent death. At a dose of 15 Gy the median survival time was 14 weeks but raising the dose above this level only slightly reduced the survival time. The way in which the time of survival after lung damage depends on dose is an important characteristic of the development of radiation-induced lung damage which should be considered when examining factors that may influence the development of radiation-induced lung damage.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puggina, Anna; Broumas, Athanasios; Ricciardi, Walter; Boccia, Stefania

    2016-02-01

    On 31 December 2013, the US Preventive Services Task Force rated low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for lung cancer screening as level 'B' recommendation. Yet, lung cancer screening implementation remains controversial, particularly when considering its cost-effectiveness. The aim of this work is to investigate the cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening program for lung cancer by performing a systematic literature review. We reviewed the published economic evaluations of LDCT in lung cancer screening. MEDLINE, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane databases were searched for literature retrieval up to 31 March 2015. Inclusion criteria included: studies reporting an original full economic evaluation; reports presenting the outcomes as Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs) gained or as Life Years Gained. Nine economic evaluations met the inclusion criteria. All the cost-effectiveness analyses included high risk populations for lung cancer and compared the use of annual LDCT screening with no screening. Seven studies reported an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio below the threshold of US$ 100 000 per QALY gained. Cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening for lung cancer is an highly debatable issue. Currently available economic evaluations suggest the cost-effectiveness of LDCT for lung cancer screening compared with no screening and indicate that the implementation of LDCT should be considered when planning a national lung cancer screening program. Additional economic evaluations, especially from a societal perspective and in an EU-setting, are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  3. HRCT technique with low-dose protocols for interstitial lung diseases; HRCT-Technik mit Low-dose-Protokollen bei interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, J. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Ley, S. [Klinikum der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany); Chirurgische Klinik Dr. Rinecker, Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    For optimal visualization of the lung parenchyma a dedicated computed tomography (CT) examination protocol has to be selected. High resolution CT (HRCT) is the best technique for non-invasive evaluation of the lung parenchyma. Given the possibility to examine the complete lungs within one breath hold, assessment of disease severity and distribution is easily possible. Various parameters have to be considered to generate optimal image quality and best possible clinical results. This review article discusses the various image acquisition parameters for HRCT as well as the issue of dose reduction. (orig.) [German] Die Wahl des optimalen Untersuchungsprotokolls fuer eine CT der Lunge ist relevant fuer die diagnostische Aussagekraft. Die hochaufloesende Computertomographie (HRCT) der Lunge ist das beste Verfahren zur nichtinvasiven Beurteilung des Lungenparenchyms. Durch die Moeglichkeit der Untersuchung der gesamten Lunge in einer Atemstillstandsphase ist die Abschaetzung der Erkrankungsschwere problemlos moeglich. Verschiedene Aspekte sind zu beachten, um eine optimale Bildqualitaet zu erreichen und eine bestmoegliche Aussagekraft der Untersuchung zu gewaehrleisten. In dieser Uebersicht werden die verschiedenen Aufnahmeparameter erlaeutert sowie das Thema der Dosisreduktion diskutiert. (orig.)

  4. A dose rate model predicting radon-induced lung cancer risk in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, W.; Lettner, H. (Salzburg Univ. (Austria). Div. of Biophysics); Crawford-Brown, D.J. (North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been used in inhalation studies as a surrogate to estimate human lung cancer risk following exposure to ambient radon progeny. Deposition, mucociliary clearance and dosimetry for the inhalation of radon progeny in the rat lung have been simulated for a variety of inhalation conditions. A state-vector model for radiation carcinogenesis has then been applied to predict the carcinogenic risk in the rat lung for different doses and dose rates. The model is based on the concepts of initiation and promotion, with the irradiation acting both to damage intercellular structures and to change the state of cells surrounding an initiated cell. Predicted lung cancer incidences show fair agreement with the experimental data. Consistent with the experimental evidence is the inverse dose rate effect observed for intermediate cumulative exposures. (author).

  5. Incorporation of functional imaging data in the evaluation of dose distributions using the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miften, Moyed M; Das, Shiva K; Su, Min; Marks, Lawrence B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2004-05-07

    Advances in the fields of IMRT and functional imaging have greatly increased the prospect of escalating the dose to highly active or hypoxic tumour sub-volumes and steering the dose away from highly functional critical structure regions. However, current clinical treatment planning and evaluation tools assume homogeneous activity/function status in the tumour/critical structures. A method was developed to incorporate tumour/critical structure heterogeneous functionality in the generalized concept of equivalent uniform dose (EUD). The tumour and critical structures functional EUD (FEUD) values were calculated from the dose-function histogram (DFH), which relates dose to the fraction of total function value at that dose. The DFH incorporates flouro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) functional data for tumour, which describes the distribution of metabolically active tumour clonogens, and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) perfusion data for critical structures. To demonstrate the utility of the method, the lung dose distributions of two non-small cell lung caner patients, who received 3D conformal external beam radiotherapy treatment with curative intent, were evaluated. Differences between the calculated lungs EUD and FEUD values of up to 50% were observed in the 3D conformal plans. In addition, a non-small cell lung cancer patient was inversely planned with a target dose prescription of 76 Gy. Two IMRT plans (plan-A and plan-B) were generated for the patient based on the CT, FDG-PET and SPECT treatment planning images using dose-volume objective functions. The IMRT plans were generated with the goal of achieving more critical structures sparing in plan-B than plan-A. Results show the target volume EUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 5% with a value of 73.31 Gy, and the FEUD in plan-B is lower than plan-A by 2.6% with a value of 75.77 Gy. The FEUD plan-B values for heart and lungs were lower than plan-A by 22% and 18%, respectively

  6. Occupational exposure to radon for underground tourist routes in Poland: Doses to lung and the risk of developing lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Walczak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Radon concentrations for 31 Polish underground tourist routes were analyzed. The equivalent dose to the lung, the effective dose and the relative risk were calculated for employees of the analyzed routes on the grounds of information on radon concentrations, work time, etc. Material and Methods: The relative risk for lung cancers was calculated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR VI Committee model. Equivalent doses to the lungs of workers were determined using the coefficients calculated by the Kendall and Smith. The conversion coefficient proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA in the report No. 33 was used for estimating the effective doses. Results: In 13 routes, the effective dose was found to be above 1 mSv/year, and in 3 routes, it exceeded 6 mSv/year. For 5 routes, the equivalent dose to lungs was higher than 100 mSv/year, and in 1 case it was as high as 490 mSv/year. In 22.6% of underground workplaces the risk of developing lung cancer among employees was about 2 times higher than that for the general population, and for 1 tourist route it was about 5 times higher. The geometric mean of the relative risk of lung cancer for all workers of underground tourist routes was 1.73 (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.6–1.87. Routes were divided into: caves, mines, post-military underground constructions and urban underground constructions. Conclusions: The difference between levels of the relative risk of developing lung cancer for all types of underground tourist routes was not found to be significant. If we include the professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes into the group of occupational exposure, the number of persons who are included in the Category A due to occupational exposure may increase by about 3/4. The professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes should be monitored for their exposure to radon. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5:687

  7. Occupational exposure to radon for underground tourist routes in Poland: Doses to lung and the risk of developing lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Katarzyna; Olszewski, Jerzy; Politański, Piotr; Zmyślony, Marek

    2017-07-14

    Radon concentrations for 31 Polish underground tourist routes were analyzed. The equivalent dose to the lung, the effective dose and the relative risk were calculated for employees of the analyzed routes on the grounds of information on radon concentrations, work time, etc. The relative risk for lung cancers was calculated using the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VI Committee model. Equivalent doses to the lungs of workers were determined using the coefficients calculated by the Kendall and Smith. The conversion coefficient proposed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the report No. 33 was used for estimating the effective doses. In 13 routes, the effective dose was found to be above 1 mSv/year, and in 3 routes, it exceeded 6 mSv/year. For 5 routes, the equivalent dose to lungs was higher than 100 mSv/year, and in 1 case it was as high as 490 mSv/year. In 22.6% of underground workplaces the risk of developing lung cancer among employees was about 2 times higher than that for the general population, and for 1 tourist route it was about 5 times higher. The geometric mean of the relative risk of lung cancer for all workers of underground tourist routes was 1.73 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-1.87). Routes were divided into: caves, mines, post-military underground constructions and urban underground constructions. The difference between levels of the relative risk of developing lung cancer for all types of underground tourist routes was not found to be significant. If we include the professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes into the group of occupational exposure, the number of persons who are included in the Category A due to occupational exposure may increase by about 3/4. The professional group of the employees of underground tourist routes should be monitored for their exposure to radon. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):687-694.

  8. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image

  9. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing.

  10. Uncertainties in electron-absorbed fractions and lung doses from inhaled beta-emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfán, Eduardo B; Bolch, Wesley E; Huston, Thomas E; Rajon, Didier A; Huh, Chulhaeng; Bolch, W Emmett

    2005-01-01

    The computer code LUDUC (Lung Dose Uncertainty Code), developed at the University of Florida, was originally used to investigate the range of potential doses from the inhalation of either plutonium or uranium oxides. The code employs the ICRP Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract model; however, rather than using simple point estimates for each of the model parameters associated with particle deposition, clearance, and lung-tissue dosimetry, probability density functions are ascribed to these parameters based upon detailed literature review. These distributions are subsequently sampled within LUDUC using Latin hypercube sampling techniques to generate multiple (e.g., approximately 1,000) sets of input vectors (i.e., trials), each yielding a unique estimate of lung dose. In the present study, the dosimetry component of the ICRP-66 model within LUDUC has been extended to explicitly consider variations in the beta particle absorbed fraction due to corresponding uncertainties and biological variabilities in both source and target tissue depths and thicknesses within the bronchi and bronchioles of the thoracic airways. Example dose distributions are given for the inhalation of absorption Type S compounds of 90Sr (Tmax = 546 keV) and 90Y (Tmax = 2,284 keV) as a function of particle size. Over the particle size range of 0.001 to 1 microm, estimates of total lung dose vary by a factor of 10 for 90Sr particles and by a factor of 4 to 10 for 90Y particles. As the particle size increases to 10 microm, dose uncertainties reach a factor of 100 for both radionuclides. In comparisons to identical exposures scenarios run by the LUDEP 2.0 code, Reference Man doses for inhaled beta-emitters were shown to provide slightly conservative estimates of lung dose compared to those in this study where uncertainties in lung airway histology are considered.

  11. Preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Angelis, Nikolaos; Papaiwannou, Antonios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Pataka, Athanasia; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Arikas, Stamatis; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Tsiouda, Theodora; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Siminelakis, Stavros; Argyriou, Michael; Kotsakou, Maria; Kessis, George; Kolettas, Alexander; Beleveslis, Thomas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades lung cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide for both sexes. Even though cigarette smoking has been proved to be the main causative factor, many other agents (e.g., occupational exposure to asbestos or heavy metals, indoor exposure to radon gas radiation, particulate air pollution) have been associated with its development. Recently screening programs proved to reduce mortality among heavy-smokers although establishment of such strategies in everyday clinical practice is much more difficult and unknown if it is cost effective compared to other neoplasms (e.g., breast or prostate cancer). Adding severe comorbidities (coronary heart disease, COPD) to the above reasons as cigarette smoking is a common causative factor, we could explain the low surgical resection rates (approximately 20-30%) for lung cancer patients. Three clinical guidelines reports of different associations have been published (American College of Chest Physisians, British Thoracic Society and European Respiratory Society/European Society of Thoracic Surgery) providing detailed algorithms for preoperative assessment. In the current mini review, we will comment on the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients. PMID:24672690

  12. A 4D treatment planning tool for the evaluation of motion effects on lung cancer treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, M; Newman, F; Kavanagh, B; Stuhr, K; Raben, D [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Colorado at Denver and Health Science Center, Aurora, CO 80010 (United States); Li, J S; Ma, C-M [Radiation Oncology Department, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States); Gaspar, L, E-mail: meisong.ding@uchsc.edu

    2008-02-01

    In this study, a 4D treatment planning tool using an analytical model accounting for breathing motion is investigated to evaluate the motion effect on delivered dose for lung cancer treatments with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). The Monte Carlo EGS4/MCDOSE user code is used in the treatment planning dose calculation, and the patient CT data are converted into respective patient geometry files for Monte Carlo dose calculation. The model interpolates CT images at different phases of the breathing cycle from patient CT scans taken at end inspiration and end expiration phases and the chest wall position. Correlation between the voxels in a reference CT dataset and the voxels in the interpolated CT datasets at any breathing phases is established so that the dose to a voxel can be accumulated through the entire breathing cycle. Simulated lung tumors at different locations are used to demonstrate our model in 3DCRT for lung cancer treatments. We demonstrated the use of a 4D treatment planning tool in evaluating the breathing motion effect on delivered dose for different planning margins. Further studies are being conducted to use this tool to study the lung motion effect through large-scale analysis and to implement this useful tool for treatment planning dose calculation and plan evaluation for 4D radiotherapy.

  13. Effects of Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms on Computer-assisted Detection (CAD) Software for Lung Nodules in Ultra-low-dose CT for Lung Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yukihiro; Higaki, Toru; Fujita, Masayo; Miki, Soichiro; Awaya, Yoshikazu; Nakanishi, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Awai, Kazuo

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on computer-assisted detection (CAD) software for lung nodules in ultra-low-dose computed tomography (ULD-CT) for lung cancer screening. We selected 85 subjects who underwent both a low-dose CT (LD-CT) scan and an additional ULD-CT scan in our lung cancer screening program for high-risk populations. The LD-CT scans were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP; LD-FBP). The ULD-CT scans were reconstructed with FBP (ULD-FBP), adaptive iterative dose reduction 3D (AIDR 3D; ULD-AIDR 3D), and forward projected model-based IR solution (FIRST; ULD-FIRST). CAD software for lung nodules was applied to each image dataset, and the performance of the CAD software was compared among the different IR algorithms. The mean volume CT dose indexes were 3.02 mGy (LD-CT) and 0.30 mGy (ULD-CT). For overall nodules, the sensitivities of CAD software at 3.0 false positives per case were 78.7% (LD-FBP), 9.3% (ULD-FBP), 69.4% (ULD-AIDR 3D), and 77.8% (ULD-FIRST). Statistical analysis showed that the sensitivities of ULD-AIDR 3D and ULD-FIRST were significantly higher than that of ULD-FBP (P CAD software in ULD-CT was improved by using IR algorithms. In particular, the performance of CAD in ULD-FIRST was almost equivalent to that in LD-FBP. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lack of a Dose-Effect Relationship for Pulmonary Function Changes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: Guckenberger_M@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klement, Rainer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hope, Andrew J. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Belderbos, Jose [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yan, Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of tumor size, prescription dose, and dose to the lungs on posttreatment pulmonary function test (PFT) changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: The analysis is based on 191 patients treated at 5 international institutions: inclusion criteria were availability of pre- and post-SBRT PFTs and dose-volume histograms of the lung and planning target volume (PTV); patients treated with more than 1 SBRT course were excluded. Correlation between early (1-6 months, median 3 months) and late (7-24 months, median 12 months) PFT changes and tumor size, planning target volume (PTV) dose, and lung doses was assessed using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristics analysis, and Lyman's normal tissue complication probability model. The PTV doses were converted to biologically effective doses and lung doses to 2 Gy equivalent doses before correlation analyses. Results: Up to 6 months after SBRT, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity changed by −1.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4% to 0) and −7.6% (95% CI, −10.2% to −3.4%) compared with pretreatment values, respectively. A modest decrease in PFTs was observed 7-24 months after SBRT, with changes of −8.1% (95% CI, −13.3% to −5.3%) and −12.4% (95% CI, −15.5% to −6.9%), respectively. Using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and normal tissue complication probability modeling, all evaluated parameters of tumor size, PTV dose, mean lung dose, and absolute and relative volumes of the lung exposed to minimum doses of 5-70 Gy were not correlated with early and late PFT changes. Subgroup analysis based on pre-SBRT PFTs (greater or equal and less than median) did not identify any dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: This study failed to demonstrate a significant dose-effect relationship for

  15. 低剂量256排螺旋 CT肺灌注扫描对非小细胞肺癌化疗疗效的评估%Evaluation of Low-dose 256 Spiral CT Lung Perfusion Scan for the Efficacy of Chemo-therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒圣捷; 王全; 周航; 刘白鹭; 李大庆; 李里; 娄阁; 王梓鹏

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨低剂量256排螺旋CT肺灌注扫描对非小细胞肺癌化疗疗效的评估意义。方法对45例晚期非小细胞肺癌患者,在化疗前和化疗后40天分别进行CT灌注扫描。计算表面通透性( permeability surface,PS)、血流量(blood flow,BF)、血容量(blood volume,BV)和平均通过时间(mean transit time,MTT)、达峰时间(time to peak)。用RE-CIST( Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors)标准测量和比较化疗前后灌注值的均数间的差异。结果 Pearson相关检验结果显示BV和BF呈显著相关性(γ=0.48,P=0.001),达峰时间与PS相关(γ=0.31,P=0.04)、与血流量相关(γ=20.66,P,0.001)、与血容量相关(γ=20.39,P=0.007)。缓解组患者的BF、BV和PS高于其他组患者。结论 CT灌注成像可以评价晚期非小细胞肺癌患者化疗前后的血管生成,进而评估疗效。%Objective To explore the evaluation of the low-dose 256 spiral CT lung perfusion scan for the efficacy of chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer( NSCLC) .Methods 45 advanced NSCLC patients undergone CT perfusion scan be-fore chemotherapy and 40 days after chemotherapy respectively.To calculate the permeability surface (PS),blood flow (BF), blood volume ( BV) and mean transit time ( MTT) ,and time to peak.RECIST standard was used for measuring and calculating the difference of the mean perfusion value before and after chemotherapy.Results Pearson correlation test results showed that the BV and BF had significant correlation(γ=0.48,P=0.001),and time to peak was related with PS(γ=0.31,P=0.04),blood flow(γ=20.66,P=0.001),and blood volume(γ=20.39,P=0.007).BF,BV,and PS of ease group were higher than the other patients.Conclusion CT perfusion imaging can evaluate angiogenesis in patients with advanced NSCLC before and after chemo-therapy,and assess the efficacy.

  16. Inhibition of human lung adenocarcinoma growth using survivint34a by low-dose systematic administration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Shan; Chunting Wang; Li Yang; Li Juan Chen; Hong Xin Deng; Han Shuo Yang; Zhimian Li; Zhiyong Li; Li Pan; Fei Leng; Yuquan Wei

    2010-06-01

    Anti-apoptosis plays an important role in tumour formation and development. Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) family, which is a target for anti-cancer drug exploitation was replaced as development. We investigated the role of the homo dominant-negative mutant Survivin-T34A in suppressing human lung adenocarcinomas (A549). The anti-tumour activity of HSurvivinT34A plasmid was evaluated in the A549 cell line and nude mice bearing A549 subcutaneous tumours. Low-dose systemic administration was continuously used. The HSurvivinT34A plasmid (5 g/one) complexed with a cationic liposome (DOTAP/Chol) significantly inhibited tumour growth in our model. We observed microvessel density degradation by CD31 immunohistochemistry and apoptotic cell increase by TUNEL assay, PI staining and flow cytometric analysis in the treated group. The present findings suggest that the HSurvivinT34A plasmid complexed with a cationic liposome may provide an effective approach to inhibit the growth of human lung adenocarcinomas in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Evaluation of diffuse lung uptake in radiogallium scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Tetsuya (Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Tatsuno, Ikuo

    1982-08-01

    Diffuse lung uptake of radiogallium was observed in 12 of 239 scans (5.0%). All of 12 patients received radiation therapy (average dose: 34Gy) and 9 of 12 patients were also placed on chemotherapy (average duration: 7 weeks). The most common cause of diffuse lung uptake was infection which included interstitial pneumonitis and the second was pleuritis. Of the 12 patients, 7 patients died an average of 3.6 months later since diffuse lung uptake was observed. Therefore, when we recognize diffuse lung uptake, we must perform closer examination and appropriate therapy as early as possible.

  18. Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstruction-Applied Ultra-Low-Dose CT with Radiography-Comparable Radiation Dose: Usefulness for Lung Nodule Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Hwang, Hye Sun; Moon, Jung Won; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the performance of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR)-applied ultra-low-dose CT (ULDCT) in detecting small lung nodules. Thirty patients underwent both ULDCT and standard dose CT (SCT). After determining the reference standard nodules, five observers, blinded to the reference standard reading results, independently evaluated SCT and both subsets of ASIR- and filtered back projection (FBP)-driven ULDCT images. Data assessed by observers were compared statistically. Converted effective doses in SCT and ULDCT were 2.81 ± 0.92 and 0.17 ± 0.02 mSv, respectively. A total of 114 lung nodules were detected on SCT as a standard reference. There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between ASIR-driven ULDCT and SCT for three out of the five observers (p = 0.678, 0.735, Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction-driven ULDCT delivering a radiation dose of only 0.17 mSv offers acceptable sensitivity in nodule detection compared with SCT and has better performance than FBP-driven ULDCT.

  19. Evaluation and comparison of New 4DCT based strategies for proton treatment planning for lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Patyal, Baldev; Ghebremedhin, Abiel; Bush, David

    2013-03-25

    To evaluate different strategies for proton lung treatment planning based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) scans. Twelve cases, involving only gross tumor volumes (GTV), were evaluated. Single image sets of (1) maximum intensity projection (MIP3) of end inhale (EI), middle exhale (ME) and end exhale (EE) images; (2) average intensity projection (AVG) of all phase images; and (3) EE images from 4DCT scans were selected as primary images for proton treatment planning. Internal target volumes (ITVs) outlined by a clinician were imported into MIP3, AVG, and EE images as planning targets. Initially, treatment uncertainties were not included in planning. Each plan was imported into phase images of 4DCT scans. Relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and mean ipsilateral lung dose of a phase image obtained by averaging the dose in inspiration and expiration phases were used to evaluate the quality of a plan for a particular case. For comparing different planning strategies, the mean of the averaged relative volumes of GTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and its standard deviation for each planning strategy for all cases were used. Then, treatment uncertainties were included in planning. Each plan was recalculated in phase images of 4DCT scans. Same strategies were used for plan evaluation except dose-volume histograms of the planning target volumes (PTVs) instead of GTVs were used and the mean and standard deviation of the relative volumes of PTVs covered by 95% of prescribed dose and the ipsilateral lung dose were used to compare different planning strategies. MIP3 plans without treatment uncertainties yielded 96.7% of the mean relative GTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 5.7% for all cases). With treatment uncertainties, MIP3 plans yielded 99.5% of mean relative PTV covered by 95% of prescribed dose (standard deviations of 0.7%). Inclusion of treatment uncertainties improved PTV dose coverage but also increased the ipsilateral

  20. Absorbed Dose and Effective Dose for Lung Cancer Image Guided Radiation Therapy(IGRT) using CBCT and 4D-CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Yong; Lee, Woo Suk; Koo, Ki Lae; Kim, Joo Seob; Lee, Sang Hyeon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, GangNeung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the results of absorbed and effective doses using CBCT and 4D-CBCT settings for lung cancer. This experimental study. Measurements were performed using a Anderson rando phantom with OSLD(optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters). It was performed computed tomography(Lightspeed GE, USA) in order to express the major organs of the human body. Measurements were obtained a mean value is repeated three times each. Evaluations of effective dose and absorbed dose were performed the CL-IX-Thorax mode and Truebeam-Thorax mode CBCT. Additionally, compared Truebeam-Thorax mode CBCT with Truebeam-Thorax mode 4D-CBCT(Four-dimensional Cone Beam Computed Tomography). Average absorbed dose in the CBCT of CL-IX was measured in lung 2.505cGy, heart 2.595cGy, liver 2.145cGy, stomach 1.934cGy, skin 2.233cGy, in case of Truebeam, It was measured lung 1.725cGy, heart 2.034cGy, liver 1.616cGy, stomach 1.470cGy, skin 1.445cGy. In case of 4D-CBCT, It was measured lung 3.849cGy, heart 4.578cGy, liver 3.497cGy, stomach 3.179cGy, skin 3.319cGy Average effective dose, considered tissue weighting and radiation weighting, in the CBCT of CL-IX was measured lung 2.164mSv, heart 2.241mSVv, liver 0.136mSv, stomach 1.668mSv, skin 0.009mSv, in case of Turebeam, it was measured lung 1.725mSv, heart 1.757mSv, liver 0.102mSv, stomach 1.270mSv, skin 0.005mSv, In case of 4D-CBCT, It was measured lung 3.326mSv, heart 3.952mSv, liver 0.223mSv, stomach 2.747mSv, skin 0.013mSv. As a result, absorbed dose and effective Dose in the CL-IX than Truebeam was higher about 1.3 times and in the 4D-CBCT Truebeam than CBCT of Truebeam was higher about 2.2times However, a large movement of the patient and respiratory gated radiotherapy may be more accurate treatment in 4D-CBCT. Therefore, it will be appropriate to selectively used.

  1. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  2. Lung cancer screening beyond low-dose computed tomography: the role of novel biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Naveed; Kumar, Rohit; Kavuru, Mani S

    2014-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common and lethal malignancy in the world. The landmark National lung screening trial (NLST) showed a 20% relative reduction in mortality in high-risk individuals with screening low-dose computed tomography. However, the poor specificity and low prevalence of lung cancer in the NLST provide major limitations to its widespread use. Furthermore, a lung nodule on CT scan requires a nuanced and individualized approach towards management. In this regard, advances in high through-put technology (molecular diagnostics, multi-gene chips, proteomics, and bronchoscopic techniques) have led to discovery of lung cancer biomarkers that have shown potential to complement the current screening standards. Early detection of lung cancer can be achieved by analysis of biomarkers from tissue samples within the respiratory tract such as sputum, saliva, nasal/bronchial airway epithelial cells and exhaled breath condensate or through peripheral biofluids such as blood, serum and urine. Autofluorescence bronchoscopy has been employed in research setting to identify pre-invasive lesions not identified on CT scan. Although these modalities are not yet commercially available in clinic setting, they will be available in the near future and clinicians who care for patients with lung cancer should be aware. In this review, we present up-to-date state of biomarker development, discuss their clinical relevance and predict their future role in lung cancer management.

  3. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia detected at low-dose CT for lung cancer screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Kyung Nyeo; Bae, Kyung Soo; Kim, Ho Cheol [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency, radiologic findings and clinical significance of the simple pulmonary eosinophilia (SPE) that was diagnosed among the asymptomatic patients who underwent low-dose CT scans for the early detection of lung cancer. From June 2003 to May 2005, 1,239 asymptomatic patients (1,275 examinations) who visited the health promotion center in our hospital and who underwent low-dose CT were enrolled in this study. SPE was defined as the presence of > 500 eosinophils per microliter of peripheral blood and the presence of abnormal parenchymal lesions such as nodules, airspace consolidation or areas of ground-glass attenuation (GGA) on CT, and there was spontaneous resolution or migration of the lesions on the follow-up examination. We analyzed the CT findings of SPE and we investigated the relationship between the occurrence of SPE and the season, smoking and the presence of parasite infestation. 36 patients were finally diagnosed as having SPE; this was 24% of the 153 patients who were diagnosed with parasite infestation and 2.8% of the total low-dose CT scans. These 36 patients consisted of 31 men and 5 women with a mean age 45.7 years. There was no significant relationship between SPE and the presence of parasite infestation, smoking or gender. Among the patients with peripheral blood eosinophilia, the eosinophil count was significantly higher in the patients with SPE than that in the patients without pulmonary infiltration ({rho} < 0.05). SPE more frequently occurred in winter and spring than in summer and autumn ({rho} < 0.05). The CT findings were single or multiple nodules in 18 patients, nodules and focal GGA in 9 patients and GGA only in 9 patients. Most of the nodules were less than 10 mm (88%, 49/56) in diameter and they showed an ill-defined margin (82%, n = 46); 30% of the nodules (n = 17) showed a halo around them. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia can be suggested as the cause if single or multiple ill-defined nodules

  4. Four-dimensional layer-stacking carbon-ion beam dose distribution by use of a lung numeric phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Kumagai, Motoki; Miki, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    To extend layer-stacking irradiation to accommodate intrafractional organ motion, we evaluated the carbon-ion layer-stacking dose distribution using a numeric lung phantom. We designed several types of range compensators. The planning target volume was calculated from the respective respiratory phases for consideration of intrafractional beam range variation. The accumulated dose distribution was calculated by registering of the dose distributions at respective phases to that at the reference phase. We evaluated the dose distribution based on the following six parameters: motion displacement, direction, gating window, respiratory cycle, range-shifter change time, and prescribed dose. All parameters affected the dose conformation to the moving target. By shortening of the gating window, dose metrics for superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) motions were decreased from a D95 of 94 %, Dmax of 108 %, and homogeneity index (HI) of 23 % at T00-T90, to a D95 of 93 %, Dmax of 102 %, and HI of 20 % at T40-T60. In contrast, all dose metrics except the HI were independent of respiratory cycle. All dose metrics in SI motion were almost the same in respective motion displacement, with a D95 of 94 %, Dmax of 108 %, Dmin of 89 %, and HI of 23 % for the ungated phase, and D95 of 93 %, Dmax of 102 %, Dmin of 85 %, and HI of 20 % for the gated phase. The dose conformation to a moving target was improved by the gating strategy and by an increase in the prescribed dose. A combination of these approaches is a practical means of adding them to existing treatment protocols without modifications.

  5. TBI lung dose comparisons using bilateral and anteroposterior delivery techniques and tissue density corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel W; Wang, Iris Z; Lakeman, Tara; Hales, Lee D; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-03-08

    This study compares lung dose distributions for two common techniques of total body photon irradiation (TBI) at extended source-to-surface distance calculated with, and without, tissue density correction (TDC). Lung dose correction factors as a function of lateral thorax separation are approximated for bilateral opposed TBI (supine), similar to those published for anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques in AAPM Report 17 (i.e., Task Group 29). 3D treatment plans were created retrospectively for 24 patients treated with bilateral TBI, and for whom CT data had been acquired from the head to the lower leg. These plans included bilateral opposed and AP-PA techniques- each with and without - TDC, using source-to-axis distance of 377 cm and largest possible field size. On average, bilateral TBI requires 40% more monitor units than AP-PA TBI due to increased separation (26% more for 23 MV). Calculation of midline thorax dose without TDC leads to dose underestimation of 17% on average (standard deviation, 4%) for bilateral 6 MV TBI, and 11% on average (standard deviation, 3%) for 23 MV. Lung dose correction factors (CF) are calculated as the ratio of midlung dose (with TDC) to midline thorax dose (without TDC). Bilateral CF generally increases with patient separation, though with high variability due to individual uniqueness of anatomy. Bilateral CF are 5% (standard deviation, 4%) higher than the same corrections calculated for AP-PA TBI in the 6 MV case, and 4% higher (standard deviation, 2%) for 23 MV. The maximum lung dose is much higher with bilateral TBI (up to 40% higher than prescribed, depending on patient anatomy) due to the absence of arm tissue blocking the anterior chest. Dose calculations for bilateral TBI without TDC are incorrect by up to 24% in the thorax for 6 MV and up to 16% for 23 MV. Bilateral lung CF may be calculated as 1.05 times the values published in Table 6 of AAPM Report 17, though a larger patient pool is necessary to better

  6. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation.

  7. Model-based dose calculations for {sup 125}I lung brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, J. G. H.; Furutani, K. M.; Garces, Y. I.; Thomson, R. M. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Department of Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Model-baseddose calculations (MBDCs) are performed using patient computed tomography (CT) data for patients treated with intraoperative {sup 125}I lung brachytherapy at the Mayo Clinic Rochester. Various metallic artifact correction and tissue assignment schemes are considered and their effects on dose distributions are studied. Dose distributions are compared to those calculated under TG-43 assumptions. Methods: Dose distributions for six patients are calculated using phantoms derived from patient CT data and the EGSnrc user-code BrachyDose. {sup 125}I (GE Healthcare/Oncura model 6711) seeds are fully modeled. Four metallic artifact correction schemes are applied to the CT data phantoms: (1) no correction, (2) a filtered back-projection on a modified virtual sinogram, (3) the reassignment of CT numbers above a threshold in the vicinity of the seeds, and (4) a combination of (2) and (3). Tissue assignment is based on voxel CT number and mass density is assigned using a CT number to mass density calibration. Three tissue assignment schemes with varying levels of detail (20, 11, and 5 tissues) are applied to metallic artifact corrected phantoms. Simulations are also performed under TG-43 assumptions, i.e., seeds in homogeneous water with no interseed attenuation. Results: Significant dose differences (up to 40% for D{sub 90}) are observed between uncorrected and metallic artifact corrected phantoms. For phantoms created with metallic artifact correction schemes (3) and (4), dose volume metrics are generally in good agreement (less than 2% differences for all patients) although there are significant local dose differences. The application of the three tissue assignment schemes results in differences of up to 8% for D{sub 90}; these differences vary between patients. Significant dose differences are seen between fully modeled and TG-43 calculations with TG-43 underestimating the dose (up to 36% in D{sub 90}) for larger volumes containing higher proportions of

  8. Paraquat poisoning: an experimental model of dose-dependent acute lung injury due to surfactant dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F.R. Silva

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the most characteristic feature of paraquat poisoning is lung damage, a prospective controlled study was performed on excised rat lungs in order to estimate the intensity of lesion after different doses. Twenty-five male, 2-3-month-old non-SPF Wistar rats, divided into 5 groups, received paraquat dichloride in a single intraperitoneal injection (0, 1, 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg body weight 24 h before the experiment. Static pressure-volume (PV curves were performed in air- and saline-filled lungs; an estimator of surface tension and tissue works was computed by integrating the area of both curves and reported as work/ml of volume displacement. Paraquat induced a dose-dependent increase of inspiratory surface tension work that reached a significant two-fold order of magnitude for 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (P<0.05, ANOVA, sparing lung tissue. This kind of lesion was probably due to functional abnormalities of the surfactant system, as was shown by the increase in the hysteresis of the paraquat groups at the highest doses. Hence, paraquat poisoning provides a suitable model of acute lung injury with alveolar instability that can be easily used in experimental protocols of mechanical ventilation

  9. More than lung cancer: Automated analysis of low-dose screening CT scans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mets, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a major health care problem and is projected to cause over 8 million deaths per year worldwide in the coming decades. To reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy smokers, several randomized screening trials were initiated in the past years using screening with low-dose Computed Tomography

  10. Verification of absorbed dose to the lung SBRT treatments; Verificacion de dosis absorbida en los tratamientos de SBRT de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, J.; Modolell Farre, I.

    2011-07-01

    The hypo fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to the lung, also known as lung SBRT is a technique that small volumes irradiated to high doses using photon beams, usually not coplanar, with energies of 6 and 15 MV. Because of the uncertainties associated with the small field dosimetry calculation in heterogeneous media comes the need to verify the absorbed dose.

  11. Lung Dose Calculation With SPECT/CT for {sup 90}Yittrium Radioembolization of Liver Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Naichang, E-mail: yun@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Srinivas, Shaym M.; DiFilippo, Frank P.; Shrikanthan, Sankaran [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Levitin, Abraham; McLennan, Gordon; Spain, James [Department of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Xia, Ping; Wilkinson, Allan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To propose a new method to estimate lung mean dose (LMD) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) single photon emission CT (SPECT)/CT for {sup 90}Yttrium radioembolization of liver tumors and to compare the LMD estimated using SPECT/CT with clinical estimates of LMD using planar gamma scintigraphy (PS). Methods and Materials: Images of 71 patients who had SPECT/CT and PS images of {sup 99m}Tc-MAA acquired before TheraSphere radioembolization of liver cancer were analyzed retrospectively. LMD was calculated from the PS-based lung shunt assuming a lung mass of 1 kg and 50 Gy per GBq of injected activity shunted to the lung. For the SPECT/CT-based estimate, the LMD was calculated with the activity concentration and lung volume derived from SPECT/CT. The effect of attenuation correction and the patient's breathing on the calculated LMD was studied with the SPECT/CT. With these effects correctly taken into account in a more rigorous fashion, we compared the LMD calculated with SPECT/CT with the LMD calculated with PS. Results: The mean dose to the central region of the lung leads to a more accurate estimate of LMD. Inclusion of the lung region around the diaphragm in the calculation leads to an overestimate of LMD due to the misregistration of the liver activity to the lung from the patient's breathing. LMD calculated based on PS is a poor predictor of the actual LMD. For the subpopulation with large lung shunt, the mean overestimation from the PS method for the lung shunt was 170%. Conclusions: A new method of calculating the LMD for TheraSphere and SIR-Spheres radioembolization of liver cancer based on {sup 99m}Tc-MAA SPECT/CT is presented. The new method provides a more accurate estimate of radiation risk to the lungs. For patients with a large lung shunt calculated from PS, a recalculation of LMD based on SPECT/CT is recommended.

  12. 4D cone beam CT-based dose assessment for SBRT lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weixing; Dhou, Salam; Cifter, Fulya; Myronakis, Marios; Hurwitz, Martina H.; Williams, Christopher L.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Seco, Joao; Lewis, John H.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a 4DCBCT-based dose assessment method for calculating actual delivered dose for patients with significant respiratory motion or anatomical changes during the course of SBRT. To address the limitation of 4DCT-based dose assessment, we propose to calculate the delivered dose using time-varying (‘fluoroscopic’) 3D patient images generated from a 4DCBCT-based motion model. The method includes four steps: (1) before each treatment, 4DCBCT data is acquired with the patient in treatment position, based on which a patient-specific motion model is created using a principal components analysis algorithm. (2) During treatment, 2D time-varying kV projection images are continuously acquired, from which time-varying ‘fluoroscopic’ 3D images of the patient are reconstructed using the motion model. (3) Lateral truncation artifacts are corrected using planning 4DCT images. (4) The 3D dose distribution is computed for each timepoint in the set of 3D fluoroscopic images, from which the total effective 3D delivered dose is calculated by accumulating deformed dose distributions. This approach is validated using six modified XCAT phantoms with lung tumors and different respiratory motions derived from patient data. The estimated doses are compared to that calculated using ground-truth XCAT phantoms. For each XCAT phantom, the calculated delivered tumor dose values generally follow the same trend as that of the ground truth and at most timepoints the difference is less than 5%. For the overall delivered dose, the normalized error of calculated 3D dose distribution is generally less than 3% and the tumor D95 error is less than 1.5%. XCAT phantom studies indicate the potential of the proposed method to accurately estimate 3D tumor dose distributions for SBRT lung treatment based on 4DCBCT imaging and motion modeling. Further research is necessary to investigate its performance for clinical patient data.

  13. Dose-Dependent Mutation Rates Determine Optimum Erlotinib Dosing Strategies for EGFR Mutant Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin L Liu

    Full Text Available The advent of targeted therapy for cancer treatment has brought about a paradigm shift in the clinical management of human malignancies. Agents such as erlotinib used for EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer or imatinib for chronic myeloid leukemia, for instance, lead to rapid tumor responses. Unfortunately, however, resistance often emerges and renders these agents ineffective after a variable amount of time. The FDA-approved dosing schedules for these drugs were not designed to optimally prevent the emergence of resistance. To this end, we have previously utilized evolutionary mathematical modeling of treatment responses to elucidate the dosing schedules best able to prevent or delay the onset of resistance. Here we expand on our approaches by taking into account dose-dependent mutation rates at which resistant cells emerge. The relationship between the serum drug concentration and the rate at which resistance mutations arise can lead to non-intuitive results about the best dose administration strategies to prevent or delay the emergence of resistance.We used mathematical modeling, available clinical trial data, and different considerations of the relationship between mutation rate and drug concentration to predict the effectiveness of different dosing strategies.We designed several distinct measures to interrogate the effects of different treatment dosing strategies and found that a low-dose continuous strategy coupled with high-dose pulses leads to the maximal delay until clinically observable resistance. Furthermore, the response to treatment is robust against different assumptions of the mutation rate as a function of drug concentration.For new and existing targeted drugs, our methodology can be employed to compare the effectiveness of different dose administration schedules and investigate the influence of changing mutation rates on outcomes.

  14. Difference in performance between 3D and 4D CBCT for lung imaging: a dose and image quality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thengumpallil, Sheeba; Smith, Kathleen; Monnin, Pascal; Bourhis, Jean; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2016-11-08

    The study was to describe and to compare the performance of 3D and 4D CBCT imaging modalities by measuring and analyzing the delivered dose and the image quality. The 3D (Chest) and 4D (Symmetry) CBCT Elekta XVI lung IGRT protocols were analyzed. Dose profiles were measured with TLDs inside a dedicated phantom. The dosimetric indicator cone-beam dose index (CBDI) was evaluated. The image quality analysis was performed by assessing the contrast transfer function (CTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS) and the noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ). Artifacts were also evaluated by simulating irregular breathing variations. The two imaging modalities showed different dose distributions within the phantom. At the center, the 3D CBCT delivered twice the dose of the 4D CBCT. The CTF was strongly reduced by motion compared to static conditions, resulting in a CTF reduction of 85% for the 3D CBCT and 65% for the 4D CBCT. The amplitude of the NPS was two times higher for the 4D CBCT than for the 3D CBCT. In the presence of motion, the NEQ of the 4D CBCT was 50% higher than the 3D CBCT. In the presence of breathing irregularities, the 4D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by view-aliasing artifacts, which were typically cone-beam artifacts, while the 3D CBCT protocol was mainly affected by duplication artifacts. The results showed that the 4D CBCT ensures a reasonable dose and better image quality when mov-ing targets are involved compared to 3D CBCT. Therefore, 4D CBCT is a reliable imaging modality for lung free-breathing radiation therapy.

  15. Rationale and Design of the Lung Cancer Screening Implementation. Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Leah S; Datta, Santanu; Melzer, Anne C; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Davis, James M; Tong, Betty C; Golden, Sara E; Slatore, Christopher G

    2017-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer using low-dose computed tomography has been demonstrated to reduce lung cancer-related mortality and is being widely implemented. Further research in this area is needed to assess the impact of screening on patient-centered outcomes. Here, we describe the design and rationale for a new study entitled Lung Cancer Screening Implementation: Evaluation of Patient-Centered Care. The protocol is composed of an interconnected series of studies evaluating patients and clinicians who are engaged in lung cancer screening in real-world settings. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate communication processes that are being used in routine care and to identify best practices that can be readily scaled up for implementation in multiple settings. We hypothesize that higher overall quality of patient-clinician communication processes will be associated with lower levels of distress and decisional conflict as patients decide whether or not to participate in lung cancer screening. This work is a critical step toward identifying modifiable mechanisms that are associated with high quality of care for the millions of patients who will consider lung cancer screening. Given the enormous potential benefits and burdens of lung cancer screening on patients, clinicians, and the healthcare system, it is important to identify and then scale up quality communication practices that positively influence patient-centered care.

  16. Inhomogeneous dose escalation increases expected local control for NSCLC patients with lymph node involvement without increased mean lung dose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tine B; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    in mediastinum, and the thorax wall. The dose was escalated using a TCP model implemented into the planning system. The difference in TCP values between the homogeneous and inhomogeneous plans were evaluated using two different TCP models. RESULTS: Dose escalation was possible for all patients. TCP values based...

  17. Dosimetric evaluation of synthetic CT for magnetic resonance-only based radiotherapy planning of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hesheng; Chandarana, Hersh; Block, Kai Tobias; Vahle, Thomas; Fenchel, Matthias; Das, Indra J

    2017-06-26

    Interest in MR-only treatment planning for radiation therapy is growing rapidly with the emergence of integrated MRI/linear accelerator technology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using synthetic CT images generated from conventional Dixon-based MRI scans for radiation treatment planning of lung cancer. Eleven patients who underwent whole-body PET/MR imaging following a PET/CT exam were randomly selected from an ongoing prospective IRB-approved study. Attenuation maps derived from the Dixon MR Images and atlas-based method was used to create CT data (synCT). Treatment planning for radiation treatment of lung cancer was optimized on the synCT and subsequently copied to the registered CT (planCT) for dose calculation. Planning target volumes (PTVs) with three sizes and four different locations in the lung were planned for irradiation. The dose-volume metrics comparison and 3D gamma analysis were performed to assess agreement between the synCT and CT calculated dose distributions. Mean differences between PTV doses on synCT and CT across all the plans were -0.1% ± 0.4%, 0.1% ± 0.5%, and 0.4% ± 0.5% for D95, D98 and D100, respectively. Difference in dose between the two datasets for organs at risk (OARs) had average differences of -0.14 ± 0.07 Gy, 0.0% ± 0.1%, and -0.1% ± 0.2% for maximum spinal cord, lung V20, and heart V40 respectively. In patient groups based on tumor size and location, no significant differences were observed in the PTV and OARs dose-volume metrics (p > 0.05), except for the maximum spinal-cord dose when the target volumes were located at the lung apex (p = 0.001). Gamma analysis revealed a pass rate of 99.3% ± 1.1% for 2%/2 mm (dose difference/distance to agreement) acceptance criteria in every plan. The synCT generated from Dixon-based MRI allows for dose calculation of comparable accuracy to the standard CT for lung cancer treatment planning. The dosimetric agreement

  18. Small Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Dose and Treatment Volume on Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter; Turrisi

    1995-01-01

    The treatment of small cell lung cancer is clearly enhanced by the addition of radiation therapy. Survival increases modestly while local thoracic failure as first site of progression is reduced from approximately 60% when chemotherapy alone is used to 30% after combined modality therapy. The variables of radiation dose and treatment volume seem to be important in the successful management of this disease. Local chest control appears to increase as doses are escalated from low levels (25 Gy) to moderate levels (45 to 50 Gy(. With about one third of patients experiencing local chest progression, one can speculate that higher radiation doses might be of value. However, at this time there is no proof that increased dose or dose intensity bears out this promise. Indeed, increasing dose intensity of radiotherapy, eg, twice-daily treatment, increases esophagitis, perhaps reduces local failure, but has not improved overall survival. Using larger total doses or altered fraction schemes must still be considered to be under investigation. To increase dose in a safe manner, reduction in the volume covered by radiation portals will likely need to take place. Modern trials suggest that prophylactic treatment of the radiographically or clinically negative contralateral hilum and/or supraclavicular nodal regions may not be necessary for survival or local control. Importantly, reducing treatment volumes may permit increasing doses without exceding normal tissue tolerance. Also, reduced volumes pave the way for further clinical trials that improve radiation dose delivery by better target definition and more conformal therapy.

  19. Evaluation of exposure dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation procedures - a phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguchi, S. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Division of Radiology, Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Aoyama, T.; Koyama, S.; Kawaura, C. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Fujii, K. [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Section of Radiological Protection, Chiba (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate entrance skin dose (ESD), organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing catheter ablation for cardiac arrhythmias, based on the dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom. ESD values associated with mean fluoroscopy time and digital cine frames were in a range of 0.12-0.30 Gy in right anterior oblique (RAO) and 0.05-0.40 Gy in left anterior oblique (LAO) projection, the values which were less than a threshold dose of 2 Gy for the onset of skin injury. Organs that received high doses in ablation procedures were lung, followed by bone surface, esophagus, liver and red bone marrow. Doses for lung were 24.8-122.7 mGy, and effective doses were 7.9-34.8 mSv for mean fluoroscopy time of 23.4-92.3 min and digital cine frames of 263-511. Conversion coefficients of dose-area product (DAP) to ESD were 8.7 mGy/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in RAO and 7.4 mGy/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in LAO projection. The coefficients of DAP to the effective dose were 0.37 mSv/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in RAO, and 0.41 mSv/(Gy.cm{sup 2}) in LAO projection. These coefficients enabled us to estimate patient exposure in real time by using monitored values of DAP. (orig.)

  20. Semiautomatic evaluation procedures for quantitative CT of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, W A; Fichte, H; Bautz, W; Skalej, M

    1991-01-01

    Accuracy, reproducibility, and objectivity are important in quantitative assessment of lung density and structure by CT, and the measurement has to be carried out under tightly controlled conditions. We therefore employ respiratory gating at defined levels of inspiration for CT scanning. In the evaluation process, we found operator-induced errors of 2-6 HU standard deviation for the relatively simple task of global lung density estimates; in regional evaluations, they frequently exceeded 10 HU. We therefore developed semi-automated evaluation algorithms that isolate lung parenchyma by fast contour tracking and define subregions by shrinking, radial segmenting, and anteroposterior subdividing of the left and the right lung. Global and regional mean density values and histogram parameters were extracted. Based on our clinical studies, we estimate that an overall precision of better than 5% can be achieved in quantitative CT of the lung with cooperative patients.

  1. SU-E-T-500: Dose Escalation Strategy for Lung Cancer Patients Using a Biologically- Guided Target Definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shusharina, N; Khan, F; Choi, N; Sharp, G [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation strategy for lung cancer patients can lead to late symptoms such as pneumonitis and cardiac injury. We propose a strategy to increase radiation dose for improving local tumor control while simultaneously striving to minimize the injury of organs at risk (OAR). Our strategy is based on defining a small, biologically-guided target volume for receiving additional radiation dose. Methods: 106 patients with lung cancer treated with radiotherapy were selected for patients diagnosed with stage II and III disease. Previous research has shown that 50% of the maximum SUV threshold in FDG-PET imaging is appropriate for delineation of the most aggressive part of a tumor. After PET- and CT-derived targets were contoured, an IMRT treatment plan was designed to deliver 60 Gy to the GTV as delineated on a 4D CT (Plan 1). A second plan was designed with additional dose of 18 Gy to the PET-derived volume (Plan 2). A composite plan was generated by the addition of Plan 1 and Plan 2. Results: Plan 1 was compared to the composite plan and increases in OAR dose were assessed. For seven patients on average, lung V5 was increased by 1.4% and V20 by 4.2% for ipsilateral lung and by 13.5% and 7% for contralateral lung. For total lung, V5 and V20 were increased by 4.5% and 4.8% respectively. Mean lung dose was increased by 9.7% for the total lung. The maximum dose to the spinal cord increased by 16% on average. For the heart, V20 increased by 4.2% and V40 by 5.2%. Conclusion: It seems feasible that an additional 18 Gy of radiation dose can be delivered to FDG PET-derived subvolume of the CT-based GTV of the primary tumor without significant increase in total dose to the critical organs such as lungs, spinal cord and heart.

  2. Low-dose budesonide treatment improves lung function in patients with infrequent asthma symptoms at baseline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddel, H. K.; Busse, W. W.; Pedersen, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    in patients with less frequent symptoms at presentation. This was investigated in a post-hoc analysis of the multinational inhaled Steroid Treatment As Regular Therapy in early asthma (START) study.2 METHODS: Patients aged 4-66 years (median 21 years) with a history of recent-onset mild asthma (11 years......RATIONALE: Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are highly effective in low doses for improving asthma outcomes, including lung function. In the past, ICS treatment was recommended for patients with 'persistent' asthma, defined by symptoms >2 days/week.1 However, evidence is lacking for the benefit of ICS...... symptom frequency groups (Figure). CONCLUSIONS: Long-term, once-daily, low-dose budesonide treatment plus usual asthma medication improves lung function in patients with mild, recent-onset asthma. These beneficial effects were seen even in patients with the lowest baseline asthma symptom frequency (0...

  3. An automated system for lung nodule detection in low-dose computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gori, I; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector helical Computed Tomography (CT) images was developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, a dot-enhancement filter for nodule candidate selection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The results obtained on the collected database of low-dose thin-slice CT scans are shown in terms of free response receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curves and discussed.

  4. Automated detection and classification of interstitial lung diseases from low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bin; Leader, Joseph K.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Sciurba, Frank C.; Gur, David

    2004-05-01

    We developed a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) scheme to detect and quantitatively assess interstitial lung diseases (ILD) depicted on low-dose and multi-slice helical high-resolution computed tomography (CT) examinations. Eighteen CT cases acquired from patients who underwent routine low-dose whole-lung screening examinations for the detection of lung cancer were used to test the scheme. ILD was identified in all of these cases. The CAD scheme involves multiple steps to segment lung areas, identify suspicious ILD regions depicted on each CT slice, and generate volumetric ILD lesions by grouping and matching ILD regions detected on multiple adjacent slices. The scheme computes five "global" features for each identified ILD region, which include size (or volume), contrast, average local pixel value fluctuation, mean of stochastic fractal dimension, and geometric fractal dimension. Two sets of classification rules are applied to remove false-positive detections. The severity of ILD in each case was rated by one experienced chest radiologist into one of the three categories (mild, moderate, and severe). A distance-weighted k-nearest neighbor algorithm and round-robin validation method was applied to classify each testing case into one of the three categories of severity. In this experiment, the CAD scheme classified 78% (14 out of 18) cases into the same categories as rated by the radiologist.

  5. Comparison of the dose to lung volume between supine and prone position during treatment planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Li; Huijun Xu ; Sujing Zhang; Xiaoliang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to compare the dose to lung volume in the supine and prone posi-tion while designing CyberKnife treatment plans to treat metastatic tumors in the spinous processes of the thoracic vertebrae, and of er a reference for reducing damage to normal tissues. Methods Nine cases of metastatic tumors in the spinous processes of the thoracic vertebrae were se-lected, and then we designed treatment plans based on the supine and prone positions and compared the results. Results In contrast with the treatment plan based on the prone position, the one for the supine position required 14862–36337 MU more; the lung D5% was 5.20–7.90 Gy higher; and the lung D20% was 2.61–5.73 Gy higher. The dif erence of dose to spine volume between the two plans was –2.21–2.67 Gy; to the skin volume was –3.93–7.85 Gy; and to the esophagus was 0.28–6.39 Gy. Conclusion The treatment plan based on the prone position of patients can better protect lung tissues than the one based on the supine position, and can also improve the availability of beams.

  6. Individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer radiotherapy: an in silico trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, A.L.; Troost, E.G.C.; Huizenga, H.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various h

  7. Patient dose simulations for scanning-beam digital x-ray tomosynthesis of the lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Geoff; Yoon, Sungwon; Krishna, Ganesh; Wilfley, Brian; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: An improved method of image guidance for lung tumor biopsies could help reduce the high rate of false negatives. The aim of this work is to optimize the geometry of the scanning-beam digital tomography system (SBDX) for providing real-time 3D tomographic reconstructions for target verification. The unique geometry of the system requires trade-offs between patient dose, imaging field of view (FOV), and tomographic angle.

  8. Dose Constraints to Prevent Radiation-Induced Brachial Plexopathy in Patients Treated for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Yang Jinzhong; Williamson, Ryan [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); McBurney, Michelle L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Erasmus, Jeremy [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Karhade, Mandar; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: As the recommended radiation dose for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) increases, meeting dose constraints for critical structures like the brachial plexus becomes increasingly challenging, particularly for tumors in the superior sulcus. In this retrospective analysis, we compared dose-volume histogram information with the incidence of plexopathy to establish the maximum dose tolerated by the brachial plexus. Methods and Materials: We identified 90 patients with NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation from March 2007 through September 2010, who had received >55 Gy to the brachial plexus. We used a multiatlas segmentation method combined with deformable image registration to delineate the brachial plexus on the original planning CT scans and scored plexopathy according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.03. Results: Median radiation dose to the brachial plexus was 70 Gy (range, 56-87.5 Gy; 1.5-2.5 Gy/fraction). At a median follow-up time of 14.0 months, 14 patients (16%) had brachial plexopathy (8 patients [9%] had Grade 1, and 6 patients [7%] had Grade {>=}2); median time to symptom onset was 6.5 months (range, 1.4-37.4 months). On multivariate analysis, receipt of a median brachial plexus dose of >69 Gy (odds ratio [OR] 10.091; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.512-67.331; p = 0.005), a maximum dose of >75 Gy to 2 cm{sup 3} of the brachial plexus (OR, 4.909; 95% CI, 0.966-24.952; p = 0.038), and the presence of plexopathy before irradiation (OR, 4.722; 95% CI, 1.267-17.606; p = 0.021) were independent predictors of brachial plexopathy. Conclusions: For lung cancers near the apical region, brachial plexopathy is a major concern for high-dose radiation therapy. We developed a computer-assisted image segmentation method that allows us to rapidly and consistently contour the brachial plexus and establish the dose limits to minimize the risk of brachial plexopathy. Our results could be used as a guideline in future prospective

  9. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for small lung tumors with a moderate dose. Favorable results and low toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncker-Rohr, V.; Nestle, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany); Momm, F. [Ortenau Klinikum Offenburg (Germany)] [and others

    2013-01-15

    Background: Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SBRT, SABR) is being increasingly applied because of its high local efficacy, e.g., for small lung tumors. However, the optimum dosage is still under discussion. Here, we report data on 45 lung lesions [non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or metastases] in 39 patients treated between 2009 and 2010 by SABR. Patients and methods: SABR was performed with total doses of 35 Gy (5 fractions) or 37.5 Gy (3 fractions) prescribed to the 60% isodose line encompassing the planning target volume. Three-monthly follow-up CT scans were supplemented by FDG-PET/CT if clinically indicated. Results: The median follow-up was 17 months. Local progression-free survival rates were 90.5% (all patients), 95.0% (NSCLC), and 81.8% (metastases) at 1 year. At 2 years, the respective local progression-free survival rates were 80.5%, 95.0%, and 59.7%. Overall survival rates were 71.1% (all patients), 65.4% (NSCLC), and 83.3% (metastases) at 1 year. Overall survival rates at 2 years were 52.7%, 45.9%, and 66.7%, respectively. Acute side effects were mild. Conclusion: With the moderate dose schedule used, well-tolerated SABR led to favorable local tumor control as in other published series. Standardization in reporting the dose prescription for SABR is needed to allow comparison of different series in order to determine optimum dosage. (orig.)

  10. Exposure to low doses of formaldehyde during pregnancy suppresses the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiellaro, Marília [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Correa-Costa, Matheus [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Gimenes Júnior, João Antônio [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva [Department of Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan [Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana, E-mail: adrilino@usp.br [Department of Clinical and Toxicological Analyses, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is an environmental and occupational pollutant, and its toxic effects on the immune system have been shown. Nevertheless, no data are available regarding the programming mechanisms after FA exposure and its repercussions for the immune systems of offspring. In this study, our objective was to investigate the effects of low-dose exposure of FA on pregnant rats and its repercussion for the development of allergic lung inflammation in offspring. Pregnant Wistar rats were assigned in 3 groups: P (rats exposed to FA (0.75 ppm, 1 h/day, 5 days/week, for 21 days)), C (rats exposed to vehicle of FA (distillated water)) and B (rats non-manipulated). After 30 days of age, the offspring was sensitised with ovalbumin (OVA)-alum and challenged with aerosolized OVA (1%, 15 min, 3 days). After 24 h the OVA challenge the parameters were evaluated. Our data showed that low-dose exposure to FA during pregnancy induced low birth weight and suppressed the development of allergic lung inflammation and tracheal hyperresponsiveness in offspring by mechanisms mediated by reduced anaphylactic antibodies synthesis, IL-6 and TNF-alpha secretion. Elevated levels of IL-10 were found. Any systemic alteration was detected in the exposed pregnant rats, although oxidative stress in the uterine environment was evident at the moment of the delivery based on elevated COX-1 expression and reduced cNOS and SOD-2 in the uterus. Therefore, we show the putative programming mechanisms induced by FA on the immune system for the first time and the mechanisms involved may be related to oxidative stress in the foetal microenvironment. - Highlights: • Formaldehyde exposure does not cause lung inflammation in pregnant rats. • Formaldehyde exposure suppresses allergic lung inflammation in the offspring. • Formaldehyde exposure induces oxidative stress in uterine environment.

  11. Evaluation of effective dose with chest digital tomosynthesis system using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyeon; Jo, Byungdu; Lee, Youngjin; Park, Su-Jin; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) system has recently been introduced and studied. This system offers the potential to be a substantial improvement over conventional chest radiography for the lung nodule detection and reduces the radiation dose with limited angles. PC-based Monte Carlo program (PCXMC) simulation toolkit (STUK, Helsinki, Finland) is widely used to evaluate radiation dose in CDT system. However, this toolkit has two significant limits. Although PCXMC is not possible to describe a model for every individual patient and does not describe the accurate X-ray beam spectrum, Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation describes the various size of phantom for individual patient and proper X-ray spectrum. However, few studies have been conducted to evaluate effective dose in CDT system with the Monte Carlo simulation toolkit using GATE. The purpose of this study was to evaluate effective dose in virtual infant chest phantom of posterior-anterior (PA) view in CDT system using GATE simulation. We obtained the effective dose at different tube angles by applying dose actor function in GATE simulation which was commonly used to obtain the medical radiation dosimetry. The results indicated that GATE simulation was useful to estimate distribution of absorbed dose. Consequently, we obtained the acceptable distribution of effective dose at each projection. These results indicated that GATE simulation can be alternative method of calculating effective dose in CDT applications.

  12. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, ... In addition, the excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) calculated for indoor exposure ranges ...

  13. Coffee and tea consumption and risk of lung cancer: a dose-response analysis of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaopeng; Yu, Xuyi; Wu, Yili; Zhang, Dongfeng

    2012-11-01

    Results from the recent meta-analysis suggested a favorable effect of green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer, while no significant association was found between black tea consumption and risk of lung cancer. Besides, a significantly positive association was found between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer. However, the relationship of green tea and coffee consumption is unclear. Thus the dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline model and multivariate random-effect meta-regression. Results suggested that a linear dose-response relationship exists between coffee consumption and risk of lung cancer, while the dose-response relationship is nonlinear between green tea consumption and risk of lung cancer.

  14. Use of 3D adaptive raw-data filter in CT of the lung: effect on radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takeshi; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Gautam, Shiva; Lin, Pei-Jan P; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Hatabu, Hiroto

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a 3D adaptive raw-data filter in improving image quality and the role of the filter in radiation dose reduction in lung CT. Fifty-eight chest CT examinations were performed with a 16-MDCT scanner. Two acquisitions were performed with different tube current-exposure time settings (50 and 150 mAs, 120 kVp). Four series of lung images were prepared from two sets of raw data with and without application of a 3D adaptive filter (50 mAs, 50 mAs with filter, 150 mAs, 150 mAs with filter). Three blinded readers using a 5-point scale from 1 (nondiagnostic) to 5 (excellent) independently evaluated image quality in five lobes and the lingula. A set of images was considered acceptable when scores in all six regions were 3 (acceptable) or higher. The SD of attenuation was calculated in 24 regions of interest. The overall mean image quality scores were 3.09, 3.53, 4.02, and 4.38 for the 50 mAs, 50 mAs with filter, 150 mAs, and 150 mAs with filter sets, respectively. Scores were significantly better with filter application (p filter application (p images, 18, 52, 50, and 58 sets were judged acceptable with no significant difference in acceptability between images obtained at 50 mAs with a filter and at 150 mAs (p = 0.72). With filter application, the acceptability of 50-mAs images became comparable with that of 150-mAs images, making dose reduction to 50 mAs practical. Use of a 3D adaptive raw-data filter improved the quality of lung images, making dose reduction to 50 mAs attainable with use of the filter.

  15. Differences in dose-volumetric data between the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo algorithm in stereotactic body radiation therapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori, E-mail: ymatsuo@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakamura, Akira; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mukumoto, Nobutaka; Miyabe, Yuki; Narabayashi, Masaru; Sakanaka, Katsuyuki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image–Applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the differences in dose-volumetric data obtained using the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) vs the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Dose-volumetric data from 20 patients treated with SBRT for solitary lung cancer generated using the iPlan XVMC for the Novalis system consisting of a 6-MV linear accelerator and micro-multileaf collimators were recalculated with the AAA in Eclipse using the same monitor units and identical beam setup. The mean isocenter dose was 100.2% and 98.7% of the prescribed dose according to XVMC and AAA, respectively. Mean values of the maximal dose (D{sub max}), the minimal dose (D{sub min}), and dose received by 95% volume (D{sub 95}) for the planning target volume (PTV) with XVMC were 104.3%, 75.1%, and 86.2%, respectively. When recalculated with the AAA, those values were 100.8%, 77.1%, and 85.4%, respectively. Mean dose parameter values considered for the normal lung, namely the mean lung dose, V{sub 5}, and V{sub 20}, were 3.7 Gy, 19.4%, and 5.0% for XVMC and 3.6 Gy, 18.3%, and 4.7% for the AAA, respectively. All of these dose-volumetric differences between the 2 algorithms were within 5% of the prescribed dose. The effect of PTV size and tumor location, respectively, on the differences in dose parameters for the PTV between the AAA and XVMC was evaluated. A significant effect of the PTV on the difference in D{sub 95} between the AAA and XVMC was observed (p = 0.03). Differences in the marginal doses, namely D{sub min} and D{sub 95}, were statistically significant between peripherally and centrally located tumors (p = 0.04 and p = 0.02, respectively). Tumor location and volume might have an effect on the differences in dose-volumetric parameters. The differences between AAA and XVMC were considered to be within an acceptable range (<5 percentage points)

  16. SU-C-BRB-02: Symmetric and Asymmetric MLC Based Lung Shielding and Dose Optimization During Translating Bed TBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S; Kakakhel, MB [Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, SBS; Hussain, A [Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The primary aim was to introduce a dose optimization method for translating bed total body irradiation technique that ensures lung shielding dynamically. Symmetric and asymmetric dynamic MLC apertures were employed for this purpose. Methods: The MLC aperture sizes were defined based on the radiological depth values along the divergent ray lines passing through the individual CT slices. Based on these RD values, asymmetrically shaped MLC apertures were defined every 9 mm of the phantom in superior-inferior direction. Individual MLC files were created with MATLAB™ and were imported into Eclipse™ treatment planning system for dose calculations. Lungs can be shielded to an optimum level by reducing the MLC aperture width over the lungs. The process was repeated with symmetrically shaped apertures. Results: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis shows that the asymmetric MLC based technique provides better dose coverage to the body and optimum shielding of the lungs compared to symmetrically shaped beam apertures. Midline dose homogeneity is within ±3% with asymmetric MLC apertures whereas it remains within ±4.5% with symmetric ones (except head region where it drops down to −7%). The substantial over and under dosage of ±5% at tissue interfaces has been reduced to ±2% with asymmetric MLC technique. Lungs dose can be reduced to any desired limit. In this experiment lungs dose was reduced to 80% of the prescribed dose, as was desired. Conclusion: The novel asymmetric MLC based technique assures optimum shielding of OARs (e.g. lungs) and better 3-D dose homogeneity and body-dose coverage in comparison with the symmetric MLC aperture optimization. The authors acknowledge the financial and infrastructural support provided by Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad and Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi during the course of this research project. Authors have no conflict of interest with any national / international

  17. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M;

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  18. Effective analgesic doses of tramadol or tapentadol induce brain, lung and heart toxicity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Juliana; Barbosa, Joana; Leal, Sandra; Afonso, Luís Pedro; Lobo, João; Moreira, Roxana; Queirós, Odília; Carvalho, Félix; Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2017-06-15

    Tramadol and tapentadol are extensively prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. Although these drugs are very effective in pain treatment, the number of intoxications and deaths due to both opioids is increasing, and the underlying toxic mechanisms are not fully understood. The present work aimed to study the potential biochemical and histopathological alterations induced by acute effective (analgesic) doses of tramadol and tapentadol, in Wistar rats. Forty-two male Wistar rats were divided into different groups: a control, administered with normal saline solution, and tramadol- or tapentadol-treated groups (10, 25 or 50mg/kg - typical effective analgesic dose, intermediate and maximum recommended doses, respectively). 24h after intraperitoneal administration, biochemical and oxidative stress analyses were performed in blood, and specimens from brain, lung and heart were taken for histopathological and oxidative stress studies. Both drugs caused an increase in the AST/ALT ratio, in LDH, CK and CK-MB activities in serum samples, and an increase in lactate levels in serum and brain samples. Oxidative damage, namely protein oxidation, was found in heart and lung tissues. In histological analyses, tramadol and tapentadol were found to cause alterations in cell morphology, inflammatory cell infiltrates and cell death in all tissues under study, although tapentadol caused more damage than tramadol. Our results confirmed the risks of tramadol exposure, and demonstrated the higher risk of tapentadol, especially at high doses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A dosimetric phantom study of dose accuracy and build-up effects using IMRT and RapidArc in stereotactic irradiation of lung tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppala Jan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Stereotactic lung radiotherapy (SLRT has emerged as a curative treatment for medically inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and volumetric modulated arc treatments (VMAT have been proposed as the best practical approaches for the delivery of SLRT. However, a large number of narrow field shapes are needed in the dose delivery of intensity-modulated techniques and the probability of underdosing the tumour periphery increases as the effective field size is decreased. The purpose of this study was to evaluate small lung tumour doses irradiated by intensity-modulated techniques to understand the risk for dose calculation errors in precision radiotherapy such as SLRT. Materials and methods The study was executed with two heterogeneous phantoms with targets of Ø1.5 and Ø4.0 cm. Dose distributions in the simulated tumours delivered by small sliding window apertures (SWAs, IMRT and RapidArc treatment plans were measured with radiochromic film. Calculation algorithms of pencil beam convolution (PBC and anisotropic analytic algorithm (AAA were used to calculate the corresponding dose distributions. Results Peripheral doses of the tumours were decreased as SWA decreased, which was not modelled by the calculation algorithms. The smallest SWA studied was 2 mm, which reduced the 90% isodose line width by 4.2 mm with the Ø4.0 cm tumour as compared to open field irradiation. PBC was not able to predict the dose accurately as the gamma evaluation failed to meet the criteria of ±3%/±1 mm on average in 61% of the defined volume with the smaller tumour. With AAA the corresponding value was 16%. The dosimetric inaccuracy of AAA was within ±3% with the optimized treatment plans of IMRT and RapidArc. The exception was the clinical RapidArc plan with dose overestimation of 4%. Conclusions Overall, the peripheral doses of the simulated

  20. Optimizing Collimator Margins for Isotoxically Dose-Escalated Conformal Radiation Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom); Panettieri, Vanessa [William Buckland Radiotherapy Centre, Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Melbourne (Australia); Panakis, Niki; Bates, Nicholas [Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom); Lester, Jason F. [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Road, Whitchurch, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Jain, Pooja [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Clatterbridge Road, Wirral (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [Department of Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Nahum, Alan E.; Mayles, W. Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Clatterbridge Road, Wirral (United Kingdom); Fenwick, John D. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Oxford Cancer Centre, Oxford University Hospitals, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Isotoxic dose escalation schedules such as IDEAL-CRT [isotoxic dose escalation and acceleration in lung cancer chemoradiation therapy] (ISRCTN12155469) individualize doses prescribed to lung tumors, generating a fixed modeled risk of radiation pneumonitis. Because the beam penumbra is broadened in lung, the choice of collimator margin is an important element of the optimization of isotoxic conformal radiation therapy for lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were replanned retrospectively using a range of collimator margins. For each plan, the prescribed dose was calculated according to the IDEAL-CRT isotoxic prescription method, and the absolute dose (D{sub 99}) delivered to 99% of the planning target volume (PTV) was determined. Results: Reducing the multileaf collimator margin from the widely used 7 mm to a value of 2 mm produced gains of 2.1 to 15.6 Gy in absolute PTV D{sub 99}, with a mean gain ± 1 standard error of the mean of 6.2 ± 1.1 Gy (2-sided P<.001). Conclusions: For NSCLC patients treated with conformal radiation therapy and an isotoxic dose prescription, absolute doses in the PTV may be increased by using smaller collimator margins, reductions in relative coverage being offset by increases in prescribed dose.

  1. Effect of high dose steroids on oleic acid-induced lung injury in rabbits: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min [Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, on the basis of CT findings, of high dose methyl prednisolone for treating acute lung injury that was induced by oleic acid injection. A total of 30 healthy rabbits (1.8-2.2 kg) were included in this study. Group I included 10 rabbits in which 0.2 mL oleic acid was injected through their ear veins. Group IIa included 10 rabbits in which 30 mg/kg methyl prednisolone and 0.2 mL oleic acid were intravenously injected at the same time. Group IIb included 5 rabbits in which 30 mg/kg methyl prednisolone was injected 6 hours prior to the 0.2 mL oleic acid intravenous injection. The other 5 rabbits (Group III) were injected intravenously with 30 mg/kg methyl prednisolone without the oleic acid. After that, 30 mg/kg methyl prednisolone per every 12 hours was injected in the non-sacrificed rabbits of Group II and Group III. Nonenhanced Chest CT scans were performed prior to the 30 minutes, 4 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the intravenous injection of oleic acid or methyl prednisolone. We randomly sacrificed one rabbit of groups I, II and III 30 minutes, 4 hours, 24 hours, 48 hours and 72 hours after CT scanning. The distribution, extent, and pattern of the lesions on the CT scan were analyzed. The analyzed pattern of the lesions was ground glass attenuation, consolidation and interstitial thickening. Pathologic correlation was then done. The main CT findings of Group I were peripheral, wedge shaped, ill-defined ground glass attenuations and /or consolidations. The pathologic findings of Group I were interstitial or intraalveolar edema, intraalveolar hemorrhage and coagulation necrosis. Diffuse ground glass opacities with interstitial thickening were noted in 20% (n=2/10) of Group I and in 60% (n=9/15) of Group II at the 30 minute CT; however, there was no statistical difference between the two groups ({rho} = 0.09). Consolidations with air bronchogram were noted in 22.2% (2/9) of Group I and in

  2. Clinical value of a one-stop-shop low-dose lung screening combined with {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of metastatic lung nodules from colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Yeon Hee; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, Chonbuk National University-Biomedical Research Institute, Chonbuk National University Hospital, Cyclotron Research Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapeutic Medicine Research Center, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of additional low-dose high-resolution lung computed tomography (LD-HRCT) combined with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography with CT (18F-FDG PET/CT) compared with conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT for the detection of metastatic lung nodules from colorectal cancer. From January 2011 to September 2011, 649 patients with colorectal cancer underwent additional LD-HRCT at maximum inspiration combined with 18F-FDG PET/CT. Forty-five patients were finally diagnosed to have lung metastasis based on histopathologic study or clinical follow-up. Twenty-five of the 45 patients had ≤5 metastatic lung nodules and the other 20 patients had  >5 metastatic nodules. One hundred and twenty nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 nodules were evaluated by conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT and by additional LD-HRCT respectively. Sensitivities, specificities, diagnostic accuracies, positive predictive values (PPVs), and negative predictive values (NPVs) of conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT and additional LD-HRCT were calculated using standard formulae. The McNemar test and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed. Of the 120 nodules in the 25 patients with ≤5 metastatic lung nodules, 66 nodules were diagnosed as metastatic. Eleven of the 66 nodules were confirmed histopathologically and the others were diagnosed by clinical follow-up. Conventional lung setting image of 18F-FDG PET/CT detected 40 of the 66 nodules and additional LD-HRCT detected 55 nodules. All 15 nodules missed by conventional lung setting imaging but detected by additional LD-HRCT were <1 cm in size. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy of the modalities were 60.6 %, 85.2 %, and 71.1 % for conventional lung setting image and 83.3 %, 88.9 %, and 85.8 % for additional LD-HRCT. By ROC analysis, the area under the ROC curve (AUC) of conventional

  3. Prescribing and evaluating target dose in dose-painting treatment plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Katrin; Specht, Lena; Aznar, Marianne C; Rasmussen, Jacob H; Bentzen, Søren M; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of target dose conformity in multi-dose-level treatment plans is challenging due to inevitable over/underdosage at the border zone between dose levels. Here, we evaluate different target dose prescription planning aims and approaches to evaluate the relative merit of such plans. A quality volume histogram (QVH) tool for history-based evaluation is proposed. Twenty head and neck cancer dose-painting plans with five prescription levels were evaluated, as well as clinically delivered simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) plans from 2010 and 2012. The QVH tool was used for target dose comparison between groups of plans, and to identify and improve a suboptimal dose-painting plan. Comparison of 2010 and 2012 treatment plans with the QVH tool demonstrated that 2012 plans have decreased underdosed volume at the expense of increased overdosed volume relative to the 2010 plans. This shift had not been detected previously. One suboptimal dose-painting plan was compared to the 'normal zone' of the QVH tool and could be improved by re-optimization. The QVH tool provides a method to assess target dose conformity in dose-painting and multi-dose-level plans. The tool can be useful for quality assurance of multi-center trials, and for visualizing the development of treatment planning in routine clinical practice.

  4. Dose-responsiveness and persistence of microRNA expression alterations induced by cigarette smoke in mouse lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzotti, Alberto; Larghero, Patrizia; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Cartiglia, Cristina; Camoirano, Anna [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Steele, Vernon E. [National Cancer Institute (NCI), Rockville, MD (United States); De Flora, Silvio, E-mail: sdf@unige.it [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that exposure to cigarette smoke (CS), either mainstream or environmental, results in a remarkable downregulation of microRNA expression in the lung of both mice and rats. The goals of the present study were to evaluate the dose responsiveness to CS and the persistence of microRNA alterations after smoking cessation. ICR (CD-1) neonatal mice were exposed whole-body to mainstream CS, at the doses of 119, 292, 438, and 631 mg/m{sup 3} of total particulate matter. Exposure started within 12 h after birth and continued daily for 4 weeks. The levels of bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were measured by {sup 32}P postlabeling procedures, and the expression of 697 mouse microRNAs was analyzed by microarray. The highest CS dose was lethal. Exposure to CS caused a dose-dependent increase of DNA alterations. DNA adducts and, even more sharply, 8-oxodGuo were reverted 1 and 4 weeks after smoking cessation. Exposure to CS resulted in an evident dysregulation of microRNA expression profiles, mainly in the sense of downregulation. The two lowest doses were not particularly effective, while the highest nonlethal dose produced extensive microRNA alterations. The expression of most downregulated microRNAs, including among others 7 members of the let-7 family, was restored one week after smoking cessation. However, the recovery was incomplete for a limited array of microRNAs, including mir-34b, mir-345, mir-421, mir-450b, mir-466, and mir-469. Thus, it appears that microRNAs mainly behave as biomarkers of effect and that exposure to high-dose, lasting for an adequate period of time, is needed to trigger the CS-related carcinogenesis process in the experimental animal model used.

  5. Low-dose CT screening in an Asian population with diverse risk for lung cancer: A retrospective cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Chin A. [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung Soo [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Myung-Hee; Cho, Yun Yung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoon-Ho [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Center for Health Promotion, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, O. Jung [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Eun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hee University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    To evaluate the performance of low-dose CT (LDCT) screening for lung cancer (LCA) detection in an Asian population with diverse risks for LCA. LCA screening was performed in 12,427 symptomless Asian subjects using either LDCT (5,771) or chest radiography (CXR) (6,656) in a non-trial setting. Subjects were divided into high-risk and non-high-risk groups. Data were collected on the number of patients with screening-detected LCAs and their survival in order to compare outcomes between LDCT and CXR screening with the stratification of risks considering age, sex and smoking status. In the non-high-risk group, a significant difference was observed for the detection of lung cancer (adjusted OR, 5.07; 95 % CI, 2.72-9.45) and survival (adjusted HR of LCA survival between LDCT vs. CXR group, 0.08; 95 % CI, 0.01-0.62). No difference in detection or survival of LCA was noticed in the high-risk group. LCAs in the non-high-risk group were predominantly adenocarcinomas (96 %), and more likely to be part-solid or non-solid compared with those in the high-risk group (p = 0.023). In the non-high-risk group, LDCT helps detect more LCAs and offers better survival than CXR screening, due to better detection of part solid or non-solid lung adenocarcinomas. (orig.)

  6. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Tan, Jun; Wang, Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Kim, Soo Hyung; Zheng, Bin

    2011-02-01

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 ± 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  7. Computer-aided detection of early interstitial lung diseases using low-dose CT images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Kim, Soo Hyung [School of Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Tan, Jun; Wang Xingwei; Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K; Zheng Bin, E-mail: zhengb@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2011-02-21

    This study aims to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme to detect early interstitial lung disease (ILD) using low-dose computed tomography (CT) examinations. The CAD scheme classifies each pixel depicted on the segmented lung areas into positive or negative groups for ILD using a mesh-grid-based region growth method and a multi-feature-based artificial neural network (ANN). A genetic algorithm was applied to select optimal image features and the ANN structure. In testing each CT examination, only pixels selected by the mesh-grid region growth method were analyzed and classified by the ANN to improve computational efficiency. All unselected pixels were classified as negative for ILD. After classifying all pixels into the positive and negative groups, CAD computed a detection score based on the ratio of the number of positive pixels to all pixels in the segmented lung areas, which indicates the likelihood of the test case being positive for ILD. When applying to an independent testing dataset of 15 positive and 15 negative cases, the CAD scheme yielded the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.884 {+-} 0.064) and 80.0% sensitivity at 85.7% specificity. The results demonstrated the feasibility of applying the CAD scheme to automatically detect early ILD using low-dose CT examinations.

  8. Nutrient intake and nutrient patterns and risk of lung cancer among heavy smokers: results from the COSMOS screening study with annual low-dose CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnagnarella, Patrizia; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Bellomi, Massimo; Rampinelli, Cristiano; Bertolotti, Raffaella; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Palli, Domenico; Veronesi, Giulia

    2013-06-01

    The role of nutrients in lung cancer aetiology remains controversial and has never been evaluated in the context of screening. Our aim was to investigate the role of single nutrients and nutrient patterns in the aetiology of lung cancer in heavy smokers. Asymptomatic heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years) were invited to undergo annual low-dose computed tomography. We assessed diet using a self-administered food frequency questionnaire and collected information on multivitamin supplement use. We performed principal component analysis identifying four nutrient patterns and used Cox proportional Hazards regression to assess the association between nutrients and nutrients patterns and lung cancer risk. During a mean follow-up of 5.7 years, 178 of 4,336 participants were diagnosed with lung cancer by screening. We found a significant risk reduction of lung cancer with increasing vegetable fat consumption (HR for highest vs. lowest quartile = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.31-0.80; P-trend = 0.02). Participants classified in the high "vitamins and fiber" pattern score had a significant risk reduction of lung cancer (HR = 0.57; 95% CI = 0.36-0.90, P-trend = 0.01). Among heavy smokers enrolled in a screening trial, high vegetable fat intake and adherence to the "vitamin and fiber" nutrient pattern were associated with reduced lung cancer incidence.

  9. Extracting the normal lung dose-response curve from clinical DVH data: a possible role for low dose hyper-radiosensitivity, increased radioresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J. J.; Snyder, K.; Zhong, H.; Barton, K.; Sun, Z.; Chetty, I. J.; Matuszak, M.; Ten Haken, R. K.

    2015-09-01

    In conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for lung cancer, radiation pneumonitis’ (RP) dependence on the normal lung dose-volume histogram (DVH) is not well understood. Complication models alternatively make RP a function of a summary statistic, such as mean lung dose (MLD). This work searches over damage profiles, which quantify sub-volume damage as a function of dose. Profiles that achieve best RP predictive accuracy on a clinical dataset are hypothesized to approximate DVH dependence. Step function damage rate profiles R(D) are generated, having discrete steps at several dose points. A range of profiles is sampled by varying the step heights and dose point locations. Normal lung damage is the integral of R(D) with the cumulative DVH. Each profile is used in conjunction with a damage cutoff to predict grade 2 plus (G2+) RP for DVHs from a University of Michigan clinical trial dataset consisting of 89 CFRT patients, of which 17 were diagnosed with G2+ RP. Optimal profiles achieve a modest increase in predictive accuracy—erroneous RP predictions are reduced from 11 (using MLD) to 8. A novel result is that optimal profiles have a similar distinctive shape: enhanced damage contribution from low doses (curves, which can be modeled using Joiner’s induced repair model. A novel search strategy is employed, which has the potential to estimate RP dependence on the normal lung DVH. When applied to a clinical dataset, identified profiles share a characteristic shape, which resembles HRS/IRR. This suggests that normal lung may have enhanced sensitivity to low doses, and that this sensitivity can affect RP risk.

  10. Vancomycin Utilization Evaluation: Are We Dosing Appropriately?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Ayazkhoo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inappropriate use of vancomycin not only increase health care costs but also contribute to the emergence of resistant organisms. Higher trough serum vancomycin concentrations (>10mg/L has been recommended for avoidance of development of resistance. We aim to compare the administered dose with recommended doses based on guideline-recommended weight-based dosing.Methods: In a cross sectional study, all patients who received vancomycin between July and October 2013, in infectious disease, internal medicine wards and emergency department of a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran were entered to the study. Indication of vancomycin and necessary data for dose calculation including height and serum creatinine were recorded. Prescribed doses were compared with recommended doses in guidelines and calculated Glomerular filtration rate (GFR for each patient.Results: One hundred and four patients (45 females and 59 males recruited in the study. Our results indicated that, from all administered doses of vancomycin, 64.4% and 88.8% differs significantly (more than 20% based on American Pharmacist Association (AphA vancomycin monograph and guideline-recommended, weight-based vancomycin dosing (for adults, respectively.Conclusion: Underdosing of vancomycin is a major risk factor for developing resistance of gram positive organisms to this glycopeptide. Our results showed that more than half of patients receiving vancomycin are in the risk of low drug levels based on guidelines. So, having a comprehensive plan for the proper use of this drug especially designing effective internal guidelines can prevent emergence of resistance to vancomycin in future.

  11. Relationship between dose-volume parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Shigeo; Shibata, Toru [Kagawa University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kagawa (Japan); Go, Tetsuhiko; Kasai, Yoshitaka; Yokomise, Hiroyasu [Kagawa University, Department of General Thoracic, Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Kagawa (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    This study evaluated the relationship between dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters and pulmonary complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NACRT) followed by surgery for lung cancer. We also examined a new DVH parameter, because the unresected lung should be more spared than the later resected lung. Data from 43 non-small cell lung cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed. The DVH parameters of the lung were calculated from the total bilateral lung volume minus (1) the gross tumor volume (DVHg) or (2) the later resected lung volume (DVHr). Radiation pneumonitis (RP) and fistula, including bronchopleural and pulmonary fistula, were graded as the pulmonary complications. Factors affecting the incidences of grade 2 or higher RP (≥G2 RP) and fistula were analyzed. Sixteen patients (37 %) experienced ≥G2 RP and a V20 value of the total lung minus the later resected lung (V20r) ≥ 12 % was a significant factor affecting the incidence of ≥G2 RP (p = 0.032). Six patients (14 %) developed a fistula and a V35 value of the total lung minus the gross tumor (V35g) ≥ 19 % and a V40g ≥ 16 % were significant factors affecting the incidence of fistula (p = 0.002 and 0.009, respectively). These DVH parameters may be related to the incidences of ≥G2 RP and fistula. (orig.) [German] In dieser Studie wurde die Beziehung zwischen Dosis-Volumen-Histogramm-(DVH-)Parametern und pulmonalen Komplikationen nach neoadjuvanter Radiochemotherapie (NARCT) und nachfolgender Operation beim Lungenkarzinom untersucht. Zudem wurde ein neuer DVH-Parameter untersucht, da das nichtresezierte Lungengewebe mehr geschont werden sollte als reseziertes Gewebe. Daten von 43 Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom wurden retrospektiv analysiert. Die DVH-Parameter der Lunge wurden aus dem gesamten beidseitigen Lungenvolumen minus (1) das makroskopische Tumorvolumen (DVHg) oder (2) das resezierte Lungenvolumen (DVHr) ermittelt. Strahlenpneumonitis (RP) und Fisteln

  12. Project of evaluation of doses in computed tomography in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slusarczyk-Kacprzyk, W.; Skrzynski, W.; Bulski, W. [Centre of Oncology, Medical Physics Dept., Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    Project of evaluation of doses in computed tomography in Poland bases on the organization solutions implemented and evaluated at one of Polish oncological centres. In this study we analyzed doses for a group of 484 patients who underwent an examination with a G.E. HiSpeed CT scanner at the Centre of Oncology in Warsaw. Patient doses (weighted computed tomography dose index, C.T.D.I.w. and dose length product, D.L.P.) have been compared against reference values published by the Polish Ministry of Health. We found that typical patient doses do not exceed reference values. As reference dose levels are defined only for a standard-size patients, sometimes they may be exceeded for a properly done examination. Polish reference dose levels are not based on up-to-date data and should be revised. (authors)

  13. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 high-dose-rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Hossein Salehi; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Jaberi, Ramin; Shabani, Hamid Reza; Allahverdi, Mahmoud; Vaezzadeh, Seyed Ali

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates to what extent the dose received by lungs from a commercially available treatment planning system, Ir-192 high-dose-rate (HDR), in breast brachytherapy, is accurate, with the emphasis on tissue heterogeneities, and taking into account the presence of ribs, in dose delivery to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan of a breast was acquired and transferred to the 3-D treatment planning system and was also used to construct a patient-equivalent phantom. An implant involving 13 plastic catheters and 383 programmed source dwell positions were simulated, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) code. The Monte Carlo calculations were compared with the corresponding commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the form of percentage isodose and cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH) in the breast, lungs, and ribs. The comparison of the Monte Carlo results and the TPS calculations showed that a percentage of isodose greater than 75% in the breast, which was located rather close to the implant or away from the breast curvature surface and lung boundary, were in good agreement. TPS calculations overestimated the dose to the lung for lower isodose contours that were lying near the breast surface and the boundary of breast and lung and were relatively away from the implant. Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  14. Effects on lung stress of position and different doses of perfluorocarbon in a model of ARDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Josefina; Lucangelo, Umberto; Albaiceta, Guillermo M; Nahum, Avi; Murias, Gastón; Cañizares, Rosario; Oliva, Joan Carles; Romero, Pablo V; Blanch, Lluís

    2015-05-01

    We determined whether the combination of low dose partial liquid ventilation (PLV) with perfluorocarbons (PFC) and prone positioning improved lung function while inducing minimal stress. Eighteen pigs with acute lung injury were assigned to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) or PLV (5 or 10 ml/kg of PFC). Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) trials in supine and prone positions were performed. Data were analyzed by a multivariate polynomial regression model. The interplay between PLV and position depended on the PEEP level. In supine PLV dampened the stress induced by increased PEEP during the trial. The PFC dose of 5 ml/kg was more effective than the dose 10 ml/kg. This effect was not observed in prone. Oxygenation was significantly higher in prone than in supine position mainly at lower levels of PEEP. In conclusion, MV settings should take both gas exchange and stress/strain into account. When protective CMV fails, rescue strategies combining prone positioning and PLV with optimal PEEP should improve gas exchange with minimal stress.

  15. Cyclophosphamide-induced lung damage in mice: protection by a small preliminary dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, C. H.; Wilson, C. M.; Jones, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Cycylphosphamide (Cy) produces an interstitial pneumonitis in CBA mice. The extent of the lung damage has been quantified by measuring the increase in ventilation rate over 6 weeks after an i.p. injection of Cy 200, 250 and 300 mg/kg. A dose-dependent response was found. When a preliminary ("priming") dose of Cy at 50 mg/kg was given 7, 9 or 14 days before a single large dose of 250 mg/kg, lung damage was reduced, as shown by a smaller increase in ventilation rate than in those receiving 250 mg/kg alone, and this difference was significant (P less than 0.01) in the Day-14-and highly significant (P<0.001) in the Day-7-"primed" groups. When primed less than 7 days before, there was a relative increase in ventilation rate, which was statistically significant (P less than 0.01) in the Day-1-primed group. Similar effects were also seen in the survival of the mice. PMID:7426315

  16. Body Size-Specific Organ and Effective Doses of Chest CT Screening Examinations of the National Lung Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonsik; Flynn, Michael J; Judy, Phillip F; Cody, Dianna D; Bolch, Wesley E; Kruger, Randell L

    2017-05-01

    We calculated body size-specific organ and effective doses for 23,734 participants in the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) using a CT dose calculator. We collected participant-specific technical parameters of 23,734 participants who underwent CT in the clinical trial. For each participant, we calculated two sets of organ doses using two methods. First, we computed body size-specific organ and effective doses using the National Cancer Institute CT (NCICT) dosimetry program, which is based on dose coefficients derived from a library of body size-dependent adult male and female computational phantoms. We then recalculated organ and effective doses using dose coefficients from reference size phantoms for all examinations to investigate potential errors caused by the lack of body size consideration in the dose calculations. The underweight participants (body mass index [BMI; weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters] 30) (3.90 mGy). Thyroid doses were approximately 1.3- to 1.6-fold greater than the lung doses (6.3-6.5 mGy). The reference phantom-based dose calculation underestimates the body size-specific lung dose by up to 50% for the underweight participants and overestimates that value by up to 200% for the overweight participants. The median effective dose ranges from 2.01 mSv in obese participants to 2.80 mSv in underweight participants. Body size-specific organ and effective doses were computed for 23,734 NLST participants who underwent low-dose CT screening. The use of reference size phantoms can lead to significant errors in organ dose estimates when body size is not considered in the dose assessment.

  17. A Monte Carlo approach to lung dose calculation in small fields used in intensity modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mesbahi

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study showed that the dose reduction with small fields in the lung was very enormous. Thus, inaccurate prediction of absorbed dose inside lung and also lung soft-tissue interfaces with small photon beams may lead to critical consequences for treatment outcome.

  18. A brief measure of Smokers' knowledge of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. Lowenstein

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the development and psychometric properties of a new, brief measure of smokers' knowledge of lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT. Content experts identified key facts smokers should know in making an informed decision about lung cancer screening. Sample questions were drafted and iteratively refined based on feedback from content experts and cognitive testing with ten smokers. The resulting 16-item knowledge measure was completed by 108 heavy smokers in Houston, Texas, recruited from 12/2014 to 09/2015. Item difficulty, item discrimination, internal consistency and test-retest reliability were assessed. Group differences based upon education levels and smoking history were explored. Several items were dropped due to ceiling effects or overlapping constructs, resulting in a 12-item knowledge measure. Additional items with high item uncertainty were retained because of their importance in informed decision making about lung cancer screening. Internal consistency reliability of the final scale was acceptable (KR-20 = 0.66 and test-retest reliability of the overall scale was 0.84 (intraclass correlation. Knowledge scores differed across education levels (F = 3.36, p = 0.04, while no differences were observed between current and former smokers (F = 1.43, p = 0.24 or among participants who met or did not meet the 30-pack-year screening eligibility criterion (F = 0.57, p = 0.45. The new measure provides a brief, valid and reliable indicator of smokers' knowledge of key concepts central to making an informed decision about lung cancer screening with LDCT, and can be part of a broader assessment of the quality of smokers' decision making about lung cancer screening.

  19. SU-E-T-633: Dose Differences in Lung Cancer SBRT: The Influences of MLC Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J; Yin, Y [Shandong Cancer Hospital, Jinan, Shandong (China)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The aim is to compare the plan dose distribution of lung SBRT with MLCs in different width. Methods: Cases with phase INSCLC were enrolled. 9 cases were undergone 4D-CT scanning in the supine position with both arms raised. 3D-CT images without IV contrast were afterwards acquired with 3mm thickness and used for dose calculations. ITV was generated by using the inspiration and expiration images. The ITV can be expanded by geometric set-up uncertainty (5 mm) to generate the PTV. All chest normal tissues including chest wall were contoured by doctors. A total dose of 55 Gy will be given in 5 fractions within 10–14 days with an inter fraction interval of 2–3 days. Guided by the RTOG trial 3502 protocol, 11–13 non-coplanar fields with 6MV photon were arranged. Three types of MLCs with width of 3mm, 5mm and 10mm at isocenter position, were used separately to generate a CRT plan for each case. Monte Carlo algorithm was applied to dose calculation. All plans were adjusted as possible to meet the dose constraints. Dose-volume parameters from plans as followed were compared and analysized: PTV V55Gy, COMPTV D70% (70% of normalization dose), volume A (body minus PTV), and R100% and R50% (the ratio of x% of prescription dose isoline volume to PTV volume). Results: MLCs, 3mm and 5mm wide, played the identical roles on dosimetry of the plans, excluding the parameter volume A (p<0.05). On the contrary, MLC with width of 10mm was significantly inferior to the other two types on most parameters (p<0.05). For R50%, all types contributed equally (p>0.05). Conclusion: For lung cancer SBRT, MLC width had influence to dosimetry, especially in irradiation area. Small size MLC, e.g. 3mm and 5mm, are helpful to generate a high quality treatment plan, which could meet the strict criteria for targets and OAR.

  20. Still equivalent for dose calculation in the Monte Carlo era? A comparison of free breathing and average intensity projection CT datasets for lung SBRT using three generations of dose calculation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvolanek, Kristina; Ma, Rongtao; Zhou, Christina; Liang, Xiaoying; Wang, Shuo; Verma, Vivek; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Qinghui; Driewer, Joseph; Lin, Chi; Zhen, Weining; Wahl, Andrew; Zhou, Su-Min; Zheng, Dandan

    2017-05-01

    Inhomogeneity dose modeling and respiratory motion description are two critical technical challenges for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy, an important treatment modality for small size primary and secondary lung tumors. Recent studies revealed lung density-dependent target dose differences between Monte Carlo (Type-C) algorithm and earlier algorithms. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the equivalence of the two most popular CT datasets for treatment planning, free breathing (FB) and average intensity projection (AIP) CTs, using Type-C algorithms, and comparing with two older generation algorithms (Type-A and Type-B). Twenty patients (twenty-one lesions) were planned using a Type-A algorithm on the FB CT. Lung was contoured separately on FB and AIP CTs and compared. Dose comparison was obtained between the two CTs using four commercial dose algorithms including one Type-A (Pencil Beam Convolution - PBC), one Type-B (Analytical Anisotropic Algorithm - AAA), and two Type-C algorithms (Voxel Monte Carlo - VMC and Acuros External Beam - AXB). For each algorithm, the dosimetric parameters of the target (PTV, Dmin , Dmax , Dmean , D95, and D90) and lung (V5, V10, V20, V30, V35, and V40) were compared between the two CTs using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Correlation between dosimetric differences and density differences for each algorithm were studied using linear regression and Spearman correlation, in which both global and local density differences were evaluated. Although the lung density differences on FB and AIP CTs were statistically significant (P = 0.003), the magnitude was small at 1.21 ± 1.45%. Correspondingly, for the two Type-C algorithms, target and lung dosimetric differences were small in magnitude and statistically insignificant (P > 0.05) for all but one instance, similar to the findings for the older generation algorithms. Nevertheless, a significant correlation was shown between the dosimetric and density differences for Type-C and Type

  1. Effect of the normalized prescription isodose line on the magnitude of Monte Carlo vs. pencil beam target dose differences for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dandan; Zhang, Qinghui; Liang, Xiaoying; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Verma, Vivek; Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Sumin

    2016-07-08

    In lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases, the pencil beam (PB) dose calculation algorithm is known to overestimate target dose as compared to the more accurate Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm. We investigated whether changing the normalized prescription isodose line affected the magnitude of MC vs. PB target dose differences. Forty-eight patient plans and twenty virtual-tumor phantom plans were studied. For patient plans, four alternative plans prescribed to 60%, 70%, 80%, and 90% isodose lines were each created for 12 patients who previously received lung SBRT treatments. Using 6 MV dynamic conformal arcs, the plans were individually optimized to achieve similar dose coverage and conformity for all plans of the same patient, albeit at the different prescription levels. These plans, having used a PB algorithm, were all recalculated with MC to compare the target dose differences. The relative MC vs. PB target dose variations were investigated by comparing PTV D95, Dmean, and D5 loss at the four prescription levels. The MC-to-PB ratio of the plan heterogeneity index (HI) was also evaluated and compared among different isodose levels. To definitively demonstrate the cause of the isodose line dependence, a simulated phantom study was conducted using simple, spherical virtual tumors planned with uniform block margins. The tumor size and beam energy were also altered in the phantom study to investigate the interplay between these confounding factors and the isodose line effect. The magnitude of the target dose overestimation by PB was greater for higher prescription isodose levels. The MC vs. PB reduction in the target dose coverage indices, D95 and V100 of PTV, were found to monotonically increase with increasing isodose lines from 60% to 90%, resulting in more pronounced target dose coverage deficiency at higher isodose prescription levels. No isodose level-dependent trend was observed for the dose errors in the target mean or high dose indices, Dmean or D5. The

  2. Methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera leaf and low doses of gamma radiation alleviated amiodarone-induced lung toxicity in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hesham F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of methanolic extract of Moringa oleifera (MO and/or low doses of gamma radiation (LDR on amiodarone (AMD-induced lung toxicity in rats. AMD administered to female albino rats (100 mg/kg body weight for 10 consecutive days. Rats received methanolic extract of MO (250 mg/kg bwt for 15 successive days and/or were exposed to whole body LDR (0.25Gy on the 1st and 10th days, up to a total dose of 0.5Gy. MO administration induced a significant decrease in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β levels as well as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH activity. Also, the content of malondialdehyde (MDA and hydroxyproline (HYP was significantly decreased in lung tissue. Furthermore, MO significantly increased reduced glutathione (GSH content in lung tissue as compared with AMD. The histopathological investigation of lung tissue revealed the appearance of interstitial pneumonia in rats treated with AMD. The oral administration of MO and/or exposure to LDR reversed the biochemical and histopathological alterations induced by AMD. It can be posited that MO and LDR might have a considerable role in the prevention of lung toxicity induced by AMD.

  3. Optimal unified combination rule in application of Dempster-Shafer theory to lung cancer radiotherapy dose response outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanyan; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Gong, Yutao U T; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-08

    Our previous study demonstrated the application of the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to dose/volume/outcome data analysis. Specifically, it provided Yager's rule to fuse data from different institutions pertaining to radiotherapy pneumonitis versus mean lung dose. The present work is a follow-on study that employs the optimal unified combination rule, which optimizes data similarity among independent sources. Specifically, we construct belief and plausibility functions on the lung cancer radiotherapy dose outcome datasets, and then apply the optimal unified combination rule to obtain combined belief and plausibility, which bound the probabilities of pneumonitis incidence. To estimate the incidence of pneumonitis at any value of mean lung dose, we use the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to fit the combined belief and plausibility curves. The results show that the optimal unified combination rule yields a narrower uncertainty range (as represented by the belief-plausibility range) than Yager's rule, which is also theoretically proven.

  4. Dose escalation for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: end of the line?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Julian C; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-02-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0617 was a randomized trial that investigated both the impact of radiation dose-escalation and the addition of cetuximab on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results of RTOG 0617 were surprising, with the dose escalation randomization being closed prematurely due to futility stopping rules, and cetuximab ultimately showing no overall survival benefit. Locally advanced unresectable NSCLC has conventionally been treated with concurrent chemoradiation. Though advances in treatment technology have improved the ability to deliver adequate treatment dose, the foundation for radiotherapy (RT) has remained the same since the 1980s. Since then, progressive studies have sought to establish the safety and efficacy of escalating radiation dose to loco-regional disease. Though RTOG 0617 did not produce the anticipated result, much interest remains in dose escalation and establishing an explanation for the findings of this study. Cetuximab was also not found to provide a survival benefit when applied to an unselected population. However, planned retrospective analysis suggests that those patients with high epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression may benefit, suggesting that cetuximab should be applied in a targeted fashion. We discuss the results of RTOG 0617 and additional findings from post-hoc analysis that suggest that dose escalation may be limited by normal tissue toxicity. We also present ongoing studies that aim to address potential causes for mortality in the dose escalation arm through adaptive or proton therapy, and are also leveraging additional concurrent systemic agents such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) for EGFR-activating mutations or EML4-ALK rearrangements, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease: effect of iterative reconstruction on low-dose computed tomographic examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, Cameron J; Krowchuk, Natasha; Alhassan, Donya; Ho, Kevin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Sin, Don D; Mayo, John R; Coxson, Harvey O

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the role that differing levels of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) have on the qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. Institutional board review approval was obtained. A total of 52 patients undergoing clinically indicated low-dose computed tomographic (CT) examinations of the chest (100 kVp, 65 mAs, mean radiation dose 1.0±0.12 mSv), with reconstruction of data with different levels of blended ASIR (0%, 40%, and 100%), were consented. Qualitative assessment of CT data sets was performed by 2 trained thoracic radiologists blinded to clinical history, spirometry, and quantitative data for the presence of emphysema (%/lung zone) and the degree of respiratory bronchiolitis. Quantitative analysis was performed (Apollo Image analysis, VIDA Diagnostics) to assess emphysema and airway measures of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The application of ASIR results in alterations in both qualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. As levels of ASIR increased, both readers scored more respiratory bronchiolitis (Pqualitative and quantitative assessment of smoking-related lung disease. Although a powerful tool to allow dose reduction, caution must be exercised when iterative reconstruction techniques are utilized when evaluating CT examinations for findings of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Dose estimate of inhaled hafnium tritide using the ICRP 66 lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Yang-Sheng; Inkret, William C; Wermer, Joseph R

    2002-06-01

    Metal tritide is widely used for research, purification, compression, and storage of tritium. The current understanding of metal tritide and its radiation dosimetry for internal exposure is limited, and ICRP publications do not provide the tritium dosimetry for hafnium tritide. The current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritide particles (including hafnium tritide) are based on the assumption that their biological behavior is similar to tritiated water, which is completely absorbed by the body. However, the solubility of metal tritide particles depends on the chemical form of the material. The biological half-live of hafnium tritide particles and the dosimetry of an inhalation exposure to those particles could be quite different from tritiated water. This paper describes experiments on the dissolution rate of hafnium tritide particles in a simulated lung fluid. The results showed that less than 1% of the tritium was dissolved in the simulated lung fluid for hafnium tritide particles after 215 d. The short-term and long-term dissolution half times were 46 and 4.28 x 10(5) d, respectively. This indicates that hafnium tritide is an extremely insoluble material. Self-absorption of beta rays in the hafnium tritide particles was estimated by a numerical method. The dose coefficients were calculated as a function of particle size using in vitro solubility data and a calculated self-absorption factor. The dose coefficient decreased with aerodynamic diameters in the range of 0.25 to 10 microm, mainly because the self-absorption factor decreased with increasing particle size. For a particle 1 microm in aerodynamic diameter, the dose coefficient of a hafnium tritide particle was about 10 times higher than that of tritiated water but was about 1.4 times lower than that calculated by ICRP Publication 71 for Type S tritiated particles. The ICRP estimate did not include a self-absorption factor and thus might have overestimated the dose. This finding has significant

  7. Cancer-associated fibroblasts from lung tumors maintain their immunosuppressive abilities after high-dose irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorchs, Laia; Hellevik, Turid; Bruun, Jack-Ansgar; Camilio, Ketil-Andre; Al-Saad, Samer; Stuge, Tor-Brynjar; Martinez-Zubiaurre, Inigo

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the notion that high-dose (>5 Gy) radiotherapy (RT) regimens are triggering stronger pro-immunogenic effects than standard low-dose (2 Gy) regimens. However, the effects of RT on certain immunoregulatory elements in tumors remain unexplored. In this study, we have investigated the effects of high-dose radiotherapy (HD-RT) on the immunomodulating functions of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). Primary CAF cultures were established from lung cancer specimens derived from patients diagnosed for non-small cell lung cancer. Irradiated and non-irradiated CAFs were examined for immunomodulation in experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from random, healthy donors. Regulation of lymphocytes behavior was checked by lymphocyte proliferation assays, lymphocyte migration assays, and T-cell cytokine production. Additionally, CAF-secreted immunoregulatory factors were studied by multiplex protein arrays, ELISAs, and by LC-MS/MS proteomics. In all functional assays, we observed a powerful immunosuppressive effect exerted by CAF-conditioned medium on activated T-cells (p > 0.001), and this effect was sustained after a single radiation dose of 18 Gy. Relevant immunosuppressive molecules such as prostaglandin E2, interleukin-6, and -10, or transforming growth factor-β were found in CAF-conditioned medium, but their secretion was unchanged after irradiation. Finally, immunogenic cell death responses in CAFs were studied by exploring the release of high motility group box-1 and ATP. Both alarmins remained undetectable before and after irradiation. In conclusion, CAFs play a powerful immunosuppressive effect over activated T-cells, and this effect remains unchanged after HD-RT. Importantly, CAFs do not switch on immunogenic cell death responses after exposure to HD-RT.

  8. Investigation of optimal beam margins for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung-cancer using Monte Carlo dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Wang, L; Li, J; Luo, W; Feigenberg, S J; Ma, C-M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19111 (United States)

    2007-07-21

    This work investigated the selection of beam margins in lung-cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with 6 MV photon beams. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to systematically and quantitatively study the dosimetric effects of beam margins for different lung densities (0.1, 0.15, 0.25, 0.35 and 0.5 g cm{sup -3}), planning target volumes (PTVs) (14.4, 22.1 and 55.3 cm{sup 3}) and numbers of beam angles (three, six and seven) in lung-cancer SBRT in order to search for optimal beam margins for various clinical situations. First, a large number of treatment plans were generated in a commercial treatment planning system, and then recalculated using Monte Carlo simulations. All the plans were normalized to ensure that 95% of the PTV at least receives the prescription dose and compared quantitatively. Based on these plans, the relationships between the beam margin and quantities such as the lung toxicity (quantified by V{sub 20}, the percentage volume of the two lungs receiving at least 20 Gy) and the maximum target (PTV) dose were established for different PTVs and lung densities. The impact of the number of beam angles on the relationship between V{sub 20} and the beam margin was assessed. Quantitative information about optimal beam margins for lung-cancer SBRT was obtained for clinical applications.

  9. Low-Dose Radiation Induces Cell Proliferation in Human Embryonic Lung Fibroblasts but not in Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyue Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hormesis and adaptive responses are 2 important biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR. In normal tissue, LDR induces hormesis as evinced by increased cell proliferation; however, whether LDR also increases tumor cell proliferation needs to be investigated. In this study, cell proliferation was assayed by total cell numbers and the Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3′ -kinase(PI3K-Akt (PI3K/AKT phosphorylation were determined by Western blot analysis. Human embryonic lung fibroblast 2BS and lung cancer NCI-H446 cell lines were irradiated with LDR at different doses (20-100 mGy. In response to 20 to 75 mGy X-rays, cell proliferation was significantly increased in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. In 2BS cells, LDR at 20 to 75 mGy also stimulated phosphorylation of MAPK/ERK pathway proteins including ERK, MEK, and Raf and of the PI3K/AKT pathway protein AKT. To test whether ERK1/2 and AKT pathway activation was involved in the stimulation of cell proliferation in 2BS cells, the MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT pathways were inhibited using their specific inhibitors, U0126 and LY294002. U0126 decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and LY294002 decreased the phosphorylation of AKT; each could significantly inhibit LDR-induced 2BS cell proliferation. However, LDR did not stimulate these kinases, and kinase inhibitors also did not affect cell proliferation in the NCI-H446 cells. These results suggest that LDR stimulates cell proliferation via the activation of both MAPK/ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in 2BS but not in NCI-H446 cells. This finding implies the potential for applying LDR to protect normal tissues from radiotherapy without diminishing the efficacy of tumor therapy.

  10. [Lung cancer screening with low-dose thoracic CT-scan in the Somme area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leleu, O; Auquier, M; Carre, O; Chauffert, B; Dubreuil, A; Petigny, V; Trancart, B; Berna, P; Jounieaux, V

    2017-03-01

    This feasibility trial proposes to set up in the department of the Somme an annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose thoracic CT. It responds to the first objective of the third cancer plan and follows the publication of the results of the National Lung Screening Trial in 2011. The method of this study is to use the existing networks among and between healthcare professionals and the departmental cancer screening structure. The inclusion criteria will be those of the National Lung Screening Trial. Screening will be proposed by treating physicians and chest physicians. The CT-scan will be performed in radiological centers that adhere to the good practice charter for low radiation scanning. A copy of CT results will be sent to the departmental structure of cancer screening (ADEMA80) which will ensure traceability and will perform statistical analysis. The study received funding from the Agence régionale de santé de la Picardie and la ligue contre le cancer. The primary endpoints of this screening will be the number of cancers diagnosed and the survival of the patients. The follow-up of positive examinations, delays in management and the level of participation will also be assessed. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Western red cedar dust exposure and lung function: a dose-response relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noertjojo, H K; Dimich-Ward, H; Peelen, S; Dittrick, M; Kennedy, S M; Chan-Yeung, M

    1996-10-01

    The relationship between levels of cumulative red cedar dust exposure and decline in lung function was explored in an 11-yr follow-up study of 243 sawmill workers who participated in at least two occasions. We also studied 140 office workers in a similar manner as control subjects. Workers with asthma were excluded from the analysis. During the period of the study, 916 personal and 216 area samples of dust were collected from the sawmill. Cumulative wood dust exposure was calculated for each sawmill worker according to the duration and exposure in each job, based on the geometric mean of all dust measurements for that job. Average daily dust exposure was calculated by dividing the total cumulative exposure by the number of days of work. Workers were divided into low-, medium-, and high-exposure groups with mean daily level of exposure of 0.4 mg/m3, respectively. Sawmill workers had significantly greater declines in FEV1 and FVC compared with office workers adjusted for age, smoking, and initial lung function. A dose-response relationship was observed between the level of exposure and the annual decline in FVC. We conclude that exposure to Western red cedar dust is associated with a greater decline in lung function which may lead to development of chronic airflow limitation.

  12. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cascio, D. [Dipt. di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Univ. di Palermo (Italy); Cheran, S.C. [Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Genova (Italy); Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Chincarini, A. [Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova (Italy); De Nunzio, G. [Dipt. di Scienza dei Materiali, Univ. di Lecce (Italy); Delogu, P.; Fantacci, M.E. [Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. di Pisa (Italy); Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Gargano, G. [Dipt. Interateneo di Fisica M. Merlin, Univ. di Bari (Italy); Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari (Italy); Gori, I.; Retico, A. [Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa (Italy); Masala, G.L. [Struttura Dipartimentale di Matematica e Fisica, Univ. di Sassari (Italy); Ist. Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Cagliari (Italy); Preite Martinez, A. [Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Santoro, M. [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. di Napoli (Italy); Spinelli, C. [Unita Operativa Radiodiagnostica 2, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Pisana, Pisa (Italy); Tarantino, T. [Divisione di Radiologia Diagnostica e Interventistica del Dipt. di Oncologia, Trapianti e Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina, Univ. di Pisa (Italy)

    2007-06-15

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness ({proportional_to}300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very high (75% range) even at 1-6 FP/scan. (orig.)

  13. Automated detection of lung nodules in low-dose computed tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cascio, D; Chincarini, A; De Nunzio, G; Delogu, P; Fantacci, M E; Gargano, G; Gori, I; Masala, G L; Martinez, A Preite; Retico, A; Santoro, M; Spinelli, C; Tarantino, T

    2007-01-01

    A computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the identification of pulmonary nodules in low-dose multi-detector computed-tomography (CT) images has been developed in the framework of the MAGIC-5 Italian project. One of the main goals of this project is to build a distributed database of lung CT scans in order to enable automated image analysis through a data and cpu GRID infrastructure. The basic modules of our lung-CAD system, consisting in a 3D dot-enhancement filter for nodule detection and a neural classifier for false-positive finding reduction, are described. The system was designed and tested for both internal and sub-pleural nodules. The database used in this study consists of 17 low-dose CT scans reconstructed with thin slice thickness (~300 slices/scan). The preliminary results are shown in terms of the FROC analysis reporting a good sensitivity (85% range) for both internal and sub-pleural nodules at an acceptable level of false positive findings (1-9 FP/scan); the sensitivity value remains very hig...

  14. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  15. The effect of rib and lung heterogeneities on the computed dose to lung in Ir-192 High-Dose-Rate breast brachytherapy: Monte Carlo versus a treatment planning system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Salehi Yazdi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Taking into account the ribs and entering the actual data for breasts, ribs, and lungs, revealed an average overestimation of the dose by a factor of 8% in the lung for TPS calculations. Therefore, the accuracy of the TPS results may be limited to regions near the implants where the treatment is planned, and is a more conservative approach for regions at boundaries with curvatures or tissues with a different material than that in the breast.

  16. Usefulness evaluation of low-dose for emphysema: Compared with high-resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jeong [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Daejeon Health Institute of Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low-dose CT (LDCT) for emphysema compared with high-resolution CT (HRCT). Measurements of radiation dose and noise were repeated 3 times in same exposure condition which was similar with obtaining HRCT and LDCT images. We analysed reading results of 146 subjects. Six images per participants selected for emphysema grading. Emphysema was graded for all 6 zones on the left and right sides of the lungs by the consensus reading of two chest radiologists using a 4-point scale. Between the HRCT and LDCT images, diagnostic differences and agreements for emphysema were analyzed by McNemar's and unweighted kappa tests, and radiation doses and noise by a Mann-Whitney U-test, using the SPSS 19.0 program. Radiation dose from HRCT was significantly higher than that of LDCT, but the noise was significantly lower in HRCT than in LDCT. Diagnostic agreement for emphysema between HRCT and LDCT images was excellent (k-value=0.88). Emphysema grading scores were not significantly different between HRCT and LDCT images for all six lung zones. Emphysema grading scores from LDCT images were significantly correlated with increased scores on HRCT images (r=0.599, p < 0.001). Considering the tradeoff between radiation dose and image noise, LDCT could be used as the gold standard method instead of HRCT for emphysema detection and grading.

  17. Clinical Study of Low-dose 70kv.50mAs MSCT Perfusion Imaging in the Evaluation of Patients with Lung Cancer%70KV.50mAs多层螺旋CT低辐射灌注扫描在肺癌诊治中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封俊; 高德培; 李振辉; 董兴祥; 朱婵

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨70KV.50mAs多层螺旋CT低辐射灌注扫描在肺癌诊治中应用的可行性。方法对发现肺部孤立性肿瘤进行70KV.50mAs多层螺旋CT低辐射灌注扫描。搜集有手术或穿刺病理证实45例患者,鳞癌15例,腺癌23例,小细胞性肺癌7例。利用体部肺肿瘤灌注软件对图像进行后处理,根据非去卷积模型法获得相应肿瘤灌注彩图,测定肿瘤的对比剂达峰时间(TTP)、血流量(BF)、血容量(BV)、渗透性(PMB)。结果鳞癌、腺癌、小细胞性肺癌的TTP(s)分别是:15.62、17.91、16.89;鳞癌、腺癌、小细胞性肺癌的BF(ml/100ml/min)分别是:91.72、77.27、90.60;鳞癌、腺癌、小细胞性肺癌的BV(ml/100ml)分别是:8.06、8.94、11.94;鳞癌、腺癌、小细胞性肺癌的PMB(ml/100ml/min)分别是:13.79、15.17、13.95。结论70KV.50mAs低辐射灌注扫描方法能有效降低射线对患者的辐射,该方法获得的肺部肿瘤的灌注数据可以作为临床分析肺部肿瘤的血供及肿瘤血液灌注的一种手段。%Objective To investigate the clinical value and feasibility of low-dose 70kv.50mAs MSCT perfusion imaging in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer. Methods Retrospectively studied 45 cases(squamous carcinoma 15 cases, adenocarcinoma 23cases, small cell carcinoma 7cases) lung cancer confirmed by operation and pathology, these patients were undergone low-dose(70kv.50mAs)MDCT perfusion scanning before operation. The original images were processed by perfusion software. The value of time to peak(TTP), blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV) and permeability (PMB) were calculated, and gained perfusion image.Results The TTP (s) of squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma were 15.62、17.91、16.89. The BF (ml/100ml/min) of squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma were 91.72, 77.27, 90.60;The BV (ml/100ml) of squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, small cell carcinoma were 8.06, 8.94, 11

  18. Evaluation of dose to cardiac structures during breast irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M C; Korreman, S-S; Pedersen, A N

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer can lead to late cardiac complications. The highest radiation doses are likely to be to the anterior portion of the heart, including the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD). The purpose of this work was to assess the radiation doses...... and the whole LAD were contoured. The radiation doses to all three cardiac structures were evaluated. RESULTS: For 13 patients, the plans were acceptable based on the criteria set for all 3 contours. For seven patients, the volume of heart irradiated was well below the set clinical threshold whereas a high dose...... was still being delivered to the LAD. In 1 case, the dose to the LAD was low while 19% of the contoured heart volume received over 20 Gy. In five patients, the dose to the arch LAD was relatively low while the dose to the whole LAD was considerably higher. CONCLUSION: This study indicates...

  19. Cystic Fibrosis: Are Volumetric Ultra-Low-Dose Expiratory CT Scans Sufficient for Monitoring Related Lung Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loeve, Martine; Lequin, Maarten H; Bruijne, Marleen de

    2009-01-01

    that differences in scores were independent of score magnitude. Conclusion: In this pilot study, CT scores from end-expiratory and end-inspiratory CT match closely, suggesting that ultra-low-dose end-expiratory CT alone may be sufficient for monitoring CF-related lung disease. This would help reduce radiation dose......Purpose: To assess whether chest computed tomography (CT) scores from ultra-low-dose end-expiratory scans alone could suffice for assessment of all cystic fibrosis (CF)-related structural lung abnormalities. Materials and Methods: In this institutional review board–approved study, 20 patients...... with CF aged 6–20 years (eight males, 12 females) underwent low-dose end-inspiratory CT and ultra-low-dose end-expiratory CT. Informed consent was obtained. Scans were randomized and scored by using the Brody-II CT scoring system to assess bronchiectasis, airway wall thickening, mucus plugging...

  20. A Phase I trial of dose escalation of topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui Ge; Wenyan Zhao; Xiaocang Ren; Yongqiang Wang; Zhigang Li; Yanqi Li; Yuee Liu; Qiang Lin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to define the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) and observe the toxicity of escalating topotecan combined whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer. Methods: Patients with brain metastasis of lung cancer received conventional fractionation radiotherapy, with 5 daily fractions of 2 Gy per week, the total radiation dose was 40 Gy, while the larger lesions were boosted to 50-60 Gy. The initial dose of topotecan was 1.0 mg/m2. Escalation dose was 0.25 mg/m2. Every cohort contained at least 3 patients.If no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was observed,the next dose level was opened for entry. These courses were repeated until DLT appeared. MTD was declared as one dose level below which DLT appeared. Results: Eighteen patients were recruited. Two cases of grade 3 leucopenia/neutropenia was observed as DLT at the level of topotecan 2.0 mg/m2. MTD of topotecan was defined as 1.75 mg/m2.The major side effects were leucopenia/neutropenia, nausea and vomiting. Conclusion: Topotecan combined with whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastasis in lung cancer is well tolerated. Maximum-tolerated dose of topotecan is 1.75 mg/m2, once a week of a total of four.

  1. A practical approach to radiological evaluation of CT lung cancer screening examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Xueqian; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON) was launched to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk patients will lead

  2. A practical approach to radiological evaluation of CT lung cancer screening examinations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Xueqian; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON) was launched to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk patients will lead

  3. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography: Canadian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, H.C.; Patsios, D.; Paul, N.S. [Univ. Health Network, Dept. of Medical Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Heidi.Roberts@uhn.on.ca (and others)

    2007-10-15

    In 2003, the department of medical imaging at the University Health Network in Toronto, Ontario, became the first Canadian site of the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (I-ELCAP). We report the results from the first 1000 baseline studies. Between June 2003 and December 2005, we enrolled 1000 high-risk smokers (that is, smokers with a history of a least 10 pack years, or the equivalent of one pack daily for 10 years), aged 55 years or older. A low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) (40 to 60 mA, 120 kV) was performed with 1.0mm to 1.25 collimation. Nodules found at baseline were followed according to the I-ELCAP protocol: 1) no noncalcified nodules (NCNs) or NCNs {<=} 4 mm or nonsolid nodules < 8 mm, annual repeat: 2) NCNs {>=} 5mm or nonsolid nodules {>=} 8 mm, 3-month follow up: or 3) nonsolid nodules {>=} 15 mm, antibiotics and 1-month follow-up. The first 100 study participants were aged 63 years, standard deviation (SD) 6 years, with a smoking history of 38 pack years, SD 22 pack years; 662 (66%) were former smokers, and 338 (34%) were current smokers; 453 (45%) were men, and 547 (55%) were women. Of the participants, 256 (26%) had a positive baseline low-dose computed tomography (LCDT) scan; 227 (23%) were followed after 3 months and 15 (1.6%) after 1 month; 7 (0.7%) received a contrast-enhanced CT and 6 (0.6%) an immediate CT-guided biopsy. Twenty-six invasive procedures were performed: 22 CT-guided biopsies, 1 ultrasound-guided lymph node metastasis biopsy, 1 bronchoscopic biopsy and 2 surgeries. The malignancy rate of the invasive procedures was 85%. Overall, the malignancy prevalence is 2.2%. Of the malignancies, 20 are lung carcinomas: 19 non-small-cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) (14 adenocarcinoma or bronchioalveolar carcinoma [BAC], 4 squamous carcinoma, and 1 large-cell carcinoma) and 1 small-cell carcinoma; 15 (78%) of the NSCLCs are Stage 1. Fourteen patients underwent surgery (1 pneumonectomy, 9 lobectomies, and 4 segmentectomies

  4. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  5. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, PO Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Hofmann, Werner [University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Str. 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  6. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  7. SU-E-I-28: Evaluating the Organ Dose From Computed Tomography Using Monte Carlo Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, T; Araki, F [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate organ doses from computed tomography (CT) using Monte Carlo (MC) calculations. Methods: A Philips Brilliance CT scanner (64 slice) was simulated using the GMctdospp (IMPS, Germany) based on the EGSnrc user code. The X-ray spectra and a bowtie filter for MC simulations were determined to coincide with measurements of half-value layer (HVL) and off-center ratio (OCR) profile in air. The MC dose was calibrated from absorbed dose measurements using a Farmer chamber and a cylindrical water phantom. The dose distribution from CT was calculated using patient CT images and organ doses were evaluated from dose volume histograms. Results: The HVLs of Al at 80, 100, and 120 kV were 6.3, 7.7, and 8.7 mm, respectively. The calculated HVLs agreed with measurements within 0.3%. The calculated and measured OCR profiles agreed within 3%. For adult head scans (CTDIvol) =51.4 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 23.2, 34.2, and 37.6 mGy, respectively. For pediatric head scans (CTDIvol =35.6 mGy), mean doses for brain stem, eye, and eye lens were 19.3, 24.5, and 26.8 mGy, respectively. For adult chest scans (CTDIvol=19.0 mGy), mean doses for lung, heart, and spinal cord were 21.1, 22.0, and 15.5 mGy, respectively. For adult abdominal scans (CTDIvol=14.4 mGy), the mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 17.4, 16.5, 16.8, 16.8, and 13.1 mGy, respectively. For pediatric abdominal scans (CTDIvol=6.76 mGy), mean doses for kidney, liver, pancreas, spleen, and spinal cord were 8.24, 8.90, 8.17, 8.31, and 6.73 mGy, respectively. In head scan, organ doses were considerably different from CTDIvol values. Conclusion: MC dose distributions calculated by using patient CT images are useful to evaluate organ doses absorbed to individual patients.

  8. Comprehensive evaluation and clinical implementation of commercially available Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aizhen; Wen, Ning; Nurushev, Teamour; Burmeister, Jay; Chetty, Indrin J

    2013-03-04

    A commercial electron Monte Carlo (eMC) dose calculation algorithm has become available in Eclipse treatment planning system. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the eMC algorithm and investigate the clinical implementation of this system. The beam modeling of the eMC algorithm was performed for beam energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV for a Varian Trilogy and all available applicator sizes in the Eclipse treatment planning system. The accuracy of the eMC algorithm was evaluated in a homogeneous water phantom, solid water phantoms containing lung and bone materials, and an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, dose calculation accuracy was compared between pencil beam (PB) and eMC algorithms in the same treatment planning system for heterogeneous phantoms. The overall agreement between eMC calculations and measurements was within 3%/2 mm, while the PB algorithm had large errors (up to 25%) in predicting dose distributions in the presence of inhomogeneities such as bone and lung. The clinical implementation of the eMC algorithm was investigated by performing treatment planning for 15 patients with lesions in the head and neck, breast, chest wall, and sternum. The dose distributions were calculated using PB and eMC algorithms with no smoothing and all three levels of 3D Gaussian smoothing for comparison. Based on a routine electron beam therapy prescription method, the number of eMC calculated monitor units (MUs) was found to increase with increased 3D Gaussian smoothing levels. 3D Gaussian smoothing greatly improved the visual usability of dose distributions and produced better target coverage. Differences of calculated MUs and dose distributions between eMC and PB algorithms could be significant when oblique beam incidence, surface irregularities, and heterogeneous tissues were present in the treatment plans. In our patient cases, monitor unit differences of up to 7% were observed between PB and eMC algorithms. Monitor unit calculations were also preformed

  9. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanca, F., E-mail: Federica.Zanca@med.kuleuven.be [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Jacobs, A. [Department of Radiology, Leuven University Center of Medical Physics in Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Crijns, W. [Department of Radiotherapy, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Wever, W. [Imaging and Pathology Department, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, Box 7003 3000 Leuven, Belgium and Department of Radiology, UZ Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  10. An official American Thoracic Society/American College of Chest Physicians policy statement: implementation of low-dose computed tomography lung cancer screening programs in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Gould, Michael K; Arenberg, Douglas A; Au, David H; Fennig, Kathleen; Lamb, Carla R; Mazzone, Peter J; Midthun, David E; Napoli, Maryann; Ost, David E; Powell, Charles A; Rivera, M Patricia; Slatore, Christopher G; Tanner, Nichole T; Vachani, Anil; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Yoon, Sue H

    2015-10-01

    Annual low-radiation-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality among high-risk individuals and is now recommended by multiple organizations. However, LDCT screening is complex, and implementation requires careful planning to ensure benefits outweigh harms. Little guidance has been provided for sites wishing to develop and implement lung cancer screening programs. To promote successful implementation of comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe, effective, and sustainable. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) and American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) convened a committee with expertise in lung cancer screening, pulmonary nodule evaluation, and implementation science. The committee reviewed the evidence from systematic reviews, clinical practice guidelines, surveys, and the experience of early-adopting LDCT screening programs and summarized potential strategies to implement LDCT screening programs successfully. We address steps that sites should consider during the main three phases of developing an LDCT screening program: planning, implementation, and maintenance. We present multiple strategies to implement the nine core elements of comprehensive lung cancer screening programs enumerated in a recent ACCP/ATS statement, which will allow sites to select the strategy that best fits with their local context and workflow patterns. Although we do not comment on cost-effectiveness of LDCT screening, we outline the necessary costs associated with starting and sustaining a high-quality LDCT screening program. Following the strategies delineated in this policy statement may help sites to develop comprehensive LDCT screening programs that are safe and effective.

  11. [Preoperative evaluation and predictors of mortality in lung cancer resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Andrés; Opazo, Marcela; Hernández, Marcela; Ávila, Paulina; Villalobos, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Surgical resection of lung cancer, the only available curative option today, is strongly associated with mortality. The goal during the perioperative period is to identify and evaluate appropriate candidates for lung resection in a more careful way and reduce the immediate perioperative risk and posterior disability. This is a narrative review of perioperative risk assessment in lung cancer resection. Instruments designed to facilitate decision-making have been implemented in recent years but with contradictory results. Cardiovascular risk assessment should be the first step before a potential lung resection, considering that most of these patients are old, smokers and have atherosclerosis. Respiratory mechanics determined by postoperative forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), the evaluation of the alveolar-capillary membrane by diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide and cardiopulmonary function measuring the maximum O2 consumption, will give clues about the patient's respiratory and cardiac response to stress. With these assessments, the patient and its attending team can reach a treatment decision balancing the perioperative risk, the chances of survival and the pulmonary long-term disability.

  12. SU-E-J-55: Dosimetric Evaluation of Centrally Located Lung Tumors: A Monte Carlo (MC) Study of Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [University Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using the iPlan XVMC algorithm and heterogeneities corrected/uncorrected Pencil Beam (PB-hete/PB-homo) algorithms for SBRT treatments of lung tumors. Methods: Ten patients with centrally located solitary lung tumors were treated using MC-based SBRT to 60Gy in 5 fractions for PTVV100%=95%. ITV was delineated on MIP-images based on 4D-CT scans. PTVs(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 10.1–106.5cc(mean=48.6cc). MC-SBRT plans were generated with a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan-XVMC-algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and 6MV-SRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG 0813 dosimetric criteria. For comparison, PB-hete/PB-homo algorithms were used to re-calculate dose distributions using same beam configurations, MLCs/monitor units. Plans were evaluated with isocenter/maximal/mean doses to PTV. Normal lung doses were evaluated with V5/V10/V20 and mean-lung-dose(MLD), excluding PTV. Other OAR doses such as maximal spinal cord/2cc-esophagus/max bronchial tree (BT/maximal heart doses were tabulated. Results: Maximal/mean/isocenter doses to PTV calculated by PB-hete were uniformly larger than MC plans by a factors of 1.09/1.13/1.07, on average, whereas they were consistently lower by PB-homo by a factors of 0.9/0.84/0.9, respectively. The volume covered by 5Gy/10Gy/20Gy isodose-lines of the lung were comparable (average within±3%) when calculated by PB-hete compared to XVMC, but, consistently lower by PB-homo by a factors of 0.90/0.88/0.85, respectively. MLD was higher with PB-hete by 1.05, but, lower by PB-homo by 0.9, on average, compared to XVMC. XVMC max-cord/max-BT/max-heart and 2cc of esophagus doses were comparable to PB-hete; however, PB-homo underestimates by a factors of 0.82/0.89/0.88/0.86, on average, respectively. Conclusion: PB-hete significantly overestimates dose to PTV relative to XVMC -hence underdosing the target. MC is more complex and accurate with

  13. Evaluation of occupational and patient dose in cerebral angiography procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuri Antonio Lunelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study was aimed at estimating the doses received by physicians and patients during cerebral angiography procedures in a public hospital of Recife, PE, Brazil. Materials and Methods The study sample included 158 adult patients, and during the procedures the following parameters were evaluated: exposure parameters (kV, mAs, number of acquired images, reference air kerma value (Ka,r and air kerma-area product (PKA. Additionally, the physicians involved in the procedures were evaluated as for absorbed dose in the eyes, thyroid, chest, hands and feet. Results The results demonstrated that the doses to the patients' eyes region were relatively close to the threshold for cataract occurrence. As regards the physicians, the average effective dose was 2.6 µSv, and the highest effective dose recorded was 16 µSv. Conclusion Depending on the number of procedures, the doses received by the physicians may exceed the annual dose limit for the crystalline lenses (20 mSv established by national and international standards. It is important to note that the high doses received by the physicians are due to the lack of radiation protection equipment and accessories, such as leaded curtains, screens and protective goggles.

  14. Hanford Site Annual Report Radiological Dose Calculation Upgrade Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2010-02-28

    Operations at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, result in the release of radioactive materials to offsite residents. Site authorities are required to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed offsite resident. Due to the very low levels of exposure at the residence, computer models, rather than environmental samples, are used to estimate exposure, intake, and dose. A DOS-based model has been used in the past (GENII version 1.485). GENII v1.485 has been updated to a Windows®-based software (GENII version 2.08). Use of the updated software will facilitate future dose evaluations, but must be demonstrated to provide results comparable to those of GENII v1.485. This report describes the GENII v1.485 and GENII v2.08 dose exposure, intake, and dose estimates for the maximally exposed offsite resident reported for calendar year 2008. The GENII v2.08 results reflect updates to implemented algorithms. No two environmental models produce the same results, as was again demonstrated in this report. The aggregated dose results from 2008 Hanford Site airborne and surface water exposure scenarios provide comparable dose results. Therefore, the GENII v2.08 software is recommended for future offsite resident dose evaluations.

  15. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Gilmer, E-mail: gilmer.valdes@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robinson, Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morel, Delphine [Department of Biomedical Engineering, AIX Marseille 2 University, Marseille (France); Department of Medical Physics, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France); Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  16. A decrease in lung cancer mortality following the introduction of low-dose chest CT screening in Hitachi, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kusano, Suzushi; Chonan, Tatsuya; Hayashihara, Kenji; Suito, Tetsushi; Endo, Katsuyuki

    2012-12-01

    Recent US clinical trial demonstrated that CT screening prevents lung cancer death among high risk individuals. However, it remains unclear whether wide implementation of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer can decrease mortality in the community. Among residents in Hitachi City (Japan), where nearly 40% of inhabitants aged 50-69 years were estimated to have participated in the screening at least once from 1998 through 2009, the trend of lung cancer mortality was described in relation to the timing of implementation of the CT screening. Cancer mortality data were obtained from regional cancer registry and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of lung cancer was calculated for each 5-year period during 1995-2009. In both men and women aged 60 years or older, age-specific lung cancer mortality rates were generally lower during 2005-2009 as compared with those during 1995-2004. For combined men and women aged 50-79 years, SMR was nearly unity prior to or during introductory phase of CT screening and during early period of implementation; however, it was significantly decreased during 2005-2009, well after the implementation of CT screening, with SMR (95% confidence interval) being 0.76 (0.67-0.86). Results suggest that wide implementation of low-dose chest CT screening may decrease lung cancer mortality in the community 4-8 years after introduction of the screening.

  17. Automatic lobar segmentation for diseased lungs using an anatomy-based priority knowledge in low-dose CT images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Joon; Kim, Jung Im; Goo, Jin Mo; Lee, Doohee

    2014-03-01

    Lung lobar segmentation in CT images is a challenging tasks because of the limitations in image quality inherent to CT image acquisition, especially low-dose CT for clinical routine environment. Besides, complex anatomy and abnormal lesions in the lung parenchyma makes segmentation difficult because contrast in CT images are determined by the differential absorption of X-rays by neighboring structures, such as tissue, vessel or several pathological conditions. Thus, we attempted to develop a robust segmentation technique for normal and diseased lung parenchyma. The images were obtained with low-dose chest CT using soft reconstruction kernel (Sensation 16, Siemens, Germany). Our PC-based in-house software segmented bronchial trees and lungs with intensity adaptive region-growing technique. Then the horizontal and oblique fissures were detected by using eigenvalues-ratio of the Hessian matrix in the lung regions which were excluded from airways and vessels. To enhance and recover the faithful 3-D fissure plane, our proposed fissure enhancing scheme were applied to the images. After finishing above steps, for careful smoothening of fissure planes, 3-D rolling-ball algorithm in xyz planes were performed. Results show that success rate of our proposed scheme was achieved up to 89.5% in the diseased lung parenchyma.

  18. The effect of different lung densities on the accuracy of various radiotherapy dose calculation methods: implications for tumour coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarup, Lasse Rye; Nahum, Alan E; Zacharatou, Christina

    2009-01-01

    and tumour have unit density). The lung tissue was assigned five densities (rho(lung)): 0.01, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4 and 1g/cm(3). Four-field treatment plans were calculated with 6- and 18 MV narrow beams for each value of rho(lung). We considered the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC(Ecl)) and the Analytical Anisotropic...... Algorithm (AAA(Ecl)) from Varian Eclipse and the Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC(OMP)) and the Collapsed Cone Convolution (CCC(OMP)) algorithms from Oncentra MasterPlan. RESULTS: When changing rho(lung) from 0.4 to 0.1g/cm(3), the MC median target dose decreased from 89.2% to 74.9% for 6 MV and from 83...... Treatment Planning System (TPS) algorithms and one Monte Carlo (MC) system (EGSnrc). We compared the performance of the algorithms in calculating the target dose for different degrees of lung inflation. The phantoms had a cubic 'body' and 'lung' and a central 2-cm diameter spherical 'tumour' (the body...

  19. Frameless high dose rate stereotactic lung radiotherapy: intrafraction tumor position and delivery time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peguret, Nicolas; Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P; Slotman, Ben J; Verbakel, Wilko F A R

    2013-06-01

    Intrafraction change in tumor position (Δ) was evaluated for stereotactic lung radiotherapy delivered with flattening filter free volumetric modulated arc therapy. In 140 fractions from 32 patients mean Δ (±SD) was -0.7±1.4 mm (vertical), -0.7±1.3 mm (longitudinal) and +0.2±1.2 mm (lateral) with mean vector 2.1±1.2 mm. Mean delivery time was 4.4±3.4 min (mean beam-on 1.9±0.4 min). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. TU-EF-204-08: Dose Efficiency of Added Beam-Shaping Filter with Varied Attenuation Levels in Lung-Cancer Screening CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yu, L; Vrieze, T; Leng, S; Fletcher, J; McCollough, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Added filtration such as tin filter has the potential to improve dose efficiency of x-ray beam in lung-cancer screening CT. However, dose efficiency with added beam filtration is highly dependent on patient attenuation level. In this phantom study, we evaluated the image quality at different tube voltages with and without added tin filter when attenuation level varies. Methods: A 30 x 20 cm anthropomorphic thorax phantom with three added extension rings were used to simulate small (S), medium (M), large (L), and extra-large (XL) adult patients. These phantoms were scanned on a 192-slice CT scanner (Force, Siemens) at 100 and 120kV without tin filtration, and 100 and 150 kV with tin filtration (100Sn and 150Sn), at multiple dose levels at each kV. Images were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (ADMIRE, Siemens). Radiation dose was measured with a 0.6 cc ion chamber in the middle and peripheral areas of the phantom. Image quality was assessed using mean image noise at uniform areas in the central region and lung. Radiation dose that is required for each kV to match the noise in a routine lung-cancer CT screening technique (120kV, 25 quality reference mAs) was calculated. Results: At each of the four phantom sizes, 100Sn had the lowest noise in both soft tissue and lung. Compared with 120 kV, 100Sn saved 39%–60% dose for the same noise, depending on phantom size. For the XL phantom (50 by 40 cm), 150Sn provided images with the least beam-hardening artifact in peripheral region. Conclusion: For thoracic CT, added tin filtration can provide considerable dose reduction compared with 120 kV. 100Sn provides better dose efficiencies for all phantom sizes, while 150Sn provides better image quality in peripheral region for extra-large patients. Drs.Joel G. Fletcher and Cynthia H. McCollough receive research support from Siemens Healthcare.

  1. Dose evaluation of organs at risk (OAR) cervical cancer using dose volume histogram (DVH) on brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif Wibowo, R.; Haris, Bambang; Inganatul Islamiyah, dan

    2017-05-01

    Brachytherapy is one way to cure cervical cancer. It works by placing a radioactive source near the tumor. However, there are some healthy tissues or organs at risk (OAR) such as bladder and rectum which received radiation also. This study aims to evaluate the radiation dose of the bladder and rectum. There were 12 total radiation dose data of the bladder and rectum obtained from patients’ brachytherapy. The dose of cervix for all patients was 6 Gy. Two-dimensional calculation of the radiation dose was based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) points or called DICRU while the 3-dimensional calculation derived from Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) on a volume of 2 cc (D2cc). The radiation dose of bladder and rectum from both methods were analysed using independent t test. The mean DICRU of bladder was 4.33730 Gy and its D2cc was4.78090 Gy. DICRU and D2cc bladder did not differ significantly (p = 0.144). The mean DICRU of rectum was 3.57980 Gy and 4.58670 Gy for D2cc. The mean DICRU of rectum differed significantly from D2cc of rectum (p = 0.000). The three-dimensional method radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was higher than the two-dimensional method with ratios 1.10227 for bladder and 1.28127 for rectum. The radiation dose of the bladder and rectum was still below the tolerance dose. Two-dimensional calculation of the bladder and rectum dose was lower than three-dimension which was more accurate due to its calculation at the whole volume of the organs.

  2. Dose calculation algorithm accuracy for small fields in non-homogeneous media: The lung SBRT case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogliata, Antonella; Cozzi, Luca

    2016-11-24

    This review addresses the theme of dose calculation accuracy in the case of the stereotactic treatment of lung lesions. Based on the classical categories of type "a", "b" and "c" algorithms (according to their degree of complexity in the management of charged particle transport), a summary of findings from literature is reported. Two main critical areas have been identified: the use of small fields and the presence of low density medium. Concerning the latter point, the algorithm accuracy is intrinsic of the algorithm core, and, notwithstanding the materials discretization and their chemical composition knowledge, type "c" are, at the most, able to reproduce the actual physical dose distribution in heterogeneous media. For what concerns the small field management, the final accuracy could be strongly related to the beam configuration appropriateness in the TPS (as well for MC this relates to the proper linac head description). As a very crude summary, type "a" should be considered as unsuitable for this kind of treatment calculations (with differences of the order of 20-30%), while type "b" and "c" could keep their accuracy approximatively within 10 and 5%, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Evaluation of radiation dose of triple rule-out coronary angiography protocols with different scan length using 256-slice CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Jung; Lee, Jason J. S.; Chen, Liang-Kuang; Mok, Greta S. P.; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wu, Tung-Hsin

    2011-10-01

    Triple rule-out coronary CT angiography (TRO-CTA) is a new approach for providing noninvasive visualization of coronary arteries with simultaneous evaluation of pulmonary arteries, thoracic aorta and other intrathoracic structures. The increasing use of TRO-CTA examination with longer scan length is associated with the concerns about radiation dose and their corresponding cancer risk. The purpose of this study is to evaluate organ dose and effective dose for the TRO-CTA examination with 2 scan lengths: TRO std and TRO ext, using 256-slice CT. TRO-CTA examinations were performed on a 256-slice CT scanner without ECG-based tube current modulation. Absorbed organ doses were measured using an anthropomorphic phantom and thermal-luminance dosimeters (TLDs). Effective dose was determined by taking a sum of the measured absorbed organ doses multiplied with the tissue weighting factor based on ICRP-103, and compared to that calculated using the dose-length product (DLP) method. We obtained high organ doses in the thyroid, esophagus, breast, heart and lung in both TRO-CTA protocols. Effective doses of the TRO std and TRO ext protocols with the phantom method were 26.37 and 42.49 mSv, while those with the DLP method were 19.68 and 38.96 mSv, respectively. Our quantitative dose information establishes a relationship between radiation dose and scanning length, and can provide a practical guidance to best clinical practice.

  4. Carboplatin- and cisplatin-induced potentiation of moderate-dose radiation cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, H. J.; Sleijfer, S.; Meijer, C.; Kampinga, H. H.; Konings, A. W. T.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Mulder, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between moderate-dose radiation and cisplatin or carboplatin was studied in a cisplatin-sensitive (GLC(4)) and -resistant (GLC(4)-CDDP) human small-cell lung cancer cell line. Cellular toxicity was analysed under oxic conditions with the microculture tetrazolium assay. For the

  5. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Joan E; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules

  6. A meta-analysis: is low-dose computed tomography a superior method for risky lung cancers screening population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Cuiping; Liu, Zilong; Zhu, Fen; Li, Shanqun; Jiang, Liyan

    2016-05-01

    Low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) has been proposed to be a new screening method to discover lung cancers in an early stage, especially those patients who are in a high risk of lung cancer. The primary objective of this meta-analysis is to systematically review the effect of LDCT on screening for lung cancers among the risky population who are older than 49 years old and with smoking exposure. We searched randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) about comparing LDCT and chest X-ray or usual caring from MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge and SpringerLink databases (January 1994 to September 2013). Nine RCTs met criteria for inclusion. Screening for lung cancer using LDCT resulted in a significantly higher number of stage I lung cancers [odds ratio (OR) 2.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-2.47], higher number of total lung cancers (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.20-1.43) than the control. Four of the nine studies indicated that the screening method did not decrease all-cause mortality (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.90-1.02), but decreased lung cancer-specific mortality (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Five studies showed that LDCT had higher false-positive rates (OR 8.7, 95% CI 7.43-10.19) than the group of control. Among the risky population, LDCT screening find out more stage I lung cancers and total lung cancers compared with chest X-ray or no screening, and also shows advantages in decreasing lung cancer-specific mortality, but the screening method does not decrease all-cause mortality and have a higher false-positive rates in diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography: grand rounds discussion from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Gerald W; Boiselle, Phillip M; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2015-04-21

    In December 2013, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) for selected current and former smokers. The Task Force based the recommendation primarily on the results of the NLST (National Lung Screening Trial). In this trial, patients randomly assigned to LDCT screening for 3 years had lower rates of both lung cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality (relative risk reduction, 6.7% [95% CI, 1.2% to 13.6%]; absolute risk reduction, 0.46% [CI, 0% to 0.9%]). Clinicians and health systems confront questions and challenges as they begin to implement lung cancer screening. This paper summarizes a conference during which an internist and a radiologist discuss the application of the Task Force recommendation to an individual patient.

  8. Acute respiratory distress syndrome and lung fibrosis after ingestion of a high dose of ortho-phenylphenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shih-Lung; Wang, Hao-Chien; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2005-08-01

    Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP) and its sodium salt are used as fungicides and antibacterial agents, ingestion of which has been found to cause liver toxicity, renal toxicity and carcinomas in the urinary tract of rats. Lung damage due to OPP ingestion has not been reported in humans. We report a suicidal 39-year-old woman with stage II cervical cancer who drank a potentially lethal dose of OPP in the form of a commercial antiseptic, which led to the complication of liver and renal function impairment, severe lung damage with acute respiratory distress syndrome and subsequent severe lung fibrosis. Open lung biopsy showed diffuse alveolar damage. She was discharged after 34 days of hospitalization with continuing domiciliary oxygen therapy.

  9. Measurement of spatial dose distribution for evaluation operator dose during nero-interventional procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Su Chul [Division of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Radiology Science, Far East University, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The spatial dose distribution was measured with ionization chamber as preliminary study to evaluate operator dose and to study dose reduction during neuro-interventional procedures. The zone of operators was divided into four area (45, 135, 225, and 315 degree).We supposed that operator exist on the four area and indicated location of critical organs(eyes, breast, gonad). The spatial doses were measured depending on distance( 80, 100, 120, and 140 cm) and location of critical organs. The spatial doses of area of 225 degree were 114.5 mR/h (eyes location), 143.1 mR/h (breast location) and 147 mR/h (gonad location) in 80 cm. When changed location of x-ray generator, spatial dose increased in 18.1±10.5%, averagely. We certified spatial dose in the operator locations, Using the results of this study, It is feasible to protect operator from radiation in neuro-interventional procedures.

  10. Treatment of small cell carcinoma of lung with combined high dose mediastinal irradiation, whole brain prophylaxis and chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shank, B.; Natale, R.B.; Hilaris, B.S.; Wittes, R.E.

    1981-04-01

    Survival of patients with small cell carcinoma of lung, treated on a new combined radiotherapy-chemotherapy protocol, compares favorably with other regimens in the literature and our own previous combined approaches. Radiation, given after induction chemotherapy, consisted of whole brain prophylaxis in all 44 evaluable patients. Patients with limited disease were also treated to the primary and mediastinum to a high dose (5000 rad equivalent) using multiple fields. The new chemotherapy regimen consisted of induction with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and vincristine alternated with cis-platinum and VP-16 (an epipodophyllotoxin) for two cycles, followed by consolidation with low dose cyclophosphamide and vincristine concurrent with irradiation. Patients with limited disease who achieved less than complete response, and all patients with extensive disease were not continued on maintenance chemotherapy. Out of 24 evaluable patients with limited disease, there was 73% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis, measured from treatment initiation. After induction, 16/24 of these limited disease patients were CR (complete responders): 20/24 were CR at completion of their irradiation. Out of 20 evaluable patients with extensive disease, there was 59% survival at 1 year by life-table analysis. Only 4/44 (9%) brain parenchymal relapses occurred, one at 3 months and one at 6 months after local failure and two in patients who did not become CRs, implicating a possible re-seeding mechanism. Five patients had central nervous system relapses outside of brain parenchyma (spinal epidural and leptomeningeal); in three patients this was the initial site of failure. Significant complications included leukopenia (50%) and thrombocytopenia (24%) primarily during induction, and chronic pulmonary fibrosis (25%), possibly contributing to two deaths.

  11. Systematic evaluation of four-dimensional hybrid depth scanning for carbon-ion lung therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji; Inaniwa, Taku; Zenklusen, Silvan; Nakao, Minoru; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2013-03-01

    Irradiation of a moving target with a scanning beam requires a comprehensive understanding of organ motion as well as a robust dose error mitigation technique. The authors studied the effects of intrafractional respiratory motion for carbon-ion pencil beam scanning with phase-controlled rescanning on dose distributions for lung tumors. To address density variations, they used 4DCT data. Dose distributions for various rescanning methods, such as simple layer rescanning (LR), volumetric rescanning, and phase-controlled rescanning (PCR), were calculated for a lung phantom and a lung patient studies. To ensure realism, they set the scanning parameters such as scanning velocity and energy variation time to be similar to those used at our institution. Evaluation metrics were determined with regard to clinical relevance, and consisted of (i) phase-controlled rescanning, (ii) sweep direction, (iii) target motion (direction and amplitude), (iv) respiratory cycle, and (v) prescribed dose. Spot weight maps were calculated by using a beam field-specific target volume, which takes account of range variations for respective respiratory phases. To emphasize the impact of intrafractional motion on the dose distribution, respiratory gating was not used. The accumulated dose was calculated by applying a B-spline-based deformable image registration, and the results for phase-controlled layered rescanning (PCRL) and phase-controlled volumetric rescanning (PCRV) were compared. For the phantom study, simple LR was unable to improve the dose distributions for an increased number of rescannings. The phase-controlled technique without rescanning (1×PCRL and 1×PCRV) degraded dose conformity significantly due to a reduced scan velocity. In contrast, 4×PCRL or more significantly and consistently improved dose distribution. PCRV showed interference effects, but in general also improved dose homogeneity with higher numbers of rescannings. Dose distributions with single PCRL∕PCRV with a

  12. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  13. Evaluation of adaptive treatment planning for patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Siddiqui, Salim M.; Movsas, Benjamin; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop metrics to evaluate uncertainties in deformable dose accumulation for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Initial treatment plans (primary) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) images were retrospectively processed for seven NSCLC patients, who showed significant tumor regression during the course of treatment. Each plan was developed with IMRT for 2 Gy  ×  33 fractions. A B-spline-based DIR algorithm was used to register weekly CBCT images to a reference image acquired at fraction 21 and the resultant displacement vector fields (DVFs) were then modified using a finite element method (FEM). The doses were calculated on each of these CBCT images and mapped to the reference image using a tri-linear dose interpolation method, based on the B-spline and FEM-generated DVFs. Contours propagated from the planning image were adjusted to the residual tumor and OARs on the reference image to develop a secondary plan. For iso-prescription adaptive plans (relative to initial plans), mean lung dose (MLD) was reduced, on average from 17.3 Gy (initial plan) to 15.2, 14.5 and 14.8 Gy for the plans adapted using the rigid, B-Spline and FEM-based registrations. Similarly, for iso-toxic adaptive plans (considering MLD relative to initial plans) using the rigid, B-Spline and FEM-based registrations, the average doses were 69.9  ±  6.8, 65.7  ±  5.1 and 67.2  ±  5.6 Gy in the initial volume (PTV1), and 81.5  ±  25.8, 77.7  ±  21.6, and 78.9  ±  22.5 Gy in the residual volume (PTV21), respectively. Tumor volume reduction was correlated with dose escalation (for isotoxic plans, correlation coefficient  =  0.92), and with MLD reduction (for iso-fractional plans, correlation coefficient  =  0.85). For the case of the iso-toxic dose escalation, plans adapted with the B-Spline and FEM DVFs differed from the primary plan adapted with rigid registration by 2.8  ±  1

  14. Combined use of positron emission tomography and volume doubling time in lung cancer screening with low-dose CT scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, H; Dirksen, A; Jakobsen, Annika Loft

    2011-01-01

    In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules.......In lung cancer screening the ability to distinguish malignant from benign nodules is a key issue. This study evaluates the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) and volume doubling time (VDT) to discriminate between benign and malignant nodules....

  15. TU-G-204-09: The Effects of Reduced- Dose Lung Cancer Screening CT On Lung Nodule Detection Using a CAD Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, S; Lo, P; Kim, G; Hsu, W; Hoffman, J; Brown, M; McNitt-Gray, M [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While Lung Cancer Screening CT is being performed at low doses, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of further reducing dose on the performance of a CAD nodule-detection algorithm. Methods: We selected 50 cases from our local database of National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) patients for which we had both the image series and the raw CT data from the original scans. All scans were acquired with fixed mAs (25 for standard-sized patients, 40 for large patients) on a 64-slice scanner (Sensation 64, Siemens Healthcare). All images were reconstructed with 1-mm slice thickness, B50 kernel. 10 of the cases had at least one nodule reported on the NLST reader forms. Based on a previously-published technique, we added noise to the raw data to simulate reduced-dose versions of each case at 50% and 25% of the original NLST dose (i.e. approximately 1.0 and 0.5 mGy CTDIvol). For each case at each dose level, the CAD detection algorithm was run and nodules greater than 4 mm in diameter were reported. These CAD results were compared to “truth”, defined as the approximate nodule centroids from the NLST reports. Subject-level mean sensitivities and false-positive rates were calculated for each dose level. Results: The mean sensitivities of the CAD algorithm were 35% at the original dose, 20% at 50% dose, and 42.5% at 25% dose. The false-positive rates, in decreasing-dose order, were 3.7, 2.9, and 10 per case. In certain cases, particularly in larger patients, there were severe photon-starvation artifacts, especially in the apical region due to the high-attenuating shoulders. Conclusion: The detection task was challenging for the CAD algorithm at all dose levels, including the original NLST dose. However, the false-positive rate at 25% dose approximately tripled, suggesting a loss of CAD robustness somewhere between 0.5 and 1.0 mGy. NCI grant U01 CA181156 (Quantitative Imaging Network); Tobacco Related Disease Research Project grant 22RT-0131.

  16. Effects of long-term low-dose oxygen supplementation on the epithelial function, collagen metabolism and interstitial fibrogenesis in the guinea pig lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishizaka Akitoshi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The patient population receiving long-term oxygen therapy has increased with the rising morbidity of COPD. Although high-dose oxygen induces pulmonary edema and interstitial fibrosis, potential lung injury caused by long-term exposure to low-dose oxygen has not been fully analyzed. This study was designed to clarify the effects of long-term low-dose oxygen inhalation on pulmonary epithelial function, edema formation, collagen metabolism, and alveolar fibrosis. Methods Guinea pigs (n = 159 were exposed to either 21% or 40% oxygen for a maximum of 16 weeks, and to 90% oxygen for a maximum of 120 hours. Clearance of inhaled technetium-labeled diethylene triamine pentaacetate (Tc-DTPA and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid-to-serum ratio (BAL/Serum of albumin (ALB were used as markers of epithelial permeability. Lung wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D was measured to evaluate pulmonary edema, and types I and III collagenolytic activities and hydroxyproline content in the lung were analyzed as indices of collagen metabolism. Pulmonary fibrotic state was evaluated by histological quantification of fibrous tissue area stained with aniline blue. Results The clearance of Tc-DTPA was higher with 2 week exposure to 40% oxygen, while BAL/Serum Alb and W/D did not differ between the 40% and 21% groups. In the 40% oxygen group, type I collagenolytic activities at 2 and 4 weeks and type III collagenolytic activity at 2 weeks were increased. Hydroxyproline and fibrous tissue area were also increased at 2 weeks. No discernible injury was histologically observed in the 40% group, while progressive alveolar damage was observed in the 90% group. Conclusion These results indicate that epithelial function is damaged, collagen metabolism is affected, and both breakdown of collagen fibrils and fibrogenesis are transiently induced even with low-dose 40% oxygen exposure. However, these changes are successfully compensated even with continuous exposure to low-dose

  17. Vorinostat and Concurrent Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases: A Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Clara Y H; Wakelee, Heather A; Neal, Joel W; Pinder-Schenck, Mary C; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael; Chang, Steven D; Adler, John R; Modlin, Leslie A; Harsh, Griffith R; Soltys, Scott G

    2017-09-01

    To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, given concurrently with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) brain metastases. Secondary objectives were to determine toxicity, local failure, distant intracranial failure, and overall survival rates. In this multicenter study, patients with 1 to 4 NSCLC brain metastases, each ≤2 cm, were enrolled in a phase 1, 3 + 3 dose escalation trial. Vorinostat dose levels were 200, 300, and 400 mg orally once daily for 14 days. Single-fraction SRS was delivered on day 3. A dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grade 3 to 5 acute nonhematologic adverse event related to vorinostat or SRS occurring within 30 days. From 2009 to 2014, 17 patients were enrolled and 12 patients completed study treatment. Because no DLTs were observed, the MTD was established as 400 mg. Acute adverse events were reported by 10 patients (59%). Five patients discontinued vorinostat early and withdrew from the study. The most common reasons for withdrawal were dyspnea (n=2), nausea (n=1), and fatigue (n=2). With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-64 months), Kaplan-Meier overall survival was 13 months. There were no local failures. One patient (8%) at the 400-mg dose level with a 2.0-cm metastasis developed histologically confirmed grade 4 radiation necrosis 2 months after SRS. The MTD of vorinostat with concurrent SRS was established as 400 mg. Although no DLTs were observed, 5 patients withdrew before completing the treatment course, a result that emphasizes the need for supportive care during vorinostat administration. There were no local failures. A larger, randomized trial may evaluate both the tolerability and potential local control benefit of vorinostat concurrent with SRS for brain metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickhoff, C; Dahele, M; Paul, M A; van de Ven, P M; de Langen, A J; Senan, S; Smit, E F; Hartemink, K J

    2016-04-01

    Curative intent treatment options for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after radical chemoradiotherapy for locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are limited. In selected patients, surgery can be technically feasible, although it is widely believed to be hazardous. As data regarding the outcome of this approach is sparse, we evaluated our institutional experience with salvage surgery. Patients with a pulmonary resection for in-field locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy (≥60 Gy) for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, were identified and retrospectively analyzed. A total of 15 patients treated between January 2007 and August 2015 were eligible for evaluation. In 13 patients (87%), the indication for surgery was a locoregional recurrence, while 2 patients had persistent tumor. The prior median radiotherapy dose was 66 Gy (range 60-70). All patients underwent an anatomical resection, with 8 patients having a pneumonectomy, and all pathological specimens revealed the presence of viable tumor. The in-hospital morbidity rate was 40% (6 patients), and the 90-day mortality rate was 6.7% (1 patient). Median follow-up was 12.1 months. The estimated median overall and event-free survivals were 46 months and 43.6 months, respectively. Salvage surgery for locoregional recurrence or persistent tumor after high dose chemoradiotherapy, resulted in acceptable morbidity, mortality and promising outcome. It should be considered as a treatment option for selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prospective study evaluating the use of IV contrast on IMRT treatment planning for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua, E-mail: huli@radonc.wustl.edu; Bottani, Beth; DeWees, Todd; Michalski, Jeff M.; Mutic, Sasa; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of exclusively using intravenous (IV) contrast x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans on lung cancer intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning. Methods: Eight patients with lung cancer (one small cell, seven nonsmall cell) scheduled to receive IMRT consented to acquisition of simulation CT scans with and without IV contrast. Clinical treatment plans optimized on the noncontrast scans were recomputed on contrast scans and dose coverage was compared, along with the γ passing rates. Results: IV contrast enhanced scans provided better target and critical structure conspicuity than the noncontrast scans. Using noncontrast scan as a reference, the median absolute/relative differences in mean, maximum, and minimum doses to the planning target volume (PTV) were −4.5 cGy/−0.09%, 41.1 cGy/0.62%, and −19.7 cGy/−0.50%, respectively. Regarding organs-at-risk (OARs), the median absolute/relative differences of maximum dose to heart was −13.3 cGy/−0.32%, to esophagus was −63.4 cGy/−0.89%, and to spinal cord was −16.3 cGy/−0.46%. The median heart region of interest CT Hounsfield Unit (HU) number difference between noncontrast and contrast scans was 136.4 HU (range, 94.2–161.8 HU). Subjectively, the regions with absolute dose differences greater than 3% of the prescription dose were small and typically located at the patient periphery and/or at the beam edges. The median γ passing rate was 0.9981 (range, 0.9654–0.9999) using 3% absolute dose difference/3 mm distance-to-agreement criteria. Overall, all evaluated cases were found to be clinically equivalent. Conclusions: PTV and OARs dose differences between noncontrast and contrast scans appear to be minimal for lung cancer patients undergoing IMRT. Using IV contrast scans as the primary simulation dataset could increase treatment planning efficiency and accuracy by avoiding unnecessary scans, manually region overriding, and planning errors caused by

  20. Abdominal pediatric cancer surveillance using serial computed tomography: evaluation of organ absorbed dose and effective dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Diana; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L; McGahan, John P; Stern, Robin; Boone, John M

    2011-02-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used extensively in cancer diagnosis, staging, evaluation of response to treatment, and in active surveillance for cancer reoccurrence. A review of CT technology is provided, at a level of detail appropriate for a busy clinician to review. The basis of x-ray CT dosimetry is also discussed, and concepts of absorbed dose and effective dose (ED) are distinguished. Absorbed dose is a physical quantity (measured in milligray [mGy]) equal to the x-ray energy deposited in a mass of tissue, whereas ED uses an organ-specific weighting method that converts organ doses to ED measured in millisieverts (mSv). The organ weighting values carry with them a measure of radiation risk, and so ED (in mSv) is not a physical dose metric but rather is one that conveys radiation risk. The use of CT in a cancer surveillance protocol was used as an example of a pediatric patient who had kidney cancer, with surgery and radiation therapy. The active use of CT for cancer surveillance along with diagnostic CT scans led to a total of 50 CT scans performed on this child in a 7-year period. It was estimated that the patient received an average organ dose of 431 mGy from these CT scans. By comparison, the radiation therapy was performed and delivered 50.4 Gy to the patient's abdomen. Thus, the total dose from CT represented only 0.8% of the patient's radiation dose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lung cancer: evaluation with MR imaging during and after irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelevitz, D F; Henschke, C I; Batata, M; Kim, Y S; Chu, F

    1994-01-01

    We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to evaluate treatment response of 10 consecutive lung cancer patients while they were receiving radiation therapy. Patients were scanned before treatment, during treatment, at completion of treatment, and if possible, at 3-month intervals thereafter. The initial tumor response to radiation was increasing signal intensity and increasing heterogeneity, best seen on T2-weighted images. Small tumors virtually disappeared, whereas larger masses remained as complex cystic structures or developed cavities. The adjacent irradiated lung parenchyma had increased signal on both the T1- and T2-weighted images as early as 17 days after start of treatment. The signal intensity continued to increase for several months after treatment, but subsequently decreased.

  2. Identification of early-stage usual interstitial pneumonia from low-dose chest CT scans using fractional high-density lung distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yiting; Salvatore, Mary; Liu, Shuang; Jirapatnakul, Artit; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Reeves, Anthony P.

    2017-03-01

    A fully-automated computer algorithm has been developed to identify early-stage Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) using features computed from low-dose CT scans. In each scan, the pre-segmented lung region is divided into N subsections (N = 1, 8, 27, 64) by separating the lung from anterior/posterior, left/right and superior/inferior in 3D space. Each subsection has approximately the same volume. In each subsection, a classic density measurement (fractional high-density volume h) is evaluated to characterize the disease severity in that subsection, resulting in a feature vector of length N for each lung. Features are then combined in two different ways: concatenation (2*N features) and taking the maximum in each of the two corresponding subsections in the two lungs (N features). The algorithm was evaluated on a dataset consisting of 51 UIP and 56 normal cases, a combined feature vector was computed for each case and an SVM classifier (RBF kernel) was used to classify them into UIP or normal using ten-fold cross validation. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under the curve (AUC) was used for evaluation. The highest AUC of 0.95 was achieved by using concatenated features and an N of 27. Using lung partition (N = 27, 64) with concatenated features had significantly better result over not using partitions (N = 1) (p-value < 0.05). Therefore this equal-volume partition fractional high-density volume method is useful in distinguishing early-stage UIP from normal cases.

  3. Dose evaluation of therapeutic radiolabeled bleomycin complexes based on biodistribution data in wild-type rats:Effect of radionuclides in absorbed dose of different organs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassan Yousefnia; Samaneh Zolghadri; Amir Reza Jalilian; Mohammad Ghannadi-Maragheh

    2015-01-01

    Bleomycins (BLMs), as tumor-seeking antibiotics, have been used for over 20 years in treatment of several types of cancers. Several radioisotopes are used in radiolabeling of BLMs for therapeutic and diagnostic purpos-es. An important points in developing new radiopharmaceuticals, especially therapeutic agents, is the absorbed dose delivered in critical organs. In this work, absorbed dose to organs after injection of 153Sm-, 177Lu-and 166Ho-labeled BLM was investigated by radiation dose assessment resource (RADAR) method based on biodis-tribution data in wild-type rats. The absorbed dose effect of the radionuclides was evaluated. The maximum absorbed dose for the complexes was observed in the kidneys, liver and lungs. For all the radiolabeled BLMs, bone and red marrow received considerable absorbed dose. Due to the high energy beta particles emitted by 166Ho, higher absorbed dose is observed for 166Ho-BLM in the most organs. The reported data can be useful for the determination of the maximum permissible injected activity of the radiolabeled BLMs in the treatment planning programs.

  4. SU-E-T-92: Achieving Desirable Lung Doses in Total Body Irradiation Based On in Vivo Dosimetry and Custom Tissue Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Shiu, A; Zhou, S; Cui, J; Ballas, L [Univ Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To achieve desirable lung doses in total body irradiation (TBI) based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensation. Methods: The 15 MV photon beam of a Varian TrueBeam STx linac was used for TBI. Patients were positioned in the lateral decubitus position for AP/PA treatment delivery. Dose was calculated using the midpoint of the separation distance across the patient’s umbilicus. Patients received 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days. The dose rate at the patient’s midplane was approximately 10 cGy/min. Cerrobend blocks with a 5-HVL thickness were used for the primary lung shielding. A custom styrofoam holder for rice-flour filled bags was created based on the lung block cutouts. This was used to provide further lung shielding based on in vivo dose measurements. Lucite plates and rice-flour bags were placed in the head, neck, chest, and lower extremity regions during the treatment to compensate for the beam off-axis output variations. Two patients were included in the study. Patients 1 and 2 received a craniospinal treatment (1080 cGy) and a mediastinum treatment (2520 cGy), respectively, before the TBI. During the TBI nanoDot dosimeters were placed on the patient skin in the forehead, neck, umbilicus, and lung regions for dose monitoring. The doses were readout immediately after the treatment. Based on the readings, fine tuning of the thickness of the rice-flour filled bags was exploited to achieve the desirable lung doses. Results: For both patients the mean lung doses, which took into consideration all treatments, were controlled within 900 +/−10% cGy, as desired. Doses to the forehead, neck, and umbilicus were achieved within +/−10% of the prescribed dose (1200 cGy). Conclusion: A reliable and robust method was developed to achieve desirable lung doses and uniform body dose in TBI based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensator.

  5. Emphysema quantification on low-dose CT using percentage of low-attenuation volume and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions: Effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Mizuho, E-mail: nmizuho@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Matsumoto, Sumiaki, E-mail: sumatsu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Seki, Shinichiro, E-mail: sshin@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Koyama, Hisanobu, E-mail: hkoyama@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Radiology, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Ohno, Yoshiharu, E-mail: yosirad@kobe-u.ac.jp [Advanced Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Functional and Diagnostic Imaging Research, Department of Radiology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, 7-5-2 Kusunoki-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0017 (Japan); Fujisawa, Yasuko, E-mail: yasuko1.fujisawa@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); Sugihara, Naoki, E-mail: naoki.sugihara@toshiba.co.jp [Toshiba Medical Systems Corporation, 1385 Shimoishigami, Otawara, Tochigi 324-8550 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Emphysema quantification (LAV% and D) was affected by image noise on low-dose CT. • For LAV% and D, AIDR 3D improved agreement of quantification on low-dose CT. • AIDR 3D has the potential to quantify emphysema accurately on low-dose CT. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the effects of adaptive iterative dose reduction using 3D processing (AIDR 3D) for quantification of two measures of emphysema: percentage of low-attenuation volume (LAV%) and size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Method and materials: : Fifty-two patients who underwent standard-dose (SDCT) and low-dose CT (LDCT) were included. SDCT without AIDR 3D, LDCT without AIDR 3D, and LDCT with AIDR 3D were used for emphysema quantification. First, LAV% was computed at 10 thresholds from −990 to −900 HU. Next, at the same thresholds, linear regression on a log–log plot was used to compute the power law exponent (D) for the cumulative frequency-size distribution of low-attenuation lung regions. Bland–Altman analysis was used to assess whether AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D. Results: The mean relative differences in LAV% between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 3.73%–88.18% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were −6.61% to 0.406%. The mean relative differences in D between LDCT without AIDR 3D and SDCT were 8.22%–19.11% and between LDCT with AIDR 3D and SDCT were 1.82%–4.79%. AIDR 3D improved agreement between LDCT and SDCT at thresholds from −930 to −990 HU for LAV% and at all thresholds for D. Conclusion: AIDR 3D improved the consistency between LDCT and SDCT for emphysema quantification of LAV% and D.

  6. Imaging dose evaluations on image guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Sun Boong; KIm, Ki Hwan; Kim, Il Hwan; Kim, Woong; Im, Hyeong Seo; Han, Su Chul; Kang, Jin Mook; Kim, Jin Ho [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul(Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Evaluating absorbed dose related to 2D and 3D imaging confirmation devices. According to the radiographic projection conditions, absorbed doses are measured that 3 glass dosimeters attached to the centers of 0°, 90°, 180°and 270° in the head, thorax and abdomen each with Rando phantom are used in field size 26.6×20, 15×15. In the same way, absorbed doses are measured for width 16 cm and 10 cm of CBCT each. OBI(version 1.5) system and calibrated glass dosimeters are used for the measurement. AP projection for 2D imaging check, In 0° absorbed doses measured in the head were 1.44±0.26 mGy with the field size 26.6×20, 1.17±0.02 mGy with the field size 15×15. With the same method, absorbed doses in the thorax were 3.08±0.86 mGy to 0.57±0.02 mGy by reducing field size. In the abdomen, absorbed dose were reduced 8.19±0.54 mGy to 4.19±0.09 mGy. Finally according to the field size, absorbed doses has decreased by average 5-12%. With Lateral projection, absorbed doses showed average 5-8% decrease. CBCT for 3D imaging check, CBDI in the head were 4.39±0.11 mGy to 3.99±0.13 mGy by reducing the width 16 cm to 10 cm. In the same way in thorax the absorbed dose were reduced 34.88±0.93(10.48±0.09) mGy to 31.01±0.3(9.30±0.09) mGy and 35.99±1.86 mGy to 32.27±1.35 mGy in the abdomen. With variation of width 16 cm and 10 cm, they showed 8-11% decrease. By means of reducing 2D field size, absorbed dose were decreased average 5-12% in 3D width size 8-11%. So that it is necessary for radiation therapists to recognize systematical management for absorbed dose for Imaging confirmation. and also for frequent CBCT, it is considered whether or not prescribed dose for RT refer to imaging dose.

  7. Small pulmonary nodules in baseline and incidence screening rounds of low-dose CT lung cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Joan E; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2017-02-01

    Currently, lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) is widely recommended for high-risk individuals by US guidelines, but there still is an ongoing debate concerning respective recommendations for European countries. Nevertheless, the available data regarding pulmonary nodules released by lung cancer screening studies could improve future screening guidelines, as well as the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules on routine CT scans. Most lung cancer screening trials present results for baseline and incidence screening rounds separately, clustering pulmonary nodules initially found at baseline screening and newly detected pulmonary nodules after baseline screening together. This approach does not appreciate possible differences among pulmonary nodules detected at baseline and firstly detected at incidence screening rounds and is heavily influenced by methodological differences of the respective screening trials. This review intends to create a basis for assessing non-calcified pulmonary nodules detected during LDCT lung cancer screening in a more clinical relevant manner. The aim is to present data of non-calcified pulmonary baseline nodules and new non-calcified pulmonary incident nodules without clustering them together, thereby also simplifying translation to the clinical practice of incidentally detected pulmonary nodules. Small pulmonary nodules newly detected at incidence screening rounds of LDCT lung cancer screening may possess a greater lung cancer probability than pulmonary baseline nodules at a smaller size, which is essential for the development of new guidelines.

  8. Lung cancer screening with low-dose helical CT in Korea: experiences at the Samsung Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Semin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Rhee, Chong H

    2005-06-01

    To determine overall detection rates of lung cancer by low-dose CT (LDCT) screening and to compare histopathologic and imaging differences of detected cancers between high- and low-risk groups, this study included 6,406 asymptomatic Korean adults with >or=45 yr of age who underwent LDCT for lung cancer screening. All were classified into high- (>or=20 pack-year smoking; 3,353) and low-risk (3,053; <20 pack-yr smoking and non-smokers) groups. We compared CT findings of detected cancers and detection rates between high- and low-risk. At initial CT, 35% (2,255 of 6,406) had at least one or more non-calcified nodule. Lung cancer detection rates were 0.36% (23 of 6,406). Twenty-one non-small cell lung cancers appeared as solid (n=14) or ground-glass opacity (GGO) (n=7) nodules. Cancer likelihood was higher in GGO nodules than in solid nodules (p<0.01). Fifteen of 23 cancers occurred in high-risk group and 8 in low-risk group (p=0.215). Therefore, LDCT screening help detect early stage of lung cancer in asymptomatic Korean population with detection rate of 0.36% on a population basis and may be useful for discovering early lung cancer in low-risk group as well as in high-risk group.

  9. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Omar; Mejia, Jorge; Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye; Toussaint, Olivier; Dogné, Jean-Michel; Lucas, Stéphane

    2014-07-01

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints).

  11. Evaluation of metal trace detachment from dosing pumps using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, Omar, E-mail: omar.lozanogarcia@unamur.be [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Mejia, Jorge [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Laloy, Julie; Alpan, Lütfiye [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Toussaint, Olivier [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Cellular Biology (URBC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Dogné, Jean-Michel [Namur Thrombosis and Hemostasis Centre (NTHC), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Lucas, Stéphane [Research Centre for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), Namur Nanosafety Centre (NNC), Namur Research Institute for Life Sciences - NARILIS, University of Namur - UNamur, Rue de Bruxelles 61, B-5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    Metal trace detachment evaluation is essential for instruments destined for pharmaceutical applications, such as pumps. Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was used to determine and quantify metal traces originated from stainless steel and ceramic dosing pumps. Metal traces were quantified from either distilled water samples or cellulose filters in two tests: a short-term test of 16 h mimicking a daily cycle of a dosing pump for industrial applications, and a long-term test of 9 days evaluating the pump wearing. The main result is that ceramic dosing pumps present lower metal detachment than stainless steel counterparts. Traces of Si and Al were found originating from pieces around the pumps (pipes and joints)

  12. Percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media for small fields of CyberKnife

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chung Il; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Suh, Tae Suk; Hong, Seung-Woo; Min, Kyung Joo; Lee, Sang Deok; Chung, Su Mi; Jung, Jae-Yong

    2014-01-01

    The percentage depth dose distributions in inhomogeneous phantoms with lung and bone equivalent media are studied. For lung equivalent media a Balsa wood is used, and for a soft bone equivalent media a compound material with epoxy resin, hardener and calcium carbonate is used. Polystyrene slabs put together with these materials are used as an inhomogeneous phantom. Dose measurements are performed with Gafchromic EBT film by using photon beams from 6MV CyberKnife at the Seoul Uridul Hospital. The cone sizes of the photon beams are varied from 5, 10 to 30 mm. As a simulation tool GEANT4 Monte Carlo code v9.4.p02 is used. When the Balsa wood is inserted in the phantom, the dose measured with EBT film is found to be significantly different from the dose without the EBT film in and beyond the Balsa wood region, particularly for small field sizes. On the other hand, when the soft bone equivalent material is inserted in the phantom, discrepancy between the dose measured with EBT film and the dose without EBT film ca...

  13. Experimental evaluation of a GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm in the Monaco treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Moti R; Kim, Anthony; Sarfehnia, Arman; Ahmad, Sayed B; Beachey, David J; Sahgal, Arjun; Keller, Brian M

    2016-11-01

    A new GPU-based Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm (GPUMCD), developed by the vendor Elekta for the Monaco treatment planning system (TPS), is capable of modeling dose for both a standard linear accelerator and an Elekta MRI linear accelerator. We have experimentally evaluated this algorithm for a standard Elekta Agility linear accelerator. A beam model was developed in the Monaco TPS (research version 5.09.06) using the commissioned beam data for a 6 MV Agility linac. A heterogeneous phantom representing several scenarios - tumor-in-lung, lung, and bone-in-tissue - was designed and built. Dose calculations in Monaco were done using both the current clinical Monte Carlo algorithm, XVMC, and the new GPUMCD algorithm. Dose calculations in a Pinnacle TPS were also produced using the collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm with heterogeneity correction. Calculations were compared with the measured doses using an ionization chamber (A1SL) and Gafchromic EBT3 films for 2×2 cm2,5×5 cm2, and 10×2 cm2 field sizes. The percentage depth doses (PDDs) calculated by XVMC and GPUMCD in a homogeneous solid water phantom were within 2%/2 mm of film measurements and within 1% of ion chamber measurements. For the tumor-in-lung phantom, the calculated doses were within 2.5%/2.5 mm of film measurements for GPUMCD. For the lung phantom, doses calculated by all of the algorithms were within 3%/3 mm of film measurements, except for the 2×2 cm2 field size where the CCC algorithm underestimated the depth dose by ∼5% in a larger extent of the lung region. For the bone phantom, all of the algorithms were equivalent and calculated dose to within 2%/2 mm of film measurements, except at the interfaces. Both GPUMCD and XVMC showed interface effects, which were more pronounced for GPUMCD and were comparable to film measurements, whereas the CCC algorithm showed these effects poorly. PACS number(s): 87.53.Bn, 87.55.dh, 87.55.km. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Performance analysis for KALIMER containment dome and offsite dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Do Hee; Lee, Y. B.; Kang, C. S.; Cho, Y. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    In case HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) occurs, large amount of radionuclide is released and causes significant hazards to environment and public health. To prevent and mitigate the accident consequences, KALIMER containment is designed to constrain release of radionuclide. In this study, performance analysis for KALIMER containment was made to determine whether the containment could maintain its integrity and achieve its purpose in case of HCDA. Performance analysis of KALIMER containment was also made through evaluating radiation dose at site boundary. The performance analysis showed that KALIMER containment could maintain its integrity and achieve its purpose in case of HCDA. Also, it was proved that sodium spray fire can be more important menace to containment integrity than sodium pool fire. Results of dose assessment was different from those of performance analysis. Sodium pool fire caused higher radiation doses than sodium spray fire. But, dose values evaluated for HCDA were much lower than dose limit values for both sodium pool fire and sodium spray fire. 23 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  15. Fetal cystic lung lesions: evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Peng; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shih, Shin-Lin; Chen, Yi-Fang; Yang, Fei-Shih; Chen, Su-Chiu

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the contribution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the diagnosis of fetal cystic lung lesions found on routine prenatal ultrasound (US). Experienced radiologists retrospectively reviewed 34 fetal MRI studies performed in 20 fetuses (from 20 to 35 gestational weeks; including 14 repeat studies 10 weeks after the initial MRI), focusing on shape, signal characteristics, feeding artery, volume change, and location of the cystic lesions. Diagnoses were confirmed after birth by postnatal multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and/or surgery. Bronchopulmonary sequestration (BPS) in the second trimester appeared as a well-defined, homogeneous, hyperintense mass (pure BPS) in eight cases or as a lobulated, inhomogeneous hyperintense mass (BPS mixed with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM)) in three cases. The feeding artery was visible in all 11 cases in the initial MRI, and regression of the mass was seen in 7 cases. As the mass regressed in the third trimester, the signal intensity decreased, becoming inhomogeneous, and the margins became lobulated. The mean initial ratio of the volume of the BPS lesion to the ipsilateral lung in lesions with partial regression was 82%; the mean initial ratio in lesions with nearly complete regression was 61%. CCAM (6) cases also appeared as a hyperintense lobulated mass, and as the lesions regressed, they decreased in size and signal intensity. As with BPS, the larger the lesion on initial MRI, the less likely it was to regress completely. Congenital lobar fluid overload in three cases appeared as a hyperintense, homogeneous lobe with stretched hilar vessels. Prenatal MRI is useful as a diagnostic tool complementary to US for evaluating fetal cystic lung lesions. Smaller lung lesions (<60%) may regress completely.

  16. SU-E-J-87: Lung Deformable Image Registration Using Surface Mesh Deformation for Dose Distribution Combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labine, A; Carrier, J; Bedwani, S [CHUM - Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Chav, R [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie et orthopedie (LIO), Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Ecole de technologie superieure, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); DeGuise, J [Laboratoire de recherche en imagerie et orthopedie (LIO), Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To allow a reliable deformable image registration (DIR) method for dose calculation in radiation therapy. This work proposes a performance assessment of a morphological segmentation algorithm that generates a deformation field from lung surface displacements with 4DCT datasets. Methods: From the 4DCT scans of 15 selected patients, the deep exhale phase of the breathing cycle is identified as the reference scan. Varian TPS EclipseTM is used to draw lung contours, which are given as input to the morphological segmentation algorithm. Voxelized contours are smoothed by a Gaussian filter and then transformed into a surface mesh representation. Such mesh is adapted by rigid and elastic deformations to match each subsequent lung volumes. The segmentation efficiency is assessed by comparing the segmented lung contour and the TPS contour considering two volume metrics, defined as Volumetric Overlap Error (VOE) [%] and Relative Volume Difference (RVD) [%] and three surface metrics, defined as Average Symmetric Surface Distance (ASSD) [mm], Root Mean Square Symmetric Surface Distance (RMSSD) [mm] and Maximum Symmetric Surface Distance (MSSD) [mm]. Then, the surface deformation between two breathing phases is determined by the displacement of corresponding vertices in each deformed surface. The lung surface deformation is linearly propagated in the lung volume to generate 3D deformation fields for each breathing phase. Results: The metrics were averaged over the 15 patients and calculated with the same segmentation parameters. The volume metrics obtained are a VOE of 5.2% and a RVD of 2.6%. The surface metrics computed are an ASSD of 0.5 mm, a RMSSD of 0.8 mm and a MSSD of 6.9 mm. Conclusion: This study shows that the morphological segmentation algorithm can provide an automatic method to capture an organ motion from 4DCT scans and translate it into a volume deformation grid needed by DIR method for dose distribution combination.

  17. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  18. SU-E-T-289: Dose-Volume-Effect Relationships for Lung Cancer Patients Treated with SBRT On a Prospective Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayyas, E; Brown, S; Liu, J; Kim, J; Sun, Z; Devpura, S; Ajlouni, M; Siddiqui, F; Movsas, B; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is commonly used to treat early stage lung tumors. This study was designed to evaluate associations between dose, volume and clinical outcomes including analysis of both clinical toxicity scores and quality of life (QOL) data for non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SBRT. Preliminary results are presented. Methods: Sixty-seven NSCLC patients, 46 primarily with early stage, and 21 with recurrent disease were treated with dose regimens consisting mainly of 12 Gy x 4 fractions, and 3 or 5 fractions at lower dose, for patients with recurrent disease (Table 1). Follow-up data is being collected at baseline, after treatment and at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months post-treatment. Clinical follow-up data acquired to date was assessed using the Charlson Comorbidity Clinical and Toxicity Scoring forms. QOL data was evaluated using the EQ-5D, and FACT-TOI validated surveys. All outcomes surveys are collected within an “in-house” developed outcomes database. Results: The median follow-up was 3.5±0.8 months. Mean lung doses (MLD) were converted to BED-2 Gy using the linear-quadratic model with an alpha/beta=3.0. Average MLD was 3.7+3.1 Gy (range: 0.4–20.9 Gy). The percentages of patients with > grade 2 cough, dyspnea and fatigue were 13.3, 17.0, 6.3%, respectively. Preliminary analyses (at 3 months after SBRT) show a mild correlation between MLD > 2 Gy and > grade 2 cough (borderline significant) and dyspnea (significant, p<0.05). One patient was observed with a grade 3 cough. Given the short follow-up, tumor control is not yet assessable. Conclusion: The SBRT dose fractionation regimen of 12 Gy x 4 was well tolerated at early time points. Additional follow-up is required to assess the long-term clinical outcome efficacy and toxicity profiles of the dose regimen.

  19. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A. W.; Saripan, M. I.; Bradley, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose.

  20. Prospective longitudinal evaluation of lung function during the first year of life after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, W.; Hanekamp, M.N.; Ijsselstijn, H.; Nieuwhof, E.M.; Hop, W.C.J.; Tibboel, D.; Jongste, J.C. de; Merkus, P.J.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To collect longitudinal data on lung function in the first year of life after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and to evaluate relationships between lung function and perinatal factors. Longitudinal data on lung function in the first year of life after extracorporeal membrane oxygenati

  1. In Vitro Dosing Performance of the ELLIPTA® Dry Powder Inhaler Using Asthma and COPD Patient Inhalation Profiles Replicated with the Electronic Lung (eLung™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melanie; Leggett, Richard; Pang, Cheng; Charles, Stephen; Gillett, Ben; Prime, David

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the in vitro dose delivery characteristics of approved asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) therapies delivered via the ELLIPTA(®) dry powder inhaler across inhalation endpoints representative of the target patient population, using the Electronic Lung (eLung™) to replicate inhaler-specific patient inhalation profiles that were previously recorded in vivo. Selected profiles, representative of the range of inhalation endpoints achieved by patients with all severities of asthma and COPD, were replicated using the eLung breathing simulator in conjunction with an oropharyngeal cast. A Next Generation Impactor was coupled to the eLung to determine the aerodynamic particle size distribution of the ex-throat dose (ETD) of asthma and COPD therapies delivered via the ELLIPTA inhaler. Delivered dose (DD), ETD, and fine particle dose (FPD; defined as a mass of active substance less than 5 μm) were determined for fluticasone furoate (FF)/vilanterol (VI) 100/25 μg and 200/25 μg (asthma and COPD), umeclidinium (UMEC)/VI 62.5/25 μg (COPD only), FF 100 μg and 200μg monotherapy (asthma only), and UMEC 62.5 μg monotherapy (COPD only). Inhalation profiles replicated by eLung covered a wide range of peak inspiratory flow rates (41.6-136.9 L/min), pressure drops (1.2-13.8 kPa), and inhaled volumes through the inhaler (0.7-4.2L). DD was consistent across the range of patient representative inhalation parameters for all components (FF, VI, and UMEC) of each therapy assessed; although ETD and FPD were also generally consistent, some small variation was observed. Dose delivery was consistent for each of the components, whether delivered as mono- or combination therapy. The in vitro performance of the ELLIPTA inhaler has been demonstrated for the delivery of FF/VI, UMEC/VI, FF monotherapy, and UMEC monotherapy. Across a range of inspiratory profiles, DD was consistent, while ETD and FPD showed little flow dependency.

  2. Effect of deformable registration on the dose calculated in radiation therapy planning CT scans of lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunliffe, Alexandra R.; Armato, Samuel G.; White, Bradley; Justusson, Julia [Department of Radiology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Contee, Clay; Malik, Renuka; Al-Hallaq, Hania A., E-mail: hal-hallaq@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effects of deformable image registration of serial computed tomography (CT) scans on the radiation dose calculated from a treatment planning scan. Methods: Eighteen patients who received curative doses (≥60 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) of photon radiation therapy for lung cancer treatment were retrospectively identified. For each patient, a diagnostic-quality pretherapy (4–75 days) CT scan and a treatment planning scan with an associated dose map were collected. To establish correspondence between scan pairs, a researcher manually identified anatomically corresponding landmark point pairs between the two scans. Pretherapy scans then were coregistered with planning scans (and associated dose maps) using the demons deformable registration algorithm and two variants of the Fraunhofer MEVIS algorithm (“Fast” and “EMPIRE10”). Landmark points in each pretherapy scan were automatically mapped to the planning scan using the displacement vector field output from each of the three algorithms. The Euclidean distance between manually and automatically mapped landmark points (d{sub E}) and the absolute difference in planned dose (|ΔD|) were calculated. Using regression modeling, |ΔD| was modeled as a function of d{sub E}, dose (D), dose standard deviation (SD{sub dose}) in an eight-pixel neighborhood, and the registration algorithm used. Results: Over 1400 landmark point pairs were identified, with 58–93 (median: 84) points identified per patient. Average |ΔD| across patients was 3.5 Gy (range: 0.9–10.6 Gy). Registration accuracy was highest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm, with an average d{sub E} across patients of 5.2 mm (compared with >7 mm for the other two algorithms). Consequently, average |ΔD| was also lowest using the Fraunhofer MEVIS EMPIRE10 algorithm. |ΔD| increased significantly as a function of d{sub E} (0.42 Gy/mm), D (0.05 Gy/Gy), SD{sub dose} (1.4 Gy/Gy), and the algorithm used (≤1 Gy). Conclusions: An

  3. Long-term prognosis of patients with lung cancer detected on low-dose chest computed tomography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Tohru; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kusano, Suzushi; Chonan, Tatsuya; Fukai, Shimao; Endo, Katsuyuki

    2012-02-01

    The effectiveness of lung cancer screening using low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) remains elusive. The present study examined the prognosis of patients with lung cancer detected on CT screening in Japanese men and women. Subjects were 210 patients with primary lung cancer identified on CT screening at two medical facilities in Hitachi, Japan, where a total of 61,914 CT screenings were performed among 25,385 screenees between 1998 and 2006. Prognostic status of these patients was sought by examining medical records at local hospitals, supplemented by vital status information from local government. The 5-year survival rate was estimated according to the characteristics of patients and lung nodule. A total of 203 (97%) patients underwent surgery. During a 5.7-year mean follow-up period, 19 patients died from lung cancer and 6 died from other causes. The estimated 5-year survival rate for all patients and for those on stage IA was 90% and 97%, respectively. Besides cancer stage, smoking and nodule appearance were independent predictors of a poor survival; multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) was 4.7 (1.3, 16.5) for current and past smokers versus nonsmokers and 4.6 (1.6, 13.9) for solid nodule versus others. Even patients with solid shadow had a 5-year survival of 82% if the lesion was 20mm or less in size. Results suggest that lung cancers detected on CT screening are mostly curative. The impact of CT screening on mortality at community level needs to be clarified by monitoring lung cancer deaths.

  4. Problems in evaluating radiation dose via terrestrial and aquatic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, B E; Soldat, J K; Schreckhise, R G; Watson, E C; McKenzie, D H

    1981-12-01

    This review is concerned with exposure risk and the environmental pathways models used for predictive assessment of radiation dose. Exposure factors, the adequacy of available data, and the model subcomponents are critically reviewed from the standpoint of absolute error propagation. Although the models are inherently capable of better absolute accuracy, a calculated dose is usually overestimated by from two to six orders of magnitude, in practice. The principal reason for so large an error lies in using "generic" concentration ratios in situations where site specific data are needed. Major opinion of the model makers suggests a number midway between these extremes, with only a small likelihood of ever underestimating the radiation dose. Detailed evaluations are made of source considerations influencing dose (i.e., physical and chemical status of released material); dispersal mechanisms (atmospheric, hydrologic and biotic vector transport); mobilization and uptake mechanisms (i.e., chemical and other factors affecting the biological availability of radioelements); and critical pathways. Examples are shown of confounding in food-chain pathways, due to uncritical application of concentration ratios. Current thoughts of replacing the critical pathways approach to calculating dose with comprehensive model calculations are also shown to be ill-advised, given present limitations in the comprehensive data base. The pathways models may also require improved parametrization, as they are not at present structured adequately to lend themselves to validation. The extremely wide errors associated with predicting exposure stand in striking contrast to the error range associated with the extrapolation of animal effects data to the human being.

  5. Terminate lung cancer (TLC) study-A mixed-methods population approach to increase lung cancer screening awareness and low-dose computed tomography in Eastern Kentucky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Reese, David; Roper, Karen L; Cardarelli, Kathryn; Feltner, Frances J; Studts, Jamie L; Knight, Jennifer R; Armstrong, Debra; Weaver, Anthony; Shaffer, Dana

    2017-02-01

    For low dose CT lung cancer screening to be effective in curbing disease mortality, efforts are needed to overcome barriers to awareness and facilitate uptake of the current evidence-based screening guidelines. A sequential mixed-methods approach was employed to design a screening campaign utilizing messages developed from community focus groups, followed by implementation of the outreach campaign intervention in two high-risk Kentucky regions. This study reports on rates of awareness and screening in intervention regions, as compared to a control region.

  6. SU-E-T-427: Feasibility Study for Evaluation of IMRT Dose Distribution Using Geant4-Based Automated Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H; Shin, W; Testa, M; Min, C [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: For intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment planning validation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, a precise and automated procedure is necessary to evaluate the patient dose distribution. The aim of this study is to develop an automated algorithm for IMRT simulations using DICOM files and to evaluate the patient dose based on 4D simulation using the Geant4 MC toolkit. Methods: The head of a clinical linac (Varian Clinac 2300 IX) was modeled in Geant4 along with particular components such as the flattening filter and the multi-leaf collimator (MLC). Patient information and the position of the MLC were imported from the DICOM-RT interface. For each position of the MLC, a step- and-shoot technique was adopted. PDDs and lateral profiles were simulated in a water phantom (50×50×40 cm{sup 3}) and compared to measurement data. We used a lung phantom and MC-dose calculations were compared to the clinical treatment planning used at the Seoul National University Hospital. Results: In order to reproduce the measurement data, we tuned three free parameters: mean and standard deviation of the primary electron beam energy and the beam spot size. These parameters for 6 MV were found to be 5.6 MeV, 0.2378 MeV and 1 mm FWHM respectively. The average dose difference between measurements and simulations was less than 2% for PDDs and radial profiles. The lung phantom study showed fairly good agreement between MC and planning dose despite some unavoidable statistical fluctuation. Conclusion: The current feasibility study using the lung phantom shows the potential for IMRT dose validation using 4D MC simulations using Geant4 tool kits. This research was supported by Korea Institute of Nuclear safety and Development of Measurement Standards for Medical Radiation funded by Korea research Institute of Standards and Science. (KRISS-2015-15011032)

  7. In pediatric leukemia, dose evaluation according to the type of compensators in total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Yeon [Dongnam Inst. of Radiological and Medical science, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Catholic University of Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    Total body irradiation (TBI) and chemotherapy are the pre-treatment method of a stem cell transplantations of the childhood leukemia. in this study, we evaluate the Quantitative human body dose prior to the treatment. The MCNPX simulation program evaluated by changing the material of the tissue compensators with imitation material of pediatric exposure in a virtual space. As a result, first, the average skin dose with the material of the tissue compensators of Plexiglass tissue compensators is 74.60 mGy/min, Al is 73.96 mGy/min, Cu is 72.26 mGy/min and Pb 67.90 mGy/min respectively. Second, regardless of the tissue compensators material that organ dose were thyroid, gentile, digestive system, brain, lungs, kidneys higher in order. Finally, the ideal distance between body compensator and the patient were 50 cm aparting each other. In conclusion, tissue compensators Al, Cu, Pb are able to replace of the currently used in Plexiglass materials.

  8. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Opioid doses required for pain management in lung cancer patients with different cholesterol levels: negative correlation between opioid doses and cholesterol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhenhua; Liang, Lining; Li, Lingyu; Xu, Miao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hao; He, Songwei; Lin, Lilong; Zhang, Yixin; Song, Yancheng; Yang, Man; Luo, Yuling; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee; Zheng, Dayong; Zheng, Hui

    2016-03-08

    Pain management has been considered as significant contributor to broad quality-of-life improvement for cancer patients. Modulating serum cholesterol levels affects analgesia abilities of opioids, important pain killer for cancer patients, in mice system. Thus the correlation between opioids usages and cholesterol levels were investigated in human patients with lung cancer. Medical records of 282 patients were selected with following criteria, 1) signed inform consent, 2) full medical records on total serum cholesterol levels and opioid administration, 3) opioid-naïve, 4) not received/receiving cancer-related or cholesterol lowering treatment, 5) pain level at level 5-8. The patients were divided into different groups basing on their gender and cholesterol levels. Since different opioids, morphine, oxycodone, and fentanyl, were all administrated at fixed low dose initially and increased gradually only if pain was not controlled, the percentages of patients in each group who did not respond to the initial doses of opioids and required higher doses for pain management were determined and compared. Patients with relative low cholesterol levels have larger percentage (11 out of 28 in female and 31 out of 71 in male) to not respond to the initial dose of opioids than those with high cholesterol levels (0 out of 258 in female and 8 out of 74 in male). Similar differences were obtained when patients with different opioids were analyzed separately. After converting the doses of different opioids to equivalent doses of oxycodone, significant correlation between opioid usages and cholesterol levels was also observed. Therefore, more attention should be taken to those cancer patients with low cholesterol levels because they may require higher doses of opioids as pain killer.

  10. LOW DOSE PIRFENIDONE SUPPRESSES TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA-1 AND TISSUE INHIBITOR OF METALLOPROTEINASE-1,AND PROTECTS RATS FROM LUNG FIBROSIS INDUCED BY BLEOMYCIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-lun Tian; Wei Yao; Zi-jian Guo; Li Gu; Yuan-jue Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the optimal dosage of pirfenidone for the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in Wistar rats, and the alteration of expressions of transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) in lung tissue.Methods Male Wistar rats were endotracheally instilled with bleomycin or normal saline. Pirfenidone (25-800 mg·kg-1·d-1), dexamethasone (3 mg/kg), or 1% carboxymethylcellulose sodium were given daily by feed 2 days before instillation of bleomycin. Groups T7 and T14 were fed pirfenidone 50 mg·kg -1·d-1 at 7 days or 14 days after bleomycin instillation. Lungs were harvested at 28 days after bleomycin instillation. Patholological changes in lung tissues were evaluated with HE staining. Lung collagen was stained by sirius red and measured by content of hydroxyproline. Expression of proteins of TGF-β, TIMP-1, and MMP-13 were detected by Western blotting.Results At doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg·kg-1·d-1, pirfenidone had significant anti-fibrofic effects for bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis, and these effects were most significantly attenuated at the dosage of 50mg·kg-1 1d-1 (HE: P<0.01, P<0.01, and P =0.064; sirius red: P<0.05, P<0.01, and P<0. 05; hydroxyproline: P=0.595, P<0.01, and P=0.976). Pirfenidone at a dosage of 50 mg·kg -1·d-1 inhibited protein expression of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1 in lung tissue in the early phase (0.79 and 0.75 times of control group), but had no effect on expression of MMP-13.Conclusion Low dose pirfenidone, especially at dosage of 50 mg·kg-1·d-1, has significant anti-fibrotic effects on bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis. Pirfenidone partially inhibits the enhancement of the expression of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1 in lung tissue.

  11. Paradigm shift in LUNG SBRT dose calculation associated with Heterogeneity correction; Cambio de paradigma en SBRT pulmonar asociada al calculo de dosis con correccion de heterogeneidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca Aparicio, D.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Fernandez Leton, P.; Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Pinto Monedero, M.; Marti Asensjo, J.; Alonso Iracheta, L.

    2015-07-01

    Treatment of lung injury SBRT requires great dosimetric accuracy, the increasing clinical importance of dose calculation heterogeneities introducing algorithms that adequately model the transport of particles narrow beams in media of low density, as with Monte Carlo calculation. (Author)

  12. Lung nodule detection in a high-risk population: Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and low-dose computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Gregor, E-mail: gregor.sommer@usb.ch [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Basel Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Tremper, Jan, E-mail: j.tremper@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine, Thoraxklinik Heidelberg gGmbH, Amalienstr. 5, 69126 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University Hospital of the School of Medicine of Ribeirao Preto – University of Sao Paulo, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, Campus Universitario Monte Alegre, 14048 900 Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Delorme, Stefan, E-mail: s.delorme@dkfz.de [Department of Radiology (E010), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Becker, Nikolaus, E-mail: n.becker@dkfz.de [Division of Cancer Epidemiology (C020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, Jürgen, E-mail: juergen.biederer@uni-heidelberg.de [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC-H), Member of the German Center for Lung Research, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    Objective: To investigate the potential of MRI for lung nodule detection in a high-risk population in comparison to low-dose CT. Methods: 49 participants (31 men, 18 women, 51–71 years) of the German Lung Cancer Screening and Intervention Trial (LUSI) with a cancer-suspicious lung lesion in CT were examined with non-contrast-enhanced MRI of the lung at 1.5 T. Data were pseudonymized and presented at random order together with 30 datasets (23 in men, 7 in women, 18–64 years) from healthy volunteers. Two radiologists read the data for the presence of nodules. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Gold standard was either histology or long-term follow-up. Contrast-to-Noise-Ratio (CNR) was measured for all detected lesions in all MRI sequences. Results: Average maximum diameter of the lesions was 15 mm. Overall sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 48% (26/54) and 88% (29/33) compared to low-dose CT. Sensitivity of MRI was significantly higher for malignant nodules (78% (12.5/16)) than for benign ones (36% (13.5/38); P = 0.007). There was no statistically significant difference in sensitivity between nodules (benign and malignant) larger or smaller than 10 mm (P = 0.7). Inter observer agreement was 84% (κ = 0.65). Lesion-to-background CNR of T2-weighted single-shot turbo-spin-echo was significantly higher for malignant nodules (89 ± 27) than for benign ones (56 ± 23; P = 0.002). Conclusion: The sensitivity of MRI for detection of malignant pulmonary nodules in a high-risk population is 78%. Due to its inherent soft tissue contrast, MRI is more sensitive to malignant nodules than to benign ones. MRI may therefore represent a useful test for early detection of lung cancer.

  13. Detection of lung cancer through low-dose CT screening (NELSON) : a prespecifi ed analysis of screening test performance and interval cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horeweg, Nanda; Scholten, Ernst Th; de Jong, Pim A.; van der Aalst, Carlijn M.; Weenink, Carla; Lammers, Jan-Willem J.; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh A.; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; Thunnissen, Erik; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mali, Willem; de Koning, Harry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-dose CT screening is recommended for individuals at high risk of developing lung cancer. However, CT screening does not detect all lung cancers: some might be missed at screening, and others can develop in the interval between screens. The NELSON trial is a randomised trial to assess

  14. CT patterns of fungal pulmonary infections of the lung: Comparison of standard-dose and simulated low-dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christe, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.christe@insel.ch [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Lin, Margaret C., E-mail: mc_lin@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Yen, Andrew C., E-mail: acyen@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Hallett, Rich L., E-mail: xraydoc97@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Roychoudhury, Kingshuk, E-mail: kingshuk@statucc.ie [Statistics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Schmitzberger, Florian, E-mail: florians@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Fleischmann, Dominik, E-mail: d.fleischmann@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Leung, Ann N., E-mail: aleung@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Rubin, Geoffry D., E-mail: grubin@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Vock, Peter, E-mail: peter.vock@insel.ch [University Institute of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, University Hospital Bern, Inselspital, Freiburgstrasse 10, 3010 Bern (Switzerland); Roos, Justus E., E-mail: justus.roos@stanford.edu [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiation dose reduction on the appearance and visual quantification of specific CT patterns of fungal infection in immuno-compromised patients. Materials and methods: Raw data of thoracic CT scans (64 × 0.75 mm, 120 kVp, 300 reference mAs) from 41 consecutive patients with clinical suspicion of pulmonary fungal infection were collected. In 32 patients fungal infection could be proven (median age of 55.5 years, range 35–83). A total of 267 cuboids showing CT patterns of fungal infection and 27 cubes having no disease were reconstructed at the original and 6 simulated tube currents of 100, 40, 30, 20, 10, and 5 reference mAs. Eight specific fungal CT patterns were analyzed by three radiologists: 76 ground glass opacities, 42 ground glass nodules, 51 mixed, part solid, part ground glass nodules, 36 solid nodules, 5 lobulated nodules, 6 spiculated nodules, 14 cavitary nodules, and 37 foci of air-space disease. The standard of reference was a consensus subjective interpretation by experts whom were not readers in the study. Results: The mean sensitivity and standard deviation for detecting pathological cuboids/disease using standard dose CT was 0.91 ± 0.07. Decreasing dose did not affect sensitivity significantly until the lowest dose level of 5 mAs (0.87 ± 0.10, p = 0.012). Nodular pattern discrimination was impaired below the dose level of 30 reference mAs: specificity for fungal ‘mixed nodules’ decreased significantly at 20, 10 and 5 reference mAs (p < 0.05). At lower dose levels, classification drifted from ‘solid’ to ‘mixed nodule’, although no lesion was missed. Conclusion: Our simulation data suggest that tube current levels can be reduced from 300 to 30 reference mAs without impairing the diagnostic information of specific CT patterns of pulmonary fungal infections.

  15. Evaluation of dose reduction and image quality in CT colonography: Comparison of low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction and routine-dose CT with filtered back projection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Koichi [Kameda Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Kamogawa, Chiba (Japan); Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tochigi (Japan); National Cancer Center, Cancer Screening Technology Division, Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Masanori; Mogi, Tomohiro; Iida, Nao [Kameda Medical Center Makuhari, Department of Radiology, Chiba (Japan); Kanazawa, Hidenori; Sugimoto, Hideharu [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tochigi (Japan); Mitsushima, Toru [Kameda Medical Center Makuhari, Department of Gastroenterology, Chiba (Japan); Lefor, Alan T. [Jichi Medical University, Department of Surgery, Tochigi (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    To prospectively evaluate the radiation dose and image quality comparing low-dose CT colonography (CTC) reconstructed using different levels of iterative reconstruction techniques with routine-dose CTC reconstructed with filtered back projection. Following institutional ethics clearance and informed consent procedures, 210 patients underwent screening CTC using automatic tube current modulation for dual positions. Examinations were performed in the supine position with a routine-dose protocol and in the prone position, randomly applying four different low-dose protocols. Supine images were reconstructed with filtered back projection and prone images with iterative reconstruction. Two blinded observers assessed the image quality of endoluminal images. Image noise was quantitatively assessed by region-of-interest measurements. The mean effective dose in the supine series was 1.88 mSv using routine-dose CTC, compared to 0.92, 0.69, 0.57, and 0.46 mSv at four different low doses in the prone series (p < 0.01). Overall image quality and noise of low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction were significantly improved compared to routine-dose CTC using filtered back projection. The lowest dose group had image quality comparable to routine-dose images. Low-dose CTC with iterative reconstruction reduces the radiation dose by 48.5 to 75.1 % without image quality degradation compared to routine-dose CTC with filtered back projection. (orig.)

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals introduction to drug evaluation and dose estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Lawerence E

    2010-01-01

    Nanoengineering, energized by the desire to find specific targeting agents, is leading to dramatic acceleration in novel drug design. However, in this flurry of activity, some issues may be overlooked. This is especially true in the area of determining dosage and evaluating the effects of multiple agents designed to target more than one site of metastasis. Offering the unique perspective of a medical physicist who has worked directly with cancer patients for over three decades, Radiopharmaceuticals: Introduction to Drug Evaluation and Dose Estimation starts by exploring the recent history and

  17. A clinical evaluation of total variation-Stokes image reconstruction strategy for low-dose CT imaging of the chest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Bhattacharji, Priya; Liang, Zhengrong

    2015-03-01

    One hundred "normal-dose" computed tomography (CT) studies of the chest (i.e., 1,160 projection views, 120kVp, 100mAs) data sets were acquired from the patients who were scheduled for lung biopsy at Stony Brook University Hospital under informed consent approved by our Institutional Review Board. To mimic low-dose CT imaging scenario (i.e., sparse-view scan), sparse projection views were evenly extracted from the total 1,160 projections of each patient and the total radiation dose was reduced according to how many sparse views were selected. A standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the 1160 projections to produce reference images for comparison purpose. In the low-dose scenario, both the FBP and total variation-stokes (TVS) algorithms were applied to reconstruct the corresponding low-dose images. The reconstructed images were evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist against the reference images. Both the low-dose reconstructions and the reference images were displayed on a 4- megapixel monitor in soft tissue and lung windows. The images were graded by a five-point scale from 0 to 4 (0, nondiagnostic; 1, severe artifact with low confidence; 2, moderate artifact or moderate diagnostic confidences; 3, mild artifact or high confidence; 4, well depicted without artifacts). Quantitative evaluation measurements such as standard deviations for different tissue types and universal quality index were also studied and reported for the results. The evaluation concluded that the TVS can reduce the view number from 1,160 to 580 with slightly lower scores as the reference, resulting in a dose reduction to close 50%.

  18. Evaluation of a New Ultrasound Thoracoscope for Localization of Lung Nodules in Ex Vivo Human Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Hideki; Kato, Tatsuya; Hu, Hsin-Pei; Hasan, Suhaib; Patel, Priya; Wada, Hironobu; Lee, Daiyoon; Fujino, Kosuke; Hwang, David M; Cypel, Marcelo; de Perrot, Marc; Pierre, Andrew; Darling, Gail; Waddell, Thomas K; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    Localization of small, nonvisible and nonpalpable nodules is challenging during video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery. We evaluated the feasibility of using a new ultrasound thoracoscope to localize nodules in resected ex vivo human lungs. The tumor was localized and measured in its greatest dimension with a prototype ultrasound thoracoscope (XLTF-UC180; Olympus Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) at different frequencies (5.0 to 12.0 MHz) and different lung specimen states (deflated, semiinflated). Measured tumor size and depth from lung surface were compared and correlated to the true diameter and depth from lung surface acquired from pathologic morphology. Ex vivo evaluation was performed on 16 solid nodules and nine part solid ground-glass nodules. All tumors were successfully localized in the deflated lung specimens (average size, 13.7 ± 5.2 mm). The tumor boundaries were best evaluated with an ultrasound frequency of 10 MHz. Solid nodules were more easily visualized than ground-glass nodules. Part solid ground-glass nodules were not easily detected in the semiinflated specimen owing to peritumoral air surrounding the tumor. Tumor boundaries were also difficult to identify in deeply situated tumors and in lungs with underlying disease. A strong positive correlation existed between the ultrasound measurement and true measurement of tumor size (R(2) = 0.89, p lungs. The clarity of the tumor boundaries is influenced by the tumor type and depth and the underlying pulmonary disease. Complete lung deflation and the use of 10 MHz ultrasound frequency optimize the visualization of target tumors. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Technical Note: Phantom study to evaluate the dose and image quality effects of a computed tomography organ-based tube current modulation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Diksha; Schmidt, Taly Gilat, E-mail: taly.gilat-schmidt@marquette.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201 (United States); Crotty, Dominic J.; Stevens, Grant M. [GE Healthcare, Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: This technical note quantifies the dose and image quality performance of a clinically available organ-dose-based tube current modulation (ODM) technique, using experimental and simulation phantom studies. The investigated ODM implementation reduces the tube current for the anterior source positions, without increasing current for posterior positions, although such an approach was also evaluated for comparison. Methods: Axial CT scans at 120 kV were performed on head and chest phantoms on an ODM-equipped scanner (Optima CT660, GE Healthcare, Chalfont St. Giles, England). Dosimeters quantified dose to breast, lung, heart, spine, eye lens, and brain regions for ODM and 3D-modulation (SmartmA) settings. Monte Carlo simulations, validated with experimental data, were performed on 28 voxelized head phantoms and 10 chest phantoms to quantify organ dose and noise standard deviation. The dose and noise effects of increasing the posterior tube current were also investigated. Results: ODM reduced the dose for all experimental dosimeters with respect to SmartmA, with average dose reductions across dosimeters of 31% (breast), 21% (lung), 24% (heart), 6% (spine), 19% (eye lens), and 11% (brain), with similar results for the simulation validation study. In the phantom library study, the average dose reduction across all phantoms was 34% (breast), 20% (lung), 8% (spine), 20% (eye lens), and 8% (brain). ODM increased the noise standard deviation in reconstructed images by 6%–20%, with generally greater noise increases in anterior regions. Increasing the posterior tube current provided similar dose reduction as ODM for breast and eye lens, increased dose to the spine, with noise effects ranging from 2% noise reduction to 16% noise increase. At noise equal to SmartmA, ODM increased the estimated effective dose by 4% and 8% for chest and head scans, respectively. Increasing the posterior tube current further increased the effective dose by 15% (chest) and 18% (head

  20. In vitro evaluation of a newly developed implantable artificial lung.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato,Hitoshi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of an implantable artificial lung without a pump (Prototype II has been tested. A commercially available membrane oxygenator, MENOX AL6000alpha R (Dainippon Ink and Chemicals, Inc., Tokyo, Japan, was used as a basic model. The packing density of the hollow fiber was decreased in order to achieve low resistance through the blood pathway. The configuration of its housing was also re-designed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. The first prototype, known as Prototype I, was already tested in a 15 kg pig, which showed excellent gas exchange with normal hemodynamics. A second prototype, Prototype II, has a larger membrane surface area than Prototype I. The device was evaluated for resistance through the blood path and gas transfer rate in an in vitro setting by the single pass method using fresh bovine blood. The resistance through the blood path of Prototype II was 2.7+- 0.7 mmHg/(L/min at Q = 5L/min. The oxygen (O2 transfer rate was 178 +- 5.3 ml/min at Q = 5 L/min, V/Q = 3, and the carbon dioxide (CO2 transfer rate was 149 +- 28 ml/min at Q = 5 L/min, V/Q = 2 (Q : blood flow rate, V : sweep oxygen flow rate through the artificial lung. For the purpose of implantation, this prototype showed sufficiently low resistance in the pulmonary circulation with reasonable gas exchange.

  1. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  2. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosens, Ilse; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun

    2015-01-01

    Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO) and a ......Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs) can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag), non-functionalised zinc oxide (Zn...... fluid (BALF) after administration of both non-functionalised and functionalised ZnO. The latter also induced systemic inflammation measured as an increase in blood neutrophils and a decrease in blood lymphocytes. Exposure to Ag NM was not accompanied by pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity......, or by systemic inflammation. A decrease in glutathione levels was demonstrated in the liver following exposure to high doses of all three nanomaterials irrespective of any noticeable inflammatory or cytotoxic effects in the lung. By applying benchmark dose (BMD) modeling statistics to compare potencies...

  3. French national evaluation for helical tomo-therapy: description of indications, dose constraints and set-up margins; Evaluation nationale de la tomotherapie helicoidale: description des indications, des contraintes de dose et des seuils de repositionnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantor, G.; Richaud, P.; Caron, J.; Dejean, C. [Institut Bergonie, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux cedex (France); Mahe, M.A. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Radiotherapie, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France); Giraud, P.; Alapetite, C.; Fourquet, A.; Zefkili, S.; Mazal, A. [Institut Curie, Service de Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Giraud, P.; Durdux, C. [Hopital Europeen Georges-Pompidou, Service d' Oncoradiotherapie, 75 - Paris, (France); Gardner, M. [Centre Rene-Huguenin, Service de Radiotherapie, 92 - Saint-Cloud (France); Le Prise, E. [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Service de Radiotherapie, 35 - Rennes (France); Maire, J.P.; Vendrely, V. [Hopital Saint-Andre, Service de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Lisbona, A.; Munos, C. [Centre Rene-Gauducheau, Service de Physique Medicale, 44 - Saint-Herblain (France)

    2007-11-15

    After a request for proposal initiated by National Institute against cancer (I.n.c.a.) in 2005, three French centers in France started tomo-therapy in the first semester of 2007. A national policy of evaluation was performed to study the feasibility of this innovative technique and to compare the interest of helical tomo-therapy with other modalities of conformal therapy. Common protocols have been designed to facilitate this evaluation. Description of dose, I.M.R.T. levels and constraints are achieved according to each selected indication as: sarcoma, head and neck tumors, lung cancer, mesothelioma, bone metastases, anal carcinoma and craniospinal irradiation. (authors)

  4. Spontaneous and Dosing Route-related Lung Lesions in Beagle Dogs from Oral Gavage and Inhalation Toxicity Studies: Differentiation from Compound-induced Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaratirwa, Sydney; Garcia, Begonya; Isobe, Kaori; Petterino, Claudio; Bradley, Alys

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to characterize lung microscopic lesions in control beagle dogs from inhalation and oral gavage toxicity studies, to determine differences associated with the route of administration, and to discuss distinguishing features from compound-induced lung lesions. Samples from 138 control dogs from oral gavage studies and 124 control dogs from inhalation (vehicle control) studies were evaluated microscopically. There was no significant sex-related difference in the incidence of all lesions. Perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration, centriacinar mixed cell infiltration, bronchopneumonia, subpleural septal fibrosis, and alveolar macrophage accumulation were the most common lesions. Aspiration pneumonia was more common in dogs from gavage studies, suggesting reflux after gavage dosing or accidental administration of test formulation as possible causes. Centriacinar mixed cell infiltration was more common in dogs from inhalation studies, suggesting mild irritation by the vehicles used. Vascular lesions, which included pulmonary arteriopathy and smooth muscle mineralization, were observed in a few animals. Some of the spontaneous lesions are similar to lesions induced by test compounds. Compared to spontaneous lesions, compound-induced lesions tend to be multifocal or diffuse, follow a pattern of distribution (e.g., centriacinar, perivascular, and interstitial), show a dose response in the incidence and severity, and may show cell-specific toxicity.

  5. Dose Evaluation and Quality Criteria in Dental Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gori, C.; Rossi, F.; Stecco, A.; Villari, N.; Zatelli, G

    2000-07-01

    Radioprotection in dental radiology is of particular interest in the framework of the Revised Medical Exposure Directive for the great number of examinations involving the adult as well as the paediatric population (Article 9: Special Practice). The present study is intended to find the quality criteria of orthodontic imaging and for evaluating the dose absorbed within the dental and maxillary volume in connection with radiological examinations performed with either spiral CT, dental panoramic tomography or teleradiography. The X ray dose to organs sited in the body, neck, ocular and intracranial area was measured using lithium fluoride dosemeters, positioned in a Rando phantom. Quality criteria have been established by an expert radiologist considering the diagnostic information obtained in the images. The dosimetric data obtained were comparable with other authors', although with some differences due to technical characteristics. These result data are useful for choosing the patient's diagnostic path, considering the radiobiological risk associated with increasing orthodontic imaging. (author)

  6. Evaluation of respiration-correlated digital tomosynthesis in lung1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Joseph; Kriminski, Sergey; Lovelock, D. Michael; Rosenzweig, Kenneth; Mostafavi, Hassan; Amols, Howard I.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2010-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) with a linear accelerator-mounted imaging system provides a means of reconstructing tomographic images from radiographic projections over a limited gantry arc, thus requiring only a few seconds to acquire. Its application in the thorax, however, often results in blurred images from respiration-induced motion. This work evaluates the feasibility of respiration-correlated (RC) DTS for soft-tissue visualization and patient positioning. Image data acquired with a gantry-mounted kilovoltage imaging system while recording respiration were retrospectively analyzed from patients receiving radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Projection images spanning an approximately 30° gantry arc were sorted into four respiration phase bins prior to DTS reconstruction, which uses a backprojection, followed by a procedure to suppress structures above and below the reconstruction plane of interest. The DTS images were reconstructed in planes at different depths through the patient and normal to a user-selected angle close to the center of the arc. The localization accuracy of RC-DTS was assessed via a comparison with CBCT. Evaluation of RC-DTS in eight tumors shows visible reduction in image blur caused by the respiratory motion. It also allows the visualization of tumor motion extent. The best image quality is achieved at the end-exhalation phase of the respiratory motion. Comparison of RC-DTS with respiration-correlated cone-beam CT in determining tumor position, motion extent and displacement between treatment sessions shows agreement in most cases within 2–3 mm, comparable in magnitude to the intraobserver repeatability of the measurement. These results suggest the method’s applicability for soft-tissue image guidance in lung, but must be confirmed with further studies in larger numbers of patients. PMID:20384261

  7. SU-E-T-410: Evaluation of Treatment Modalities for Stereotactic Lung Radiation Therapy: A Phantom Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohatt, D; Malhotra, H [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate and verify the accuracy of alternative treatment modalities for stereotactic lung therapy with end-to-end testing. We compared three dimensional conformal therapy (3DCRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using 6 MV, 6 MV flattening filter free (FFF) and 10 MV FFF photons. Methods: A QUASAR respiratory motion phantom was utilized with custom ion chamber and gafchromatic EBT2 film inserts. The phantom contained a low density lung medium with a cylindrical polystyrene tumor (35 cc). Pseudo representative structures for various organs at risk (OAR) were created. All treatment plans were created using Eclipse ver. 11 using the same image and structure sets, and delivered via Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator equipped with high definition MLC. Evaluation of plan quality followed ROTG 0813 criterion for conformity index (CI100%), high dose spillage, D2cm, and R50%. Results: All treatment plans met the OAR dose constraints per protocol and could be delivered without any beam hold offs or other interlocks and hence were deemed clinically safe. For equivalent beam energies, target conformity was improved for all modalities when switching to FFF mode. Treatment efficiency increased for VMAT FFF by a factor of 3–4 over IMRT, and up to factor of 7 when compared to 3DCRT. Pass rates were > 97% for all treatment using gamma criteria of 3%, 3mm. Absolute dose at iso-center was verified with ion chamber, and found to be within 2% of the treatment planning system. Conclusion: The higher dose rate associated with FFF not only reduces delivery times, but in most cases enhances plan quality. The one modality with succeeding best results for all RTOG criterions was VMAT 6 MV FFF. This end-to-end testing provides necessary confidence in the entire dose delivery chain for lung SBRT patients.

  8. Evaluation of the effective dose and image quality of low-dose multi-detector CT for orthodontic treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Gi Chung; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    This study was designed to compare the effective doses from low-dose and standard-dose multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanning protocols and evaluate the image quality and the spatial resolution of the low-dose MDCT protocols for clinical use. 6-channel MDCT scanner (Siemens Medical System, Forschheim, Germany), was used for this study. Protocol of the standard-dose MDCT for the orthodontic analysis was 130 kV, 35 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.8 pitch. Those of the low-dose MDCT for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery were 110 kV, 30 mAs, 1.25 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch and 110 kV, 45 mAs, 2.5 mm slice width, 0.85 pitch. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed at 31 sites throughout the levels of adult female ART head and neck phantom. Effective doses were calculated according to ICRP 1990 and 2007 recommendations. A formalin-fixed cadaver and AAPM CT performance phantom were scanned for the evaluation of subjective image quality and spatial resolution. Effective doses in {mu}Sv (E2007) were 699.1, 429.4 and 603.1 for standard-dose CT of orthodontic treatment, low-dose CT of orthodontic analysis, and low-dose CT of orthodontic surgery, respectively. The image quality from the low-dose protocol were not worse than those from the standard-dose protocol. The spatial resolutions of both standard-dose and low-dose CT images were acceptable. From the above results, it can be concluded that the low-dose MDCT protocol is preferable in obtaining CT images for orthodontic analysis and orthodontic surgery.

  9. Comparative hazard identification by a single dose lung exposure of zinc oxide and silver nanomaterials in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Gosens

    Full Text Available Comparative hazard identification of nanomaterials (NMs can aid in the prioritisation for further toxicity testing. Here, we assessed the acute lung, systemic and liver responses in C57BL/6N mice for three NMs to provide a hazard ranking. A silver (Ag, non-functionalised zinc oxide (ZnO and a triethoxycaprylylsilane functionalised ZnO NM suspended in water with 2% mouse serum were examined 24 hours following a single intratracheal instillation (I.T.. An acute pulmonary inflammation was noted (marked by a polymorphonuclear neutrophil influx with cell damage (LDH and total protein in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF after administration of both non-functionalised and functionalised ZnO. The latter also induced systemic inflammation measured as an increase in blood neutrophils and a decrease in blood lymphocytes. Exposure to Ag NM was not accompanied by pulmonary inflammation or cytotoxicity, or by systemic inflammation. A decrease in glutathione levels was demonstrated in the liver following exposure to high doses of all three nanomaterials irrespective of any noticeable inflammatory or cytotoxic effects in the lung. By applying benchmark dose (BMD modeling statistics to compare potencies of the NMs, we rank functionalised ZnO ranked the highest based on the largest number of affected endpoints, as well as the strongest responses observed after 24 hours. The non-functionalised ZnO NM gave an almost similar response, whereas Ag NM did not cause an acute response at similar doses.

  10. Dose Calculations for Lung Inhomogeneity in High-Energy Photon Beams and Small Beamlets: A Comparison between XiO and TiGRT Treatment Planning Systems and MCNPX Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Mesbahi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Radiotherapy with small fields is used widely in newly developed techniques. Additionally, dose calculation accuracy of treatment planning systems in small fields plays a crucial role in treatment outcome. In the present study, dose calculation accuracy of two commercial treatment planning systems was evaluated against Monte Carlo method. Materials and Methods Siemens Once or linear accelerator was simulated, using MCNPX Monte Carlo code, according to manufacturer’s instructions. Three analytical algorithms for dose calculation including full scatter convolution (FSC in TiGRT, along with convolution and superposition in XiO system were evaluated for a small solid liver tumor. This solid tumor with a diameter of 1.8 cm was evaluated in a thorax phantom, and calculations were performed for different field sizes (1×1, 2×2, 3×3 and4×4 cm2. The results obtained in these treatment planning systems were compared with calculations by MC method (regarded as the most reliable method. Results For FSC and convolution algorithm, comparison with MC calculations indicated dose overestimations of up to 120%and 25% inside the lung and tumor, respectively in 1×1 cm2field size, using an 18 MV photon beam. Regarding superposition, a close agreement was seen with MC simulation in all studied field sizes. Conclusion The obtained results showed that FSC and convolution algorithm significantly overestimated doses of the lung and solid tumor; therefore, significant errors could arise in treatment plans of lung region, thus affecting the treatment outcomes. Therefore, use of MC-based methods and super position is recommended for lung treatments, using small fields and beamlets.

  11. High-dose corticosteroid therapy for erlotinib-induced interstitial lung disease in Japanese patient with advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Masato; Watanabe, Go; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Ise, Norihito; Nakagawa, Yasuhiko; Kudoh, Kazuhiro; Morita, Ryo; Andoh, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2014-11-28

    Erlotinib is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor used as a target therapy against non-small lung cancer and advanced pancreatic cancer. A regimen of erlotinib plus gemcitabine has been proven to prolong overall survival in the patient with advanced pancreatic cancer. In addition to common adverse effects, such as diarrhea, mucositis and skin rash (acne form eruptions), acute interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been reported as an infrequent but potentially fatal complication. We here report a case of a Japanese patient with erlotinib-induced ILD in whom high-dose corticosteroid therapy was successful. A fifty-five-year-old male with cancer of the head of the pancreas with multiple liver metastases started treatment with gemcitabine plus erlotinib. On the 13th day of erlotinib treatment, he had high fever. Chest computed tomography (CT) scan showed a diffuse ground-glass like infiltration of both lungs. He was diagnosed with ILD, and high-dose corticosteroid therapy was started. Two weeks after the introduction of steroid therapy, the reticular shadow faded away on CT. He was successfully treated with corticosteroid for erlotinib-induced acute ILD although he died 6 months after the initiation of chemotherapy owing to disease progression. we showed a case of a successfully treated Japanese patient of erlotinib-induced ILD. Because erlotinib-induced ILD would frequently occur in Japanese patients, closer attention to ILD should be paid for Japanese patients than in Western populations. If erlotinib-induced ILD occurs, a high-dose corticosteroid therapy would be a useful option of treatment.

  12. Chapter 7: Description of MISCAN-lung, the Erasmus MC Lung Cancer microsimulation model for evaluating cancer control interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, F W; Boer, R; de Koning, H J

    2012-07-01

    The MISCAN-lung model was designed to simulate population trends in lung cancer (LC) for comprehensive surveillance of the disease, to relate past exposure to risk factors to (observed) LC incidence and mortality, and to estimate the impact of cancer-control interventions. MISCAN-lung employs the technique of stochastic microsimulation of life histories affected by risk factors. It includes the two-stage clonal expansion model for carcinogenesis and a detailed LC progression model; the latter is specifically intended for the evaluation of screenings. This article elucidates further the principles of MISCAN-lung and describes its application to a comparative study within the CISNET Lung Working Group on the impact of tobacco control on U.S. LC mortality. MISCAN-lung yields an estimate of the number of LC deaths avoided during 1975-2000. The potential number of avoidable LC deaths, had everybody quit smoking in 1965, is 2.2 million; 750,000 deaths (30%) were avoided in the United States due to actual tobacco control interventions. The model fits in the actual tobacco-control scenario, providing credibility to the estimates of other scenarios, although considering survey-reported smoking trends alone has limitations.

  13. Prophylactic G-CSF and antibiotics enable a significant dose-escalation of triplet-chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer-Bonte, J.N.H.; Punt, C.J.A.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Die, C.E. van; Bussink, J.; Beijnen, J.H.; Huitema, A.D.; Tjan-Heijnen, V.C.

    2008-01-01

    In advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the clinical benefit of a platinum-based doublet is only modest, therefore, attenuated dosed three-drug combinations are investigated. We hypothesized that with adequate support a full dosed chemotherapy triplet is feasible. The study was designed as a

  14. Inclusion of functional information from perfusion SPECT improves predictive value of dose-volume parameters in lung toxicity outcome after radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Kallehauge, Jesper F; Møller, Ditte S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To compare functional and standard dose-volume parameters as predictors of postradiation pulmonary toxicity in lung cancer patients undergoing curative chemo-radiotherapy (RT) studied prospectively. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 58 patients treated with Intensity...... pneumonitis (RP) grade 2-5. RESULTS: Functional mean lung dose (MLD) and lung volumes receiving 5, 10, 20 and 30Gy (V5-V30, respectively) revealed high correlation with corresponding standard parameters (r>0.8). Standard MLD, V20 and V30 were significantly higher in patients with RP (p=0.01). All functional...... Modulated RT (60-66Gy) were analysed. Standard dose-volume parameters were extracted from treatment planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Corresponding functional dose-volume parameters were calculated from perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Primary end-point was radiation...

  15. Evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric patients undergoing voiding cystourethrography; Avaliacao das doses de radiacao em uretrocistografia miccional de criancas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travassos, Leonardo Vieira [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Fernandes Figueira; Boechat, Marcia Cristina Bastos; Santos, Eloa Nunez [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto Fernandes Figueira. Servico de Radiologia; Santos, Eloa Nunez; Oliveira, Sergio Ricardo de; Silva, Marcos Otaviano da [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept . de Radiologia

    2009-01-15

    To evaluate dose-area product, skin entrance dose and doses from fluoroscopy and radiography in voiding cystourethrography studies of pediatric patients. Procedures performed in 37 patients by four physicians of the institution were evaluated. Measurements were performed with an equipment including an ionization chamber directly coupled to the x-ray tube window and an electrometer (Diamentor) connected to a computer for data collection. Some procedures heterogeneity was observed and guidelines for good radiographic techniques were not followed. On average, 11 radiographs are performed for each study, with extended fluoroscopy time delivering a higher average final dose than those reported in the literature. The adoption of radiography with high kilo voltage technique and restricted utilization of fluoroscopy can result in a significant reduction of doses during this procedure, considering that the major contribution to the final dose comes from fluoroscopy. (author)

  16. Performance of ultralow-dose CT with iterative reconstruction in lung cancer screening: limiting radiation exposure to the equivalent of conventional chest X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Adrian [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Polyvalent and Oncological Radiology, Paris (France); Landau, Julia; Buetikofer, Yanik; Leidolt, Lars; Brela, Barbara; May, Michelle; Heverhagen, Johannes; Christe, Andreas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules in ultralow-dose CT acquisitions. In this lung phantom study, 232 nodules (115 solid, 117 ground-glass) of different sizes were randomly distributed in a lung phantom in 60 different arrangements. Every arrangement was acquired once with standard radiation dose (100 kVp, 100 references mAs) and once with ultralow radiation dose (80 kVp, 6 mAs). Iterative reconstruction was used with optimized kernels: I30 for ultralow-dose, I70 for standard dose and I50 for CAD. Six radiologists examined the axial 1-mm stack for solid and ground-glass nodules. During a second and third step, three radiologists used maximum intensity projection (MIPs), finally checking with computer-assisted detection (CAD), while the others first used CAD, finally checking with the MIPs. The detection rate was 95.5 % with standard dose (DLP 126 mGy*cm) and 93.3 % with ultralow-dose (DLP: 9 mGy*cm). The additional use of either MIP reconstructions or CAD software could compensate for this difference. A combination of both MIP reconstructions and CAD software resulted in a maximum detection rate of 97.5 % with ultralow-dose. Lung cancer screening with ultralow-dose CT using the same radiation dose as a conventional chest X-ray is feasible. (orig.)

  17. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Rajib Lochan [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Rao, Ramakrishna [Department of Radiation Physics, MNJ Institute of Oncology and Regional Cancer Center, Hyderabad (India); Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R. [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  18. Evaluation of inhaled and cutaneous doses of imidacloprid during stapling ornamental plants in tunnels or greenhouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprea, Cristina; Lunghini, Liana; Banchi, Bruno; Peruzzi, Antonio; Centi, Letizia; Coppi, Luana; Bogi, Mirella; Marianelli, Enrico; Fantacci, Mariella; Catalano, Pietro; Benvenuti, Alessandra; Miligi, Lucia; Sciarra, Gianfranco

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this research was to assess dermal and respiratory exposure of workers to imidacloprid during manual operations with ornamental plants previously treated in greenhouses or tunnels. A total of 10 female workers, 5 in greenhouses and 5 in tunnels, were monitored for 3 or 5 consecutive days. Actual skin contamination, excluding hands, was evaluated using nine filter paper pads placed directly on the skin. To evaluate the efficacy of protective clothing in reducing occupational exposure we also placed four pads on top of the outer clothing. Hand contamination was evaluated by washing with 95% ethanol. Respiratory exposure was evaluated by personal air sampling. Respiratory dose was calculated on the basis of a lung ventilation of 15 l/min. Absorbed doses were calculated assuming a skin penetration of 10% and a respiratory retention of 100%. Dislodgeable foliar residues (DFRs) were determined during the days of re-entry in order to determine the dermal transfer factor. From the dependence of dermal exposure of hands from DFRs, a mean transfer factor was estimated to be 36.4 cm(2)/h. Imidacloprid was determined by liquid chromatography with selective mass detection and electrospray interface in all matrices analysed. Respiratory dose was 4.1+/-4.0 (0.1-14.3)% and 3.0+/-2.0 (0.6-6.9)% (mean+/-SD (range)) of the total real dose during work in tunnels and greenhouses, respectively. The estimated absorbed doses, 0.29+/-0.45 microg/kg (0.06-2.25 microg/kg) body weight and 0.32+/-0.18 microg/kg (0.07-0.66 microg/kg) body weight (mean+/-SD (range)) in tunnels and in greenhouses, respectively, were less than the acceptable operator exposure level of 0.15 mg/kg body weight and than the acceptable daily intake of 0.05 mg/kg body weight. The hands and exposed skin of all workers were found to be contaminated, indicating that greater precautions, such as daily changing of gloves and clothing, are necessary to reduce skin exposure.

  19. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlin XIAO

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is regarded as the standard care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer at present. This paper is designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low-dose weekly docetaxel (DTX with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with DTX and cisplatin for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Methods 44 previously untreated patients with stage III NSCLC were randomized into low-dose weekly DTX group and control group concomitant with radiotherapy. Both groups were treated by the standard fractionation schedule with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. An involved-field irradiation technique was performed. Gross tumor and metastatic lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 66 Gy~70 Gy. Patients in the former group received chemotherapy with DTX 20mg. m-2.w-1,and the other group patients received DTX 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and DDP 30 mg/m2 on day 1~3 every 21 days. All patients received consolidation chemotherapy with DP regime after chemoradiotherapy for no more than 4 cycles. Results The overall response rates of patients in the low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 81.8% with 27.3% CR(complete response and 86.4% with 27.3% CR respectively (Chisquare=0.120, P=0.942. After a median follow-up of 20months, the median survival time was 20 months and 17 months respectively. The 1-, 2- year survival rates of patients in low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 69.8%, 48.1% versus 66.5%, 40.2% respectively;there was no difference between two groups. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and esophagitis occurred in 26.3%, 14.3% and 15.8%, 28.6% respectively (Chiquare=0.765,P =0.382(Chiquare=1.108,P =0.292.Grade 3 and 4 pulmonary toxicity was unusual.Conclusion Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin is highly active with manageable toxicity in patients

  20. Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts from lung tumors maintain their immuno-suppressive abilities after high-dose irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia eGorchs

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence supports the notion that high-dose (>5 Gy radiotherapy (RT regimens are triggering stronger pro-immunogenic effects than standard low-dose (2 Gy regimens. However, the effects of RT on certain immunoregulatory elements in tumors remain unexplored. In this study we have investigated the effects of high-dose irradiation (HD-RT on the immunomodulating functions of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs. Primary CAF cultures were established from lung cancer specimens derived from patients diagnosed for non-small cell lung cancer. Irradiated and non-irradiated CAFs were examined for immunomodulation in experiments with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from random, healthy donors. Regulation of lymphocytes behavior was checked by lymphocyte proliferation assays, lymphocyte migration assays and T-cell cytokine production. Additionally, CAF-secreted immuno-regulatory factors were studied by multiplex protein arrays, ELISAs and by LC-MS/MS proteomics. In all functional assays we observed a powerful immuno-suppressive effect exerted by CAF-conditioned medium on activated T-cells (p>0,001, and this effect was sustained after a single radiation dose of 18 Gy. Relevant immuno-suppressive molecules such as prostaglandin E2, interleukin-6 and -10, or transforming growth factor-β were found in CAF conditioned medium, but their secretion was unchanged after irradiation. Finally, immunogenic cell death responses in CAFs were studied by exploring the release of high motility group box-1 and ATP. Both alarmins remained undetectable before and after irradiation. In conclusion, CAFs play a powerful immuno-suppressive effect over activated T-cells, and this effect remains unchanged after HD-RT. Importantly, CAFs do not switch on immunogenic cell death responses after exposure to HD-RT.

  1. SU-E-T-95: An Alternative Option for Reducing Lung Dose for Electron Scar Boost Irradiation in Post-Mastectomy Breast Cancer Patients with a Thin Chest Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Breast cancer patients who undergo a mastectomy often require post-mastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) due to high risk disease characteristics. PMRT usually accompanies scar boost irradiation (10–16Gy in 5–8 fractions) using en face electrons, which often results in increased dose to the underlying lungs, thereby potentially increasing the risk of radiation pneumonitis. Hence, this study evaluated water-equivalent phantoms as energy degraders and as an alternative to a bolus to reduce radiation dose to the underlying lungs for electron scar boost irradiation. Methods: Percent depth dose (PDD) profiles of 6 MeV (the lowest electron energy available in most clinics) were obtained without and with commercial solid water phantoms (1 to 5mm by 1mm increments) placed on top of electron cones. Phantom attenuation was measured by taking a ratio of outputs with to without the phantoms in 10×10cm2 cone size for monitor unit (MU) calculation. In addition, scatter dose to contralateral breast was measured on a human-like phantom using two selected scar (short and long) boost patient setups. Results: The PDD plots showed that the solid water phantoms and the bolus had similar dosimetric effects for the same thickness. Lower skin dose (up to 3%) to ipsilateral breast was observed with a 5mm phantom compared with a 5mm bolus (up to 10%) for all electron cones. Phantom attenuation was increased by 50% with about a 4.5mm phantom. Also, the energy degraders caused scatter dose to contralateral breast by a factor of 3 with a 5mm phantom. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using water-equivalent phantoms to reduce lung dose using en face electrons in patients with a thin chest wall undergoing PMRT. The disadvantages of this treatment approach (i.e., the increase in MUs and treatment time, and clinically insignificant scatter dose to the contralateral breast given usually 10Gy) are outweighed by its above clinical benefits.

  2. Evaluation of /sup 99m/Tc-albumin distribution ratio in cardiac chambers and lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Kanai, Hisakata; Tanaka, Masao and others

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess blood volume of the cardiac chambers and lungs, distribution ratio of /sup 99m/Tc-albumin (HSA) was obtained from radionuclide angiocardiogram and non-gated or gated equilibrium cardiac pool scintigram, using a scintillation camera coupled to a minicomputer. The radioactivity of /sup 99m/Tc of the entire cardiac blood pool including the large vessels (T), the right ventricle including the right atrium (RV) and the left ventricle (LV) was calculated from the 30deg anterior oblique cardiac pool scintigram. That of the both lungs (Lu) was calculated from the anterior cardiac pool scintigram. The radioactivity of total injected dose of HSA (H) was estimated from the initial transit of the tracer obtained by the radionuclide angiocardiogram. Then, distribution ratio of HSA of the each region of interest was expressed as RV/H, LV/H, T/H and Lu/H. RV/H, LV/H and T/H were 3.4+-0.6%, 3.1+-0.5% and 10.4+-2.0% in controls, 6.0+-0.8%, 2.6+-0.8% and 14.2+-2.4% in cor pulmonale, and 7.9+-1.7%, 7.7+-3.5% and 20.7+-4.3% in heart diseases with left heart failure, respectively. Lu/H was 4.9+-1.4% in controls, 4.4+-1.1% in cor pulmonale and 6.6+-1.9% in heart diseases without left heart failure. LV/H was correlated with left ventricular end-diastolic volume by contrast ventriculography. LV/H and RV/H were related with functional classification of NYHA. In conclusion, these parameters may be utilized as indices of the volume of blood pool of the heart chambers and lungs, and this method seems to be clinically applicable for the evaluation of pathophysiology in heart diseases.

  3. Evaluation of the absorbed dose in odontological computerized tomography; Avaliacao da dose absorvida em tomografia computadorizada odontologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legnani, Adriano; Schelin, Hugo R.; Rocha, Anna Silvia P.S. da, E-mail: schelin@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: anna@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J., E-mail: khoury@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluated the absorbed dose at the surface entry known as 'cone beam computed tomography' (CBCT) in odontological computerized tomography. Examination were simulated with CBCT for measurements of dose. A phantom were filled with water, becoming scatter object of radiation. Thermoluminescent dosemeters were positioned on points correspondent to eyes and salivary glands

  4. Dose-effect relationship of CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide 1826 in murine Lewis lung cancer treated with irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang XB

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Xibing Zhuang,1 Tiankui Qiao,1 Sujuan Yuan,1 Wei Chen,1 Lin Zha,2 Li Yan11Department of Oncology, Jinshan Hospital, Medical Center of Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology, Tongling People's Hospital, Tongling, Anhui, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs, which induce signaling via Toll-like receptor 9, have recently been suggested to enhance sensitivity to traditional therapies, including chemotherapy, in certain cancer cell lines. This study aimed to define the dose-effect relationship for CpG ODN 1826 in increasing radiosensitivity and its impact on immune function in a mouse model of Lewis lung cancer.Methods: The tumor-bearing mouse model was induced by injecting Lewis lung cancer cells into the right anterior leg subcutaneously. Sixty-four C57BL/6 J mice were evenly randomized into eight groups, comprising: a control group; an irradiation group; a CpG ODN 0.15 group; a CpG ODN 0.3 group; a CpG ODN 0.45 group; a CpG 0.15 + irradiation group; a CpG 0.3 + irradiation group; and a CpG 0.45 + irradiation group. Tumor growth, serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 concentrations, spleen and thymus exponents, and effect of CpG on the secondary immune response were measured, and apoptosis of tumor cells was investigated using TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL after treatment.Results: Tumor volumes in the treated groups were smaller than in the control group, with those of the CpG 0.45 + irradiation group being the smallest. TUNEL showed that the apoptosis rate in all the active treatment groups was higher than in the control group. CpG ODN apoptosis rate, serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-12 levels, and the spleen and thymus exponent showed greater improvement in the groups receiving combination therapy of CpG ODN and irradiation than the control group or the group receiving irradiation alone. With the

  5. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampado, Osvaldo, E-mail: orampado@cittadellasalute.to.it; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto [Struttura Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Città della Salute e della Scienza, Corso Bramante 88, Torino 10126 (Italy); Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Department, University of Turin, Torino 10126 (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K{sub air}), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ

  6. SU-E-P-47: Evaluation of Improvement of Esophagus Sparing in SBRT Lung Patients with Biologically Based IMRT Optimization

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    Liang, X; Penagaricano, J; Paudel, N; Zhang, X; Morrill, S; Corry, P; Han, E; Hardee, M; Ratanatharathorn, V [University of Arkansas Medical Science, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study the potential of improving esophageal sparing for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) lung cancer patients by using biological optimization (BO) compared to conventional dose-volume based optimization (DVO) in treatment planning. Methods: Three NSCLC patients (PTV (62.3cc, 65.1cc, and 125.1cc) adjacent to the heart) previously treated with SBRT were re-planned using Varian Eclipse TPS (V11) using DVO and BO. The prescription dose was 60 Gy in 5 fractions normalized to 95% of the PTV volume. Plans were evaluated by comparing esophageal maximum doses, PTV heterogeneity (HI= D5%/D95%), and Paddick’s conformity (CI) indices. Quality of the plans was assessed by clinically-used IMRT QA procedures. Results: By using BO, the maximum dose to the esophagus was decreased 1384 cGy (34.6%), 502 cGy (16.5%) and 532 cGy (16.2%) in patient 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The maximum doses to spinal cord and the doses to 1000 cc and 1500 cc of normal lung were comparable in both plans. The mean doses (Dmean-hrt) and doses to 15cc of the heart (V15-hrt) were comparable for patient 1 and 2. However for patient 3, with the largest PTV, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased by 62.2 cGy (18.3%) and 549.9 cGy (24.9%) respectively for the BO plans. The mean target HI of BO plans (1.13) was inferior to the DVO plans (1.07). The same trend was also observed for mean CI in BO plans (0.77) versus DVO plans (0.83). The QA pass rates (3%, 3mm) were comparable for both plans. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the use of biological models in treatment planning optimization can substantially improve esophageal sparing without compromising spinal cord and normal lung doses. However, for the large PTV case (125.1cc) we studied here, Dmean-hrt and V15-hrt increased substantially. The target HI and CI were inferior in the BO plans.

  7. Strategies of dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: image guidance and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Radiation dose in the setting of chemo-radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been historically limited by the risk of normal tissue toxicity and this has been hypothesized to correlate with the poor results in regard to local tumor recurrences. Dose escalation, as a means to improve local control, with concurrent chemotherapy has been shown to be feasible with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in early phase studies with good clinical outcome. However, the potential superiority of moderate dose escalation to 74 Gy has not been shown in phase III randomized studies. In this review, the limitations in target volume definition in previous studies; and the factors that may be critical to safe dose escalation in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, such as respiratory motion management, image guidance, intensity modulation, FDG-PET incorporation in the treatment planning process, and adaptive radiotherapy, are discussed. These factors, along with novel treatment approaches that have emerged in recent years, are proposed to warrant further investigation in future trials in a more comprehensive and integrated fashion.

  8. A dosimetric evaluation of VMAT for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrow, Caitlin E; Wang, Iris Z; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the dosimetric potential of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the treatment of patients with medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Fourteen patients treated with 3D CRT with varying tumor locations, tumor sizes, and dose fractionation schemes were chosen for study. The prescription doses were 48 Gy in 4 fractions, 52.5 Gy in 5 fractions, 57.5 Gy in 5 fractions, and 60 Gy in 3 fractions for 2, 5, 1, and 6 patients, respectively. VMAT treatment plans with a mix of two to three full and partial noncoplanar arcs with 5°-25° separations were retrospectively generated using Eclipse version 10.0. The 3D CRT and VMAT plans were then evaluated by comparing their target dose, critical structure dose, high dose spillage, and low dose spillage as defined according to RTOG 0813 and RTOG 0236 protocols. In the most dosimetrically improved case, VMAT was able to decrease the dose from 17.35 Gy to 1.54 Gy to the heart. The D(2cm) decreased in 11 of 14 cases when using VMAT. The three that worsened were still within the acceptance criteria. Of the 14 3D CRT plans, seven had a D(2cm) minor deviation, while only one of the 14 VMAT plans had a D(2cm) minor deviation. The R(50%) improved in 13 of the 14 VMAT cases. The one case that worsened was still within the acceptance criteria of the RTOG protocol. Of the 14 3D CRT plans, seven had an R(50%) deviation. Only one of the 14 VMAT plans had an R(50%) deviation, but it was still improved compared to the 3D CRT plan. In this cohort of patients, no evident dosimetric compromises resulted from planning SBRT treatments with VMAT relative to the 3D CRT treatment plans actually used in their treatment.

  9. Loss of lung function after chemo-radiotherapy for NSCLC measured by perfusion SPECT/CT: Correlation with radiation dose and clinical morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Møller, Ditte S; Khalil, Azza A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to assess dose and time dependence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in regional lung function measured with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the lung and relate these changes to the symptomatic endpoint of radiation pneumonitis (RP......, of which 45 had three-month follow-up SPECT/CT scans. Analysis showed a statistically significant dose-dependent reduction in regional perfusion at three-month follow-up. The largest population composite perfusion loss was in 41-60 Gy (42.2%) and > 60 Gy (41.7%) dose bins. Lung regions receiving low dose....... The risk of symptomatic RP was higher for the patients with perfusion reduction after RT (p = 0.02), with the relative risk estimate of 3.6 (95% CI 1.1-12). CONCLUSION: Perfusion lung function changes in a dose-dependent manner after RT. The severity of radiation-induced lung symptoms is significantly...

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

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    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  11. Cystic fibrosis in adults. Short-term and long-term reproducibility of the Brody score for lung morphology in low-dose MDCT scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, K.; Paolini, M.; Schmitz, M.; Coppenrath, E.; Reiser, M.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Fischer, R.; Huber, R. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Medical Hospital V

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The semi-quantitative Brody score measures the severity of cystic fibrosis (CF)-related lung disease. We investigated the short-term (28 - 60 days) and long-term (2 - 7 years) intra- and inter-observer reproducibility of the Brody score in low-dose multidetector row computed tomography examinations performed in inspiration (LDCTs) of adult CF patients. Materials and Methods: Composite Brody scores and respective underlying bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, peribronchial thickening, parenchymal opacity, and hyperinflation subscores were evaluated twice (time interval, 1 - 84 months) by each of 3 independent radiologists (1 - 20 years of professional diagnostic radiology experience) in LDCTs (4 - 64 rows, 120 KVp, 10 - 15 mAs/slice, CTDIw approx. 1.0 mGy, effective dose approx. 0.5 mSv) of 15 adult patients with CF-related lung disease (8 female, 7 male, age, 18 - 50 years, mean, 33 years). Results: The average reproducibility of the Brody score was within +/-7 % (range, 2 - 30 %) between radiologists, and +/-6 % (3 - 12 %) within radiologists (short-term, 28 - 60 days, 4 %, 0 - 12 %, long-term, 2 - 7 years, 12 %, 1 - 36 %). For the different subscores, the reproducibility was within +/-25 % (15 - 41 %) between radiologists and +/-23 % (12 - 46 %) within radiologists. Conclusion: The Brody score shows high average inter-observer reproducibility in LDCTs of adult CF patients. The Brody score also demonstrates high average intra-observer reproducibility if subsequent assessments are made within 28 - 61 days. With time intervals of 2 - 7 years between subsequent evaluations, however, intra-observer reproducibility decreases. Respective subscores each demonstrate lower intra- and inter-observer reproducibility than does the composite Brody score. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation and Diagnosis of HIV-Associated Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximous, Stephanie; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison

    2016-04-01

    There are myriad pulmonary conditions associated with HIV, ranging from acute infections to chronic noncommunicable diseases. The epidemiology of these diseases has changed significantly in the era of widespread antiretroviral therapy. Evaluation of the HIV-infected patient involves assessment of the severity of illness and a thorough yet efficient pursuit of definitive diagnosis, which may involve multiple etiologies simultaneously. Important clues to a diagnosis include medical and social history, demographic details such as travel and geography of residence, substance use, sexual practices, and domiciliary and incarceration status. CD4 cell count is a tremendously useful measure of immune function and risk for HIV-related diseases, and helps narrow down the differential. Careful history of current symptoms and physical examination with particular attention to extrapulmonary signs are crucial early steps. Many adjunctive laboratory studies can suggest or rule out particular diagnoses. Pulmonary function testing (PFT) may aid in characterization of several chronic noninfectious illnesses accelerated by HIV. Chest radiograph and computed tomography (CT) scan allow for classification of diseases by pathognomonic imaging patterns, although many infectious conditions present atypically, particularly with lower CD4 counts. Ultimately, definitive diagnosis with sputum, bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage, or lung tissue is often needed. It is of utmost importance to maintain a high degree of suspicion for HIV in otherwise undiagnosed patients, as the first presentation of HIV may be via an acute pulmonary illness.

  13. HRCT evaluation of the accessory fissures of the lung

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    Yildiz, Altan E-mail: ayildiz@mersin.edu.tr; Goelpinar, Fulya; Calikoglu, Mukadder; Duce, Meltem Nass; Oezer, Caner; Apaydin, F. Demir

    2004-03-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to classify the accessory fissures of the lung and to assess their frequency by using high-resolution CT. Methods and patients: HRCT scans of 115 patients were prospectively reviewed. 1 mm thin sections were obtained at 10 mm intervals with a scan time of 1.9 s. The fissure and its relationship to the segmental bronchovascular structures were then evaluated on transverse sections. Results: Forty-four accessory fissures were detected in 35 of 115 patients. The most common accessory fissure was the inferior accessory fissure (12%). The second most common accessory fissure was the left minor fissure (8%). The right superior accessory fissure (5%), the accessory fissure between the medial and lateral segments of the right middle lobe (5%), and the accessory fissure between the superior and inferior segments of the lingula (5%) were seen in equal frequencies. Also, intersegmental accessory fissures, namely the fissure between the anterobasal and laterobasal of both the right (1%) and the left (2%) lower lobes were detected. We found only one subsegmental accessory fissure. Discussion and conclusion: The inferior accessory fissure and the left minor fissure were the most common accessory fissures in our study.

  14. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  15. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  16. Evaluation of Angiogenesis Using Micro-Computed Tomography in a Xenograft Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Savai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative evaluation of lung tumor angiogenesis using immunohistochemical techniques has been limited by difficulties in generating reproducible data. To analyze intrapulmonary tumor angiogenesis, we used high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT of lung tumors of mice inoculated with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC1 or human adenocarcinoma (A549 cell lines. The lung vasculature was filled with the radiopaque silicone rubber, Microfil, through the jugular vein (in vivo application or pulmonary artery (ex vivo application. In addition, human adenocarcinoma lung tumor-bearing mice treated site-specifically with humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab against vascular endothelial growth factor. Quantitative analysis of lung tumor microvessels imaged with micro-CT showed that more vessels (mainly small, <0.02 mm2 were filled using the in vivo (5.4% compared with the ex vivo (2.1% method. Furthermore, bevacizumab-treated lung tumor-bearing mice showed significantly reduced lung tumor volume and lung tumor angiogenesis compared with untreated mice as assessed by micro-CT. Interestingly, microvascularization of mainly the smaller vessels (<0.02 mm2 was reduced after bevacizumab treatment. This observation with micro-CT was nicely correlated with immunohistochemical measurement of microvessels. Therefore, micro-CT is a novel method for investigating lung tumor angiogenesis, and this might be considered as an additional complementary tool for precise quantification of angiogenesis.

  17. Vaginal dose assessment in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: Can we really rely on dose-point evaluation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limkin, Elaine Johanna; Dumas, Isabelle; Rivin Del Campo, Eleonor; Chargari, Cyrus; Maroun, Pierre; Annède, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Seisen, Thomas; Doyeux, Kaya; Tailleur, Anne; Martinetti, Florent; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Haie-Meder, Christine; Mazeron, Renaud

    2016-01-01

    Although dose-volume parameters in image-guided brachytherapy have become a standard, the use of posterior-inferior border of the pubic symphysis (PIBS) points has been recently proposed in the reporting of vaginal doses. The aim was to evaluate their pertinence. Nineteen patients who received image-guided brachytherapy after concurrent radiochemotherapy were included. Per treatment, CT scans were performed at Days 2 and 3, with reporting of the initial dwell positions and times. Doses delivered to the PIBS points were evaluated on each plan, considering that they were representative of one-third of the treatment. The movements of the applicator according to the PIBS point were analysed. Mean prescribed doses at PIBS -2, PIBS, PIBS +2 were, respectively, 2.23 ± 1.4, 6.39 ± 6.6, and 31.85 ± 36.06 Gy. Significant differences were observed between the 5 patients with vaginal involvement and the remaining 14 at the level of PIBS +2 and PIBS: +47.60 Gy and +7.46 Gy, respectively (p = 0.023 and 0.03). The variations between delivered and prescribed doses at PIBS points were not significant. However, at International commission on radiation units and measurements rectovaginal point, the delivered dose was decreased by 1.43 ± 2.49 Gy from the planned dose (p = 0.019). The delivered doses at the four points were strongly correlated with the prescribed doses with R(2) ranging from 0.93 to 0.95. The movements of the applicator in regard of the PIBS point assessed with the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine coordinates were insignificant. The doses evaluated at PIBS points are not impacted by intrafractional movements. PIBS and PIBS +2 dose points allow distinguishing the plans of patients with vaginal infiltration. Further studies are needed to correlate these parameters with vaginal morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Energy dependence evaluation of the patient dose calibrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, N. A.; Potiens, M. P. A.

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the energy dependence of the kerma-area product meter Patient Dose Calibrator (PDC). The research was done using the calculation of the coefficient calibration of the air kerma values of different energies that are related to the radiation qualities provided on the International Standard of the International Electrotechnical Commission IEC 61267 for conventional X-rays, mammography and computerized tomography (CT), established at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. The calibration was made using reference ionization chambers with traceability to the Primary Laboratory Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Germany. The energy dependence of the PDC was determined and the results showed that the PDC has small energy dependence, less than 6%, for the range of recommended energy while to the mammography range the values were 16% and for CT qualities the dependence was 1%.

  19. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of tubulin inhibitors with non-small cell lung cancer pre-clinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lama R

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic small molecule tubulin inhibitors have many advantages as novel anti-cancer agents compared to the current tubulin inhibitors generated from natural products. Our previous studies led to the design and synthesis of a series of novel tubulin inhibitors. Some of these compounds also inhibited heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27, and showed promising in vitro anti-cancer activities in several breast cancer cell lines at sub nano-molar concentrations. However, whether these compounds could suppress tumor growth in animals was not investigated yet. In the current study, to identify the best drug candidates, therapeutic efficacy of the representative compounds from previous analyses was evaluated using non-small cell lung cancer preclinical models. These agents dose-dependently inhibited the growth of lung cancer cells in both monolayer cultures and three-dimensional multicellular spheroids. Several compounds also showed promising tumor growth suppressive activity in nude mice xenograft model

  20. Effect of intensiti modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fu Zhou; Qian Sun; Ya-Jun Zhang; Geng-Ming Wang; Bin He; Tao Qi; An Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of the intensity modulated radiation therapy according to equivalent uniform dose optimization method on patients with lung cancer.Methods:A total of 82 cases of non-small cell lung cancer were divided into observation group and control group according to the random number table method. Patients in the control group received conventional radiotherapy while observation group received intensity modulated radiotherapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimization method. The treatment effects, survival times, blood vessel-related factors, blood coagulation function and the levels of inflammatory factors and so on were compared between the two groups of patients.Results:The effective rate of the observation group after treatment was higher than that of the control group. Progression free survival and median overall survival times were longer than those of patients in the control group (P<0.05). The serum VEGF and HIF-αα levels as well as D-D, TT, PT, APTT and FIB levels were lower in observation group patients after treatment than those in the control group(P<0.05). At the same time point, serum TNF-αα, CRP and PCT levels in the observation group after treatment were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05). Serum M2-PK, CA125, CEA and SCC values of patients in the observation group after treatment were all significantly lower than those in the control group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:Intensity modulated radiation therapy based on equivalent uniform dose optimized method can improve the treatment effect, prolong the survival time, optimize micro inflammatory environment and inhibit tumor biological behavior at the same time.

  1. Local Tumor Control and Normal Tissue Toxicity of Pulsed Low-Dose Rate Radiotherapy for Recurrent Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study investigates (1 local tumor control and (2 normal tissue toxicity of pulsed low-dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR for recurrent lung cancer. Methods: For study 1, nude mice were implanted with A549 tumors and divided into the following 3 groups: (1 control (n = 10, (2 conventional radiotherapy (RT; n = 10, and (3 PLDR (n = 10. Tumor-bearing mice received 2 Gy daily dose for 2 consecutive days. Weekly magnetic resonance imaging was used for tumor growth monitoring. For study 2, 20 mice received 8 Gy total body irradiation either continuously (n = 10 or 40 × 0.2 Gy pulses with 3-minute intervals (n = 10. Results: For study 1, both conventional RT and PLDR significantly inhibited the growth of A549 xenografts compared with the control group (>35% difference in the mean tumor volume; P .05. For study 2, the average weight was 20.94 ± 1.68 g and 25.69 ± 1.27 g and the survival time was 8 days and 12 days for mice treated with conventional RT and PLDR (P < .05, respectively. Conclusion: This study showed that PLDR could control A549 tumors as effectively as conventional RT, and PLDR induced much less normal tissue toxicity than conventional RT. Thus, PLDR would be a good modality for recurrent lung cancers. Advances in Knowledge: This article reports our results of an in vivo animal investigation of PLDR for the treatment of recurrent cancers, which may not be eligible for treatment because of the dose limitations on nearby healthy organs that have been irradiated in previous treatments. This was the first in vivo study to quantify the tumor control and normal tissue toxicities of PLDR using mice with implanted tumors, and our findings provided evidence to support the clinical trials that employ PLDR treatment techniques.

  2. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  3. Analysis of Incidental Radiation Dose to Uninvolved Mediastinal/Supraclavicular Lymph Nodes in Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Without Elective Nodal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Fulp, William J. [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI{sub off}) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI{sub on}). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 'bins' (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI{sub on} plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI{sub off} plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the '1 echelon away' nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to

  4. Comparison of pencil beam–based homogeneous vs inhomogeneous target dose planning for stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral lung tumors through Monte Carlo–based recalculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtakara, Kazuhiro, E-mail: ohtakara@murakami.asahi-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Murakami Memorial Hospital, Asahi University, Gifu (Japan); Hoshi, Hiroaki [Department of Radiology, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2015-10-01

    This study was conducted to ascertain whether homogeneous target dose planning is suitable for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of peripheral lung cancer under appropriate breath-holding. For 20 peripheral lung tumors, paired dynamic conformal arc plans were generated by only adjusting the leaf margin to the planning target volume (PTV) edge for fulfilling the conditions such that the prescription isodose surface (IDS) encompassing exactly 95% of the PTV (PTV D{sub 95}) corresponds to 95% and 80% IDS, normalized to 100% at the PTV isocenter under a pencil beam (PB) algorithm with radiologic path length correction. These plans were recalculated using the x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) algorithm under otherwise identical conditions, and then compared. Lesions abutting the parietal pleura or not were defined as edge or island tumors, respectively, and the influences of the target volume and its location relative to the chest wall on the target dose were examined. The median (range) leaf margin required for the 95% and 80% plans was 3.9 mm (1.3 to 5.0) and −1.2 mm (−1.8 to 0.1), respectively. Notably, the latter was significantly correlated negatively with PTV. In the 80% plans, the PTV D{sub 95} was slightly higher under XVMC, whereas the PTV D{sub 98} was significantly lower, irrespective of the dose calculation algorithm used. Other PTV and all gross tumor volume doses were significantly higher, while the lung doses outside the PTV were slightly lower. The target doses increased as a function of PTV and were significantly lower for island tumors than for edge tumors. In conclusion, inhomogeneous target dose planning using smaller leaf margin for a larger tumor volume was deemed suitable in ensuring more sufficient target dose while slightly reducing lung dose. In addition, more inhomogeneous target dose planning using <80% IDS (e.g., 70%) for PTV covering would be preferable for island tumors.

  5. Evaluation of effectiveness of a computer system (CAD) in the identification of lung nodules with low-dose MSCT: scanning technique and preliminary results; Valutazione dell'efficacia di un sistema computerizzato (CAD) nell'identificazione dei noduli polmonari con TSMS a basso dosaggio: tecnica di sudio e risultati preliminari

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraioli, Francesco; Catalano, Carlo; Almberger, Maria; Bertoletti, Linda; Cantisani, Vito; Danti, Massimiliano; Pediconi, Federica; Passariello, Roberto [La Sapienza Univ., Roma (Italy). Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the effectiveness of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in the identification of pulmonary nodules. Materials and methods: Two observers (A1, A2) with different levels of experience independently evaluated 20 chest MSCT studies with and without the aid of a CAD system (LungCheck, R2 Technology, Inc.). The study parameters were as follows: 140 kVs, 40 mAs, collimation 4x1 mm, slice thickness 1.25 mm, reconstruction interval 1.0 mm. The observers analysed the images with and without CAD and evaluated: 1) nodule size (longer axis); 2) number and location of nodules; 3) reading time for each observer. The gold standard was represented by the evaluation of both readers in consensus with the aid of the CAD system. Results: Without CAD support the two readers identified 77 (A1) and 79 (A2) nodules and with CAD 81 (A1) and 82 (A2) nodules. Working in consensus the two observers identified 81 nodules without the aid of CAD and 84 nodules with the aid of CAD. Total number of nodules identified by CAD was 104, 25 of which were false positive and 5 false negative. The average reading time with the aid of CAD decreased by as much as 40% for both the observers. Conclusions: The preliminary results of our study suggest that the CAD technique is an accurate automatic support tool in the identification of pulmonary nodules. It reduces reading time and automatically supplies the size, volume, density and number of nodules, thus being useful both in screening programmes and in the follow-up of cancer patients, in whom comparison of the images is particularly difficult. [Italian] Scopo: Valutazione dell'efficacia di un sistema computerizzato (CAD) nell'identificazione di noduli polmonari. Materiale e metodi: Due osservatori (A1, A2) con differente livello di esperienza hanno valutato 20 esami di TC multistrato del torace con e senza l'ausilio di un sistema CAD (LungCheck, R2 Technology, Inc.). I parametri di studio utilizzati sono stati i seguenti

  6. Evaluating adherence to ocular hypotensives using the Travatan dosing aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dell L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leslie O'Dell1, Amy L Hennessy2,3, Alan L Robin2–41May Eye Care Center, Hanover, PA, USA; 2Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Glaucoma Specialists, Baltimore, MD, USA; 4Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAPurpose: The Travatan™ Dosing Aid (TDA is the first commercially available device designed to aid in patients' adherence to their glaucoma therapies and to record patients' eyedrop administration, so that doctors can better assess adherence. No prior studies have objectively evaluated adherence to glaucoma medications and its relationship to the severity of glaucoma or the use of multiple systemic medications.Methods: We enrolled 100 consecutive subjects from a private glaucoma practice, all currently using topical travoprost 0.004%. Each subject was issued a TDA to record the time and date of each drop instilled. Informed consents were signed and the subjects were aware that their medication use was being monitored. Patients returned for follow-up 30–60 days after their initial exam.Results: 89 subjects completed the study: 44 were male, with a mean age of 67 years, and 69.7% were Caucasian. Overall, patient adherence was 74.8% (range 22%–100% improving to 85.4% on the day prior to follow-up. The mean number of missed doses per month was 6.24 ± 5.9. Only 7.9% of the study population never missed a dose and 23.6% ± 4.3% missed more than ten drops per month. No marked association was observed between the severity of glaucoma, race, or the number of systemic medications and adherence. A marked improvement in adherence was noted in patients using travoprost 0.004% as monocular therapy rather than binocular therapy, 84.0% ± 17.1% vs 67.4% ± 23.5% (P < 0.005.Conclusion: Patient adherence to glaucoma medical therapy is a major barrier in the management and treatment of glaucoma patients given the chronic nature and asymptomatic course of the disease. Until recently

  7. Cardiac toxicity and radiation dose to the heart in definitive treated non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred (Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark)), E-mail: tine.schytte@dadlnet.dk; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Brink, Carsten (Radiophysic Laboratory, Odense Univ. Hospital, 5000 Odense C (Denmark))

    2010-10-15

    In this retrospective analysis of a consecutive series of NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, we did not find a correlation between high mean-dose to three different volumes of the heart (left ventricle, both ventricles or whole heart) and cardiac toxicity defined as having an cardiac event after radiotherapy start. This is not as shown in studies with other diseases treated with radiotherapy. Darby et al. recently published a review concerning radiation related heart disease. They reported a significantly worse survival beyond ten years for breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Some studies reported mortality from heart disease increased by 27%. In Hodgkin lymphoma patients an increased risk value of three to five for cardiac morbidity in general compared to general population and relative risk of death from myocardial infarction compared with general population in range 2 to 4. There may be several possible reasons why we did not experience a significant toxicity despite the high doses we delivered to the heart compared with patients receiving RT for breast cancer and lymphoma. Only relative few NSCLC patients live long enough to experience cardiac disease either due to lung cancer itself or comorbidity as a competitive risk factor. In our study the five year survival was 15% leaving very few patients at risk for developing cardiac disease. Without long-term survivors cardiac toxicity does not seem to be a problem, and this suggests that we should aim to increase tumour control by administrating larger doses of radiotherapy to the tumour and/or by adding concurrent chemotherapy. However, the latter may increase the risk of cardiac toxicity by itself, and the results given in present study, may not be extrapolated to this situation. Another reason might be that if NSCLC patients develop dyspnoea, chest pain, etc. it is interpreted as being due to a relapse of lung cancer and not cardiac disease. There are several studies indicating that

  8. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-03-21

    The γ-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the γ-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate γ-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate γ-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original γ-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a γ-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the γ-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  9. Evaluation of useful treatment which uses dual-energy when curing lung-cancer patient with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hyeong Jun; Lee, Yeong Gyu; Kim, Yeong Jae; Park, Yeong Gyu [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Catholic University Seoul St Mary' s hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study will evaluate the clinical utility by applying clinical schematic that uses monoenergy or dual energy as according to the location of tumors to the stereotactic radiotherapy to compare the change in actual dose given to the real tumor and the dose that locates adjacent to the tumor. CT images from a total of 10 patients were obtained and the clinical planning were planned based on the volumetric modulated arc therapy on monoenergy and dual energy. To analyze the change factor in the tumor, Conformity Index(CI) and Homogeneity Index(HI) and maximum dose quantity were each calculated and comparing the dose distribution on normal tissues, v{sub 10} and v{sub 5}, first ⁓ fourth ribs closest to the tumor (1st ⁓ 4th Rib), Spinal Cord, Esophagus and Trachea were selected. Also, in order to confirm the accuracy on which the planned dose distribution is really measured, the 2-dimensional ion chamber array was used to measure the dose distribution. As of the tumor factor, CI and HI showed a number close to 1 when the two energies were used. As of the maximum dose, the front chest wall showed 2% and the dorsal tumor showed equivalent value. As of normal tissue, the front chest wall tumors were reduced by 4%, 5% when both energies were used in the adjacent rib and as of trachea, reduced by 11%, 17%. As of the dose in the lung, as of v{sub 10}, it reduced by 1.5%, v{sub 5} by 1%. As of the rear chest wall, when both energies were used, the ribs adjacent to the tumors showed 6%, 1%, 4%, 12% reduction, and in the lung dose distribution, v{sub 10} reduced by 3%, and v{sub 5} reduced by 3.1%. The dose measurement in all energies were in accordance to the results of Gamma Index 3mm/3%. Conclusion : It is considered that rather than using monoenergy, utilizing double energy in the clinical setting can be more effectively applied to the superficial tumors.

  10. Using Generalized Equivalent Uniform Dose Atlases to Combine and Analyze Prospective Dosimetric and Radiation Pneumonitis Data From 2 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Dose Escalation Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Fan; Yorke, Ellen D. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Borst, Gerben R. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rosenzweig, Kenneth E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Lebesque, Joos V. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Jackson, Andrew, E-mail: jacksona@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the use of generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) atlas for data pooling in radiation pneumonitis (RP) modeling, to determine the dependence of RP on gEUD, to study the consistency between data sets, and to verify the increased statistical power of the combination. Methods and Materials: Patients enrolled in prospective phase I/II dose escalation studies of radiation therapy of non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) (78 pts) and the Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI) (86 pts) were included; 10 (13%) and 14 (17%) experienced RP requiring steroids (RPS) within 6 months after treatment. gEUD was calculated from dose-volume histograms. Atlases for each data set were created using 1-Gy steps from exact gEUDs and RPS data. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model was fit to the atlas and exact gEUD data. Heterogeneity and inconsistency statistics for the fitted parameters were computed. gEUD maps of the probability of RPS rate {>=}20% were plotted. Results: The 2 data sets were homogeneous and consistent. The best fit values of the volume effect parameter a were small, with upper 95% confidence limit around 1.0 in the joint data. The likelihood profiles around the best fit a values were flat in all cases, making determination of the best fit a weak. All confidence intervals (CIs) were narrower in the joint than in the individual data sets. The minimum P value for correlations of gEUD with RPS in the joint data was .002, compared with P=.01 and .05 for MSKCC and NKI data sets, respectively. gEUD maps showed that at small a, RPS risk increases with gEUD. Conclusions: The atlas can be used to combine gEUD and RPS information from different institutions and model gEUD dependence of RPS. RPS has a large volume effect with the mean dose model barely included in the 95% CI. Data pooling increased statistical power.

  11. Dose evaluation in special fluoroscopy procedures: Hysterosalpingography and Dacryocystography; Avaliacao de dose em procedimentos especiais de fluoroscopia: histerossalpingografia e dacriocistografia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Cintya Carolina Barbosa

    2006-04-15

    The hysterosalpingography (HSG) and dacryocystography (DCG) are among the special fluoroscopy procedures. The HSG is a radiodiagnostic technique used to detect uterine and tubal pathologies and it is fundamental for the investigation of infertility. The DCG is a form of lacrimal system imaging, being important to show the level of obstruction, the presence of dilatation of the lacrimal sac, as well as alterations in nearby structures. At this research, the study of skin entrance dose was evaluated for these two special fluoroscopy procedures, besides the analyses of staff doses whose performs the exams. The exams of 22 HSG patients and 8 DCG patients were evaluated using TL-100 dosimeters attached on patient' skin at anatomical landmarks evolved on each exam. In the case of HSG, the results showed that skin entrance doses varied from 0.5 mGy to 73.4 mGy, with an average value of 22.1 mGy. The estimated uterus dose was 5.5 mGy, and 6.6 mGy was the average dose estimated to the ovaries. The patient' skin entrance dose undergoing to DCG examinations varied from 2.1 mGy to 10.6 mGy, and the average eye's dose was 6.1 mGy. The results of staff dose showed that, on HSG, the average dose on doctor's right hand was 4.3 mGy per examination. This value had to the fact that the physician introduces the contrast manually while all contrast exposures. In relation of DCG, the staff's dose values were nearby background radiation, evidencing that, inside of permitted limits, there is no risk for the physicians at this procedure. (author)

  12. A threefold dose intensity treatment with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide for patients with small cell lung cancer: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyvraz, Serge; Pampallona, Sandro; Martinelli, Giovanni; Ploner, Ferdinand; Perey, Lucien; Aversa, Savina; Peters, Solange; Brunsvig, Paal; Montes, Ana; Lange, Andrzej; Yilmaz, Ugur; Rosti, Giovanni

    2008-04-16

    The dose intensity of chemotherapy can be increased to the highest possible level by early administration of multiple and sequential high-dose cycles supported by transfusion with peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs). A randomized trial was performed to test the impact of such dose intensification on the long-term survival of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients who had limited or extensive SCLC with no more than two metastatic sites were randomly assigned to high-dose (High, n = 69) or standard-dose (Std, n = 71) chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE). High-ICE cycles were supported by transfusion with PBPCs that were collected after two cycles of treatment with epidoxorubicin at 150 mg/m(2), paclitaxel at 175 mg/m(2), and filgrastim. The primary outcome was 3-year survival. Comparisons between response rates and toxic effects within subgroups (limited or extensive disease, liver metastases or no liver metastases, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, normal or abnormal lactate dehydrogenase levels) were also performed. Median relative dose intensity in the High-ICE arm was 293% (range = 174%-392%) of that in the Std-ICE arm. The 3-year survival rates were 18% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10% to 29%) and 19% (95% CI = 11% to 30%) in the High-ICE and Std-ICE arms, respectively. No differences were observed between the High-ICE and Std-ICE arms in overall response (n = 54 [78%, 95% CI = 67% to 87%] and n = 48 [68%, 95% CI = 55% to 78%], respectively) or complete response (n = 27 [39%, 95% CI = 28% to 52%] and n = 24 [34%, 95% CI = 23% to 46%], respectively). Subgroup analyses showed no benefit for any outcome from High-ICE treatment. Hematologic toxicity was substantial in the Std-ICE arm (grade > or = 3 neutropenia, n = 49 [70%]; anemia, n = 17 [25%]; thrombopenia, n = 17 [25%]), and three patients (4%) died from toxicity. High-ICE treatment was predictably associated with severe

  13. Lung cancer incidence and mortality in National Lung Screening Trial participants who underwent low-dose CT prevalence screening: a retrospective cohort analysis of a randomised, multicentre, diagnostic screening trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Edward F; Greco, Erin; Gatsonis, Constantine; Pinsky, Paul; Kramer, Barnett S; Aberle, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Annual low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been recommended for high-risk individuals, but the necessity of yearly low-dose CT in all eligible individuals is uncertain. This study examined rates of lung cancer in National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) participants who had a negative prevalence (initial) low-dose CT screen to explore whether less frequent screening could be justified in some lower-risk subpopulations. Methods We did a retrospective cohort analysis of data from the NLST, a randomised, multicentre screening trial comparing three annual low-dose CT assessments with three annual chest radiographs for the early detection of lung cancer in high-risk, eligible individuals (aged 55–74 years with at least a 30 pack-year history of cigarette smoking, and, if a former smoker, had quit within the past 15 years), recruited from US medical centres between Aug 5, 2002, and April 26, 2004. Participants were followed up for up to 5 years after their last annual screen. For the purposes of this analysis, our cohort consisted of all NLST participants who had received a low-dose CT prevalence (T0) screen. We determined the frequency, stage, histology, study year of diagnosis, and incidence of lung cancer, as well as overall and lung cancer-specific mortality, and whether lung cancers were detected as a result of screening or within 1 year of a negative screen. We also estimated the effect on mortality if the first annual (T1) screen in participants with a negative T0 screen had not been done. The NLST is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00047385. Findings Our cohort consisted of 26 231 participants assigned to the low-dose CT screening group who had undergone their T0 screen. The 19 066 participants with a negative T0 screen had a lower incidence of lung cancer than did all 26 231 T0-screened participants (371·88 [95% CI 337·97–408·26] per 100 000 person-years vs 661·23 [622·07–702·21]) and had lower lung cancer

  14. Osteoporosis markers on low-dose lung cancer screening chest computed tomography scans predict all-cause mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckens, C.F. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Graaf, Y. van der [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verkooijen, H.M.; Mali, W.P.; Jong, P.A. de [University Medical Center Utrecht, Radiology Department, Utrecht (Netherlands); Isgum, I.; Mol, C.P. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Image Sciences Institute, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaar, H.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vliegenthart, R.; Oudkerk, M. [Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Aalst, C.M. van; Koning, H.J. de [Erasmus MC Rotterdam, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Further survival benefits may be gained from low-dose chest computed tomography (CT) by assessing vertebral fractures and bone density. We sought to assess the association between CT-measured vertebral fractures and bone density with all-cause mortality in lung cancer screening participants. Following a case-cohort design, lung cancer screening trial participants (N = 3,673) who died (N = 196) during a median follow-up of 6 years (inter-quartile range: 5.7-6.3) were identified and added to a random sample of N = 383 from the trial. We assessed vertebral fractures using Genant and acute;s semiquantative method on sagittal reconstructions and measured bone density (Hounsfield Units (HU)) in vertebrae. Cox proportional hazards modelling was used to determine if vertebral fractures or bone density were independently predictive of mortality. The prevalence of vertebral fractures was 35 % (95 % confidence interval 30-40 %) among survivors and 51 % (44-58 %) amongst cases. After adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, pack years smoked, coronary and aortic calcium volume and pulmonary emphysema, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for vertebral fracture was 2.04 (1.43-2.92). For each 10 HU decline in trabecular bone density, the adjusted HR was 1.08 (1.02-1.15). Vertebral fractures and bone density are independently associated with all-cause mortality. (orig.)

  15. Smoking habits in the randomised Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial with low-dose CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Saghir, Zaigham; Dirksen, Asger

    2014-01-01

    to annual low-dose CT (CT group) and 2052 received no intervention (control group). Participants were current and ex-smokers (≥4 weeks abstinence from smoking) with a tobacco consumption of ≥20 pack years. Smoking habits were determined annually. Missing values for smoking status at the final screening...

  16. Linking Different Exposure Patterns to Internal Lung Dose for Heterogeneous Ambient Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter (PM) in the ambient air is a complex mixture of particles with different sizes and chemical compositions. Because potential health effects are known to be different for different size particles, specific dose of size-fractionated PM under realistic exposure con...

  17. Multicentre knowledge sharing and planning/dose audit on flattening filter free beams for SBRT lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Sykes, J. R.; Barber, J.;

    2015-01-01

    . In particular, for the centres with less SBRT and/or volumetric- modulated arc therapy (VMAT) experience the MPV average per plan improved. All vendor/TPS combinations were also able to successfully deliver the FF and FFF SBRT VMAT plans. The plan quality and dose accuracy were found to be clinically acceptable....

  18. To Screen or not to Screen: Low Dose Computed Tomography in Comparison to Chest Radiography or Usual Care in Reducing Morbidity and Mortality from Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdar, Jay; Moats, Austin; Nguyen, Brenda

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers. This paper seeks to address the question: Can the mortality of lung cancer be decreased by screening with low-dose computerized tomography (LDCT) in higher risk patients compared to chest X-rays (CXR) or regular patient care? Currently, CXR screening is recommended for certain high-risk patients. Several recent trials have examined the effectiveness of LDCT versus chest radiography or usual care as a control. These trials include National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), Detection And screening of early lung cancer with Novel imaging TEchnology (DANTE), Lung Screening Study (LSS), Depiscan, Italian Lung (ITALUNG), and Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study). NLST, the largest trial (n=53, 454), demonstrated a decrease in mortality from lung cancer in the LDCT group (RRR=20%, P=0.004). LSS demonstrated a greater sensitivity in detecting both early stage and any stage of lung cancer in comparison to traditional CXR. Although the DANTE trial yielded data consistent with findings in LSS, it also showed that via LDCT screening a greater proportion of patients were placed under unnecessary surgical procedures. The Depiscan trial yielded a high nodule detection rate at the cost of a high false-positive rate compared to CXR screening. The ITALUNG and NELSON trials demonstrated the early detection capabilities of LDCT for lung cancers compared to usual care without surveillance imaging. False-positive findings with unnecessary workup, intervention, and radiation exposure remain significant concerns for routine LDCT screening. However, current data suggests LDCT may provide a highly sensitive and specific means for detecting lung cancers and reducing mortality. PMID:27375974

  19. Pulmonary Artery Invasion, High-Dose Radiation, and Overall Survival in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cheng-Bo [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Wang, Wei-Li [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fourth Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Quint, Leslie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Xue, Jian-Xin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Thoracic Oncology, Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Matuszak, Martha; Ten Haken, Randall [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fkong@gru.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose radiation to the pulmonary artery (PA) affects overall survival (OS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Patients with medically inoperable/unresectable NSCLC treated with definitive radiation therapy in prospective studies were eligible for this study. Pulmonary artery involvement was defined on the basis of pretreatment chest CT and positron emission tomography/CT fusion. Pulmonary artery was contoured according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 1106 atlas, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results: A total of 100 patients with a minimum follow-up of 1 year for surviving patients were enrolled: 82.0% underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy. Radiation dose ranged from 60 to 85.5 Gy in 30-37 fractions. Patients with PA invasion of grade ≤2, 3, 4, and 5 had 1-year OS and median survival of 67% and 25.4 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 15.7-35.1), 62% and 22.2 months (95% CI 5.8-38.6), 90% and 35.8 months (95% CI 28.4-43.2), and 50% and 7.0 months, respectively (P=.601). Two of the 4 patients with grade 5 PA invasion died suddenly from massive hemorrhage at 3 and 4.5 months after completion of radiation therapy. Maximum and mean doses to PA were not significantly associated with OS. The V45, V50, V55, and V60 of PA were correlated significantly with a worse OS (P<.05). Patients with V45 >70% or V60 >37% had significantly worse OS (13.3 vs 37.9 months, P<.001, and 13.8 vs 37.9 months, P=.04, respectively). Conclusions: Grade 5 PA invasion and PA volume receiving more than 45-60 Gy may be associated with inferior OS in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with concurrent chemoradiation.

  20. Adaptive radiotherapy for NSCLC patients: utilizing the principle of energy conservation to evaluate dose mapping operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hualiang; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2017-06-01

    Tumor regression during the course of fractionated radiotherapy confounds the ability to accurately estimate the total dose delivered to tumor targets. Here we present a new criterion to improve the accuracy of image intensity-based dose mapping operations for adaptive radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Six NSCLC patients were retrospectively investigated in this study. An image intensity-based B-spline registration algorithm was used for deformable image registration (DIR) of weekly CBCT images to a reference image. The resultant displacement vector fields were employed to map the doses calculated on weekly images to the reference image. The concept of energy conservation was introduced as a criterion to evaluate the accuracy of the dose mapping operations. A finite element method (FEM)-based mechanical model was implemented to improve the performance of the B-Spline-based registration algorithm in regions involving tumor regression. For the six patients, deformed tumor volumes changed by 21.2  ±  15.0% and 4.1  ±  3.7% on average for the B-Spline and the FEM-based registrations performed from fraction 1 to fraction 21, respectively. The energy deposited in the gross tumor volume (GTV) was 0.66 Joules (J) per fraction on average. The energy derived from the fractional dose reconstructed by the B-spline and FEM-based DIR algorithms in the deformed GTV’s was 0.51 J and 0.64 J, respectively. Based on landmark comparisons for the 6 patients, mean error for the FEM-based DIR algorithm was 2.5  ±  1.9 mm. The cross-correlation coefficient between the landmark-measured displacement error and the loss of radiation energy was  -0.16 for the FEM-based algorithm. To avoid uncertainties in measuring distorted landmarks, the B-Spline-based registrations were compared to the FEM registrations, and their displacement differences equal 4.2  ±  4.7 mm on average. The displacement differences were

  1. Use of motion tracking in stereotactic body radiotherapy: Evaluation of uncertainty in off-target dose distribution and optimization strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casamassima, F. [Univ. di Firenze, Florence (Italy). Dept. di Fisiopatologia Clinica; Cavedon, C.; Francescon, P.; Stancanello, J.; Avanzo, M.; Cora, S.; Scalchi, P. [Ospedale S.Bortolo, Vicenza (Italy). Servizio di Fisica Sanitaria

    2006-09-15

    Spatial accuracy in extracranial radiosurgery is affected by organ motion. Motion tracking systems may be able to avoid PTV enlargement while preserving treatment times, however special attention is needed when fiducial markers are used to identify the target can move with respect to organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients treated by means of the Synchrony system were taken into account. Sparing of irradiated volume and of complication probability were estimated by calculating treatment plans with a motion tracking system (Cyberknife Synchrony, Sunnyvale, CA (US). ) and a PTV-enlargement strategy for ten patients. Six patients were also evaluated for possible inaccuracy of estimation of dose to OARs due to relative movement between PTV and OAR during respiration. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and Equivalent Uniform Dose (EUD) were calculated for the organs at risk. In the cases for which the target moved closer to the OAR (three cases of six), a small but significant increase was detected in the DVH and EUD of the OAR. In three other cases no significant variation was detected. Mean reduction in PTV volume was 38% for liver cases, 44% for lung cases and 8.5% for pancreas cases. NTCP for liver reduced from 23.1 to 14.5% on average, for lung it reduced from 2.5 to 0.1% on average. Significant uncertainty may arise from the use of a motion-tracking device in determination of dose to organs at risk due to the relative motion between PTV and OAR. However, it is possible to limit this uncertainty. The breathing phase in which the OAR is closer to the PTV should be selected for planning. A full understanding of the dose distribution would only be possible by means of a complete 4D-CT representation.

  2. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I as a potential lung perfusion agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miroslavov, Alexander E.; Gorshkov, Nikolay I.; Lumpov, Alexander L. [Division of Radiochemical Research, Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinskii pr. 28, 194021, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Yalfimov, Anatoly N. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Central Research Institute of Roentgenology and Radiology, Leningradskaya str. 70/4, 197000, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Suglobov, Dmitrii N. [Division of Radiochemical Research, Khlopin Radium Institute, 2nd Murinskii pr. 28, 194021, St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ellis, Beverley L. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom)], E-mail: bev.ellis@manchester.ac.uk; Braddock, Rattana; Smith, Anne-Marie [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, School of Cancer and Imaging Science, Stopford Building, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom); Prescott, Mary C.; Lawson, Richard S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Manchester Royal Infirmary, M13 9WL Manchester (United Kingdom); Sharma, Harbans L. [Imaging Science and Biomedical Engineering, School of Cancer and Imaging Science, Stopford Building, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PT (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    Introduction: The use of {sup 99m}Tc-macroggregated albumin for lung perfusion imaging is well established in nuclear medicine. However, there have been safety concerns over the use of blood-derived products because of potential contamination by infective agents, for example, Variant Creutzfeldt Jakob Disease. Preliminary work has indicated that Tc(CO){sub 5}I is primarily taken up in the lungs following intravenous administration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I and its potential as a lung perfusion agent. Methods: {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I was synthesized by carbonylation of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4-} at 160 atm of CO at 170 deg. C in the presence of HI for 40 min. Radiochemical purity was determined by HPLC using {sup 99}Tc(CO){sub 5}I as a reference. {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I was administered by ear-vein injection to three chinchilla rabbits, and dynamic images were acquired using a gamma camera (Siemens E-cam) over 20 min. Imaging studies were also performed with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled macroaggregated albumin ({sup 99m}Tc-MAA) and {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4-} for comparison. {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I was administered intravenously to Sprague-Dawley rats, and tissue distribution studies were obtained at 15 min and 1 h postinjection. Comparative studies were performed using {sup 99m}Tc-MAA. Results: Radiochemical purity, assessed by HPLC, was 98%. The retention time was similar to that of {sup 99}Tc(CO){sub 5}I. The dynamic images showed that 70% of {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I appeared promptly in the lungs and remained constant for at least 20 min. In contrast, {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4-} rapidly washed out of the lungs after administration. As expected {sup 99m}Tc-MAA showed 90% lung accumulation. The percentage of injected dose per gram of organ {+-}S.D. at 1 h for {sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 5}I was as follows: blood, 0.22{+-}0.02; lung, 12.8{+-}2.87; liver, 0.8{+-}0.15; heart, 0.15{+-}0.01; kidney, 0.47{+-}0.08. The

  3. Endobronchial valves in severe emphysematous patients: CT evaluation of lung fissures completeness, treatment radiological response and quantitative emphysema analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Koenigkam-Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate lung fissures completeness, post-treatment radiological response and quantitative CT analysis (QCTA in a population of severe emphysematous patients submitted to endobronchial valves (EBV implantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Multi-detectors CT exams of 29 patients were studied, using thin-section low dose protocol without contrast. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all images in consensus; fissures completeness was estimated in 5% increments and post-EBV radiological response (target lobe atelectasis/volume loss was evaluated. QCTA was performed in pre and post-treatment scans using a fully automated software. RESULTS: CT response was present in 16/29 patients. In the negative CT response group, all 13 patients presented incomplete fissures, and mean oblique fissures completeness was 72.8%, against 88.3% in the other group. QCTA most significant results showed a reduced post-treatment total lung volume (LV (mean 542 ml, reduced EBV-submitted LV (700 ml and reduced emphysema volume (331.4 ml in the positive response group, which also showed improved functional tests. CONCLUSION: EBV benefit is most likely in patients who have complete interlobar fissures and develop lobar atelectasis. In patients with no radiological response we observed a higher prevalence of incomplete fissures and a greater degree of incompleteness. The fully automated QCTA detected the post-treatment alterations, especially in the treated lung analysis.

  4. Endobronchial valves in severe emphysematous patients: CT evaluation of lung fissures completeness, treatment radiological response and quantitative emphysema analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenigkam-Santos, Marcel, E-mail: marcelk46@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marcelk46@usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (HCFMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina; Paula, Wagner Diniz de [University of Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil). Brasilia University Hospital; Gompelmann, Daniela [University of Heidelberg (Germany). Department of Pneumology and Respiratory Medicine of the Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [University of Heidelberg (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Heussel, Claus Peter; Puderbach, Michael [University of Heidelberg (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine of the Chest Clinic (Thoraxklinik)

    2013-01-15

    Objective: To evaluate lung fissures completeness, post-treatment radiological response and quantitative CT analysis (QCTA) in a population of severe emphysematous patients submitted to endobronchial valves (EBV) implantation. Materials and Methods: Multi-detectors CT exams of 29 patients were studied, using thin-section low dose protocol without contrast. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed all images in consensus; fissures completeness was estimated in 5% increments and post-EBV radiological response (target lobe atelectasis/volume loss) was evaluated. QCTA was performed in pre and post-treatment scans using a fully automated software. Results: CT response was present in 16/29 patients. In the negative CT response group, all 13 patients presented incomplete fissures, and mean oblique fissures completeness was 72.8%, against 88.3% in the other group. QCTA most significant results showed a reduced post-treatment total lung volume (LV) (mean 542 ml), reduced EBV-submitted LV (700 ml) and reduced emphysema volume (331.4 ml) in the positive response group, which also showed improved functional tests. Conclusion: EBV benefit is most likely in patients who have complete interlobar fissures and develop lobar atelectasis. In patients with no radiological response we observed a higher prevalence of incomplete fissures and a greater degree of incompleteness. The fully automated QCTA detected the post-treatment alterations, especially in the treated lung analysis. (author)

  5. Evaluating of Serum Adenosine Deaminase Isoenzymes in Lung Contusion

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

          Aim: We aimed to investigate the activity of ADA isoenzymes in serum of rats with lung contusion Material and Method: Lung contusion was induced in twelve male wistar albino rats by dropping a cylindrical weight from a height of 50 cm with a mobile platform positioned over the thorax. Rats were killed at 24 hour (n=6) and 72 hour (n=6) after contusion. ADA isoenzymes were measured in serum traumatic and control (n=6) (uninjured) rats. Results: Our results indica...

  6. Estimation of absorbed and effective dose in {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT exams for diagnosis of lung cancer; Estimativa de dose absorvida e efetiva em exames de {sup 18}F-FDG em PET- CT para diagnostico de cancer de pulmao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Guilherme Neto de Pinho; Santana, Priscila do Carmo, E-mail: guinpc1@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Anatomia e Imagem; Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de; Reis, Lucas Paixao dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-04-15

    This paper presents an evaluation of tissues and organs absorbed doses as well as the effective dose resulting from PET-CT scans performed with {sup 18}F-FDG radiopharmaceutical for lung cancer diagnosis in whole body scans. The ICRP-106 biokinetic model was used to estimate the absorbed and effective doses from the radiopharmaceutical for both male and female patient according to the characteristics of anthropomorphic Alderson Rando® simulators. Computer Tomography doses were evaluated using thermoluminescent detectors inserted in the same anthropomorphic simulators. Optimization protocols for image acquisition and the use of automatic exposure control were used in order to reduce patient doses, taking into account the equipment model and its system. The effective dose in female patients was 5.8 mSv. The effective dose in male patients was 8.4 mSv. The dose values estimated for the {sup 18}F-FDG PET-CT scan are below the values described in the literature. This is because the CT was not used for diagnostic but for morphological mapping. (author)

  7. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure.

  8. Multimodal lung cancer screening using the ITALUNG biomarker panel and low dose computed tomography. Results of the ITALUNG biomarker study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carozzi, Francesca Maria; Bisanzi, Simonetta; Carrozzi, Laura; Falaschi, Fabio; Lopes Pegna, Andrea; Mascalchi, Mario; Picozzi, Giulia; Peluso, Marco; Sani, Cristina; Greco, Luana; Ocello, Cristina; Paci, Eugenio

    2017-07-01

    Asymptomatic high-risk subjects, randomized in the intervention arm of the ITALUNG trial (1,406 screened for lung cancer), were enrolled for the ITALUNG biomarker study (n = 1,356), in which samples of blood and sputum were analyzed for plasma DNA quantification (cut off 5 ng/ml), loss of heterozygosity and microsatellite instability. The ITALUNG biomarker panel (IBP) was considered positive if at least one of the two biomarkers included in the panel was positive. Subjects with and without lung cancer diagnosis at the end of the screening cycle with LDCT (n = 517) were evaluated. Out of 18 baseline screen detected lung cancer cases, 17 were IBP positive (94%). Repeat screen-detected lung cancer cases were 18 and 12 of them positive at baseline IBP test (66%). Interval cancer cases (2-years) and biomarker tests after a suspect Non Calcific Nodule follow-up were investigated. The single test versus multimodal screening measures of accuracy were compared in a simulation within the screened ITALUNG intervention arm, considering screen-detected and interval cancer cases. Sensitivity was 90% at baseline screening. Specificity was 71 and 61% for LDCT and IBP as baseline single test, and improved at 89% with multimodal, combined screening. The positive predictive value was 4.3% for LDCT at baseline and 10.6% for multimodal screening. Multimodal screening could improve the screening efficiency at baseline and strategies for future implementation are discussed. If IBP was used as primary screening test, the LDCT burden might decrease of about 60%. © 2017 UICC.

  9. Low-Dose Chest Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening Among Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wattson, Daniel A., E-mail: dwattson@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hunink, M.G. Myriam [Departments of Radiology and Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, the Netherlands and Center for Health Decision Science, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); DiPiro, Pamela J. [Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Das, Prajnan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hodgson, David C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mauch, Peter M.; Ng, Andrea K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors face an increased risk of treatment-related lung cancer. Screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) may allow detection of early stage, resectable cancers. We developed a Markov decision-analytic and cost-effectiveness model to estimate the merits of annual LDCT screening among HL survivors. Methods and Materials: Population databases and HL-specific literature informed key model parameters, including lung cancer rates and stage distribution, cause-specific survival estimates, and utilities. Relative risks accounted for radiation therapy (RT) technique, smoking status (>10 pack-years or current smokers vs not), age at HL diagnosis, time from HL treatment, and excess radiation from LDCTs. LDCT assumptions, including expected stage-shift, false-positive rates, and likely additional workup were derived from the National Lung Screening Trial and preliminary results from an internal phase 2 protocol that performed annual LDCTs in 53 HL survivors. We assumed a 3% discount rate and a willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold of $50,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Results: Annual LDCT screening was cost effective for all smokers. A male smoker treated with mantle RT at age 25 achieved maximum QALYs by initiating screening 12 years post-HL, with a life expectancy benefit of 2.1 months and an incremental cost of $34,841/QALY. Among nonsmokers, annual screening produced a QALY benefit in some cases, but the incremental cost was not below the WTP threshold for any patient subsets. As age at HL diagnosis increased, earlier initiation of screening improved outcomes. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the model was most sensitive to the lung cancer incidence and mortality rates and expected stage-shift from screening. Conclusions: HL survivors are an important high-risk population that may benefit from screening, especially those treated in the past with large radiation fields including mantle or involved-field RT. Screening

  10. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Ayakawa Shiho; Oda Kyota; Ikeya-Hashizume Chisa; Tomita Natsuo; Shibamoto Yuta; Baba Fumiya; Ogino Hiroyuki; Sugie Chikao

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrenc...

  11. Evaluation of enzyme dose and dose-frequency in ameliorating substrate accumulation in MPS IIIA Huntaway dog brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Marshall, Neil; Beard, Helen; Hassiotis, Sofia; Trim, Paul J; Snel, Marten F; Rozaklis, Tina; Jolly, Robert D; Hopwood, John J; Hemsley, Kim M

    2015-03-01

    Intracerebrospinal fluid (CSF) infusion of replacement enzyme is under evaluation for amelioration of disease-related symptoms and biomarker changes in patients with the lysosomal storage disorder mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (MPS IIIA; www.clinicaltrials.gov ; NCT#01155778; #01299727). Determining the optimal dose/dose-frequency is important, given the invasive method for chronically supplying recombinant protein to the brain, the main site of symptom generation. To examine these variables, we utilised MPS IIIA Huntaway dogs, providing recombinant human sulphamidase (rhSGSH) to young pre-symptomatic dogs from an age when MPS IIIA dog brain exhibits significant accumulation of primary (heparan sulphate) and secondary (glycolipid) substrates. Enzyme was infused into CSF via the cisterna magna at one of two doses (3 mg or 15 mg/infusion), with the higher dose supplied at two different intervals; fortnightly or monthly. Euthanasia was carried out 24 h after the final injection. Dose- and frequency-dependent reductions in heparan sulphate were observed in CSF and deeper layers of cerebral cortex. When we examined the amount of immunostaining of the general endo/lysosomal marker, LIMP-2, or quantified activated microglia, the higher fortnightly dose resulted in superior outcomes in affected dogs. Secondary lesions such as accumulation of GM3 ganglioside and development of GAD-reactive axonal spheroids were treated to a similar degree by both rhSGSH doses and dose frequencies. Our findings indicate that the lower fortnightly dose is sub-optimal for ameliorating existing and preventing further development of disease-related pathology in young MPS IIIA dog brain; however, increasing the dose fivefold but halving the frequency of administration enabled near normalisation of disease-related biomarkers.

  12. Nuclear methods in pulmonary medicine. Evaluation of lung epithelial permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhouse, M.; Jordana, M.; Dolovich, M.

    1987-06-01

    During the last few years a number of factors affecting the measurements of the rate of absorption of /sup 99m/Tc-DTPA across the alveolar-capillary membrane have been identified. These have helped to provide insights into the significance of lung epithelial permeability (LEP) measurements and their potential limitations.

  13. Analytical evaluation of dose measurement of critical accident at SILENE (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Tonoike, K

    2003-01-01

    Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) jointly organized SILENE Accident Dosimetry Intercomparison Exercise to intercompare the dose measurement systems of participating countries. Each participating country carried out dose measurements in the same irradiation field, and the measurement results were mutually compared. The participated in the exercise to measure the doses of gamma rays and neutron from SILENE by using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD's) and an alanine dosimeter. In this examination, the derived evaluation formulae for obtaining a tissue-absorbed dose from measured value (ambient dose equivalent) of TLD for neutron. We reported the tissue-absorbed dose computed using this evaluation formula to OECD/NEA. TLD's for neutron were irradiated in the TRACY facility to verify the evaluation formulae. The results of TLD's were compared with the calculations of MCNP and measurements with alanine dose meter. We found that the ratio of the dose b...

  14. Evaluation of skin dose in tomographic radiographs of temporomandibular joint; Avaliacao da dose pele em radiografias tomograficas da articulacao tempromandibular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, S.B.; Chaves, F.C.; Rocha, F.E.F.C. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Clinica e Odontologia Preventiva; Khoury, H.J. [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: khoury@elogica.com.br

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the skin entrance dose, in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunctions submitted to computerized tomography. For this purpose, in a private medical establishment, in the city of Recife-Pe/Br, 40 patients were evaluated, in according to radiation doses received in eyes, thyroid and TMJ regions. The value found for eye region range from 0.004 to 0.125 mGy, for thyroid range from 0.002 to 0.113 mGy and for TMJ range from 0.112 to 0.541 mGy.

  15. Occurrence and lung cancer probability of new solid nodules at incidence screening with low-dose CT : analysis of data from the randomised, controlled NELSON trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Joan E.; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; de Jong, Pim A.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Peters, Robin B.; ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mali, Willem; Groen, Harry J. M.; de Koning, Harry J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    Background US guidelines now recommend lung cancer screening with low-dose CT for high-risk individuals. Reports of new nodules after baseline screening have been scarce and are inconsistent because of differences in definitions used. We aimed to identify the occurrence of new solid nodules and thei

  16. Occurrence and lung cancer probability of new solid nodules at incidence screening with low-dose CT : analysis of data from the randomised, controlled NELSON trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Joan E.; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; de Jong, Pim A.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Peters, Robin B.; ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mali, Willem; Groen, Harry J. M.; de Koning, Harry J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: US guidelines now recommend lung cancer screening with low-dose CT for high-risk individuals. Reports of new nodules after baseline screening have been scarce and are inconsistent because of differences in definitions used. We aimed to identify the occurrence of new solid nodules and the

  17. Adaptation requirements due to anatomical changes in free-breathing and deep-inspiration breath-hold for standard and dose-escalated radiotherapy of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibolt, Patrik; Ottosson, Wiviann; Sjöström, David;

    2015-01-01

    Background. Radiotherapy of lung cancer patients is subject to uncertainties related to heterogeneities, anatomical changes and breathing motion. Use of deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) can reduce the treated volume, potentially enabling dose-escalated (DE) treatments. This study was designed...

  18. Occurrence and lung cancer probability of new solid nodules at incidence screening with low-dose CT : analysis of data from the randomised, controlled NELSON trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, Joan E.; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A.; de Jong, Pim A.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; van Ooijen, Peter M A; Peters, Robin B.; ten Haaf, Kevin; Yousaf-Khan, Uraujh; van der Aalst, Carlijn M.; de Bock, Geertruida H.; Mali, Willem P Th M; Groen, Harry J M; de Koning, Harry J.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    BACKGROUND: US guidelines now recommend lung cancer screening with low-dose CT for high-risk individuals. Reports of new nodules after baseline screening have been scarce and are inconsistent because of differences in definitions used. We aimed to identify the occurrence of new solid nodules and

  19. Screening for early lung cancer with low-dose spiral computed tomography: results of annual follow-up examinations in asymptomatic smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, Stefan [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany); Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Marien Hospital, Academic Teaching Hospital, Rochusstrasse 2, 40479, Duesseldorf (Germany); Thomas, Michael [Department of Haematology/Oncology and Respiratory Medicine, University of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany); Semik, Michael [Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, University of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany); Lenzen, Horst; Roos, Nikolaus; Weber, Anushe; Heindel, Walter; Wormanns, Dag [Department of Clinical Radiology, University of Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Strasse 33, 48129, Muenster (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    The aim of this study was analysis of incidence results in a prospective one-arm feasibility study of lung cancer screening with low-radiation-dose spiral computed tomography in heavy smokers. Eight hundred seventeen smokers ({>=}40 years, {>=}20 pack years of smoking history) underwent baseline low-dose CT. Biopsy was recommended in nodules >10 mm with CT morphology suggesting malignancy. In all other lesions follow-up with low-dose CT was recommended. Annual repeat CT was offered to all study participants. Six hundred sixty-eight (81.8%) of the 817 subjects underwent annual repeat CT with a total of 1735 follow-up years. Follow-up of non-calcified nodules present at baseline CT demonstrated growth in 11 of 792 subjects. Biopsy was performed in 8 of 11 growing nodules 7 of which represented lung cancer. Of 174 new nodules, 3 represented lung cancer. The 10 screen-detected lung cancers were all non-small cell cancer (6 stage IA, 1 stage IB, 1 stage IIIA, 2 stage IV). Five symptom-diagnosed cancers (2 small cell lung cancer: 1 limited disease, 1 extensive disease, 3 central/endobronchial non-small cell lung cancer, 2 stage IIIA, 1 stage IIIB) were diagnosed because of symptoms in the 12-month interval between two annual CT scans. Incidence of lung cancer was lower than prevalence, screen-detected cancers were smaller, and stage I was found in 70% (7 of 10) of screen-detected tumors. Only 27% (4 of 15) of invasive procedures was performed for benign lesions; however, 33% (5 of 15) of all cancers diagnosed in the population were symptom-diagnosed cancers (3 central NSCLC, all stage III, 2 SCLC) demonstrating the limitations of CT screening. (orig.)

  20. Lung cancer probability in patients with CT-detected pulmonary nodules: a prespecified analysis of data from the NELSON trial of low-dose CT screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horeweg, Nanda; van Rosmalen, Joost; Heuvelmans, Marjolein A; van der Aalst, Carlijn M; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Scholten, Ernst Th; ten Haaf, Kevin; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Weenink, Carla; Groen, Harry J; van Ooijen, Peter; de Jong, Pim A; de Bock, Geertruida H; Mali, Willem; de Koning, Harry J; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2014-11-01

    The main challenge in CT screening for lung cancer is the high prevalence of pulmonary nodules and the relatively low incidence of lung cancer. Management protocols use thresholds for nodule size and growth rate to determine which nodules require additional diagnostic procedures, but these should be based on individuals' probabilities of developing lung cancer. In this prespecified analysis, using data from the NELSON CT screening trial, we aimed to quantify how nodule diameter, volume, and volume doubling time affect the probability of developing lung cancer within 2 years of a CT scan, and to propose and evaluate thresholds for management protocols. Eligible participants in the NELSON trial were those aged 50-75 years, who have smoked 15 cigarettes or more per day for more than 25 years, or ten cigarettes or more for more than 30 years and were still smoking, or had stopped smoking less than 10 years ago. Participants were randomly assigned to low-dose CT screening at increasing intervals, or no screening. We included all participants assigned to the screening group who had attended at least one round of screening, and whose results were available from the national cancer registry database. We calculated lung cancer probabilities, stratified by nodule diameter, volume, and volume doubling time and did logistic regression analysis using diameter, volume, volume doubling time, and multinodularity as potential predictor variables. We assessed management strategies based on nodule threshold characteristics for specificity and sensitivity, and compared them to the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. The NELSON trial is registered at www.trialregister.nl, number ISRCTN63545820. Volume, volume doubling time, and volumetry-based diameter of 9681 non-calcified nodules detected by CT screening in 7155 participants in the screening group of NELSON were used to quantify lung cancer probability. Lung cancer probability was low in participants with a nodule

  1. Development of a new interfacility extracorporeal membrane oxygenation transport program for pediatric lung transplantation evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Edward G.; Gee, Samantha W.

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric lung transplantation is a life-saving intervention for children with irreversible end-stage lung disease. Access to transplant can be limited by geographic isolation from a center or the presence of comorbidities affecting transplant eligibility. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO)-supported patients are an uncommon but historically high-risk cohort of patients considered for lung transplant. We report the development of a service at our center to provide transport services to our hospital for patients unable to wean from ECMO support at their local institution for the purpose of evaluation for lung transplantation by our program. We developed a process for pre-transport consultation by the lung transplant physician team, standardized hand-off tools and equipment lists, and procedures for transitioning patients to transport ECMO machinery. Four patients have been transported to date including fixed wing (FW) and helicopter transports. All patients were successfully transported with either none or minor complications. Transport of ECMO-supported patients is a feasible method to increase access of patients with irreversible lung injured patients to evaluation for lung transplant. PMID:28275613

  2. Phase 3 Randomized Low-Dose Paclitaxel Chemoradiotherapy Study for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Lin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the standard treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC, but is associated with poor chest tumor control. Here we report results of a randomized phase 3 study comparing two CCRT regimens in improving chest tumor control by low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation for LA-NSCLC. Methods: Due to the logistics of local referral pattern, the study was designed to enroll patients with stage III LA-NSCLC who had completed 2-4 cycles of full-dose chemotherapy. One hundred thirty four were randomized to either Arm 1 (paclitaxel at 15 mg/m2, three times/wk [M, W, F] for 6 weeks, n=74, or Arm 2 (weekly paclitaxel at 45 mg/m2 for 6 weeks, n=60. Chest RT was 60-70 Gy in standard fractionation. Response rate was the primary endpoint, with recurrence-free survival (RFS as the secondary endpoint. Results: From March 2006 to February 2013, seventy-one patients completed Arm 1 treatment, and 59 completed Arm 2 treatment. The response rate for Arm 1 was significantly higher (83.1% than Arm 2 (54.2% (p=0.001. RFS was superior in Arm 1: median 14.6 months vs. 9.4 months, p=0.005, Hazard ratio (HR 1.868 (95% CI 1.203, 2.901. Overall survival was not significantly different: median 32.6 months in Arm 1 vs. 31.3 months in Arm 2, p = 0.91, HR 0.969 (95% CI 0.552, 1.703. Toxicity was significantly lower in Arm 1 for grade 3 and 4 leucopenia/neutropenia (p<0.001.Conclusions: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel CCRT resulted in significantly better RFS and tumor response rate, and less hematologic toxicities than weekly CCRT for LA-NSCLC.

  3. A Method to Evaluate Hormesis in Nanoparticle Dose-Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Nascarella, Marc A.; Calabrese, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    The term hormesis describes a dose-response relationship that is characterized by a response that is opposite above and below the toxicological or pharmacological threshold. Previous reports have shown that this relationship is ubiquitous in the response of pharmaceuticals, metals, organic chemicals, radiation, and physical stressor agents. Recent reports have also indicated that certain nanoparticles (NPs) may also exhibit a hormetic dose-response. We describe the application of three previo...

  4. Rapid Response to High-Dose, Pulsatile Erlotinib in Afatinib-Refractory Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis from Adenocarcinoma of the Lung: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank S. Fan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis occurred in an old female patient who was on a standard dose of afatinib for the treatment of her non-small cell lung cancer harboring an epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors when extracranial lesions were still under control. Shifting to high-dose, pulsatile erlotinib dramatically saved her from the devastating condition in a very short period of time. Inadequate afatinib concentration in cerebrospinal fluid is reasonably suspected, and there is a call for clinical trials testing high-dose afatinib in leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

  5. Pulmonary function tests in the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer surgery candidates. A review of guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Trzaska-Sobczak, Marzena; Skoczyński, Szymon; Pierzchała, Władysław

    2014-01-01

    Before planned surgical treatment of lung cancer, the patient's respiratory system function should be evaluated. According to the current guidelines, the assessment should start with measurements of FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) and DLco (carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity). Pneumonectomy is possible when FEV1 and DLco are > 80% of the predicted value (p.v.). If either of these parameters is < 80%, an exercise test with VO2 max (oxygen consumption during maximal exercise) m...

  6. Evaluating of Serum Adenosine Deaminase Isoenzymes in Lung Contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berrak Güven

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available       Aim: We aimed to investigate the activity of ADA isoenzymes in serum of rats with lung contusion Material and Method: Lung contusion was induced in twelve male wistar albino rats by dropping a cylindrical weight from a height of 50 cm with a mobile platform positioned over the thorax. Rats were killed at 24 hour (n=6 and 72 hour (n=6 after contusion. ADA isoenzymes were measured in serum traumatic and control (n=6 (uninjured rats. Results: Our results indicated that serum total ADA activities were significantly decreased at 72 h after contusion. There was a significant decreased in ADA1 activity at 24 and 72 h after contusion when compared with controls. On the other hand, the increase in the ADA2 activity at 24 h and 72 h was not statistically significant. Discussion: In conclusion, serum ADA2 became predominant isozyme because of the inflammatory response in the lung contusion. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the regulatory mechanisms that effect the activity of serum ADA1.

  7. Efficacy and safety evaluation of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiqin Gu; Chunlei Shi; Liwen Xiong; Tianqing Chu; Jun Pei; Baohui Han

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib hydrochloride in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).Methods:A total of 89 patients with stage ⅢB or Ⅳ NSCLC received icotinib at a dose of 125 mg admimstered 3 times a day.Icotinib treatment was continued until disease progression or development of unacceptable toxicity.Results:A total of 89 patients were assessable.In patients treated with icotinib,the overall response rate (RR) was 36.0% (32/89),and the disease control rate (DCR) was 69.7% (62/89).RR and DCR were significantly improved in patients with adenocarcinoma versus non-adenocarcinoma (P<0.05).The symptom improvement rate was 57.3% (51/89),and the main symptoms improved were cough,pain,chest distress,dyspnea,and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status.The main toxic effects were rash [30/89 (33.7 %)] and diarrhea [15/89 (16.9%)].The level of toxicity was typically low.Conclusions:The use of icotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of advanced NSCLC is efficacious and safe,and its toxic effects are tolerable.

  8. Percutaneous CT-guided high-dose brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors in nonsurgical candidates; Perkutane CT-gesteuerte Hochdosis-Brachytherapie (CT-HDRBT) von primaeren und metastatischen Lungentumoren in nicht chirurgischen Kandidaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collettini, F.; Schnapauff, D.; Poellinger, A.; Denecke, T.; Banzer, J.; Golenia, M.J.; Gebauer, B. [Charite - Universitatesmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Wust, P. [Charite - Universitatesmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided high-dose brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) ablation of primary and metastatic lung tumors. Between November 2007 and May 2010, all consecutive patients with primary or metastatic lung tumors, unsuitable for surgery, were treated with CT-HDRBT. Imaging follow-up after treatment was performed with contrast-enhanced CT at 6 weeks, 3 months and every 6 months after the procedure. The endpoints of the study were local tumor control and time to progression. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival functions and local tumor progression rates. 34 procedures were carried out on 33 lesions in 22 patients. The mean diameter of the tumors was 33.3 mm (SD = 20.4). The first contrast-enhanced CT showed that complete ablation was achieved in all lesions. The mean minimal tumor enclosing dose was 18.9 Gy (SD = 2). Three patients developed a pneumothorax after the procedure. The mean follow-up time was 13.7 (3 - 29) months. 2 of 32 lesions (6.25 %) developed a local tumor progression. 8 patients (36.3 %) developed a distant tumor progression. After 17.7 months, 13 patients were alive and 9 patients had died. CT-HDRBT ablation is a safe and attractive treatment option for patients with lung malignancies and allows targeted destruction of tumor tissue with simultaneous preservation of important lung structures. Furthermore, CT-HDRBT is independent of the size of the lesion and its location within the lung parenchyma. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation of bismuth shielding effectiveness in reducing breast absorbed dose during thoracic CT scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T. C.; Mourao, A. P.; Santana, P. C.; Silva, T. A. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Program of Nuclear Science and Techniques, Av. Pte. Antonio Carlos 6627, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Computed Tomography (CT) is an essential method for tracking neoplasia and efficiently diagnosing a wide variety of thoracic diseases. CT is generally considered the most accurate choice for lung examination. Due to the growing use of CT, breast and other superficial and radiosensitive organs are unnecessarily irradiated during radiological procedures, thus requiring the development of strategies appropriate to optimize and, if possible, to reduce the radiation dose. The use of bismuth shielding to reduce radiation dose absorbed by breast during thoracic CT examinations has been the subject of many studies recently published by Brazilian and foreign authors of various fields. The purpose of this paper is both to accurately determine the glandular dose when breast is exposed to radiation and to assess the reduction in absorbed dose during thoracic CT examinations, using a set of Thermoluminescent Dosimeters, an anthropomorphic phantom and bismuth shielding. (Author)

  10. Should Nonsmokers Be Excluded from Early Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose Spiral Computed Tomography? Community-Based Practice in Shanghai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Luo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated the efficacy of early lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography(LDCT in both smokers and nonsmokers based on the current situation of community health service, with integration of superior resources of medical institutions at all levels in Shanghai. METHODS: From August 2013 to August 2014, we screened 11,332 (male 7144; female 4188 high-risk individuals in selected communities of Minhang, Shanghai City, for early diagnosis of lung cancer with LDCT combined with multidisciplinary comprehensive treatment pattern including minimally invasive surgery, exploring the medical service network covering prevention, diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation, and follow-up. RESULTS: Screening resulted in a diagnosis of cancer in 29 participants. Of these participants, 27 had primary lung cancer, 1 had lung metastatic cancer, and 1 had breast cancer. The detection rate of primary lung cancer was 238.26 cases per 100,000 person-years among all the participants. Specifically, the incidence of primary lung cancer was 336.97 cases per 100,000 person-years among the nonsmoking participants, as compared with 159.06 cases per 100,000 person-years among the smoking participants (P = .054. Among the 27 primary lung cancers, 22 (81.48% had stage 0 to I lung cancer. CONCLUSION: Based on community health service, screening with LDCT could improve the early diagnosis rate of lung cancer in both smokers and nonsmokers with feasibility and validity, which could be applicable in qualified eligible medical centers and communities in China. It is not reasonable to exclude nonsmokers from screening with LDCT.

  11. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2cm, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β=3Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61-947)Gy/178 (61-980)Gy, respectively). At 5mm depth, doses were 98 (55-212)Gy/91 (54-227)Gy left/right, and 71 (51-145)Gy/67 (49-189)Gy anterior/posterior, respectively. The dose at PIBS and PIBS±2cm was 41 (3-81)Gy, 54 (32-109)Gy and 5 (1-51)Gy, respectively. At PIBS+2cm (mid vagina) dose variation was coming from BT. The variation at PIBS-2cm (lower vagina) was mainly dependent on EBRT field border location. This novel method for reporting vaginal doses coming from EBRT and BT through well-defined dose points gives a robust representation of the dose along the vaginal axis. In addition, it allows comparison of vaginal dose between patients from different centres. The doses at the PIBS points represent the doses at the mid and lower parts of the vagina. Large variations in dose throughout the vagina were observed between patients and centres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.

    2014-01-01

    Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Ho......Respiration and anatomical variation during radiotherapy (RT) of lung cancer yield dosimetric uncertainties of the delivered dose, possibly affecting the clinical outcome if not corrected for. Adaptive radiotherapy (ART), based on deformable image registration (DIR) and Deep....... Delineations of anatomical structures were performed on each image set. The CT images were retrospective rigidly and deformable registered to all obtained images using the Varian Smart Adapt v. 11.0. The registered images were analysed for volume change and Dice Similarity Coefficient (DSC). Result...

  13. Evaluation of the peripheral dose in stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Betta, Erika; Fariselli, Laura; Bergantin, Achille; Locatelli, Federica; Del Vecchio, Antonella; Broggi, Sara; Fumagalli, Maria Luisa [Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy); Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Radiotherapy, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy); CyberKnife Centre, Centro Diagnostico Italiano, 20147 Milano (Italy); Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto S. Raffaele, 20132 Milano (Italy); Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Medical Physics, Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Neurologico C. Besta, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The main purpose of this work was to compare peripheral doses absorbed during stereotactic treatment of a brain lesion delivered using different devices. These data were used to estimate the risk of stochastic effects. Methods: Treatment plans were created for an anthropomorphic phantom and delivered using a LINAC with stereotactic cones and a multileaf collimator, a CyberKnife system (before and after a supplemental shielding was applied), a TomoTherapy system, and a Gamma Knife unit. For each treatment, 5 Gy were prescribed to the target. Measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters inserted roughly in the position of the thyroid, sternum, upper lung, lower lung, and gonads. Results: Mean doses ranged from of 4.1 (Gamma Knife) to 62.8 mGy (LINAC with cones) in the thyroid, from 2.3 (TomoTherapy) to 30 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the sternum, from 1.7 (TomoTherapy) to 20 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the upper part of the lungs, from 0.98 (Gamma Knife) to 15 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the lower part of the lungs, and between 0.3 (Gamma Knife) and 10 mGy (preshielding CyberKnife) in the gonads. Conclusions: The peripheral dose absorbed in the sites of interest with a 5 Gy fraction is low. Although the risk of adverse side effects calculated for 20 Gy delivered in 5 Gy fractions is negligible, in the interest of optimum patient radioprotection, further studies are needed to determine the weight of each contributor to the peripheral dose.

  14. PET/CT imaging in response evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Mortensen, Jann; Langer, Seppo W;

    2006-01-01

    UNLABELLED: There is an increasing amount of evidence on the usability of PET in response evaluation of non-small cell lung cancer. However, data on SCLC is scarce and mainly retrospective. This prospective study assesses the use of PET (positron emission tomography) and PET/CT in response...... evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Assignment of early and final response was compared between PET, PET/CT, and CT in 20 patients with SCLC. Final response as assigned by CT (RECIST) served as reference. RESULTS: At response evaluation after one cycle of chemotherapy major...

  15. Is 5 mm MMLC suitable for VMAT-based lung SBRT? A dosimetric comparison with 2.5 mm HDMLC using RTOG-0813 treatment planning criteria for both conventional and high-dose flattening filter-free photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Shanmuga V; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Thirumalai Swamy, Shanmugam; Gandhi, Arun; Chilukuri, Srinivas; Kathirvel, Murugesan

    2015-07-08

    The aim of this study is to assess the suitability of 5 mm millennium multileaf collimator (MMLC) for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT)-based lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Thirty lung SBRT patient treatment plans along with their planning target volumes (ranging from 2.01 cc to 150.11 cc) were transferred to an inhomogeneous lung phantom and retrospectively planned using VMAT technique, along with the high definition multileaf collimator (HDMLC) and MMLC systems. The plans were evaluated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG-0813) treatment planning criteria for target coverage, normal tissue sparing, and treatment efficiency for both the MMLC and HDMLC systems using flat and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams. Irrespective of the target volumes, both the MLC systems were able to satisfy the RTOG-0813 treatment planning criteria without having any major deviation. Dose conformity was marginally better with HDMLC. The average conformity index (CI) value was found to be 1.069 ± 0.034 and 1.075 ± 0.0380 for HDMLC and MMLC plans, respectively. For the 6 MV FFF beams, the plan was slightly more conformal, with the average CI values of 1.063 ± 0.029 and 1.073 ± 0.033 for the HDMLC and MMLC plans, respectively. The high dose spillage was the maximum for 2 cc volume set (3% for HDMLC and 3.1% for MMLC). In the case of low dose spillage, both the MLCs were within the protocol of no deviation, except for the 2 cc volume set. The results from this study revealed that VMAT-based lung SBRT using 5 mm MMLC satisfies the RTOG-0813 treatment planning criteria for the studied target size and shapes.

  16. Pirfenidone-loaded liposomes for lung targeting: preparation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng H

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hui Meng, Yong XuDepartment of Pharmaceuticals, 85th People’s Liberation Army Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to develop novel pirfenidone (PFD-loaded liposomes for targeting to the lung.Methods: The liposomes were prepared by the film hydration method, and their in vitro/vivo characteristics were evaluated.Results: The PFD liposomes appeared visually as green to yellowish suspensions and were spherical in shape. The particle size was 582.3±21.6 nm and the entrapment efficiency was relatively high (87.2%±5.7%. The liposomes showed typical sustained and prolonged drug-release behavior in vitro and fitted well with the Weibull distribution equation. The relatively slower time taken to reach a minimal plasma PFD concentration in vivo suggests that PFD liposomes have a sustained-release profile, which is consistent with the results of the in vitro release study. The PFD liposomes showed the largest area under the curve for the lung. The high distribution of PFD achieved in the lungs using this liposomal formulation may be explained by physical entrapment of the liposomes in the vascular network of the lung. Histopathological results indicated that liposomal PFD could alleviate pathological injury in lung tissue.Conclusion: This liposomal formulation can enable sustained release of PFD and increase targeting to the lung. Keywords: pirfenidone, liposomes, lung targeting, in vivo, histopathological 

  17. SU-E-T-389: Evaluation of Flattening-Filter-Free Arcs for Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, L; Lee, H; Pompos, A; Yan, Y; Jiang, S; Foster, R [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods: Five clinical patients, previously treated with SBRT using non-coplanar 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), were selected and re-planned with DCAT and VMAT with both FFF beam (6xFFF with a dose rate of 1200MU/min) and flattened beams (6x with 600 MU/min). All the arc plans were planned with one 360° arc and normalized to the same PTV coverage (100% prescription cover 95% PTV volume) for comparison. Treatment planning metrics such as R100%, R50%, D2cm and lung V20 were compared to the original plans. To evaluate the treatment efficiency differences, all the arc plans were delivered and plan delivery time was compared to that of the clinical treatment as recorded in Mosaiq. Results: All plans meet RTOG conformality constraints and normal tissue tolerances. Average R100% was similar for FFFDCAT (1.07±0.05), FFFVMAT (1.03±0.08) and flattened VMAT (fVMAT) (1.03±0.09) while flattened DCAT (fDCAT) (1.09±0.07) and 3DCRT (1.11±0.06) were significantly inferior (p<0.05, t test). FFFDCAT produced the best average intermediate dose conformality as indicated by R50% (3.86±0.44) and D2cm (43.7±5.3%) when compared to all the other techniques. Significant improvement (p<0.05) in lung V20 was also found with FFFDCAT (2.33±2.06%) when compared to FFFVMAT (2.48±2.03%), fVMAT (2.52±2.07%) and fDCAT (2.64±2.11%) and was slightly better than 3DCRT (2.43±2.04%), though not significant. The FFFDCAT delivery significantly improves the treatment efficiency with an average plan delivery time of 2.70±1.57 min (p<0.05), as compared to fDCAT (5.98±3.45min), fVMAT (6.51±2.94) and 3DCRT (25.14±5.67), but is not significantly better than the FFFVMAT (3.18±1.04). Conclusion: Combining FFF beams and DCAT provide promising

  18. Low Dose Hyper-radiosensitivity in Human Lung Cancer Cell Line A549 and Its Possible Mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofang DAI; Dan TAO; Hongge WU; Jing CHENG

    2009-01-01

    The low dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) in human lung cancer cell line A549 was in-vestigated,the changes of ATM kinase,cell cycle and apoptosis of cells at different doses of radiation were observed,and the possible mechanisms were discussed.A549 cells in logarithmic growth phase were irradiated with 60Co γ-rays at doses of 0-2 Gy.Together with flow cytometry for precise cell sorting,cell survival fraction was measured by means of conventional colony-formation assay.The expression of ATM1981Ser-P protein was examined by Western blot 1 h after radiation.Apoptosis was detected by Hoechst 33258 fluorescent staining,and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining flow cytometry 24 h after radiation.Cell cycle distribution was observed by flow cytometly 6,12 and 24 h after ra-diation.The results showed that the expression of ATM1981Ser-P protein was observed at 0.2 Gy,followed by an increase at >0.2 Gy,and reached the peak at 0.5 Gy,with little further increase as the dose exceeded 0.5 Gy.Twenty-four h after radiation,partial cells presented the characteristic mor-phological changes of apoptosis,and the cell apoptosis curve was coincident with the survival curve.As compared with control group,the cell cycle almost had no changes after exposure to 0.1 and 0.2 Gy radiation (P>0.05).After exposure to 0.3,0.4 and 0.5 Cry radiation,G2/M phase arrest occurred 6 and 12 h after radiation (P<0.05),and the ratio of G2/M phase cells was decreased 24 h after radiation (P<0.05).It was concluded that A549 cells displayed the phenomenon of HRS/IRR.The mode of cell death was mainly apoptosis.The activity of ATM and cell cycle change may take an important role in HRS/IRR.

  19. Red and processed meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer: a dose-response meta-analysis of 33 published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xiu-Juan; Gao, Qing; Qiao, Jian-Hong; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Cui-Ping; Liu, Ju

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis was to summarize the published studies about the association between red/processed meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. 5 databases were systematically reviewed, and random-effect model was used to pool the study results and to assess dose-response relationships. Results shown that six cohort studies and twenty eight case-control studies were included in this meat-analysis. The pooled Risk Radios (RR) for total red meat and processed meat were 1.44 (95% CI, 1.29-1.61) and 1.23 (95% CI, 1.10-1.37), respectively. Dose-response analysis revealed that for every increment of 120 grams red meat per day the risk of lung cancer increases 35% and for every increment of 50 grams red meat per day the risk of lung cancer increases 20%. The present dose-response meta-analysis suggested that both red and processed meat consumption showed a positive effect on lung cancer risk.

  20. Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy with a total dose of 54-56 Gy given in 9-7 fractions for patients with peripheral lung tumor: impact of maximum dose and fraction size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Sato, Mariko; Hirose, Katsumi; Akimoto, Hiroyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Hatayama, Yoshiomi; Ono, Shuichi; Takai, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-22

    Radiation-induced rib fracture after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer has been recently reported. However, incidence of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes with a long-term follow-up time are not clarified. We examined incidence and risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after SBRT using moderate fraction sizes for the patients with peripherally located lung tumor. During 2003-2008, 41 patients with 42 lung tumors were treated with SBRT to 54-56 Gy in 9-7 fractions. The endpoint in the study was radiation-induced rib fracture detected by CT scan after the treatment. All ribs where the irradiated doses were more than 80% of prescribed dose were selected and contoured to build the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Comparisons of the several factors obtained from the DVHs and the probabilities of rib fracture calculated by Kaplan-Meier method were performed in the study. Median follow-up time was 68 months. Among 75 contoured ribs, 23 rib fractures were observed in 34% of the patients during 16-48 months after SBRT, however, no patients complained of chest wall pain. The 4-year probabilities of rib fracture for maximum dose of ribs (Dmax) more than and less than 54 Gy were 47.7% and 12.9% (p = 0.0184), and for fraction size of 6, 7 and 8 Gy were 19.5%, 31.2% and 55.7% (p = 0.0458), respectively. Other factors, such as D2cc, mean dose of ribs, V10-55, age, sex, and planning target volume were not significantly different. The doses and fractionations used in this study resulted in no clinically significant rib fractures for this population, but that higher Dmax and dose per fraction treatments resulted in an increase in asymptomatic grade 1 rib fractures.

  1. Evaluation of Neonatal Lung Volume Growth by Pulmonary Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Patients with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schopper, Melissa A; Walkup, Laura L; Tkach, Jean A; Higano, Nara S; Lim, Foong Yen; Haberman, Beth; Woods, Jason C; Kingma, Paul S

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate postnatal lung volume in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and determine if a compensatory increase in lung volume occurs during the postnatal period. Using a novel pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging method for imaging neonatal lungs, the postnatal lung volumes in infants with CDH were determined and compared with prenatal lung volumes obtained via late gestation magnetic resonance imaging. Infants with left-sided CDH (2 mild, 9 moderate, and 1 severe) were evaluated. The total lung volume increased in all infants, with the contralateral lung increasing faster than the ipsilateral lung (mean ± SD: 4.9 ± 3.0 mL/week vs 3.4 ± 2.1 mL/week, P = .005). In contrast to prenatal studies, the volume of lungs of infants with more severe CDH grew faster than the lungs of infants with more mild CDH (Spearman's ρ=-0.086, P = .01). Although the contralateral lung volume grew faster in both mild and moderate groups, the majority of total lung volume growth in moderate CDH came from increased volume of the ipsilateral lung (42% of total lung volume increase in the moderate group vs 32% of total lung volume increase in the mild group, P = .09). Analysis of multiple clinical variables suggests that increased weight gain was associated with increased compensatory ipsilateral lung volume growth (ρ = 0.57, P = .05). These results suggest a potential for postnatal catch-up growth in infants with pulmonary hypoplasia and suggest that weight gain may increase the volume growth of the more severely affected lung. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluating patients' walking capacity during hospitalization for lung cancer resection†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Pedro A; Hernández, Nieves; Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo

    2017-05-04

    The goal of this study was to describe non-supervised daily physical activity in patients during the period immediately following anatomical lung resection. The study was an observational study on 50 consecutive patients (33 men) admitted for anatomical lung resection over a 4-month period. All cases were approached using a minimally invasive technique. Patients were instructed by nursing and physiotherapy staff and asked to wear a portable pedometer (Omron HJ-720 T-E2) from admission until hospital discharge, excluding the day of the operation and the first hours in the recovery room. The variables collected included sex, age, body mass index, type of lung resection, cardiopulmonary postoperative complications, percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s, percentage single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 s calculated according to functional segments removed at surgery, predicted postoperative single-breath carbon monoxide diffusing capacity calculated according to functional segments removed at surgery, total steps, aerobic steps and daily total strolled distance in metres. Comparison of activity was analysed using the paired t -test for individual data evolution and the unpaired t -test for patients showing complications or not. Body mass index and exercise capacity were analysed using the Spearman correlation analysis. A total of 34 patients underwent lobectomy or bilobectomy. All patients could walk on the first postoperative day. The average walked distance on the first and fourth postoperative days was 6100 m and 7400 m, respectively. Compared with the preoperative day, patients walked significantly fewer total steps on Day 1 and Day 2 (Day 1, P  = 0.0001; Day 2, P  = 0.049). The rate of aerobic to total daily steps was comparable after the second postoperative day. Patients having any postoperative cardiopulmonary complication showed a significantly inferior walking capacity ( P

  3. SU-E-J-30: Benchmark Image-Based TCP Calculation for Evaluation of PTV Margins for Lung SBRT Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M [Wayne State Univeristy, Detroit, MI (United States); Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhong, H [Henry Ford Hospital System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor control probability (TCP) calculated with accumulated radiation doses may help design appropriate treatment margins. Image registration errors, however, may compromise the calculated TCP. The purpose of this study is to develop benchmark CT images to quantify registration-induced errors in the accumulated doses and their corresponding TCP. Methods: 4DCT images were registered from end-inhale (EI) to end-exhale (EE) using a “demons” algorithm. The demons DVFs were corrected by an FEM model to get realistic deformation fields. The FEM DVFs were used to warp the EI images to create the FEM-simulated images. The two images combined with the FEM DVF formed a benchmark model. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images, created from the EI and simulated images, were used to develop IMRT plans. Two plans with 3 and 5 mm margins were developed for each patient. With these plans, radiation doses were recalculated on the simulated images and warped back to the EI images using the FEM DVFs to get the accumulated doses. The Elastix software was used to register the FEM-simulated images to the EI images. TCPs calculated with the Elastix-accumulated doses were compared with those generated by the FEM to get the TCP error of the Elastix registrations. Results: For six lung patients, the mean Elastix registration error ranged from 0.93 to 1.98 mm. Their relative dose errors in PTV were between 0.28% and 6.8% for 3mm margin plans, and between 0.29% and 6.3% for 5mm-margin plans. As the PTV margin reduced from 5 to 3 mm, the mean TCP error of the Elastix-reconstructed doses increased from 2.0% to 2.9%, and the mean NTCP errors decreased from 1.2% to 1.1%. Conclusion: Patient-specific benchmark images can be used to evaluate the impact of registration errors on the computed TCPs, and may help select appropriate PTV margins for lung SBRT patients.

  4. Differential evaluation of bronchoalveolar lavage cells and leukotrienes in unilateral acute lung injury and ARDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, M; Lenti, L; Bufi, M; De Blasi, R A; Vivino, G; Conti, G; Pelaia, P; Zicari, A; Pontieri, G; Gasparetto, A

    1989-01-01

    Patients with unilateral acute lung injury (UALI; n = 6) and ARDS (n = 4) were evaluated by bronchoalveolar lavage, as controls we used 5 patients suffering from cerebral hemorrhage and without pulmonary, cardiac or infectious disease who were mechanically ventilated. For each group of patients two independent bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were performed. The BAL fluid recovered from the two lungs was immediately analyzed for leukotrienes (LTS) by means of RP-HPLC and stained for cell counts. The BAL from the control group did not show any LTS and the percentage of neutrophils was within the normal range: 1 +/- 0.2% right lung and 1.2 +/- 0.4% left lung. The BAL fluid from UALI patients showed two different patterns, the injured lung showed high levels of LTS (39.1 +/- 8 ng ml-1 LTB4; 25 +/- 6 ng ml-1 LTD4 and 27.8 +/- 8.2 ng ml-1 11-trans LTC4) and an increased percentage of neutrophils (74.2 +/- 7%) compared to controls. Only 2 out of the 6 patients from the UALI group showed small amounts of LTB4 (4 ng ml-1) and LTD4 (3.2 ng ml-1). The BAL obtained from the "healthy lung" in both cases showed values of LTS almost eight fold lower than those present in the injured lung. The percentage of neutrophils from the unaffected lungs (4.3 +/- 7%) was not significantly different from controls. Lavage fluid from ARDS patients showed a similar picture to that of the affected lung from UALI patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. A planning study of radiotherapy dose escalation of PET-active tumour volumes in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloth Moeller, Ditte; Hoffmann, Lone (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)), e-mail: dittmoel@rm.dk; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Marquard Knap, Marianne (Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark)); Muren, Ludvig Paul (Dept. of Medical Physics, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Dept. of Oncology, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark))

    2011-08-15

    Background. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have poor prognosis partly because of high local failure rates. Escalating the dose to the tumour may decrease the local failure rates and thereby, improve overall survival, but the risk of complications will limit the possibility to dose-escalate a broad range of patients. Escalating only PET-active areas of the tumour may increase the potential for reaching high doses for a variety of tumour sizes and locations. Material and methods. Ten patients were randomly chosen for a dose escalation planning study. A planning target volume (PTV) was defined on the mid-ventilation scan of a four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) scan and a boost planning target volume (PTV-boost) was defined based on a positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT) scan. Treatment plans were created aiming to reach the highest achievable of 74 Gy, 78 Gy or 82 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction prescribed to the PTV-boost without compromising normal tissue constraints and with the PTV prescribed in all cases a biological equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions of 66 Gy. Results. Nine of ten patients could be escalated to the highest dose level (82 Gy), while one patient was limited by the oesophagus dose constraint and could only reach 74 Gy. Four patients could be dose-escalated above 82 Gy without compromising normal tissue constraints. Conclusion. Dose-escalating only the PET-active areas of lung tumours to doses of 82 Gy while respecting normal tissue constraints is feasible, also in a series of unselected patients including cases with relatively large tumours

  6. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography; Bronchialkarzinom-Screening mit Niedrigdosis-CT. Aktueller Stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diederich, S.; Wormanns, D.; Heindel, W. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from malignancy. It is characterized by a favourable prognosis when treated in early stages and a poor prognosis in advanced stages. Populations at risk are relatively well defined, i.e. heavy smokers and workers exposed to asbestos and radon. Therefore, early detection using diagnostic techniques promises reduction of mortality from this tumor. Previous studies using chest radiography and sputum cytology were, however, disappointing due to poor sensitivity of these tests for early tumor stages. The new technique of low-dose computed tomography provides both high sensitivity for small tumors and a comfortable examination. As small benign pulmonary nodules are common reliable non-invasive diagnostic algorithms are required for classification of nodules. Preliminary studies using low-dose CT screening in smokers have provided promising results. Prior to a wide application of the technique in clinical routine more data are required as to inclusion criteria, examination intervals and the effect of screening on mortality reduction. (orig.) [German] Das Bronchialkarzinom ist der am haeufigsten zum Tode fuehrende maligne Tumor. Seine Prognose ist bei einer Therapie in fruehen Stadien relativ gut, in fortgeschrittenen Erkrankungsstadien dagegen ausgesprochen schlecht. Die Risikopopulationen sind gut charakterisiert, v.a. starke Raucher und Personen mit einer beruflichen Asbest- bzw. Radonexposition. Vor diesem Hintergrund erscheinen Frueherkennungsuntersuchungen mittels diagnostischer Verfahren sinnvoll, um die Sterblichkeit an diesem Tumor zu senken. Bisherige Erfahrungen mit Thoraxroentgenaufnahmen und Sputumuntersuchungen waren aufgrund der geringen Sensitivitaet der Verfahren fuer fruehe Tumorstadien jedoch enttaeuschend. Das relativ neue Verfahren der Niedrigdosis-Computertomographie des Thorax verbindet eine hohe Sensitivitaet fuer kleine Tumoren mit einer geringen Belastung der untersuchten Person. Wegen der Haeufigkeit

  7. SU-E-T-374: Evaluation and Verification of Dose Calculation Accuracy with Different Dose Grid Sizes for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, C; Schultheiss, T [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In this study, we aim to evaluate the effect of dose grid size on the accuracy of calculated dose for small lesions in intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), and to verify dose calculation accuracy with radiochromic film dosimetry. Methods: 15 intracranial lesions from previous SRS patients were retrospectively selected for this study. The planning target volume (PTV) ranged from 0.17 to 2.3 cm{sup 3}. A commercial treatment planning system was used to generate SRS plans using the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique using two arc fields. Two convolution-superposition-based dose calculation algorithms (Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm and Acuros XB algorithm) were used to calculate volume dose distribution with dose grid size ranging from 1 mm to 3 mm with 0.5 mm step size. First, while the plan monitor units (MU) were kept constant, PTV dose variations were analyzed. Second, with 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, variations of the plan MUs as a function of dose grid size were analyzed. Radiochomic films were used to compare the delivered dose and profile with the calculated dose distribution with different dose grid sizes. Results: The dose to the PTV, in terms of the mean dose, maximum, and minimum dose, showed steady decrease with increasing dose grid size using both algorithms. With 95% of the PTV covered by the prescription dose, the total MU increased with increasing dose grid size in most of the plans. Radiochromic film measurements showed better agreement with dose distributions calculated with 1-mm dose grid size. Conclusion: Dose grid size has significant impact on calculated dose distribution in intracranial SRS treatment planning with small target volumes. Using the default dose grid size could lead to under-estimation of delivered dose. A small dose grid size should be used to ensure calculation accuracy and agreement with QA measurements.

  8. Development and validation of a fast voxel-based dose evaluation system in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Hsin-Hon; Chuang, Keh-Shih; Dong, Shang-Lung; Wu, Jay; Ni, Yu-Ching; Jan, Meei-Ling

    2014-11-01

    PET imaging has been widely used in the detection and staging of malignancies and the evaluation of patient-specific dosimetry for PET scans is important in nuclear medicine. However, patient-specific dosimetry can be estimated only by Monte Carlo methods which are usually time-consuming. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast dose evaluation system namely SimDOSE. SimDOSE is a Monte Carlo code embedded in SimSET with a dose scoring routine to record the deposited energy of the photons and electrons. Fluorine-18 is one of the most commonly used radionuclides that decay predominantly by positron emission. Only a 635 keV (Emax) positron and two annihilation photons should be concerned in F-18 radiation dosimetry, hence simulation is relatively simple. To evaluate the effects of resolution, an F-18 point source placed in a 20 cm diameter sphere filled with water was simulated by SimDOSE and GATE v6.1. Grid sizes of 1 mm, 3 mm, and 5 mm were tested and each was simulated with a total of 107 decays. The resultant dose distribution functions were compared. Dose evaluation on ORNL phantom was also performed to validate the accuracy of SimDOSE. The grid size of phantom was set as 3 mm and the number of decays was 107. The S-values of liver computed by SimDOSE were compared with GATE and OLINDA (Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment) for 11C, 15O, and 18F.Finally, the CPU time of simulations was compared between SimDOSE and GATE. The dose profiles show the absorption doses located 3 mm outside the center are similar between SimDOSE and GATE. However, 71% (19%) difference of the center dose between SimDOSE and GATE are observed for 1 mm (3 mm) grid. The differences of the profile lie in the assumption in SimDOSE that all kinetic energies of electrons are locally absorbed. The ratios of S values of (SimDOSE/OLINDA) range from 0.95 to 1.11 with a mean value of 1.02±0.043. To compare simulation time from SimDOSE to GATE for calculation of 1 mm, 3 mm, 5 mm gird point

  9. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V(25 Gy)). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic evaluation of sulbactam against Acinetobacter baumannii in in vitro and murine thigh and lung infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yuta; Matsumoto, Kazuaki; Ikawa, Kazuro; Watanabe, Erika; Shigemi, Akari; Umezaki, Yasuhiro; Nakamura, Koyo; Ueno, Keiichiro; Morikawa, Norifumi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2014-06-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a pathogen that has become globally associated with nosocomial infections. Sulbactam, a potent inhibitor of β-lactamases, was previously shown to be active against A. baumannii strains in vitro and effective against A. baumannii infections. However, a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of sulbactam against A. baumannii infections has not yet been performed. This is necessary because optimisation of dosing regimens should be based on PK/PD analysis. Therefore, in vitro and in vivo PK/PD analyses of sulbactam were performed using murine thigh and lung infection models of A. baumannii to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of sulbactam. Sulbactam showed time-dependent bactericidal activity in vitro against A. baumannii. The PK/PD index that best correlated with its in vivo effects was the time that the free drug concentration remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration (fT>MIC) both in the thigh (R(2)=0.95) and lung (R(2)=0.96) infection models. Values of fT>MIC for a static effect and 1, 2 and 3log10 kill, respectively, were 21.0%, 32.9%, 43.6% and 57.3% in the thigh infection model and 20.4%, 24.5%, 29.3% and 37.3% in the lung infection model. Here we report the in vitro and in vivo time-dependent activities of sulbactam against A. baumannii infection and demonstrate that sulbactam was sufficiently bactericidal when an fT>MIC of >60% against A. baumannii thigh infection and >40% against A. baumannii lung infection was achieved.

  11. Lung tumors in mice induced by "whole-life" inorganic arsenic exposure at human-relevant doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waalkes, Michael P; Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J; Kissling, Grace E; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-08-01

    In mice, inorganic arsenic in the drinking water in the parts per million range via the dam during in utero life or with whole-life exposure is a multi-site carcinogen in the offspring. However, human arsenic exposure is typically in the parts per billion (ppb) range. Thus, we studied "whole-life" inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in mice at levels more relevant to humans. Breeder male and female CD1 mice were exposed to 0, 50, 500 or 5,000 ppb arsenic (as sodium arsenite) in the drinking water for 3 weeks prior to breeding, during pregnancy and lactation, and after weaning (at week 3) groups of male and female offspring (initial n = 40) were exposed for up to 2 years. Tumors were assessed in these offspring. Arsenic exposure had no effect on pregnant dam weights or water consumption, litter size, offspring birthweight or weight at weaning compared to control. In male offspring mice, arsenic exposure increased (p ppb group (51 %) and 500-ppb group (54 %), but not at 5,000-ppb group (28 %) compared to control (22 %). These arsenic-induced bronchiolo-alveolar tumors included increased (p ppb group (27 %) compared to controls (8 %). An increase (p ppb group compared to control (11 %) occurred in female offspring. Thus, in CD1 mice whole-life arsenic exposure induced lung tumors at human-relevant doses (i.e., 50 and 500 ppb).

  12. Lung Tumors in Mice Induced by “Whole Life” Inorganic Arsenic Exposure at Human Relevant Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Wei; Tokar, Erik J.; Kissling, Grace E.; Dixon, Darlene

    2014-01-01

    In mice, inorganic arsenic in the drinking water in the parts per million (ppm) range via the dam during in utero life or with whole life exposure is a multi-site carcinogen in the offspring. However, human arsenic exposure is typically in the parts per billion (ppb) range. Thus, we studied “whole life” inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in mice at levels more relevant to humans. Breeder male and female CD1 mice were exposed to 0, 50, 500 or 5000 ppb arsenic (as sodium arsenite) in the drinking water for three weeks prior to breeding, during pregnancy and lactation, and after weaning (at week 3) groups of male and female offspring (initial n = 40) were exposed for up to 2 years. Tumors were assessed in these offspring. Arsenic exposure had no effect on pregnant dam weights or water consumption, litter size, offspring birth weight, or weight at weaning compared to control. In male offspring mice, arsenic exposure increased (p ppb (51%) and 500 ppb (54%), but not at 5000 ppb (28%) compared to control (22%). These arsenic-induced bronchiolo-alveolar tumors included increased (p ppb (27%) compared to controls (8%). An increase (p ppb group compared to control (11%) occurred in female offspring. Thus, in CD1 mice whole life arsenic exposure induced lung tumors at human relevant doses (i.e. 50 and 500 ppb). PMID:25005685

  13. Low-dose computed tomography for lung cancer screening: comparison of performance between annual and biennial screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola; Silva, M. [University of Parma, Radiology, Department of Surgical Sciences, Parma (Italy); Calareso, G.; Marchiano, A. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Department of Radiology, Milan (Italy); Galeone, C. [University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, Division of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Public Health, Laboratory of Healthcare Research and Pharmacoepidemiology, Milan (Italy); Sestini, S.; Pastorino, U. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Milan (Italy); Sozzi, G. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Tumor Genomics Unit, Department of Experimental Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    To compare the performance metrics of two different strategies of lung cancer screening by low-dose computed tomography (LDCT), namely, annual (LDCT1) or biennial (LDCT2) screen. Recall rate, detection rate, interval cancers, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) were compared between LDCT1 and LDCT2 arms of the MILD trial over the first seven (T0-T6; median follow-up 7.3 years) and four rounds (T0-T3; median follow-up 7.3 years), respectively. 1152 LDCT1 and 1151 LDCT2 participants underwent a total of 6893 and 4715 LDCT scans, respectively. The overall recall rate was higher in LDCT2 arm (6.97 %) than in LDCT1 arm (5.81 %) (p = 0.01), which was counterbalanced by the overall lower number of LDCT scans. No difference was observed for the overall detection rate (0.56 % in both arms). The two LDCT arms had similar specificity (99.2 % in both arms), sensitivity (73.5 %, in LDCT2 vs. 68.5 % in LDCT1, p = 0.62), PPV (42.4 %, in LDCT2, vs. 40.6 %, in LDCT1, p = 0.83) and NPV (99.8 %, in LDCT2 vs. 99.7 %, in LDCT1, p = 0.71). Biennial screen may save about one third of LDCT scans with similar performance indicators as compared to annual screening. (orig.)

  14. Clinical introduction of Monte Carlo treatment planning: a different prescription dose for non-small cell lung cancer according to tumor location and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C; Hoogeman, Mischa S; van de Water, Steven; Levendag, Peter C; van der Holt, Bronno; Heijmen, Ben J M; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2010-07-01

    To provide a prescription dose for Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer according to tumor size and location. Fifty-three stereotactic radiotherapy plans designed using the equivalent path-length (EPL) algorithm were re-calculated using MC. Plans were compared by the minimum dose to 95% of the PTV (D95), the heterogeneity index (HI) and the mean dose to organs at risk (OARs). Based on changes in D95, the prescription dose was converted from EPL to MC. Based on changes in HI, we examined the feasibility of MC prescription to plans re-calculated but not re-optimized with MC. The MC fraction dose for peripheral tumors is 16-18 Gy depending on tumor size. For central tumors the MC dose was reduced less than for peripheral tumors. The HI decreased on average by 4-9% in peripheral tumors and 3-5% in central tumors. The mean dose to OARs was lower for MC than EPL, and correlated strongly (R(2)=0.98-0.99). For the conversion from EPL to MC we recommend a separate prescription dose according to tumor size. MC optimization is not required if a HI > or = 70% is accepted. Dose constraints to OARs can be easily converted due to the high EPL-MC correlation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Systemic Evaluation and Clinical Significance of Immunological Function for Advanced Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jialing WANG

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The actual evaluation of immunological function is significant for studing the tumor development and devising a treatment in time. The aim of this study is to evaluate the immunological function of advanced lung cancer patients systematically, and to discuss the clinical significance. Methods The nucleated cell amounts of advanced lung cancer patients and the healthy individuals were counted. The immune cell subsets and the levels of IL-4, INF-γ, perforin and granzyme in CD8+T cells by the flow cytometry were measured. The proliferation activity and the inhibition ratio of immune cells to several tumor cell lines were evaluated by MTT assay. Results The absolute amounts and subsets of T, B, NK cells of advanced lung cancer patients were lower than the healthy individuals (P < 0.05; However, the proportion of regulatory T cells of advanced lung cancer patients (4.00±1.84% was lower than the healthy individuals (1.27±0.78% (P < 0.05. The positive rates of IFN-γ perforin, granzyme in CD8+T cells decreased while them in IL-4 did not in the advanced lung cancer patients compared to the healthy control group (P < 0.05. The proliferation activity of immune cells, the positive rate of PPD masculine and the inhibition ratio to tumor cells in the advanced lung cancer patients was lower than the healthy subsets obviously (P < 0.05. Conclusion There was a significant immune depression in the advanced lung cancer patients compared to the healthy individuals.

  16. Pediatric and staff dose evaluation in fluoroscopy upper gastrointestinal series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipov, Danielle; Nascimento, Eduarda X. do; Lacerda, Camila M., E-mail: diilipov@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R.; Ledesma, Jorge A.; Denyak, Valeriy; Legnani, Adriano, E-mail: ledesmajorgealberto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluoroscopy upper GI series are widely used for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children. Pediatric radiological procedures bring concern due to the high life expectancy and radiosensitivity on children, as well as the risks to the exposed staff Important studies present the mean KAP values on patients and the European Commission (EC) recommends specific techniques for these procedures. For the occupational expositions, staffs doses must be within the annual limit, according to the CNEN 3.01. Based on those data, the aims of the current study are: analyzing the upper GI procedure; determining the KAP on the patient and estimating the annual equivalent dose on the staff's crystalline. LiF :Mg,Ti TLDs were positioned on the patient upper chest center, so that the entrance surface air kerma could be determined. The field size on the patient s surface and the kerma were multiplied so that the KAP was obtained. LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters were used to estimate the equivalent dose on the staff s crystalline. The results showed discrepancy in the kVp range and in the exposure time when compared to the EC data. The mean KAP values for the 0-1,1-3 and 3-10 years old patients were, respectively: 102 ± 19 cGy.cm2, 142 ± 25 cGy.cm2 and 323 ± 39 cGy.cm2; which are higher than the KAPs presented in the studies used for comparison. The estimated annual equivalent dose in the staff s crystalline would be approximately 85% higher than the limit set by the CNEN. Analyzing the data, it becomes clear that an optimization implementation is necessary in order to reduce the radiation levels. (author)

  17. Technology Development for Radiation Dose Measurement and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Hwan; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, T. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The correction factors essential for the operation of In-Vivo counting system were produced and implemented into a field operation for the improvement of accuracy in measurement of the radioactivity inside a human body. The BiDAS2007 code which calculate an internal dose was developed by upgrading the former code prepared in the previous stage of this project. The method of using the multibioassy data, the maximum likelihood function and the Bayesian statistics were established to an internal dose based on the measurement data of radioactivity, intakes and retention of radioactivity in a human body and it can improve the accuracy in estimation of the intakes of radioactivity and the committed effective dose equivalent. In order to solve the problem of low detection efficiency of the conventional Bonner Sphere (BS) to a high energy neutron, the extended BS's were manufactured and the technique for neutron field spectrometry was established. The fast neutron and gamma spectrometry system with a BC501A scintillation detector was also prepared. Several neutron fluence spectra at several nuclear facilities were measured and collected by using the extended BS. The spectrum weighted responses of some neutron monitoring instruments were also derived by using these spectra and the detector response functions. A high efficient TL material for the neutron personal dosimeter was developed. It solved the main problem of low thermal stability and high residual dose of the commercial TLDs and has the sensitivity to neutron and to gamma radiation with 40 and 10 times higher respectively than them.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko, E-mail: matsutomo_llp@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kogo, Kasei [Kumamoto Radiosurgery Clinic, Kumamoto (Japan); Oya, Natsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  19. Evaluation of patients undergoing lung volume reduction surgery: Ancillary information available from computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleverley, Joanne R.; Desai, Sujal R.; Wells, Athol U.; Koyama, Hiroshi; Eastick, Sian; Schmidt, Maria A.; Charrier, Clare L.; Gatehouse, Peter D.; Goldstraw, Peter; Pepper, John R.; Geddes, Duncan M.; Hansell, David M

    2000-01-01

    AIM: A number of imaging techniques have been used for the pre-operative assessment of patients for lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). We evaluated whether data currently acquired from perfusion scintigrams and cine MR of the diaphragm are obtainable from high resolution CT (HRCT) of the thorax. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients taking part in a randomized controlled trial of LVRS against maximal medical therapy were evaluated. HRCT examinations (n= 30) were scored for (i) the extent and distribution of emphysema; (ii) the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature; and (iii) diaphragmatic contour, apparent defects and herniation. On scintigraphy, (n28), perfusion of the lower thirds of both lungs, as a proportion of total lung perfusion (LZ/T{sub PERF}), was expressed as a percentage of predicted values (derived from 10 normal control subjects). On cine MR (n= 25) hemidiaphragmatic excursion and coordination were recorded. RESULTS: Extensive emphysema was present on HRCT (60% {+-} 13.2%). There was strong correlation between the extent of normal pulmonary vasculature on HRCT and on perfusion scanning (r{sub s}= 0.85, P< 0.00005). Hemidiaphragmatic incoordination on MR was weakly associated with hemidiaphragmatic eventration on HRCT (P0.04). CONCLUSION: The strong correlation between lung perfusion assessed by HRCT and lung perfusion on scintigraphy suggests that perfusion scintigraphy is superfluous in the pre-operative evaluation of patients with emphysema for LVRS. Cleverley, J.R. (2000)

  20. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-21

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA (®) for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and (192)Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as (131)I and (90)Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ([Formula: see text]), energy group structures ([Formula: see text]) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders ([Formula: see text], and scattering order expansions ([Formula: see text]-[Formula: see text]); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  -3% to  -20% with larger differences at lower energies (-3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  -20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for (90)Y and (131)I were  -6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a

  1. Evaluation of a deterministic grid-based Boltzmann solver (GBBS) for voxel-level absorbed dose calculations in nuclear medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikell, Justin; Cheenu Kappadath, S.; Wareing, Todd; Erwin, William D.; Titt, Uwe; Mourtada, Firas

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the 3D Grid-based Boltzmann Solver (GBBS) code ATTILA ® for coupled electron and photon transport in the nuclear medicine energy regime for electron (beta, Auger and internal conversion electrons) and photon (gamma, x-ray) sources. Codes rewritten based on ATTILA are used clinically for both high-energy photon teletherapy and 192Ir sealed source brachytherapy; little information exists for using the GBBS to calculate voxel-level absorbed doses in nuclear medicine. We compared DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) with published voxel-S-values to establish MC as truth. GBBS was investigated for mono-energetic 1.0, 0.1, and 0.01 MeV electron and photon sources as well as 131I and 90Y radionuclides. We investigated convergence of GBBS by analyzing different meshes ({{M}0},{{M}1},{{M}2} ), energy group structures ({{E}0},{{E}1},{{E}2} ) for each radionuclide component, angular quadrature orders (≤ft. {{S}4},{{S}8},{{S}16}\\right) , and scattering order expansions ({{P}0} -{{P}6} ); higher indices imply finer discretization. We compared GBBS to MC in (1) voxel-S-value geometry for soft tissue, lung, and bone, and (2) a source at the interface between combinations of lung, soft tissue, and bone. Excluding Auger and conversion electrons, MC agreed within  ≈5% of published source voxel absorbed doses. For the finest discretization, most GBBS absorbed doses in the source voxel changed by less than 1% compared to the next finest discretization along each phase space variable indicating sufficient convergence. For the finest discretization, agreement with MC in the source voxel ranged from  -3% to  -20% with larger differences at lower energies (-3% for 1 MeV electron in lung to  -20% for 0.01 MeV photon in bone); similar agreement was found for the interface geometries. Differences between GBBS and MC in the source voxel for 90Y and 131I were  -6%. The GBBS ATTILA was benchmarked against MC in the nuclear medicine regime. GBBS can be a viable

  2. Monte Carlo evaluation of the dose calculation algorithm of TomoTherapy for clinical cases in dynamic jaws mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpin, E

    2015-05-01

    For the TomoTherapy(®) system, longitudinal conformation can be improved by selecting a smaller field width but at the expense of longer treatment time. Recently, the TomoEdge(®) feature has been released with the possibility to move dynamically the jaws at the edges of the target volume, improving longitudinal penumbra and enabling faster treatments. Such delivery scheme requires additional modeling of treatment delivery. Using a previously validated Monte Carlo model (TomoPen), we evaluated the accuracy of the implementation of TomoEdge in the new dose engine of TomoTherapy for 15 clinical cases. TomoPen is based on PENELOPE. Particle tracking in the treatment head is performed almost instantaneously by 1) reading a particle from a phase-space file corresponding to the largest field and 2) correcting the weight of the particle depending on the actual jaw and MLC configurations using Monte Carlo pre-generated data. 15 clinical plans (5 head-and-neck, 5 lung and 5 prostate tumors) planned with TomoEdge and with the last release of the treatment planning system (VoLO(®)) were re-computed with TomoPen. The resulting dose-volume histograms were compared. Good agreement was achieved overall, with deviations for the target volumes typically within 2% (D95), excepted for small lung tumors (17 cm(3)) where a maximum deviation of 4.4% was observed for D95. The results were consistent with previously reported values for static field widths. For the clinical cases considered in the present study, the introduction of TomoEdge did not impact significantly the accuracy of the computed dose distributions. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J, E-mail: ichetty1@hfhs.or [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m{sub 3} MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within {+-}4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC

  4. Evaluation of radiation dose to patients in intraoral dental radiography using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Il; Kim, Kyeong Ho; Oh, Seung Chul; Song, Ji Young [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    The use of dental radiographic examinations is common although radiation dose resulting from the dental radiography is relatively small. Therefore, it is required to evaluate radiation dose from the dental radiography for radiation safety purpose. The objectives of the present study were to develop dosimetry method for intraoral dental radiography using a Monte Carlo method based radiation transport code and to calculate organ doses and effective doses of patients from different types of intraoral radiographies. Radiological properties of dental radiography equipment were characterized for the evaluation of patient radiation dose. The properties including x-ray energy spectrum were simulated using MCNP code. Organ doses and effective doses to patients were calculated by MCNP simulation with computational adult phantoms. At the typical equipment settings (60 kVp, 7 mA, and 0.12 sec), the entrance air kerma was 1.79 mGy and the measured half value layer was 1.82 mm. The half value layer calculated by MCNP simulation was well agreed with the measurement values. Effective doses from intraoral radiographies ranged from 1 μSv for maxilla premolar to 3 μSv for maxilla incisor. Oral cavity layer (23⁓82 μSv) and salivary glands (10⁓68 μSv) received relatively high radiation dose. Thyroid also received high radiation dose (3⁓47 μSv) for examinations. The developed dosimetry method and evaluated radiation doses in this study can be utilized for policy making, patient dose management, and development of low-dose equipment. In addition, this study can ultimately contribute to decrease radiation dose to patients for radiation safety.

  5. Quantitative assessment of selective in-plane shielding of tissues in computed tomography through evaluation of absorbed dose and image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geleijns, J.; Veldkamp, W.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Center, Radiology Department, ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Salvado Artells, M.; Lopez Tortosa, M. [Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Facultat de Medicina i Ciencies de la Salut, Departament de Ciencies Mediques Basiques, Reus, Tarragona (Spain); Calzado Cantera, A. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Radiologia, Madrid (Spain)

    2006-10-15

    This study aimed at assessment of efficacy of selective in-plane shielding in adults by quantitative evaluation of the achieved dose reduction and image quality. Commercially available accessories for in-plane shielding of the eye lens, thyroid and breast, and an anthropomorphic phantom were used for the evaluation of absorbed dose and image quality. Organ dose and total energy imparted were assessed by means of a Monte Carlo technique taking into account tube voltage, tube current, and scanner type. Image quality was quantified as noise in soft tissue. Application of the lens shield reduced dose to the lens by 27% and to the brain by 1%. The thyroid shield reduced thyroid dose by 26%; the breast shield reduced dose to the breasts by 30% and to the lungs by 15%. Total energy imparted (unshielded/shielded) was 88/86 mJ for computed tomography (CT) brain, 64/60 mJ for CT cervical spine, and 289/260 mJ for CT chest scanning. An increase in image noise could be observed in the ranges were bismuth shielding was applied. The observed reduction of organ dose and total energy imparted could be achieved more efficiently by a reduction of tube current. The application of in-plane selective shielding is therefore discouraged. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation of administered dose using portal images in craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carina Marques; Calçada, Raquel; Rodrigues, Sofia; Barragán, Juan Antonio; Sá, Ana Cravo; Macedo, Ana Paula; de Fátima Monsanto, Maria

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to assess the administered dose based on portal imaging in craniospinal pediatric irradiation by evaluating cases in which portal images did or did not account for the total administered dose. We also intended to calculate the mean increase in total administered dose. Data were collected from General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón; we evaluated the total dose administered, total dose planned, number of portal images per treatment and corresponding monitor units of two different groups: one in which the dose from portal images is deducted from the total administered dose (D), and another in which it was not (N). We used descriptive statistics to analyze the collected data, including the mean and respective standard deviation. We used the Shapiro-Wilk and Spearman rank correlation coefficient tests and estimated the linear regression coefficients. Patients in group D received a mean dose of 29.00 ± 10.28 cGy based on the verification portal images, a quantity that was deducted from the planned dose to match the total administered dose. Patients in group N received a mean dose of 41.50 ± 30.53 cGy, which was not deducted from the planned dose, evidencing a mean increase of 41.50 ± 30.55 cGy over the total administered dose. The acquisition of the set-up verification portal images, without their inclusion in the total administered dose, reflects an average increase in total dose for craniospinal irradiation of pediatric patients. Subtraction of the monitor units used to acquire the verification images is recommended.

  7. Impact of different beam directions on intensity-modulated radiation therapy dose delivered to functioning lung tissue identified using single-photon emission computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qin; Zhang, Fucheng; Wang, Yanming; Qu, Weiqiang

    2014-01-01

    To use different beam arrangements and numbers to plan intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and investigate their effects on low and high radiation doses delivered to the functional lung, in order to reduce radiation-induced lung damage. Ten patients with stage I-III non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) underwent IMRT. Beam arrangements were selected on the basis of orientation and dose-volume histograms to create SPECT-guided IMRT plans that spared the functional lung and maintained target coverage. Four different plans, including CT-7, SPECT-7, SPECT-4, SPECT-5 with different beam arrangements, were used. The differences of conformity index (CI), heterogeneity index (HI) between the plans were analyzed, by using a paired t-test. The seven-beam SPECT (SPECT-7) plan reduced the volume of the functional lung irradiated with at least 20 Gy (FV20) and 30 Gy (FV30) by 26.02% ±15.45% and 14.41% ±16.66%, respectively, as compared to the seven-beam computed tomography (CT-7) plan. The CI significantly differed between the SPECT-7 and SPECT-4 plans and between the SPECT-5 and SPECT-4 plans, but not between the SPECT-5 and SPECT-7 plans. The CIs in the SPECT-5 and SPECT-7 plans were better than that in the SPECT-4 plan. The heterogeneity index significantly differed among the three SPECT plans and was best in the SPECT-7 plan. The incorporation of SPECT images into IMRT planning for NSCLC greatly affected beam angles and number of beams. Fewer beams and modified beam angles achieved similar or better IMRT quality. The low-dose volumes were lower in SPECT-4.

  8. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo James K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95% was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%. The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9. Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60. Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05. Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated.

  9. Dose to level I and II axillary lymph nodes and lung by tangential field radiation in patients undergoing postmastectomy radiation with tissue expander reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background To define the dosimetric coverage of level I/II axillary volumes and the lung volume irradiated in postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) following tissue expander placement. Methods and Materials Twenty-three patients were identified who had undergone postmastectomy radiotherapy with tangent only fields. All patients had pre-radiation tissue expander placement and expansion. Thirteen patients had bilateral expander reconstruction. The level I/II axillary volumes were contoured using the RTOG contouring atlas. The patient-specific variables of expander volume, superior-to-inferior location of expander, distance between expanders, expander angle and axillary volume were analyzed to determine their relationship to the axillary volume and lung volume dose. Results The mean coverage of the level I/II axillary volume by the 95% isodose line (VD95%) was 23.9% (range 0.3 - 65.4%). The mean Ipsilateral Lung VD50% was 8.8% (2.2-20.9). Ipsilateral and contralateral expander volume correlated to Axillary VD95% in patients with bilateral reconstruction (p = 0.01 and 0.006, respectively) but not those with ipsilateral only reconstruction (p = 0.60). Ipsilateral Lung VD50% correlated with angle of the expander from midline (p = 0.05). Conclusions In patients undergoing PMRT with tissue expanders, incidental doses delivered by tangents to the axilla, as defined by the RTOG contouring atlas, do not provide adequate coverage. The posterior-superior region of level I and II is the region most commonly underdosed. Axillary volume coverage increased with increasing expander volumes in patients with bilateral reconstruction. Lung dose increased with increasing expander angle from midline. This information should be considered both when placing expanders and when designing PMRT tangent only treatment plans by contouring and targeting the axilla volume when axillary treatment is indicated. PMID:22204504

  10. Radiation-induced changes in breathing frequency and lung histology of C57BL/6J mice are time- and dose-dependent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldh, T.; Heinzelmann, F.; Velalakan, A. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Budach, W. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Belka, C. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Jendrossek, V. [Univ. Hospital of Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (DE). Inst. of Cell Biology (Cancer Research)

    2012-03-15

    Pneumonitis and fibrosis constitute serious adverse effects of radiotherapy in the thoracic region. In this study, time-course and dose-dependence of clinically relevant parameters of radiation-induced lung injury in C57BL/6J mice were analyzed. A well-characterized disease model is necessary for the analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms using genetically modified mice. C57BL/6J mice received single dose right hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 or 22.5 Gy. Body weight and breathing frequency were recorded as parameters for health impairment. Lung tissue was collected over 24 weeks for histological analysis. Hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 or 22.5 Gy induced biphasic breathing impairment with the first increase between days 7 and 70. Although breathing impairment was more pronounced in the 22.5 Gy group, it was accompanied in both dose groups by pneumonitis-associated histological changes. A second rise in breathing frequency ratios became visible starting on day 70 with a steady increase until day 210. Again, breathing was more strongly affected in the 22.5 Gy group. However, breathing impairment coincided only in the 22.5 Gy group with a significant increase in collagen deposition in the lung tissue by day 210. Tissue inflammation and fibrosis were observed in the irradiated and the shielded lungs, pointing toward involvement of systemic effects. Hemithorax irradiation induces time-dependent pneumonitis and fibrosis in C57BL/6J mice. While hemithorax irradiation with 12.5 Gy is sufficient to induce lung inflammation, it is below the threshold for collagen deposition and fibrosis development by day 210.

  11. Reproduction and evaluation of a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-fan LIU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce and evaluate a rat model of inhalation lung injury caused by black gunpowder smog. Methods The smog composition was analyzed and a rat model of inhalation lung injury was reproduced. Forty two healthy male Wistar rats were randomly divided into normal control (NC group and 1h, 2h, 6h, 24h, 48h and 96h after inhalation group (n=6. The arterial blood gas, wet to dry weight ratio (W/D of lung, leukocyte count, and protein concentration in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF were determined. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in lung tissue were observed. Results The composition of black gunpowder smog was composed mainly of CO2 and CO, and their concentrations remained stable within 12 minutes. Smog inhalation caused a significant hypoxemia, the co