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Sample records for lung diseases parasitic

  1. Parasitic diseases of lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.C.; Rybakova, N.I.; Vinner, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Roentgenologic semiotics of the main parasitic diseases of lungs is described: echinococcosis, paragonimiasis, cysticercosis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiosis and some rarely met parasitic diseases

  2. Parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenshtraukh, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    Foundations of roentgenological semiotics of parasitic diseases of lungs, w hich are of the greatest practical value, are presented. Roentgenological pictu res of the following parasitic diseases: hydatid and alveolar echinococcosis, pa ragonimiasis, toxoplasmosis, ascariasis, amebiasis, bilharziasis (Schistosomias is) of lungs, are considered

  3. Children and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because they disproportionately affect impoverished people. More on: Neglected Tropical Diseases Prevention One of the most important ways to help prevent these parasitic diseases is to teach children the importance of washing hands correctly with soap ...

  4. Parasitic Diseases: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the leg. Endemic: A disease that is native to a particular geographic region. Epidemiology: The study ... parasites/glossary.html) T Telediagnosis: The transmission of digital images captured from a clinical specimen and sent ...

  5. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, Maurice C.

    2008-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  6. Imaging of parasitic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddad, Maurice C. [American Univ. of Beirut Medical Center (Lebanon). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology; Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E. [Riyadh Military Hospital (Saudi Arabia). Radiology and Imaging Dept. 920W; Tamraz, Jean C. (eds.) [CHU Hotel-Dieu de France, Beirut (Lebanon)

    2008-07-01

    This book provides an overview of the imaging findings of parasitic diseases using modern imaging equipment. The chapters consist of short descriptions of causative pathogens, epidemiology, modes of transmission, pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory tests, and imaging findings, with illustrative examples of parasitic diseases that can affect various systems of the human body. Tables summarizing key diagnostic features and clinical data pertinent to diagnosis are also included. This book is intended for radiologists worldwide. (orig.)

  7. Scintiangiographic demonstration of parasitization of systemic blood supply by inflammatory lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, A.E.; Lee, V.W.; Shapiro, J.H.

    1985-03-01

    An unusual case in which a computed tomogram demonstrated abnormal, enlarged vessels in the right lower lobe of the lung and suggested an arteriovenous malformation is presented. A scintiangiogram showed abnormal systemic supply to this area in the aortic phase. Contrast angiography demonstrated hypertrophy of the right inferior phrenic artery with abnormal systemic supply to the pleura and parenchyma of the right lower lobe, presumably on the basis of old infection.

  8. Parasitism and calfhood diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlich, H; Douvres, F W

    1977-02-01

    That animals can and do acquire an effective immunity against helminth parasites has been demonstrated extensively experimentally, and the fact that domestic animals such as cattle, sheep, and horses become adults while maintaining good health in spite of constant exposure to reinfection long has suggested that immunity must be important to such survival. Although our attempts to date to vaccinate calves against helminth parasites have either failed or been unsatisfactory because of the pathosis induced by the experimental vaccines, the results are not surprising or discouraging. In contrast to the long history of immunization research on bacterial and viral diseases, only within a relatively short time have serious efforts been directed at exploiting hostal immunity for prevention and control of helminthic diseases. Unlike the comparatively simple structures of viruses and bacteria, helminths are complex multicellular animals with vast arrays of antigens and complicated physiological and immunological interactions with their hosts. Much more fundamental information on helminth-bovine interactions, on helminth antigens, and on cattle antibody systems must be developed before progress on control of cattle helminths by vaccination can be meaningful.

  9. Women and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consultations, and General Public. Contact Us Parasites Home Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Infection with ... of parasites can lead to unique consequences for women. Some examples are given below. Infection with Toxoplasma ...

  10. Childhood Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rule out conditions such as asthma , cystic fibrosis , acid reflux, heart disease, neuromuscular disease, and immune deficiency. Various ... a lung infection. Acid-blocking medicines can prevent acid reflux, which can lead to aspiration. Lung Transplant A ...

  11. Parasitic Diseases and Psychiatric Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Mitchell Gralnick

    1994-01-01

    Distinguishing parasitic diseases from other infections and tropical medical disorders based on microbiological classification is a matter of convenience. Organic brain syndromes are associated with both protozoan and helminthic infections; side-effects of drugs commonly used to treat parasitoses may impair mood and cause anxiety, agitation or psychosis. Emotional states may in turn affect the experience of medical illness. Psychiatrically significant features of medical illness are determine...

  12. Drug induced lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; Eisenhuber, Edith

    2010-01-01

    There is an ever increasing number of drugs that can cause lung disease. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, since the clinical symptoms are mostly nonspecific. Various HRCT patterns can be correlated - though with overlaps - to lung changes caused by certain groups of drugs. Alternative diagnosis such as infection, edema or underlying lung disease has to be excluded by clinical-radiological means. Herefore is profound knowledge of the correlations of drug effects and imaging findings essential. History of drug exposure, suitable radiological findings and response to treatment (corticosteroids and stop of medication) mostly provide the base for the diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Mitochondria in Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are autonomous cellular organelles that oversee a variety of functions such as metabolism, energy production, calcium buffering, and cell fate determination. Regulation of their morphology and diverse activities beyond energy production are being recognized as playing major roles in cellular health and dysfunction. This review is aimed at summarizing what is known regarding mitochondrial contributions to pathogenesis of lung diseases. Emphasis is given to understanding the importance of structural and functional aspects of mitochondria in both normal cellular function (based on knowledge from other cell types) and in development and modulation of lung diseases such as asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis and cancer. Emerging techniques that allow examination of mitochondria, and potential strategies to target mitochondria in the treatment of lung diseases are also discussed. PMID:23978003

  14. Occupational lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlow, Bryant

    2011-01-01

    Chest radiography and high-resolution computed tomography are indispensable tools in the detection, classification and characterization of occupational lung diseases that are caused by inhaling mineral particles such as asbestos, silicon-containing rock dust and other tissue-damaging antigens, nanomaterials and toxins. Radiographic evidence of occupational lung disease is interpreted with a patient's clinical signs and symptoms and a detailed occupational history in mind because of high variability in radiographic findings. This Directed Reading reviews the history, epidemiology, functional anatomy, pathobiology and medical diagnostic imaging of occupational lung diseases associated with inhalation of fine particulates in the workplace. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your CE preference. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store.

  15. Update on pathology of ocular parasitic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Ramachandra, Varsha; Islam, Saidul; Bhattacharjee, Harsha; Biswas, Jyotirmay; Koul, Akanksha; Deka, Panna; Deka, Apurba

    2016-11-01

    Parasites are a group of eukaryotic organisms that may be free-living or form a symbiotic or parasitic relationship with the hosts. Consisting of over 800,000 recognized species, parasites may be unicellular (Protozoa) or multicellular (helminths and arthropods). The association of parasites with human population started long before the emergence of civilization. Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent worldwide including India. Appropriate epidemiological data are lacking on existing zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in our scenario. Systemic diseases such as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. Acquired Toxoplasma infections are rising in immune-deficient individuals. Amongst the ocular parasitic diseases, various protozoas such as Cystoidea, trematodes, tissue flagellates, sporozoas etc. affect humans in general and eyes in particular, in different parts of the world. These zoonoses seem to be a real health related problem globally. Recent intensification of research throughout the world has led to specialization in biological fields, creating a conducive situation for researchers interested in this subject. The basics of parasitology lie in morphology, pathology, and with recent updates in molecular parasitology, the scope has extended further. The current review is to address the recent update in ophthalmic parasites with special reference to pathology and give a glimpse of further research in this field.

  16. Update on pathology of ocular parasitic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasites are a group of eukaryotic organisms that may be free-living or form a symbiotic or parasitic relationship with the hosts. Consisting of over 800,000 recognized species, parasites may be unicellular (Protozoa or multicellular (helminths and arthropods. The association of parasites with human population started long before the emergence of civilization. Parasitic zoonotic diseases are prevalent worldwide including India. Appropriate epidemiological data are lacking on existing zoonotic parasitic diseases, and newer diseases are emerging in our scenario. Systemic diseases such as cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, hydatidosis, and toxoplasmosis are fairly common. Acquired Toxoplasma infections are rising in immune-deficient individuals. Amongst the ocular parasitic diseases, various protozoas such as Cystoidea, trematodes, tissue flagellates, sporozoas etc. affect humans in general and eyes in particular, in different parts of the world. These zoonoses seem to be a real health related problem globally. Recent intensification of research throughout the world has led to specialization in biological fields, creating a conducive situation for researchers interested in this subject. The basics of parasitology lie in morphology, pathology, and with recent updates in molecular parasitology, the scope has extended further. The current review is to address the recent update in ophthalmic parasites with special reference to pathology and give a glimpse of further research in this field.

  17. Immunologic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    The term immunologic lung disease comprises a broad spectrum of disease. The authors have covered a few entities in which recent studies have been particularly helpful in elucidating pathophysiology though not in uncovering the inciting cause. Common to all of these entities is the problem of finding appropriate methods of defining disease activity and response to treatment. As exemplified by the improved outlook for Goodpasture's syndrome with elucidation of its underlying immunopathology, it is likely that better understanding of the immunologic basis of sarcoid and interstitial disease may be helpful in planning more effective treatment strategies. 44 references

  18. Black lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramani, R.V.; Frantz, R.L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Coal workers` pneumoconiosis (CWP), often called Black Lung Disease is a occupational disease which results from inhalation of coal mine dust which usually contains small amounts of free crystalline silica. This chapter reviews the current knowledge of the epidemiology and clinical aspects of CWP and how it has been controlled in the USA through the 1969 Coal Mine Act and dust level standards. It describes the sampling methods used. Medical control methods and engineering control of the disease is discussed. Work of the Generic Mineral Technology Center for Respirable Dust is described. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Diffuse infiltrative lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.

    1984-01-01

    The authors discuss their approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with DILD. Gallium scans play a central role in this process. Not only do they help them decide whom to biopsy, but also where to biopsy. The scans can be used for the early detection of disease in a high-risk population, for following the progression and regression of disease, for the regulation of medication, and for the evaluation of therapy. Bronchoalveolar lung lavage appears to be equally sensitive. However, patients are less willing to undergo repeated fiberoptic bronchoscopies than lung scans. Both tests may prove useful, one complementing the other. Gallium imaging has also been utilized by the authors in select patients with questionable diffuse lung infiltrates roentgenographically or with a normal chest roentgenogram, chronic respiratory symptoms, and abnormal pulmonary function studies. An abnormal gallium lung scan in these clinical situations helps them select which patients have a diffuse active pulmonary process meriting transbronchial biopsies. This has proven to be of particular value in the management of older patients

  20. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Tomassetti

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Between September 2015 and August 2016 there were >1500 publications in the field of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. For the Clinical Year in Review session at the European Respiratory Society Congress that was held in London, UK, in September 2016, we selected only five articles. This selection, made from the enormous number of published papers, does not include all the relevant studies that will significantly impact our knowledge in the field of DPLDs in the near future. This review article provides our personal view on the following topics: early diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, current knowledge on the multidisciplinary team diagnosis of DPLDs and the diagnostic role of transbronchial cryobiopsy in this diagnostic setting, insights on the new entity of interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features, and new therapeutic approaches for scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease.

  1. Bacterial and parasitic diseases of parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneley, Robert J T

    2009-09-01

    As wild-caught birds become increasingly rare in aviculture, there is a corresponding decline in the incidence of bacterial and parasitic problems and an increase in the recognition of the importance of maintaining health through better nutrition and husbandry. Nevertheless, the relatively close confines of captivity mean an increased pathogen load in the environment in which companion and aviary parrots live. This increased pathogen load leads to greater exposure of these birds to bacteria and parasites, and consequently a greater risk of infection and disease. This article discusses bacterial and parasitic infections in companion and aviary parrots. It includes the origins, pathogens, diagnosis, treatment, and some of the associated risk factors.

  2. Tumorous interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Meyer, E.; Mundinger, A.; Helwig, A.; Blum, U.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1990-01-01

    The radiological findings in pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis and in leukemic pulmonary infiltrates mirror the tumor-dependent monomorphic interstitial pathology of lung parenchyma. It is a proven fact that pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis is caused by hematogenous tumor embolization to the lungs; pathogenesis by contiguous lymphangitic spread is the exception. High-resolution CT performed as a supplement to the radiological work-up improves the sensitivity for pulmonary infiltrates in general and thus makes the differential diagnosis decided easier. Radiological criteria cannot discriminate the different forms of leukemia. Plain chest X-ray allows the diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in leukemia due to tumorous infiltrates and of tumor- or therapy-induced complications. It is essential that the radiological findings be interpreted with reference to the stage of tumor disease and the clinical parameters to make the radiological differential diagnosis of opportunistic infections more reliable. (orig.) [de

  3. Marijuana and lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manish; Joshi, Anita; Bartter, Thaddeus

    2014-03-01

    Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is used throughout the world, and its use is increasing. In much of the world, marijuana is illicit. While inhalation of smoke generated by igniting dried components of the plant is the most common way marijuana is used, there is concern over potential adverse lung effects. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent studies that explore the impact upon the respiratory system of inhaling marijuana smoke. Smoking marijuana is associated with chronic bronchitis symptoms and large airway inflammation. Occasional use of marijuana with low cumulative use is not a risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The heavy use of marijuana alone may lead to airflow obstruction. The immuno-histopathologic and epidemiologic evidence in marijuana users suggests biological plausibility of marijuana smoking as a risk for the development of lung cancer; at present, it has been difficult to conclusively link marijuana smoking and cancer development. There is unequivocal evidence that habitual or regular marijuana smoking is not harmless. A caution against regular heavy marijuana usage is prudent. The medicinal use of marijuana is likely not harmful to lungs in low cumulative doses, but the dose limit needs to be defined. Recreational use is not the same as medicinal use and should be discouraged.

  4. Marijuana and Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkin, Donald P

    2018-05-17

    As marijuana smoking prevalence increases in the U.S. concern regarding its potential risks to lung health has also risen, given the general similarity in the smoke contents between marijuana and tobacco. Most studies have found a significant association between marijuana smoking and chronic bronchitis symptoms after adjustment for tobacco. While reports are mixed regarding associations between marijuana smoking and lung function, none has shown a relationship to decrements in forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV1) and few have found a relationship to a decreased ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC), possibly related to an association between marijuana and an increased FVC. A few studies have found a modest reduction in specific airway conductance in relation to marijuana, probably reflecting endoscopic evidence of bronchial mucosal edema among habitual marijuana smokers. Diffusing capacity in marijuana smokers has been normal and two studies of thoracic high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) have not shown any association of marijuana smoking with emphysema. Although bronchial biopsies from habitual marijuana smokers have shown precancerous histopathological changes, a large cohort study and a pooled analysis of six well-designed case-control studies have not found evidence of a link between marijuana smoking and lung cancer. The immunosuppressive effects of delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol raise the possibility of an increased risk of pneumonia, but further studies are needed to evaluate this potential risk. Several cases series have demonstrated pneumothoraces/pneumomediastinum, as well as bullous lung disease, in marijuana smokers, but these associations require epidemiologic studies for firmer evidence of possible causality. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Carla F

    2017-06-30

    The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  6. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  7. Parasites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-06

    In this podcast, a listener wants to know what to do if he thinks he has a parasite or parasitic disease.  Created: 5/6/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/6/2010.

  8. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kaushik Saha

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a final common pathway of a broad heterogeneous group of parenchymal lung disorders. It is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the lung leading to restriction and diminished oxygen transfer. Clinically, the presenting symptoms of ILD are non-specific (cough and progressive dyspnea on exertion) and are often attributed to other diseases, thus delaying diagnosis and timely therapy. Clues from the medical history along with the clinical context and radiolo...

  9. Travel/Travelers and Parasitic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the world and specific country. Many infectious diseases transmitted in food and water can also be acquired directly through the fecal-oral route. Parasitic Illnesses That Can Be Acquired During Travel* From Contaminated Food and Water More ... filariasis African sleeping sickness Onchoceriasis *This list ...

  10. Interstitial Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... propranolol (Inderal, Innopran), may harm lung tissue. Some antibiotics. Nitrofurantoin (Macrobid, Macrodantin, others) and ethambutol (Myambutol) can cause lung damage. Anti-inflammatory drugs. Certain anti-inflammatory drugs, such as rituximab ( ...

  11. [Parasitic diseases of the central nervous system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmutzhard, E

    2010-02-01

    Central nervous system infections and infestations by protozoa and helminths constitute a problem of increasing importance throughout all of central European and northern/western countries. This is partially due to the globalisation of our society, tourists and business people being more frequently exposed to parasitic infection/infestation in tropical countries than in moderate climate countries. On top of that, migrants may import chronic infestations and infections with parasitic pathogens, eventually also--sometimes exclusively--involving the nervous system. Knowledge of epidemiology, initial clinical signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures as well as specific chemotherapeutic therapies and adjunctive therapeutic strategies is of utmost important in all of these infections and infestations of the nervous systems, be it by protozoa or helminths. This review lists, mainly in the form of tables, all possible infections and infestations of the nervous systems by protozoa and by helminths. Besides differentiating parasitic diseases of the nervous system seen in migrants, tourists etc., it is very important to have in mind that disease-related (e.g. HIV) or iatrogenic immunosuppression has led to the increased occurrence of a wide variety of parasitic infections and infestations of the nervous system (e. g. babesiosis, Chagas disease, Strongyloides stercoralis infestation, toxoplasmosis, etc.).

  12. Occupational and environmental lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaman, Danielle M; Meyer, Cristopher A; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2015-06-01

    Occupational and environmental lung disease remains a major cause of respiratory impairment worldwide. Despite regulations, increasing rates of coal worker's pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis are being reported in the United States. Dust exposures are occurring in new industries, for instance, silica in hydraulic fracking. Nonoccupational environmental lung disease contributes to major respiratory disease, asthma, and COPD. Knowledge of the imaging patterns of occupational and environmental lung disease is critical in diagnosing patients with occult exposures and managing patients with suspected or known exposures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux and lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Keith C

    2015-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) can cause respiratory symptoms and may trigger, drive and/or worsen airway disorders, interstitial lung diseases and lung allograft dysfunction. Whether lifestyle changes and acid suppression alone can counter and prevent the adverse effects of GER on the respiratory tract remains unclear. Recent data suggest that antireflux surgery may be more effective in preventing lung disease progression in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or lung transplant recipients who have evidence of allograft dysfunction associated with the presence of excessive GER. Additional research and clinical trials are needed to determine the role of GER in various lung disorders and identify which interventions are most efficacious in preventing the respiratory consequences of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In addition, measuring biomarkers that indicate that gastric refluxate has been aspirated into the lower respiratory tract (e.g., pepsin and bile acid concentrations in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) may prove helpful in both diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  14. [Intestinal parasitic diseases in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mare, Anca; Man, A; Toma, Felicia; Székely, Edit; Lôrinczi, Lilla; Sipoş, Anca

    2007-01-01

    To compare the incidence of intestinal parasitosis between children with residence in urban and rural areas: to compare the efficacy of parasitologic diagnostic methods. In our study we included two lots of children. The first lot consisted in 74 children from rural areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces and 55 samples for the "Scotch tape" test. The second lot consisted in 214 children from urban areas from which we collected 44 samples of feces. We examined each sample of feces by three different methods. The study was performed between April to June 2006. The incidence of intestinal parasitosis increases in children from urban areas towards rural areas, and in children between 5 and 10 years. Ascariasis is the most frequent disease in both urban and rural areas. By examination of each fecal sample by three different methods, the number of positive cases increased. The residence in rural areas and age between 5 to 10 years are risk factors for intestinal parasitosis. The "Scotch tape" test was more efficient in Enterobius vermicularis infection than the methods performed from feces. We recommend using at the same time three diagnostic methods for feces examination to improve the diagnostic sensibility.

  15. Occupational lung diseases in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Ryan F; Brims, Fraser

    2017-11-20

    Occupational exposures are an important determinant of respiratory health. International estimates note that about 15% of adult-onset asthma, 15% of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and 10-30% of lung cancer may be attributable to hazardous occupational exposures. One-quarter of working asthmatics either have had their asthma caused by work or adversely affected by workplace conditions. Recently, cases of historical occupational lung diseases have been noted to occur with new exposures, such as cases of silicosis in workers fabricating kitchen benchtops from artificial stone products. Identification of an occupational cause of a lung disease can be difficult and requires maintaining a high index of suspicion. When an occupational lung disease is identified, this may facilitate a cure and help to protect coworkers. Currently, very little information is collected regarding actual cases of occupational lung diseases in Australia. Most assumptions about many occupational lung diseases are based on extrapolation from overseas data. This lack of information is a major impediment to development of targeted interventions and timely identification of new hazardous exposures. All employers, governments and health care providers in Australia have a responsibility to ensure that the highest possible standards are in place to protect workers' respiratory health.

  16. Comorbidities in interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Margaritopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrosing lung disorders include a large number of diseases with diverse behaviour. Patients can die because of the progression of their illness, remain stable or even improve after appropriate treatment has been instituted. Comorbidities, such as acute and chronic infection, gastro-oesophageal reflux, pulmonary hypertension, lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and obstructive sleep apnoea, can pre-exist or develop at any time during the course of the disease and, if unidentified and untreated, may impair quality of life, impact upon the respiratory status of the patients, and ultimately lead to disease progression and death. Therefore, early identification and accurate treatment of comorbidities is essential.

  17. Some diseases and parasites of captive woodcocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Stickel, W.H.; Geis, S.A.

    1965-01-01

    Observations were made concerning the diseases and parasites of a group of woodcocks (Philohela minor) caught in Massachusetts in the summer of 1960 and kept in captivity in Maryland, and of another group caught and kept in Louisiana in the winter of 1960-61. Bumblefoot, a granulomatous swelling of the foot caused by Micrococcus sp., is reported for woodcocks for the first time. Six of 31 woodcocks were infected with a renal coccidium of an undetermined species. Tetrameres sp. was found in 4 of 31 birds examined. Sarcocystis was found in one bird. Aerosaculitis was found in several.

  18. Parasitic Diseases of Ruminants Brought to Two Zonal Veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A five years study (2003-2007) of parasitic diseases of ruminants brought to two Zonal Veterinary clinics located in the Southern part of Niger State, Central Nigeria was carried out to establish disease patterns in cattle, sheep and goats. The study was based on the data extracted from the monthly records of parasitic disease ...

  19. Human Parasitic Diseases in Bulgaria in Between 2013-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainova, Iskra; Harizanov, Rumen; Kaftandjiev, Iskren; Tsvetkova, Nina; Mikov, Ognyan; Kaneva, Eleonora

    2018-01-01

    Background: In Bulgaria, more than 20 autochthonous human parasitic infections have been described and some of them are widespread. Over 50 imported protozoan and helminthic infections represent diagnostic and therapeutic challenges and pose epidemiological risks due to the possibility of local transmission. Aims: To establish the distribution of autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases among the population of the country over a 2-year period (2013-2014) and to evaluate their significance in the public health system. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Methods: We used the annual reports by regional health inspectorates and data from the National Reference Laboratory at the National Centre of Infectious and Parasitic Diseases on all individuals infected with parasitic diseases in the country. Prevalence was calculated for parasitic diseases with few or absent clinical manifestations (oligosymptomatic or asymptomatic infections). Incidence per 100.000 was calculated for diseases with an overt clinical picture or those that required hospitalisation and specialised medical interventions (e.g. surgery). Results: During the research period, parasitological studies were conducted on 1441.244 persons, and parasitic infections were diagnosed in 22.039 individuals. Distribution of various parasitic pathogens among the population displayed statistically significant differences in prevalence for some intestinal parasites (enterobiasis 0.81%, giardiasis 0.34% and blastocystosis 0.22%). For certain zoonotic diseases such as cystic echinococcosis (average incidence of 3.99 per 100.000) and trichinellosis (average incidence of 0.8 per 100.000), the incidence exceeds several times the annual incidence recorded in the European Union. Conclusion: Parasitic diseases still pose a substantial problem with social and medical impacts on the residents of our country. Improved efficiency regarding autochthonous and imported parasitic diseases is essential in providing the public

  20. Satellite technology and the control of parasitic diseases in Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential application of these techniques in the surveillance, control and prevention of parasitic diseases in Africa is explored in this write-up. Keywords: surveillance, parasitic diseases, satellite techniques, remote sensing, Geographical Information System (GIS), Global Positioning Sytem (GPS), human and robotic, ...

  1. Diffuse lung disease: Pneumoconioses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoud, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    This paper begins with a discussion of the 1980 International Labour Organization classification of the pneumoconioses. Emphasis is on the common pneumoconioses, that is, silicosis, coalworker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related pleural and parenchymal disease. Examples of the five radiographic forms of silicosis-simple and complicated silicosis, Caplan syndrome, silicotuberculosis, and acute silicosis- are presented, and the differential diagnoses are discussed. Discussion of asbestos-related disease included pleural manifestations such as plaques, diffuse pleural thickening, and asbestos pleural effusion as well as asbestosis and malignancies associated with asbestos exposure, such as bronchogenic carcinoma and malignant mesothelioma. Although the standard radiographic findings are stressed, the use of CT in the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis and the staging of dust-related malignancies is also discussed

  2. Imaging of Occupational Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champlin, Jay; Edwards, Rachael; Pipavath, Sudhakar

    2016-11-01

    Occupational lung diseases span a variety of pulmonary disorders caused by inhalation of dusts or chemical antigens in a vocational setting. Included in these are the classic mineral pneumoconioses of silicosis, coal worker's pneumoconiosis, and asbestos-related diseases as well as many immune-mediated and airway-centric diseases, and new and emerging disorders. Although some of these have characteristic imaging appearances, a multidisciplinary approach with focus on occupational exposure history is essential to proper diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PARASITES, DISEASES AND DEFORMITIES OF COBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewen McLean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobia, Rachycentron canadum, is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Order Perciformes and as a warm–water fish is to be found in tropical and subtropical waters. The species has been reported in eastern Mediterranean waters and it is likely that in this particular case, cobia are lessespian. Cobia has been farmed in Taiwan since the early 1990s and today nascent cobia aquaculture operations operate throughout South East and Eastern Asia, in Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as well as in the United States. Many other nations are presently considering adopting cobia as a new species for aquaculture. Production by aquaculture experienced a 7000–fold increase from 1995 to 2005. The increased interest in the species has evolved due in large part to its many excellent characteristics which include good growth, with production of 6 kg live weight fish being possible over a year–long production cycle. Cobia are accepting of pond, net pens and recirculation–based culture; their fillet quality is high and meat delectable; They readily take formulated feeds and respond well to alternate proteins in their diets. Like other species new to aquaculture however, enlarged farming activities have been accompanied by increased incidence of commonly–encountered and emerging diseases. As an aid to current and potential producers as well as researchers, the following provides an overview of the published literature on cobia diseases, parasites and physical deformities.

  4. [Clinical microbiology laboratory and imported parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Rabadán, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Rocío; Cuadros, Juan; Cañavate, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Imported parasitosis represents an increasingly frequent diagnostic challenge for microbiology laboratories. A surge in immigration and international travel has led to a rise in the number of imported cases of parasitosis, and this trend is expected to continue in the future. The present article addresses this challenge by reviewing recommended diagnostic approaches and tests. Currently, microscopy is always recommended when analysing blood samples for parasites. If malaria is suspected, rapid antigen testing (including at least HRP2 antigen) should also be performed. The work-up for suspected leishmaniasis should include serology, culture, and in selected cases detection of antigen in urine. In suspected Chagas disease, two different serological tests should be performed. PCR for blood protozoa is highly sensitive, although it cannot be used to rule out Chagas disease, since this condition may be present without parasitemia. Accurate diagnosis of intestinal amebiasis usually requires PCR or antigen detection tests. In helminthiasis, traditional microscopy may need to be complemented with other tests, such as agar plate culture for strongyloidiasis, Og4C3 antigen detection for bancroftian filariasis, and antibody detection test for filariasis and schistosomiasis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, W.R.

    1995-01-01

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.)

  6. High resolution CT in diffuse lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, W R [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    High resolution CT (computerized tomography) was discussed in detail. The conclusions were HRCT is able to define lung anatomy at the secondary lobular level and define a variety of abnormalities in patients with diffuse lung diseases. Evidence from numerous studies indicates that HRCT can play a major role in the assessment of diffuse infiltrative lung disease and is indicate clinically (95 refs.).

  7. Disease dynamics in a specialized parasite of ant societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sandra Breum; Ferrari, Matthew; Evans, Harry C.

    2012-01-01

    Coevolution between ant colonies and their rare specialized parasites are intriguing, because lethal infections of workers may correspond to tolerable chronic diseases of colonies, but the parasite adaptations that allow stable coexistence with ants are virtually unknown. We explore the trade......-offs experienced by Ophiocordyceps parasites manipulating ants into dying in nearby graveyards. We used field data from Brazil and Thailand to parameterize and fit a model for the growth rate of graveyards. We show that parasite pressure is much lower than the abundance of ant cadavers suggests...

  8. Chronic lung disease in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, M Jeeva; Agarwal, Ramesh; Deorari, Ashok K; Paul, Vinod K

    2008-04-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) occurs in preterm infants who require respiratory support in the first few days of birth. Apart from prematurity, oxygen therapy and assisted ventilation, factors like intrauterine/postnatal infections, patent ductus arteriosus, and genetic polymorphisms also contribute to its pathogenesis. The severe form of BPD with extensive inflammatory changes is rarely seen nowadays; instead, a milder form characterized by decreased alveolar septation due to arrest in lung development is more common. A multitude of strategies, mainly pharmacological and ventilatory, have been employed for prevention and treatment of BPD. Unfortunately, most of them have not been proved to be beneficial. A comprehensive protocol for management of BPD based on the current evidence is discussed here.

  9. Disease dynamics in a specialized parasite of ant societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra B Andersen

    Full Text Available Coevolution between ant colonies and their rare specialized parasites are intriguing, because lethal infections of workers may correspond to tolerable chronic diseases of colonies, but the parasite adaptations that allow stable coexistence with ants are virtually unknown. We explore the trade-offs experienced by Ophiocordyceps parasites manipulating ants into dying in nearby graveyards. We used field data from Brazil and Thailand to parameterize and fit a model for the growth rate of graveyards. We show that parasite pressure is much lower than the abundance of ant cadavers suggests and that hyperparasites often castrate Ophiocordyceps. However, once fruiting bodies become sexually mature they appear robust. Such parasite life-history traits are consistent with iteroparity--a reproductive strategy rarely considered in fungi. We discuss how tropical habitats with high biodiversity of hyperparasites and high spore mortality has likely been crucial for the evolution and maintenance of iteroparity in parasites with low dispersal potential.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  11. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  12. Diagnostics of parasitic diseases. Myths of the present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kozlov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics of parasitic diseases in many medical laboratories is carried out with a bad quality. Principal causes are the low level of qualification of laboratorians and a small amount of laboratory methods which are used. The majority of practising doctors has bad knowledge about diseases. All this serves as base for occurrence in the market of medical services of various pseudoscientific methods of diagnostics of parasitic diseases, such as Voll-method and its analogues, including a method of bioresonant diagnostics, scanning of the crushed drop of blood, including a dark field method, diagnostics on pulse, detection of toxins of parasites in salivaric crystal amilase and others. These methods cannot be scientific to be the methods of demonstrative medicine often lead to development of parasitic phobias of patients.

  13. Pulmonary nuclear medicine: Techniques in diagnosis of lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents papers on the application of nuclear medicine to the diagnosis of lung diseases. Topics considered include lung physiology and anatomy, radiopharmaceuticals in pulmonary medicine, pulmonary embolism, obstructive pulmonary disease, diffuse infiltrative lung disease, pneumoconioses, tumor localization scans in primary lung tumors, the interactions of heart diseases and lung diseases on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function, radionuclide imaging in pediatric lung diseases, and future possibilities in pulmonary nuclear medicine

  14. THE PARASITIC DISEASES OF MAN IN AFRICA *

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    wind, and Cd) the existence of forests. ... its incidence seems to vary almost from town to town. It is possible, of ... land and in some parts of Bechuanaland, but in Southern ... In a small survey in ... new dam, and the establishment of irrigation projects spreads ... have been linked with a poor diet, the possibility of a parasitic.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Marciniak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to inhaled pollutants, including fine particulates and cigarette smoke is a major cause of lung disease in Europe. While it is established that inhaled pollutants have devastating effects on the genome, it is now recognised that additional effects on protein folding also drive the development of lung disease. Protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum affects the pathogenesis of many diseases, ranging from pulmonary fibrosis to cancer. It is therefore important to understand how cells respond to endoplasmic reticulum stress and how this affects pulmonary tissues in disease. These insights may offer opportunities to manipulate such endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways and thereby cure lung disease.

  16. Contemporary models and prospects of control of parasitic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petričević Saša M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic, social and expert-scientific factors determine activities in connection with the development of the control of parasitic infections in the upcoming period of the 21st century. The primary research activities are directed at studies of the physiological functions of parasites and the ecological relations between the parasite and the host, and all that is undertaken with the objective of securing adequate pharmacotherapy/pharmacoprophylaxis and immunoprophilaxis. As there is a huge expansion in the synthesis of chemical compounds, there is a great number of potential substances for use in the form of a medicine. Along these lines, activities concerning the development of new antiparasitics and/or modification of existing ones are primarily based on securing a quality target spot for its action. Another possibility in the area of research is connected to the problem of resistance of parasites and intensive studies of the biochemical-physiological characteristics of parasites, as well as the development of an active epidemiological-episootiological network for monitoring resistance. In parallel with the development of medicines, the results of investigations of physiological functions of parasites and their mutual relations with their host, are intensely used for the development of immunological control, and the development of vaccines (for example, the development of vaccines for the control of coccidiosis, babesiosis, echinococcosis. The second important approach is related to studies of parasitic zoonoses, the effect of global warming on the epidemiological-episootiological characteristics of parasitic diseases and the selection of resistant animal breeds/hybrids. Animal welfare is also of importance, the perfecting of reliable, rapid and less-costly methods for diagnosing parasitic diseases and the development of in vitro methods for the examination of resistance to antiparasitics.

  17. Histopathology of lung disease in the connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero, Marina; Padera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The pathologic correlates of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to connective tissue disease (CTD) comprise a diverse group of histologic patterns. Lung biopsies in patients with CTD-associated ILD tend to demonstrate simultaneous involvement of multiple anatomic compartments of the lung. Certain histologic patterns tend to predominate in each defined CTD, and it is possible in many cases to confirm connective tissue-associated lung disease and guide patient management using surgical lung biopsy. This article will cover the pulmonary pathologies seen in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, myositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed CTD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Control of human parasitic diseases: Context and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneux, David H

    2006-01-01

    The control of parasitic diseases of humans has been undertaken since the aetiology and natural history of the infections was recognized and the deleterious effects on human health and well-being appreciated by policy makers, medical practitioners and public health specialists. However, while some parasitic infections such as malaria have proved difficult to control, as defined by a sustained reduction in incidence, others, particularly helminth infections can be effectively controlled. The different approaches to control from diagnosis, to treatment and cure of the clinically sick patient, to control the transmission within the community by preventative chemotherapy and vector control are outlined. The concepts of eradication, elimination and control are defined and examples of success summarized. Overviews of the health policy and financing environment in which programmes to control or eliminate parasitic diseases are positioned and the development of public-private partnerships as vehicles for product development or access to drugs for parasite disease control are discussed. Failure to sustain control of parasites may be due to development of drug resistance or the failure to implement proven strategies as a result of decreased resources within the health system, decentralization of health management through health-sector reform and the lack of financial and human resources in settings where per capita government expenditure on health may be less than $US 5 per year. However, success has been achieved in several large-scale programmes through sustained national government investment and/or committed donor support. It is also widely accepted that the level of investment in drug development for the parasitic diseases of poor populations is an unattractive option for pharmaceutical companies. The development of partnerships to specifically address this need provides some hope that the intractable problems of the treatment regimens for the trypanosomiases and

  19. 67Gallium citrate lung scans in interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.

    1976-01-01

    Patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease often require a lung biopsy to determine the diagnosis and proper therapy. However, once the diagnosis is established, clinical evaluation of symptoms, chest roentgenogram and pulmonary function testing are the only noninvasive means currently available to assess activity of the disease process and response to the therapy. Although these measures appear adequate in the presence of acute active disease in which response to therapy results in readily demonstrable changes in the above parameters, they may be insensitive to subtle changes that can occur in minimally active disease with slowly progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis over a period of years. A more sensitive noninvasive technique for identifying these cases with a smoldering diffuse interstitial inflammatory process might greatly improve our ability to effectively manage such patients. With this in mind, the value of gallium lung scan was investigated to assess its ability to predict inflammatory activity in such a clinical setting

  20. /sup 67/Gallium citrate lung scans in interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niden, A.H.; Mishkin, F.S.; Khurana, M.M.L.

    1976-02-01

    Patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease often require a lung biopsy to determine the diagnosis and proper therapy. However, once the diagnosis is established, clinical evaluation of symptoms, chest roentgenogram and pulmonary function testing are the only noninvasive means currently available to assess activity of the disease process and response to the therapy. Although these measures appear adequate in the presence of acute active disease in which response to therapy results in readily demonstrable changes in the above parameters, they may be insensitive to subtle changes that can occur in minimally active disease with slowly progressive interstitial pulmonary fibrosis over a period of years. A more sensitive noninvasive technique for identifying these cases with a smoldering diffuse interstitial inflammatory process might greatly improve our ability to effectively manage such patients. With this in mind, the value of gallium lung scan was investigated to assess its ability to predict inflammatory activity in such a clinical setting.

  1. Retrospective Study of Epidermal Parasitic Skin Diseases amongst ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: A ten year retrospective study (1997-2006) was undertaken to determine the prevalence of. Epidermal Parasitic Skin Diseases (EPSD) among out-patients from the skin diseases hospital in Maiduguri, Borno state. Out of 10,000 out-patients examined during the study period, 3527(35.27%) where infected with ...

  2. Transbronchial biopsies safely diagnose amyloid lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Praveen; Keyes, Colleen M.; Hankinson, Elizabeth A.; O’Hara, Carl J.; Sanchorawala, Vaishali; Berk, John L.

    2018-01-01

    Background Autopsy identifies lung involvement in 58–92% of patients with the most prevalent forms of systemic amyloidoses. In the absence of lung biopsies, amyloid lung disease often goes unrecognized. Report of a death following transbronchial biopsies in a patient with systemic amyloidosis cautioned against the procedure in this patient cohort. We reviewed our experience with transbronchial biopsies in patients with amyloidosis to determine the safety and utility of bronchoscopic lung biopsies. Methods We identified patients referred to the Amyloidosis Center at Boston Medical Center with lung amyloidosis diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsies (TBBX). Amyloid typing was determined by immunohistochemistry or mass spectrometry. Standard end organ assessments, including pulmonary function test (PFT) and chest tomography (CT) imaging, and extra-thoracic biopsies established the extent of disease. Results Twenty-five (21.7%) of 115 patients with lung amyloidosis were diagnosed by TBBX. PFT classified 33.3% with restrictive physiology, 28.6% with obstructive disease, and 9.5% mixed physiology; 9.5% exhibited isolated diffusion defects while 19% had normal pulmonary testing. Two view chest or CT imaging identified focal opacities in 52% of cases and diffuse interstitial disease in 48%. Amyloid type and disease extent included 68% systemic AL disease, 16% localized (lung limited) AL disease, 12% ATTR disease, and 4% AA amyloidosis. Fluoroscopy was not used during biopsy. No procedure complications were reported. Conclusions Our case series of 25 patients supports the use of bronchoscopic transbronchial biopsies for diagnosis of parenchymal lung amyloidosis. Normal PFTs do not rule out the histologic presence of amyloid lung disease. PMID:28393574

  3. Radiological diagnosis of lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauczor, H.U.; Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.

    2000-01-01

    Radiological cross-sectional imaging modalities, particularly computed tomography (CT) have become the mainstays for diagnosing lung disease in recent years. These enable morphological visualization of pathological processes with the greatest possible spatial resolution. Modern technical developments and complementary strategies have led to new applications and new functional assessments which need to be reviewed together with state-of-the-art techniques in nuclear imaging. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism using spiral CT angiography and magnetic resonance (MR) angiography certainly belongs in this category. CT has become the an alternative modality of first choice, and it is also challenging pulmonary angiography as the gold standard. Direct visualization of patent pulmonary arteries and thromboembolic material is complemented by that of effects on the pulmonary parenchyma and right heart function; it also provides perfusion studies and MR-based flow measurement to assess hemodynamic compromise. Ventilation studies have long been a domain of nuclear imaging, and new techniques for the direct visualization of ventilation are emerging from recent developments in the field of MR imaging, for example, using hyperpolarized inert gases. New functional parameters of ventilation can be derived from these studies. For the diagnosis of metabolically active disease, such as tumor and pneumonia, CT offers very high sensitivity, for example, in screening for intrapulmonary nodules using low-dose CT and in the early detection of pulmonary infiltrates in high-risk patients. Especially for characterizing pulmonary nodules there is a need to combine nuclear medicine techniques, such as in positron-emission tomography. (orig.) [de

  4. [Screening of parasitic diseases in the asymptomatic immigrant population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goterris, Lidia; Bocanegra, Cristina; Serre-Delcor, Núria; Moure, Zaira; Treviño, Begoña; Zarzuela, Francesc; Espasa, Mateu; Sulleiro, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Parasitic diseases suppose an important health problem in people from high endemic areas, so these must be discarded properly. Usually, these infections develop asymptomatically but, in propitious situations, are likely to reactivate themselves and can cause clinical symptoms and/or complications in the receiving country. Moreover, in some cases it is possible local transmission. Early diagnosis of these parasitic diseases made by appropriate parasitological techniques and its specific treatment will benefit both, the individual and the community. These techniques must be selected according to geoepidemiological criteria, patient's origin, migration route or time spent outside the endemic area; but other factors must also be considered as its sensitivity and specificity, implementation experience and availability. Given the high prevalence of intestinal parasites on asymptomatic immigrants, it is recommended to conduct a study by coproparasitological techniques. Because of its potential severity, the screening of asymptomatic malaria with sensitive techniques such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) is also advisable. Serological screening for Chagas disease should be performed on all Latin American immigrants, except for people from the Caribbean islands. Other important parasites, which should be excluded, are filariasis and urinary schistosomiasis, by using microscopic examination. The aim of this paper is to review the different techniques for the screening of parasitic diseases and its advices within the care protocols for asymptomatic immigrants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Imaging of macrophage-related lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, Katharina; Hansell, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Macrophage-related pulmonary diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by macrophage accumulation, activation or dysfunction. These conditions include smoking-related interstitial lung diseases, metabolic disorders such as Niemann-Pick or Gaucher disease, and rare primary lung tumors. High-resolution computed tomography abnormalities include pulmonary ground-glass opacification secondary to infiltration by macrophages, centrilobular nodules or interlobular septal thickening reflecting peribronchiolar or septal macrophage accumulation, respectively, emphysema caused by macrophage dysfunction, and honeycombing following macrophage-related lung matrix remodeling. (orig.)

  6. Lung Manifestations in the Rheumatic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracy J; Dellaripa, Paul F

    2017-12-01

    Lung ailments in rheumatic diseases present unique challenges for diagnosis and management and are a source of significant morbidity and mortality for patients. Unlike the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, patients with rheumatic diseases experience lung disease in the context of a systemic disease that may make it more difficult to recognize and that may present greater risks with treatment. Despite recent advances in our awareness of these diseases, there is still a significant lack of understanding of natural history to elucidate which patients will have disease that is progressive and thus warrants treatment. What we do know is that a subset of patients with rheumatic disease experience parenchymal lung disease that can prognostically resemble idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, such as in rheumatoid arthritis, and that others can have aggressive inflammatory lung disease in the context of autoimmune myositis, systemic sclerosis, or an undifferentiated autoimmune process. As we enter into a paradigm shift where we view lung health as a cornerstone of our care of patients with rheumatic diseases, we hopefully will improve our ability to identify those patients at highest risk for pulmonary disease and progression, and offer emerging treatments which will result in better outcomes and a better quality of life. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. One world health: socioeconomic burden and parasitic disease control priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgerson, Paul R

    2013-08-01

    Parasitic diseases present a considerable socio-economic impact to society. Zoonotic parasites can result in a considerable burden of disease in people and substantive economic losses to livestock populations. Ameliorating the effects of these diseases may consist of attempts at eradicating specific diseases at a global level, eliminating them at a national or local level or controlling them to minimise incidence. Alternatively with some parasitic zoonoses it may only be possible to treat human and animal cases as they arise. The choice of approach will be determined by the potential effectiveness of a disease control programme, its cost and the cost effectiveness or cost benefit of undertaking the intervention. Furthermore human disease burden is being increasingly measured by egalitarian non-financial measures which are difficult to apply to livestock. This adds additional challenges to the assessment of socio-economic burdens of zoonotic diseases. Using examples from the group of neglected zoonotic diseases, information regarding the socio-economic effects is reviewed together with how this information is used in decision making with regard to disease control and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can make it hard to breathe. Certain vaccinepreventable diseases can also increase swelling of your airways and lungs. The combination of the two can lead to pneumonia and other serious respiratory illnesses. Vaccines are one of the safest ways ...

  9. What Are Asbestos-Related Lung Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... asbestosis include: Fibrotic lung disease Pneumoconiosis (NOO-mo-ko-ne-O-sis) Interstitial (in-ter-STISH-al) ... tissue samples. One way is through bronchoscopy (bron-KOS-ko-pee). For this procedure, your doctor will ...

  10. Aeroparticles, composition and lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Ivan Falcon-Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urban air pollution is a serious worldwide problem due to its impact on human health. In the past sixty years, growing evidence established a correlation between exposure to air pollutants and the developing of severe respiratory diseases. Recently Particulate matter (PM is drawing more public attention to various aspects including historical backgrounds, physicochemical characteristics and its pathological role. Therefore, this review is focused on these aspects. The most famous air pollution disaster happened in London on December 1952; it has been calculated that more than 4000 deaths occurred during this event. Air pollution is a complex mix of gases and particles. Gaseous pollutants disseminate deeply into the alveoli, allowing its diffusion through the blood-air barrier to several organs. Meanwhile, PM is a mix of solid or liquid particles suspended in the air. PM is deposited at different levels of the respiratory tract, depending on its size: Coarse particles (PM10 in upper airways and fine particles (PM2.5 can be accumulated in the lung parenchyma, inducing several respiratory diseases. Additionally to size, the composition of particulate matter has been associated with different toxicological outcomes on clinical, epidemiological, as well as in vivo and in vitro animal and human studies. PM can be constituted by organic, inorganic and biological compounds. All these compounds are capable of modifying several biological activities including alterations in cytokine production, coagulation factors balance, pulmonary function, respiratory symptoms, and cardiac function. It can also generate different modifications during its passage through the airways, like inflammatory cells recruitment, with the release of cytokines and reactive oxygen species (ROS. These inflammatory mediators can activate different pathways such as MAP-kinases, NF-B, and stat-1, or induce DNA adducts. All these alterations can mediate obstructive or restrictive

  11. Vaccines for viral and parasitic diseases produced with baculovirus vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The baculovirus¿insect cell expression system is an approved system for the production of viral antigens with vaccine potential for humans and animals and has been used for production of subunit vaccines against parasitic diseases as well. Many candidate subunit vaccines have been expressed in this

  12. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marten, K.

    2007-01-01

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis

  13. Radioaerosol lung imaging in small airways disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, T; Dorow, P; Felix, R

    1981-06-01

    Aerosol inhalation lung imaging was performed in 35 asymptomatic smokers who have been selected on the basis of abnormal findings in small airways pulmonary function tests. Qualitative (image inspection) and quantitative (aerosol distribution index = ADI) analysis of the radioaerosol lung patterns was accomplished. Compared to healthy subjects as well as to patients with chronic obstructive lung disease significant differences of mean aerosol distribution homogeneity were observed. A characteristic type of abnormal aerosol pattern, indicating peripheral airways obstruction, was found in 71% of the patients with small airways disease.

  14. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  15. Criticality of Parasitic Disease Transmission in a Diffusive Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Minhua; Zhang Duanming; Yin Yanping; Chen Zhiyuan; Pan Guijun

    2008-01-01

    Through using the methods of finite-size effect and short time dynamic scaling, we study the critical behavior of parasitic disease spreading process in a diffusive population mediated by a static vector environment. Through comprehensive analysis of parasitic disease spreading we find that this model presents a dynamical phase transition from disease-free state to endemic state with a finite population density. We determine the critical population density, above which the system reaches an epidemic spreading stationary state. We also perform a scaling analysis to determine the order parameter and critical relaxation exponents. The results show that the model does not belong to the usual directed percolation universality class and is compatible with the class of directed percolation with diffusive and conserved fields

  16. [Modern Views on Children's Interstitial Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boĭtsova, E V; Beliashova, M A; Ovsiannikov, D Iu

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILD, diffuse lung diseases) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a pathological process primarily involved alveoli and perialveolar interstitium, resulting in impaired gas exchange, restrictive changes of lung ventilation function and diffuse interstitial changes detectable by X-ray. Children's interstitial lung diseases is an topical problem ofpediatricpulmonoogy. The article presents current information about classification, epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostics, treatment and prognosis of these rare diseases. The article describes the differences in the structure, pathogenesis, detection of various histological changes in children's ILD compared with adult patients with ILD. Authors cite an instance of registers pediatric patients with ILD. The clinical semiotics of ILD, the possible results of objective research, the frequency of symptoms, the features of medical history, the changes detected on chest X-rays, CT semiotics described in detail. Particular attention was paid to interstitial lung diseases, occurring mainly in newborns and children during the first two years of life, such as congenital deficiencies of surfactant proteins, neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia of infancy, pulmonary interstitial glycogenosis. The diagnostic program for children's ILD, therapy options are presented in this article.

  17. Black lung: the social production of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B E

    1981-01-01

    The black lung movement that erupted in West Virginia in 1968 was not simply a struggle for recognition of an occupational disease; it grew into a bitter controversy over who would control the definition of that disease. This article examines the historical background and medical politics of that controversy, arguing that black lung was socially produced and defined on several different levels. As a medical construct, the changing definitions of this disease can be traced to major shifts in the political economy of the coal industry. As an occupational disease, the history of black lung is internally related to the history of the workplace in which it is produced. As the object of a mass movement, black lung acquired a political definition that grew out of the collective experience of miners and their families. The definition of disease with which black lung activists challenged the medical establishment has historical roots and justification; their experience suggests that other health advocates may need to redefine the diseases they hope to eradicate.

  18. 25 CFR 700.723 - Control of livestock disease and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control of livestock disease and parasites. 700.723... RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.723 Control of livestock disease and parasites. Whenever livestock within the New Lands become infected with contagious or infectious disease or parasites or have...

  19. Chronic interstitial lung disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Griese

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Children's interstitial lung diseases (chILD are increasingly recognised and contain many lung developmental and genetic disorders not yet identified in adult pneumology. Worldwide, several registers have been established. The Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD has identified problems in estimating rare disease prevalence; focusing on chILD in immunocompetent patients, a period prevalence of 1.5 cases per million children and a mortality rate of 7% were determined. The chILD-EU register highlighted the workload to be covered per patient included and provided protocols for diagnosis and initial treatment, similar to the United States chILD network. Whereas case reports may be useful for young physicians to practise writing articles, cohorts of patients can catapult progress, as demonstrated by recent studies on persistent tachypnoea of infancy, hypersensitivity pneumonitis in children and interstitial lung disease related to interferonopathies from mutations in transmembrane protein 173. Translational research has linked heterozygous mutations in the ABCA3 transporter to an increased risk of interstitial lung diseases, not only in neonates, but also in older children and adults. For surfactant dysfunction disorders in infancy and early childhood, lung transplantation was reported to be as successful as in adult patients. Mutual potentiation of paediatric and adult pneumologists is mandatory in this rapidly extending field for successful future development. This brief review highlights publications in the field of paediatric interstitial lung disease as reviewed during the Clinical Year in Review session presented at the 2017 European Respiratory Society (ERS Annual Congress in Milan, Italy. It was commissioned by the ERS and critically presents progress made as well as drawbacks.

  20. Fatal interstitial lung disease associated with icotinib

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiexia; Zhan, Yangqing; Ouyang, Ming; Qin, Yinyin; Zhou, Chengzhi; Chen, Rongchang

    2014-01-01

    The most serious, and maybe fatal, yet rare, adverse reaction of gefitinib and erlotinib is drug-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), which has been often described. However, it has been less well described for icotinib, a similar orally small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The case of a 25-year-old female patient with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who developed fatal ILD is reported here. She denied chemotherapy, and received palliative treatment with icotinib (125 mg po, th...

  1. Lung transplantation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liou TG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theodore G Liou, Sanjeev M Raman, Barbara C CahillDivision of Respiratory, Critical Care and Occupational Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USAAbstract: Patients with end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD comprise the largest single lung disease group undergoing transplantation. Selection of appropriate candidates requires consideration of specific clinical characteristics, prognosis in the absence of transplantation, and likely outcome of transplantation. Increased availability of alternatives to transplantation for end-stage patients and the many efforts to increase the supply of donor organs have complicated decision making for selecting transplant candidates. Many years of technical and clinical refinements in lung transplantation methods have improved survival and quality of life outcomes. Further advances will probably come from improved selection methods for the procedure. Because no prospective trial has been performed, and because of confounding and informative censoring bias inherent in the transplant selection process in studies of the existing experience, the survival effect of lung transplant in COPD patients remains undefined. There is a lack of conclusive data on the impact of lung transplantation on quality of life. For some patients with end-stage COPD, lung transplantation remains the only option for further treatment with a hope of improved survival and quality of life. A prospective trial of lung transplantation is needed to provide better guidance concerning survival benefit, resource utilization, and quality of life effects for patients with COPD.Keywords: outcomes, emphysema, COPD, alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency, survival, single lung transplant, bilateral sequential single lung transplant, lung volume reduction, referral, guidelines, health related quality of life

  2. Diagnosis of Parasitic Diseases: Old and New Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momar Ndao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methods for the diagnosis of infectious diseases have stagnated in the last 20–30 years. Few major advances in clinical diagnostic testing have been made since the introduction of PCR, although new technologies are being investigated. Many tests that form the backbone of the “modern” microbiology laboratory are based on very old and labour-intensive technologies such as microscopy for malaria. Pressing needs include more rapid tests without sacrificing sensitivity, value-added tests, and point-of-care tests for both high- and low-resource settings. In recent years, research has been focused on alternative methods to improve the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. These include immunoassays, molecular-based approaches, and proteomics using mass spectrometry platforms technology. This review summarizes the progress in new approaches in parasite diagnosis and discusses some of the merits and disadvantages of these tests.

  3. Parasitic Disease in the U.S. Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-21

    Myiass, phthirus, other arthropod, hirudiniasis, other and unspecified. t Ascariasis, strongyloidiasis, trichuriasis, enterobiasis, other nematodes ...combined, laris, is harbored in the fox-vole predator-prey community in Northern latitudes of the United States (14). The duty sta- Results lion of...categories showed frequencies of para- ing those which are most frequent. Two common parasitic sitic disease which were higher than expected (Table 4). Sea

  4. [Lung transplantation in pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berastegui, Cristina; Monforte, Victor; Bravo, Carlos; Sole, Joan; Gavalda, Joan; Tenório, Luis; Villar, Ana; Rochera, M Isabel; Canela, Mercè; Morell, Ferran; Roman, Antonio

    2014-09-15

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is the second indication for lung transplantation (LT) after emphysema. The aim of this study is to review the results of LT for ILD in Hospital Vall d'Hebron (Barcelona, Spain). We retrospectively studied 150 patients, 87 (58%) men, mean age 48 (r: 20-67) years between August 1990 and January 2010. One hundred and four (69%) were single lung transplants (SLT) and 46 (31%) bilateral-lung transplants (BLT). The postoperative diagnoses were: 94 (63%) usual interstitial pneumonia, 23 (15%) nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, 11 (7%) unclassifiable interstitial pneumonia and 15% miscellaneous. We describe the functional results, complications and survival. The actuarial survival was 87, 70 and 53% at one, 3 and 5 years respectively. The most frequent causes of death included early graft dysfunction and development of chronic rejection in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans (BOS). The mean postoperative increase in forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) was similar in SLT and BLT. The best FEV1 was reached after 10 (r: 1-36) months. Sixteen percent of patients returned to work. At some point during the evolution, proven acute rejection was diagnosed histologically in 53 (35%) patients. The prevalence of BOS among survivors was 20% per year, 45% at 3 years and 63% at 5 years. LT is the best treatment option currently available for ILD, in which medical treatment has failed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice, E-mail: btrotmandickenson@partners.org

    2014-01-15

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended.

  6. Cystic lung disease: Achieving a radiologic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotman-Dickenson, Beatrice

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse cystic lung disease represents a diverse group of uncommon disorders with characteristic appearance on high resolution CT imaging. The combination of imaging appearance with clinical features and genetic testing where appropriate permits a confident and accurate diagnosis in the majority of the diseases without recourse for open lung biopsy. The mechanism of cyst development disease is unclear but in some disorders appears to be related to small airways obstruction. These diseases are incurable, with the exception of Langerhans cell histiocytosis which may spontaneously remit or resolve on smoking cessation. Disease progression is unpredictable; in general older patients have a more benign disease, while young patients may progress rapidly to respiratory failure. An understanding of the complications of cystic lung disease and the appearance of disease progression is essential for the management of these patients. A number of these disorders are associated with malignancy, recognition of the potential tumors permits appropriate imaging surveillance. Due to the widespread use of CT, pulmonary cysts are increasingly discovered incidentally in an asymptomatic individual. The diagnostic challenge is to determine whether these cysts represent an early feature of a progressive disease or have no clinical significance. In the elderly population the cysts are unlikely to represent a progressive disease. In individuals <50 years further evaluation is recommended

  7. Lung Surfactant and Its Use in Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rosenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review considers the present views of lung surfactant (LS functions with emphasis on its protective and barrier properties and ability to maintain local and adaptive immunity. The composition of commercial LS formulations is analyzed. Data on qualitative and quantitative LS abnormalities are presented in various diseases in neonates and adults. The results of clinical trials of different LS formulations in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome in adults are analyzed in detail. Recent data on the results of and prospects for surfactant therapy for bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary tuberculosis are given. 

  8. Lung involvement in systemic connective tissue diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavec Goran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Systemic connective tissue diseases (SCTD are chronic inflammatory autoimmune disorders of unknown cause that can involve different organs and systems. Their course and prognosis are different. All of them can, more or less, involve the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to find out the frequency of respiratory symptoms, lung function disorders, radiography and high-resolution computerized tomography (HRCT abnormalities, and their correlation with the duration of the disease and the applied treatment. Methods. In 47 non-randomized consecutive patients standard chest radiography, HRCT, and lung function tests were done. Results. Hypoxemia was present in nine of the patients with respiratory symptoms (20%. In all of them chest radiography was normal. In five of these patients lung fibrosis was established using HRCT. Half of all the patients with SCTD had symptoms of lung involvement. Lung function tests disorders of various degrees were found in 40% of the patients. The outcome and the degree of lung function disorders were neither in correlation with the duration of SCTD nor with therapy used (p > 0.05 Spearmans Ro. Conclusion. Pulmonary fibrosis occurs in about 10% of the patients with SCTD, and possibly not due to the applied treatment regimens. Hypoxemia could be a sing of existing pulmonary fibrosis in the absence of disorders on standard chest radiography.

  9. 25 CFR 168.15 - Control of livestock diseases and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Control of livestock diseases and parasites. 168.15... REGULATIONS FOR THE HOPI PARTITIONED LANDS AREA § 168.15 Control of livestock diseases and parasites. Whenever... parasites or have been exposed thereto, such livestock must be treated and the movement thereof restricted...

  10. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  11. Stem cell treatment for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Ntolios, Paschalis; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a considerable human, societal and financial burden. In view of the current disappointing status of available pharmaceutical agents, there is an urgent need for alternative more effective therapeutic approaches that will not only help to relieve patient symptoms but will also affect the natural course of the respective disease. Regenerative medicine represents a promising option with several fruitful therapeutic applications in patients suffering from chronic lung diseases. Nevertheless, despite relative enthusiasm arising from experimental data, application of stem cell therapy in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by several safety concerns arising from the major lack of knowledge on the fate of exogenously administered stem cells within chronically injured lung as well as the mechanisms regulating the activation of resident progenitor cells. On the other hand, salient data arising from few 'brave' pilot investigations of the safety of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases seem promising. The main scope of this review article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the application status of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases, address important safety and efficacy issues and present future challenges and perspectives. In this review, we argue in favor of large multicenter clinical trials setting realistic goals to assess treatment efficacy. We propose the use of biomarkers that reflect clinically inconspicuous alterations of the disease molecular phenotype before rigid conclusions can be safely drawn. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Vascular injury in lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, A D; Wyatt, J H; Barry, J M; Undery, D

    1975-10-01

    Inhaled particulates which stimulate a 'delayed', cellular mode of alveolar clearance are excreted to the airways through lymphoid foci in the bronchial bifurcations. The anatomic relations and developing pathology of the tissues adjacent to these foci, including the divisions of accompanying arteries, were studied by serial sectioning and photomicrographic modelling of rat lungs. The changes are typical of classic 'delayed' inflammatory reactions and, in the rat, the fully developed stage is characterised by fibrinoid necrosis involving all three layers of the arterial wall in a linear lesion across the leading edge of the flow divider. An hypothesis was developed to relate the injury to pulsatile forces. Recent published findings indicate that similarly placed lesions, with species-specific changes in development, are universal in both cerebral and extra-cranial arterial forks of man and animals. Possible associations of the microvascular changes with human atherosclerosis and their further significance in pulmonary and systemic effects arising from industrial and environmental contaminants are explored.

  13. Vascular injury in lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, A.D.; Wyatt, J.H.; Barry, J.M.; Undery, Dawn.

    1975-10-01

    Inhaled particulates which stimulate a 'delayed', cellular mode of alveolar clearance are excreted to the airways through lymphoid foci in the bronchial bifurcations. The anatomic relations and developing pathology of the tissues adjacent to these foci, including the divisions of accompanying arteries, were studied by serial sectioning and photomicrographic modelling of rat lungs. The changes are typical of classic 'delayed' inflammatory reactions and, in the rat, the fully developed stage is characterised by fibrinoid necrosis involving all three layers of the arterial wall in a linear lesion across the leading edge of the flow divider. An hypothesis was developed to relate the injury to pulsatile forces. Recent published findings indicate that similarly placed lesions, with species-specific changes in development, are universal in both cerebral and extra-cranial arterial forks of man and animals. Possible associations of the microvascular changes with human atherosclerosis and their further significance in pulmonary and systemic effects arising from industrial and environmental contaminants are explored. (author)

  14. Quantitative stratification of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushravya Raghunath

    Full Text Available Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients.

  15. Quantitative Stratification of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Maldonado, Fabien; Peikert, Tobias; Moua, Teng; Ryu, Jay H.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) are characterized by widespread pathological changes within the pulmonary tissue that impair the elasticity and gas exchange properties of the lungs. Clinical-radiological diagnosis of these diseases remains challenging and their clinical course is characterized by variable disease progression. These challenges have hindered the introduction of robust objective biomarkers for patient-specific prediction based on specific phenotypes in clinical practice for patients with DPLD. Therefore, strategies facilitating individualized clinical management, staging and identification of specific phenotypes linked to clinical disease outcomes or therapeutic responses are urgently needed. A classification schema consistently reflecting the radiological, clinical (lung function and clinical outcomes) and pathological features of a disease represents a critical need in modern pulmonary medicine. Herein, we report a quantitative stratification paradigm to identify subsets of DPLD patients with characteristic radiologic patterns in an unsupervised manner and demonstrate significant correlation of these self-organized disease groups with clinically accepted surrogate endpoints. The proposed consistent and reproducible technique could potentially transform diagnostic staging, clinical management and prognostication of DPLD patients as well as facilitate patient selection for clinical trials beyond the ability of current radiological tools. In addition, the sequential quantitative stratification of the type and extent of parenchymal process may allow standardized and objective monitoring of disease, early assessment of treatment response and mortality prediction for DPLD patients. PMID:24676019

  16. Imaging in occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Kavakama, Jorge Issamu; Rodrigues, Reynaldo Tavares

    2006-01-01

    This chapter consists of a review of the literature regarding radiographic and tomographic characteristics of the principal occupational respiratory diseases (silicosis and asbestosis). Special attention is given to the practical relevance of high-resolution computed tomography, which is the most sensitive and specific method of identifying and quantifying the extent of pleural and parenchymal lesions related to such diseases. (author)

  17. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions of heart disease and lung disease on radionuclide tests of lung anatomy and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, R.N. Jr.; Barrett, C.R. Jr.; Yamashina, A.; Friedman, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    This paper considers the effects of heat diseases on lung anatomy, lung function, and pulmonary nuclear test procedures, and also the effects of lung diseases on cardiac function, with particular reference to radionuclide tests. Historically, pulmonary nuclear medicine has been focused on discovering and quantifying pulmonary embolism, but the potential of nuclear tracer techniques to carry out high-precision, regional, quantitative measurements of blood flow, air flow, and membrane transport promises a much more powerful and wide-ranging diagnostic application than the search for pulmonary emboli. The authors therefore define normal anatomy and function in a framework suitable to develop the relationships between cardiac and pulmonary function, with particular attention to regional differences in lung function, since regional measurements provide a special province for radionuclide lung studies

  19. THE INCIDENCE OF PARASITIC DISEASES IN LIVESTOCK IN BALI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Suratma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The population of livestock in Bali has continuously increased from year to year. However, some problems are encountered with parasitic infections in livestock. Parasitic infections may be caused by worms, protozoa or ectoparasites. In cattle, the most common infections are those caused by Oesophagostomum sp, Ostertagia sp, Haemonchus sp, Mecistocirrus sp, and Cooperia sp which is the most dominant. Neoascaris vitulorum was reported to be as high as 29.1% in calves. Fascioliasis in cattle was found highly prevalent, between 34.9 to 56.7% and was caused by Fasciola gigantica. Also Paramphistomum infection was reported to be highly prevalent (50.1%. In addition, Boophilus microplus was recorded as high as 36.9%. In goat and sheep, the incidence of Haemonchus contortus was 27.7% and 53.6% respectively. Infestation of Paramphistomum sp in goat was 9.27%. Concerning ectoparasites, Sarcoptes scabiei was reported to be the cause of death of 67% of young goats and up to 11% of older gats in Br. Penginuman, Gilimanuk Negara. Parasitic infections in pigs were caused by Cysticercus tenuicollis (11% and Ascaris suum (24.2% and 21.1% showed Metastrongylus apri and also Sarcoptes scabiei was reported to be the cause of skin disease in pigs. In poultry, parasitic infection were caused by Raillietina (96%, Heterakis gallinae (66.7%, Capillaria sp (6.6%, Ascardia galli (56.7%, Oxyspirura mansoni (50%, Acuaria spiralis (13.3% and Syngamus trachea (3.3%. Multiple infections are common.

  20. [Establishment of response system to emergency parasitic disease affairs in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Li, C; Le-Ping, S; Qing-Biao, H; Bian-Li, X U; Bo, Z; Jian-Bing, L; Dan-Dan, L; Shi-Zhu, L I; Oning, X; Xiao-Nong, Z

    2017-08-14

    China's prevention and control of parasitic diseases has made remarkable achievements. However, the prevalence and transmission of parasitic diseases is impacted by the complicated natural and social factors of environment, natural disasters, population movements, and so on. Therefore, there are still the risks of the outbreak of emergency parasitic diseases affairs, which may affect the control effectiveness of parasitic diseases and endanger the social stability seriously. In this article, we aim at the analysis of typical cases of emergency parasitic disease affairs and their impacts on public health security in China in recently years, and we also elaborate the disposal characteristics of emergency parasitic disease affairs, and propose the establishment of response system to emergency parasitic disease affairs in China, including the organizational structure and response flow path, and in addition, point out that, in the future, we should strengthen the system construction and measures of the response system to emergency parasitic disease affairs, so as to control the risk and harm of parasitic disease spread as much as possible and to realize the early intervention and proper disposal of emergency parasitic disease affairs.

  1. Protein misfolding and obstructive lung disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has evolved a number of mechanisms to manage the accumulation of incorrectly folded proteins. This results in loss of function of these proteins, but occasionally, in conditions such as α-1 antitrpysin (A1AT) deficiency, the misfolded protein can acquire a toxic gain of function promoting exaggerated ER stress responses and inflammation. Mutations leading to deficiency in a second serine proteinase inhibitor, α-1 antichymotrpysin (ACT), can induce potentially similar consequences. A1AT and ACT deficiencies are associated with chronic obstructive lung disease. Until recently, it was thought that the lung diseases associated with these conditions were entirely due to loss of antiprotease protection in the lung (i.e., loss of function), whereas gain of function was the major cause of the liver disease associated with A1AT deficiency. This paradigm is being increasingly challenged because ER stress is being recognized in bronchial epithelial cells and inflammatory cells normally resident in the lung, giving rise to an inflammatory phenotype that adds to the proteolytic burden associated with these conditions. In this article, we describe the cellular mechanisms that are activated to cope with an increasing burden of misfolded proteins within the ER in A1AT and ACT deficiency, show how these events are linked to inflammation, and outline the therapeutic strategies that can potentially interfere with production of misfolded proteins.

  2. Host behaviour–parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, Elizabeth A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Hawley, Dana M.; Martin, Lynn B.; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour–disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour–parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour–parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  3. Host behaviour-parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Archie, Elizabeth A; Craft, Meggan E; Hawley, Dana M; Martin, Lynn B; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-04-13

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour-disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour-parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour-parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Interstitial Lung disease in Systemic Sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ooi, G.C.; Mok, M.Y.; Tsang, K.W.T.; Khong, P.L.; Fung, P.C.W.; Chan, S.; Tse, H.F.; Wong, R.W.S.; Lam, W.K.; Lau, C.S.; Wong, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate high-resolution CT (HRCT) parameters of inflammation and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), for correlation with lung function, skin scores and exercise tolerance. Material and Methods: : 45 SSc patients (40 women, 48.5±13.4 years), underwent thoracic HRCT, lung function assessment, and modified Rodnan skin scores. Exercise tolerance was also graded. HRCT were scored for extent of 4 HRCT patterns of interstitial lung disease (ILD): ground glass opacification (GGO), reticular, mixed and honeycomb pattern in each lobe. Total HRCT score, inflammation index (GGO and mixed score) and fibrosis index (reticular and honeycomb scores) were correlated with lung function and clinical parameters. Results: ILD was present in 39/45 (86.7%) patients. Abnormal (<80% predicted) forced vital capacity (FVC), total lung capacity (TLC) and carbon monoxide diffusion factor (DLco) were detected in 30%, 22% and 46% of patients. Total HRCT score correlated with FVC (r=0.43, p=0.008), FEV1 (forced expiratory volume) (r=-0.37, p=0.03), TLC (r=-0.47, p=0.003), and DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008); inflammatory index with DLCO (r=-0.43, p=0.008) and exercise tolerance (r=-0.39, p < 0.05); and fibrosis index with FVC (r=-0.31, p=0.05) and TLC (r=-0.38, p=0.02). Higher total HRCT score, and inflammation and fibrosis indices were found in patients with abnormal lung function. Conclusion: Qualitative HRCT is able to evaluate inflammation and fibrosis, showing important relationships with diffusion capacity and lung volume, respectively

  5. Major parasitic diseases of poverty in mainland China: perspectives for better control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Li, Ting-Ting; Huang, Si-Yang; Cong, Wei; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-08-01

    Significant progress has been made in the prevention, control, and elimination of human parasitic diseases in China in the past 60 years. However, parasitic diseases of poverty remain major causes of morbidity and mortality, and inflict enormous economic costs on societies.In this article, we review the prevalence rates, geographical distributions, epidemic characteristics, risk factors, and clinical manifestations of parasitic diseases of poverty listed in the first issue of the journal Infectious Diseases of Poverty on 25 October 2012. We also address the challenges facing control of parasitic diseases of poverty and provide suggestions for better control.

  6. [Lung Cancer as an Occupational Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, X; Woitowitz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently encountered cancer types. According to the latest WHO data, about 10 % of this disease are due to occupational exposure to cancerogens. Asbestos is still the number one carcinogen. Further frequent causes include quarz and ionizing radiation (uranium mining). Probable causes of the disease can be identified only with the help of detailed occupational history taken by a medical specialist and qualified exposure assessment. Without clarifying the cause of the disease, there is neither a correct insurance procedure nor compensation for the victim, and furthermore, required preventive measures cannot be initiated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. The lung microbiome in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William Ocm

    2017-12-01

    The Human Microbiome Project began 10 years ago, leading to a significant growth in understanding of the role the human microbiome plays in health and disease. In this article, we explain with an emphasis on the lung, the origins of microbiome research. We discuss how 16S rRNA gene sequencing became the first major molecular tool to examine the bacterial communities present within the human body. We highlight the pitfalls of molecular-based studies, such as false findings resulting from contamination, and the limitations of 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Knowledge about the lung microbiome has evolved from initial scepticism to the realisation that it might have a significant influence on many illnesses. We also discuss the lung microbiome in the context of disease by giving examples of important respiratory conditions. In addition, we draw attention to the challenges for metagenomic studies of respiratory samples and the importance of systematic bacterial isolation to enable host-microbiome interactions to be understood. We conclude by discussing how knowledge of the lung microbiome impacts current clinical diagnostics. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  8. Lung perfusion scintigraphy in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimura, Hiroshi; Nagamachi, Shigeki; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Oonishi, Takashi; Futami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1990-01-01

    Lung perfusion scintigrams were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients with congenital heart disease, whose ages ranged from the first year to 16 years with an average age of 5 years and 6 months. Seventy four MBq (2 mCi), 111 MBq (2 mCi), and 185 MBq (5 mCi) of Tc-99m macroaggregated albumin were iv injected in the age groups of 0-3, 4-11, and more than 11 years, respectively. Five minutes later, images were obtained in six projections. Abnormal findings on lung perfusion scintigrams were observed in 13 patients (46%). Of these patients, 8 (29%) had a partially decreased blood flow and 5 (17%) had a decreased blood flow in the unilateral lung. No significant difference in the occurrence of abnormal findings was observed among the age groups, although they tended to occur in younger patients. Sex, underlying conditions, and hemodynamics were also independent of scintigraphically abnormal findings. Even when classifying the patients as having either cyanotic or non-cyanotic heart disease, no significant difference in hemodynamics was observed between the group of abnormal findings and the group of normal findings. Pulmonary arteriography available in all patients failed to reveal abnormal findings, with the exception of pulmonary artery stenosis in 2 patients that corresponded to a decreased blood flow in the unilateral lung. Pulmonary artery stenosis seemed to be responsible for abnormal pulmonary blood flow, although other causes remained uncertain. (N.K.)

  9. Interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, Yimy F; Restrepo, Jose Felix; Iglesias, Antonio; Ojeda, Paulina; Matiz, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    An interstitial lung disease (ILD) belongs to a group of diffuse parenchyma lung diseases it should be differentiated from other pathologies among those are idiopathic and ILD associated to connective tissue diseases (CTD) New concepts have been developed in the last years and they have been classified in seven defined subgroups. It has been described the association of each one of these subgroups with CTD. Natural history and other aspects of its treatment is not known completely .For complete diagnose it is required clinical, image and histopathologic approaches. The biopsy lung plays an essential role. It is important to promote and to stimulate the subclasification of each subgroup with the purpose of knowing their natural history directing the treatment and to improve their outcome

  10. SLPI and inflammatory lung disease in females.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKiernan, Paul J

    2012-02-01

    During the course of certain inflammatory lung diseases, SLPI (secretory leucoprotease inhibitor) plays a number of important roles. As a serine antiprotease it functions to protect the airways from proteolytic damage due to neutrophil and other immune cell-derived serine proteases. With respect to infection it has known antimicrobial and anti-viral properties that are likely to contribute to host defence. Another of its properties is the ability to control inflammation within the lung where it can interfere with the transcriptional induction of pro-inflammatory gene expression induced by NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB). Thus, factors that regulate the expression of SLPI in the airways can impact on disease severity and outcome. Gender represents once such idiosyncratic factor. In females with CF (cystic fibrosis), it is now thought that circulating oestrogen contributes, in part, to the observed gender gap whereby females have worse disease and poorer prognosis than males. Conversely, in asthma, sufferers who are females have more frequent exacerbations at times of low-circulating oestrogen. In the present paper, we discuss how SLPI participates in these events and speculate on whether regulatory mechanisms such as post-transcriptional modulation by miRNAs (microRNAs) are important in the control of SLPI expression in inflammatory lung disease.

  11. 'Biomass lung': primitive biomass combustion and lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baris, Y. I.; Seyfikli, Z.; Demir, A.; Hoskins, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Domestic burning of biomass fuel is one of the most important risk factors for the development of respiratory diseases and infant mortality. The fuel which causes the highest level of disease is dung. In the rural areas of developing countries some 80% of households rely on biomass fuels for cooking and often heating as well and so suffer high indoor air pollution. Even when the fire or stove is outside the home those near it are still exposed to the smoke. In areas where the winters are long and cold the problem is aggravated since the fire or stove is indoors for many months of the year. The consequence of biomass burning is a level of morbidity in those exposed to the smoke as well as mortality. The rural areas of Turkey are among many in the world where biomass is the major fuel source. In this case report 8 patients from rural areas, particularly Anatolia, who used biomass are presented. Many of these are non-smoking, female patients who have respiratory complaints and a clinical picture of the chronic lung diseases which would have been expected if they had been heavy smokers. Typically patients cook on the traditional 'tandir' stove using dung and crop residues as the fuel. Ventilation systems are poor and they are exposed to a high level of smoke pollution leading to cough and dyspnoea. Anthracosis is a common outcome of this level of exposure and several of the patients developed lung tumours. The findings from clinical examination of 8 of these patients (2 M, 6 F) are presented together with their outcome where known. (author)

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, M A; Karolewska-Bochenek, K; Dembiński, Ł; Gawronska, A; Krenke, K; Lange, J; Banasiuk, M; Kuchar, E; Kulus, M; Albrecht, P; Banaszkiewicz, A

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is common in adult patients with interstitial lung disease. However, no data currently exist regarding the prevalence and characteristics of the disease in pediatric patients with interstitial lung disease. The aim of the present study was to prospectively assess the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and characterize its features in children with interstitial lung disease. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was established based on 24 h pH-impedance monitoring (MII-pH). Gastroesophageal reflux episodes (GERs) were classified according to widely recognized criteria as acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. Eighteen consecutive patients (15 boys, aged 0.2-11.6 years) were enrolled in the study. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in a half (9/18) of children. A thousand GERs were detected by MII-pH (median 53.5; IQR 39.0-75.5). Of these, 585 (58.5 %) episodes were acidic, 407 (40.7 %) were weakly acidic, and eight (0.8 %) were weakly alkaline. There were 637 (63.7 %) proximal GERs. The patients in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed had a significantly higher number of proximal and total GERs. We conclude that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with interstitial lung disease is high; thus, the disease should be considered regardless of presenting clinical symptoms. A high frequency of non-acid and proximal GERs makes the MII-pH method a preferable choice for the detection of reflux episodes in this patient population.

  13. New mechanisms of disease and parasite-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Tiago Alves Jorge; de Carli, Gabriel Jose; Pereira, Tiago Campos

    2016-09-01

    An unconventional interaction between a patient and parasites was recently reported, in which parasitic cells invaded host's tissues, establishing several tumors. This finding raises various intriguing hypotheses on unpredicted forms of interplay between a patient and infecting parasites. Here we present four unusual hypothetical host-parasite scenarios with intriguing medical consequences. Relatively simple experimental designs are described in order to evaluate such hypotheses. The first one refers to the possibility of metabolic disorders in parasites intoxicating the host. The second one is on possibility of patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) being more resistant to parasites (due to accumulation of toxic compounds in the bloodstream). The third one refers to a mirrored scenario: development of tumors in parasites due to ingestion of host's circulating cancer cells. The last one describes a complex relationship between parasites accumulating a metabolite and supplying it to a patient with an IEM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lili; He, Zhengxiang; Qin, Li; Li, Qinyan; Shi, Xibao; Zhao, Siting; Chen, Ling; Zhong, Nanshan; Chen, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC) model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL) staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+) T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria parasite may provide a novel strategy or therapeutic vaccine vector for anti-lung cancer

  15. Antitumor effect of malaria parasite infection in a murine Lewis lung cancer model through induction of innate and adaptive immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the most common malignancy in humans and its high fatality means that no effective treatment is available. Developing new therapeutic strategies for lung cancer is urgently needed. Malaria has been reported to stimulate host immune responses, which are believed to be efficacious for combating some clinical cancers. This study is aimed to provide evidence that malaria parasite infection is therapeutic for lung cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Antitumor effect of malaria infection was examined in both subcutaneously and intravenously implanted murine Lewis lung cancer (LLC model. The results showed that malaria infection inhibited LLC growth and metastasis and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Histological analysis of tumors from mice infected with malaria revealed that angiogenesis was inhibited, which correlated with increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated (TUNEL staining and decreased Ki-67 expression in tumors. Through natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity activity, cytokine assays, enzyme-linked immunospot assay, lymphocyte proliferation, and flow cytometry, we demonstrated that malaria infection provided anti-tumor effects by inducing both a potent anti-tumor innate immune response, including the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α and the activation of NK cells as well as adaptive anti-tumor immunity with increasing tumor-specific T-cell proliferation and cytolytic activity of CD8(+ T cells. Notably, tumor-bearing mice infected with the parasite developed long-lasting and effective tumor-specific immunity. Consequently, we found that malaria parasite infection could enhance the immune response of lung cancer DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1-hMUC1 and the combination produced a synergistic antitumor effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria infection significantly suppresses LLC growth via induction of innate and adaptive antitumor responses in a mouse model. These data suggest that the malaria

  16. Inflammatory/granulomatous diseases of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivancevic, V.; Munz, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    The term 'inflammatory' and 'granulomatous' lung disease represents a pool of many etiologically different diseases, the pathologic mechanisms of which are characterized by inflammatory reactions of varying intensity and cell composition. In sarcoidosis and other granulomatous diseases as well as in lung fibroses, gallium scintigraphy allows reliable non-invasive estimation of alveolitis activity and is suitable for therapy monitoring. Granulomatous diseases seem to be detectable sensitively by means of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy as well. It is yet uncertain, whether positron emission tomography with F-18 fluordeoxyglucose will play a role in quantitative assessment of disease activity in sarcoidosis. Gallium scintigraphy is very useful in the early detection of pulmonary complications in AIDS patients. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which is important in this patient population, can also be detected by both Tc-99m and In-111 labelled polyclonal human immunoglobulin, and in future possibly with a monoclonal antibody fragment against Pneumocystis carinii as well. The significance of primary bacterial pneumonias has decreased and nuclear medicine procedures for diagnosing inflammation are needed only exceptionally in this indication. (orig.) [de

  17. Lung inhalation scintigraphy with radioactive aerosols in several pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, L.R.; Marioni Filho, H.; Romaldini, H.; Uehara, C.; Alonso, G.

    1983-01-01

    The pulmonary ventilation scintigraphy with 99m Tc diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) delivered through a new nebulizer system when analyzed together with the classic lung perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-labeled albumin macroaggregates (99mTcMAA) is a very important diagnostic tool in several pulmonary diseases. Several aspects of the lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy are studied in 15 people with no lung disease, smokers and nonsmokers. The findings with the lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy are also discussed in 34 patients with several pulmonary diseases: lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, policystic pulmonary disease, and pulmonary embolims. The authors concluded that the procedure is a valuable diagnostic tool in several pulmonary diseases, especially because good lung images are obtained, no side effects were detected, the technique is ease and low cost, and it brings new informations, not available with other diagnostic methods. (author)

  18. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. ... loss to improve pulmonary mechanics and compliance, thereby reducing the work of breathing. ... of obtaining similar functional advantages to surgical lung volume reduction, ...

  19. Interstital lung disease in ANCA vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Marco A; Flores-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Henderson, Ashley G; Xiao, Hong; Hu, Peiqi; Nachman, Patrick H; Falk, Ronald J; Charles Jennette, J

    2017-07-01

    Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) vasculitides are immune-mediated disorders that primarily affect small blood vessels of the airway and kidneys. Lung involvement, one of the hallmarks of microscopic polyangiitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In recent years, several retrospective series and case reports have described the association of interstitial lung disease (ILD) and ANCA vasculitis, particularly those positive for ANCA specific for myeloperoxidase. In the majority of these patients pulmonary fibrosis occurs concurrently or predates the diagnosis of ANCA vasculitis. More importantly, these studies have shown that ILD has an adverse impact on the long-term prognosis of ANCA vasculitis. This review focuses on the main clinical and radiologic features of pulmonary fibrosis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Major histopathology features, prognosis and therapeutic options are summarized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Lung scan alterations in congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, R; Sanchez, J; Munoz, A; Lanaro, A E; Pico, A M

    1975-04-01

    This report analyzes the patterns in 54 lung scannings of 34 patients with altered pulmonary blood flow due to congenital heart disease. The technique and the results are presented. According to the images obtained, the patients are classified in three groups: Group I--normal distribution with more concentration of particles over the right lung and the bases. Group II--normal scannings found in left to right shunts unless there is pulmonary venous hypertension in which case the apex-base relationship was inverted. Group III--patients with right to left shunts of different types presenting various patterns according to severity, associated anomalies and palliative surgery. The hemodynamics created by cardiac defects and surgical procedures explain these alterations. This method is recommended in view of its advantages and accurate results.

  1. Hazy increased density in diffuse lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.S.; Webb, W.R.; Gamsu, G.; Warnock, M.; Park, C.K.

    1989-01-01

    In order to determine the significance of ground glass density on high-resolution CT scans of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other lung disorders, the authors have reviewed 200 high-resolution CT studies and found 50 cases demonstrating areas of hazy increased lung density. Disease entities most often associated with this finding included DIP, UIP, alveolar proteinosis, sarcoidosis, and bronchiolitis obliterans/ organizing pneumonia. Pathologic examination revealed either cellular or fluid material lining terminal air spaces, often associated with alveolar wall infiltration and an absence of fibrosis. Gallium scans and bronchoalveolar lavage in some cases showed active inflammation Follow-up high-resolution CT studies in 10 patients showed either change or resolution of the hazy densities, confirming the presence of a reversible parenchymal lesion

  2. Inflammation and angiogenesis in fibrotic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael P; Strieter, Robert M; Lynch, Joseph P; Belperio, John A

    2006-12-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis is poorly understood. Although inflammation has been presumed to have an important role in the development of fibrosis this has been questioned recently, particularly with regard to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). It is, however, increasingly recognized that the polarization of the inflammatory response toward a type 2 phenotype supports fibroproliferation. Increased attention has been on the role of noninflammatory structural cells such as the fibroblast, myofibroblast, epithelial cell, and endothelial cells. Furthermore, the origin of these cells appears to be multifactorial and includes resident cells, bone marrow-derived cells, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Increasing evidence supports the presence of vascular remodeling in fibrotic lung disease, although the precise role in the pathogenesis of fibrosis remains to be determined. Therefore, the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis is complex and involves the interaction of multiple cell types and compartments within the lung.

  3. Fatal interstitial lung disease associated with icotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiexia; Zhan, Yangqing; Ouyang, Ming; Qin, Yinyin; Zhou, Chengzhi; Chen, Rongchang

    2014-12-01

    The most serious, and maybe fatal, yet rare, adverse reaction of gefitinib and erlotinib is drug-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), which has been often described. However, it has been less well described for icotinib, a similar orally small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). The case of a 25-year-old female patient with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who developed fatal ILD is reported here. She denied chemotherapy, and received palliative treatment with icotinib (125 mg po, three times daily) on March 1, 2013. One month after treatment initiation, the patient complained of continuous dry cough and rapid progressive dyspnea. Forty one days after icotinib treatment, icotinib associated ILD was suspected when the patient became increasingly dyspnoeic despite of treatment of pericardial effusion, left pleural effusion and lower respiratory tract infection, and X-ray computed tomography (CT) of chest revealed multiple effusion shadows and ground-glass opacities in bilateral lungs. Then, icotinib was discontinued and intravenous corticosteroid was started (methylprednisolone 40 mg once daily, about 1 mg per kilogram) respectively. Forty three days after icotinib treatment, the patient died of hypoxic respiratory failure. ILD should be considered as a rare, but often fatal side effect associated with icotinib treatment.

  4. Spontaneous pneumothorax in diffuse cystic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Joseph; Lee, Yun Chor Gary; Gupta, Nishant

    2017-07-01

    Diffuse cystic lung diseases (DCLDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders with varying pathophysiologic mechanisms that are characterized by the presence of air-filled lung cysts. These cysts are prone to rupture, leading to the development of recurrent spontaneous pneumothoraces. In this article, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, and management DCLD-associated spontaneous pneumothorax, with a focus on lymphangioleiomyomatosis, Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis. DCLDs are responsible for approximately 10% of apparent primary spontaneous pneumothoraces. Computed tomography screening for DCLDs (Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome, lymphangioleiomyomatosis, and pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis) following the first spontaneous pneumothorax has recently been shown to be cost-effective and can help facilitate early diagnosis of the underlying disorders. Patients with DCLD-associated spontaneous pneumothorax have a very high rate of recurrence, and thus pleurodesis should be considered following the first episode of spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients, rather than waiting for a recurrent episode. Prior pleurodesis is not a contraindication to future lung transplant. Although DCLDs are uncommon, spontaneous pneumothorax is often the sentinel event that provides an opportunity for diagnosis. By understanding the burden and implications of pneumothoraces in DCLDs, clinicians can facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate management of the underlying disorders.

  5. Fascioliasis: a worldwide parasitic disease of importance in travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Keyhan; Bargues, M Dolores; O'Neill, Sandra; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Fascioliasis is a foodborne zoonotic disease caused by the two parasite species Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica. This trematodiasis has never been claimed special relevance for travellers and migrants. However, the situation has drastically changed in the last two decades, in a way that fascioliasis should today be included in the list of diseases to be enhanced in Travel Medicine. Different kind of travellers have been involved in human infection reports: business travellers, tourists, migrants, expatriated workers, military personnel, religious missionaries, and refugees. Europe is the continent where more imported cases have been reported in many countries. More cases would have been probably reported in Europe if fascioliasis would be a reportable disease. In the Americas, most of the reports concern cases diagnosed in USA. Relative few patients have been diagnosed in studies on travellers performed in Asia. In Africa, most cases were reported in Maghreb countries. Blood eosinophilia and the ingestion of watercress or any other suggestive freshwater plant in anamnesis are extremely useful in guiding towards a fascioliasis diagnosis in a developed country, although may not be so in human endemic areas of developing countries. Several suggestive clinical presentation aspects may be useful, although the clinical polymorphism may be misleading in many cases. Non-invasive techniques are helpful for the diagnosis, although images may lead to confusion. Laparoscopic visualization should assist and facilitate procurement of an accurately guided biopsy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) is the first choice in patients in the chronic phase. ERCP and sphincterotomy are used to extract parasites from the biliary tree. Fluke egg finding continues to be the gold standard and enables for burden quantification and establishing of the drug dose. Many serological and stool antigen detection tests have been developed. Immunological techniques present

  6. The Impact of Cultural Behaviours, Local Beliefs, and Practices on Emerging Parasitic Diseases in Tropical Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuliri, Celestine O. E.; Anosike, Jude C.; Oguoma, Chibuzor; Onwuliri, Viola A.; Nwoke, Betram E. B.; Dozie, Ikechukwu, N. S.; Iwuala, Moses O. E.

    2005-01-01

    The scourge of emerging parasitic diseases (e.g., urinary schistosomiasis, ascariasis, malaria, chagas disease, leishmaniasis, trachoma, trichiuriasis, taeniasis, dracunculiasis, sleeping sickness, filariasis) causes tremendous pain, suffering, and eventually death in tropical African communities. Patterns of transmission of these emerging…

  7. Advanced sickle cell associated interstitial lung disease presenting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported abnormal pulmonary function and pulmonary hypertension among Nigerians with sickle cell disease, but there is no report of interstitial lung disease among them. We report a Nigerian sickle cell patient who presented with computed tomography proven interstitial lung disease complicated by ...

  8. Association between periodontitis and lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Rito Macedo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the association between periodontal disease and lung disease from an epidemiological, case and control survey, in patients who attended the first aid service of the Adriano Jorge Foundation Hospital, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, from June 2006 to February 2007. Methods: The sample consisted of 140 patients, among whom community-acquired pneumonia was present in 60% (n = 70, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in 40% (case-group; and 70 patients without respiratory disease (control group, ranging between 19 and 69 years of ages, with a mean age of 41.3, and standard deviation of 13.6 years. The clinical parameters for evaluating periodontal changes were obtained by means of pocket depth, bleeding on probing, plaque index and clinical attachment loss. Results: Both groups showed no significant difference in any of the control variables (p>0.05. The groups showed significant difference only in the plaque index (p 0.05. Due to the increase in the bacterial plaque index in the oral cavity of patients with respiratory diseases, further studies should be conducted to verify what the relationship between the two diseases is.

  9. Classical patterns of interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Mang, C.

    2014-01-01

    High resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is the most important non-invasive tool in the diagnostics and follow-up of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). A systematic review of the HRCT patterns of ILD was carried out and the most relevant differential diagnoses are discussed in order to provide a road map for the general radiologist to successfully navigate the complex field of ILD. Using HRCT four basic patterns of ILD can be identified: linear and reticular patterns, the nodular pattern, the high attenuation and low attenuation patterns. These patterns can be further differentiated according to their localization within the secondary pulmonary lobule (SPL), e.g. centrilobular or perilymphatic and their distribution within the lungs (e.g. upper or lower lobe predominance). Relevant clinical data, such as smoking history and course of the disease provide useful additional information in the diagnosis of ILD. On the basis of the pattern and anatomical distribution on HRCT, an accurate diagnosis can be achieved in some cases of ILD; however, due to morphological and clinical overlap the final diagnosis of many ILDs requires close cooperation between clinicians, radiologists and pathologists. (orig.) [de

  10. The butterfly effect: parasite diversity, environment, and emerging disease in aquatic wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlard, Robert D; Miller, Terrence L; Smit, Nico J

    2015-04-01

    Aquatic wildlife is increasingly subjected to emerging diseases often due to perturbations of the existing dynamic balance between hosts and their parasites. Accelerating changes in environmental factors, together with anthropogenic translocation of hosts and parasites, act synergistically to produce hard-to-predict disease outcomes in freshwater and marine systems. These outcomes are further complicated by the intimate links between diseases in wildlife and diseases in humans and domestic animals. Here, we explore the interactions of parasites in aquatic wildlife in terms of their biodiversity, their response to environmental change, their emerging diseases, and the contribution of humans and domestic animals to parasitic disease outcomes. This work highlights the clear need for interdisciplinary approaches to ameliorate disease impacts in aquatic wildlife systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of radiations and radioisotopes for investigating problems connected with parasitic diseases of animals in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewari, H.C.; Singh, K.S.

    1979-01-01

    The status of the present knowledge regarding the use of isotopes and radiations for studies of animal parasitic diseases in India is reviewed. The concepts in immunology of metazoan parasites with relevance to vaccination have been discussed. A brief review of radiation attenuated vaccines against certain economically important species of helminth parasites and the use of radioisotopes for pathophysiological investigations and for the study of anthelmintic activity is given. (auth.)

  12. [Current situation of human resources of parasitic disease control and prevention organizations in Henan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya-Lan, Zhang; Yan-Kun, Zhu; Wei-Qi, Chen; Yan, Deng; Peng, Li

    2018-01-10

    To understand the current status of human resources of parasitic disease control and prevention organizations in Henan Province, so as to provide the reference for promoting the integrative ability of the prevention and control of parasitic diseases in Henan Province. The questionnaires were designed and the method of census was adopted. The information, such as the amounts, majors, education background, technical titles, working years, and turnover in each parasitic disease control and prevention organization was collected by the centers for disease control and prevention (CDCs) at all levels. The data were descriptively analyzed. Totally 179 CDCs were investigated, in which only 19.0% (34/179) had the independent parasitic diseases control institution (department) . There were only 258 full-time staffs working on parasitic disease control and prevention in the whole province, in which only 61.9% (159/258) were health professionals. Those with junior college degree or below in the health professionals accounted for 60.3% (96/159) . Most of them (42.1%) had over 20 years of experience, but 57.9% (92/159) of their technical post titles were at primary level or below. The proportion of the health professionals is low in the parasitic disease control and prevention organizations in Henan Province. The human resource construction for parasitic disease control and prevention at all levels should be strengthened.

  13. Impacts of parasite infection on columnaris disease of tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is no information available on whether parasite infection will increase the susceptibility of tilapia to Flavobacterium columnare and whether parasite treatment could improve fish survival after F. columnare exposure. Two trials were conducted to evaluate 1) the susceptibility of hybrid tilapi...

  14. Malfolded protein structure and proteostasis in lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, William E; Sznajder, Jacob I; Budinger, Scott; Finley, Daniel; Laposky, Aaron D; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Benjamin, Ivor J; Barreiro, Esther; Morimoto, Richard I; Postow, Lisa; Weissman, Allan M; Gail, Dorothy; Banks-Schlegel, Susan; Croxton, Thomas; Gan, Weiniu

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that disorders of protein folding and degradation play a particularly important role in the development of lung diseases and their associated complications. The overarching purpose of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute workshop on "Malformed Protein Structure and Proteostasis in Lung Diseases" was to identify mechanistic and clinical research opportunities indicated by these recent discoveries in proteostasis science that will advance our molecular understanding of lung pathobiology and facilitate the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for the prevention and treatment of lung disease. The workshop's discussion focused on identifying gaps in scientific knowledge with respect to proteostasis and lung disease, discussing new research advances and opportunities in protein folding science, and highlighting novel technologies with potential therapeutic applications for diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Parasite-Derived Proteins for the Treatment of Allergies and Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Wu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The morbidity associated with atopic diseases and immune dysregulation disorders such as asthma, food allergies, multiple sclerosis, atopic dermatitis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease has been increasing all around the world over the past few decades. Although the roles of non-biological environmental factors and genetic factors in the etiopathology have been particularly emphasized, they do not fully explain the increase; for example, genetic factors in a population change very gradually. Epidemiological investigation has revealed that the increase also parallels a decrease in infectious diseases, especially parasitic infections. Thus, the reduced prevalence of parasitic infections may be another important reason for immune dysregulation. Parasites have co-evolved with the human immune system for a long time. Some parasite-derived immune-evasion molecules have been verified to reduce the incidence and harmfulness of atopic diseases in humans by modulating the immune response. More importantly, some parasite-derived products have been shown to inhibit the progression of inflammatory diseases and consequently alleviate their symptoms. Thus, parasites, and especially their products, may have potential applications in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this review, the potential of parasite-derived products and their analogs for use in the treatment of atopic diseases and immune dysregulation is summarized.

  16. Taeniasis and Cysticercosis as A Zoonotic Parasitic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwitri Endah Estuningsih

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Taeniasis is a parasitic disease caused by tapeworms from the genus Taenia, and infection with the larvae form of Taenia is called Cysticercosis. Some species of Taenia are zoonotic, and humans serve as the definitive host, the intermediate host or both. Humans are the definitive hosts for Taenia solium, T. saginata and T. asiatica, however, humans also act as an intermediate host for T. solium and T. asiatica. Animals, such as pigs, are the intermediate host for T. solium and T. asiatica, and cattle are the intermediate host for T. saginata. Humans can be infected by taeniasis when they eat beef or pork that contains larvae (cysticercus. While, cysticercosis is transmitted via food or water contaminated with the eggs of Taenia spp. The transmission may also occur by autoinfection due to lack of hygiene. The diagnosis of taeniasis based on finding the eggs or proglotid in the human feces. For diagnosing cysticercosis in live animals can be done by tongue palpation to find the presence of cysts or nodules. Serological test may also help for diagnosing cysticercosis in humans or animals. Adult tapeworms in the intestine can be killed by anthelmintic and prevention of taeniasis can be conducted by avoiding raw or undercooked pork (T. solium and T. asiatica and beef (T. saginata. Besides that, to prevent the infection of T. solium, T. saginata or T. asiatica, pigs or cattle should not be exposed to human feces.

  17. Hard metal lung disease: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Rafael Futoshi; Terra-Filho, Mário; Lima, Evelise; Freitas, Carolina Salim Gonçalves; Chate, Rodrigo Caruso; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Santos, Ubiratan Paula

    2016-01-01

    To describe diagnostic and treatment aspects of hard metal lung disease (HMLD) and to review the current literature on the topic. This was a retrospective study based on the medical records of patients treated at the Occupational Respiratory Diseases Clinic of the Instituto do Coração, in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, between 2010 and 2013. Of 320 patients treated during the study period, 5 (1.56%) were diagnosed with HMLD. All of those 5 patients were male (mean age, 42.0 ± 13.6 years; mean duration of exposure to hard metals, 11.4 ± 8.0 years). Occupational histories were taken, after which the patients underwent clinical evaluation, chest HRCT, pulmonary function tests, bronchoscopy, BAL, and lung biopsy. Restrictive lung disease was found in all subjects. The most common chest HRCT finding was ground glass opacities (in 80%). In 4 patients, BALF revealed multinucleated giant cells. In 3 patients, lung biopsy revealed giant cell interstitial pneumonia. One patient was diagnosed with desquamative interstitial pneumonia associated with cellular bronchiolitis, and another was diagnosed with a hypersensitivity pneumonitis pattern. All patients were withdrawn from exposure and treated with corticosteroid. Clinical improvement occurred in 2 patients, whereas the disease progressed in 3. Although HMLD is a rare entity, it should always be included in the differential diagnosis of respiratory dysfunction in workers with a high occupational risk of exposure to hard metal particles. A relevant history (clinical and occupational) accompanied by chest HRCT and BAL findings suggestive of the disease might be sufficient for the diagnosis. Descrever aspectos relacionados ao diagnóstico e tratamento de pacientes com doença pulmonar por metal duro (DPMD) e realizar uma revisão da literatura. Estudo retrospectivo dos prontuários médicos de pacientes atendidos no Serviço de Doenças Respiratórias Ocupacionais do Instituto do Coração, localizado na cidade de S

  18. The economic impact of diseases and parasitic problems in freshwater fish production

    OpenAIRE

    Okaeme, A.N.; Obiekezie, A.I.; Ogbondeminu, F.S.

    1987-01-01

    Diseases and parasitic problems could constitute significant economic losses in fish production if not controlled, thus the need to continue monitoring its prevalence. Based on field studies on feral and intensively raised fish at the Kainji Lake Research Institute Nigeria, some diseases and parasitic problems have been identified. These include; helminthiasis; fungal disease; protozoa which include Myxosoma sp., Myxobolus spp., Henneguya sp., Trichodina sp., Ichthopthrius sp. bacterial mainl...

  19. How patient positioning affects radiographic signs of canine lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steyn, P.F.; Green, R.W.

    1990-01-01

    A single radiographic projection risks missing signs of lung disease. Four case reports of dogs are given to emphasize inadequate visualization with just one or two radiographs. It is advisable to take both right and left lateral views along with a dorsoventral view in a patient, that might have lung disease

  20. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed

  1. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: histopathological and imaging perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, S.R.; Ryan, S.M.; Colby, T.V

    2003-04-01

    The present review focuses on the interstitial lung diseases related to smoking. Thus, the pathology and radiology of Langerhans cell histiocytosis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis and respiratory bronchiolitis-associated-interstitial lung disease are considered. The more tenuous association between pulmonary fibrosis and smoking is also discussed.

  2. Prevalence of aspergillosis in chronic lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty eight patients of chronic lung diseases (CLD attending TB and Chest department of J.N. Medical college Hospital were studied to find out the prevalence of Aspergillus in Broncho-alveolar Lavage (BAL and anti- aspergillus antibodies in their sera. Direct microscopy and fungal culture of BAL was done. Antibodies were studied by immunodiffusion (ID and Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Dot blot assay for anti-aspergillus antibodies was also performed in sera of patients which were either positive by ID or by ELISA. Aspergillus was isolated in culture from 13(14.7% cases of CLD, while, 30.6% cases showed anti-aspergillus antibodies by serological methods. Aspergillus fumigatus was the predominant species isolated. 17(19.3% cases of CLD showed antibody against Aspergillus by ID, 22(25% by ELISA, while 19 of 27 seropositive cases also showed positive results by Dot Blot assay. In cases of bronchogenic carcinoma and pulmonary tuberculosis, anti-aspergillus antibodies were detected equally by ID and ELISA in 21.42% and 21.05% cases respectively. In bronchial asthma, the antibodies could be detected in 60% cases by ELISA, while, in only 10% cases by ID. ELISA was found more sensitive than ID for detection of anti-aspergillus antibodies. The sensitivity of Dot Blot lies some what between ID and ELISA. It is concluded that prevalence of Aspergillosis is quite high in chronic lung diseases, culture and serological test should be performed in conjunction and more than one type of serological tests should be performed to establish the diagnosis.

  3. Bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Kropski

    Full Text Available Although in some cases clinical and radiographic features may be sufficient to establish a diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD, surgical lung biopsy is frequently required. Recently a new technique for bronchoscopic lung biopsy has been developed using flexible cryo-probes. In this study we describe our clinical experience using bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for diagnosis of diffuse lung disease.A retrospective study of subjects who had undergone bronchoscopic cryobiopsy for evaluation of DPLD at an academic tertiary care center from January 1, 2012 through January 15, 2013 was performed. The procedure was performed using a flexible bronchoscope to acquire biopsies of lung parenchyma. H&E stained biopsies were reviewed by an expert lung pathologist.Twenty-five eligible subjects were identified. With a mean area of 64.2 mm(2, cryobiopsies were larger than that typically encountered with traditional transbronchial forceps biopsy. In 19 of the 25 subjects, a specific diagnosis was obtained. In one additional subject, biopsies demonstrating normal parenchyma were felt sufficient to exclude diffuse lung disease as a cause of dyspnea. The overall diagnostic yield of bronchoscopic cryobiopsy was 80% (20/25. The most frequent diagnosis was usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP (n = 7. Three of the 25 subjects ultimately required surgical lung biopsy. There were no significant complications.In patients with suspected diffuse parenchymal lung disease, bronchoscopic cryobiopsy is a promising and minimally invasive approach to obtain lung tissue with high diagnostic yield.

  4. Cyclophosphamide for connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Hayley; Holland, Anne E; Westall, Glen P; Goh, Nicole Sl; Glaspole, Ian N

    2018-01-03

    Approximately one-third of individuals with interstitial lung disease (ILD) have associated connective tissue disease (CTD). The connective tissue disorders most commonly associated with ILD include scleroderma/systemic sclerosis (SSc), rheumatoid arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and Sjögren's syndrome. Although many people with CTD-ILD do not develop progressive lung disease, a significant proportion do progress, leading to reduced physical function, decreased quality of life, and death. ILD is now the major cause of death amongst individuals with systemic sclerosis.Cyclophosphamide is a highly potent immunosuppressant that has demonstrated efficacy in inducing and maintaining remission in autoimmune and inflammatory illnesses. However this comes with potential toxicities, including nausea, haemorrhagic cystitis, bladder cancer, bone marrow suppression, increased risk of opportunistic infections, and haematological and solid organ malignancies.Decision-making in the treatment of individuals with CTD-ILD is difficult; the clinician needs to identify those who will develop progressive disease, and to weigh up the balance between a high level of need for therapy in a severely unwell patient population against the potential for adverse effects from highly toxic therapy, for which only relatively limited data on efficacy can be found. Similarly, it is not clear whether histological subtype, disease duration, or disease extent can be used to predict treatment responsiveness. To assess the efficacy and adverse effects of cyclophosphamide in the treatment of individuals with CTD-ILD. We performed searches on CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and Web of Science up to May 2017. We handsearched review articles, clinical trial registries, and reference lists of retrieved articles. We included randomised controlled parallel-group trials that compared cyclophosphamide in any form, used individually or concomitantly with other immunomodulating therapies, versus non

  5. Proceedings: Regenerative Medicine for Lung Diseases: A CIRM Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadyk, Lisa C; DeWitt, Natalie D; Gomperts, Brigitte

    2017-10-01

    The mission of the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) is to accelerate treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. In September 2016, CIRM sponsored a workshop held at the University of California, Los Angeles, to discuss regenerative medicine approaches for treatment of lung diseases and to identify the challenges remaining for advancing such treatments to the clinic and market approval. Workshop participants discussed current preclinical and clinical approaches to regenerative medicine in the lung, as well as the biology of lung stem cells and the role of stem cells in the etiology of various lung diseases. The outcome of this effort was the recognition that whereas transient cell delivery approaches are leading the way in the clinic, recent advances in the understanding of lung stem cell biology, in vitro and in vivo disease modeling, gene editing and replacement methods, and cell engraftment approaches raise the prospect of developing cures for some lung diseases in the foreseeable future. In addition, advances in in vitro modeling using lung organoids and "lung on a chip" technology are setting the stage for high quality small molecule drug screening to develop treatments for lung diseases with complex biology. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1823-1828. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. Pediatric Interstitial Lung Disease Masquerading as Difficult Asthma: Management Dilemmas for Rare Lung Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EY Chan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic nontransplant-related childhood bronchiolitis obliterans is an uncommon disease. Most patients present with chronic recurrent dyspnea, cough and wheezing, which are also features of asthma, by far a much more common condition. The present case study reports on a six-year-old girl who presented to a tertiary care centre with recurrent episodes of respiratory distress on a background of baseline tachypnea, chronic hypoxemia and exertional dyspnea. Her past medical history revealed significant lung disease in infancy, including respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and repaired gastroesophageal reflux. She was treated for 'asthma exacerbations' throughout her early childhood years. Bronchiolitis obliterans was subsequently diagnosed with an open lung biopsy. She did not have sustained improvement with systemic corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine or clarithromycin. Cardiac catheterization confirmed the presence of secondary pulmonary hypertension. Treatment options remain a dilemma for this patient because there is no known effective treatment for this condition, and the natural history is not well understood. The present case demonstrates the need for careful workup in 'atypical asthma', and the urgent need for further research into the rare lung diseases of childhood.

  7. Differential diagnosis of granulomatous lung disease: clues and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Ohshimo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have a wide spectrum of pathologies with variable clinical manifestations and outcomes. Precise clinical evaluation, laboratory testing, pulmonary function testing, radiological imaging including high-resolution computed tomography and often histopathological assessment contribute to make a confident diagnosis of granulomatous lung diseases. Differential diagnosis is challenging, and includes both infectious (mycobacteria and fungi and noninfectious lung diseases (sarcoidosis, necrotising sarcoid granulomatosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, hot tub lung, berylliosis, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, rheumatoid nodules, talc granulomatosis, Langerhans cell histiocytosis and bronchocentric granulomatosis. Bronchoalveolar lavage, endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration, transbronchial cryobiopsy, positron emission tomography and genetic evaluation are potential candidates to improve the diagnostic accuracy for granulomatous lung diseases. As granuloma alone is a nonspecific histopathological finding, the multidisciplinary approach is important for a confident diagnosis.

  8. A preface on advances in diagnostics for infectious and parasitic diseases: detecting parasites of medical and veterinary importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothard, J Russell; Adams, Emily

    2014-12-01

    There are many reasons why detection of parasites of medical and veterinary importance is vital and where novel diagnostic and surveillance tools are required. From a medical perspective alone, these originate from a desire for better clinical management and rational use of medications. Diagnosis can be at the individual-level, at close to patient settings in testing a clinical suspicion or at the community-level, perhaps in front of a computer screen, in classification of endemic areas and devising appropriate control interventions. Thus diagnostics for parasitic diseases has a broad remit as parasites are not only tied with their definitive hosts but also in some cases with their vectors/intermediate hosts. Application of current diagnostic tools and decision algorithms in sustaining control programmes, or in elimination settings, can be problematic and even ill-fitting. For example in resource-limited settings, are current diagnostic tools sufficiently robust for operational use at scale or are they confounded by on-the-ground realities; are the diagnostic algorithms underlying public health interventions always understood and well-received within communities which are targeted for control? Within this Special Issue (SI) covering a variety of diseases and diagnostic settings some answers are forthcoming. An important theme, however, throughout the SI is to acknowledge that cross-talk and continuous feedback between development and application of diagnostic tests is crucial if they are to be used effectively and appropriately.

  9. Fasciolopsiasis: Endemic focus of a neglected parasitic disease in Bihar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Achra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe a newly discovered, previously unreported endemic focus of fasciolopsiasis in the Phulwaria village, under tehsil Sugauli, East Champaran, Bihar. Materials and Methods: A study was conducted at village Phulwaria, following diagnosis of fasciolopsiasis in three children from the village. A total of 120 individuals, including all the children and adults who gave history of recent passage of red fleshy masses in their stool, were included in the study. The cases of fasciolopsiasis were treated with Praziquantel 25 mg/kg, three doses a day. Risk factors for the transmission of the parasite in the village were also studied. Results: Questionnaire revealed majority of the population suffering from abdominal discomfort and passage of red fleshy masses in stool. These fleshy masses were identified as Fasciolopsis buski. One hundred and eighteen individuals were presumably considered as cases of the parasitic infection. After treatment with Praziquantel, all of them passed the parasite in their stool for the next 2-3 days. On investigating, it was observed that all the conditions required for effective continuation of the life cycle of the parasite were present in this village. Conclusion: This study draws attention to a new endemic focus of fasciolopsiasis in Bihar, with a very high prevalence due to poverty, the lack of awareness about the parasite in villagers as well as ignorance among local medical practitioners. There is an urgent need for mass campaign around the region for its effective control.

  10. X-ray analysis in lung leptospira disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shiyong; Peng Shi; He Guoman

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the X-ray signs and subtype of the lung leptospira disease, and improve the undersdand, reduce the error diagnosis of this diseases. Methods: 40 cases of lung leptospira disease were evaluated about the check X-ray sings and clinical data, the check X-ray sings were dynamic observated and typed, and 40 cases had a diagnostic treatment. Results: There were various X-ray changes of lung leptospira disease. in 40 cases, 12 cases (30%) pulmonary marking, 21 cases (52%) little lesions, and 7 cases(18%) lager lesions, respectively. The patients who were correctly diagnosed made a recovery after effective treatment, the patients who were error diagnosed died because of multiple system organ damage. Conclusion: The check X-ray signs in lung leptospira disease have some characteristics. It may play an important role in improving this disease' diagnosis combining the dynamic observation of check X-ray sings with clinical data. (authors)

  11. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Assayag

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is a common inflammatory disease affecting about 1% of the population. Interstitial lung disease is a serious and frequent complication of rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD is characterized by several histopathologic subtypes. This article reviews the proposed pathogenesis and risk factors for RA-ILD. We also outline the important steps involved in the work-up of RA-ILD and review the evidence for treatment and prognosis.

  12. Combined prednisolone and pirfenidone in bleomycin-induced lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preyas J Vaidya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleomycin is a cytostatic drug commonly employed in the treatment of Hodgkin's disease, seminomas, and choriocarcinoma. Bleomycin may induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation that may progress to fibrosis. So far, only corticosteroids have been used in the treatment of bleomycin-induced lung disease with variable results. Pirfenidone is an antifibrotic drug that has been approved for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We report two cases of bleomycin-induced lung disease treated successfully with pirfenidone and oral corticosteroids.

  13. Pulmonary artery hypertension in chronic obstructive lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Mundinger, A.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1989-01-01

    Standard biplane chest X-rays were tested for the validity of morphometric criteria in the diagnosis of pulmonary artery hypertension. Twenty-seven patients suffering from chronic obstructive lung disease were examined and compared with a control group without cardiopulmonary disease. The diameter of the right and left pulmonary artery, pulmonary conus and the hilar-to-thoracic ratio were significantly increased in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (p [de

  14. Extracellular matrix in lung development, homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Horowitz, Jeffrey C; Naba, Alexandra; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Atabai, Kamran; Balestrini, Jenna; Bitterman, Peter B; Corley, Richard A; Ding, Bi-Sen; Engler, Adam J; Hansen, Kirk C; Hagood, James S; Kheradmand, Farrah; Lin, Qing S; Neptune, Enid; Niklason, Laura; Ortiz, Luis A; Parks, William C; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; White, Eric S; Chapman, Harold A; Thannickal, Victor J

    2018-03-08

    The lung's unique extracellular matrix (ECM), while providing structural support for cells, is critical in the regulation of developmental organogenesis, homeostasis and injury-repair responses. The ECM, via biochemical or biomechanical cues, regulates diverse cell functions, fate and phenotype. The composition and function of lung ECM become markedly deranged in pathological tissue remodeling. ECM-based therapeutics and bioengineering approaches represent promising novel strategies for regeneration/repair of the lung and treatment of chronic lung diseases. In this review, we assess the current state of lung ECM biology, including fundamental advances in ECM composition, dynamics, topography, and biomechanics; the role of the ECM in normal and aberrant lung development, adult lung diseases and autoimmunity; and ECM in the regulation of the stem cell niche. We identify opportunities to advance the field of lung ECM biology and provide a set recommendations for research priorities to advance knowledge that would inform novel approaches to the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic lung diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Estimation of pulmonary hypertension in lung and valvular heart diseases by perfusion lung scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Tadashige [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Allied Medical Sciences; Tanaka, Masao; Yazaki, Yoshikazu; Kitabayashi, Hirosi; Koizumi, Tomonori; Kubo, Keisi; Sekiguchi, Morie; Yano, Kesato

    1999-06-01

    To estimate pulmonary hypertension, we measured postural differences in pulmonary blood flow for the lateral decubitus positions on perfusion lung scintigrams with Tc-99 m macro-aggregated albumin, applying the method devised by Tanaka et al (Eur J Nucl Med 17: 320-326, 1990). Utilizing a scintillation camera coupled to a minicomputer system, changes in the distribution of pulmonary blood flow caused by gravitational effects, namely, changes in the total count ratios for the right lung versus the left lung in the right and left lateral decubitus positions (R/L), were obtained for 44 patients with lung disease, 95 patients with valvular heart disease, and 23 normal subjects. Mean standard deviation in the R/L ratios was 3.09{+-}1.28 for the normal subjects, 1.97{+-}0.89 for the patients with lung disease, and 1.59{+-}0.59 for the patients with valvular heart disease. The R/L ratios correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardio-thoracic ratios in the lung disease and valvular heart disease groups, with pulmonary arteriolar resistance in the former, and with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in the latter. Defining pulmonary hypertension (>20 mmHg) as an R/L ratio of less than 1.81, which is the mean-1 standard deviation for normal subjects, the sensitivity and the specificity of the R/L ratio for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension were 62.9% and 76.2%, respectively, for the lung disease patients, and 80.3% and 61.8%, respectively, for the valvular heart disease patients. This method seems to be useful for the pathophysiologic evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in cases of lung disease and valvular heart disease. (author)

  16. Estimation of pulmonary hypertension in lung and valvular heart diseases by perfusion lung scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Tanaka, Masao; Yazaki, Yoshikazu; Kitabayashi, Hirosi; Koizumi, Tomonori; Kubo, Keisi; Sekiguchi, Morie; Yano, Kesato

    1999-01-01

    To estimate pulmonary hypertension, we measured postural differences in pulmonary blood flow for the lateral decubitus positions on perfusion lung scintigrams with Tc-99 m macro-aggregated albumin, applying the method devised by Tanaka et al (Eur J Nucl Med 17: 320-326, 1990). Utilizing a scintillation camera coupled to a minicomputer system, changes in the distribution of pulmonary blood flow caused by gravitational effects, namely, changes in the total count ratios for the right lung versus the left lung in the right and left lateral decubitus positions (R/L), were obtained for 44 patients with lung disease, 95 patients with valvular heart disease, and 23 normal subjects. Mean standard deviation in the R/L ratios was 3.09±1.28 for the normal subjects, 1.97±0.89 for the patients with lung disease, and 1.59±0.59 for the patients with valvular heart disease. The R/L ratios correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure and cardio-thoracic ratios in the lung disease and valvular heart disease groups, with pulmonary arteriolar resistance in the former, and with pulmonary capillary wedge pressure in the latter. Defining pulmonary hypertension (>20 mmHg) as an R/L ratio of less than 1.81, which is the mean-1 standard deviation for normal subjects, the sensitivity and the specificity of the R/L ratio for the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension were 62.9% and 76.2%, respectively, for the lung disease patients, and 80.3% and 61.8%, respectively, for the valvular heart disease patients. This method seems to be useful for the pathophysiologic evaluation of pulmonary perfusion in cases of lung disease and valvular heart disease. (author)

  17. Pulmonary hypertension associated with lung diseases and hypoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttica, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension that develops in the setting of underlying lung diseases such as COPD or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is associated with decreased functional status, worsening hypoxemia and quality of life, and increased mortality. This complication of lung disease is complex in its origin and carries a unique set of diagnostic and therapeutic issues. This review attempts to provide an overview of mechanisms associated with the onset of pulmonary hypertension in COPD and IPF, touches on appropriate evaluation, and reviews the state of knowledge on treating pulmonary hypertension related to underlying lung disease.

  18. Application of nuclear techniques in study of host parasite relationship and immunological control of parasite diseases of livestock in India- an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this review article was to make a realistic appraisal of scientific achievements in understanding host parasite relationship and in development of safe effective diagnosis of diseases caused by parasites. The article also enlists future prospects and areas of future study. 99 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Intracerebral abscess: A complication of severe cystic fibrosis lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Mark E; Cockcroft, Donald W; Gjevre, John A

    2008-01-01

    Intracerebral abscess is an uncommon complication of severe cystic fibrosis lung disease. The present report describes a case of fatal multiple intracerebral abscesses in a patient with a severely bronchiectatic, nonfunctioning right lung and chronic low-grade infection. The patient was previously turned down for pneumonectomy. Intracerebral abscess in cystic fibrosis and the potential role of pneumonectomy in the present patient are discussed.

  20. Is Previous Respiratory Disease a Risk Factor for Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denholm, Rachel; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt; Stücker, Isabelle; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Brenner, Darren R.; De Matteis, Sara; Boffetta, Paolo; Guida, Florence; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Siemiatycki, Jack; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Zaridze, David; Field, John K.; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rudnai, Peter; Fabianova, Eleonora; Dumitru, Rodica Stanescu; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Kendzia, Benjamin; Peters, Susan; Behrens, Thomas; Vermeulen, Roel; Brüning, Thomas; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Previous respiratory diseases have been associated with increased risk of lung cancer. Respiratory conditions often co-occur and few studies have investigated multiple conditions simultaneously. Objectives: Investigate lung cancer risk associated with chronic bronchitis, emphysema, tuberculosis, pneumonia, and asthma. Methods: The SYNERGY project pooled information on previous respiratory diseases from 12,739 case subjects and 14,945 control subjects from 7 case–control studies conducted in Europe and Canada. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the relationship between individual diseases adjusting for co-occurring conditions, and patterns of respiratory disease diagnoses and lung cancer. Analyses were stratified by sex, and adjusted for age, center, ever-employed in a high-risk occupation, education, smoking status, cigarette pack-years, and time since quitting smoking. Measurements and Main Results: Chronic bronchitis and emphysema were positively associated with lung cancer, after accounting for other respiratory diseases and smoking (e.g., in men: odds ratio [OR], 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20–1.48 and OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.21–1.87, respectively). A positive relationship was observed between lung cancer and pneumonia diagnosed 2 years or less before lung cancer (OR, 3.31; 95% CI, 2.33–4.70 for men), but not longer. Co-occurrence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema and/or pneumonia had a stronger positive association with lung cancer than chronic bronchitis “only.” Asthma had an inverse association with lung cancer, the association being stronger with an asthma diagnosis 5 years or more before lung cancer compared with shorter. Conclusions: Findings from this large international case–control consortium indicate that after accounting for co-occurring respiratory diseases, chronic bronchitis and emphysema continue to have a positive association with lung cancer. PMID:25054566

  1. Smart Technology in Lung Disease Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Nancy L; Kim, Dong-Yun; Tian, Xin

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of smart technology by investigators and patients to facilitate lung disease clinical trials and make them less costly and more efficient. By "smart technology" we include various electronic media, such as computer databases, the Internet, and mobile devices. We first describe the use of electronic health records for identifying potential subjects and then discuss electronic informed consent. We give several examples of using the Internet and mobile technology in clinical trials. Interventions have been delivered via the World Wide Web or via mobile devices, and both have been used to collect outcome data. We discuss examples of new electronic devices that recently have been introduced to collect health data. While use of smart technology in clinical trials is an exciting development, comparison with similar interventions applied in a conventional manner is still in its infancy. We discuss advantages and disadvantages of using this omnipresent, powerful tool in clinical trials, as well as directions for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The Functioning of Strategic Management in the Control of Endemic Parasitic Diseases in Iran (Case: fascioliasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador Hajimohammadi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Strategic management in the control of endemic parasitic diseases is essential according to their widespread negative consequences. Fascioliasis is one of the most common diseases of this kind in Iran. Preventing and controlling of this disease requires the formulation of a suitable strategic plan with rational goals and main strategies as same as the development, implementing and monitoring of operational programs.

  3. CASE STUDY – HIV AND LUNG DISEASE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-02

    Apr 2, 2011 ... pathology deep to the paraseptal bullae. An intercostal drain tip is seen in the left lateral pleural space. Fig. 2. Axial computed tomography scan on lung windows. Large bilateral paraseptal bullae are demonstrated with residual antero-medial pneumothorax. 37. CASE STUDY – HIV AND LUNG DISEASE ...

  4. Serial perfusion in native lungs in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and other interstitial lung diseases after single lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokai, Akihiko; Handa, Tomohiro; Chen, Fengshi; Tanizawa, Kiminobu; Aoyama, Akihiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Ikezoe, Kohei; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Hirai, Toyohiro; Nagai, Sonoko; Chin, Kazuo; Date, Hiroshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2016-04-01

    Lung perfusions after single lung transplantation (SLT) have not been fully clarified in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). The present study aimed to investigate temporal changes in native lung perfusion and their associated clinical factors in patients with ILD who have undergone SLT. Eleven patients were enrolled. Perfusion scintigraphy was serially performed up to 12 months after SLT. Correlations between the post-operative perfusion ratio in the native lung and clinical parameters, including pre-operative perfusion ratio and computed tomography (CT) volumetric parameters, were evaluated. On average, the perfusion ratio of the native lung was maintained at approximately 30% until 12 months after SLT. However, the ratio declined more significantly in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) than in other ILDs (p = 0.014). The perfusion ratio before SLT was significantly correlated with that at three months after SLT (ρ = 0.64, p = 0.048). The temporal change of the perfusion ratio in the native lung did not correlate with those of the CT parameters. The pre-operative perfusion ratio may predict the post-operative perfusion ratio of the native lung shortly after SLT in ILD. Perfusion of the native lung may decline faster in IPF compared with other ILDs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Evaluation on intervention measures of comprehensive control for parasitic diseases in demonstration plot of Xiangyun County].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Juan, Li; Shao-Rong, Chen; Yan-Hong, Li; Wen, Fang; Chun-Rong, Ke; Li-Bo, Wang

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of comprehensive intervention measures to control and prevent parasitic diseases in the demonstration plot of Xiangyun County, so as to provide the evidence for establishing appropriate measures of parasitic diseases control and prevention. The baseline data of soil-transmitted nematode infections were obtained in 2006. A series of intervention measures, including health education, deworming, drinking water improvement,latrine improvement, and environment reconstruction, were performed for three years and the effect of the comprehensive intervention measures was evaluated by the national expert group in 2009. The awareness rate of parasitic disease knowledge of residents in 2009 (86.96%) was significantly higher than that in 2006 (35.20%) (Chi2 = 122.95, P transmitted nematode infections, the infection rates of Ascaris lumbricoides in both 2006 and 2009 were the highest and the rates were 18.74% and 2.08%, respectively. In the demonstration plots for parasitic diseases control and prevention of Xiangyun County, the effect of the comprehensive intervention measures which take health education as the forerunner and give priority to control source of parasite infection is remarkable. The measures implemented can achieve the purpose to reduce the infection rates of parasites and improve human health.

  6. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    List, A.F.; Doll, D.C.; Greco, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  7. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive and interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte U; Mellemkjær, Søren; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2013-01-01

    , and is considered one of the most frequent types of PH. However, the prevalence of PH among patients with COPD and ILD is not clear. The diagnosis of PH in chronic lung disease is often established by echocardiographic screening, but definitive diagnosis requires right heart catheterization, which...... is not systematically performed in clinical practice. Given the large number of patients with chronic lung disease, biomarkers to preclude or increase suspicion of PH are needed. NT-proBNP may be used as a rule-out test, but biomarkers with a high specificity for PH are still required. It is not known whether specific...... treatment with existent drugs effective in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is beneficial in lung disease related PH. Studies investigating existing PAH drugs in animal models of lung disease related PH have indicated a positive effect, and so have case reports and open label studies. However...

  8. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denzel Woode

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  9. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D’Armiento, Jeanine, E-mail: jmd12@cumc.columbia.edu [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10033 (United States)

    2015-02-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD.

  10. Collagenolytic Matrix Metalloproteinases in Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woode, Denzel; Shiomi, Takayuki; D’Armiento, Jeanine

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer result in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. In addition to the role of environmental smoke exposure in the development of both diseases, recent epidemiological studies suggests a connection between the development of COPD and lung cancer. Furthermore, individuals with concomitant COPD and cancer have a poor prognosis when compared with individuals with lung cancer alone. The modulation of molecular pathways activated during emphysema likely lead to an increased susceptibility to lung tumor growth and metastasis. This review summarizes what is known in the literature examining the molecular pathways affecting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in this process as well as external factors such as smoke exposure that have an impact on tumor growth and metastasis. Increased expression of MMPs provides a unifying link between lung cancer and COPD

  11. A CURIOUS CASE OF FEVER AND INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Shahid Mahdi; Dr. Darpanarayan Hazra; Dr. Zainab Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    Antisynthetase syndrome is a rare chronic autoimmune inflammatory myopathy with fever, interstitial lung disease, Raynaud’s phenomenon and polyarthritis. The exact underlying cause of antisynthetase syndrome is not yet known. Diagnosis is made with presence of Jo-1 (Histydyl t RNA synthase) antigen in a patient with underlying interstitial lung disease, myositis, arthritis, Raynaud’s phenomenon and mechanic’s hand. Some of the other antisynthetase anti bodies are PL-7 (antigen – threonyl-tRNA...

  12. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases; Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen bei Rauchern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marten, K. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinikum rechts der Isar, Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    2007-03-15

    The most important smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (ILD) are respiratory bronchiolitis, respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and Langerhans' cell histiocytosis. Although traditionally considered to be discrete entities, smoking-related ILDs often coexist, thus accounting for the sometimes complex patterns encountered on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative role of smoking in the development of pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. World Health Organization Estimates of the Global and Regional Disease Burden of 11 Foodborne Parasitic Diseases, 2010 : A Data Synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torgerson, Paul R; Devleesschauwer, Brecht; Praet, Nicolas; Speybroeck, Niko; Willingham, Arve Lee; Kasuga, Fumiko; Rokni, Mohammad B; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Fèvre, Eric M; Sripa, Banchob; Gargouri, Neyla; Fürst, Thomas; Budke, Christine M; Carabin, Hélène; Kirk, Martyn D; Angulo, Frederick J; Havelaar, Arie; de Silva, Nilanthi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Foodborne diseases are globally important, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Parasitic diseases often result in high burdens of disease in low and middle income countries and are frequently transmitted to humans via contaminated food. This study presents the first

  14. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis: a complex lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riario Sforza, Gian Galeazzo; Marinou, Androula

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), also called extrinsic allergic alveolitis, is a respiratory syndrome involving the lung parenchyma and specifically the alveoli, terminal bronchioli, and alveolar interstitium, due to a delayed allergic reaction. Such reaction is secondary to a repeated and prolonged inhalation of different types of organic dusts or other substances to which the patient is sensitized and hyper responsive, primarily consisting of organic dusts of animal or vegetable origin, more rarely from chemicals. The prevalence of HP is difficult to evaluate because of uncertainties in detection and misdiagnosis and lacking of widely accepted diagnostic criteria, and varies considerably depending on disease definition, diagnostic methods, exposure modalities, geographical conditions, agricultural and industrial practices, and host risk factors. HP can be caused by multiple agents that are present in work places and in the home, such as microbes, animal and plant proteins, organic and inorganic chemicals. The number of environment, settings and causative agents is increasing over time. From the clinical point of view HP can be divided in acute/subacute and chronic, depending on the intensity and frequency of exposure to causative antigens. The mainstay in managing HP is the avoidance of the causative antigen, though the complete removal is not always possible due to the difficulties to identify the agent or because its avoidance may lead to major changes in life style or occupational settings. HP is a complex syndrome that needs urgently for more stringent and selective diagnostic criteria and validation, including wider panels of IgG, and a closer collaboration with occupational physicians, as part of a multidisciplinary expertise.

  15. Parasitic diseases of camels in Iran (1931–2017 – a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazmand Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasitic diseases of camels are major causes of impaired milk and meat production, decreases in performance or even death. Some camel parasites also represent a threat to human health. About 171,500 one-humped camels (Camelus dromedarius and 100–300 two-humped camels (Camelus bactrianus live in Iran. Knowledge of the biodiversity of their parasites is still limited. The present review covers all information about camel parasitic diseases in Iran published as dissertations and in both Iranian and international journals from 1931 to February 2017. Ten genera of Protozoa (Trypanosoma, Eimeria, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, Neospora, Sarcocystis, Besnoitia, Theileria, Babesia and Balantidium, 48 helminth species detected in the digestive system, including three species of Trematoda, four species of Cestoda, and 41 species of Nematoda, as well as helminths from other organs – Echinococcus spp., Dictyocaulus filaria, Thelazia leesei, Dipetalonema evansi and Onchocerca fasciata – have so far been described in Iranian camels. Furthermore, 13 species of hard ticks, mange mites, the myiasis flies Cephalopina titillator and Wohlfahrtia magnifica, and immature stages of the Pentastomida Linguatula serrata have also been reported from camels of Iran. Camel parasitic diseases are a major issue in Iran in terms of economics and public health. The present review offers information for an integrated control programme against economically relevant parasites of camels.

  16. [SWOT Analysis of the National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHU, Hui-hui; ZHOU, Chang-hai; CHEN, Ying-dan; ZANG, Wei; XIAO, Ning; ZHOU, Xiao-nong

    2015-10-01

    The National Survey on Current Status of Major Human Parasitic Diseases in China has been carried out since 2014 under the organization of the National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China. The National Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (NIPD, China CDC) provided technical support and was responsible for quality control in this survey. This study used SWOT method to analyze the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats that were encountered by he NIPD, China CDC during the completion of the survey. Accordingly, working strategies were proposed to facilitate the future field work.

  17. New insights into lung diseases using hyperpolarized gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flors, L; Altes, T A; Mugler, J P; de Lange, E E; Miller, G W; Mata, J F; Ruset, I C; Hersman, F W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperpolarized (HP) gases are a new class of contrast agents that permit to obtain high temporal and spatial resolution magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the lung airspaces. HP gas MRI has become important research tool not only for morphological and functional evaluation of normal pulmonary physiology but also for regional quantification of pathologic changes occurring in several lung diseases. The purpose of this work is to provide an introduction to MRI using HP noble gases, describing both the basic principles of the technique and the new information about lung disease provided by clinical studies with this method. The applications of the technique in normal subjects, smoking related lung disease, asthma, and cystic fibrosis are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Food plant derived disease tolerance and resistance in a natural butterfly-plant-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Lefèvre, Thierry; Li, James; de Castillejo, Carlos Lopez Fernandez; Li, Hui; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2012-11-01

    Organisms can protect themselves against parasite-induced fitness costs through resistance or tolerance. Resistance includes mechanisms that prevent infection or limit parasite growth while tolerance alleviates the fitness costs from parasitism without limiting infection. Although tolerance and resistance affect host-parasite coevolution in fundamentally different ways, tolerance has often been ignored in animal-parasite systems. Where it has been studied, tolerance has been assumed to be a genetic mechanism, unaffected by the host environment. Here we studied the effects of host ecology on tolerance and resistance to infection by rearing monarch butterflies on 12 different species of milkweed food plants and infecting them with a naturally occurring protozoan parasite. Our results show that monarch butterflies experience different levels of tolerance to parasitism depending on the species of milkweed that they feed on, with some species providing over twofold greater tolerance than other milkweed species. Resistance was also affected by milkweed species, but there was no relationship between milkweed-conferred resistance and tolerance. Chemical analysis suggests that infected monarchs obtain highest fitness when reared on milkweeds with an intermediate concentration, diversity, and polarity of toxic secondary plant chemicals known as cardenolides. Our results demonstrate that environmental factors-such as interacting species in ecological food webs-are important drivers of disease tolerance. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Occupational Lung Disease: Clinical-Pathological-Radiological Correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto; Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucia; Ojeda Paulina; Paez Garcia, Diana Sofia

    2008-01-01

    People are exposed to hundreds of substances daily, some of which may induce pulmonary injury. Occupational Lung Disease diagnosis requires 4 elements: Exposure to the harmful agent, adequate latency between exposure and beginning of the symptoms, syndrome with post-exposure abnormalities, and exclusion of other conditions which may otherwise explain signs and symptoms. Several occupational lung disease classifications based on structural or functional injury, type of agent, or both have been proposed. Generally, 5 groups are considered: Pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, toxic fumes exposure, asthma, and occupational lung infections. Conventional radiographs and in specific situations, CT, are crucial elements for the diagnosis of Occupational Lung Disease. In the patient with respiratory symptoms and altered imaging studies, the possibility of Occupational Lung Disease should be considered. Radiologist should be familiar the variety of substances that cause these entities and their radiological features. In this article Occupational Lung diseases are reviewed, including diagnostic criteria, classification, physiopathology, clinical and radiological manifestations as well as their corresponding histopathological features.

  20. Flock worker's lung: chronic interstitial lung disease in the nylon flocking industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, D G; Crausman, R S; Durand, K T; Nayer, A; Kuhn, C

    1998-08-15

    Two young men working at a nylon flocking plant in Rhode Island developed interstitial lung disease of unknown cause. Similar clusters at the same company's Canadian plant were reported previously. To define the extent, clinicopathologic features, and potential causes of the apparent disease outbreak. Case-finding survey and retrospective cohort study. Academic occupational medicine program. All workers employed at the Rhode Island plant on or after 15 June 1990. Symptomatic employees had chest radiography, pulmonary function tests, high-resolution computed tomography, and serologic testing. Those with unexplained radiographic or pulmonary function abnormalities underwent bronchoalveolar lavage, lung biopsy, or both. The case definition of "flock worker's lung" required histologic evidence of interstitial lung disease (or lavage evidence of lung inflammation) not explained by another condition. Eight cases of flock worker's lung were identified at the Rhode Island plant. Three cases were characterized by a high proportion of eosinophils (25% to 40%) in lavage fluid. Six of the seven patients who had biopsy had histologic findings of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, and the seventh had bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. All seven of these patients had peribronchovascular interstitial lymphoid nodules, usually with germinal centers, and most had lymphocytic bronchiolitis and interstitial fibrosis. All improved after leaving work. Review of the Canadian tissue specimens showed many similar histologic findings. Among the 165-member study cohort, a 48-fold or greater increase was seen in the sex-adjusted incidence rate of all interstitial lung disease. Work in the nylon flocking industry poses substantial risk for a previously unrecognized occupational interstitial lung disease. Nylon fiber is the suspected cause of this condition.

  1. The airway microbiota in early cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayman, Katherine B; Armstrong, David S; Grimwood, Keith; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2017-11-01

    Infection plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Over the past two decades, the application of molecular and extended culture-based techniques to microbial analysis has changed our understanding of the lungs in both health and disease. CF lung disease is a polymicrobial disorder, with obligate and facultative anaerobes recovered alongside traditional pathogens in varying proportions, with some differences observed to correlate with disease stage. While healthy lungs are not sterile, differences between the lower airway microbiota of individuals with CF and disease-controls are already apparent in childhood. Understanding the evolution of the CF airway microbiota, and its relationship with clinical treatments and outcome at each disease stage, will improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CF lung disease and potentially inform clinical management. This review summarizes current knowledge of the early development of the respiratory microbiota in healthy children and then discusses what is known about the airway microbiota in individuals with CF, including how it evolves over time and where future research priorities lie. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Lung cancer in never smokers: disease characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallis, Athanasios G; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2013-12-01

    It is estimated that approximately 25% of all lung cancer cases are observed in never-smokers and its incidence is expected to increase due to smoking prevention programs. Risk factors for the development of lung cancer described include second-hand smoking, radon exposure, occupational exposure to carcinogens and to cooking oil fumes and indoor coal burning. Other factors reported are infections (HPV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis), hormonal and diatery factors and diabetes mellitus. Having an affected relative also increases the risk for lung cancer while recent studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with increased risk for lung cancer development in never smokers. Distinct clinical, pathology and molecular characteristics are observed in lung cancer in never smokers; more frequently is observed in females and adenocarcinoma is the predominant histology while it has a different pattern of molecular alterations. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of this disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Helminth-induced arginase-1 exacerbates lung inflammation and disease severity in tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monin, Leticia; Griffiths, Kristin L.; Lam, Wing Y.; Gopal, Radha; Kang, Dongwan D.; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Rajamanickam, Anuradha; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Babu, Subash; Kolls, Jay K.; Mitreva, Makedonka; Rosa, Bruce A.; Ramos-Payan, Rosalio; Morrison, Thomas E.; Murray, Peter J.; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Pearce, Edward J.; Khader, Shabaana A.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth worms, such as Schistosoma mansoni, are endemic in regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) among the population. Human studies suggest that helminth coinfections contribute to increased TB susceptibility and increased rates of TB reactivation. Prevailing models suggest that T helper type 2 (Th2) responses induced by helminth infection impair Th1 immune responses and thereby limit Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) control. Using a pulmonary mouse model of Mtb infection, we demonstrated that S. mansoni coinfection or immunization with S. mansoni egg antigens can reversibly impair Mtb-specific T cell responses without affecting macrophage-mediated Mtb control. Instead, S. mansoni infection resulted in accumulation of high arginase-1–expressing macrophages in the lung, which formed type 2 granulomas and exacerbated inflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Treatment of coinfected animals with an antihelminthic improved Mtb-specific Th1 responses and reduced disease severity. In a genetically diverse mouse population infected with Mtb, enhanced arginase-1 activity was associated with increased lung inflammation. Moreover, in patients with pulmonary TB, lung damage correlated with increased serum activity of arginase-1, which was elevated in TB patients coinfected with helminths. Together, our data indicate that helminth coinfection induces arginase-1–expressing type 2 granulomas, thereby increasing inflammation and TB disease severity. These results also provide insight into the mechanisms by which helminth coinfections drive increased susceptibility, disease progression, and severity in TB. PMID:26571397

  4. MRI of interstitial lung diseases. What is possible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Wielpuetz, M.O.; Jobst, B.J.; Dinkel, J.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lungs is becoming increasingly appreciated as a third diagnostic imaging modality besides chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT). Its value is well acknowledged for pediatric patients or for scientific use particularly when radiation exposure should be strictly avoided. However, the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is the biggest challenge of all indications. The objective of this article is a summary of the current state of the art for diagnostic MRI of interstitial lung diseases. This article reflects the results of a current search of the literature and discusses them against the background of the authors own experience with lung MRI. Due to its lower spatial resolution and a higher susceptibility to artefacts MRI does not achieve the sensitivity of CT for the detection of small details for pattern recognition (e.g. fine reticulation and micronodules) but larger details (e.g. coarse fibrosis and honeycombing) can be clearly visualized. Moreover, it could be shown that MRI has the capability to add clinically valuable information on regional lung function (e.g. ventilation, perfusion and mechanical properties) and inflammation with native signal and contrast dynamics. In its present state MRI can be used for comprehensive cardiopulmonary imaging in patients with sarcoidosis or for follow-up of lung fibrosis after initial correlation with CT. Far more indications are expected when the capabilities of MRI for the assessment of regional lung function and activity of inflammation can be transferred into robust protocols for clinical use. (orig.) [de

  5. Speech characteristics of miners with black lung disease (pneumoconiosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H R

    1975-06-01

    Speech samples were obtained from 10 miners with diagnosed black lung disease and 10 nonminers who had never worked in a dusty environment and who had no history of respiratory diseases. Frequency, intensity and durational measures were used as a basis upon which to compare the two groups. Results indicated that four of the six pausal measures, vowel duration, vowel intensity variation and vowel perturbation differentiated the miners from the nonminers. The results indicate that black lung disease may affect not only respiratory physiology associated with speech production but also laryngeal physiology.

  6. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Rowell, Temperance R.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig ...

  7. Survey of diseases and parasites of honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Niweiri, M. A.; El-Sarrag, M. S. A.; Satti, A. A.

    2009-01-01

    A survey of the honeybee diseases and parasites including questionnaires were carried out in eight bee areas in Sudan during the season 2002/03. About 117 local colonies and 324 packages of imported colonies of Apis mellifera were inspected, in addition to 25 colonies of Apis florea. All areas were found to be free of most bacterial brood diseases and fungal diseases, except the bacterial brood disease (Serratia marcescens) which was merely detected in 2.6% of Khartoum colonies. However, non infective dysentery was the only adult disease found during this study infecting 18.2% of Kordofan colonies. On the other hand, the parasitic mite (Varroa jacobsoni) was reported as first record in Sudan, detected only in Khartoum State infecting about 75% of colonies in apiaries and 27% of wild colonies. Sudanese honeybees were found to be characterized by hygienic behaviour of colonies which resist most pests and diseases, and no chemicals were used for control.(Author)

  8. Pattern of interstitial lung disease detected by high resolution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diffuse lung diseases constitute a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is the recommended imaging technique in the diagnosis, assessment and followup of these diseases. Objectives: To describe the pattern of HRCT findings in patients with ...

  9. Assessment of airway lesion in obstructive lung diseases by CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niimi, Akio; Matsumoto, Hisako; Ueda, Tetsuya; Mishima, Michiaki

    2002-01-01

    Airway lesion in obstructive pulmonary diseases, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), has recently been assessed quantitatively. Especially in asthma, wall thickening of central airways, and its relation to the severity of disease or airflow obstruction has been clarified. Pathophysiologic importance of peripheral airway lesion has also been highlighted by pathologic or physiologic studies. However, direct evaluation of peripheral airway lesion is beyond resolutional limitation of CT. To assess airway trapping, an indirect CT finding of peripheral airway disease, by quantitative and semiquantitative measures and compare them with clinical indices such as pulmonary function, airway responsiveness, or airway inflammation. Patients with stable asthma (n=20) were studied. HRCT at 3 levels of both lungs were scanned. Low attenuation area (LAA)% and mean lung density were quantitatively assessed by an automatic method. Distribution of mosaic pattern was visually scored semiquantitatively. LAA% and mean lung density at full expiratory phase correlated with the degree of airflow obstruction. Mosaic score at full inspiratory phase correlated with the severity of disease and airflow obstruction. Expiratory/inspiratory ratio of mean lung density was also associated with airway responsiveness or residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC). These CT findings may be useful as markers of asthma pathophysiology. (author)

  10. Current and new challenges in occupational lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara De Matteis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Occupational lung diseases are an important public health issue and are avoidable through preventive interventions in the workplace. Up-to-date knowledge about changes in exposure to occupational hazards as a result of technological and industrial developments is essential to the design and implementation of efficient and effective workplace preventive measures. New occupational agents with unknown respiratory health effects are constantly introduced to the market and require periodic health surveillance among exposed workers to detect early signs of adverse respiratory effects. In addition, the ageing workforce, many of whom have pre-existing respiratory conditions, poses new challenges in terms of the diagnosis and management of occupational lung diseases. Primary preventive interventions aimed to reduce exposure levels in the workplace remain pivotal for elimination of the occupational lung disease burden. To achieve this goal there is still a clear need for setting standard occupational exposure limits based on transparent evidence-based methodology, in particular for carcinogens and sensitising agents that expose large working populations to risk. The present overview, focused on the occupational lung disease burden in Europe, proposes directions for all parties involved in the prevention of occupational lung disease, from researchers and occupational and respiratory health professionals to workers and employers.

  11. Stem cell therapy: the great promise in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, Dario; Sullo, Nikol; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2008-06-01

    Lung injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease characterized by loss of lung elasticity, small airway tethers, and luminal obstruction with inflammatory mucoid secretions, or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characterized by excessive matrix deposition and destruction of the normal lung architecture, have essentially symptomatic treatments and their management is costly to the health care system.Regeneration of tissue by stem cells from endogenous, exogenous, and even genetically modified cells is a promising novel therapy. The use of adult stem cells to help with lung regeneration and repair could be a newer technology in clinical and regenerative medicine. In fact, different studies have shown that bone marrow progenitor cells contribute to repair and remodeling of lung in animal models of progressive pulmonary hypertension.Therefore, lung stem cell biology may provide novel approaches to therapy and could represent a great promise for the future of molecular medicine. In fact, several diseases can be slowed or even blocked by stem cell transplantation.

  12. Edible vaccines against veterinary parasitic diseases--current status and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Siju S; Cherian, Susan; Sumithra, T G; Raina, O K; Sankar, M

    2013-04-08

    Protection of domestic animals against parasitic infections remains a major challenge in most of the developing countries, especially in the surge of drug resistant strains. In this circumstance vaccination seems to be the sole practical strategy to combat parasites. Most of the presently available live or killed parasitic vaccines possess many disadvantages. Thus, expression of parasitic antigens has seen a continued interest over the past few decades. However, only a limited success was achieved using bacterial, yeast, insect and mammalian expression systems. This is witnessed by an increasing number of reports on transgenic plant expression of previously reported and new antigens. Oral delivery of plant-made vaccines is particularly attractive due to their exceptional advantages. Moreover, the regulatory burden for veterinary vaccines is less compared to human vaccines. This led to an incredible investment in the field of transgenic plant vaccines for veterinary purpose. Plant based vaccine trials have been conducted to combat various significant parasitic diseases such as fasciolosis, schistosomosis, poultry coccidiosis, porcine cycticercosis and ascariosis. Besides, passive immunization by oral delivery of antibodies expressed in transgenic plants against poultry coccidiosis is an innovative strategy. These trials may pave way to the development of promising edible veterinary vaccines in the near future. As the existing data regarding edible parasitic vaccines are scattered, an attempt has been made to assemble the available literature. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Challenge and strategy of prevention and control of important parasitic diseases under the Belt and Road Initiative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Li, Cao; Jia-Gang, Guo

    2018-04-17

    China was once a country with the heaviest burden of parasitic diseases. Under the leadership of the Communist Party and national authority, after more than 60 years' efforts of prevention and control, the remarkable results have been achieved in China. However, affected by the social and economic development and environmental changes, the prevention and control of parasitic diseases, especially imported parasitic diseases, are facing new challenges, and the parasitic diseases, such as malaria, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, filariasis and trypanosomiasis, appear increasingly. With the development of the Belt and Road Initiative, the transmission risks of these diseases are more increased. The purpose of this paper is to describe the experience and results of parasitic disease prevention and control in China, understand the present parasitic disease epidemic situation of the Belt and Road Initiative related countries, analyze the transmission risks of important parasitic diseases, and present some relevant suggestions, so as to provide the evidence for the health administrative department formulating the prevention and control strategies of such parasitic diseases timely and effectively.

  14. CT of chronic infiltrative lung disease: Prevalence of mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Hiroshi; Kang, Eun-Young; Kwong, S. [Univ. of British Columbia and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of mediastinal lymph node enlargement at CT in patients with diffuse infiltrative lung disease. The study was retrospective and included 175 consecutive patients with diffuse infiltrative lung diseases. Diagnoses included idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 61), usual interstitial pneumonia associated with collagen vascular disease (CVD) (n = 20), idiopathic bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) (n = 22), extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) (n = 17), and sarcoidosis (n = 55). Fifty-eight age-matched patients with CT of the chest performed for unrelated conditions served as controls. The presence, number, and sites of enlarged nodes (short axis {ge}10 mm in diameter) were recorded. Enlarged mediastinal nodes were present in 118 of 175 patients (67%) with infiltrative lung disease and 3 of 58 controls (5%) (p < 0.001). The prevalence of enlarged nodes was 84% (46 of 55) in sarcoidosis, 67% (41 of 61) in IPF, 70% (14 of 20) in CVD, 53% (9 of 17) in EAA, and 36% (8 of 22) in BOOP. The mean number of enlarged nodes was higher in sarcoidosis (mean 3.2) than in the other infiltrative diseases (mean 1.2) (p < 0.001). Enlarged nodes were most commonly present in station 10R, followed by 7, 4R, and 5. Patients with infiltrative lung disease frequently have enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes. However, in diseases other than sarcoid, usually only one or two nodes are enlarged and their maximal short axis diameter is <15 mm. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Unusual progression and subsequent improvement in cystic lung disease in a child with radiation-induced lung injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael S. [Monroe Carell Jr. Children' s Hospital at Vanderbilt, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Chadha, Ashley D. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Carroll, Clinton M.; Borinstein, Scott C. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Young, Lisa R. [Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Radiation-induced lung disease is a known complication of therapeutic lung irradiation, but the features have not been well described in children. We report the clinical, radiologic and histologic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in a 4-year-old child who had previously received lung irradiation as part of successful treatment for metastatic Wilms tumor. Her radiologic abnormalities and clinical symptoms developed in an indolent manner. Clinical improvement gradually occurred with corticosteroid therapy. However, the observed radiologic progression from interstitial and reticulonodular opacities to diffuse cystic lung disease, with subsequent improvement, is striking and has not been previously described in children. (orig.)

  16. [New toxicity of fotemustine: diffuse interstitial lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, M; Wémeau-Stervinou, L; Gauthier, S; Auffret, M; Mortier, L

    2012-04-01

    Fotemustine is an alkylating cytostatic drug belonging to the nitrosourea family and is used in particular in the treatment of disseminated malignant melanoma. Herein, we report a case of interstitial lung disease associated with fotemustine. An 81-year-old man treated with fotemustine for metastatic melanoma presented acute interstitial lung disease 20 days after a fourth course of fotemustine monotherapy. The condition regressed spontaneously, with the patient returning to the clinical, radiological and blood gas status that had preceded fotemustine treatment. After other potential aetiologies had been ruled out, acute fotemustine-induced lung toxicity was considered and this treatment was definitively withdrawn. Other cytostatic agents belonging to the nitrosourea family can cause similar pictures, with a number of cases of interstitial lung disease thus being ascribed to fotemustine and dacarbazine. To our knowledge, this is the first case of interstitial lung disease induced by fotemustine monotherapy. This diagnosis should be considered where respiratory signs appear in melanoma patients undergoing fotemustine treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta; Bordes, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  18. Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases: radiologic-pathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, Alberto [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Thoracic Radiology, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Franquet, Tomas; Gimenez, Ana; Pineda, Rosa; Madrid, Marta [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Bordes, Ramon [Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona, Department of Pathology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-11-15

    Smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) are a heterogeneous group of entities of unknown cause. These diseases include desquamative interstitial pneumonia (DIP), respiratory-bronchiolitis-related interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD), pulmonary Langerhans' cell histiocytosis (LCH) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). High-resolution CT is highly sensitive in the detection of abnormalities in the lung parenchyma and airways. Ground-glass attenuation can occur in DIP and RB-ILD. Whereas DIP is histologically characterized by intra-alveolar pigmented macrophages, RB-ILD shows alveolar macrophages in a patchy peribronchiolar distribution. LCH shows nodular infiltrates on histopathological examination containing varying amounts of characteristic Langerhans' histiocytes. The HRCT findings are characteristically bilateral, symmetrical and diffuse, involving the upper lobe zones with sparing of the costophrenic angles. The most prominent CT features are nodules (sometimes cavitary) measuring 1 to 10 mm in diameter, cysts and areas of ground-glass attenuation. Pathologically, IPF is characterized by its heterogeneity with areas of normal clung, alveolitis and end-stage fibrosis shown in the same biopsy specimen. High-resolution CT findings consist of honeycombing, traction bronchiectasis and intralobular interstitial thickening with subpleural and lower lung predominance. Since coexisting lesions in the same cases have been observed, a better understanding of the different smoking-related interstitial lung diseases (SRILD) allows a more confident and specific diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Lung disease and coal mining: what pulmonologists need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Leonard H T; Krefft, Silpa D; Cohen, Robert A; Rose, Cecile S

    2016-03-01

    Coal mine workers are at risk for a range of chronic respiratory diseases including coal workers' pneumoconiosis, diffuse dust-related fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The purpose of this review is to describe coal mining processes and associated exposures to inform the diagnostic evaluation of miners with respiratory symptoms. Although rates of coal workers' pneumoconiosis declined after regulations were enacted in the 1970s, more recent data shows a reversal in this downward trend. Rapidly progressive pneumoconiosis with progressive massive fibrosis (complicated coal workers' pneumoconiosis) is being observed with increased frequency in United States coal miners, with histologic findings of silicosis and mixed-dust pneumoconiosis. There is increasing evidence of decline in lung function in individuals with pneumoconiosis. Multiple recent cohort studies suggest increased risk of lung cancer in coal miners. A detailed understanding of coal mining methods and processes allows clinicians to better evaluate and confirm chronic lung diseases caused by inhalational hazards in the mine atmosphere.

  20. Connective tissue diseases, multimorbidity and the ageing lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases encompass a wide range of heterogeneous disorders characterised by immune-mediated chronic inflammation often leading to tissue damage, collagen deposition and possible loss of function of the target organ. Lung involvement is a common complication of connective tissue diseases. Depending on the underlying disease, various thoracic compartments can be involved but interstitial lung disease is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension or both are found most commonly in systemic sclerosis. In the elderly, the prevalence of connective tissue diseases continues to rise due to both longer life expectancy and more effective and better-tolerated treatments. In the geriatric population, connective tissue diseases are almost invariably accompanied by age-related comorbidities, and disease- and treatment-related complications, which contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions, and complicate treatment decision-making. Connective tissue diseases in the elderly represent a growing concern for healthcare providers and an increasing burden of global health resources worldwide. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the immune functions in the elderly and evidence-based guidelines specifically designed for this patient population are instrumental to improving the management of connective tissue diseases in elderly patients. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  1. A review of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) of parasitic origin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fore a now recognized mode of transmission – sexual contact. This in turn has led to giardiasis being classified as a sexually transmitted disease by the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States. This review identifies its occurrence mainly in homosexual populations of the developed world ...

  2. [SWOT analysis of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan-hong; Zheng, Bin

    2014-04-01

    This study analyzes the strength, weakness, opportunity and threat (SWOT) of laboratory certification and accreditation on detection of parasitic diseases by SWOT analysis comprehensively, and it puts forward some development strategies specifically, in order to provide some indicative references for the further development.

  3. Nutritional state and lung disease in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, W

    1992-10-01

    The life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is largely dependent on the severity and progress of the pulmonary involvement associated with the disease. Many data support the view that malnutrition and deterioration of lung function are closely interrelated and interdependent, with each affecting the other, leading to a spiral decline in both. The occurrence of malnutrition appears to be associated with poor lung function and poor survival, and conversely prevention of malnutrition appears to be associated with better lung function and improved survival. Nutritional intervention may lead to an improvement in body weight, lung function and exercise tolerance, provided that the intervention is combined with exercise training in order to increase both respiratory and other muscle mass. These improvements can be preserved when patients have the stamina to continue with a high-energy, high-fat diet and daily exercise training at home.

  4. IgG4-related lung disease presenting as interstitial lung disease with bronchiolitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiu-Fan; Chu, Kuo-An; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Wu, Chang-Che; Lai, Ruay-Sheng

    2017-12-01

    IgG4-related disease is a rare and novel disease entity that tends to involve multiple organs. The pulmonary manifestation of this disease is highly variable and may mimic lung cancer, pneumonia, interstitial lung disease (ILD), sarcoidosis, and so forth. Small airway disease is rarely reported in IgG4-related lung disease (IgG4-RLD). In the current study, we describe a rare case of IgG4-RLD with patterns of ILD and bronchiolitis. A 43-year-old man had chronic cough and dyspnea on exertion for 4 years. Initial chest radiography showed diffuse interstitial infiltration. Follow-up chest computed tomography 4 years later revealed bilateral diffuse centrilobular nodules with tree-in-bud pattern, bronchial wall thickening, and mediastinal lymph nodes. Bilateral diffuse multifocal ground-glass opacities and mosaic attenuation were also observed. Pulmonary function test revealed mixed restrictive and obstructive ventilatory impairment. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lung biopsy showed interstitial fibrosis with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells. Serum IgG4 level also showed remarkable elevation. Therefore, IgG4-RLD is confirmed. VATS wedge resection of right upper lobe and mediastinal lymph node. The patient responded well to steroid and immunosuppression therapy, and was regular followed-up in outpatient clinic. IgG4-RLD should be considered not only in ILD, but also in small airway disease. Serum IgG4 level may be a useful tool for screening.

  5. A review of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) of parasitic origin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... damage, cancer, heart disease, infertility and other ab- normalities of the reproductive system, ... TRANSMISSION OF GIARDIASIS THROUGH SEX. Established and more ... through the faeco-anal-oral route and transmission.

  6. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  7. Fish parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems......This book contains 22 chapters on some of the most important parasitic diseases in wild and farmed fish. International experts give updated reviews and provide solutions to the problems...

  8. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > ... Cancer Learn About Lung Cancer What Is Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Basics Causes & Risk Factors Lung Cancer Staging ...

  9. Classification of diffuse lung diseases: why and how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, David M

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of complex lung diseases, notably the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and small airways diseases, owes as much to repeated attempts over the years to classify them as to any single conceptual breakthrough. One of the many benefits of a successful classification scheme is that it allows workers, within and between disciplines, to be clear that they are discussing the same disease. This may be of particular importance in the recruitment of individuals for a clinical trial that requires a standardized and homogeneous study population. Different specialties require fundamentally different things from a classification: for epidemiologic studies, a classification that requires categorization of individuals according to histopathologic pattern is not usually practicable. Conversely, a scheme that simply divides diffuse parenchymal disease into inflammatory and noninflammatory categories is unlikely to further the understanding about the pathogenesis of disease. Thus, for some disease groupings, for example, pulmonary vasculopathies, there may be several appropriate classifications, each with its merits and demerits. There has been an interesting shift in the past few years, from the accepted primacy of histopathology as the sole basis on which the classification of parenchymal lung disease has rested, to new ways of considering how these entities relate to each other. Some inventive thinking has resulted in new classifications that undoubtedly benefit patients and clinicians in their endeavor to improve management and outcome. The challenge of understanding the logic behind current classifications and their shortcomings are explored in various examples of lung diseases.

  10. [Analysis of 2 patients with occupational hard mental lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bangmei; Ding, Lu; Yu, Bin; Fan, Cunhua; Han, Lei; Hu, Jinmei; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-01-01

    We sought to master the clinical characteristics and prognosis of hard mental lung disease, improving this disease's diagnosis and treatment quality. We recruited two suspected patients with hard mental lung disease and collected their occupational history, examination results of occupational health, and past medical records. By virtue of laboratory tests, high Kv chest radiography, CT and HRCT of chest, fiberoptic bronchoscopy and ECG examination, diagnostic report was synthesized respectively by respiratory physicians and pathologist from three different agencies. Then the report was submitted to diagnosis organizations of occupational disease, and diagnostic conclusion of occupational disease was drawn after discussion by at least three diagnosticians of occupational disease. We found that both of the two suspected patients were exposed to dusts of hard metal, and length of exposure service ranged from 8 to 9 years. Clinical manifestations were dominated by dry cough, wheezing after activities, and pathological manifestation was characteristic giant cell interstitial pneumonia. The prognosis and outcome of the disease were different. According to exact occupational exposure history, clinical manifestations, combined with the results of high Kv chest radiography, CT of chest and pathological manifestation, it can be diagnosed with hard mental lung disease.

  11. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marilaine; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães; Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Moura, Marco Antonio Saboia; Santos, Eyde Cristianne Saraiva; Saraceni, Valéria; Saraiva, Maria Graças Gomes

    2015-01-01

    In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil) were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE), Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS) and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  12. Bleb Point: Mimicker of Pneumothorax in Bullous Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelabert, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients presenting with severe dyspnea, several diagnostic challenges arise in distinguishing the diagnosis of pneumothorax versus several other pulmonary etiologies like bullous lung disease, pneumonia, interstitial lung disease, and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Distinguishing between large pulmonary bullae and pneumothorax is of the utmost importance, as the acute management is very different. While multiple imaging modalities are available, plain radiographs may be inadequate to make the diagnosis and other advanced imaging may be difficult to obtain. Ultrasound has a very high specificity for pneumothorax. We present a case where a large pulmonary bleb mimics the lung point and therefore inaccurately suggests pneumothorax. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(3:447–449.

  13. Lung Disease Associated With Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatkin, José Miguel; Zabert, Gustavo; Zabert, Ignacio; Chatkin, Gustavo; Jiménez-Ruiz, Carlos Andrés; de Granda-Orive, Jose Ignacio; Buljubasich, Daniel; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Figueiredo, Ana; Ravara, Sofia; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; Gratziou, Christina

    2017-09-01

    Marijuana is the most widely usedillegal drug in the world, with a prevalence of 2.5%-5%, and the second most commonly smoked substance after tobacco. The components of smoke from combustion of marijuana are similar to those produced by the combustion of tobacco, but they differ in terms of psychoactive components and use. Inhalation of cannabis smoke affects the respiratory tract, so the available evidence must be updated in order to provide pulmonologists with the latest scientific information. In this article, we review the impact of cannabis consumption on the lungs, taking into account that the respiratory route is the most popular route of cannabis consumption. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Common fish diseases and parasites affecting wild and farmed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intensification of aquaculture production in Uganda is likely to result into disease out-breaks leading to economic losses to commercial fish farms and associated natural aquatic ecosystems. This survey assessed health profiles of selected commercial fish farms and adjacent natural aquatic ecosystemsto identify fish ...

  15. [Consumer surveys among hospitalized patients with lung disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humborstad, O T; Omenaas, E; Gulsvik, A

    2001-03-30

    The aim of our survey was to record the experiences of hospitalised patients with respiratory diseases in order to create a more patient-friendly department. Our study included 609 patients (response rate 70%) with a median age of 64 years (range 13-91) who were discharged from the Department of Thoracic Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital in October 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995 and 1996. 268 patients had obstructive lung disease, 82 had lung cancer. They answered a questionnaire with 24 questions. Patient reception to the ward and staff knowledge of the patients' illnesses, were for the physicians rated as good or better by 92% and 79% and for the nurses by 94% and 70% respectively. 16% of the patients experienced insecurity, 17% anxiety, 12% helplessness, 9% loneliness and 12% little say in the decision making process. Trend factors for these emotional experiences were female sex, old age, obstructive lung disease and long stay in hospital. Patients aged 50 to 69 years and patients with lung cancer had the lowest rate of negative emotional experiences. Despite staff awareness of the prevalence and of the patients' emotional experiences and the risk factors involved, there was no clear reduction of negative experiences in the later surveys compared to the first survey. Patients in a university hospital with respiratory diseases showed unchanged experiences of health care and personal emotions in repeated surveys over a period of five years.

  16. Lung function imaging methods in Cystic Fibrosis pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołodziej, Magdalena; de Veer, Michael J; Cholewa, Marian; Egan, Gary F; Thompson, Bruce R

    2017-05-17

    Monitoring of pulmonary physiology is fundamental to the clinical management of patients with Cystic Fibrosis. The current standard clinical practise uses spirometry to assess lung function which delivers a clinically relevant functional readout of total lung function, however does not supply any visible or localised information. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is a well-established current 'gold standard' method for monitoring lung anatomical changes in Cystic Fibrosis patients. HRCT provides excellent morphological information, however, the X-ray radiation dose can become significant if multiple scans are required to monitor chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis. X-ray phase-contrast imaging is another emerging X-ray based methodology for Cystic Fibrosis lung assessment which provides dynamic morphological and functional information, albeit with even higher X-ray doses than HRCT. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-ionising radiation imaging method that is garnering growing interest among researchers and clinicians working with Cystic Fibrosis patients. Recent advances in MRI have opened up the possibilities to observe lung function in real time to potentially allow sensitive and accurate assessment of disease progression. The use of hyperpolarized gas or non-contrast enhanced MRI can be tailored to clinical needs. While MRI offers significant promise it still suffers from poor spatial resolution and the development of an objective scoring system especially for ventilation assessment.

  17. Counter-insurgents of the blue revolution? Parasites and diseases affecting aquaculture and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaylock, Reginald B; Bullard, Stephen A

    2014-12-01

    Aquaculture is the fastest-growing segment of food production and is expected to supply a growing portion of animal protein for consumption by humans. Because industrial aquaculture developed only recently compared to industrial agriculture, its development occurred within the context of a growing environmental awareness and acknowledgment of environmental issues associated with industrial farming. As such, parasites and diseases have become central criticisms of commercial aquaculture. This focus on parasites and diseases, however, has created a nexus of opportunities for research that has facilitated considerable scientific advances in the fields of parasitology and aquaculture. This paper reviews Myxobolus cerebralis , Lepeophtheirus salmonis , white spot syndrome virus, and assorted flatworms as select marquee aquaculture pathogens, summarizes the status of the diseases caused by each and their impacts on aquaculture, and highlights some of the significant contributions these pathogens have made to the science of parasitology and aquaculture.

  18. Predictors of end stage lung disease in a cohort of patients with scleroderma

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, C; Knight, C; Lunt, M; Black, C; Silman, A

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incidence of severe lung disease in patients with scleroderma and identify the combination(s) of features present at first assessment which would be useful to predict future risk of severe lung disease.

  19. Change in lung function in never-smokers with nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Kobayashi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Never-smokers account for a large proportion of subjects in general population studies on nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease (NTM-LD. However, the influence of NTM infection on the lung function of never-smokers has not yet been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine how NTM-LD impairs the lung function in never-smokers, and whether there are an association between successful NTM-LD treatment in radiologic outcomes and improvement in lung function of never-smokers with NTM-LD or not. Methods: We performed a retrospective study of patients (1 who have never smoked during their lifetime; (2 with at least two respiratory specimens from sputum, one bronchial washing sample, or one lung tissue that were culture positive for the same NTM species; and (3 who underwent at least two pulmonary function tests. We enrolled healthy never-smokers as the control group. Results: In 22 never-smokers with NTM-LD, the median forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC at baseline was lower than those in 9 healthy never-smokers [1800 vs 2080 ml (p = 0.23 and 2230 vs 2620 ml (p = 0.06], respectively. The median change in FEV1 in never-smokers with NTM-LD was lower than that in healthy never-smokers [−70 vs 20 ml per year (p = 0.07, respectively]. On univariate analysis, baseline %-predicted FEV1 in never-smokers with NTM-LD was associated with changes in FVC (p = 0.026 and FEV1 (p = 0.013. Anti-NTM treatment was administered for at least 1 year in 19 patients (86.4%. The relationship between worsening chest CT findings and rapid progressive decline in both FVC (p = 0.66 and FEV1 (p = 0.23 were not significant. Conclusion: Never-smokers with NTM-LD showed lung function decline. There was no association between successful NTM-LD treatment in radiologic outcomes and improvement in lung function of never-smokers. Keywords: Lung function, Never-smoker, Nontuberculous mycobacterial

  20. Can mechanical ventilation strategies reduce chronic lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donn, Steven M; Sinha, Sunil K

    2003-12-01

    Chronic lung disease (CLD) continues to be a significant complication in newborn infants undergoing mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure. Although the aetiology of CLD is multifactorial, specific factors related to mechanical ventilation, including barotrauma, volutrauma and atelectrauma, have been implicated as important aetiologic mechanisms. This article discusses the ways in which these factors might be manipulated by various mechanical ventilatory strategies to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury. These include continuous positive airway pressure, permissive hypercapnia, patient-triggered ventilation, volume-targeted ventilation, proportional assist ventilation, high-frequency ventilation and real-time monitoring.

  1. World Health Organization Estimates of the Global and Regional Disease Burden of 11 Foodborne Parasitic Diseases, 2010: A Data Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R Torgerson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Foodborne diseases are globally important, resulting in considerable morbidity and mortality. Parasitic diseases often result in high burdens of disease in low and middle income countries and are frequently transmitted to humans via contaminated food. This study presents the first estimates of the global and regional human disease burden of 10 helminth diseases and toxoplasmosis that may be attributed to contaminated food.Data were abstracted from 16 systematic reviews or similar studies published between 2010 and 2015; from 5 disease data bases accessed in 2015; and from 79 reports, 73 of which have been published since 2000, 4 published between 1995 and 2000 and 2 published in 1986 and 1981. These included reports from national surveillance systems, journal articles, and national estimates of foodborne diseases. These data were used to estimate the number of infections, sequelae, deaths, and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs, by age and region for 2010. These parasitic diseases, resulted in 48.4 million cases (95% Uncertainty intervals [UI] of 43.4-79.0 million and 59,724 (95% UI 48,017-83,616 deaths annually resulting in 8.78 million (95% UI 7.62-12.51 million DALYs. We estimated that 48% (95% UI 38%-56% of cases of these parasitic diseases were foodborne, resulting in 76% (95% UI 65%-81% of the DALYs attributable to these diseases. Overall, foodborne parasitic disease, excluding enteric protozoa, caused an estimated 23.2 million (95% UI 18.2-38.1 million cases and 45,927 (95% UI 34,763-59,933 deaths annually resulting in an estimated 6.64 million (95% UI 5.61-8.41 million DALYs. Foodborne Ascaris infection (12.3 million cases, 95% UI 8.29-22.0 million and foodborne toxoplasmosis (10.3 million cases, 95% UI 7.40-14.9 million were the most common foodborne parasitic diseases. Human cysticercosis with 2.78 million DALYs (95% UI 2.14-3.61 million, foodborne trematodosis with 2.02 million DALYs (95% UI 1.65-2.48 million and foodborne

  2. New vaccines for neglected parasitic diseases and dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Gillespie, Portia M; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2013-09-01

    Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are a significant source of morbidity and socioeconomic burden among the world's poor. Virtually all of the 2.4 billion people who live on less than $2 per d, more than a third of the world's population, are at risk for these debilitating NTDs. Although chemotherapeutic measures exist for many of these pathogens, they are not sustainable countermeasures on their own because of rates of reinfection, risk of drug resistance, and inconsistent maintenance of drug treatment programs. Preventative and therapeutic NTD vaccines are needed as long-term solutions. Because there is no market in the for-profit sector of vaccine development for these pathogens, much of the effort to develop vaccines is driven by nonprofit entities, mostly through product development partnerships. This review describes the progress of vaccines under development for many of the NTDs, with a specific focus on those about to enter or that are currently in human clinical trials. Specifically, we report on the progress on dengue, hookworm, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease, and onchocerciasis vaccines. These products will be some of the first with specific objectives to aid the world's poorest populations. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine lung uptake in heart and lung diseases. With reference to lung uptake ratio and decrease of lung uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Tanaka, Masao; Yazaki, Yoshikazu; Kitabayashi, Hiroshi; Koizumi, Tomonori; Sekiguchi, Morie; Gomi, Tsutomu; Yano, Kesato; Itoh, Atsuko.

    1997-01-01

    123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) myocardial scintigraphy was performed in 64 patients with heart and lung diseases. Distribution of MIBG in the chest was evaluated by planar images, using counts ratios of the heart to the mediastinum (H/M) and the unilateral lung to the mediastinum (Lu/M). Most of patients with heart diseases showed obvious lung uptake of MIBG. The ratios of H/M were 1.75±0.20 in the group without heart failure and 1.55±0.19 in the group with heart failure. The ratios of Lu/M in the right and left lung were 1.56±0.16 and 1.28±0.16 in the group without heart failure. And those were 1.45±0.16 and 1.19±0.15 in the group with heart failure. But 3 patients complicated with chronic pulmonary emphysema and one patient with interstitial pneumonia due to dermatomyositis showed markedly decreased lung uptake. The ratios of Lu/M in the right and left lung of these patients were 1.20, 1.17; 1.17, 1.13; 1.01, 0.97 and 1.27, 0.94, respectively. These results suggest that the lung uptake of MIBG may reflect the state of pulmonary endothelial cell function in clinical situations, considering that it has been demonstrated that MIBG may be useful as a marker of pulmonary endothelial cell function in the isolated rat lung. (author)

  4. Commentary: research on the mechanisms of the occupational lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rom, W.N.

    1984-01-01

    In this commentary, the pathogenesis of alveolitis is examined and elucidated by animal models. The use of broncho alveolar lavage (BAL) and Ga-67 citrate whole-body scanning as a measure of the activity of alveolar inflammation in workers is discussed. Gallium scan indices have been reported to be elevated in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis; diseases which may now be evaluated at earlier, potentially reversible stages. Research in emphysema and other lung diseases associated with α 1 antitrypsin deficiency may help explain why coal miners develop focal emphysema. Furthermore, investigation of genetic factors may reveal why workers with similar exposures have a different susceptibility for the development of pneumoconiosis or lung cancer. Occupational asthma may not respond to removal of the worker from exposure because reactive airways may be a predisposing factor for chronic ashthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. A continuing challenge will be disease risk in new industries such as electronics and alternate energy industries and new diseases in worker groups not previously studied, such as the variety of pneumoconioses among dental laboratory technicians who work with exotic metal alloys. 52 references

  5. Empowering women to tackle cattle lung disease

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A new vaccine being developed will address these shortcomings. The vaccine is produced using novel, molecular technologies and bioinformatic tools in Canada and clinical trials in local Boran and Zebu cattle breeds in Kenya. The Vaccine and Infectious Disease Organization. (VIDO) of Canada has so far generated 69.

  6. Role of gastroesophageal reflux disease in lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathorn, Kelly E; Chan, Walter W; Lo, Wai-Kit

    2017-01-01

    Lung transplantation is one of the highest risk solid organ transplant modalities. Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and lung transplant outcomes, including acute and chronic rejection. The aim of this review is to discuss the pathophysiology, evaluation, and management of GERD in lung transplantation, as informed by the most recent publications in the field. The pathophysiology of reflux-induced lung injury includes the effects of aspiration and local immunomodulation in the development of pulmonary decline and histologic rejection, as reflective of allograft injury. Modalities of reflux and esophageal assessment, including ambulatory pH testing, impedance, and esophageal manometry, are discussed, as well as timing of these evaluations relative to transplantation. Finally, antireflux treatments are reviewed, including medical acid suppression and surgical fundoplication, as well as the safety, efficacy, and timing of such treatments relative to transplantation. Our review of the data supports an association between GERD and allograft injury, encouraging a strategy of early diagnosis and aggressive reflux management in lung transplant recipients to improve transplant outcomes. Further studies are needed to explore additional objective measures of reflux and aspiration, better compare medical and surgical antireflux treatment options, extend follow-up times to capture longer-term clinical outcomes, and investigate newer interventions including minimally invasive surgery and advanced endoscopic techniques. PMID:28507913

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Shared Mechanistic and Phenotypic Traits Suggest Overlapping Disease Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Francisco; Doyle, Tracy J; Fletcher, Elaine A; Ascherman, Dana P; Rosas, Ivan O

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of clinically evident interstitial lung disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis is approximately 10%. An additional 33% of undiagnosed patients have interstitial lung abnormalities that can be detected with high-resolution computed tomography. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease patients have three times the risk of death compared to those with rheumatoid arthritis occurring in the absence of interstitial lung disease, and the mortality related to interstitial lung disease is rising. Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease is most commonly classified as the usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, overlapping mechanistically and phenotypically with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, but can occur in a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, mainly nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Based on this, we propose two possible pathways to explain the coexistence of rheumatoid arthritis and interstitial lung disease: (i) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a non-usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may come about when an immune response against citrullinated peptides taking place in another site (e.g. the joints) subsequently affects the lungs; (ii) Rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease with a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern may represent a disease process in which idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis-like pathology triggers an immune response against citrullinated proteins that promotes articular disease indicative of rheumatoid arthritis. More studies focused on elucidating the basic mechanisms leading to different sub-phenotypes of rheumatoid arthritis-interstitial lung disease and the overlap with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are necessary to improve our understanding of the disease process and to define new therapeutic targets.

  8. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lung function and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Lange, Peter; Bojesen, Stig Egil

    2014-01-01

    25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk o...... of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).......25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk...

  9. Assessing the feasibility of a web-based registry for multiple orphan lung diseases: the Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) experience

    OpenAIRE

    Casamento, K.; Laverty, A.; Wilsher, M.; Twiss, J.; Gabbay, E.; Glaspole, I.; Jaffe, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the feasibility of using an online registry to provide prevalence data for multiple orphan lung diseases in Australia and New Zealand. Methods A web-based registry, The Australasian Registry Network of Orphan Lung Diseases (ARNOLD) was developed based on the existing British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease Registry. All adult and paediatric respiratory physicians who were members of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand in Australia and New Zealand were s...

  10. [The association of lung cancer and atheromatous arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, A; Azorin, J; Tchandjou Ngoko, L E; Valeyre, D; Morère, F; Destable, M D; de Saint-Florent, G

    1989-01-01

    This work is based on the retrospective study of the case history of 26 patients who were treated between September 1979 and January 1987 in the department of thoracic and vascular surgery at the Avicenne Hospital--and who were all suffering from both lung cancer and atheromatous arterial disease. It is now well established by all the epidemiologic research that the link between lung cancer and atheromatous arterial disease is smoking tobacco. The risks involved in the misunderstanding of such an association are not without danger for the patient, particularly the risk of severe complication of possible coronary or carotid lesions, threatening survival; from this derives the necessity to decide automatically for a minimum of pre-surgery vascular investigations in the case of patients suffering from lung cancer. The therapeutic strategy in this association must be thorough, considering that there are three priorities in the vascular field which must absolutely be treated before the lung itself: --the coronary and carotid lesions which are likely to be complicated cancer after surgery and any state of emergency in the other vascular territories. The fight against tobacco smoking must also be considered as a priority aim.

  11. Perception of climate change in patients with chronic lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götschke, Jeremias; Mertsch, Pontus; Bischof, Michael; Kneidinger, Nikolaus; Matthes, Sandhya; Renner, Ellen D.; Schultz, Konrad; Traidl-Hoffmann, Claudia; Duchna, Hans-Werner; Behr, Jürgen; Schmude, Jürgen; Huber, Rudolf M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Climate change affects human health. The respective consequences are predicted to increase in the future. Patients with chronic lung disease are particularly vulnerable to the involved environmental alterations. However, their subjective perception and reactions to these alterations remain unknown. Methods In this pilot study, we surveyed 172 adult patients who underwent pulmonary rehabilitation and 832 adult tourists without lung disease in the alpine region about their perception of being affected by climate change and their potential reaction to specific consequences. The patients’ survey also contained the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) to rate the severity of symptoms. Results Most of the patients stated asthma (73.8%), COPD (9.3%) or both (11.0%) as underlying disease while 5.8% suffered from other chronic lung diseases. Patients and tourists feel equally affected by current climate change in general, while allergic subjects in both groups feel significantly more affected (p = 0.04). The severity of symptoms assessed by CAT correlates with the degree of feeling affected (p<0.01). The main disturbing consequences for patients are decreased air quality, increasing numbers of ticks and mosquitos and a rising risk for allergy and extreme weather events such as thunderstroms, while tourists are less disturbed by these factors. Increasing number of heat-days is of little concern to both groups. Conclusion Overall patients are more sensitive to health-related consequences of climate change. Yet, the hazard of heat-days seems underestimated and awareness should be raised. PMID:29045479

  12. Lung Ultrasound Has Limited Diagnostic Value in Rare Cystic Lung Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Henriksen, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    : This single centre case-based cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with LAM, PCLH and BHDS was conducted at a Danish DPLD specialist centre. Patients underwent clinical examination including LUS. LUS findings were compared to findings scored according to a modified Belmaati score on HRCT and reviewed...... value as a diagnostic tool in patients with LAM, PLCH, and BHDS as normal LUS findings did not rule out severe cystic lung disease....

  13. Nanomedicine and therapy of lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Fabricio de Melo

    2014-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology has significantly increased in different fields of science, including the development of drug delivery systems. Currently, the most modern pharmaceutical nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions and polymeric nanoparticles, demonstrate extremely useful properties from the point of view of drug therapy. In this context, the development of nanocarriers for pulmonary application has been much debated by the scientific community in recent decades. Although research on the use of nanoparticles for pulmonary application are still in the initial phase, the studies conducted to date suggest that the development of drug delivery systems for systemic or local treatment of diseases that affect the respiratory system may be promising. (author)

  14. Nanomedicine and therapy of lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Fabricio de Melo, E-mail: fabriciomgarcia@gmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina Nova Esperanca, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    The use of nanotechnology has significantly increased in different fields of science, including the development of drug delivery systems. Currently, the most modern pharmaceutical nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions and polymeric nanoparticles, demonstrate extremely useful properties from the point of view of drug therapy. In this context, the development of nanocarriers for pulmonary application has been much debated by the scientific community in recent decades. Although research on the use of nanoparticles for pulmonary application are still in the initial phase, the studies conducted to date suggest that the development of drug delivery systems for systemic or local treatment of diseases that affect the respiratory system may be promising. (author)

  15. Lung Infections in Systemic Rheumatic Disease: Focus on Opportunistic Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Manuela; Lucchino, Bruno; Spaziante, Martina; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Valesini, Guido; Iaiani, Giancarlo

    2017-01-29

    Systemic rheumatic diseases have significant morbidity and mortality, due in large part to concurrent infections. The lung has been reported among the most frequent sites of infection in patients with rheumatic disease, who are susceptible to developing pneumonia sustained both by common pathogens and by opportunistic microorganisms. Patients with rheumatic disease show a peculiar vulnerability to infectious complications. This is due in part to intrinsic disease-related immune dysregulation and in part to the immunosuppressive treatments. Several therapeutic agents have been associated to a wide spectrum of infections, complicating the management of rheumatic diseases. This review discusses the most frequent pulmonary infections encountered in rheumatic diseases, focusing on opportunistic agents, consequent diagnostic challenges and appropriate therapeutic strategies.

  16. Assessment and management of refractory breathlessness in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, Lucy; Walthall, Helen

    2017-09-02

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) refers to a cluster of fibroinflammatory conditions. There are limited treatment options and most patients have severe dyspnoea. The prognosis is poor. This study aims to evaluate current literature on the assessment and management of refractory breathlessness in ILD. Few tools are available to assess dyspnoea in advanced respiratory disease. Holistic assessment requires a combination of tools but there are few disease specific tools. The role of opioids is well established in the reduction of breathlessness, but there is insufficient evidence that benzodiazepines are beneficial. Non-pharmcolological breathlessness intervention services can give patients mastery of their disease, reduced distress due to breathlessness and were more cost effective. More research on holistic interventions for use in advanced disease needs to be done. Patient-reported outcome measures could elicit valuable evidence to describe the benefit of breathlessness management services in advanced respiratory disease.

  17. Radionuclide study for the interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Kenji; Mori, Yutaka; Ujita, Masuo

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine was evaluated in 105 patients with interstitial pulmonary diseases (IPD). Ventilation study (V) with 81m Kr, distribution of compliance in thoraco-pulmonary system (C) by 81m Kr gas bolus inhalation method, perfusion study (Q) with 99m Tc-MAA, 67 Ga scintigraphy and an assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability with 99m Tc-DTPA aerosol were performed as nuclear medicine procedures. Pulmonary function test (%DLco, vital capacity and functional residual capacity) and blood gas analysis were also examined. Abnormalities in V were larger than that in Q which was high V/Q mismatch finding, in the interstitial pneumonia. Correlation between V/Q mismatch and PaO 2 was, therefore, not significant. %DLco was decreased in cases with larger V/Q mismatches. 67 Ga accumulated in the early stage of interstitial pneumonia when CT or chest X-ray did not show any finding. %DLco was decreased in cases with strong accumulation of 67 Ga. 67 Ga might be useful to evaluate activity of the diseases. Pulmonary epithelial permeability was assessed by 99m Tc-DTPA inhalation study. This permeability accelerated in idiopathic interstitial fibrosis and sarcoidosis. Pulmonary epithelial permeability may be useful as an indicator for epithelial cell injury. (author)

  18. Radionuclide study for the interstitial lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Kenji; Mori, Yutaka; Ujita, Masuo (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-07-01

    The contribution of pulmonary nuclear medicine was evaluated in 105 patients with interstitial pulmonary diseases (IPD). Ventilation study (V) with {sup 81m}Kr, distribution of compliance in thoraco-pulmonary system (C) by {sup 81m}Kr gas bolus inhalation method, perfusion study (Q) with {sup 99m}Tc-MAA, {sup 67}Ga scintigraphy and an assessment of pulmonary epithelial permeability with {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA aerosol were performed as nuclear medicine procedures. Pulmonary function test (%DLco, vital capacity and functional residual capacity) and blood gas analysis were also examined. Abnormalities in V were larger than that in Q which was high V/Q mismatch finding, in the interstitial pneumonia. Correlation between V/Q mismatch and PaO{sub 2} was, therefore, not significant. %DLco was decreased in cases with larger V/Q mismatches. {sup 67}Ga accumulated in the early stage of interstitial pneumonia when CT or chest X-ray did not show any finding. %DLco was decreased in cases with strong accumulation of {sup 67}Ga. {sup 67}Ga might be useful to evaluate activity of the diseases. Pulmonary epithelial permeability was assessed by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA inhalation study. This permeability accelerated in idiopathic interstitial fibrosis and sarcoidosis. Pulmonary epithelial permeability may be useful as an indicator for epithelial cell injury. (author).

  19. Progression of the load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases in the State of Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilaine Martins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the State of Amazonas, Brazil, urban expansion together with precarious basic sanitation conditions and human settlement on river banks has contributed to the persistence of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases. Time series of the recorded cases of cholera, typhoid fever, hepatitis A and leptospirosis are described, using data from different levels of the surveillance systems. The sources for intestinal parasitosis prevalence data (non-compulsory reporting in Brazil were Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana (LILACS and the annals of major scientific meetings. Relevant papers and abstracts in all languages were accessed by two independent reviewers. The references cited by each relevant paper were scrutinized to locate additional papers. Despite its initial dissemination across the entire State of Amazonas, cholera was controlled in 1998. The magnitude of typhoid fever has decreased; however, a pattern characterized by eventual outbreaks still remains. Leptospirosis is an increasing cause of concern in association with the annual floods. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasites is high regardless of the municipality and the characteristics of areas and populations. The incidence of hepatitis A has decreased over the past decade. A comparison of older and recent surveys shows that the prevalence of intestinal parasitic diseases has remained constant. The load of waterborne and intestinal parasitic diseases ranks high among the health problems present in the State of Amazonas. Interventions aiming at basic sanitation and vaccination for hepatitis A were formulated and implemented, but assessment of their effectiveness in the targeted populations is still needed.

  20. Severe nitrofurantoin lung disease resolving without the use of steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhullar S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an elderly woman who developed a severe, chronic pulmonary reaction to nitrofurantoin therapy that she had taken continuously for three years to prevent urinary tract infections. The patient was taking no other drug known to cause lung disease but the diagnosis was delayed by failure to recognize the association between nitrofurantoin and adverse drug reactions affecting the lung. When originally seen, the patient was unable to care for herself due to dyspnea. Bronchoscopy with biopsy ruled out other causes of her pulmonary disease. Immediate withdrawal of nitrofurantoin led to substantial, sustained improvement and disappearance of symptoms over several months without administration of corticosteroids. Nitrofurantoin toxicity should always be considered in any person taking that drug who develops bilateral infiltrates.

  1. Leflunomide-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aygül Güzel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leflunomide (LEF induced interstitial pneumonitis is a very rare condition but potentially fatal. We report a case of LEF induced interstitial pneumonitis. A 63-year-old woman followed-up for 37 years with the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis treated with LEF (20 mg/day since 5 months were admitted to our hospital with cough, dyspnea, fever, and dark sputum.Chest radiography represented bilateral alveolar consolidation. High-resolution computed tomography demonstrated diffuse ground-glass appearance and interlobular septal thickening. Since the patient’s clinics and radiologic findings improved dramatically after the cessation of LEF and recieving oral steriod therapy, she was diagnosed as drug-induced interstitial lung disease. In conclusion, when nonspecific clinical signs such as respiratory distress, cough and fever seen during the use of LEF, drug-induced interstitial lung disease should be kept in mind for the differantial diagnosis.

  2. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of the review considers the problem of surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in adults and young and old children. It gives information on the results of surfactant therapy and prevention of ARDS in patients with severe concurrent trauma, inhalation injuries, complications due to complex expanded chest surgery, or severe pneumonias, including bilateral pneumonia in the presence of A/H1N1 influenza. There are data on the use of a surfactant in obstetric care and prevention of primary graft dysfunction during lung transplantation. The results of longterm use of surfactant therapy in Russia, suggesting that death rates from ARDS may be substantially reduced (to 20% are discussed. Examples of surfactant therapy for other noncritical lung diseases, such as permanent athelectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and asthma, as well tuberculosis, are also considered.

  3. Esophageal motor disease and reflux patterns in patients with advanced pulmonary disease undergoing lung transplant evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seccombe, J; Mirza, F; Hachem, R; Gyawali, C P

    2013-08-01

    Advanced pulmonary disorders are linked to esophageal hypomotility and reflux disease. However, characterization of esophageal function using high resolution manometry (HRM) and ambulatory pH monitoring, segregation by pulmonary pathology, and comparison to traditional reflux disease are all limited in the literature. Over a 4 year period, 73 patients (55.2 ± 1.3 years, 44F) were identified who underwent esophageal function testing as part of lung transplant evaluation for advanced pulmonary disease (interstitial lung disease, ILD = 47, obstructive lung disease, OLD = 24, other = 2). Proportions of patients with motor dysfunction (≥ 80% failed sequences = severe hypomotility) and/or abnormal reflux parameters (acid exposure time, AET ≥ 4%) were determined, and compared to a cohort of 1081 patients (48.4 ± 0.4 years, 613F) referred for esophageal function testing prior to antireflux surgery (ARS). The proportion of esophageal body hypomotility was significantly higher within advanced pulmonary disease categories (35.6%), particularly ILD (44.7%), compared to ARS patients (12.1%, P esophageal motor pattern or reflux evidence. Interstitial lung disease has a highly significant association with esophageal body hypomotility. Consequently, prevalence of abnormal esophageal acid exposure is high, but implications for post lung transplant chronic rejection remain unclear. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Diseases and parasites of laboratory reared and wild population of banded pearl spot Etroplus suratensis (Cichlidae) in Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rattan, P.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Banded Pearl spot Etroplus suratensis, the inhabitant of coastal backwaters and lagoons is one among the few finfish species identified for brackishwater farming. Common diseases and parasites from the wild population of Goa and from the laboratory...

  5. Infectious diseases, parasites, and biological toxins in sea ducks: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J. Christian

    2015-01-01

    This chapter addresses disease agents in the broad sense, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoan and helminth parasites, and biological toxins. Some of these agents are known to cause mortality in sea ducks, some are thought to be incidental findings, and the significance of others is yet poorly understood. Although the focus of the chapter is on free-living sea ducks, the study of disease in this taxonomic group has been relatively limited and examples from captive sea ducks and other wild waterfowl are used to illustrate the pathogenicity of certain diseases. Much of the early work in sea ducks consisted of anecdotal and descriptive reports of parasites, but it was soon recognized that diseases such as avian cholera, renal coccidiosis, and intestinal infections with acanthocephalans were causes of mortality in wild populations. More recently, adenoviruses, reoviruses, and the newly emergent Wellfleet Bay virus, for example, also have been linked to die-offs of sea ducks. Declining populations of animals are particularly vulnerable to the threats posed by disease and it is important that we improve our understanding of the significance of disease in sea ducks. To conclude, we offer our recommendations for future directions in this field.

  6. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-10-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites--endogenous digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone. This was assessed in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and in individuals of differing hemispheric dominance to find out the role of hemispheric dominance in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. All 15 cases of interstitial lung disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. The isoprenoidal metabolites--digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone, RBC membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum magnesium, tyrosine/tryptophan catabolic patterns, free radical metabolism, glycoconjugate metabolism, and RBC membrane composition--were assessed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as well as in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance. In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis there was elevated digoxin synthesis, increased dolichol and glycoconjugate levels, and low ubiquinone and elevated free radical levels. There was also an increase in tryptophan catabolites and a reduction in tyrosine catabolites. There was an increase in cholesterol phospholipid ratio and a reduction in glycoconjugate level of RBC membrane in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Isoprenoid pathway dysfunction con tributes to the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The biochemical patterns obtained in interstitial lung disease are similar to those obtained in left-handed/right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals by the dichotic listening test. However, all the patients with interstitial lung disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation with handedness or the dichotic listening test. Interstitial lung disease occurs in right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals and is a reflection of altered brain function.

  7. Pleuroparenchymal Lung Disease Secondary to Nonoccupational Exposure to Vermiculite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Al-Ghimlas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An unusual case of pleuroparenchymal lung disease caused by the inhalation of vermiculite dust, presumably containing asbestos fibers is described. The uniqueness of the case lies in the very indirect nature of exposure – the wife of a factory owner, rather than a worker exposed to asbestos, whose factory manufactured vermiculite. The present case illustrates the importance of taking careful occupational histories of all household members when presented with a patient whose chest radiograph exhibits features consistent with asbestos exposure.

  8. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirmasoud Zangiabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  9. Mechanisms of Physical Activity Limitation in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vogiatzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients’ quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  10. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  11. Effects of global warming on respiratory diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abe Olugbenga

    and tuberculosis), parasitic lung diseases, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease ... Methods: A literature search on global warming and respiratory diseases was carried out through the internet .... (COPD) The main factor to consider here is.

  12. Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Miho; Mori, Masaaki; Nishimaki, Shigeru; An, Hiromi; Naruto, Takuya; Sugai, Toshiyuki; Shima, Yoshio; Seki, Kazuo; Yokota, Shumpei

    2010-04-01

    It is clear that inflammation plays an important role in developing chronic lung disease in preterm infants. The purpose of the present study is to investigate changes of serum soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 levels over time in infants with chronic lung disease. The serum levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 were measured after delivery, and at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of age in 10 infants with chronic lung disease and in 18 infants without chronic lung disease. The serum level of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 was significantly higher in infants with chronic lung disease than in infants without chronic lung disease after delivery. The differences between these two groups remained up to 28 days of age. Prenatal inflammation with persistence into postnatal inflammation may be involved in the onset of chronic lung disease.

  13. The acknowledgement of the Schneeberg lung disease as occupational disease in the first decree of occupational diseases from 1925

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuettmann, W.

    1987-01-01

    The Schneeberg lung disease is the lung cancer, conditioned by radiation which is caused by the influence of radon and of its subsequent products. It has gained a great importance after World War II as a consequence of the intensified mining of uranium ore. From the history of the disease, lasting some centuries, the period of the twenties and thirties of this century is represented in which on one side the conception of the causal importance of radon has made its way little by little, and on the other side the disease was acknowledged as occupational disease within the first decree of occupational diseases in the former German Reich. Evaluating materials from Saxon archives it is described how the legislative preparations to the acknowledgement of the Schneeberg lung disease as occupational disease and the simultaneous research to the elucidation of nature and cause of the disease have penetrated and influenced each other. (author)

  14. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  15. Mechanisms of protein misfolding in conformational lung diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McElvaney, N G

    2012-08-01

    Genetic or environmentally-induced alterations in protein structure interfere with the correct folding, assembly and trafficking of proteins. In the lung the expression of misfolded proteins can induce a variety of pathogenetic effects. Cystic fibrosis (CF) and alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency are two major clinically relevant pulmonary disorders associated with protein misfolding. Both are genetic diseases the primary causes of which are expression of mutant alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and SERPINA1, respectively. The most common and best studied mutant forms of CFTR and AAT are ΔF508 CFTR and the Glu342Lys mutant of AAT called ZAAT, respectively. Non-genetic mechanisms can also damage protein structure and induce protein misfolding in the lung. Cigarette-smoke contains oxidants and other factors that can modify a protein\\'s structure, and is one of the most significant environmental causes of protein damage within the lung. Herein we describe the mechanisms controlling the folding of wild type and mutant versions of CFTR and AAT proteins, and explore the consequences of cigarette-smoke-induced effects on the protein folding machinery in the lung.

  16. Environmental temperature affects prevalence of blood parasites of birds on an elevation gradient: implications for disease in a warming climate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzel Zamora-Vilchis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rising global temperature is predicted to expand the distribution of vector-borne diseases both in latitude and altitude. Many host communities could be affected by increased prevalence of disease, heightening the risk of extinction for many already threatened species. To understand how host communities could be affected by changing parasite distributions, we need information on the distribution of parasites in relation to variables like temperature and rainfall that are predicted to be affected by climate change. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined relations between prevalence of blood parasites, temperature, and seasonal rainfall in a bird community of the Australian Wet Tropics along an elevation gradient. We used PCR screening to investigate the prevalence and lineage diversity of four genera of blood parasites (Plasmodium, Haemoproteus, Leucocytozoon and Trypanosoma in 403 birds. The overall prevalence of the four genera of blood parasites was 32.3%, with Haemoproteus the predominant genus. A total of 48 unique lineages were detected. Independent of elevation, parasite prevalence was positively and strongly associated with annual temperature. Parasite prevalence was elevated during the dry season. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low temperatures of the higher elevations can help to reduce both the development of avian haematozoa and the abundance of parasite vectors, and hence parasite prevalence. In contrast, high temperatures of the lowland areas provide an excellent environment for the development and transmission of haematozoa. We showed that rising temperatures are likely to lead to increased prevalence of parasites in birds, and may force shifts of bird distribution to higher elevations. We found that upland tropical areas are currently a low-disease habitat and their conservation should be given high priority in management plans under climate change.

  17. Influence of lung CT changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD on the human lung microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Engel

    Full Text Available Changes in microbial community composition in the lung of patients suffering from moderate to severe COPD have been well documented. However, knowledge about specific microbiome structures in the human lung associated with CT defined abnormalities is limited.Bacterial community composition derived from brush samples from lungs of 16 patients suffering from different CT defined subtypes of COPD and 9 healthy subjects was analyzed using a cultivation independent barcoding approach applying 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragment amplicons.We could show that bacterial community composition in patients with changes in CT (either airway or emphysema type changes, designated as severe subtypes was different from community composition in lungs of patients without visible changes in CT as well as from healthy subjects (designated as mild COPD subtype and control group (PC1, Padj = 0.002. Higher abundance of Prevotella in samples from patients with mild COPD subtype and from controls and of Streptococcus in the severe subtype cases mainly contributed to the separation of bacterial communities of subjects. No significant effects of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on bacterial community composition were detected within COPD cases with and without abnormalities in CT in PCoA. Co-occurrence analysis suggests the presence of networks of co-occurring bacteria. Four communities of positively correlated bacteria were revealed. The microbial communities can clearly be distinguished by their associations with the CT defined disease phenotype.Our findings indicate that CT detectable structural changes in the lung of COPD patients, which we termed severe subtypes, are associated with alterations in bacterial communities, which may induce further changes in the interaction between microbes and host cells. This might result in a changed interplay with the host immune system.

  18. Influence of lung CT changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on the human lung microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Marion; Endesfelder, David; Schloter-Hai, Brigitte; Kublik, Susanne; Granitsiotis, Michael S; Boschetto, Piera; Stendardo, Mariarita; Barta, Imre; Dome, Balazs; Deleuze, Jean-François; Boland, Anne; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Prasse, Antje; Welte, Tobias; Hohlfeld, Jens; Subramanian, Deepak; Parr, David; Gut, Ivo Glynne; Greulich, Timm; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Nowinski, Adam; Gorecka, Dorota; Singh, Dave; Gupta, Sumit; Brightling, Christopher E; Hoffmann, Harald; Frankenberger, Marion; Hofer, Thomas P; Burggraf, Dorothe; Heiss-Neumann, Marion; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Schloter, Michael; Zu Castell, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Changes in microbial community composition in the lung of patients suffering from moderate to severe COPD have been well documented. However, knowledge about specific microbiome structures in the human lung associated with CT defined abnormalities is limited. Bacterial community composition derived from brush samples from lungs of 16 patients suffering from different CT defined subtypes of COPD and 9 healthy subjects was analyzed using a cultivation independent barcoding approach applying 454-pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragment amplicons. We could show that bacterial community composition in patients with changes in CT (either airway or emphysema type changes, designated as severe subtypes) was different from community composition in lungs of patients without visible changes in CT as well as from healthy subjects (designated as mild COPD subtype and control group) (PC1, Padj = 0.002). Higher abundance of Prevotella in samples from patients with mild COPD subtype and from controls and of Streptococcus in the severe subtype cases mainly contributed to the separation of bacterial communities of subjects. No significant effects of treatment with inhaled glucocorticoids on bacterial community composition were detected within COPD cases with and without abnormalities in CT in PCoA. Co-occurrence analysis suggests the presence of networks of co-occurring bacteria. Four communities of positively correlated bacteria were revealed. The microbial communities can clearly be distinguished by their associations with the CT defined disease phenotype. Our findings indicate that CT detectable structural changes in the lung of COPD patients, which we termed severe subtypes, are associated with alterations in bacterial communities, which may induce further changes in the interaction between microbes and host cells. This might result in a changed interplay with the host immune system.

  19. Role of radio-aerosol and perfusion lung imaging in early detection of chronic obstructive lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A; Pande, J N; Guleria, J S; Gopinath, P G

    1983-04-01

    The efficacy of radio-aerosol and perfusion lung imaging in the early detection of chronic obstructive lung disease was evaluated in 38 subjects. The subjects included 5 non-smokers, 21 smokers with minimal or no respiratory symptoms and 12 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. Each subject consented to a respiratory questionaire, detailed physical examination, chest X-ray examinations, detailed pulmonary function tests and sup(99m)Tc-radioaerosol-inhalation lung imaging. Perfusion lung imaging with sup(99m)Tc-labelled macroaggregated albumin was performed in 22 subjects. A significant correlation (P<0.001) was observed between the degree of abnormalities on radio-aerosol imaging and pulmonary function tests (PFTs) including forced expiratory volume in 1 s, maximum midexpiratory flow rate and mean transit time analysis. Abnormal radio-aerosol patterns and deranged PFTs were observed in 21 subjects each. Of 21 subjects with abnormal radioaerosol pattern 8 had normal PFTs. Of 21 subjects with abnormal PFTs 8 had normal aerosol images. Aerosol lung images and PFTs were abnormal more frequently than perfusion lung images. The results suggest that radio-aerosol lung imaging is as sensitive an indicator as PFTs for early detection of chronic obstructive lung disease and can be usefully combined with PFTs for early detection of alteration in pulmonary physiology in smokers.

  20. Will chronic e-cigarette use cause lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Temperance R; Tarran, Robert

    2015-12-15

    Chronic tobacco smoking is a major cause of preventable morbidity and mortality worldwide. In the lung, tobacco smoking increases the risk of lung cancer, and also causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which encompasses both emphysema and chronic bronchitis. E-cigarettes (E-Cigs), or electronic nicotine delivery systems, were developed over a decade ago and are designed to deliver nicotine without combusting tobacco. Although tobacco smoking has declined since the 1950s, E-Cig usage has increased, attracting both former tobacco smokers and never smokers. E-Cig liquids (e-liquids) contain nicotine in a glycerol/propylene glycol vehicle with flavorings, which are vaporized and inhaled. To date, neither E-Cig devices, nor e-liquids, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has proposed a deeming rule, which aims to initiate legislation to regulate E-Cigs, but the timeline to take effect is uncertain. Proponents of E-Cigs say that they are safe and should not be regulated. Opposition is varied, with some opponents proposing that E-Cig usage will introduce a new generation to nicotine addiction, reversing the decline seen with tobacco smoking, or that E-Cigs generally may not be safe and will trigger diseases like tobacco. In this review, we shall discuss what is known about the effects of E-Cigs on the mammalian lung and isolated lung cells in vitro. We hope that collating this data will help illustrate gaps in the knowledge of this burgeoning field, directing researchers toward answering whether or not E-Cigs are capable of causing disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  1. The mitochondrial activation of silicate and its role in silicosis, black lung disease and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadler, H I; Cook, G L

    1979-01-01

    Silicate substitutes for phosphate in the transitory uncoupling of rat liver mitochondria induced by hydrazine when beta-hydroxy-butyrate is the substrate. Uncoupling is blocked by rutamycin. Just as in the case when phosphate is combined with hydrazine, ATP, ADP, PPi, and Mg++ protect against hydrazine when silicate is combined with hydrazine. A high level of ADP in the absence of added phosphate, but in the presence of silicate, induces a pseudo state three of the mitochondria. Silicate, like sulfate and arsenate which have been reported previously, is activated by the enzymes which mediate oxidative phosphorylation. These results serve to explain a role for silicate in silicosis, black lung disease, and cancer. In addition, since there is suggestive evidence in the literature that lung tissue solubilizes asbestos fibers, these results not only expand the confluence between oxidative phosphorylation and chemical carcinogenesis but are correlated with the synergistic carcinogenicity of asbestos and smoking observed by epidemiologists.

  2. Disease severity in patients with visceral leishmaniasis is not altered by co-infection with intestinal parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adem, Emebet; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Mulualem; Fikre, Helina; Raynes, John; Tamiru, Aschalew; Mulugeta, Zemenay; Diro, Ermias; Toulza, Frederic; Shkedy, Ziv; Ayele, Tadesse; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease that affects the poorest communities and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by the presence of Leishmania parasites in the spleen, liver and bone marrow, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, prolonged fever, systemic inflammation and low body mass index (BMI). The factors impacting on the severity of VL are poorly characterized. Here we performed a cross-sectional study to assess whether co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites influences disease severity, assessed with clinical and haematological data, inflammation, cytokine profiles and BMI. Data from VL patients was similar to VL patients co-infected with intestinal parasites, suggesting that co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites does not alter disease severity. PMID:28732017

  3. Disease severity in patients with visceral leishmaniasis is not altered by co-infection with intestinal parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajebe, Fitsumbrhan; Getahun, Mulusew; Adem, Emebet; Hailu, Asrat; Lemma, Mulualem; Fikre, Helina; Raynes, John; Tamiru, Aschalew; Mulugeta, Zemenay; Diro, Ermias; Toulza, Frederic; Shkedy, Ziv; Ayele, Tadesse; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Müller, Ingrid; Takele, Yegnasew; Kropf, Pascale

    2017-07-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a neglected tropical disease that affects the poorest communities and can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Visceral leishmaniasis is characterized by the presence of Leishmania parasites in the spleen, liver and bone marrow, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, prolonged fever, systemic inflammation and low body mass index (BMI). The factors impacting on the severity of VL are poorly characterized. Here we performed a cross-sectional study to assess whether co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites influences disease severity, assessed with clinical and haematological data, inflammation, cytokine profiles and BMI. Data from VL patients was similar to VL patients co-infected with intestinal parasites, suggesting that co-infection of VL patients with intestinal parasites does not alter disease severity.

  4. Esophageal involvement and interstitial lung disease in mixed connective tissue disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagundes, M N; Caleiro, M T C; Navarro-Rodriguez, T; Baldi, B G; Kavakama, J; Salge, J M; Kairalla, R; Carvalho, C R R

    2009-06-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease is a systemic inflammatory disorder that results in both pulmonary and esophageal manifestations. We sought to evaluate the relationship between esophageal dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. We correlated the pulmonary function data and the high-resolution computed tomography findings of interstitial lung disease with the results of esophageal evaluation in manometry, 24-hour intraesophageal pH measurements, and the presence of esophageal dilatation on computed tomography scan. Fifty consecutive patients with mixed connective tissue disease, according to Kasukawa's classification criteria, were included in this prospective study. High-resolution computed tomography parenchymal abnormalities were present in 39 of 50 patients. Esophageal dilatation, gastroesophageal reflux, and esophageal motor impairment were also very prevalent (28 of 50, 18 of 36, and 30 of 36, respectively). The presence of interstitial lung disease on computed tomography was significantly higher among patients with esophageal dilatation (92% vs. 45%; pmotor dysfunction (90% vs. 35%; pesophageal and pulmonary involvement, our series revealed a strong association between esophageal motor dysfunction and interstitial lung disease in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

  5. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  6. Limited value of transbronchial lung biopsy for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Akimasa; Saito, Takefumi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Morishita, Yukio; Tsunoda, Yoshiya; Tanaka, Toru; Yatagai, Yohei; Lin, Shih-Yuen; Miyazaki, Kunihiko; Miura, Yukiko; Hayashihara, Kenji

    2017-11-01

    It remains unclear whether transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) is useful for diagnosing Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease. Thirty-eight consecutive patients with MAC lung disease, who were evaluated with TBLB tissue culture between June 2006 and May 2010, were included. Bronchial washing (BW) and histopathological evaluation were performed in all patients. The positivity rates of BW and TBLB tissue culture, and typical histopathological findings for MAC disease were investigated. Furthermore, all patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of intrabronchial purulent or mucopurulent secretion and the clinical, bacteriological and pathological characteristics were compared between the two groups. The positive culture rates of BW and TBLB specimens for MAC were 100% (38 patients) and 28.9% (11 patients). BW materials were much more sensitive for culture positivity than TBLB specimens (P present in the TBLB specimens of only 11 patients (28.9%). Intrabronchial secretion was identified in 15 patients (39.5%, secretion-positive group) and absent in 23 patients (60.5%, secretion-negative group). Typical histopathological findings for MAC disease were more common in the secretion-positive group than in the secretion-negative group (53.3% vs 13.0%, P = 0.01), although the radiological classification and smear positivity of BW were not different between the two groups. TBLB for pathological and bacterial investigations would provide only a limited value for MAC diagnosis. Moreover, the presence of intrabronchial secretion may be an important manifestation of ongoing airway damage, which would require early treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Mechanisms Underlying HIV-Associated Noninfectious Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presti, Rachel M; Flores, Sonia C; Palmer, Brent E; Atkinson, Jeffrey J; Lesko, Catherine R; Lau, Bryan; Fontenot, Andrew P; Roman, Jesse; McDyer, John F; Twigg, Homer L

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary disease remains a primary source of morbidity and mortality in persons living with HIV (PLWH), although the advent of potent combination antiretroviral therapy has resulted in a shift from predominantly infectious to noninfectious pulmonary complications. PLWH are at high risk for COPD, pulmonary hypertension, and lung cancer even in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. The underlying mechanisms of this are incompletely understood, but recent research in both human and animal models suggests that oxidative stress, expression of matrix metalloproteinases, and genetic instability may result in lung damage, which predisposes PLWH to these conditions. Some of the factors that drive these processes include tobacco and other substance use, direct HIV infection and expression of specific HIV proteins, inflammation, and shifts in the microbiome toward pathogenic and opportunistic organisms. Further studies are needed to understand the relative importance of these factors to the development of lung disease in PLWH. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An approach to interstitial lung disease in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J N Pande

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Interstitial lung diseases are common and have varied etiology, clinical presentation, clinical course and outcome. They pose a diagnostic challenge to physicians and pulmonologists. Patients present with dry cough, exertional dyspnoea, interstitial lesions on X-ray of the chest and restrictive ventilatory defect on spirometry. A sharp decline in oxygen saturation with exercise is characteristic. Careful evaluation of the history of the patient and physical examination help in narrowing down diagnostic probabilities. HRCT of the chest has emerged as an important tool in the evaluation of these disorders. Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonias (IIP are a group of conditions which are classified into several types based on pathological features. Bronchoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosis of certain disorders but are of limited value in classification of IIP which requires surgical biopsy. Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP, also referred to as Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, has a progressive course and an unfavourable outcome. Certain new drugs have recently become available for treatment of UIP. Our approach towards diagnosis and management of interstitial lung diseases based on personal experience over the past three decades is reported here. Key words: Usual interstitial pneumonia – sarcoidosis – pneumoconiosis – bronchoscopy – lung biopsy 

  9. Interstitial lung disease: Diagnostic accuracy and safety of surgical lung biopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Guerra

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study reports our experience, diagnostic accuracy and safety of surgical lung biopsy in patients with interstitial lung diseases. From January 1998 – December 2007 surgical lung biopsy was performed in 53 patients (22 female [41.5%]; age 47.2 ± 13 years. A total of 37 patients (69.8% underwent videothoracoscopic lung biopsy and minithoracotomy was performed in 16 patients (30.2%. Right lung was the choice in 47 patients (88.7%. Postoperative complications were rare (9.4% and included three prolonged air leaks (5.7%, one pneumothorax re-quiring a chest drain (1.9%, and one haemothorax requiring reoperation (1.9%. One patient died of cardiac arrest of unknown cause. Average chest tube duration was 4.4 ± 3 days and average hospital stay 5.4 ± 4 days. Lung biopsy contributed to the diagnosis in 50 patients (94.3%. In conclusion, the potential benefits of diagnostic surgical lung biopsy must be considered against the risks of the procedure especially in patients with severe cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Resumo: Os autores descrevem a sua casuística de biópsias pulmonares cirúrgicas em doentes com doença pulmonar intersticial, de forma a determinar a acuidade diagnóstica, os riscos e a morbimortalidade associados ao procedimento. Entre Janeiro de 1998 e Dezembro de 2007, 53 doentes (idade média de 47,2 ± 13 anos foram referenciados para a realização de biópsia pulmonar cirúrgica, dos quais 22 eram mulheres (41,5%. As biópsias pulmonares foram realizadas quer por videotoracoscopia (37 doentes, 69,8%, quer por minitoracotomia (16 doentes, 30,2%. Foi escolhido o pulmão direito para biopsar em 88,7% dos casos. Registaram-se complicações pós-operatórias em 5 doentes (9,4%: fuga aérea prolongada em 3 doentes (5,7%, persistência de loca de pneumotórax num doente (1,9% e hemorragia com necessidade de revisão de hemostase noutro doente (1,9%. Ocorreu um

  10. TOBACCO SMOKING AND LUNG DISEASES: EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Nikitin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents data on the significant increase of tobacco smoking prevalence and its harmful effect on the development and course of chronic respiratory diseases: tuberculosis, pneumonia, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Negative consequences of tobacco smoking are caused by chronic intoxication of the host by the components of tobacco smoke providing impact on various organs and cells of the host, thus causing a big variety of diseases. Both active and passive smoking deteriorates their course and increase the risk of exacerbation, hinders taking control over the disease and interferes with adequate response to drugs.Current approaches to treatment of tobacco addiction have been presented. There are several ways to overcome nicotine addiction – drug therapy and the other forms of therapy. Integrated approach to tobacco smoking management allows achieving success in 30% of cases within short period of time with continuous and quality remissions. 

  11. Interstitial lung disease during trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzurio, Syota; Horita, Naokatsu; Shiota, Yutaro; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2010-01-01

    We studied clinical and radiographic features of interstitial lung disease (ILD) during trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) administration. Ten patients who had received prednisolone treatment for underlying diffuse pulmonary disease showed various ILDs after introduction of TMP/SMX. The radiographic features of the ILDs were not consistent with infectious disease or exacerbation of the underlying disease, and these diagnoses were excluded radiographically and on clinical grounds during the differential diagnosis of the ILDs. These ILDs emerged relatively early after introduction of TMP/SMX, which is consistent with the former case report of drug-induced ILD (DI-ILD) caused by TMP/SMX. Therefore DI-ILDs caused by TMP/SMX were suspected in these cases. In most of these cases, the ILDs were clinically mild and disappeared immediately although administration of TMP/SMX was continued. (author)

  12. Interstitial lung diseases with fibrosis - the pattern at high resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarzemska, A.; Lasek, W.; Nawrocka, E.; Meder, G.; Zapala, M.

    2003-01-01

    Surgical lung biopsy, either open thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracoscopy is recommended in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILD). In some cases, however, the repetitive pattern of radiological features in high-resolution computed tomography is often sufficient to confirm the diagnosis in a non-invasive manner. The purpose of the study was to determine whether patients with ILD can be selected on the basis of the HRCT pattern. Thin-section CT scans were performed in 40 patients with histologically proven idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (26 patients with usual interstitial pneumonia UIP, 2 patients with desquamative interstitial pneumonia DIP, 2 patients with bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia BOOP, 2 patients with non-specific interstitial pneumonia NSIP, 11 patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and 3 patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X). The location and the intensity of lesions were taken into consideration. Clinical and histopathological findings were compared. HRCT features of interstitial lung diseases such as nodules and cystic spaces in hypersensitivity pneumonitis and pulmonary histiocytosis, and ground-glass opacities in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIP) were statistically significant for differential diagnosis in ILD cases. Combination of honeycombing and ground-glass opacities found in UIP and nodules found in DIP were also statistically significant features in IIP subtypes diagnosis. In some cases, HRCT patterns of hypersensitivity pneumonitis, pulmonary histiocytosis X and IPF combined with clinical findings allowed for the accurate diagnosis without resorting to lung biopsy. Within a group of idiopathic interstitial pneumonia only in usual interstitial pneumonia characteristic pattern in thin-section CT can be defined. In other subgroups some typical features can imply a diagnosis. (author)

  13. Classification of interstitial lung disease patterns with topological texture features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Markus B.; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Leinsinger, Gerda; Ray, Lawrence A.; Wismüller, Axel

    2010-03-01

    Topological texture features were compared in their ability to classify morphological patterns known as 'honeycombing' that are considered indicative for the presence of fibrotic interstitial lung diseases in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images. For 14 patients with known occurrence of honey-combing, a stack of 70 axial, lung kernel reconstructed images were acquired from HRCT chest exams. A set of 241 regions of interest of both healthy and pathological (89) lung tissue were identified by an experienced radiologist. Texture features were extracted using six properties calculated from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM), Minkowski Dimensions (MDs), and three Minkowski Functionals (MFs, e.g. MF.euler). A k-nearest-neighbor (k-NN) classifier and a Multilayer Radial Basis Functions Network (RBFN) were optimized in a 10-fold cross-validation for each texture vector, and the classification accuracy was calculated on independent test sets as a quantitative measure of automated tissue characterization. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare two accuracy distributions and the significance thresholds were adjusted for multiple comparisons by the Bonferroni correction. The best classification results were obtained by the MF features, which performed significantly better than all the standard GLCM and MD features (p < 0.005) for both classifiers. The highest accuracy was found for MF.euler (97.5%, 96.6%; for the k-NN and RBFN classifier, respectively). The best standard texture features were the GLCM features 'homogeneity' (91.8%, 87.2%) and 'absolute value' (90.2%, 88.5%). The results indicate that advanced topological texture features can provide superior classification performance in computer-assisted diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases when compared to standard texture analysis methods.

  14. Global perspectives of emerging occupational and environmental lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moitra, Subhabrata; Puri, Rajan; Paul, Devon; Huang, Yuh-Chin T

    2015-03-01

    New technologies continue to be introduced into the workplace and the environment. These novel technologies also bring in new hazards leading to evolving patterns of established occupational and environmental diseases, as well as novel conditions never before encountered. Many of these emerging conditions have appeared in media outlets or in the literature as case reports. These sentinel cases often serve as a warning sign for subsequent outbreaks. This review will discuss environmental and occupational lung diseases and exposures from a global perspective. These diseases and exposures include environmental exposure to asbestos and lung diseases, accelerated silicosis in sandblasting jean workers, coal worker's pneumoconiosis in surface coal miners, health effects of indoor air pollution from burning of biomass fuels and exposures to heavy metals and potential health effects from hydraulic fracturing (fracking). Other emerging conditions are also discussed, including smog in developing countries, sand storms in Asia and the Middle East and respiratory illnesses from nanoparticles and man-made fibres. Clinicians must remain vigilant for potential occupational and environmental exposures, especially when evaluating patients with unusual and unique presentation, so that occupational and environmental risk factors may be identified, and monitoring and preventive measures can be implemented early.

  15. Pets and Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... good news is that this rarely happens. Most pet-to-people diseases can be avoided by following a few ... your doctor Can a parasite cause death in people and pets? Can human disease from a parasite be treated ...

  16. Role of Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsies in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases: Interest of a Sequential Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Bondue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transbronchial lung cryobiopsies (TBLCs are a promising diagnostic tool in the setting of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs. However, no comparison with surgical lung biopsy (SLB in the same patient is available. Methods. The diagnostic yield and safety data of TBLCs, as well as the result of SLB performed after TBLCs, were analysed in a multicentric Belgian study. A SLB was performed after TBLCs in absence of a definite pathological diagnosis or if a NSIP pattern was observed without related condition identified following multidisciplinary discussion. Results. Between April 2015 and November 2016, 30 patients were included. Frequent complications included pneumothorax (20% and bleeding (severe 7%, moderate 33%, and mild 53%. There was no mortality. The overall diagnostic yield was 80%. A SLB was performed in six patients (three without definite histological pattern and three with an NSIP. The surgical biopsy changed the pathological diagnosis into a UIP pattern in five patients and confirmed a NSIP pattern in one patient. Conclusion. TBLCs are useful in the diagnostic work-up of DPLDs avoiding a SLB in 80% of the patients. However, surgical biopsies, performed as a second step after TBLCs because of an indefinite diagnosis or a NSIP pattern, provide additional information supporting the interest of a sequential approach in these patients.

  17. Lipid Bodies as Sites of Prostaglandin E2 Synthesis During Chagas Disease: Impact in the Parasite Escape Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia E. de Almeida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During Chagas disease, the Trypanosoma cruzi can induce some changes in the host cells in order to escape or manipulate the host immune response. The modulation of the lipid metabolism in the host phagocytes or in the parasite itself is one feature that has been observed. The goal of this mini review is to discuss the mechanisms that regulate intracellular lipid body (LB biogenesis in the course of this parasite infection and their meaning to the pathophysiology of the disease. The interaction host–parasite induces LB (or lipid droplet formation in a Toll-like receptor 2-dependent mechanism in macrophages and is enhanced by apoptotic cell uptake. Simultaneously, there is a lipid accumulation in the parasite due to the incorporation of host fatty acids. The increase in the LB accumulation during infection is correlated with an increase in the synthesis of PGE2 within the host cells and the parasite LBs. Moreover, the treatment with fatty acid synthase inhibitor C75 or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as NS-398 and aspirin inhibited the LB biogenesis and also induced the down modulation of the eicosanoid production and the parasite replication. These findings show that LBs are organelles up modulated during the course of infection. Furthermore, the biogenesis of the LB is involved in the lipid mediator generation by both the macrophages and the parasite triggering escape mechanisms.

  18. Parasites and diseases in marine copepods: Challenges for future mass-production of live feed for fish larva production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Alf

    Copepods are the natural food for many marine fish larvae, and the use of cultured copepods as life feed is, therefore, becoming increasingly important as more marine fish species are being produced in aquaculture. Large-scale cultivation of copepods may be challenged by diseases and parasites....... In nature, marine copepods are hosts for parasitic organisms of many different taxonomic groups, including e.g. dinoflagellates, ciliates, paramyxans, nematodes and even other crustaceans. In addition, several parasites of copepods have yet not been investigated in relation to their taxonomic affiliation...

  19. Emerging Animal Parasitic Diseases: A Global Overview and Appropriate Strategies for their Monitoring and Surveillance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehmengo, Ngongeh L; Nnagbo, Chiejina S

    2014-01-01

    Emerging animal parasitic diseases are reviewed and appropriate strategies for efficient monitoring and surveillance in Nigeria are outlined. Animal and human parasitic infections are distinguished. Emerging diseases have been described as those diseases that are being recognised for the first time or diseases that are already recorded but their frequency and/or geographic range is being increased tremendously. Emergence of new diseases may be due to a number of factors such as the spread of a new infectious agent, recognition of an infection that has been in existence but undiagnosed, or when it is realised that an established disease has an infectious origin. The terms could also be used to describe the resurgence of a known infection after its incidence had been known to have declined. Emerging infections are compounding the control of infectious diseases and huge resources are being channeled to alleviate the rising challenge. The diseases are numerous and include helminth, protozoal / rickettsial and entomological. A list of parasitic emerging diseases in Nigeria is included. Globally occurring emerging parasitic diseases are also outlined. Emerging and re-emerging infections can be brought about by many factors including climate change and global warming, changes in biodiversity, population mobility, movement of animals, globalisation of commerce/trade and food supply, social and cultural factors such as food eating habits, religious beliefs, farming practices, trade of infected healthy animals, reduction in the available land for animals, immune-suppressed host and host density and misuse or over use of some drugs leading to drug resistance.

  20. Altered Pulmonary Lymphatic Development in Infants with Chronic Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNellis, Emily M.; Mabry, Sherry M.; Taboada, Eugenio; Ekekezie, Ikechukwu I.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphatic development in chronic lung disease (CLD) has not been investigated, and anatomy of lymphatics in human infant lungs is not well defined. Hypothesis. Pulmonary lymphatic hypoplasia is present in CLD. Method. Autopsy lung tissues of eighteen subjects gestational ages 22 to 40 weeks with and without history of respiratory morbidity were stained with monoclonal antipodoplanin and reviewed under light microscopy. Percentage of parenchyma podoplanin stained at the acinar level was determined using computerized image analysis; 9 CLD and 4 control subjects gestational ages 27 to 36 weeks were suitable for the analysis. Results. Distinct, lymphatic-specific staining with respect to other vascular structures was appreciated in all gestations. Infants with and without respiratory morbidity had comparable lymphatic distribution which extended to the alveolar ductal level. Podoplanin staining per parenchyma was increased and statistically significant in the CLD group versus controls at the alveolar ductal level (0.06% ± 0.02% versus 0.04% ± 0.01%, 95% CI −0.04% to −0.002%, P CLD. It is suggested that the findings, by expanding current knowledge of CLD pathology, may offer insight into the development of more effective therapies to tackle CLD. PMID:24527433

  1. Assessing the feasibility of a web-based registry for multiple orphan lung diseases: the Australasian Registry Network for Orphan Lung Disease (ARNOLD) experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamento, K; Laverty, A; Wilsher, M; Twiss, J; Gabbay, E; Glaspole, I; Jaffe, A

    2016-04-18

    We investigated the feasibility of using an online registry to provide prevalence data for multiple orphan lung diseases in Australia and New Zealand. A web-based registry, The Australasian Registry Network of Orphan Lung Diseases (ARNOLD) was developed based on the existing British Paediatric Orphan Lung Disease Registry. All adult and paediatric respiratory physicians who were members of the Thoracic Society of Australia and New Zealand in Australia and New Zealand were sent regular emails between July 2009 and June 2014 requesting information on patients they had seen with any of 30 rare lung diseases. Prevalence rates were calculated using population statistics. Emails were sent to 649 Australian respiratory physicians and 65 in New Zealand. 231 (32.4%) physicians responded to emails a total of 1554 times (average 7.6 responses per physician). Prevalence rates of 30 rare lung diseases are reported. A multi-disease rare lung disease registry was implemented in the Australian and New Zealand health care settings that provided prevalence data on orphan lung diseases in this region but was limited by under reporting.

  2. The pathogenesis of Chagas' disease: when autoimmune and parasite-specific immune responses meet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILENA B. P. SOARES

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas' disease is a major health problem in Latin America, where it constitutes one of the leading causes of heart failure. About one fourth of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals develop chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CChC, the most severe form of the disease. CChC is histologically characterized by the presence of multifocal inflammatory infiltrates in the heart, composed mainly by mononuclear cells, usually adhered to myocytes and leading to myocytolysis, and frequently by interstitial fibrosis. The pathogenesis of CChC is still unclear, despite intense investigations both in human beings and in animal models of the disease. Although tissue parasitism is rare in the chronic phase of infection, an immune response targeted to persistent parasites or parasite antigens is suggested, by some authors, as the pathogenic mechanism of CChC. Other researchers affirm that the lack of correlation between tissue parasitism and intensity of inflammation suggests, along with the presence of autoreactive immune responses, that CChC results from the action of an autoimmune response. Herein we review reports from the literature and our own data, which together indicate, on one hand, the participation of parasite-specific immune responses and, on the other hand, clearly demonstrate the participation of heart-specific immune responses in the pathogenesis of CChC. Moreover, multiple factors may determine whether an individual in the indeterminate form of the disease will develop CChC. The mechanisms by which T. cruzi breaks immunological tolerance to heart antigens are also discussed.A doença de Chagas constitui um grave problema de saúde pública na América Latina, onde é uma das principais causas de problemas cardíacos. A cardiopatia chagásica crônica (CChC, forma mais grave da doença, manifesta-se em cerca de 25% dos indivíduos infectados pelo Trypanosoma cruzi, e é caracterizada, a nível histopatológico, pela presença de infiltrados

  3. Postnatal Infections and Immunology Affecting Chronic Lung Disease of Prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryhuber, Gloria S

    2015-12-01

    Premature infants suffer significant respiratory morbidity during infancy with long-term negative consequences on health, quality of life, and health care costs. Enhanced susceptibility to a variety of infections and inflammation play a large role in early and prolonged lung disease following premature birth, although the mechanisms of susceptibility and immune dysregulation are active areas of research. This article reviews aspects of host-pathogen interactions and immune responses that are altered by preterm birth and that impact chronic respiratory morbidity in these children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An advanced case of indium lung disease with progressive emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Makiko; Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki; Kumazoe, Hiroyuki; Wakamatsu, Kentaro; Kamada, Dan; Omae, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-30

    To report the occurrence of an advanced case of indium lung disease with severely progressive emphysema in an indium-exposed worker. A healthy 42-year-old male smoker was employed to primarily grind indium-tin oxide (ITO) target plates, exposing him to indium for 9 years (1998-2008). In 2004, an epidemiological study was conducted on indium-exposed workers at the factory in which he worked. The subject's serum indium concentration (In-S) was 99.7 μg/l, while his serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 level was 2,350 U/ml. Pulmonary function tests showed forced vital capacity (FVC) of 4.17 l (91.5% of the JRS predicted value), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) of 3.19 l (80.8% of predicted), and an FEV 1 -to-FVC ratio of 76.5%. A high-resolution chest computed tomography (HRCT) scan showed mild interlobular septal thickening and mild emphysematous changes. In 2008, he was transferred from the ITO grinding workplace to an inspection work section, where indium concentrations in total dusts had a range of 0.001-0.002 mg/m 3 . In 2009, the subject's In-S had increased to 132.1 μg/l, and pulmonary function tests revealed obstructive changes. In addition, HRCT scan showed clear evidence of progressive lung destruction with accompanying severe centrilobular emphysema and interlobular septal thickening in both lung fields. The subject's condition gradually worsened, and in 2015, he was registered with the Japan Organ Transplant Network for lung transplantation (LTx). Heavy indium exposure is a risk factor for emphysema, which can lead to a severity level that requires LTx as the final therapeutic option.

  5. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures.

  6. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2015-10-22

    Host-parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host-parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host-parasite systems. © 2015 The Author(s).

  7. Disease ecology across soil boundaries: effects of below-ground fungi on above-ground host–parasite interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Leiling; Gowler, Camden D.; Ahmad, Aamina; Hunter, Mark D.; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2015-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are subject to strong trait-mediated indirect effects from other species. However, it remains unexplored whether such indirect effects may occur across soil boundaries and connect spatially isolated organisms. Here, we demonstrate that, by changing plant (milkweed Asclepias sp.) traits, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) significantly affect interactions between a herbivore (the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus) and its protozoan parasite (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha), which represents an interaction across four biological kingdoms. In our experiment, AMF affected parasite virulence, host resistance and host tolerance to the parasite. These effects were dependent on both the density of AMF and the identity of milkweed species: AMF indirectly increased disease in monarchs reared on some species, while alleviating disease in monarchs reared on other species. The species-specificity was driven largely by the effects of AMF on both plant primary (phosphorus) and secondary (cardenolides; toxins in milkweeds) traits. Our study demonstrates that trait-mediated indirect effects in disease ecology are extensive, such that below-ground interactions between AMF and plant roots can alter host–parasite interactions above ground. In general, soil biota may play an underappreciated role in the ecology of many terrestrial host–parasite systems. PMID:26468247

  8. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases. © AlphaMed Press.

  9. Quantification of heterogeneity in lung disease with image-based pulmonary function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahr, Charlene S; Samarage, Chaminda R; Donnelley, Martin; Farrow, Nigel; Morgan, Kaye S; Zosky, Graeme; Boucher, Richard C; Siu, Karen K W; Mall, Marcus A; Parsons, David W; Dubsky, Stephen; Fouras, Andreas

    2016-07-27

    Computed tomography (CT) and spirometry are the mainstays of clinical pulmonary assessment. Spirometry is effort dependent and only provides a single global measure that is insensitive for regional disease, and as such, poor for capturing the early onset of lung disease, especially patchy disease such as cystic fibrosis lung disease. CT sensitively measures change in structure associated with advanced lung disease. However, obstructions in the peripheral airways and early onset of lung stiffening are often difficult to detect. Furthermore, CT imaging poses a radiation risk, particularly for young children, and dose reduction tends to result in reduced resolution. Here, we apply a series of lung tissue motion analyses, to achieve regional pulmonary function assessment in β-ENaC-overexpressing mice, a well-established model of lung disease. The expiratory time constants of regional airflows in the segmented airway tree were quantified as a measure of regional lung function. Our results showed marked heterogeneous lung function in β-ENaC-Tg mice compared to wild-type littermate controls; identified locations of airway obstruction, and quantified regions of bimodal airway resistance demonstrating lung compensation. These results demonstrate the applicability of regional lung function derived from lung motion as an effective alternative respiratory diagnostic tool.

  10. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I. [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Barrios, Roberto [Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital Physician Organization, 6565 Fannin Street, Suite M227, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Department of Pediatrics, Section of Neonatology, Texas Children' s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, MC: FC530.01, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO{sub 2} > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F{sub 2} alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure.

  11. Sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury in mice: Implications for acute and chronic lung disease in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingappan, Krithika; Jiang, Weiwu; Wang, Lihua; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Barrios, Roberto; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2013-01-01

    Sex-specific differences in pulmonary morbidity in humans are well documented. Hyperoxia contributes to lung injury in experimental animals and humans. The mechanisms responsible for sex differences in the susceptibility towards hyperoxic lung injury remain largely unknown. In this investigation, we tested the hypothesis that mice will display sex-specific differences in hyperoxic lung injury. Eight week-old male and female mice (C57BL/6J) were exposed to 72 h of hyperoxia (FiO 2 > 0.95). After exposure to hyperoxia, lung injury, levels of 8-iso-prostaglandin F 2 alpha (8-iso-PGF 2α) (LC–MS/MS), apoptosis (TUNEL) and inflammatory markers (suspension bead array) were determined. Cytochrome P450 (CYP)1A expression in the lung was assessed using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. After exposure to hyperoxia, males showed greater lung injury, neutrophil infiltration and apoptosis, compared to air-breathing controls than females. Pulmonary 8-iso-PGF 2α levels were higher in males than females after hyperoxia exposure. Sexually dimorphic increases in levels of IL-6 (F > M) and VEGF (M > F) in the lungs were also observed. CYP1A1 expression in the lung was higher in female mice compared to males under hyperoxic conditions. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that male mice are more susceptible than females to hyperoxic lung injury and that differences in inflammatory and oxidative stress markers contribute to these sex-specific dimorphic effects. In conclusion, this paper describes the establishment of an animal model that shows sex differences in hyperoxic lung injury in a temporal manner and thus has important implications for lung diseases mediated by hyperoxia in humans. - Highlights: • Male mice were more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury than females. • Sex differences in inflammatory markers were observed. • CYP1A expression was higher in females after hyperoxia exposure

  12. Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases. Often forgotten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, F.; Stroszczynski, C.; Hamer, O.W.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced interstitial lung diseases (DILD) are probably more common than diagnosed. Due to their potential reversibility, increased vigilance towards DILD is appropriate also from the radiologist's point of view, particularly as these diseases regularly exhibit radiological correlates in high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the lungs. Based on personal experience typical relatively common manifestations of DILD are diffuse alveolar damage (DAD), eosinophilic pneumonia (EP), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), organizing pneumonia (OP), non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). These patterns are presented based on case studies, whereby emphasis is placed on the clinical context. This is to highlight the relevance of interdisciplinary communication and discussion in the diagnostic field of DILD as it is a diagnosis of exclusion or of probability in most cases. Helpful differential diagnostic indications for the presence of DILD, such as an accompanying eosinophilia or increased attenuation of pulmonary consolidations in amiodarone-induced pneumopathy are mentioned and the freely available online database http://www.pneumotox.com is presented. (orig.) [de

  13. [Analysis on theses of the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng-Yun; Qu, Lin-Ping; Yan, He; Sheng, Hui-Feng

    2013-12-01

    The published articles at the Chinese Journal of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases in 2009-2012 were statistically analyzed. Among 547 papers published in the four years, original articles occupied 45.3% (248/547). The number of authors was 2712, with an average cooperation degree of 5.0, and the co-authorship accounted for 95.4% of the papers. Authors were mainly from colleges/universities (51.9%, 284/547), institutions for disease control (34.4%, 188/547) and hospitals health centers (13.7%, 75/547). The average publishing delay was 212, 141, 191 and 207 d in 2009-2012. Statistical analysis reflected the characteristics and academic level for improving the quality of the journal, and revealed the latest development and trends.

  14. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Haseem, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan...... the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans...

  15. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-10-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases.

  16. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satija, Bhawna; Kumar, Sanyal; Ojha, Umesh Chandra; Gothi, Dipti

    2013-01-01

    Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases

  17. Cavitary Lung Disease in an HIV-Positive Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    alone. Primary lung abscesses are thought to be more common in immunocompromised hosts. The radiographic findings for lung abscess in both...westermani, Entamoeba histolytica, Echinococcus Non Infectious Neoplasm: Primary lung cancer , metastatic carcinoma, lymphoma Pulmonary infarction due to...Congenital (or acquired) bullae, Abscess , Vasculitis, Infection (fungal), TB, and cYst (post-traumatic). A peripheral lung abscesses may also be

  18. Evasion and Immuno-Endocrine Regulation in Parasite Infection: Two Sides of the Same Coin in Chagas Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrot, Alexandre; Villar, Silvina R; González, Florencia B; Pérez, Ana R

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a serious illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Nearly 30% of chronically infected people develop cardiac, digestive, or mixed alterations, suggesting a broad range of host-parasite interactions that finally impact upon chronic disease outcome. The ability of T. cruzi to persist and cause pathology seems to depend on diverse factors like T. cruzi strains, the infective load and the route of infection, presence of virulence factors, the parasite capacity to avoid protective immune response, the strength and type of host defense mechanisms and the genetic background of the host. The host-parasite interaction is subject to a constant neuro-endocrine regulation that is thought to influence the adaptive immune system, and as the infection proceeds it can lead to a broad range of outcomes, ranging from pathogen elimination to its continued persistence in the host. In this context, T. cruzi evasion strategies and host defense mechanisms can be envisioned as two sides of the same coin, influencing parasite persistence and different outcomes observed in Chagas disease. Understanding how T. cruzi evade host's innate and adaptive immune response will provide important clues to better dissect mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Chagas disease.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD).

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, David N

    2013-10-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is the most common Connective Tissue Disease (CTD) and represents an increasing burden on global health resources. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) has been recognised as a complication of RA but its potential for mortality and morbidity has arguably been under appreciated for decades. New studies have underscored a significant lifetime risk of ILD development in RA. Contemporary work has identified an increased risk of mortality associated with the Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern which shares similarity with the most devastating of the interstitial pulmonary diseases, namely Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF). In this paper, we discuss recent studies highlighting the associated increase in mortality in RA-UIP. We explore associations between radiological and histopathological features of RA-ILD and the prognostic implications of same. We emphasise the need for translational research in this area given the growing burden of RA-ILD. We highlight the importance of the respiratory physician as a key stakeholder in the multidisciplinary management of this disorder. RA-ILD focused research offers the opportunity to identify early asymptomatic disease and define the natural history of this extra articular manifestation. This may provide a unique opportunity to define key regulatory fibrotic events driving progressive disease. We also discuss some of the more challenging and novel aspects of therapy for RA-ILD.

  20. Artificial intelligence-assisted occupational lung disease diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, P; McCoy, J M; Howard, K; Greer, D; Luo, J

    1991-08-01

    An artificial intelligence expert-based system for facilitating the clinical recognition of occupational and environmental factors in lung disease has been developed in a pilot fashion. It utilizes a knowledge representation scheme to capture relevant clinical knowledge into structures about specific objects (jobs, diseases, etc) and pairwise relations between objects. Quantifiers describe both the closeness of association and risk, as well as the degree of belief in the validity of a fact. An independent inference engine utilizes the knowledge, combining likelihoods and uncertainties to achieve estimates of likelihood factors for specific paths from work to illness. The system creates a series of "paths," linking work activities to disease outcomes. One path links a single period of work to a single possible disease outcome. In a preliminary trial, the number of "paths" from job to possible disease averaged 18 per subject in a general population and averaged 25 per subject in an asthmatic population. Artificial intelligence methods hold promise in the future to facilitate diagnosis in pulmonary and occupational medicine.

  1. Comparison of parasite loads in serum and blood samples from patients in acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Carolina; Teherán, Aníbal; Flórez, Carolina; Ramírez, Juan David

    2018-04-17

    Molecular methods have been developed for the detection and quantification of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood samples from patients with Chagas disease. However, aspects of sample processing necessary for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), such as the addition of guanidine hydrochloride to whole blood samples, may limit timely access to molecular diagnosis. We analysed 169 samples from serum and guanidine-EDTA blood (GEB) obtained from patients in acute and chronic phases of Chagas disease. We applied qPCR targeted to the satellite DNA region. Finally, we compared the parasite loads and cycle of threshold values of the qPCR. The results confirmed the usefulness of serum samples for the detection and quantification of parasite DNA in patients with Chagas disease, especially in the acute phase. However, the parasite loads detected in serum samples from patients in the chronic phase were lower than those detected in GEB samples. The epidemiological implications of the findings are herein discussed.

  2. Lung cancer in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease: clinical features and impact on outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Saeki, Keigo; Waseda, Yuko; Murata, Akari; Takato, Hazuki; Ichikawa, Yukari; Yasui, Masahide; Kimura, Hideharu; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Matsushita, Takashi; Yamada, Kazunori; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2018-02-01

    Lung cancer (LC) adversely impacts survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. However, little is known about LC in patients with connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for LC in CTD-ILD, and the clinical characteristics and survival of CTD-ILD patients with LC. We conducted a single-center, retrospective review of patients with CTD-ILD from 2003 to 2016. Patients with pathologically diagnosed LC were identified. The prevalence, risk factors, and clinical features of LC and the impact of LC on CTD-ILD patient outcomes were observed. Of 266 patients with CTD-ILD, 24 (9.0%) had LC. CTD-ILD with LC was more likely in patients who were older, male, and smokers; had rheumatoid arthritis, a usual interstitial pneumonia pattern, emphysema on chest computed tomography scan, and lower diffusing capacity of the lung carbon monoxide (DLco)% predicted; and were not receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Multivariate analysis indicated that the presence of emphysema [odds ratio (OR), 8.473; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.241-32.033] and nonuse of immunosuppressive therapy (OR, 8.111; 95% CI, 2.457-26.775) were independent risk factors for LC. CTD-ILD patients with LC had significantly worse survival than patients without LC (10-year survival rate: 28.5% vs. 81.8%, P<0.001). LC is associated with the presence of emphysema and nonuse of immunosuppressive therapy, and contributes to increased mortality in patients with CTD-ILD.

  3. Lung disease with chronic obstruction in opium smokers in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, J. L.; Tock, E. P. C.; Boey, H. K.

    1971-01-01

    Fifty-four opium smokers with chronic obstructive lung disease were studied for two-and-a-half years. Forty-eight patients had a cough for at least two years before the onset of inappropriate exertional dyspnoea. Fine, bubbling adventitious sounds suggesting small airway disease were heard on auscultation over the middle and lower lobes in 38 patients. The prevalence of inflammatory lung disease and chronic respiratory failure in this series is suggested as the main cause for the frequent finding of right ventricular hypertrophy and congestive heart failure. Physiological studies revealed moderate to severe airways obstruction with gross over-inflation and, in 32 patients, an additional restrictive defect probably due to peribronchiolar fibrosis. Radiological evidence of chronic bronchitis and bronchiolitis was observed in 45 patients, `pure' chronic bronchiolitis in six patients, and `widespread' emphysema in 25 patients respectively. Necropsy examinations in nine patients, however, showed destructive emphysema of variable severity in all. Chronic bronchiolitis often associated with striking bronchiolectasis was present in six cases. More severe bronchiolar rather than bronchial inflammation was noted. The heavy opium smokers had characteristic nodular shadows on chest radiography, sometimes associated with a striking reticular pattern not seen in `pure' cigarette smokers. This was due to gross pigmented dust (presumably carbon) deposition in relation to blood vessels, lymphatics, and bronchioles, and also within the alveoli. It is speculated that the initial lesion is an acquired bronchiolitis. Opium smoking induces an irritative bronchopathy favouring repeated attacks of acute bronchiolitis and eventually resulting in obliterative bronchiolitis, peribronchiolar fibrosis, chronic bronchitis, and destructive emphysema. Images PMID:5134057

  4. Statin Use Is Associated with Reduced Mortality in Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Krogh, Signe; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We hypothesized that statin use begun before the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease is associated with reduced mortality. METHODS: We studied all patients diagnosed with interstitial lung disease in the entire Danish population from 1995 through 2009, comparing statin use versus...... no statin use in a nested 1:2 matched study. RESULTS: The cumulative survival as a function of follow-up time from the date of diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (n = 1,786 + 3,572) and idiopathic lung fibrosis (n = 261 + 522) was higher for statin users versus never users (log-rank: P = 7 · 10......(-9) and P = 0.05). The median survival time in patients with interstitial lung disease was 3.3 years in statin users and 2.1 years in never users. Corresponding values in patients with idiopathic lung fibrosis were 3.4 versus 2.4 years. After multivariable adjustment, the hazard ratio for all...

  5. The value of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles in the diagnosis of diffused lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tieyi; Ji Jingling

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles in the differential diagnosis of the diffuse lung disease, seventy-two patients with diffuse lung diseases were evaluated, 15 of 72 patients were pathologically proven and the others clinically proven. Of these 72 patients, there were 33 patients with diffuse pulmonary interstitial disease, 5 patients with pulmonary parenchymal disease, 14 patients with bronchial disease, and 20 patients with disseminated disease. All patients had conventional CT scan of the chest, some also had HRCT scan. All CT images were jointly reviewed by two radiologists. The features of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles included: (1) Thinning of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in diffuse interstitial disease of lung and chronic bronchitis; (2) thickening of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in interstitial diseases and disseminated lung diseases such as sarcoidosis and lymphangitis carcinomatosis with beaded appearance of bronchovascular bundles; (3) Increased visibility of bronchovascular bundles, predominantly seen in bronchiolitis and disseminated lung diseases. CT features of the abnormalities of bronchovascular bundles are present in 80% of diffuse lung diseases. The features are not specific, but the beaded bronchovascular bundles are always seen in sarcoidosis and lymphangitis carcinomatosis. In making a distinction between idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and chronic bronchitis complicated with interstitial fibrosis, the position of diaphragm is of value in differential diagnosis, normal or elevated diaphragm is usually seen in the former, while low and flattened diaphragm in the latter. Change of the appearance of bronchovascular bundles from normality to abnormality reflects the process of development of the lung disease

  6. Lung-dominant connective tissue disease among patients with interstitial lung disease: prevalence, functional stability, and common extrathoracic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Antunes Silva Pereira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of a cohort of patients with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-CTD. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD, positive antinuclear antibody (ANA results (≥ 1/320, with or without specific autoantibodies, and at least one clinical feature suggestive of connective tissue disease (CTD. RESULTS: Of the 1,998 patients screened, 52 initially met the criteria for a diagnosis of LD-CTD: 37% were male; the mean age at diagnosis was 56 years; and the median follow-up period was 48 months. During follow-up, 8 patients met the criteria for a definitive diagnosis of a CTD. The remaining 44 patients comprised the LD-CTD group, in which the most prevalent extrathoracic features were arthralgia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The most prevalent autoantibodies in this group were ANA (89% and anti-SSA (anti-Ro, 27%. The mean baseline and final FVC was 69.5% and 74.0% of the predicted values, respectively (p > 0.05. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia patterns were found in 45% and 9% of HRCT scans, respectively; 36% of the scans were unclassifiable. A similar prevalence was noted in histological samples. Diffuse esophageal dilatation was identified in 52% of HRCT scans. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed in 22 patients; 17 showed a scleroderma pattern. CONCLUSIONS: In our LD-CTD group, there was predominance of females and the patients showed mild spirometric abnormalities at diagnosis, with differing underlying ILD patterns that were mostly unclassifiable on HRCT and by histology. We found functional stability on follow-up. Esophageal dilatation on HRCT and scleroderma pattern on nailfold capillaroscopy were frequent findings and might come to serve as diagnostic criteria.

  7. Basic principles of pulmonary anatomy and physiology for CT interpretation of lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remy-Jardin, M.; Beigelman, C.; Desfontaines, C.; Dupont, S.; Remy, J.

    1989-01-01

    High resolution CT is now the method of choice in the diagnosis of lung diseases, especially in their early recognition. However, the radiologist must be aware of precise anatomic, pathologic and physiologic data which are observed when the patient is supine. This concept leads to a transversal analysis of lung diseases by CT, as previously proposed in the coronal and sagittal planes for conventional chest X Ray interpretation. The aim of the study is to demonstrate that these regional differences in the lung must be included in the method of chest scanning but also in the interpretation of lung diseases [fr

  8. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Young Yhee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

  9. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.

  10. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima; Correa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida, E-mail: andrealb@ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina

    2016-09-15

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. (author)

  11. Interstitial lung disease associated with human papillomavirus vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Yamamoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinations against the human papillomavirus (HPV have been recommended for the prevention of cervical cancer. HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccines (Cervarix are said to have favourable safety profiles. Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs can occur following exposure to a drug or a biological agent. We report a case of ILD associated with a Cervarix vaccination. A woman in her 40's, with a history of conisation, received three inoculations of Cervarix. Three months later, she presented with a cough and shortness of breath. Findings from a computed tomography of the chest and a transbronchial lung biopsy were consistent with non-specific interstitial pneumonia. Workup eliminated all other causes of the ILD, except for the vaccination. Over the 11 months of the follow-up period, her symptoms resolved without steroid therapy. The onset and spontaneous resolution of the ILD showed a chronological association with the HPV vaccination. The semi-quantitative algorithm revealed that the likelihood of an adverse drug reaction to Cervarix was “Probable”. The outcome was relatively good, but more attention should be paid to a potential risk for HPV vaccinations to cause ILDs. Wherever possible, chest radiographic examinations should be performed in order not to overlook any ILDs.

  12. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima; Correa, Ricardo de Amorim; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida

    2016-01-01

    Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed), Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses. (author)

  13. Tomography patterns of lung disease in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa de Lima Bastos

    Full Text Available Abstract Currently, lung impairment is the leading factor responsible for the morbidity and mortality associated with systemic sclerosis. Therefore, the recognition of the various tomography patterns becomes decisive in the clinical management of these patients. In high-resolution computed tomography studies, the most common pattern is that of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. However, there are other forms of lung involvement that must also be recognized. The aim of this study was to review the literature on the main changes resulting from pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis and the corresponding radiological findings, considering the current classification of interstitial diseases. We searched the Medline (PubMed, Lilacs, and SciELO databases in order to select articles related to pulmonary changes in systemic sclerosis and published in English between 2000 and 2015. The pulmonary changes seen on computed tomography in systemic sclerosis are varied and are divided into three main categories: interstitial, alveolar, and vascular. Interstitial changes constitute the most common type of pulmonary involvement in systemic sclerosis. However, alveolar and vascular manifestations must also be recognized and considered in the presence of atypical clinical presentations and inadequate treatment responses.

  14. When More Transmission Equals Less Disease: Reconciling the Disconnect between Disease Hotspots and Parasite Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Andrew W.; Magori, Krisztian; White, Brad A.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The assumed straightforward connection between transmission intensity and disease occurrence impacts surveillance and control efforts along with statistical methodology, including parameter inference and niche modeling. Many infectious disease systems have the potential for this connection to be more complicated–although demonstrating this in any given disease system has remained elusive. Hemorrhagic disease (HD) is one of the most important diseases of white-tailed deer and is caused by viruses in the Orbivirus genus. Like many infectious diseases, the probability or severity of disease increases with age (after loss of maternal antibodies) and the probability of disease is lower upon re-infection compared to first infection (based on cross-immunity between virus strains). These broad criteria generate a prediction that disease occurrence is maximized at intermediate levels of transmission intensity. Using published US field data, we first fit a statistical model to predict disease occurrence as a function of seroprevalence (a proxy for transmission intensity), demonstrating that states with intermediate seroprevalence have the highest level of case reporting. We subsequently introduce an independently parameterized mechanistic model supporting the theory that high case reporting should come from areas with intermediate levels of transmission. This is the first rigorous demonstration of this phenomenon and illustrates that variation in transmission rate (e.g. along an ecologically-controlled transmission gradient) can create cryptic refuges for infectious diseases. PMID:23579922

  15. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    .... Often endemic in developing countries many parasitic diseases are neglected in terms of research funding and much remains to be understood about parasites and the interactions they have with the immune system...

  16. Lack of spirometry use in Danish patients initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette; Christensen, René Depont; Søndergaard, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing.......Research indicates that a large proportion of patients using medication targeting obstructive lung disease have no history of spirometry testing....

  17. Inhaled medication and inhalation devices for lung disease in patients with cystic fibrosis : A European consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijerman, Harry; Westerman, Elsbeth; Conway, Steven; Touw, Daan; Döring, Gerd; Frijlink, Henderik

    In cystic fibrosis inhalation of drugs for the treatment of CF related lung disease has been proven to be highly effective. Consequently, an increasing number of drugs and devices have been developed for CF lung disease or are currently under development. In this European consensus document we

  18. Oxygen titration strategies in chronic neonatal lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primhak, Robert

    2010-09-01

    The history of oxygen therapy in neonatology has been littered with error. Controversies remain in a number of areas of oxygen therapy, including targets and strategies in supplemental oxygen therapy in Chronic Neonatal Lung Disease (CNLD). This article reviews some of these controversies, and makes some recommendations based on the available evidence. In graduates of neonatal units who are left with CNLD, oxygen saturation should be kept above 93-95%, with levels below 90% being avoided as far as possible. Titration of oxygen should be done using oximetry recordings which include periods of different activities. Weaning of oxygen supplementation should only be done based on satisfactory recordings during a trial of a lower flow. There is insufficient evidence to say whether weaning for increasing hours a day or stepwise weaning to a continuous lower flow is a better method. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Management of Myositis-Related Interstitial Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisset, Julie; Johnson, Cheilonda; Rich, Eric; Collard, Harold R; Lee, Joyce S

    2016-11-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a frequent pulmonary manifestation and an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. Myositis-related ILD presents a therapeutic challenge for clinicians, as there are no available guidelines to help with management decisions. This review covers the existing evidence on the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management of myositis-related ILD, highlighting the lack of randomized controlled data to guide treatment. Given the absence of existing guidelines to inform treatment decisions, we provide a comprehensive summary, including dosing, side effects, and suggested monitoring of the commonly used immunosuppressive agents and a proposed treatment algorithm based on the existing literature. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Long term cardiovascular consequences of chronic lung disease of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Chuen Yeow; Edwards, Martin Oliver; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2013-12-01

    Pulmonary arterial (PA) hypertension in preterm infant is an important consequence of chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) arising mainly due to impaired alveolar development and dysregulated angiogenesis of the pulmonary circulation. Although PA pressure and resistance in these children normalise by school age, their pulmonary vasculature remains hyper-reactive to hypoxia until early childhood. Furthermore, there is evidence that systemic blood pressure in preterm born children with or without CLD is mildly increased at school age and in young adulthood when compared to term-born children. Arterial stiffness may be increased in CLD survivors due to increased smooth muscle tone of the pre-resistance and resistance vessels rather than the loss of elasticity in the large arteries. This review explores the long term effects of CLD on the pulmonary and systemic circulations along with their clinical correlates and therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgical lung biopsy for diffuse lung disease. Our experience in the last 15 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Blanco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical lung biopsy is a technique that presents a morbi-mortality rate of considerable importance. We analyze our experience with surgical lung biopsies for the diagnosis of diffuse lung disease and the effect produced on the indications for surgical biopsy in these pathologies after the publication of the consensus of the ATS (American Thoracic Society and ERS (European Respiratory Society for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF. Patients and methods: We performed a retrospective review of 171 patients operated between January 1997 and December 2011. We divided the series into 2 groups: group 1 (operated between 1997 and 2002 and group 2 (operated between 2003 and 2011. Suspected preoperative diagnosis, respiratory status, pathological postoperative diagnoses, percentage of thoracotomies, mean postoperative stay and perioperative morbidity and mortality were analyzed. Results: Group 1 consisted of 99 patients and group two 72. The most frequent postoperative diagnoses were: usual interstitial pneumonia and extrinsic allergic alveolitis. There were ten (5.84% deaths. Death was caused by progressive respiratory failure that was related to interstitial lung disease in 7 (70% of 10 cases, alveolar haemorrhage in 2 (20% and heart failure in 1 (10%. Conclusions: Since the publication of the ATS and ERS consensus on the IPF, we have observed a noticeable decrease in the number of indications for surgical lung biopsy. This technique, though simple, has a considerable morbidity and mortality. Resumo: Introdução: A biópsia pulmonar cirúrgica é uma técnica com uma morbimortalidade não negligenciável. Este trabalho resulta da experiência adquirida na realização de biópsias pulmonares cirúrgicas para o diagnóstico da doença pulmonar intersticial difusa, bem como pelo efeito provocado sobre as indicações da biópsia cirúrgica nesta entidade, após a publicação do consenso da ATS (American Thoracic Society e da ERS (European

  2. Ground-glass opacity in diffuse lung diseases: high-resolution computed tomography-pathology correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Maria Lucia de Oliveira; Vianna, Alberto Domingues; Marchiori, Edson; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Moraes, Heleno Pinto de

    2003-01-01

    Ground-glass opacity is a finding frequently seen in high-resolution computed tomography examinations of the chest and is characterized by hazy increased attenuation of lung, however without blurring of bronchial and vascular margins. Due to its un specificity, association with other radiological, clinical and pathological findings must be considered for an accurate diagnostic interpretation. In this paper were reviewed 62 computed tomography examinations of patients with diffuse pulmonary diseases of 14 different etiologies in which ground-glass opacity was the only or the most remarkable finding, and correlated this findings with pathology abnormalities seen on specimens obtained from biopsies or necropsies. In pneumocystosis, ground-glass opacities correlated histologically with alveolar occupation by a foaming material containing parasites, in bronchiole alveolar cell carcinoma with thickening of the alveolar septa and occupation of the lumen by mucus and tumoral cells, in paracoccidioidomycosis with thickening of the alveolar septa, areas of fibrosis and alveolar bronchopneumonia exudate, in sarcoidosis with fibrosis or clustering of granulomas and in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis with alveolar septa thickening due to fibrosis. Alveolar occupation by blood was found in cases of leptospirosis, idiopathic hemo siderosis, metastatic kidney tumor and invasive aspergillosis whereas oily vacuole were seen in lipoid pneumonia, proteinaceous and lipo proteinaceous material in silico proteinosis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and edematous fluid in cardiac failure. (author)

  3. Disruption of the Hepcidin/Ferroportin Regulatory System Causes Pulmonary Iron Overload and Restrictive Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Neves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that pulmonary iron accumulation is implicated in a spectrum of chronic lung diseases. However, the mechanism(s involved in pulmonary iron deposition and its role in the in vivo pathogenesis of lung diseases remains unknown. Here we show that a point mutation in the murine ferroportin gene, which causes hereditary hemochromatosis type 4 (Slc40a1C326S, increases iron levels in alveolar macrophages, epithelial cells lining the conducting airways and lung parenchyma, and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Pulmonary iron overload is associated with oxidative stress, restrictive lung disease with decreased total lung capacity and reduced blood oxygen saturation in homozygous Slc40a1C326S/C326S mice compared to wild-type controls. These findings implicate iron in lung pathology, which is so far not considered a classical iron-related disorder.

  4. Rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease: lung inflammation evaluated with high resolution computed tomography scan is correlated to rheumatoid arthritis disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Dórame, Renzo; Mejía, Mayra; Mateos-Toledo, Heidegger; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    To describe the association between rheumatoid arthritis disease activity (RA) and interstitial lung damage (inflammation and fibrosis), in a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). A retrospective study of RA patients with interstitial lung disease (restrictive pattern in lung function tests and evidence of interstitial lung disease in high resolution computed tomography (HRCT)). Patients were evaluated to exclude other causes of pulmonary disease. RA disease activity was measured with the CDAI index. Interstitial lung inflammation and fibrosis were determined by Kazerooni scale. We compared Kazerooni ground-glass score with the nearest CDAI score to HRCT date scan of the first medical evaluation at our institution. In nine patients, we compared the first ground-glass score with a second one after treatment with DMARDs and corticosteroids. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was used to evaluate association between RA disease activity and the Kazerooni ground-glass and fibrosis scores. Thirty-four patients were included. A positive correlation between CDAI and ground-glass scores was found (rs=0.3767, P<0.028). Fibrosis and CDAI scores were not associated (rs=-0.0747, P<0.6745). After treatment, a downward tendency in the ground-glass score was observed (median [IQR]): (2.33 [2,3] vs. 2 [1.33-2.16]), P<0.056, along with a lesser CDAI score (27 [8-43] vs. 9 [5-12]), P<0.063. There is a correlation between RA disease activity and ground-glass appearance in the HRCT of RA-ILD patients. These results suggest a positive association between RA disease activity and lung inflammation in RA-ILD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Using a One Health approach to assess the impact of parasitic disease in livestock: how does it add value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Jonathan; Bruce, Mieghan

    2017-01-01

    Human population increases, with greater food demands, have resulted in a rapid evolution of livestock food systems, leading to changes in land and water use. The scale of global livestock systems mean that changes in animal health status, particularly in parasite levels, have impacts that go beyond farm and sector levels. To quantify the true impact of parasites in livestock, frameworks that look at both resources and services valued in markets and those that have no true market value are required. Mitigating the effects of parasitic disease in livestock will not only increase productivity, but also improve animal welfare and human health, whilst reducing the environmental burden of livestock production systems. To measure these potential benefits, a One Health approach is needed. This paper discusses the types of methods and the data collection tools needed for a more holistic perspective and provides a framework with its application to coccidiosis in poultry. To build a body of knowledge that allows the ranking of parasite diseases in a wider animal health setting, such One Health frameworks need to be applied more frequently and with rigour. The outcome will improve the allocation of resources to critical constraints on parasite management.

  6. Interstitial Lung Disease in a 70-Year-Old Man with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hampton W; Frye, Jeanetta W

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a rare but increasingly recognized extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease that can have devastating consequences if left untreated. We report a case of ulcerative colitis-associated interstitial lung disease presenting with acute hypoxic respiratory failure during an ulcerative colitis flare. Gastroenterologists and pulmonologists should be aware of the numerous bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms that can suggest systemic illness in inflammatory bowel disease.

  7. Emerging Animal Parasitic Diseases: A Global Overview and Appropriate Strategies for their Monitoring and Surveillance in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehmengo, Ngongeh L; Nnagbo, Chiejina S

    2014-01-01

    Emerging animal parasitic diseases are reviewed and appropriate strategies for efficient monitoring and surveillance in Nigeria are outlined. Animal and human parasitic infections are distinguished. Emerging diseases have been described as those diseases that are being recognised for the first time or diseases that are already recorded but their frequency and/or geographic range is being increased tremendously. Emergence of new diseases may be due to a number of factors such as the spread of a new infectious agent, recognition of an infection that has been in existence but undiagnosed, or when it is realised that an established disease has an infectious origin. The terms could also be used to describe the resurgence of a known infection after its incidence had been known to have declined. Emerging infections are compounding the control of infectious diseases and huge resources are being channeled to alleviate the rising challenge. The diseases are numerous and include helminth, protozoal / rickettsial and entomological. A list of parasitic emerging diseases in Nigeria is included. Globally occurring emerging parasitic diseases are also outlined. Emerging and re-emerging infections can be brought about by many factors including climate change and global warming, changes in biodiversity, population mobility, movement of animals, globalisation of commerce/trade and food supply, social and cultural factors such as food eating habits, religious beliefs, farming practices, trade of infected healthy animals, reduction in the available land for animals, immune-suppressed host and host density and misuse or over use of some drugs leading to drug resistance. PMID:25328553

  8. Parasitic, fungal and prion zoonoses: an expanding universe of candidates for human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akritidis, N

    2011-03-01

    Zoonotic infections have emerged as a burden for millions of people in recent years, owing to re-emerging or novel pathogens often causing outbreaks in the developing world in the presence of inadequate public health infrastructure. Among zoonotic infections, those caused by parasitic pathogens are the ones that affect millions of humans worldwide, who are also at risk of developing chronic disease. The present review discusses the global effect of protozoan pathogens such as Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma sp., and Toxoplasma sp., as well as helminthic pathogens such as Echinococcus sp., Fasciola sp., and Trichinella sp. The zoonotic aspects of agents that are not essentially zoonotic are also discussed. The review further focuses on the zoonotic dynamics of fungal pathogens and prion diseases as observed in recent years, in an evolving environment in which novel patient target groups have developed for agents that were previously considered to be obscure or of minimal significance. © 2011 The Author. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  9. PROGRESSION OF DISEASES CAUSED BY THE OYSTER PARASITES, PERKINSUS MARINUS AND HAPLOSPORIDIUM NELSONI, IN CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CONSTRUCTED INTERTIDAL REEFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The progression of diseases caused by the oyster parasites, Perkinsus marinus and Haplosporidium nelsoni, were evaluated by periodic sampling (May 1994-Dec. 1995) of oysters, Crassostrea virginica, that set on an artificial reef located in the Piankatank River, Virginia, in Augus...

  10. [Progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yuan; Yu, Chuan-xin

    2013-08-01

    Antibody has extensive application prospects in the biomedical field. The inherent disadvantages of traditional polyclonal antibody and monoclonal antibody limit their application values. The humanized and fragmented antibody remodeling has given a rise to a series of genetic engineered antibody variant. This paper reviews the progress of research on genetic engineering antibody and its application in prevention and control of parasitic diseases.

  11. Mechanisms and consequences of oxidative stress in lung disease: therapeutic implications for an aging populace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Louise

    2018-04-01

    The rapid expansion of the elderly population has led to the recent epidemic of age-related diseases, including increased incidence and mortality of chronic and acute lung diseases. Numerous studies have implicated aging and oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various pulmonary diseases; however, despite recent advances in these fields, the specific contributions of aging and oxidative stress remain elusive. This review will discuss the consequences of aging on lung morphology and physiology, and how redox imbalance with aging contributes to lung disease susceptibility. Here, we focus on three lung diseases for which aging is a significant risk factor: acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Preclinical and clinical development for redox- and senescence-altering therapeutic strategies are discussed, as well as scientific advancements that may direct current and future therapeutic development. A deeper understanding of how aging impacts normal lung function, redox balance, and injury-repair processes will inspire the development of new therapies to prevent and/or reverse age-associated pulmonary diseases, and ultimately increase health span and longevity. This review is intended to encourage basic, clinical, and translational research that will bridge knowledge gaps at the intersection of aging, oxidative stress, and lung disease to fuel the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for lung diseases that disproportionately afflict the elderly.

  12. 18FDG uptake associated with CT density on PET/CT in lungs with and without chronic interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kentaro; Okada, Ken; Taki, Yasuyuki; Goto, Ryoi; Kinomura, Shigeo; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    The dependent-density of computed tomography (CT) images of positron emission tomography (PET)/CT is sometimes difficult to distinguish from chronic interstitial lung disease (ILD) when it accompanies increased 18 F-fluorodeoxy-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) uptake. Though the possible utility of 18 FDG-PET for the diagnosis of active ILD has been reported, the clinical relevance of mild lung 18 FDG uptake in ILD cases without signs and symptoms suggesting acute progression has not been described. This study aimed to test relationships between 18 FDG uptake and lung density on CT using PET/CT in patients with normal lung as well as clinically stable chronic ILD. Thirty-six patients with normal lungs (controls) and 28 patients with chronic ILD (ILD cases) without acute exacerbation were retrospectively selected from 18 FDG PET/CT scans performed in examination of malignant neoplasms. Elliptical regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on the lung. The relationships between CT density and 18 FDG uptake between the control and ILD cases were tested. The CT density and 18 FDG uptake had a linear correlation in both the controls and the ILD cases without a difference in their regression slopes, and they were overlapped between the controls and the ILD cases with higher mean values in the ILD cases. Lung 18 FDG uptake was considered to reflect a gravity-dependent tissue density in the normal lung. Though the lung 18 FDG uptake as well as the CT density tended to be higher in chronic ILD patients, it may be difficult to distinguish them in normal dependent regions from those related to chronic ILD in some cases. (author)

  13. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Monotherapy for Granulomatous Lymphocytic Interstitial Lung Disease in Common Variable Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizue; Sakai, Fumikazu; Okabayashi, Asako; Sato, Akitoshi; Yokohori, Naoko; Katsura, Hideki; Asano, Chihiro; Kamata, Toshiko; Koh, Eitetsu; Sekine, Yasuo; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Ogura, Takashi; Takemura, Tamiko

    2017-11-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous subset of immunodeficiency disorders. Recurrent bacterial infection is the main feature of CVID, but various non-infectious complications can occur. A 42-year-old woman presented with cough and abnormal chest X-ray shadows. Laboratory tests showed remarkable hypogammaglobulinemia. Computed tomography revealed multiple consolidation and nodules on the bilateral lung fields, systemic lymphadenopathy, and splenomegaly. A surgical lung biopsy specimen provided the final diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease in CVID, which was grouped under the term granulomatous lymphocytic interstitial lung disease. Interestingly, the lung lesions of this case resolved immediately after the initiation of intravenous immunoglobulin monotherapy.

  14. The COPD Assessment Test as a Prognostic Marker in Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiko Someya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD Assessment Test (CAT, which was developed to measure the health status of patients with COPD, was applied to patients with interstitial lung disease, aiming to examine the CAT as a predictor of outcome. Over a follow-up period of more than one year, 101 consecutive patients with interstitial lung disease were evaluated by the CAT. The CAT scores of 40 in total were categorized into four subsets according to the severity. Patients with higher (more severe scores exhibited lower forced vital capacity and lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide. The survival rate was significantly lower in patients with higher scores (log-rank test, P = 0.0002, and the hazard ratios for death of the higher scores and lower lung diffusion capacity for carbon monoxide were independently significant. These findings suggest that CAT can indicate the risk of mortality in patients with interstitial lung disease.

  15. Erectile dysfunction is a common problem in interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to chronic diseases, including COPD. The patho- genesis may involve chronic hypoxia, which is common in interstitial lung disease (ILD). We aimed to study the relationship between ILD and ED. Method: Male patients with ILD detected by high...... degree of ED, thirty (56.6%) had moderate to severe ED, and 23 (43.4%) had severe ED. Low diffusion capacity and high body mass index showed a trend of increasing risk of moderate to severe ED. The risk increased with age (OR per 5-year increase=2.63 (1.25; 5.53)) and decreased with 6MWT distance (OR per...... 50 m increase=0.60 (0.41; 0.89). Only two patients (6.7%) received specific treatment with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Conclusion: Severe ED is a common problem in men with ILD, and is associated with poor walking distance and high age. Treatment coverage is low, and physicians should ad- dress...

  16. Parasitic diseases as the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the cause of death of prisoners of war during the Korean War (1950-1953), death certificates or medical records were analyzed. Out of 7,614 deaths, 5,013 (65.8%) were due to infectious diseases. Although dysentery and tuberculosis were the most common infectious diseases, parasitic diseases had caused 14 deaths: paragonimiasis in 5, malaria in 3, amoebiasis in 2, intestinal parasitosis in 2, ascariasis in 1, and schistosomiasis in 1. These results showed that paragonimiasis, malaria, and amoebiasis were the most fatal parasitic diseases during the early 1950s in the Korean Peninsula. Since schistosomiasis is not endemic to Korea, it is likely that the infected private soldier moved from China or Japan to Korea.

  17. Variation in Cilia Protein Genes and Progression of Lung Disease in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Elizabeth; Louie, Tin L; Chong, Jessica X; Hebbring, Scott J; Barnes, Kathleen C; Rafaels, Nicholas M; Knowles, Michael R; Gibson, Ronald L; Bamshad, Michael J; Emond, Mary J

    2018-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis, like primary ciliary dyskinesia, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by abnormal mucociliary clearance and obstructive lung disease. We hypothesized that genes underlying the development or function of cilia may modify lung disease severity in persons with cystic fibrosis. To test this hypothesis, we compared variants in 93 candidate genes in both upper and lower tertiles of lung function in a large cohort of children and adults with cystic fibrosis with those of a population control dataset. Variants within candidate genes were tested for association using the SKAT-O test, comparing cystic fibrosis cases defined by poor (n = 127) or preserved (n = 127) lung function with population controls (n = 3,269 or 3,148, respectively). Associated variants were then tested for association with related phenotypes in independent datasets. Variants in DNAH14 and DNAAF3 were associated with poor lung function in cystic fibrosis, whereas variants in DNAH14 and DNAH6 were associated with preserved lung function in cystic fibrosis. Associations between DNAH14 and lung function were replicated in disease-related phenotypes characterized by obstructive lung disease in adults. Genetic variants within DNAH6, DNAH14, and DNAAF3 are associated with variation in lung function among persons with cystic fibrosis.

  18. Clinical Utility of Additional Measurement of Total Lung Capacity in Diagnosing Obstructive Lung Disease in Subjects With Restrictive Pattern of Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Chang, Boksoon; Kim, Kyunga; Song, Won Jun; Chon, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Jung Soo; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-04-01

    Total lung capacity (TLC), forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% (FEF25-75%), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or post-bronchodilator volume response is recommended to detect obstructive abnormalities in the lung. The present study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of these pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters to diagnose obstructive lung disease in subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry. A retrospective study was conducted in 64 subjects with a restrictive pattern of spirometry (normal FEV1/FVC and low FVC) out of 3,030 patients who underwent all pre- and post-bronchodilator spirometry and lung volume measurement between April 2008 and December 2010. After subjects were clinically classified into those with obstructive lung disease, restrictive lung disease, and mixed lung disease, the agreements between the clinical diagnosis and PFT classification according to TLC, FEF(25-75%), PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria were compared. Of 64 subjects, 18 (28.1%) were classified with obstructive lung disease, 39 (60.9%) had restrictive lung disease, 1 (1.6%) had mixed lung disease, and 6 (9.4%) had no clinical lung disease. Among the 58 subjects with clinical lung disease, 22 (37.9%), 37 (63.8%), 33 (56.9%), and 3 (5.2%) were classified as having obstructive pattern based on TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria, respectively. The kappa coefficients for the agreement between the clinical classification and PFT classification using TLC, FEF25-75%, PEF, and post-bronchodilator response criteria in 58 subjects were 0.59, 0.18, 0.17, and spirometry, when obstructive lung disease is clinically suspected. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  19. HRCT patterns of the most important interstitial lung diseases; HRCT-Muster der wichtigsten interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer-Prokop, C. [Meander Medisch Centrum, Abt. Radiologie, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Radboud Universitaet, Abt. Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Interstitial lung diseases are a mixed group of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases which can have an acute or chronic course. Idiopathic diseases and diseases with an underlying cause (e.g. collagen vascular diseases) share the same patterns. Thin section computed tomography (CT) plays a central role in the diagnostic work-up. The article describes the most important interstitial lung diseases following a four pattern approach with a predominant nodular or reticular pattern or a pattern with increased or decreased lung density. (orig.) [German] Interstitielle Lungenerkrankungen stellen eine gemischte Gruppe diffuser Lungenparenchymerkrankungen dar, die einen akuten oder chronischen Verlauf haben koennen. Idiopathische Erkrankungen und Erkrankungen mit definierter Ursache (z. B. kollagenvaskulaere Erkrankungen) weisen ein gemeinsames Muster auf. Die Duennschichtcomputertomographie spielt eine zentrale Rolle in der diagnostischen Abklaerung. In dem vorliegenden Beitrag werden die wichtigsten interstitiellen Lungenerkrankungen beschrieben. Dabei gibt es 4 Grundmuster: ueberwiegend nodulaere Verdichtungen, vorwiegend retikulaere Verdichtungen, erhoehte oder erniedrigte Lungenparenchymdichte. (orig.)

  20. Role of the Lung Microbiome in the Pathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Hao, Ke; Yang, Ting; Wang, Chen

    2017-09-05

    The development of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis shows that bronchial tree is not sterile in either healthy or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) individuals. With the advance of sequencing technologies, lung microbiome has become a new frontier for pulmonary disease research, and such advance has led to better understanding of the lung microbiome in COPD. This review aimed to summarize the recent advances in lung microbiome, its relationships with COPD, and the possible mechanisms that microbiome contributed to COPD pathogenesis. Literature search was conducted using PubMed to collect all available studies concerning lung microbiome in COPD. The search terms were "microbiome" and "chronic obstructive pulmonary disease", or "microbiome" and "lung/pulmonary". The papers in English about lung microbiome or lung microbiome in COPD were selected, and the type of articles was not limited. The lung is a complex microbial ecosystem; the microbiome in lung is a collection of viable and nonviable microbiota (bacteria, viruses, and fungi) residing in the bronchial tree and parenchymal tissues, which is important for health. The following types of respiratory samples are often used to detect the lung microbiome: sputum, bronchial aspirate, bronchoalveolar lavage, and bronchial mucosa. Disordered bacterial microbiome is participated in pathogenesis of COPD; there are also dynamic changes in microbiota during COPD exacerbations. Lung microbiome may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD by manipulating inflammatory and/or immune process. Normal lung microbiome could be useful for prophylactic or therapeutic management in COPD, and the changes of lung microbiome could also serve as biomarkers for the evaluation of COPD.

  1. Comparison between Two Decades of Prevalence of Intestinal Parasitic Diseases and Risk Factors in a Brazilian Urban Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Alves de Oliveira Serra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study’s objective was to compare the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors in children in urban communities, in the Brazilian Northeast, between two decades. Methods. This quantitative transversal study consisted of a comparative analysis of two different samples: the first viewing the years 1992–1996 and the other through a coproepidemiological data survey undertaken in 2010-2011. Results. It was evidenced that there was a reduction of intestinal parasites and that there were improvements in the socioenvironmental conditions between the two decades evaluated. It was observed that, in the period 1992–1996, playing out in the streets was associated with a higher risk for acquiring intestinal parasites. Over the 2010-2011 period, the characteristics of more than five residents per household, houses with dirt floors, children who live in homes without piped water, and children who play out in the streets were associated with a higher risk of intestinal parasitic infection. Conclusion. The study showed a reduction of intestinal parasitic diseases to 23.8% in 2010-2011 from 81.3% in 1992–1996 and improvement of the social-sanitary conditions of the population between the decades analyzed.

  2. The safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Yuichiro; Hattori, Yoshihiro; Tohnai, Rie; Ito, Shoichi; Kawa, Yoshitaka; Kono, Yuko; Urata, Yoshiko; Nogami, Munenobu; Takenaka, Daisuke; Negoro, Shunichi; Satouchi, Miyako

    2018-01-01

    The optimal chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease is unclear. We therefore investigated the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line regimen for non-small cell lung cancer in patients with interstitial lung disease. We retrospectively reviewed advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with interstitial lung disease who received carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel as a first-line chemotherapy regimen at Hyogo Cancer Center between February 2013 and August 2016. interstitial lung disease was diagnosed according to the findings of pretreatment chest high-resolution computed tomography. Twelve patients were included (male, n = 11; female, n = 1). The overall response rate was 67% and the disease control rate was 100%. The median progression free survival was 5.1 months (95% CI: 2.9-8.3 months) and the median overall survival was 14.9 months (95% CI: 4.8-not reached). A chemotherapy-related acute exacerbation of interstitial lung disease was observed in one patient; the extent of this event was Grade 2. There were no treatment-related deaths. Carboplatin plus nab-paclitaxel, as a first-line chemotherapy regimen for non-small cell lung cancer, showed favorable efficacy and safety in patients with preexisting interstitial lung disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Interstitial Lung Disease due to Siderosis in a Lathe Machine Worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothi, D; Satija, B; Kumar, S; Kaur, Omkar

    2015-01-01

    Since its first description in 1936, siderosis of lung has been considered a benign pneumoconiosis due to absence of significant clinical symptoms or respiratory impairment. Subsequently, authors have questioned the non-fibrogenic property of iron. However, siderosis causing interstitial lung disease with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern has not been described in the past. We report a case of UIP on high resolution computed tomography, proven to be siderosis on transbronchial lung biopsy in a lathe machine worker.

  4. Critical study of the diagnostic value of lung scans using 67 gallium in respiratory diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin-Fayolle, M.; Brun, J.; Moret, R.; Kofman, J.; Ortonne, J.P.; Petigny, C.

    1975-01-01

    70 lungs scans using gallium 67 were carried out. Among the 41 malignant lesions, an uptake of the radio-isotope by the tumour in 51% of cases was noted. Among the 29 benign lesions, there were also 34% of cases which took up gallium 67. Their lack of reliability and selectivity make gallium 67 lung scans unsuitable for the recognition of the malignant nature of lung diseases [fr

  5. The Rabbit as a Model for Studying Lung Disease and Stem Cell Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Kamaruzaman, Nurfatin Asyikhin; Kardia, Egi; Kamaldin, Nurulain ‘Atikah; Latahir, Ahmad Zaeri; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2013-01-01

    No single animal model can reproduce all of the human features of both acute and chronic lung diseases. However, the rabbit is a reliable model and clinically relevant facsimile of human disease. The similarities between rabbits and humans in terms of airway anatomy and responses to inflammatory mediators highlight the value of this species in the investigation of lung disease pathophysiology and in the development of therapeutic agents. The inflammatory responses shown by the rabbit model, e...

  6. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrams TE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Thad E Abrams,1,2 Amy Blevins,1,3 Mark W Vander Weg1,2,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, 2Center for Comprehensive Access and Delivery Research and Evaluation, Iowa City VA Health Care System, 3Hardin Health Sciences Library, 4Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA Background: Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature.Objectives: The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1 determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2 identify targeted areas for further research.Methods: A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1 the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2 the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology.Results: A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD

  7. Th17/Treg immunoregulation and implications in treatment of sulfur mustard gas-induced lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iman, Maryam; Rezaei, Ramazan; Azimzadeh Jamalkandi, Sadegh; Shariati, Parvin; Kheradmand, Farrah; Salimian, Jafar

    2017-12-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is an extremely toxic gas used in chemical warfare to cause massive lung injury and death. Victims exposed to SM gas acutely present with inhalational lung injury, but among those who survive, some develop obstructive airway diseases referred to as SM-lung syndrome. Pathophysiologically, SM-lung shares many characteristics with smoking-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including airway remodeling, goblet cell metaplasia, and obstructive ventilation defect. Some of the hallmarks of COPD pathogenesis, which include dysregulated lung inflammation, neutrophilia, recruitment of interleukin 17A (IL -17A) expressing CD4 + T cells (Th17), and the paucity of lung regulatory T cells (Tregs), have also been described in SM-lung. Areas covered: A literature search was performed using the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases inclusive of all literature prior to and including May 2017. Expert commentary: Here we review some of the recent findings that suggest a role for Th17 cell-mediated inflammatory changes associated with pulmonary complications in SM-lung and suggest new therapeutic approaches that could potentially alter disease progression with immune modulating biologics that can restore the lung Th17/Treg balance.

  8. Periodontal Disease and Incident Lung Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xian-Tao; Xia, Ling-Yun; Zhang, Yong-Gang; Li, Sheng; Leng, Wei-Dong; Kwong, Joey S W

    2016-10-01

    Periodontal disease is linked to a number of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus. Recent evidence has suggested periodontal disease might be associated with lung cancer. However, their precise relationship is yet to be explored. Hence, this study aims to investigate the association of periodontal disease and risk of incident lung cancer using a meta-analytic approach. PubMed, Scopus, and ScienceDirect were searched up to June 10, 2015. Cohort and nested case-control studies investigating risk of lung cancer in patients with periodontal disease were included. Hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated, as were their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using a fixed-effect inverse-variance model. Statistical heterogeneity was explored using the Q test as well as the I(2) statistic. Publication bias was assessed by visual inspection of funnel plots symmetry and Egger's test. Five cohort studies were included, involving 321,420 participants in this meta-analysis. Summary estimates based on adjusted data showed that periodontal disease was associated with a significant risk of lung cancer (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.36; I(2) = 30%). No publication bias was detected. Subgroup analysis indicated that the association of periodontal disease and lung cancer remained significant in the female population. Evidence from cohort studies suggests that patients with periodontal disease are at increased risk of developing lung cancer.

  9. The Echinococcus canadensis (G7) genome: a key knowledge of parasitic platyhelminth human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Lucas L; Assis, Juliana; Araújo, Flávio M Gomes; Salim, Anna C M; Macchiaroli, Natalia; Cucher, Marcela; Camicia, Federico; Fox, Adolfo; Rosenzvit, Mara; Oliveira, Guilherme; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-02-27

    The parasite Echinococcus canadensis (G7) (phylum Platyhelminthes, class Cestoda) is one of the causative agents of echinococcosis. Echinococcosis is a worldwide chronic zoonosis affecting humans as well as domestic and wild mammals, which has been reported as a prioritized neglected disease by the World Health Organisation. No genomic data, comparative genomic analyses or efficient therapeutic and diagnostic tools are available for this severe disease. The information presented in this study will help to understand the peculiar biological characters and to design species-specific control tools. We sequenced, assembled and annotated the 115-Mb genome of E. canadensis (G7). Comparative genomic analyses using whole genome data of three Echinococcus species not only confirmed the status of E. canadensis (G7) as a separate species but also demonstrated a high nucleotide sequences divergence in relation to E. granulosus (G1). The E. canadensis (G7) genome contains 11,449 genes with a core set of 881 orthologs shared among five cestode species. Comparative genomics revealed that there are more single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between E. canadensis (G7) and E. granulosus (G1) than between E. canadensis (G7) and E. multilocularis. This result was unexpected since E. canadensis (G7) and E. granulosus (G1) were considered to belong to the species complex E. granulosus sensu lato. We described SNPs in known drug targets and metabolism genes in the E. canadensis (G7) genome. Regarding gene regulation, we analysed three particular features: CpG island distribution along the three Echinococcus genomes, DNA methylation system and small RNA pathway. The results suggest the occurrence of yet unknown gene regulation mechanisms in Echinococcus. This is the first work that addresses Echinococcus comparative genomics. The resources presented here will promote the study of mechanisms of parasite development as well as new tools for drug discovery. The availability of a high

  10. The association between combined non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim YW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Yeon Wook Kim,1 Kwang-Nam Jin,2 Eun Young Heo,3 Sung Soo Park,3 Hee Soon Chung,3 Deog Kyeom Kim31Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 3Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of KoreaBackground: Whereas the epidemiological association between lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, a chronic inflammatory respiratory disease, is well known, limited studies have examined the association between lung cancer and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis, a representative chronic airway inflammatory disease. This study evaluated the association between bronchiectasis and lung cancer in patients with COPD.Methods: A matched case–control study was conducted in a referral hospital in South Korea. Among COPD patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation (forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity <0.7 and forced expiratory volume in one second ≤70% [% predicted] who underwent chest computed tomography (CT between January 1, 2010 and May 30, 2013, patients with lung cancer and controls matched for age, sex, and smoking history were selected. The risk of lung cancer was assessed according to the presence of underlying bronchiectasis confirmed by chest CT.Results: The study enrolled 99 cases and 198 controls. Combined bronchiectasis on chest CT was inversely associated with the risk of lung cancer compared with controls (odds ratio [OR] 0.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.12–0.52, P<0.001. Significant associations were found in

  11. Ecomorphology and disease: cryptic effects of parasitism on host habitat use, thermoregulation, and predator avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brett A; Johnson, Pieter T J

    2011-03-01

    Parasites can cause dramatic changes in the phenotypes of their hosts, sometimes leading to a higher probability of predation and parasite transmission. Because an organism's morphology directly affects its locomotion, even subtle changes in key morphological traits may affect survival and behavior. However, despite the ubiquity of parasites in natural communities, few studies have incorporated parasites into ecomorphological research. Here, we evaluated the effects of parasite-induced changes in host phenotype on the habitat use, thermal biology, and simulated predator-escape ability of Pacific chorus frogs (Pseudacris regilla) in natural environments. Frogs with parasite-induced limb malformations were more likely to use ground microhabitats relative to vertical refugia and selected less-angled perches closer to the ground in comparison with normal frogs. Although both groups had similar levels of infection, malformed frogs used warmer microhabitats, which resulted in higher body temperatures. Likely as a result of their morphological abnormalities, malformed frogs allowed a simulated predator to approach closer before escaping and escaped shorter distances relative to normal frogs. These data indicate that parasite-induced morphological changes can significantly alter host behavior and habitat use, highlighting the importance of incorporating the ubiquitous, albeit cryptic, role of parasites into ecomorphological research.

  12. Detection and Severity Scoring of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Using Volumetric Analysis of Lung CT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseini, Mohammad Parsa; Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Akhlaghpoor, Shahram

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a devastating disease.While there is no cure for COPD and the lung damage associated with this disease cannot be reversed, it is still very important to diagnose it as early as possible. In this paper, we propose a novel method based on the measurement of air trapping in the lungs from CT images to detect COPD and to evaluate its severity. Twenty-five patients and twelve normal adults were included in this study. The proposed method found volumetric changes of the lungs from inspiration to expiration. To this end, trachea CT images at full inspiration and expiration were compared and changes in the areas and volumes of the lungs between inspiration and expiration were used to define quantitative measures (features). Using these features,the subjects were classified into two groups of normal and COPD patients using a Bayesian classifier. In addition, t-tests were applied to evaluate discrimination powers of the features for this classification. For the cases studied, the proposed method estimated air trapping in the lungs from CT images without human intervention. Based on the results, a mathematical model was developed to relate variations of lung volumes to the severity of the disease. As a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system, the proposed method may assist radiologists in the detection of COPD. It quantifies air trapping in the lungs and thus may assist them with the scoring of the disease by quantifying the severity of the disease

  13. Quantitative measurement of lung density with x-ray CT and positron CT, (2). Diseased subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Kengo; Ito, Masatoshi; Kubota, Kazuo

    1985-05-01

    Lung density was quantitatively measured on six diseased patients with X-ray CT (XCT) and Positron CT(PCT). The findings are as follows: In the silicosis, extravascular lung density was found to be remarkably increased compared to normals (0.29gcm/sup 3/), but blood volume was in normal range. In the post-irradiated lung cancers, extravascular lung density increased in the irradiated sites compared to the non-irradiated opposite sites, and blood volume varied in each case. In a patient with chronic heart failure, blood volume decreased (0.11mlcm/sup 3/) with increased extravascular lung density (0.23gcm/sup 3/). In the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, both extravascular lung density and blood volume decreased (0.11gcm/sup 3/ and 0.10mlcm/sup 3/ respectively). Lung density measured with XCT was constantly lower than that with PCT in all cases. But changes in the values of lung density measured, correlated well with each other. In conclusion, the method presented here may clarify the etiology of the diffuse pulmonary diseases, and be used to differentiate and grade the diseases.

  14. Clinical Outcomes in Interstitial Lung Diseases : Measuring and improving quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.G. Van Manen (Mirjam)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractInterstitial lung diseases (ILDs) contain a wide variety of disorders, usually affecting both lungs diffusely. The most common ILDs are idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and sarcoidosis. ILDs have a major impact on quality of life. Although it is well-known that quality of life is

  15. Genetic Modification of the Lung Directed Toward Treatment of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondhi, Dolan; Stiles, Katie M; De, Bishnu P; Crystal, Ronald G

    2017-01-01

    Genetic modification therapy is a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases of the lung intractable to other treatments. Lung gene therapy has been the subject of numerous preclinical animal experiments and human clinical trials, for targets including genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and α1-antitrypsin deficiency, complex disorders such as asthma, allergy, and lung cancer, infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and Pseudomonas, as well as pulmonary arterial hypertension, transplant rejection, and lung injury. A variety of viral and non-viral vectors have been employed to overcome the many physical barriers to gene transfer imposed by lung anatomy and natural defenses. Beyond the treatment of lung diseases, the lung has the potential to be used as a metabolic factory for generating proteins for delivery to the circulation for treatment of systemic diseases. Although much has been learned through a myriad of experiments about the development of genetic modification of the lung, more work is still needed to improve the delivery vehicles and to overcome challenges such as entry barriers, persistent expression, specific cell targeting, and circumventing host anti-vector responses.

  16. Transbronchial Lung Cryobiopsy and Video-assisted Thoracoscopic Lung Biopsy in the Diagnosis of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease. A Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Test Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikhar, Imran H; Alghothani, Lana; Sardi, Alejandro; Berkowitz, David; Musani, Ali I

    2017-07-01

    Transbronchial lung cryobiopsy is increasingly being used for the assessment of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Several studies have shown larger biopsy samples and higher yields compared with conventional transbronchial biopsies. However, the higher risk of bleeding and other complications has raised concerns for widespread use of this modality. To study the diagnostic accuracy and safety profile of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy and compare with video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) by reviewing available evidence from the literature. Medline and PubMed were searched from inception until December 2016. Data on diagnostic performance were abstracted by constructing two-by-two contingency tables for each study. Data on a priori selected safety outcomes were collected. Risk of bias was assessed with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Random effects meta-analyses were performed to obtain summary estimates of the diagnostic accuracy. The pooled diagnostic yield, pooled sensitivity, and pooled specificity of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy were 83.7% (76.9-88.8%), 87% (85-89%), and 57% (40-73%), respectively. The pooled diagnostic yield, pooled sensitivity, and pooled specificity of VATS were 92.7% (87.6-95.8%), 91.0% (89-92%), and 58% (31-81%), respectively. The incidence of grade 2 (moderate to severe) endobronchial bleeding after transbronchial lung cryobiopsy and of post-procedural pneumothorax was 4.9% (2.2-10.7%) and 9.5% (5.9-14.9%), respectively. Although the diagnostic test accuracy measures of transbronchial lung cryobiopsy lag behind those of VATS, with an acceptable safety profile and potential cost savings, the former could be considered as an alternative in the evaluation of patients with diffuse parenchymal lung diseases.

  17. Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeNardo, G.L.; Blankenship, W.J.; Burdine, J.A. Jr.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1975-01-01

    At present no simple statement can be made relative to the role of radionuclidic lung studies in the pediatric population. It is safe to assume that they will be used with increasing frequency for research and clinical applications because of their sensitivity and ready applicability to the pediatric patient. Methods comparable to those used in adults can be used in children older than 4 years. In younger children, however, a single injection of 133 Xe in solution provides an index of both regional perfusion and ventilation which is easier to accomplish. This method is particularly valuable in infants and neonates because it is rapid, requires no patient cooperation, results in a very low radiation dose, and can be repeated in serial studies. Radionuclidic studies of ventilation and perfusion can be performed in almost all children if the pediatrician and the nuclear medicine specialist have motivation and ingenuity. S []ontaneous pulmonary vascular occlusive disease which occurs in infants and pulmonary emboli in children are easily detected using radionuclides. The pathophysiologic defects of pulmonary agenesis, bronchopulmonary sequestration, and foreign body aspiration may be demonstrated by these techniques. These techniques also appear to be useful in following patients with bronchial asthma, cystic fibrosis, congenital emphysema, and postinfection pulmonary abnormalities. (auth)

  18. Oxygen therapy for interstitial lung disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily C. Bell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to establish the impact of oxygen therapy on dyspnoea, health-related quality of life (HRQoL, exercise capacity and mortality in interstitial lung disease (ILD. We included studies that compared oxygen therapy to no oxygen therapy in adults with ILD. No limitations were placed on study design or intervention type. Two reviewers independently evaluated studies for inclusion, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. The primary outcome was dyspnoea. Eight studies evaluated the acute effects of oxygen (n=1509. There was no effect of oxygen therapy on modified Borg dyspnoea score at end exercise (mean difference (MD −0.06 units, 95% CI −0.24–0.13; two studies, n=27. However, effects on exercise outcomes consistently favoured oxygen therapy. One study showed reduction in dyspnoea at rest with oxygen in patients who were acutely unwell (MD visual analogue scale 30 mm versus 48 mm, p<0.05; n=10. Four studies of long-term oxygen therapy (n=2670 had high risk of bias and no inferences could be drawn. This systematic review showed no effects of oxygen therapy on dyspnoea during exercise in ILD, although exercise capacity was increased. Future trials should evaluate whether acute improvements in exercise capacity with oxygen can be translated into improved physical activity and HRQoL.

  19. Predicting onset of chronic lung disease using cord blood cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daishi; Ibara, Satoshi; Tokuhisa, Takuya; Ishihara, Chie; Maede, Yoshinobu; Matsui, Takako; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Sato, Kyoko; Hirakawa, Eiji; Kabayama, Chika; Yamamoto, Masakatu

    2014-08-01

    Applicability of cord blood interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) as markers for early prediction of the onset of chronic lung disease (CLD) due to intrauterine infection was investigated in the present study. Eighty very low-birthweight infants with chorioamnionitis were divided into two groups: the CLD group (42 patients) and the non-CLD group (38 patients), according to the presence or absence of CLD, and the clinical background and cord blood IL-6 and IL-8 levels in each group were compared and investigated. The CLD group had significantly longer duration of mechanical ventilation and hospitalization (P CLD group. Using the receiver operating characteristic curves of CLD onset for both IL-6 and IL-8, the cut-off value of IL-6 for predicting onset of CLD was 48.0 pg/mL, and its sensitivity and specificity were 76% and 96%, respectively. The cut-off value for IL-8 was 66.0 pg/mL, and its sensitivity and specificity were 71% and 82%, respectively. The cord blood levels of both IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly higher in the CLD group, indicating that both IL-6 and IL-8 are useful predictors of onset of CLD. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  20. Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and non-asthma lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Morehead

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder in Western countries, and its relationship to airways disorders (e.g. asthma has been well established. Lung diseases other than asthma have also been associated with GERD, but the nature and scope of this relationship has not been fully defined. Diseases that have been associated with GERD include bronchiolitis syndromes, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, scleroderma and nontubercular mycobacterial infection. Diagnostic evaluation centres upon proving both reflux and pulmonary aspiration, which may be accomplished in some cases by lung biopsy. However, in many cases a compatible clinical and radiographic picture coupled with proof of proximal reflux by combined oesophageal probe testing may suffice for a provisional diagnosis and allow institution of anti-reflux measures. Proton-pump inhibitors are the medications of choice for GERD; other interventions shown to reduce reflux are weight loss, elevation of the head of the bed and avoidance of recumbency after meals. However, acid suppression therapy does not address non-acid reflux that may be important in disease pathogenesis in select patients, and lifestyle modifications often fail. Laparoscopic fundoplication is the procedure of choice for medically refractory GERD with excellent short-term results with respect to respiratory symptoms associated with GERD; however, long-term studies document a significant percentage of patients requiring ongoing acid suppression therapy.

  1. Progression of Common Variable Immunodeficiency Interstitial Lung Disease Accompanies Distinct Pulmonary and Laboratory Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Overbey, Jessica R; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency may be complicated by interstitial lung disease, which leads to worsened morbidity and mortality in some. Although immunomodulatory treatment has efficacy, choice of patient, duration of treatment, and long-term follow-up are not available. Interstitial lung disease appears stable in certain instances, so it is not known whether all patients will develop progressive disease or require immunomodulatory therapy. This study aims to determine if all common variable immunodeficiency patients with interstitial lung disease have physiological worsening, and if clinical and/or laboratory parameters may correlate with disease progression. A retrospective review of medical records at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York was conducted for referred patients with common variable immunodeficiency, CT scan-confirmed interstitial lung disease, and periodic pulmonary function testing covering 20 or more months before immunomodulatory therapy. Fifteen patients were identified from the retrospective review and included in this study. Of the 15 patients with common variable immunodeficiency, 9 had physiological worsening of interstitial lung disease adapted from consensus guidelines, associated with significant reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, forced vital capacity, and diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Those with progressive lung disease also had significantly lower mean immunoglobulin G levels, greater increases and highest levels of serum immunoglobulin M (IgM), and more significant thrombocytopenia. Interstitial lung disease resulted in physiological worsening in many, but not all subjects, and was associated with suboptimal immunoglobulin G replacement. Those with worsening pulmonary function tests, elevated IgM, and severe thrombocytopenic episodes appear to be at highest risk for progressive disease. Such patients may benefit from immunomodulatory treatment. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy

  2. Lung cancer development in patients with connective tissue disease-related interstitial lung disease: A retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Yasunori; Inui, Naoki; Yoshimura, Katsuhiro; Nishimoto, Koji; Mori, Kazutaka; Kono, Masato; Fujisawa, Tomoyuki; Enomoto, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Yutaro; Iwashita, Toshihide; Suda, Takafumi

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis occasionally develop lung cancer (LC). However, in connective tissue disease (CTD)-related interstitial lung disease (ILD), there are few data regarding the LC development. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical significance of LC development in patients with CTD-ILD. A retrospective review of our database of 562 patients with ILD between 2000 and 2014 identified 127 patients diagnosed with CTD-ILD. The overall and cumulative incidences of LC were calculated. In addition, the risk factors and prognostic impact of LC development were evaluated. The median age at the ILD diagnosis was 63 years (range 37-84 years), and 73 patients (57.5%) were female. The median follow-up period from the ILD diagnosis was 67.4 months (range 10.4-322.1 months). During the period, 7 out of the 127 patients developed LC (overall incidence 5.5%). The cumulative incidences at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.0%, 1.8%, and 2.9%, respectively. The risk of LC development was significantly higher in patients with higher smoking pack-year (odds ratio [OR] 1.028; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.008-1.049; P = 0.007) and emphysema on chest high-resolution computed tomography (OR 14.667; 95% CI 2.871-74.926; P = 0.001). The median overall survival time after developing LC was 7.0 months (95% CI 4.9-9.1 months), and the most common cause of death was LC, not ILD. According to the Cox proportional hazard model analysis with time-dependent covariates, patients who developed LC showed significantly poorer prognosis than those who did not (hazard ratio 87.86; 95% CI 19.56-394.67; P < 0.001). In CTD-ILD, clinicians should be careful with the risk of LC development in patients with a heavy smoking history and subsequent emphysema. Although not so frequent, the complication could be a poor prognostic determinant.

  3. Nuclear techniques in the diagnosis of lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isawa, T.

    1992-01-01

    Lung studies by nuclear techniques have been mostly neglected so far in the developing countries because ''total lung imaging'' was not possible. The availability of radioaerosols had now provided means to do complete lung studies in these countries. IAEA's effort to make radioaerosol techniques more widely available in the Asian countries has been most noteworthy. Pulmonary tuberculosis is still prevalent in the developing countries, scourge of smoking is becoming increasingly wide spread and atmospheric pollution is on the rise as these countries race towards industrialisation with insufficient technical and financial resources. These conditions would provide a fascinating backdrop of infective, cancerous and pollution-induced conditions of lungs where lung imaging techniques would have a large scope of providing useful service

  4. Nuclear techniques in the diagnosis of lung diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isawa, T

    1993-12-31

    Lung studies by nuclear techniques have been mostly neglected so far in the developing countries because ``total lung imaging`` was not possible. The availability of radioaerosols had now provided means to do complete lung studies in these countries. IAEA`s effort to make radioaerosol techniques more widely available in the Asian countries has been most noteworthy. Pulmonary tuberculosis is still prevalent in the developing countries, scourge of smoking is becoming increasingly wide spread and atmospheric pollution is on the rise as these countries race towards industrialisation with insufficient technical and financial resources. These conditions would provide a fascinating backdrop of infective, cancerous and pollution-induced conditions of lungs where lung imaging techniques would have a large scope of providing useful service 11 figs, 1 tab

  5. Doenças parasitárias em ruminantes no semi-árido brasileiro Parasitic diseases in ruminants in the Brazilian semiarid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Medeiros de M. Costa

    2009-07-01

    -árido o Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus não sobrevive durante o período de seca, mas, tristeza parasitária pode ocorrer quando no início do período chuvoso bovinos com carrapatos são introduzidos e esses se multiplicam durante o mesmo.Clinical cases and diagnostic specimens from ruminants received by the Veterinary Hospital of the University of Campina Grande in Patos, Paraíba, Brazil, from January 2000 to August 2007, were reviewed to evaluate some epidemiological aspects of parasitic diseases of ruminants in the semiarid region of Paraíba and neighboring states. The region has an annual rainfall of about 800mm, with irregular rains concentrated in a 3 to 4-month-period, and an average annual temperature of 26°C. During those years, 163 (5.31% out of 3,064 ruminants were affected by some parasitic disease. The most important parasitosis in goats and sheep was gastrointestinal helminthiasis, mainly hemonchosis; goats were more affected (6.24% of cases in this species than sheep (4.7% of cases. The higher frequency of the disease in goats may be associated with higher susceptibility or due to treatment mistakes, i.e. use of the same dose for both species, which for most anti-antihelmintics is insufficient for goats. Cattle have a low rate of gastrointestinal helminthiasis (1 out of 1,113 cases. This low frequency is probably due to the farming system in the semiarid, with low stocking rate, up to one adult bovine for every 13-16 ha, and permanence of calves (susceptible with their mothers (resistant for nearly one year before weaning. The occurrence of eimeriosis in goats and sheep was observed in 0.76% of the cases, involving only young animals. The main cattle disease was tick fever with 14 outbreaks. Outbreaks of tick fever occur, mainly at the end of the raining season in areas of the semiarid which are marginal for tick, like plateaus and mountains of the Borborema region, irrigated areas, and areas of the basins of two rivers of the region. In the drier

  6. Intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic diseases Parasitosis intestinales, cisticercosis e hidatidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Botero

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available

    This paper offers an up to date review of the intestinal parasitic infections, cysticercosis and hydatic disease found In Colombia. Their main epidemiological, clinical, preventive and therapeutic features are presented, to provide the reader with a current view of their public health Importance, prevalence and impact on morbidity and mortality.

    Se presenta una revisión actualizada sobre las parasitosis intestinales, la cisticercosis y la hidatidosis en Colombia, con una breve descripción de la prevalencia, las características epidemiológicas, los efectos sobre la salud y algunos aspectos de control y tratamiento. Con esta revisión se busca tener información resumida sobre las parasitosis que se encuentran en Colombia y su mayor o menor Importancia en salud pública. TambIén se pretende ofrecer una Idea del nivel de gravedad de estas entidades como causas de morbilidad y mortalidad en este país. 

  7. Elemental analysis of occupational and environmental lung diseases by electron probe microanalyzer with wavelength dispersive spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Occupational and environmental lung diseases are a group of pulmonary disorders caused by inhalation of harmful particles, mists, vapors or gases. Mineralogical analysis is not generally required in the diagnosis of most cases of these diseases. Apart from minerals that are encountered rarely or only in specific occupations, small quantities of mineral dusts are present in the healthy lung. As such when mineralogical analysis is required, quantitative or semi-quantitative methods must be employed. An electron probe microanalyzer with wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS) enables analysis of human lung tissue for deposits of elements by both qualitative and semi-quantitative methods. Since 1993, we have analyzed 162 cases of suspected occupational and environmental lung diseases using an EPMA-WDS. Our institute has been accepting online requests for elemental analysis of lung tissue samples by EPMA-WDS since January 2011. Hard metal lung disease is an occupational interstitial lung disease that primarily affects workers exposed to the dust of tungsten carbide. The characteristic pathological findings of the disease are giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) with centrilobular fibrosis, surrounded by mild alveolitis with giant cells within the alveolar space. EPMA-WDS analysis of biopsied lung tissue from patients with GIP has demonstrated that tungsten and/or cobalt is distributed in the giant cells and centrilobular fibrosing lesion in GIP. Pneumoconiosis, caused by amorphous silica, and acute interstitial pneumonia, associated with the giant tsunami, were also elementally analyzed by EPMA-WDS. The results suggest that commonly found elements, such as silicon, aluminum, and iron, may cause occupational and environmental lung diseases. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. [A national survey on current status of the important parasitic diseases in human population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-30

    In order to understand the current status and trends of the important parasitic diseases in human population, to evaluate the effect of control activities in the past decade and provide scientific base for further developing control strategies, a national survey was carried out in the country (Taiwan, Hongkong and Macau not included) from June, 2001 to 2004 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of Health. The sample sizes of the nationwide survey and of the survey in each province (autonomous region and municipality, P/A/M) were determined following a calculating formula based on an estimation of the sample size of random sampling to the rate of population. A procedure of stratified cluster random sampling was conducted in each province based on geographical location and economical condition with three strata: county/city, township/town, and spot, each spot covered a sample of 500 people. Parasitological examinations were conducted for the infections of soil-transmitted nematodes, Taenia spp, and Clonorchis sinensis, including Kato-Katz thick smear method, scotch cellulose adhesive tape technique and test tube-filter paper culture (for larvae). At the same time, another sampled investigation for Clonorchis sinensis infection was carried out in the known endemic areas in 27 provinces. Serological tests combined with questionnaire and/or clinical diagnosis were applied for hydatid disease, cysticercosis, paragonimiasis, trichinosis, and toxoplasmosis. A total sampled population of 356 629 from the 31 P/A/M was examined by parasitological methods and 26 species of helminth were recorded. Among these helminth, human infections of Metorchis orientalis and Echinostoma aegypti were detected in Fujian Province which seemed to be the first report in the world, and Haplorchis taichui infection in Guangxi Region was the first human infection record in the country. The overall prevalence of helminth infections was 21.74%. The prevalence of soil-transmitted nematodes was 19

  9. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Analysis of disease manifestation by region-based quantification of lung parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilig, D., E-mail: dorothea.theilig@charite.de [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Doellinger, F. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kuhnigk, J.M. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, B.; Huebner, R.H. [Charité, Department of Pneumology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schreiter, N.; Poellinger, A. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The distribution of cystic lesions in LAM was evaluated with quantitative CT. •There were more cystic lesions in the central lung compared to peripheral areas. •Cystic changes were more frequent in apical two thirds compared to lower third. •Results might help to obviate the need for biopsy in more cases. -- Abstract: Purpose: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by proliferation of smooth muscle tissue that causes bronchial obstruction and secondary cystic destruction of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the typical distribution of cystic defects in LAM with quantitative volumetric chest computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: CT examinations of 20 patients with confirmed LAM were evaluated with region-based quantification of lung parenchyma. Additionally, 10 consecutive patients were identified who had recently undergone CT imaging of the lung at our institution, in which no pathologies of the lung were found, to serve as a control group. Each lung was divided into three regions (upper, middle and lower thirds) with identical number of slices. In addition, we defined a “peel” and “core” of the lung comprising the 2 cm subpleural space and the remaining inner lung area. Computerized detection of lung volume and relative emphysema was performed with the PULMO 3D software (v3.42, Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen, Germany). This software package enables the quantification of emphysematous lung parenchyma by calculating the pixel index, which is defined as the ratio of lung voxels with a density <−950 HU to the total number of voxels in the lung. Results: Cystic changes accounted for 0.1–39.1% of the total lung volume in patients with LAM. Disease manifestation in the central lung was significantly higher than in peripheral areas (peel median: 15.1%, core median: 20.5%; p = 0.001). Lower thirds of lung parenchyma showed significantly less cystic changes than upper and middle lung areas combined (lower

  10. Delayed lung scintigraphy with N-isopropyl-I-123-p-iodoamphetamine in lung cancer and inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Takada, Yoshiki and others

    1989-01-01

    Lung studies with N-Isopropyl-I-123-p-Iodoamphetamine (IMP) were performed on patients with lung cancer or inflammatory disease. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of the delayed scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 27 patients with lung cancer (34 lesions), 3 with radiation pneumonitis, 2 with interstitial pneumonitis, 2 with old tuberculous lesion (tuberculomas), 1 with diffuse panbronchiolitis, 1 with pneumonia and 1 with lung abscess. The delayed scintigraphy was performed 24 hr after intravenous injection of 3 mCi IMP, in sitting position. In 10 patients, SPECT images were obtained following the delayed scintigraphy. Delayed scintigraphic appearances of lung cancer were classified into 5 types, high IMP uptake in the area congruent with the lesion of atelectasis and/or obstructive pneumonia (Type I), high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type II), a defect in the area consistent with the tumor and no high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type III), high IMP uptake in the area almost congruent with the tumor (Type IV) and no significant change (Type V). Excluding 10 lesions with Type IV or V, no IMP uptake was seen in the areas congruent with the tumors. Type II was the most frequently observed pattern. Normal scintigrams (Type V) were observed in 8 lesions, whose sizes were fairly small. There was no definite trend caused by difference in histological types of cancers. In 8 patients with viable inflammatory disease of the lung, the delayed scintigrams showed high IMP uptake in the areas congruent with the abnormalities on chest roentgenograms. On the other hand, no uptake was seen in the old tuberculous lesions. (J.P.N.).

  11. Delayed lung scintigraphy with N-isopropyl-I-123-p-iodoamphetamine in lung cancer and inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suematsu, Toru; Narabayashi, Isamu; Takada, Yoshiki

    1989-01-01

    Lung studies with N-Isopropyl-I-123-p-Iodoamphetamine (IMP) were performed on patients with lung cancer or inflammatory disease. In the present study, we evaluated the usefulness of the delayed scintigraphy. The subjects consisted of 27 patients with lung cancer (34 lesions), 3 with radiation pneumonitis, 2 with interstitial pneumonitis, 2 with old tuberculous lesion (tuberculomas), 1 with diffuse panbronchiolitis, 1 with pneumonia and 1 with lung abscess. The delayed scintigraphy was performed 24 hr after intravenous injection of 3 mCi IMP, in sitting position. In 10 patients, SPECT images were obtained following the delayed scintigraphy. Delayed scintigraphic appearances of lung cancer were classified into 5 types, high IMP uptake in the area congruent with the lesion of atelectasis and/or obstructive pneumonia (Type I), high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type II), a defect in the area consistent with the tumor and no high IMP uptake in the area surrounded the tumor (Type III), high IMP uptake in the area almost congruent with the tumor (Type IV) and no significant change (Type V). Excluding 10 lesions with Type IV or V, no IMP uptake was seen in the areas congruent with the tumors. Type II was the most frequently observed pattern. Normal scintigrams (Type V) were observed in 8 lesions, whose sizes were fairly small. There was no definite trend caused by difference in histological types of cancers. In 8 patients with viable inflammatory disease of the lung, the delayed scintigrams showed high IMP uptake in the areas congruent with the abnormalities on chest roentgenograms. On the other hand, no uptake was seen in the old tuberculous lesions. (J.P.N.)

  12. Respiratory bronchiolitis-associated interstitial lung disease secondary to electronic nicotine delivery system use confirmed with open lung biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, Mark; Nandakumar, Lakshmy; Singh, Mahendra; Wyld, David; Windsor, Morgan; Fielding, David

    2017-05-01

    As a modern phenomenon, there is currently limited understanding of the possible toxic effects and broader implications of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). Large volumes of aerosolized particles are inhaled during "vaping" and there are now an increasing number of case reports demonstrating toxic effects of ENDS, as well as human studies demonstrating impaired lung function in users. This article presents a case of respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease (RB-ILD) precipitated by vaping in a 33-year-old male with 10 pack years of traditional cigarette and prior treatment for mixed germ cell tumour. The patient had started vaping 10-15 times per day while continuing to smoke 10 traditional cigarettes per day. After 3 months of exposure to e-cigarette vapour, chest computed tomography demonstrated multiple new poorly defined pulmonary nodules with fluffy parenchyma opacification centred along the terminal bronchovascular units. Video-assisted thoracoscopy with lung biopsy of the right upper and right middle lobes was undertaken. The microscopic findings were overall consistent with RB-ILD. This case demonstrates toxicity with use of ENDS on open lung biopsy with resolution of radiographic findings on cessation. We believe that this is the first case where open lung biopsy has demonstrated this and our findings are consistent with RB-ILD.

  13. Physiological and morphological determinants of maximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive lung disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); H.O. Coxson (Harvey); P.D. Pare

    1996-01-01

    textabstractMaximal expiratory flow in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) could be reduced by three different mechanisms; loss of lung elastic recoil, decreased airway conductance upstream of flow-limiting segments; and increased collapsibility of airways.

  14. EFFECTS OF CORTICOSTEROIDS ON BRONCHODILATOR ACTION IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG-DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WEMPE, JB; POSTMA, DS; BREEDERVELD, N; KORT, E; VANDERMARK, TW; KOETER, GH

    Background Short term treatment corticosteroids does not usually reduce airflow limitation and airway responsiveness in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease. We investigated whether corticosteroids modulate the effects of inhaled salbutamol and ipratropium bromide. Methods Ten non-allergic

  15. PET imaging approaches for inflammatory lung diseases: Current concepts and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Delphine L., E-mail: chend@wustl.edu [Divisions of Radiological Sciences and Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Campus Box 8225, 510S, Kingshighway Blvd, St. Louis, MO (United States); Schiebler, Mark L. [Department of Radiology, UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Heath, Madison, WI (United States); Goo, Jin Mo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Beek, Edwin J.R. van [Clinical Research Imaging Centre, Queen’s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Positron emission tomography can provide molecular information inflammatory lung disease mechanisms and assess targeted treatment responses. • {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose, {sup 18}F-(+/−)NOS, and {sup 18}F-fluciclatide have potential for serving as biomarkers of inflammation and fibrosis. • PET can complement computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to improve our understanding of inflammatory lung disease mechanisms. - Abstract: Inflammatory lung disease is one of the most common clinical scenarios, and yet, it is often poorly understood. Inflammatory lung disorders, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, which are causing significant mortality and morbidity, have limited therapeutic options. Recently, new treatments have become available for pulmonary fibrosis. This review article will describe the new insights that are starting to be gained from positron emission tomography (PET) methods, by targeting molecular processes using dedicated radiotracers. Ultimately, this should aid in deriving better pathophysiological classification of these disorders, which will ultimately result in better evaluation of novel therapies.

  16. Radiological findings in congenital cystic disease of the lung in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heymer, R.; Benz-Bohm, G.; Arnold, G.; Koeln Univ.

    1982-01-01

    Three infants with congenital cystic disease of the lung are described. They consisted of a solitary bronchial cyst, an adenomatous cystic malformation and congenital lobar emphysema. The radiological appearance and differential diagnosis of these three conditions are discussed. (orig.) [de

  17. Cryptogenic Organizing Pneumonia With Lung Nodules Secondary to Pulmonary Manifestation of Crohn Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiq Zaman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Crohn disease is an immune-mediated inflammatory condition with gastrointestinal and extraintestinal manifestations in patients. Pulmonary involvement of Crohn disease is one manifestation. There have been case reports which have shown Crohn disease and lung nodules which were noted to be histopathological as cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP. In our case, a 22-year-old woman with Crohn disease was seen with complaints of chest pain and cough. Computed tomographic scan of chest showed multiple bilateral lung nodules, for which biopsy was done, which showed COP. The case study is followed by a deeper discussion of COP and the extraintestinal manifestation seen in inflammatory bowel disease.

  18. Zoonotic and Non-Zoonotic Diseases in Relation to Human Personality and Societal Values: Support for the Parasite-Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Thornhill

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The parasite-stress model of human sociality proposes that humans' ontogenetic experiences with infectious diseases as well as their evolutionary historical interactions with these diseases exert causal influences on human psychology and social behavior. This model has been supported by cross-national relationships between parasite prevalence and human personality traits, and between parasite prevalence and societal values. Importantly, the parasite-stress model emphasizes the causal role of non-zoonotic parasites (which have the capacity for human-to-human transmission, rather than zoonotic parasites (which do not, but previous studies failed to distinguish between these conceptually distinct categories. The present investigation directly tested the differential predictive effects of zoonotic and non-zoonotic (both human-specific and multihost parasite prevalence on personality traits and societal values. Supporting the parasite-stress model, cross-national differences in personality traits (unrestricted sexuality, extraversion, openness to experiences and in societal values (individualism, collectivism, gender equality, democratization are predicted specifically by non-zoonotic parasite prevalence.

  19. Prenatal and Perinatal Determinants of Lung Health and Disease in Early Life: A National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Tracy A; Levy, Philip T; Gyamfi-Bannerman, Cynthia; Jobe, Alan H; Blaisdell, Carol J

    2016-05-02

    Human lung growth and development begins with preconception exposures and continues through conception and childhood into early adulthood. Numerous environmental exposures (both positive and negative) can affect lung health and disease throughout life. Infant lung health correlates with adult lung function, but significant knowledge gaps exist regarding the influence of preconception, perinatal, and postnatal exposures on general lung health throughout life. On October 1 and 2, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a group of extramural investigators to develop their recommendations for the direction(s) for future research in prenatal and perinatal determinants of lung health and disease in early life and to identify opportunities for scientific advancement. They identified that future investigations will need not only to examine abnormal lung development, but also to use developing technology and resources to better define normal and/or enhanced lung health. Birth cohort studies offer key opportunities to capture the important influence of preconception and obstetric risk factors on lung health, development, and disease. These studies should include well-characterized obstetrical data and comprehensive plans for prospective follow-up. The importance of continued basic science, translational, and animal studies for providing mechanisms to explain causality using new methods cannot be overemphasized. Multidisciplinary approaches involving obstetricians, neonatologists, pediatric and adult pulmonologists, and basic scientists should be encouraged to design and conduct comprehensive and impactful research on the early stages of normal and abnormal human lung growth that influence adult outcome.

  20. Ventilation inhomogeneity in obstructive lung diseases measured by electrical impedance tomography: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullcke, B; Krueger-Ziolek, S; Gong, B; Jörres, R A; Mueller-Lisse, U; Moeller, K

    2017-10-10

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has mostly been used in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) to monitor ventilation distribution but is also promising for the diagnosis in spontaneously breathing patients with obstructive lung diseases. Beside tomographic images, several numerical measures have been proposed to quantitatively assess the lung state. In this study two common measures, the 'Global Inhomogeneity Index' and the 'Coefficient of Variation' were compared regarding their capability to reflect the severity of lung obstruction. A three-dimensional simulation model was used to simulate obstructed lungs, whereby images were reconstructed on a two-dimensional domain. Simulations revealed that minor obstructions are not adequately recognized in the reconstructed images and that obstruction above and below the electrode plane may result in misleading values of inhomogeneity measures. EIT measurements on several electrode planes are necessary to apply these measures in patients with obstructive lung diseases in a promising manner.

  1. Open lung biopsy in patients on mechanical ventilation with suspected diffuse lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Melo

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While open lung biopsy (OLB performed in patients on mechanical ventilation (MV with diffuse lung diseases (DLD can be extremely important in establishing the diagnosis, the associated risk of this procedure should be taken into account. Aim: To determine the diagnostic yield, therapeutic changes, complications and mortality in patients with DLD on MV submitted to OLB. Methods: Retrospective study of 19 patients admitted to S. João Hospital between January 1999 and July 2007 (8.5 years. Data analysed included demographic data, ventilation variables before and after biopsy, diagnostic yield, effect on subsequent treatment changes and complications of OLB. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 14.0. Results: The mean age of patients was 58 ± 16.3 years old and 53% were male. The mean duration of hospital stay in Intensive Care Unit before performing OLB was 13 ± 7 days. All biopsies were performed by thoracotomy. The diagnostic yield was 95%. There were no significant differences in partial pressure of arterial oxygen/fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2 ratio and the positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP before and after OLB. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (21%; persistent air leak. Alteration in the diagnosis occurred in 14 patients (74% and in 8 patients (42% there was a modification in the treatment regimen. Global mortality was 47% (9 patients but there were no biopsyrelated deaths. Conclusion: The high diagnostic yield and the low incidence of complications make OLB a useful procedure in patients on MV with DLD of unknown aetiology. However, early OLB may lead to even better results in some patients. Resumo: Introdução: A realização de biópsia pulmonar cirúrgica (BPC em doentes sob ventilação invasiva (VI no contexto de doenças difusas do pulmão (DPD poderá revelar-se necessária em circunstâncias em que se torne fundamental a precis

  2. Parasites, diseases, and health status of sympatric populations of sika deer and white-tailed deer in Maryland and Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, W R; Crow, C B

    1983-10-01

    In July 1981, investigations on parasites, diseases, and herd health status were conducted on sympatric populations of sika deer (Cervus nippon) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Maryland) and Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge (Virginia) on the Delmarva Peninsula. Five adult deer of each species were collected from each location and subjected to thorough necropsy examinations and laboratory tests. White-tailed deer at both locations harbored protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasites typically associated with this species throughout the southeastern United States. In contrast, sika deer at both locations harbored only light burdens of ticks, chiggers, and sarcocysts. Serologic tests for antibodies to seven infectious disease agents revealed evidence of exposure to bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) virus, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, and parainfluenza3 virus in white-tailed deer, but only BVD virus in sika deer. At both locations the general health status of sika deer was superior to that of white-tailed deer.

  3. Radioaerosol lung scanning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong Whee Bahk; Soo Kyo Chung

    1994-01-01

    As a coordinated research project of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a multicentre joint study on radioaerosol lung scan using the BARC nebulizer has prospectively been carried out during 1988-1992 with the participation of 10 member countries in Asia [Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand]. The study was designed so that it would primarily cover chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the other related and common pulmonary diseases. The study also included normal controls and asymptomatic smokers. The purposes of this presentation are three fold: firstly, to document the usefulness of the nebulizer and the validity of user's protocol in imaging COPD and other lung diseases; secondly, to discuss scan features of the individual COPD and other disorders studied and thirdly, to correlate scan alterations with radiographic findings. Before proceeding with a systematic analysis of aerosol scan patterns in the disease groups, we documented normal pattern. The next step was the assessment of scan features in those who had been smoking for more than several years but had no symptoms or signs referable to airways. The lung diseases we analyzed included COPD [emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma and bronchiectasis], bronchial obstruction, compensatory overinflation and other common lung diseases such as lobar pneumonia, tuberculosis, interstitial fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, lung edema and primary and metastatic lung cancers. Lung embolism, inhalation bums and glue-sniffer's lung are separately discussed by Dr. Sundram of Singapore elsewhere in this book. The larger portion of this chapter is allocated to the discussion of COPD with a special effort made in sorting out differential scan features. Diagnostic criteria in individual COPD were defined for each category of disease and basic clinical symptoms and signs and pertinent laboratory data as well as radiographic manifestations are

  4. Prevalence and correlates of ENDS use among adults being treated for chronic lung disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meghan Moran; Shyam Biswal; Joanna Cohen; Robert Henderson; Janet Holbrook; Venkataramana Sidhaye; Robert Wise

    2018-01-01

    Background Chronic lung disease such as asthma or COPD may be exacerbated by electronic nicotine device (ENDS) use. Despite this, little is known about the extent to which adults with chronic lung disease use ENDS and what factors are associated with use. Methods We analyzed data from the second wave of the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) study. The PATH study recruited 28,362 U.S. adults over the age of 18 using a multi-stage randomized sampli...

  5. Effect of metabolic alkalosis on respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, R.; Goldstein, M.; Phillipson, E.; Ho, M.; Hammeke, M.; Feldman, R.; Handelsman, S.; Halperin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven instances of a mixed acid-base disorder consisting of chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis were recognized in eight patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention. Correction of the metabolic alkalosis led to substantial improvement in blood gas values and clinical symptoms. Patients with mixed chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis constitute a common subgroup of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention; these patients benefit from correction of the metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21028

  6. The diffuse interstitial lung disease - with emphasis in the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustillo P, Jose G; Pacheco, Pedro M; Matiz, Carlos; Ojeda, Paulina; Carrillo B, Jorge A.

    2003-01-01

    The term diffuse interstitial lung disease, it refers to those diseases that commit the interstice basically, the space between the membrane basal epithelial and endothelial, although the damage can also commit the outlying air spaces and the vessels; the supplement is centered in the diffuse interstitial lung illness of unknown cause; well-known as idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, making emphasis in the more frequents, the pulmonary fibrosis idiopathic or cryptogenic fibrosant alveolitis

  7. Radioaerosol lung scanning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and related disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Departments of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Soo Kyo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    As a coordinated research project of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a multicentre joint study on radioaerosol lung scan using the BARC nebulizer has prospectively been carried out during 1988-1992 with the participation of 10 member countries in Asia [Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore and Thailand]. The study was designed so that it would primarily cover chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the other related and common pulmonary diseases. The study also included normal controls and asymptomatic smokers. The purposes of this presentation are three fold: firstly, to document the usefulness of the nebulizer and the validity of user's protocol in imaging COPD and other lung diseases; secondly, to discuss scan features of the individual COPD and other disorders studied and thirdly, to correlate scan alterations with radiographic findings. Before proceeding with a systematic analysis of aerosol scan patterns in the disease groups, we documented normal pattern. The next step was the assessment of scan features in those who had been smoking for more than several years but had no symptoms or signs referable to airways. The lung diseases we analyzed included COPD [emphysema, chronic bronchitis, asthma and bronchiectasis], bronchial obstruction, compensatory overinflation and other common lung diseases such as lobar pneumonia, tuberculosis, interstitial fibrosis, diffuse panbronchiolitis, lung edema and primary and metastatic lung cancers. Lung embolism, inhalation bums and glue-sniffer's lung are separately discussed by Dr. Sundram of Singapore elsewhere in this book. The larger portion of this chapter is allocated to the discussion of COPD with a special effort made in sorting out differential scan features. Diagnostic criteria in individual COPD were defined for each category of disease and basic clinical symptoms and signs and pertinent laboratory data as well as radiographic manifestations are

  8. Influence of Multiple Infection and Relatedness on Virulence: Disease Dynamics in an Experimental Plant Population and Its Castrating Parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Lorenza; López-Villavicencio, Manuela; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Snirc, Alodie; Giraud, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    The level of parasite virulence, i.e., the decrease in host's fitness due to a pathogen, is expected to depend on several parameters, such as the type of the disease (e.g., castrating or host-killing) and the prevalence of multiple infections. Although these parameters have been extensively studied theoretically, few empirical data are available to validate theoretical predictions. Using the anther smut castrating disease on Silene latifolia caused by Microbotryum lychnidis-dioicae, we studied the dynamics of multiple infections and of different components of virulence (host death, non-recovery and percentage of castrated stems) during the entire lifespan of the host in an experimental population. We monitored the number of fungal genotypes within plants and their relatedness across five years, using microsatellite markers, as well as the rates of recovery and host death in the population. The mean relatedness among genotypes within plants remained at a high level throughout the entire host lifespan despite the dynamics of the disease, with recurrent new infections. Recovery was lower for plants with multiple infections compared to plants infected by a single genotype. As expected for castrating parasites, M. lychnidis-dioicae did not increase host mortality. Mortality varied across years but was generally lower for plants that had been diseased the preceding year. This is one of the few studies to have empirically verified theoretical expectations for castrating parasites, and to show particularly i) that castrated hosts live longer, suggesting that parasites can redirect resources normally used in reproduction to increase host lifespan, lengthening their transmission phase, and ii) that multiple infections increase virulence, here in terms of non-recovery and host castration. PMID:24892951

  9. Pulmonary hypertension due to unclassified interstitial lung disease in a Pembroke Welsh corgi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Tomoya; Nakamura, Kensuke; Tatsuyuki, Osuga; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ichii, Osamu; Yabuki, Akira; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2018-04-23

    A 12 year-old intact male Pembroke Welsh corgi weighing 10.8 kg was presented for evaluation of a 3-month history of dyspnea, and a 1-week history of exercise intolerance and anorexia. Severe hypoxemia (PaO 2 56 mmHg), diffuse lung alveolar infiltration, and severe pulmonary hypertension (tricuspid regurgitation pressure gradient was 81 mmHg) were identified. A tentative diagnosis of severe PH due to lung disease or pulmonary thromboembolism was made and treated intensively. After 5 days of hospitalization, the dog died despite oxygen supplementation and anticoagulant therapy. This dog was diagnosed as unclassified interstitial lung disease based on histopathological findings.

  10. The importance of balanced pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms in diffuse lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strieter Robert

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The lung responds to a variety of insults in a remarkably consistent fashion but with inconsistent outcomes that vary from complete resolution and return to normal to the destruction of normal architecture and progressive fibrosis. Increasing evidence indicates that diffuse lung disease results from an imbalance between the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mechanisms, with a persistent imbalance that favors pro-inflammatory mediators dictating the development of chronic diffuse lung disease. This review focuses on the mediators that influence this imbalance.

  11. Amplicon-Based Pyrosequencing Reveals High Diversity of Protistan Parasites in Ships' Ballast Water: Implications for Biogeography and Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagenkopp Lohan, K M; Fleischer, R C; Carney, K J; Holzer, K K; Ruiz, G M

    2016-04-01

    Ships' ballast water (BW) commonly moves macroorganisms and microorganisms across the world's oceans and along coasts; however, the majority of these microbial transfers have gone undetected. We applied high-throughput sequencing methods to identify microbial eukaryotes, specifically emphasizing the protistan parasites, in ships' BW collected from vessels calling to the Chesapeake Bay (Virginia and Maryland, USA) from European and Eastern Canadian ports. We utilized tagged-amplicon 454 pyrosequencing with two general primer sets, amplifying either the V4 or V9 domain of the small subunit (SSU) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene complex, from total DNA extracted from water samples collected from the ballast tanks of bulk cargo vessels. We detected a diverse group of protistan taxa, with some known to contain important parasites in marine systems, including Apicomplexa (unidentified apicomplexans, unidentified gregarines, Cryptosporidium spp.), Dinophyta (Blastodinium spp., Euduboscquella sp., unidentified syndinids, Karlodinium spp., Syndinium spp.), Perkinsea (Parvilucifera sp.), Opisthokonta (Ichthyosporea sp., Pseudoperkinsidae, unidentified ichthyosporeans), and Stramenopiles (Labyrinthulomycetes). Further characterization of groups with parasitic taxa, consisting of phylogenetic analyses for four taxa (Cryptosporidium spp., Parvilucifera spp., Labyrinthulomycetes, and Ichthyosporea), revealed that sequences were obtained from both known and novel lineages. This study demonstrates that high-throughput sequencing is a viable and sensitive method for detecting parasitic protists when present and transported in the ballast water of ships. These data also underscore the potential importance of human-aided dispersal in the biogeography of these microbes and emerging diseases in the world's oceans.

  12. Lung volume reduction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    compliance, thereby reducing the work of breathing. ... with the objective of obtaining similar functional advantages to surgical lung volume reduction, .... Any type of antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy that cannot be discontinued for 7 days.

  13. Chest physiotherapy in preterm infants with lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cota Francesco

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In neonatology the role of chest physiotherapy is still uncertain because of the controversial outcomes. Methods The aim of this study was to test the applicability in preterm infants of 'reflex rolling', from the Vojta method, in preterm neonates with lung pathology, with particular attention to the effects on blood gases and oxygen saturation, on the spontaneous breathing, on the onset of stress or pain. The study included 34 preterm newborns with mean gestational age of 30.5 (1.6 weeks - mean (DS - and birth weight of 1430 (423 g - mean (DS -, who suffered from hyaline membrane disease, under treatment with nasal CPAP (continuous positive airways pressure, or from pneumonia, under treatment with oxygen-therapy. The neonates underwent phase 1 of 'reflex rolling' according to Vojta method three times daily. Respiratory rate, SatO2, transcutaneous PtcCO2 e PtcO2 were monitored; in order to evaluate the onset of stress or pain following the stimulations, the NIPS score and the PIPP score were recorded; cerebral ultrasound scans were performed on postnatal days 1-3-5-7, and then weekly. Results In this population the first phase of Vojta's 'reflex rolling' caused an increase of PtcO2 and SatO2 values. No negative effects on PtcCO2 and respiratory rate were observed, NIPS and PIPP stress scores remained unmodified during the treatment; in no patient the intraventricular haemorrhage worsened in time and none of the infants developed periventricular leucomalacia. Conclusions Our experience, using the Vojta method, allows to affirm that this method is safe for preterm neonates, but further investigations are necessary to confirm its positive effects and to evaluate long-term respiratory outcomes.

  14. Occupational lung disease survey of respiratory physicians in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeagney, T F P; Addley, K; Asanati, K

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory physicians are likely to encounter occupational lung disease (OLD) in their daily practice. To assess the profile of cases being encountered by general respiratory physicians in Northern Ireland (NI) and determine satisfaction with training, confidence in diagnosis and management of OLD. An online survey of all consultant respiratory physicians currently practising in NI. Questions assessed the numbers of new cases seen over the preceding year, case type, satisfaction with specialist registrar training in OLD and degree of confidence in the diagnosis and management of these conditions. Of the 40 consultants identified, the response rate was 80% (n = 32) with 94% of respondents (n = 30) indicating they had dealt with patients suspected of having occupation-related respiratory symptoms. The most commonly encountered OLDs were pleural plaques (91% of respondents), occupational asthma (88%), asbestosis (84%), non-asbestosis pulmonary fibrosis (76%), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (67%) and mesothelioma (66%). Just over one third of consultants (36%, n = 10) indicated a lack of confidence in diagnosis and management of OLD with almost half (48%) dissatisfied with OLD training as a registrar and a further 78% (n = 25) indicating they would value additional training in OLD as a consultant. The majority of respiratory consultants in NI encountered OLD in their day to day practice and half were dissatisfied with their specialist registrar training in OLD and express a lack of confidence in the diagnosis and management of these conditions. This highlights the need for additional training at both registrar and consultant level. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Contemporary challenges for specialist nursing in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Anne Marie; Olive, Sandra; Lines, Sarah; Murphy, Anna; Hocking, Julie; Newell, Karen; Morris, Helen; Harris, Emma; Dixon, Catherine; Agnew, Sarah; Burge, Geraldine

    2018-03-01

    The role of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) in interstitial lung disease (ILD) is evolving in response to clinical guidelines and the growth of clinical research. The role is well established in the UK, although more ILD posts are needed to ensure supply meets clinical demand. This phenomenon is also happening across Europe. An appreciation of the similarities and differences between CNS and advanced nurse practitioners is important given the challenges in defining, developing and supporting this nursing specialisation. Globally, different models exist. In some countries charitable organisations take a leading role in supporting patients. Many European centres look to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and quality standards as a template to develop and evaluate the role of the ILD CNS. We present a UK perspective in the context of a government subsidised healthcare system to promote professional discussion and debate regarding the future of nursing practice in the ILD specialty. ILDs are often complex and associated with significant mortality, morbidity and co-morbid conditions that require a technical healthcare skill setThere is worldwide shortage of nurses, low retention rates and retirement of many skilled nursesCollaboration across the ILD interdisciplinary community is needed to safeguard the future of our professions and high-quality patient careThe ILD interdisciplinary and nurse network has identified key priorities to help secure the future of the ILD clinical and academic nurse specialism. To explain the similarities and differences between clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) in the context of ILD specialismTo review contemporary nursing specialism in the UK's government subsidised healthcare systemTo stimulate discussion and debate across the European/international respiratory community regarding the clinical and academic development of the ILD CNSTo identify key priorities that will

  16. Immunogenetic basis of environmental lung disease: Lessons from the berylliosis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltini, C.; Richeldi, L.; Amicosante, M.; Franchi, A.; Lombardi, G.

    1998-01-01

    The role of genetic factors has been hypothesized in the pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammatory lung diseases. The genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) locus on human chromosome 6 have been identified as important determinants in diseases caused both by inorganic and organic compounds such as beryllium, gold, acid anhydrides, isocyanates and grass pollens. Since many environmental factors are the determinants of the immunopathogenesis of asthma, pulmonary granulomatous disorders, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and fibrotic lung disorders, an understanding of the interaction between environmental factors is crucial to epidemiology, prevention and treatment of these disorders. Berylliosis is an environmental chronic inflammatory disorder of the lung caused by inhalation of beryllium dusts. A human leukocyte antigen class II marker (HLA-DP Glu69) has been found to be strongly associated with the disease. In in vitro studies, the gene has been shown to play a direct role in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. In human studies, the gene has been shown to confer increased susceptibility to beryllium in exposed workers, thus suggesting that HLA gene markers may be used as epidemiological probes to identify population groups at higher risk of environmental lung diseases, to identify environmental levels of lung immunotoxicants that would be safe for the entire population and the prevent disease risk associated with occupation, manufactured products and the environment. Studies on the associations between human leukocyte antigens and chronic inflammatory lung disorders are reviewed in the context of the berylliosis model. (au)

  17. Fitness to Fly Testing in Patients with Congenital Heart and Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoorenberg, Mandy E; van den Oord, Marieke H A H; Meeuwsen, Ted; Takken, Tim

    2016-01-01

    During commercial air travel passengers are exposed to a low ambient cabin pressure, comparable to altitudes of 5000 to 8000 ft (1524 to 2438 m). In healthy passengers this causes a fall in partial pressure of oxygen, which results in relative hypoxemia, usually without symptoms. Patients with congenital heart or lung disease may experience more severe hypoxemia during air travel. This systematic review provides an overview of the current literature focusing on whether it is safe for patients with congenital heart or lung disease to fly. The Pubmed database was searched and all studies carried out at an (simulated) altitude of 5000-8000 ft (1524-2438 m) for a short time period (several hours) and related to patients with congenital heart or lung disease were reviewed. Included were 11 studies. These studies examined patients with cystic fibrosis, neonatal (chronic) lung disease and congenital (a)cyanotic heart disease during a hypoxic challenge test, in a hypobaric chamber, during commercial air travel, or in the mountains. Peripheral/arterial saturation, blood gases, lung function, and/or the occurrence of symptoms were listed. Based on the current literature, it can be concluded that air travel is safe for most patients. However, those at risk of hypoxia can benefit from supplemental in-flight oxygen. Therefore, patients with congenital heart and lung disease should be evaluated carefully prior to air travel to select the patients at risk for hypoxia using the current studies and guidelines.

  18. Lung inhalation scintigraphy with radioactive aerosols in several pulmonary diseases. Cintigrafia de ventialacao pulmonar por aerosol em diversas patologias pulmonares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, L R; Marioni Filho, H [Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Romaldini, H; Uehara, C; Alonso, G [Escola Paulista de Medicina, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1983-01-01

    The pulmonary ventilation scintigraphy with 99m Tc diethylene-triamine-pentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA) delivered through a new nebulizer system when analyzed together with the classic lung perfusion scintigraphy with 99mTc-labeled albumin macroaggregates (99mTcMAA) is a very important diagnostic tool in several pulmonary diseases. Several aspects of the lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy are studied in 15 people with no lung disease, smokers and nonsmokers. The findings with the lung ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy are also discussed in 34 patients with several pulmonary diseases: lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, policystic pulmonary disease, and pulmonary embolims. The authors concluded that the procedure is a valuable diagnostic tool in several pulmonary diseases, especially because good lung images are obtained, no side effects were detected, the technique is ease and low cost, and it brings new informations, not available with other diagnostic methods. (author).

  19. Lung scintiscanning in corrective surgery of congenital heart disease, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Kaoru

    1981-01-01

    Lung scintiscanning was performed to investigate the distribution of pulmonary blood flow before and after surgery in 30 patients with tetralogy of Fallot. Uniformity of lung scintigram and the derangement of the distribution pattern were observed preoperatively and postoperatively. The results were as follows: 1) Preoperatively, uniformity of lung scintigram was 27.7 - 100% (average 63.4%). It is more necessary to construct the outflow tract in most cases, when the PA/Ao diameter ratio was lower than 0.5 and uniformity of lung scintigram was under 50%. Besides, preoperative uniformity of lung scintigram correlated with the degree of polycythemia. In 3 cases who died after corrective surgery, the value of uniformity of lung scintigram was as low as 33.3 - 61.1%. 2) Preoperative pulmonary blood flow disturbances were found in 50% of 30 cases. In all of the cases without pulmonary blood flow disturbances, total correction was successfully performed. On the other hand, in cases with pulmonary blood flow disturbances, the result of total correction was not satisfactory. 3) In cases with the slight and moderately deranged distribution preoperatively, postoperative follow up study by scintiscanning at 1 to 2 months after surgery showed considerately more improvement of pulmonary blood flow. (author)

  20. Defining the relationship between Plasmodium falciparum parasite rate and clinical disease: statistical models for disease burden estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Robert W

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical malaria has proven an elusive burden to enumerate. Many cases go undetected by routine disease recording systems. Epidemiologists have, therefore, frequently defaulted to actively measuring malaria in population cohorts through time. Measuring the clinical incidence of malaria longitudinally is labour-intensive and impossible to undertake universally. There is a need, therefore, to define a relationship between clinical incidence and the easier and more commonly measured index of infection prevalence: the "parasite rate". This relationship can help provide an informed basis to define malaria burdens in areas where health statistics are inadequate. Methods Formal literature searches were conducted for Plasmodium falciparum malaria incidence surveys undertaken prospectively through active case detection at least every 14 days. The data were abstracted, standardized and geo-referenced. Incidence surveys were time-space matched with modelled estimates of infection prevalence derived from a larger database of parasite prevalence surveys and modelling procedures developed for a global malaria endemicity map. Several potential relationships between clinical incidence and infection prevalence were then specified in a non-parametric Gaussian process model with minimal, biologically informed, prior constraints. Bayesian inference was then used to choose between the candidate models. Results The suggested relationships with credible intervals are shown for the Africa and a combined America and Central and South East Asia regions. In both regions clinical incidence increased slowly and smoothly as a function of infection prevalence. In Africa, when infection prevalence exceeded 40%, clinical incidence reached a plateau of 500 cases per thousand of the population per annum. In the combined America and Central and South East Asia regions, this plateau was reached at 250 cases per thousand of the population per annum. A temporal

  1. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Lynne R; Maxwell, Nicola C; Gill, Sharonjit K; Dockrell, David H; Sabroe, Ian; McGreal, Eamon P; Kotecha, Sailesh; Whyte, Moira K

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD) is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation. To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or CLD. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry. Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+)/CD16(+) monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02). Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+) macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02). At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+) mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03), but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05) or CD36 (p = 0.05) positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung. These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  2. Macrophage phenotype is associated with disease severity in preterm infants with chronic lung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne R Prince

    Full Text Available The etiology of persistent lung inflammation in preterm infants with chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD is poorly characterized, hampering efforts to stratify prognosis and treatment. Airway macrophages are important innate immune cells with roles in both the induction and resolution of tissue inflammation.To investigate airway innate immune cellular phenotypes in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS or CLD.Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was obtained from term and preterm infants requiring mechanical ventilation. BAL cells were phenotyped by flow cytometry.Preterm birth was associated with an increase in the proportion of non-classical CD14(+/CD16(+ monocytes on the day of delivery (58.9 ± 5.8% of total mononuclear cells in preterm vs 33.0 ± 6.1% in term infants, p = 0.02. Infants with RDS were born with significantly more CD36(+ macrophages compared with the CLD group (70.3 ± 5.3% in RDS vs 37.6 ± 8.9% in control, p = 0.02. At day 3, infants born at a low gestational age are more likely to have greater numbers of CD14(+ mononuclear phagocytes in the airway (p = 0.03, but fewer of these cells are functionally polarized as assessed by HLA-DR (p = 0.05 or CD36 (p = 0.05 positivity, suggesting increased recruitment of monocytes or a failure to mature these cells in the lung.These findings suggest that macrophage polarization may be affected by gestational maturity, that more immature macrophage phenotypes may be associated with the progression of RDS to CLD and that phenotyping mononuclear cells in BAL could predict disease outcome.

  3. A novel mechanical lung model of pulmonary diseases to assist with teaching and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Geoffrey M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A design concept of low-cost, simple, fully mechanical model of a mechanically ventilated, passively breathing lung is developed. An example model is built to simulate a patient under mechanical ventilation with accurate volumes and compliances, while connected directly to a ventilator. Methods The lung is modelled with multiple units, represented by rubber bellows, with adjustable weights placed on bellows to simulate compartments of different superimposed pressure and compliance, as well as different levels of lung disease, such as Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. The model was directly connected to a ventilator and the resulting pressure volume curves recorded. Results The model effectively captures the fundamental lung dynamics for a variety of conditions, and showed the effects of different ventilator settings. It was particularly effective at showing the impact of Positive End Expiratory Pressure (PEEP therapy on lung recruitment to improve oxygenation, a particulary difficult dynamic to capture. Conclusion Application of PEEP therapy is difficult to teach and demonstrate clearly. Therefore, the model provide opportunity to train, teach, and aid further understanding of lung mechanics and the treatment of lung diseases in critical care, such as ARDS and asthma. Finally, the model's pure mechanical nature and accurate lung volumes mean that all results are both clearly visible and thus intuitively simple to grasp.

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with lung cancer: prevalence, impact and management challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyratos D

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Dionisios Spyratos, Eleni Papadaki, Sofia Lampaki, Theodoros Kontakiotis Pulmonary Department, Lung Cancer Oncology Unit, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, G. Papanicolaou Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer share a common etiological factor (cigarette smoking and usually coexist in everyday clinical practice. The prevalence of COPD among newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer sometimes exceeds 50%. COPD is an independent risk factor (2–4 times higher than non-COPD subjects for lung cancer development.The presence of emphysema in addition to other factors (e.g., smoking history, age could be incorporated into risk scores in order to define the most appropriate target group for lung cancer screening using low-dose computed tomography. Clinical management of patients with coexistence of COPD and lung cancer requires a multidisciplinary oncology board that includes a pulmonologist. Detailed evaluation (lung function tests, cardiopulmonary exercise test and management (inhaled drugs, smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation of COPD should be taken into account for lung cancer treatment (surgical approach, radiotherapy. Keywords: lung cancer, COPD, coexistence, risk factor, therapy decisions 

  5. Spirometry utilisation among Danish adults initiating medication targeting obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, Mette

    2015-01-01

    performed. RESULTS: A total of 40,969 adults initiated medication targeting obstructive lung medication in 2008 in Denmark. The mean age of the cohort was 55.6 years (SD18.7) and approximately half of the mediations users had spirometry test performed. Initiating several types of medication targeting......UNLABELLED: This PhD thesis was written during my employment at the Research Unit of General Practice in Odense, University of Southern Denmark. It comprises an overview and three papers, all published or submitted for publication in international peer-reviewed scientific journals. BACKGROUND: Non...... with pharmacotherapy targeting obstructive lung disease and only few have additional tests conducted, although the predictive value of respiratory symptoms for diagnosing obstructive lung disease has proven to be low. Spirometry is recommended as the gold standard for confirming obstructive lung disease, and testing...

  6. Neglected Parasitic Infections: Toxocariasis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-01-05

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Neglected Parasitic Infections in the United States. Neglected Parasitic Infections are a group of diseases that afflict vulnerable populations and are often not well studied or diagnosed. A subject matter expert from CDC's Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria describes the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of toxocariasis.  Created: 1/5/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria (DPDM); Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC), Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 1/9/2012.

  7. Improving the quality of lung cancer care in Ontario: the lung cancer disease pathway initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, William K; Ung, Yee C; Assouad, Nathalie; Chyjek, Anna; Sawka, Carol

    2013-07-01

    Before 2008, Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) undertook provincial cancer control quality-improvement initiatives on a programmatic basis. CCO has now added Disease Pathway Management (DPM) to its quality improvement strategy, with the intent of achieving high-quality care, processes, and patient experience across the patient pathway for specific cancers. The three goals of DPM are: to describe and share evidence-based best practice along the cancer continuum for specific cancers; identify quality-improvement priorities for specific cancers and catalyze action; monitor performance against best practice for specific cancers. The objective of this article is to describe the process by which the CCO lung cancer (LC) DPM was initiated and some of its early successes. In 2009, LC DPM began with a draft LC disease pathway map and the establishment of five multidisciplinary working groups, each focused on a phase of the LC patient journey: prevention, screening, and early detection; diagnosis; treatment; palliative care, end-of-life care, and survivorship; and patient experience. The working groups held 25 meetings of 2-hour duration and developed concepts for 17 quality-improvement projects across the patient journey. Eight were selected for detailed discussion at a provincial consensus conference, which provided input on priorities for action. A report on the priorities for action was prepared and widely circulated, and regional roadshows were held in all 14 regions of the province of Ontario. Region-specific data on incidence, stage, treatment compliance, and wait times among other issues relevant to LC, were shared with the regional care providers at these roadshows. Funding was provided by CCO to address opportunities for regional improvement based on the data and the priorities identified. The LC disease pathways were refined through substantial multidisciplinary discussion, and the diagnostic pathway was posted on CCO's Web site in February 2012. The treatment pathways

  8. The origin and dispersion of human parasitic diseases in the old world (Africa, Europe and Madagascar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozais, Jean-Pierre

    2003-01-01

    The ancestors of present-day man (Homo sapiens sapiens) appeared in East Africa some three and a half million years ago (Australopithecs), and then migrated to Europe, Asia, and later to the Americas, thus beginning the differentiation process. The passage from nomadic to sedentary life took place in the Middle East in around 8000 BC. Wars, spontaneous migrations and forced migrations (slave trade) led to enormous mixtures of populations in Europe and Africa and favoured the spread of numerous parasitic diseases with specific strains according to geographic area. The three human plasmodia (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae) were imported from Africa into the Mediterranean region with the first human migrations, but it was the Neolithic revolution (sedentarisation, irrigation, population increase) which brought about actual foci for malaria. The reservoir for Leishmania infantum and L. donovani--the dog--has been domesticated for thousands of years. Wild rodents as reservoirs of L. major have also long been in contact with man and probably were imported from tropical Africa across the Sahara. L. tropica, by contrast, followed the migrations of man, its only reservoir. L. infantum and L. donovani spread with man and his dogs from West Africa. Likewise, for thousands of years, the dog has played an important role in the spread and the endemic character of hydatidosis through sheep (in Europe and North Africa) and dromadary (in the Sahara and North Africa). Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni have existed since prehistoric times in populations living in or passing through the Sahara. These populations then transported them to countries of Northern Africa where the specific, intermediary hosts were already present. Madagascar was inhabited by populations of Indonesian origin who imported lymphatic filariosis across the Indian Ocean (possibly of African origin since the Indonesian sailors had spent time on the African coast before reaching Madagascar

  9. The origin and dispersion of human parasitic diseases in the Old World (Africa, Europe and Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Nozais

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The ancestors of present-day man (Homo sapiens sapiens appeared in East Africa some three and a half million years ago (Australopithecs, and then migrated to Europe, Asia, and later to the Americas, thus beginning the differentiation process. The passage from nomadic to sedentary life took place in the Middle East in around 8000 BC. Wars, spontaneous migrations and forced migrations (slave trade led to enormous mixtures of populations in Europe and Africa and favoured the spread of numerous parasitic diseases with specific strains according to geographic area. The three human plasmodia (Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, and P. malariae were imported from Africa into the Mediterranean region with the first human migrations, but it was the Neolithic revolution (sedentarisation, irrigation, population increase which brought about actual foci for malaria. The reservoir for Leishmania infantum and L. donovani - the dog - has been domesticated for thousands of years. Wild rodents as reservoirs of L. major have also long been in contact with man and probably were imported from tropical Africa across the Sahara. L. tropica, by contrast, followed the migrations of man, its only reservoir. L. infantum and L. donovani spread with man and his dogs from West Africa. Likewise, for thousands of years, the dog has played an important role in the spread and the endemic character of hydatidosis through sheep (in Europe and North Africa and dromadary (in the Sahara and North Africa. Schistosoma haematobium and S. mansoni have existed since prehistoric times in populations living in or passing through the Sahara. These populations then transported them to countries of Northern Africa where the specific, intermediary hosts were already present. Madagascar was inhabited by populations of Indonesian origin who imported lymphatic filariosis across the Indian Ocean (possibly of African origin since the Indonesian sailors had spent time on the African coast before

  10. Biopsia en enfermedad intersticial pulmonar Lung biopsy for the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Quadrelli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo del presente estudio fue determinar el rédito diagnóstico y los factores asociados a mayor morbimortalidad en la biopsia quirúrgica de pulmón en pacientes con enfermedad intersticial difusa. Se analizaron en forma retrospectiva los registros clínicos de 71 pacientes. Se registraron complicaciones en 16 pacientes (22.5%. La mortalidad operatoria fue 11.2%. Los pacientes en quienes la biopsia se realizó por videotoracoscopia (n = 52 y por toracotomía (n = 17 tuvieron la misma duración de estadía en terapia intensiva y de estadía hospitalaria. La tasa de complicaciones (22.2% vs. 21.0%, p = 1.0000 y la mortalidad (9.2 vs. 15.7%, p = 0.2738 no fueron diferentes. Ocho pacientes murieron dentro de los 30 días. La prevalencia de inmunosupresión (4/8 vs. 9/63, p = 0.0325 fue significativamente superior en el grupo de pacientes fallecidos. Estos pacientes tuvieron valores preoperatorios más elevados de urea (50 ± 20.1 mg/dl vs. 31.2 ± 10.3 mg/ dl, p = 0.0013 y menores valores de saturación de O2: 82.7 ± 14.8% vs. 92.8 ± 3.4%, p = 0.0009. En los 11 pacientes con iniciación aguda la mortalidad fue significativamente más elevada (36.3% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.0223. La biopsia aportó un diagnóstico específico en 100% de los pacientes y cambió la estrategia terapéutica en 66.7%. En conclusión, la biopsia de pulmón por vía toracoscópica es un procedimiento útil y seguro en los pacientes con enfermedad intersticial difusa del pulmón. Sin embargo, en el grupo de pacientes inmunocomprometidos, con cuadros de presentación aguda y con insuficiencia respiratoria preoperatoria, la mortalidad es elevada y deben balancearse muy críticamente los riesgos contra los beneficios en ese grupo de enfermos.The objective of this study was to determine the morbidity, mortality and diagnostic yield of video assisted thoracoscopy (VATS and thoracotomy lung biopsy in interstitial lung disease (ILD. Clinical records of 71 patients were

  11. Lung scintiscanning in corrective surgery of congenital heart diseases, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Kaoru

    1981-01-01

    External scintillation scanning of intravenously administered 131 I-MAA was employed to evaluate the distribution of pulmonary blood flow in 63 patients (42 VSD, 9 PDA, 5 VSD with PDA, 4 ECD, 2 VSD with MI and 1 A-P window) with pulmonary hypertension. 1) Preoperative uniformity of lung scintigram was 33.3 - 100% (average 73.0%) in VSD, 27.7 - 100% (68.8%) in PDA, 66.6 - 72.2% (68.2%) in VSD with PDA, 63.8 - 86.1% (78.4%) in ECD, 58.3 - 100% in VSD with MI and 88.8% in A-P window. 2) Preoperative uniformity of lung scintigram correlated with the pulmonary arterial systolic pressure and the ratio of pulmonary to systemic pressure in patients over 1 year of age, but not correlated with pulmonary hemodynamics in patients under 1 year of age. 3) Even though the value of uniformity of lung scintigram was low, pulmonary arterial pressure decreased evidently after corrective surgery in the cases under 1 year of age. However, its decrease was mild in the cases over 1 year of age. Operative death was found in 6 cases. Of these, the value of uniformity of lung scintigram was as low as 55.5 - 72.2% in VSD and PDA, on the other hand, it was as high as 80.5 - 83.3% in ECD. 4) Preoperative pulmonary blood flow disturbances were found in about 51% of the cases of VSD, PDA and VSD with PDA. In cases with the deranged distribution pattern in the left lung or both lungs, postoperative care in the acute stage must be done carefully. 5) In cases with the deranged distribution preoperatively, the postoperative changes of the lung scintigrams were studied at 1 to 2 months after surgery. Postoperative distribution pattern of the pulmonary flow has not improved sufficiently at this time. (author)

  12. Spectrum of high-resolution computed tomography imaging in occupational lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Satija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage to the lungs caused by dusts or fumes or noxious substances inhaled by workers in certain specific occupation is known as occupational lung disease. Recognition of occupational lung disease is especially important not only for the primary worker, but also because of the implications with regard to primary and secondary disease prevention in the exposed co-workers. Although many of the disorders can be detected on chest radiography, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT is superior in delineating the lung architecture and depicting pathology. The characteristic radiological features suggest the correct diagnosis in some, whereas a combination of clinical features, occupational history, and radiological findings is essential in establishing the diagnosis in others. In the presence of a history of exposure and consistent clinical features, the diagnosis of even an uncommon occupational lung disease can be suggested by the characteristic described HRCT findings. In this article, we briefly review the HRCT appearance of a wide spectrum of occupational lung diseases.

  13. A case of immunoglobulin G-4 related sclerosing disease mimicking lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Soo Hee; Lee, Young Kyung; Shim, Mi Suk; Lee, Hyang Im

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) G4-related sclerosing disease is a recently described systemic fibro-inflammatory disease associated with an elevated circulating level of IgG4 and extensive IgG4-positive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, resulting in sclerosing inflammation involving various body organs. We experienced one case where surgery confirmed IgG4-related sclerosing disease as a solitary lung mass mimicking lung cancer. We report radiologic findings including chest computed tomography and positron emission tomography computed tomography, with clinical manifestations of IgG4-related sclerosing disease.

  14. A systematic review of zoonotic enteric parasitic diseases among nomadic and pastoral people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Barnes

    Full Text Available Zoonotic enteric parasites are ubiquitous and remain a public health threat to humans due to our close relationship with domestic animals and wildlife, inadequate water, sanitation, and hygiene practices and diet. While most communities are now sedentary, nomadic and pastoral populations still exist and experience unique exposure risks for acquiring zoonotic enteric parasites. Through this systematic review we sought to summarize published research regarding pathogens present in nomadic populations and to identify the risk factors for their infection.Using systematic review guidelines set forth by PRISMA, research articles were identified, screened and summarized based on exclusion criteria for the documented presence of zoonotic enteric parasites within nomadic or pastoral human populations. A total of 54 articles published between 1956 and 2016 were reviewed to determine the pathogens and exposure risks associated with the global transhumance lifestyle.The included articles reported more than twenty different zoonotic enteric parasite species and illustrated several risk factors for nomadic and pastoralist populations to acquire infection including; a animal contact, b food preparation and diet, and c household characteristics. The most common parasite studied was Echinococcosis spp. and contact with dogs was recognized as a leading risk factor for zoonotic enteric parasites followed by contact with livestock and/or wildlife, water, sanitation, and hygiene barriers, home slaughter of animals, environmental water exposures, household member age and sex, and consumption of unwashed produce or raw, unprocessed, or undercooked milk or meat.Nomadic and pastoral communities are at risk of infection with a variety of zoonotic enteric parasites due to their living environment, cultural and dietary traditions, and close relationship to animals. Global health efforts aimed at reducing the transmission of these animal-to-human pathogens must incorporate

  15. Characteristic features of tacrolimus-induced lung disease in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Takanori; Nakamura, Wataru; Inokuma, Shigeko; Matsubara, Erika

    2016-02-01

    This paper aims to study the background and clinical characteristics of tacrolimus (TAC)-induced lung disease. A case of a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patient who developed TAC-induced interstitial lung disease (TAC-ILD) is reported. The Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA) website was searched for cases of TAC-ILD and its prevalence among all cases of TAC-related adverse events. As for cases of TAC-ILD, its underlying disease, preexisting lung diseases, and fatal outcome were also searched. Literature review of TAC-ILD cases was added. A 65-year-old female RA patient with preexisting bronchiectasis developed near-fatal TAC-ILD. Amelioration of RA, ground-glass opacities in the upper, anterior, and central lung fields, and decrease in peripheral blood lymphocyte count were the major findings in this patient. A search of the PMDA website revealed the following: the prevalence of TAC-ILD was 3 % of all cases of TAC-related adverse events, 56 out of 85 RA cases (66 %), and one out of 15 other cases had a preexisting lung disease; the prevalences of fatal outcome in RA and other cases were 24 and 38 %, respectively. A few cases in the literature had preexisting ILD and developed diffuse alveolar damage. In our case, preexisting bronchiectasis, arthritis remission, newly developed ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in the upper, anterior, and central lung fields, and decrease in peripheral blood lymphocyte count were the major findings. From the search of the PMDA website, about one fourth of the cases with TAC-related lung injury had a fatal outcome, and among RA patients, two thirds had preexisting lung diseases.

  16. Interstitial lung disease in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzeni, Fabiola; Gerardi, Maria Chiara; Barilaro, Giuseppe; Masala, Ignazio Francesco; Benucci, Maurizio; Sarzi-Puttini, Piercarlo

    2018-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) are among the most serious complications associated with systemic rheumatic diseases, and lead to significant morbidity and mortality; they may also be the first manifestation of connective tissue diseases (CTDs). The aim of this narrative review is to summarise the data concerning the pathogenesis of CTD/ILD and its distinguishing features in different rheumatic diseseas. Areas covered: The pathogenesis, clinical aspects and treatment of ILD associated with rheumatic systemic diseases and CTDs were reviewed by searching the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases for papers published between 1995 and February 2017 using combinations of words or terms. Articles not written in English were excluded. Expert commentary: The management of CTD-ILD is challenging because of the lack of robust data regarding the treatments used, the heterogeneity of the diseases themselves, and the scarcity of well-defined outcome measures. Treatment decisions are often made clinically on the basis of functional, radiographic progression, and exacerbating factors such as age and the burden of comorbidities. Given the complexities of diagnosis and the paucity of treatment trials, the management of CTD patients with ILD requires multidisciplinary collaboration between rheumatologists and pulmonologists in CTD-ILD clinics.

  17. The role of nailfold capillaroscopy in interstitial lung diseases - can it differentiate idiopathic cases from collagen tissue disease associated interstitial lung diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakmakçı Karadoğan, Dilek; Balkarlı, Ayşe; Önal, Özgür; Altınışık, Göksel; Çobankara, Veli

    2015-01-01

    Nailfold capillaroscopy (NFC) is a non-invasive diagnostic test that is mostly used for early diagnosis of collagen tissue diseases (CTDs). We aimed to evaluate whether NFC findings could be a clue for discriminating idiopathic interstitial lung diseases (ILD) from CTD associated ILDs (CTD-ILD). Additionally it was aimed to determine whether NFC could be helpful in discriminating usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern from non-specific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) pattern. We grouped patients into three main groups: 15 CTD-ILD, 18 idiopathic ILD, and 17 patients in the control group. The CTD-ILD group was split into two subgroups: 8 patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SJS)-associated ILD and 7 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated ILD. The idiopathic-ILD group consisted of 10 idiopathic NSIP and 8 IPF patients. The control group consisted of 10 SJS and 7 RA patients without lung disease. None of the patients were on acute exacerbation at the time of examination, and none had Reynaud's phenomenon. Mean capillary density was significantly reduced only in the CTD-ILD group as compared to the control group (p= 0.006). In subgroup analysis, it was determined that RA-ILD, IPF, and SJS-ILD subgroups had more severe capillaroscopic abnormalities. Mean capillary density in patients with the UIP pattern was reduced compared to patients with the NSIP pattern and those in the control group; p values were 0.008 and nailfold capillaroscopic findings of patients with NSIP and UIP patterns. NFC findings can be helpful in discriminating UIP patterns from NSIP patterns. But to show its role in differentiating idiopathic disease, more studies with more patients are needed.

  18. Antioxidant supplementation for lung disease in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway infection leads to progressive damage of the lungs in cystic fibrosis and oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology. Supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients (vitamin E, vitamin C, ß-carotene and selenium) or glutathione may therefore potentially help maintain...... COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. We contacted trial investigators to obtain missing information. Primary outcomes are lung function and quality of life; secondary outcomes are oxidative stress...... or by inhalation) appears to improve lung function in some cases and decrease oxidative stress; however, due to the very intensive antibiotic treatment and other treatments that cystic fibrosis patients receive, the beneficial effect of antioxidants is very difficult to assess in patients with chronic infection...

  19. Chronic obstructive lung disease and posttraumatic stress disorder: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Thad E; Blevins, Amy; Weg, Mark W Vander

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have reported on the co-occurrence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and psychiatric conditions, with the most robust evidence base demonstrating an impact of comorbid anxiety and depression on COPD-related outcomes. In recent years, research has sought to determine if there is a co-occurrence between COPD and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as for associations between PTSD and COPD-related outcomes. To date, there have been no published reviews summarizing this emerging literature. The primary objective of this review was to determine if there is adequate evidence to support a co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Secondary objectives were to: 1) determine if there are important clinical considerations regarding the impact of PTSD on COPD management, and 2) identify targeted areas for further research. A structured review was performed using a systematic search strategy limited to studies in English, addressing adults, and to articles that examined: 1) the co-occurrence of COPD and PTSD and 2) the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes. To be included, articles must have addressed some type of nonreversible obstructive lung pathology. A total of 598 articles were identified for initial review. Upon applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, n=19 articles or abstracts addressed our stated objectives. Overall, there is inconclusive evidence to support the co-occurrence between PTSD and COPD. Studies finding a significant co-occurrence generally had inferior methods of identifying COPD; in contrast, studies that utilized more robust COPD measures (such as a physician exam) generally failed to find a relationship. Among studies that examined the impact of PTSD on COPD-related outcomes, there was more consistent evidence that PTSD affects the perception of respiratory symptom burden and management. In addition, methods for measuring an important confounder (smoking) were generally lacking. There is inconclusive evidence to

  20. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  1. A role of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for cystic lung diseases in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, Jun; Shimotake, Takashi; Deguchi, Eiichi; Tokiwa, Kazuaki; Iwai, Naomi

    1995-01-01

    Fourteen children with cystic lung diseases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These patients studied included 7 patients with bronchogenic cyst of lung, 4 with pulmonary sequestration, 1 with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, 1 with lung abscess, and 1 with cystic bronchoectasis. MRI identified all lesions seen on the chest radiographs. It was particularly valuable delineating contents of bronchogenic cyst without the need for contrast material enhancement. However, MRI was not quite as sensitive as CT that detected very small abnormalities, because MRI had more artifacts than those of CT. In conclusion, we believe that both CT and MRI are needed for differential diagnosis of lung diseases in children. (author)

  2. A role of computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging for cystic lung diseases in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagihara, Jun; Shimotake, Takashi; Deguchi, Eiichi; Tokiwa, Kazuaki; Iwai, Naomi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    Fourteen children with cystic lung diseases were imaged using computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These patients studied included 7 patients with bronchogenic cyst of lung, 4 with pulmonary sequestration, 1 with congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation, 1 with lung abscess, and 1 with cystic bronchoectasis. MRI identified all lesions seen on the chest radiographs. It was particularly valuable delineating contents of bronchogenic cyst without the need for contrast material enhancement. However, MRI was not quite as sensitive as CT that detected very small abnormalities, because MRI had more artifacts than those of CT. In conclusion, we believe that both CT and MRI are needed for differential diagnosis of lung diseases in children. (author).

  3. Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulshine, James L; Avila, Rick; Yankelevitz, David; Baer, Thomas M; Estépar, Raul San Jose; Ambrose, Laurie Fenton; Aldigé, Carolyn R

    2015-05-01

    The Prevent Cancer Foundation Lung Cancer Workshop XI: Tobacco-Induced Disease: Advances in Policy, Early Detection and Management was held in New York, NY on May 16 and 17, 2014. The two goals of the Workshop were to define strategies to drive innovation in precompetitive quantitative research on the use of imaging to assess new therapies for management of early lung cancer and to discuss a process to implement a national program to provide high quality computed tomography imaging for lung cancer and other tobacco-induced disease. With the central importance of computed tomography imaging for both early detection and volumetric lung cancer assessment, strategic issues around the development of imaging and ensuring its quality are critical to ensure continued progress against this most lethal cancer.

  4. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  5. pattern of interstitial lung disease as seen by high resolution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... Black and white bands (so called “Hurricane artifact”) are seen on HRCT due to difference in attenuation of structures like blood vessels and adjacent lung. Motion artifact may also be a problem in dyspnoeic patients undergoing volumetric imaging. This can mitigate against by doing axial incremental.

  6. Three-center feasibility of lung clearance index in infants and preschool children with cystic fibrosis and other lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Mirjam; Graeber, Simon Y; Joachim, Cornelia; Barth, Sandra; Ricklefs, Isabell; Diekmann, Gesa; Kopp, Matthias V; Naehrlich, Lutz; Mall, Marcus A

    2018-03-01

    Lung clearance index (LCI) detects early ventilation inhomogeneity and has been suggested as sensitive endpoint in multicenter intervention trials in infants and preschoolers with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the feasibility of multicenter LCI in this age group has not been determined. We, therefore, investigated the feasibility of LCI in infants and preschoolers with and without CF in a three-center setting. Following central training, standardized SF 6 -MBW measurements were performed in 73 sedated children (10 controls, 49 with CF and 14 with other lung diseases), mean age 2.3±1.2years across three centers, and data were analyzed centrally. Overall success rate of LCI measurements was 91.8% ranging from 78.9% to 100% across study sites. LCI was increased in patients with CF (P<0.05) and with other lung diseases (P<0.05) compared to controls. Our results support feasibility of LCI as multicenter endpoint in clinical trials in infants and preschoolers with CF. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The lung microbiome in moderate and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa A Pragman

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is an inflammatory disorder characterized by incompletely reversible airflow obstruction. Bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract contributes to approximately 50% of COPD exacerbations. Even during periods of stable lung function, the lung harbors a community of bacteria, termed the microbiome. The role of the lung microbiome in the pathogenesis of COPD remains unknown. The COPD lung microbiome, like the healthy lung microbiome, appears to reflect microaspiration of oral microflora. Here we describe the COPD lung microbiome of 22 patients with Moderate or Severe COPD compared to 10 healthy control patients. The composition of the lung microbiomes was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Sequences were analyzed using mothur, Ribosomal Database Project, Fast UniFrac, and Metastats. Our results showed a significant increase in microbial diversity with the development of COPD. The main phyla in all samples were Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Proteobacteria. Principal coordinate analyses demonstrated separation of control and COPD samples, but samples did not cluster based on disease severity. However, samples did cluster based on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled bronchodilators. Metastats analyses demonstrated an increased abundance of several oral bacteria in COPD samples.

  8. Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Disease Is Not a Contraindication to Lung Transplantation in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tanja; Thomsen, V O

    2013-01-01

    of these died of non-NTM-related causes whereas two developed deep Mycobacterium abscessus wound infections and one was transiently culture negative until M abscessus was reactivated. One patient was subsequently cured; the other two remained on therapy with good performance status. The study supports...... infection poses a contraindication to lung transplantation. All CF patients with current or prior NTM who had undergone lung transplantation were identified. Out of 52 lung transplant patients with CF 9 (17%) had NTM disease. Five patients had known infection at the time of transplantation. Two...

  9. Reversible Lansoprazole-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Showing Improvement after Drug Cessation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Kyu Won; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Shin, Bong Kyung; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Eun Young

    2008-01-01

    Lansoprazole is an acid proton-pump inhibitor that is similar to omeprazole. It is used to treat duodenal or gastric ulcers, H. pylori infection, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Common adverse effects of lansoprazole are diarrhea, abdominal pain, skin rash and/or itching. Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine warns that this drug can on rare occasion cause cough or cold-like symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanisms of lansoprazole-related pulmonary symptoms are not yet understood. In particular, there are no known reports regarding lansoprazole-induced interstitial lung diseases. We report here a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) induced by oral administration of lansoprazole, which showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) as detected from a video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy. We believe that this is the first report of a case of pathologically proven lansoprazole-induced ILD for which a surgical lung biopsy was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of DI-ILD caused by lansoprazole. The diagnosis was made by considering the radiological, histopathological and clinical findings, including the close temporal relationship between lansoprazole exposure and symptom severity. Other possible causes were excluded due to a lack of a temporal relationship between the symptoms and work history or prednisolone therapy, and no other history of specific allergen exposure. When there is diffuse interstitial lung disease with an unknown etiology, it is important to remember that drugs can be the cause of pulmonary symptoms and it is crucial to take a careful patient history. If there is a recent history of taking lansoprazole in a patient with clinical and radiological findings of diffuse interstitial lung disease, we recommend stopping the medication to see if there is clinical and radiological improvement. That way, one can avoid using invasive procedures to

  10. Reversible Lansoprazole-Induced Interstitial Lung Disease Showing Improvement after Drug Cessation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Kyu Won; Woo, Ok Hee; Yong, Hwan Seok; Shin, Bong Kyung; Shim, Jae Jeong; Kang, Eun Young [College of Medicine, Korea University, Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Lansoprazole is an acid proton-pump inhibitor that is similar to omeprazole. It is used to treat duodenal or gastric ulcers, H. pylori infection, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Common adverse effects of lansoprazole are diarrhea, abdominal pain, skin rash and/or itching. Information from U.S. National Library of Medicine warns that this drug can on rare occasion cause cough or cold-like symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanisms of lansoprazole-related pulmonary symptoms are not yet understood. In particular, there are no known reports regarding lansoprazole-induced interstitial lung diseases. We report here a case of interstitial lung disease (ILD) induced by oral administration of lansoprazole, which showed a pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) as detected from a video-assisted thoracoscopic lung biopsy. We believe that this is the first report of a case of pathologically proven lansoprazole-induced ILD for which a surgical lung biopsy was performed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of DI-ILD caused by lansoprazole. The diagnosis was made by considering the radiological, histopathological and clinical findings, including the close temporal relationship between lansoprazole exposure and symptom severity. Other possible causes were excluded due to a lack of a temporal relationship between the symptoms and work history or prednisolone therapy, and no other history of specific allergen exposure. When there is diffuse interstitial lung disease with an unknown etiology, it is important to remember that drugs can be the cause of pulmonary symptoms and it is crucial to take a careful patient history. If there is a recent history of taking lansoprazole in a patient with clinical and radiological findings of diffuse interstitial lung disease, we recommend stopping the medication to see if there is clinical and radiological improvement. That way, one can avoid using invasive procedures to

  11. The Chagas disease domestic transmission cycle in Guatemala: Parasite-vector switches and lack of mitochondrial co-diversification between Triatoma dimidiata and Trypanosoma cruzi subpopulations suggest non-vectorial parasite dispersal across the Motagua valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Pamela M; Messenger, Louisa Alexandra; Reina, Jeffrey; Juárez, José G; Lawrence, Gena G; Dotson, Ellen M; Llewellyn, Martin S; Cordón-Rosales, Celia

    2015-11-01

    Parasites transmitted by insects must adapt to their vectors and reservoirs. Chagas disease, an American zoonosis caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is transmitted by several species of triatomines. In Central America, Triatoma dimidiata is a widely dispersed vector found in sylvatic and domestic habitats, with distinct populations across the endemic region of Guatemala. Our aim was to test the strength of association between vector and parasite genetic divergence in domestic environments. Microsatellite (MS) loci were used to characterize parasites isolated from T. dimidiata (n=112) collected in domestic environments. Moderate genetic differentiation was observed between parasites north and south of the Motagua Valley, an ancient biogeographic barrier (FST 0.138, p=0.009). Slightly reduced genotypic diversity and increased heterozygosity in the north (Allelic richness (Ar)=1.00-6.05, FIS -0.03) compared to the south (Ar=1.47-6.30, FIS 0.022) suggest either a selective or demographic process during parasite dispersal. Based on parasite genotypes and geographic distribution, 15 vector specimens and their parasite isolates were selected for mitochondrial co-diversification analysis. Genetic variability and phylogenetic congruence were determined with mitochondrial DNA sequences (10 parasite maxicircle gene fragments and triatomine ND4+CYT b). A Mantel test as well as phylogenetic, network and principal coordinates analyses supported at least three T. dimidiata haplogroups separated by geographic distance across the Motagua Valley. Maxicircle sequences showed low T. cruzi genetic variability (π nucleotide diversity 0.00098) with no evidence of co-diversification with the vector, having multiple host switches across the valley. Sylvatic Didelphis marsupialis captured across the Motagua Valley were found to be infected with T. cruzi strains sharing MS genotypes with parasites isolated from domiciliated triatomines. The current parasite distribution in domestic environments

  12. The lung tissue microbiota of mild and moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragman, Alexa A; Lyu, Tianmeng; Baller, Joshua A; Gould, Trevor J; Kelly, Rosemary F; Reilly, Cavan S; Isaacson, Richard E; Wendt, Chris H

    2018-01-09

    Oral taxa are often found in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) lung microbiota, but it is not clear if this is due to a physiologic process such as aspiration or experimental contamination at the time of specimen collection. Microbiota samples were obtained from nine subjects with mild or moderate COPD by swabbing lung tissue and upper airway sites during lung lobectomy. Lung specimens were not contaminated with upper airway taxa since they were obtained surgically. The microbiota were analyzed with 16S rRNA gene qPCR and 16S rRNA gene hypervariable region 3 (V3) sequencing. Data analyses were performed using QIIME, SourceTracker, and R. Streptococcus was the most common genus in the oral, bronchial, and lung tissue samples, and multiple other taxa were present in both the upper and lower airways. Each subject's own bronchial and lung tissue microbiota were more similar to each other than were the bronchial and lung tissue microbiota of two different subjects (permutation test, p = 0.0139), indicating more within-subject similarity than between-subject similarity at these two lung sites. Principal coordinate analysis of all subject samples revealed clustering by anatomic sampling site (PERMANOVA, p = 0.001), but not by subject. SourceTracker analysis found that the sources of the lung tissue microbiota were 21.1% (mean) oral microbiota, 8.7% nasal microbiota, and 70.1% unknown. An analysis using the neutral theory of community ecology revealed that the lung tissue microbiota closely reflects the bronchial, oral, and nasal microbiota (immigration parameter estimates 0.69, 0.62, and 0.74, respectively), with some evidence of ecologic drift occurring in the lung tissue. This is the first study to evaluate the mild-moderate COPD lung tissue microbiota without potential for upper airway contamination of the lung samples. In our small study of subjects with COPD, we found oral and nasal bacteria in the lung tissue microbiota, confirming that

  13. Lung involvement in Osler's disease and cerebral complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepgras, U.; Sielecki, S.

    1986-01-01

    About 50% of patients with Morbus Osler also have arteriovenous lung malformations. The wall-insufficiency mural inadequacy of the malformated vessels is due to the secondary infectious cerebral and meningeal complications which frequently occur in the disease. If a brain abscess is diagnosed one has first to take into consideration in a.-v. malformation of the lungs as possible source of the infection. (orig.).

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among lung cancer-free smokers: The importance of healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpman, Michelle D; Eldridge, Ronald; Follis, Jack L; Etzel, Carol J; Shete, Sanjay; El-Zein, Randa A

    2018-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in smokers enrolled as "healthy" controls in studies is 10-50%. The COPD status of ideal smoker populations for lung cancer case-control studies should be checked via spirometry; however, this is often not feasible, because no medical indications exist for asymptomatic smokers to undergo spirometry prior to study enrollment. Therefore, there is an unmet need for robust, cost effective assays for identifying undiagnosed lung disease among asymptomatic smokers. Such assays would help excluding unhealthy smokers from lung cancer case-control studies. We used the cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay (a measure of genetic instability) to identify undiagnosed lung disease among asymptomatic smokers. We used a convenience population from an on-going lung cancer case-control study including smokers with lung cancer (n = 454), smoker controls (n = 797), and a self-reported COPD (n = 200) contingent within the smoker controls. Significant differences for all CBMN endpoints were observed when comparing lung cancer to All controls (which included COPD) and Healthy controls (with no COPD). The risk ratio (RR) was increased in the COPD group vs. Healthy controls for nuclear buds (RR 1.28, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.62), and marginally increased for micronuclei (RR 1.06, 0.98-1.89) and nucleoplasmic bridges (RR 1.07, 0.97-1.15). These findings highlight the importance of using truly healthy controls in studies geared toward assessment of lung cancer risk. Using genetic instability biomarkers would facilitate the identification of smokers susceptible to tobacco smoke carcinogens and therefore predisposed to either disease. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Respiratory Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Pulmonary imaging techniques in the diagnosis of occupational interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.F.; Templeton, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The chest radiograph is extensively used in evaluating workers at risk for developing occupational lung disease. Other pulmonary imaging techniques used in conjunction with the initial chest radiograph include conventional computed tomography, high resolution computed tomography, and gallium scintigraphy. This chapter evaluates the use of these techniques and their appropriate applications in the pneumoconioses, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, berylliosis, and hard metal diseases.65 references

  16. Is sweat chloride predictive of severity of cystic fibrosis lung disease assessed by chest computed tomography?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caudri, Daan; Zitter, David; Bronsveld, Inez; Tiddens, Harm

    BACKGROUND: Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by a marked heterogeneity. Sweat chloride-level is a functional marker of the CF Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) protein and could be an important predictor of later disease severity. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis children from

  17. Pathway reconstruction of airway remodeling in chronic lung diseases: a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najafi

    Full Text Available Airway remodeling is a pathophysiologic process at the clinical, cellular, and molecular level relating to chronic obstructive airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma and mustard lung. These diseases are associated with the dysregulation of multiple molecular pathways in the airway cells. Little progress has so far been made in discovering the molecular causes of complex disease in a holistic systems manner. Therefore, pathway and network reconstruction is an essential part of a systems biology approach to solve this challenging problem. In this paper, multiple data sources were used to construct the molecular process of airway remodeling pathway in mustard lung as a model of airway disease. We first compiled a master list of genes that change with airway remodeling in the mustard lung disease and then reconstructed the pathway by generating and merging the protein-protein interaction and the gene regulatory networks. Experimental observations and literature mining were used to identify and validate the master list. The outcome of this paper can provide valuable information about closely related chronic obstructive airway diseases which are of great importance for biologists and their future research. Reconstructing the airway remodeling interactome provides a starting point and reference for the future experimental study of mustard lung, and further analysis and development of these maps will be critical to understanding airway diseases in patients.

  18. Pulmonary Artery Size in Interstitial Lung Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension: Association with Interstitial Lung Disease Severity and Diagnostic Utility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Chin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available PurposeIt is postulated that ILD causes PA dilatation independent of the presence of pulmonary hypertension (PH, so the use of PA size to screen for PH is not recommended. The aims of this study were to investigate the association of PA size with the presence and severity of ILD and to assess the diagnostic accuracy of PA size for detecting PH.MethodsIncident patients referred to a tertiary PH centre underwent baseline thoracic CT, MRI and right heart catheterisation (RHC. Pulmonary artery diameter was measured on CT pulmonary angiography and pulmonary arterial areas on MRI. A thoracic radiologist scored the severity of ILD on CT from 0 to 4, 0 = absent, 1 = 1–25%, 2 = 26–50%, 3 = 51–75%, and 4 = 76–100% extent of involvement. Receiver operating characteristic analysis and linear regression were employed to assess diagnostic accuracy and independent associations of PA size.Results110 had suspected PH due to ILD (age 65 years (SD 13, M:F 37:73 and 379 had suspected PH without ILD (age 64 years (SD 13, M:F 161:218. CT derived main PA diameter was accurate for detection of PH in patients both with and without ILD - AUC 0.873, p =< 0.001, and AUC 0.835, p =< 0.001, respectively, as was MRI diastolic PA area, AUC 0.897, p =< 0.001, and AUC 0.857, p =< 0.001, respectively Significant correlations were identified between mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP and PA diameter in ILD (r = 0.608, p < 0.001, and non-ILD cohort (r = 0.426, p < 0.001. PA size was independently associated with mPAP (p < 0.001 and BSA (p = 0.001, but not with forced vital capacity % predicted (p = 0.597, Transfer factor of the lungs for carbon monoxide (TLCO % predicted (p = 0.321 or the presence of ILD on CT (p = 0.905. The severity of ILD was not associated with pulmonary artery dilatation (r = 0.071, p = 0.459.ConclusionsPulmonary arterial pressure elevation leads to pulmonary arterial dilation, which is not independently influenced by the presence or severity of

  19. Clinical use of pulmonary function tests and high-resolution tomography in interstitial lung diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia C, Clara P; Mejia M, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases is generally arrived at by clinical history, physical examination, and radiologic images, especially high-resolution CT-scanning. It is important to note that, while these diseases have different clinical and histological characteristics, they share a basic pattern of abnormal lung function. With regard to high-resolution tomography, the characteristics of these diseases are similar, although there are specific differences that can be helpful for correct diagnosis. These diseases have severe consequences on respiratory gas exchange. These alterations, combined with other abnormalities of lung function, cause the signs and symptoms and have an impact on quality of life. The use of physiologic parameters is not only helpful for diagnosis, but can also assess severity, help to define the consequences of treatment, and aid in the follow-up. Although some pulmonary function tests can remain completely normal with severe radiographic findings, 10% of patients have impaired lung function before radiologic changes. High-resolution tomography is an essential imaging tool for the study of these patients. This is true not only for diagnosis, but also with regard to clinical parameters and follow-up. Its prognostic use is continually gaining importance. In this article we assess the clinical use of pulmonary function tests and high-resolution tomography in interstitial lung diseases.

  20. Myofibroblasts in interstitial lung diseases show diverse electron microscopic and invasive features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, Henna M; Lehtonen, Siri T; Sormunen, Raija T; Harju, Terttu H; Lappi-Blanco, Elisa; Bloigu, Risto S; Kaarteenaho, Riitta L

    2012-09-01

    The characteristic features of myofibroblasts in various lung disorders are poorly understood. We have evaluated the ultrastructure and invasive capacities of myofibroblasts cultured from small volumes of diagnostic bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from patients with different types of lung diseases. Cells were cultured from samples of BAL fluid collected from 51 patients that had undergone bronchoscopy and BAL for diagnostic purposes. The cells were visualized by transmission electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy to achieve ultrastructural localization of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin. The levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA and fibronectin mRNA were measured by western blot and quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The invasive capacities of the cells were evaluated. The cultured cells were either fibroblasts or myofibroblasts. The structure of the fibronexus, and the amounts of intracellular actin, extracellular fibronectin and cell junctions of myofibroblasts varied in different diseases. In electron and immunoelectron microscopy, cells cultured from interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) expressed more actin filaments and α-SMA than normal lung. The invasive capacity of the cells obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was higher than that from patients with other type of ILDs. Cells expressing more actin filaments had a higher invasion capacity. It is concluded that electron and immunoelectron microscopic studies of myofibroblasts can reveal differential features in various diseases. An analysis of myofibroblasts cultured from diagnostic BAL fluid samples may represent a new kind of tool for diagnostics and research into lung diseases.

  1. Diagnosis of thromboembolic disease: combined ventilation perfusion lung scan and compression ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadparvar, S.; Woods, K.; Magno, R.M.; Sabatino, J. C.; Patil, S.; Dou, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The clinical management of pulmonary embolism and deep venous thrombosis of the legs are similar and require prolonged anticoagulation therapy. The standard diagnostic approach in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism is ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) lung scan and compression ultrasonography to detect deep venous thrombosis. This retrospective study analyzed the role of V Q lung scan and compression ultrasonography in detection of thromboembolic disease. One hundred-twenty consecutive patients (65 female, 55 male) age range 18-95 (mean age 60.7) suspected for pulmonary embolism underwent concomitant V/Q lung scan and compression ultrasonography of the lower extremities. The clinical and radiographic correlation was performed. Of patients with non-diagnostic (low or intermediate probability ) lung scans, 15.4 % (14/91) received anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary embolism. This patients had either high pre-clinical suspicion for PE or underwent pulmonary arterio gram. However, there was an additional 7 % (7/91) increase in the number of patients who received anticoagulation therapy based on the results of ultrasound with confidence interval (3 %-16 %). We conclude that V/Q lung scan is a more sensitive examination for thromboembolic disease, and has a high negative predictive value. Ultrasonography of lower extremities demonstrated higher specificity and positive value. Among patients with non-diagnostic lung scan, the detection rate of thromboembolic disease is improved with addition of ultrasound

  2. Inhaled ENaC antisense oligonucleotide ameliorates cystic fibrosis-like lung disease in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Jeff R; Zhao, Chenguang; Jiang, Chong; Bai, Dong; Katz, Melanie; Greenlee, Sarah; Kawabe, Hiroshi; McCaleb, Michael; Rotin, Daniela; Guo, Shuling; Monia, Brett P

    2017-11-01

    Epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, Scnn1) hyperactivity in the lung leads to airway surface dehydration and mucus accumulation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and in mice with CF-like lung disease. We identified several potent ENaC specific antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and tested them by inhalation in mouse models of CF-like lung disease. The inhaled ASOs distributed into lung airway epithelial cells and decreased ENaC expression by inducing RNase H1-dependent degradation of the targeted Scnn1a mRNA. Aerosol delivered ENaC ASO down-regulated mucus marker expression and ameliorated goblet cell metaplasia, inflammation, and airway hyper-responsiveness. Lack of systemic activity of ASOs delivered via the aerosol route ensures the safety of this approach. Our results demonstrate that antisense inhibition of ENaC in airway epithelial cells could be an effective and safe approach for the prevention and reversal of lung symptoms in CF and potentially other inflammatory diseases of the lung. Copyright © 2017 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An Ultrasound Surface Wave Technique for Assessing Skin and Lung Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhou, Boran; Kalra, Sanjay; Bartholmai, Brian; Greenleaf, James; Osborn, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multi-organ connective tissue disease characterized by immune dysregulation and organ fibrosis. Severe organ involvement, especially of the skin and lung, is the cause of morbidity and mortality in SSc. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) includes multiple lung disorders in which the lung tissue is fibrotic and stiffened. The purpose of this study was to translate ultrasound surface wave elastography (USWE) for assessing patients with SSc and/or ILD via measuring surface wave speeds of both skin and superficial lung tissue. Forty-one patients with both SSc and ILD and 30 healthy patients were enrolled in this study. An external harmonic vibration was used to generate the wave propagation on the skin or lung. Three excitation frequencies of 100, 150 and 200 Hz were used. An ultrasound probe was used to measure the wave propagation in the tissue non-invasively. Surface wave speeds were measured on the forearm and upper arm of both left and right arm, as well as the upper and lower lungs, through six intercostal spaces of patients and healthy patients. Viscoelasticity of the skin was calculated by the wave speed dispersion with frequency using the Voigt model. The magnitudes of surface wave speed and viscoelasticity of patients' skin were significantly higher than those of healthy patients (p wave speeds of patients' lung were significantly higher than those of healthy patients (p ionizing technique for measuring both skin and lung surface wave speed and may be useful for quantitative assessment of SSc and/or ILD. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lung cancer and bronchi-pulmonary diseases of iron uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gneusheva, G. I.; Uspenskaya, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    The lung cancer mortality has been analyzed for 2.582 miners employed from 1943 to 1961. All persons observed had three years occupation at least. Basing upon the lung cancer risk value per unit of the exposure, the assessment of the effective standard of pulmonary organ irradiation to radon progeny was elaborated and mortality excess was calcuated. Medical demography studies of morbidity and mortality were elaborated for silicosis, silicotuberculosis, lung cancer and occupational bronchitis versus the magnitude of dust and radiation exposure. Annual and cumulative exposures have been assessed for seven cohorts of miners employed and vast primary material has been accumulated for the period of 40 years (1943-1984). Intensive indice of mortality were determined for observation periods. The mortality excess was compared to cumulated radiation exposure. The lung cancer mortality excess in iron-uranium miners was 3.3 cases per 106 man-years per 1 WLM; 4.8 cases per 106 man-years per 1 WLM was assessed if first years of occupation are negected. The latent period from radiation exposure to death from lung cancer is generally ten year or more. Changes of miners labor conditions (the magnitude of dust exposure) have been reflected by the bronchi pulmonary disease structure. The input of these dieseases into the occupational lung pathology has been significantly changed with the time course. Within first 18-20 years, pneumoconiosis was the only form of occupational lung pathology in the mine, whereas occupational bronchis and lung cancers were recorded within next then years thereafter. In cohorts of longest observation period, the average age of patients was increasingly ranked versus diseases as follows: silicosis, silicotuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, and lung cancer. (Author)

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with lung cancer: Prevalence, severity, and common pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffin JP

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop a clinical prediction model of contribution of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD to the pathogenesis of lung cancer, by reporting the estimated prevalence and severity by GOLD criteria in a single-institution cohort of patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer. Primary objective was investigating the effects of impaired lung function with various histological cell types on crude survival, while considering the initial staging of disease extent. Materials & methods: A total of 441 patients, in this historical cohort from electronic medical records, completed spirometry prior to invasive diagnostic procedures and initial treatment of their lung cancer. All statistical analyses, including ANOVA and survival analysis, were performed using SAS version 9.1 software. Results: Estimated prevalence of COPD was 79.1% (95% confidence interval: 71.3%-82.9%. Lung function as measured by spirometry was a significant predictor of survival time in months (p<0.0001 both with and without adjusting for tumor-cell-type, age, and stage of disease. Median survival was similar (p=0.32 and longer among those patients with normal pulmonary function, those with restrictive disease patterns, and those with COPD–GOLD-1 defects. Median survival was shortest among patients with COPD–GOLD-4 impairment (p=0.001. Those patients with COPD–GOLD-2 and COPD-GOLD-3 impairment levels had intermediate survival times (p=0.003. Conclusions: This investigation suggests that strategies for early detection and slowing the progression of COPD before the development of lung cancer might increase patient survival. As demonstrated in this study, the presence and severity of COPD in lung cancer patients is an independent predictor of survival time, different from the established staging of initial extent of disease.

  6. Experimental chronic kidney disease attenuates ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo rat lung model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Kan Peng

    Full Text Available Lung ischemia reperfusion injury (LIRI is one of important complications following lung transplant and cardiopulmonary bypass. Although patients on hemodialysis are still excluded as lung transplant donors because of the possible effects of renal failure on the lungs, increased organ demand has led us to evaluate the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD on LIRI. A CKD model was induced by feeding Sprague-Dawley rats an adenine-rich (0.75% diet for 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and an isolated rat lung in situ model was used to evaluate ischemia reperfusion (IR-induced acute lung injury. The clinicopathological parameters of LIRI, including pulmonary edema, lipid peroxidation, histopathological changes, immunohistochemistry changes, chemokine CXCL1, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, heat shock protein expression, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation were determined. Our results indicated that adenine-fed rats developed CKD as characterized by increased blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels and the deposition of crystals in the renal tubules and interstitium. IR induced a significant increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure, lung edema, lung injury scores, the expression of CXCL1 mRNA, iNOS level, and protein concentration of the bronchial alveolar lavage fluid (BALF. The tumor necrosis factor-α levels in the BALF and perfusate; the interleukin-10 level in the perfusate; and the malondialdehyde levels in the lung tissue and perfusate were also significantly increased by LIRI. Counterintuitively, adenine-induced CKD significantly attenuated the severity of lung injury induced by IR. CKD rats exhibited increased heat shock protein 70 expression and decreased activation of NF-κB signaling. In conclusion, adenine-induced CKD attenuated LIRI by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  7. Lung disease in a global context. A call for public health action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluger, Neil W; Koppaka, Ram

    2014-03-01

    As described in a recently released report of the Forum of International Respiratory Societies, four of the leading causes of death in the world are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, acute respiratory tract infections, lung cancer, and tuberculosis. A fifth, asthma, causes enormous global morbidity. Not enough progress has been made in introducing new therapies and reducing disease burden for these illnesses in the last few decades, despite generous investments and some notable progress in biomedical research. Four external and modifiable drivers are responsible for a substantial percentage of the disease burden represented by the major lung diseases: tobacco, outdoor air pollution, household air pollution, and occupational exposures to lung toxins. Especially in low- and middle-income countries, but in highly developed economies as well, pressures for economic development and lax regulation are contributing to the continued proliferation of these drivers. Public health approaches to the most common lung diseases could have enormous effects on reducing morbidity and mortality. There must be increased advocacy from and mobilization of civil society to bring attention to the drivers of lung diseases in the world. The World Health Organization should negotiate accords similar to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control to address air pollution and occupational exposures. Large increases in funding by government agencies and nongovernmental organizations around the world are needed to identify technologies that will reduce health risks while allowing populations to enjoy the benefits of economic development. This paradigm, focused more on public health than on individual medical treatment, has the best chance of substantial reduction in the burden of lung disease around the world in the next several years.

  8. Evaluation of imaging of the ventilatory lung motion in pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashige; Kanai, Hisakata; Tanaka, Masao; Hirayama, Jiro; Handa, Kenjiro

    1988-01-01

    Using perfusion lung scintigram with 99m Tc-macroaggregated albumin at maximal expiration (E) and inspiration (I), images of the motion of the regional pulmonary areas and lung margins during ventilation ((E-I)/I) was obtained in patients with various respiratory diseases. The image of (E-I)/I consisted of positive and negative components. The former component visualized the motion of the regional pulmonary areas that corresponded with the ventilatory amplitude of the videodensigram. The sum of the positive component of (E-I)/I in both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.62). It was 163.5 ± 52.5 in cases with a vital capacity of more than 3.01, 94.1 ± 61.5 in primary lung cancer, 89.2 ± 44.7 in chronic obstructive lung diseases and 69.0 ± 27.5 in diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The distribution pattern of pulmonary perfusion and the positive component of (E-I)/I matched fairly in many cases, but did not match in some cases. The negative component of (E-I)/I demonstrated the ventilatory motion of the lung margin and its decreased activity was shown in cases with hypoventilation of various causes including pleural diseases. The sum of the negative component of (E-I)/I in the both lungs correlated with the vital capacity (n = 50, r = 0.44). These results suggest that this technique is useful to estimate the regional pulmonary ventilatioin and motion of the lung margins. (author)

  9. ‘WNT-er is coming’: WNT signalling in chronic lung diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baarsma, H A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases represent a major public health problem with only limited therapeutic options. An important unmet need is to identify compounds and drugs that target key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases. Over the last decade, there has been extensive interest in investigating Wingless/integrase-1 (WNT) signalling pathways; and WNT signal alterations have been linked to pulmonary disease pathogenesis and progression. Here, we comprehensively review the cumulative evidence for WNT pathway alterations in chronic lung pathologies, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, asthma and COPD. While many studies have focused on the canonical WNT/β-catenin signalling pathway, recent reports highlight that non-canonical WNT signalling may also significantly contribute to chronic lung pathologies; these studies will be particularly featured in this review. We further discuss recent advances uncovering the role of WNT signalling early in life, the potential of pharmaceutically modulating WNT signalling pathways and highlight (pre)clinical studies describing promising new therapies for chronic lung diseases. PMID:28416592

  10. Artificial intelligence in diagnosis of obstructive lung disease: current status and future potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nilakash; Topalovic, Marko; Janssens, Wim

    2018-03-01

    The application of artificial intelligence in the diagnosis of obstructive lung diseases is an exciting phenomenon. Artificial intelligence algorithms work by finding patterns in data obtained from diagnostic tests, which can be used to predict clinical outcomes or to detect obstructive phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to describe the latest trends and to discuss the future potential of artificial intelligence in the diagnosis of obstructive lung diseases. Machine learning has been successfully used in automated interpretation of pulmonary function tests for differential diagnosis of obstructive lung diseases. Deep learning models such as convolutional neural network are state-of-the art for obstructive pattern recognition in computed tomography. Machine learning has also been applied in other diagnostic approaches such as forced oscillation test, breath analysis, lung sound analysis and telemedicine with promising results in small-scale studies. Overall, the application of artificial intelligence has produced encouraging results in the diagnosis of obstructive lung diseases. However, large-scale studies are still required to validate current findings and to boost its adoption by the medical community.

  11. Cigarettes, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease: the effects of inhalation and tar yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higenbottam, T; Shipley, M J; Rose, G

    1982-06-01

    Ten-year mortality rates for lung cancer and coronary heart disease have been related to cigarette smoking habits in 17 475 male civil servants aged 40-64 and in sample of 8089 male British residents aged 35-69. Both diseases were more frequent in smokers. Lung cancer rates were higher overall for "non-inhalers", particularly in heavy smokers. Tar yield correlated with the risk of lung cancer in non-inhalers but less so in inhalers. Conversely, coronary deaths were more common among inhalers, and the effect of tar/nicotine yield (such as it was) was confined to inhalers. It appears that there are subtle interactions between the amount smoked, the tar/nicotine yield of the cigarette, and the style of smoking. Thus the effects of a change in cigarette characteristics are hard to predict, and they may be different for respiratory and cardiovascular disease.

  12. Lung diseases in the elderly. Pathogenetic significance of pollutants and environmental factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitz, M; Herzog, H

    1984-05-03

    In the elderly pneumoconioses due to anorganic or organic dusts are not very common. The incidence of mesothelioma is increasing also in the elderly population. Mesothelioma has become the most frequent occupational malignancy. There is also evidence that mesothelioma can be produced by other fibers than asbestos particles. The paper discusses further the effect of passive smoking, where there is new evidence that passive-smokers are exposed to a higher risk for bronchial cancer than non-smokers. The interactions between smoking and air pollution and morbidity of chronic bronchitis are illustrated. New aspects of pathogenesis and pathophysiology of chronic obstructive lung disease and pulmonary emphysema due to smoking as the most frequent environmental lung disease in the elderly are further discussed. A brief overview of the therapeutical approach to chronic obstructive lung disease including new forms of treatment of cor pulmonale is finally given.

  13. Clinical application of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in pediatric lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non invasive method for assessing the inflammatory status of children with airway disease. Different ways to measure FeNO levels are currently available. The possibility of measuring FeNO levels in an office setting even in young children, and the commercial availability of portable devices, support the routine use of FeNO determination in the daily pediatric practice. Although many confounding factors may affect its measurement, FeNO is now widely used in the management of children with asthma, and seems to provide significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than lung function or bronchial challenge tests. The role of FeNO in airway infection (e.g. viral bronchiolitis and common acquired pneumonia, in bronchiectasis, or in cases with diffuse lung disease is less clear. This review focuses on the most recent advances and the current clinical applications of FeNO measurement in pediatric lung disease.

  14. Congenital Chagas disease as an ecological model of interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi parasites, pregnant women, placenta and fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss the main ecological interactions between the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and its hosts, the mother and the fetus, leading to the transmission and development of congenital Chagas disease. One or several infecting strains of T. cruzi (with specific features) interact with: (i) the immune system of a pregnant woman whom responses depend on genetic and environmental factors, (ii) the placenta harboring its own defenses, and, finally, (iii) the fetal immune system displaying responses also susceptible to be modulated by maternal and environmental factors, as well as his own genetic background which is different from her mother. The severity of congenital Chagas disease depends on the magnitude of such final responses. The paper is mainly based on human data, but integrates also complementary observations obtained in experimental infections. It also focuses on important gaps in our knowledge of this congenital infection, such as the role of parasite diversity vs host genetic factors, as well as that of the maternal and placental microbiomes and the microbiome acquisition by infant in the control of infection. Investigations on these topics are needed in order to improve the programs aiming to diagnose, manage and control congenital Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Parasites in marine food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    Most species interactions probably involve parasites. This review considers the extent to which marine ecologists should consider parasites to fully understand marine communities. Parasites are influential parts of food webs in estuaries, temperate reefs, and coral reefs, but their ecological importance is seldom recognized. Though difficult to observe, parasites can have substantial biomass, and they can be just as common as free-living consumers after controlling for body mass and trophic level. Parasites have direct impacts on the energetics of their hosts and some affect host behaviors, with ecosystem-level consequences. Although they cause disease, parasites are sensitive components of ecosystems. In particular, they suffer secondary extinctions due to biodiversity loss. Some parasites can also return to a system after habitat restoration. For these reasons, parasites can make good indicators of ecosystem integrity. Fishing can indirectly increase or decrease parasite populations and the effects of climate change on parasites are likely to be equally as complex.

  16. 99Tcm-MIBI imaging in diagnosing benign/malign pulmonary disease and analysis of lung cancer DNA content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yanlin; Tan Jiaju; Yang Jie; Zhu Zheng; Yu Fengwen; He Xiaohong; Huang Kemin; Yuan Baihong; Su Shaodi

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of 99 Tc m -methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) lung imaging in diagnosing benign/malign pulmonary disease and the relation of 99 Tc m -MIBI uptake ratio (UR) with lung cancer DNA content. Methods: Early and delay imaging were performed on 27 cases of benign lung disease and 46 cases of malign lung disease. Visual analysis of the images and T/N uptake ratio measurement were performed on every case. Cancer cell DNA content and DNA index (DI) were measured in 24 cases of malign pulmonary disease. Results: The delay phase UR was 1.13 ± 0.19 in benign disease group, and the delay phase UR was 1.45 ± 0.21 in malign disease group (t6.51, P 99 Tc m -MIBI is not an ideal imaging agent for differentiating pulmonary benign/malign disease. Lung cancer DNA content may be reflected by delay phase UR

  17. Using Fractal And Morphological Criteria For Automatic Classification Of Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehel, Jacques Levy

    1989-11-01

    Medical Images are difficult to analyze by means of classical image processing tools because they are very complex and irregular. Such shapes are obtained for instance in Nuclear Medecine with the spatial distribution of activity for organs such as lungs, liver, and heart. We have tried to apply two different theories to these signals: - Fractal Geometry deals with the analysis of complex irregular shapes which cannot well be described by the classical Euclidean geometry. - Integral Geometry treats sets globally and allows to introduce robust measures. We have computed three parameters on three kinds of Lung's SPECT images: normal, pulmonary embolism and chronic desease: - The commonly used fractal dimension (FD), that gives a measurement of the irregularity of the 3D shape. - The generalized lacunarity dimension (GLD), defined as the variance of the ratio of the local activity by the mean activity, which is only sensitive to the distribution and the size of gaps in the surface. - The Favard length that gives an approximation of the surface of a 3-D shape. The results show that each slice of the lung, considered as a 3D surface, is fractal and that the fractal dimension is the same for each slice and for the three kind of lungs; as for the lacunarity and Favard length, they are clearly different for normal lungs, pulmonary embolisms and chronic diseases. These results indicate that automatic classification of Lung's SPECT can be achieved, and that a quantitative measurement of the evolution of the disease could be made.

  18. The prevalence and extent of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlates to the type of lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisichella, Piero Marco; Davis, Christopher S; Shankaran, Vidya; Gagermeier, James; Dilling, Daniel; Alex, Charles G; Kovacs, Elizabeth J; Joehl, Raymond J; Love, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Evidence is increasingly convincing that lung transplantation is a risk factor of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, it is still not known if the type of lung transplant (unilateral, bilateral, or retransplant) plays a role in the pathogenesis of GERD. The records of 61 lung transplant patients who underwent esophageal function tests between September 2008 and May 2010, were retrospectively reviewed. These patients were divided into 3 groups based on the type of lung transplant they received: unilateral (n=25); bilateral (n=30), and retransplant (n=6). Among these groups we compared: (1) the demographic characteristics (eg, sex, age, race, and body mass index); (2) the presence of Barrett esophagus, delayed gastric emptying, and hiatal hernia; and (3) the esophageal manometric and pH-metric profile. Distal and proximal reflux were more prevalent in patients with bilateral transplant or retransplant and less prevalent in patients after unilateral transplant, regardless of the cause of their lung disease. The prevalence of hiatal hernia, Barrett esophagus, and the manometric profile were similar in all groups of patients. Although our data show a discrepancy in prevalence of GERD in patients with different types of lung transplantation, we cannot determine the exact cause for these findings from this study. We speculate that the extent of dissection during the transplant places the patients at risk for GERD. On the basis of the results of this study, a higher level of suspicion of GERD should be held in patients after bilateral or retransplantation.

  19. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo [University of Rome ' ' Sapienza' ' , Radiology, Rome (Italy); Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni [General Hospital Ca' Foncello, Radiology Department, Treviso (Italy); Spronk, Sandra [Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Ros, Mirco [Ca' Foncello Hospital, Pediatrics, Treviso (Italy); Fraioli, Francesco [University College London (UCL), Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Quattrucci, Serena [University of Rome Sapienza, Pediatrics, Rome (Italy); Assael, M.B. [Azienda Ospedaliera di Verona, Verona CF Center, Verona (Italy); Pomerri, Fabio [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Sophia Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Pulmonology Erasmus MC, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus MC, Radiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  20. Nano-based theranostics for chronic obstructive lung diseases: challenges and therapeutic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, Neeraj

    2011-09-01

    The major challenges in the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of nano-delivery systems in chronic obstructive airway conditions are airway defense, severe inflammation and mucous hypersecretion. Chronic airway inflammation and mucous hypersecretion are hallmarks of chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and CF (cystic fibrosis). Distinct etiologies drive inflammation and mucous hypersecretion in these diseases, which are further induced by infection or components of cigarette smoke. Controlling chronic inflammation is at the root of treatments such as corticosteroids, antibiotics or other available drugs, which pose the challenge of sustained delivery of drugs to target cells or tissues. In spite of the wide application of nano-based drug delivery systems, very few are tested to date. Targeted nanoparticle-mediated sustained drug delivery is required to control inflammatory cell chemotaxis, fibrosis, protease-mediated chronic emphysema and/or chronic lung obstruction in COPD. Moreover, targeted epithelial delivery is indispensable for correcting the underlying defects in CF and targeted inflammatory cell delivery for controlling other chronic inflammatory lung diseases. We propose that the design and development of nano-based targeted theranostic vehicles with therapeutic, imaging and airway-defense penetrating capability, will be invaluable for treating chronic obstructive lung diseases. This paper discusses a novel nano-theranostic strategy that we are currently evaluating to treat the underlying cause of CF and COPD lung disease.

  1. Assessment of CF lung disease using motion corrected PROPELLER MRI: a comparison with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Serra, Goffredo; Catalano, Carlo; Bertolo, Silvia; Morana, Giovanni; Spronk, Sandra; Ros, Mirco; Fraioli, Francesco; Quattrucci, Serena; Assael, M.B.; Pomerri, Fabio; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    To date, PROPELLER MRI, a breathing-motion-insensitive technique, has not been assessed for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We compared this technique to CT for assessing CF lung disease in children and adults. Thirty-eight stable CF patients (median 21 years, range 6-51 years, 22 female) underwent MRI and CT on the same day. Study protocol included respiratory-triggered PROPELLER MRI and volumetric CT end-inspiratory and -expiratory acquisitions. Two observers scored the images using the CF-MRI and CF-CT systems. Scores were compared with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots. The sensitivity and specificity of MRI versus CT were calculated. MRI sensitivity for detecting severe CF bronchiectasis was 0.33 (CI 0.09-0.57), while specificity was 100 % (CI 0.88-1). ICCs for bronchiectasis and trapped air were as follows: MRI-bronchiectasis (0.79); CT-bronchiectasis (0.85); MRI-trapped air (0.51); CT-trapped air (0.87). Bland-Altman plots showed an MRI tendency to overestimate the severity of bronchiectasis in mild CF disease and underestimate bronchiectasis in severe disease. Motion correction in PROPELLER MRI does not improve assessment of CF lung disease compared to CT. However, the good inter- and intra-observer agreement and the high specificity suggest that MRI might play a role in the short-term follow-up of CF lung disease (i.e. pulmonary exacerbations). (orig.)

  2. Distinct genetic control of parasite elimination, dissemination, and disease after Leishmania major infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kurey, Irina; Kobets, Tetyana; Havelková, Helena; Slapničková, Martina; Quan, L.; Trtková, Kateřina; Grekov, Igor; Svobodová, M.; Stassen, A. P. M.; Hutson, A.; Demant, P.; Lipoldová, Marie

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 9 (2009), s. 619-633 ISSN 0093-7711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/06/1745; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Grant - others:EC(XE) 05-1000004-7761 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Leishmania major * Parasite elimination * QTL mapping Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.988, year: 2009

  3. SU-F-R-31: Identification of Robust Normal Lung CT Texture Features for the Prediction of Radiation-Induced Lung Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, W; Riyahi, S; Lu, W [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Normal lung CT texture features have been used for the prediction of radiation-induced lung disease (radiation pneumonitis and radiation fibrosis). For these features to be clinically useful, they need to be relatively invariant (robust) to tumor size and not correlated with normal lung volume. Methods: The free-breathing CTs of 14 lung SBRT patients were studied. Different sizes of GTVs were simulated with spheres placed at the upper lobe and lower lobe respectively in the normal lung (contralateral to tumor). 27 texture features (9 from intensity histogram, 8 from grey-level co-occurrence matrix [GLCM] and 10 from grey-level run-length matrix [GLRM]) were extracted from [normal lung-GTV]. To measure the variability of a feature F, the relative difference D=|Fref -Fsim|/Fref*100% was calculated, where Fref was for the entire normal lung and Fsim was for [normal lung-GTV]. A feature was considered as robust if the largest non-outlier (Q3+1.5*IQR) D was less than 5%, and considered as not correlated with normal lung volume when their Pearson correlation was lower than 0.50. Results: Only 11 features were robust. All first-order intensity-histogram features (mean, max, etc.) were robust, while most higher-order features (skewness, kurtosis, etc.) were unrobust. Only two of the GLCM and four of the GLRM features were robust. Larger GTV resulted greater feature variation, this was particularly true for unrobust features. All robust features were not correlated with normal lung volume while three unrobust features showed high correlation. Excessive variations were observed in two low grey-level run features and were later identified to be from one patient with local lung diseases (atelectasis) in the normal lung. There was no dependence on GTV location. Conclusion: We identified 11 robust normal lung CT texture features that can be further examined for the prediction of radiation-induced lung disease. Interestingly, low grey-level run features identified normal

  4. Infections and parasitic diseases of the gray wolf and their potential effects on wolf populations in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, C.J.; Pybus, M.J.; Ballard, W.B.; Peterson, R.O.

    1995-01-01

    Numerous infections and parasitic diseases have been reported for the gray wolf, including more than 10 viral, bacterial, and mycotic disease and more than 70 species of helminths and ectoparasites. However, few studies have documented the role of diseases in population dynamics. Disease can affect wolf populations directly by causing mortality or indirectly by affecting physiological and homeostatic processes, thriftiness, reproduction, behavior, or social structure. In addition, wolves are hosts to diseases that can affect prey species, thus affecting wolf populations indirectly by reducing prey abundance or increasing vulnerability to predation. Diseases such as canine distemper and infectious canine hepatitis are enzootic in wolf populations, whereas rabies occurs in wolves primarily as a result of transmission from other species such as artic and red foxes. Contact between wolves and domestic pets and livestock may affect the composition of diseases in wolves and their effects on wolf populations. Dogs were suspected of introducing lice and canine parovirus to several wolf populations. THe potential for disease to affect wolf populations and other wild and domestic animals should be considered in wolf management plans, particularly in plans for reintroduction of wolves to area within their former range.

  5. Health outcomes associated with lung function decline and respiratory symptoms and disease in a community cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baughman, Penelope; Marott, Jacob L; Lange, Peter

    2011-01-01

    in relation to asthma, chronic bronchitis, shortness of breath, and lung function level at examination 2 (1981-1983) or lung function decline established from examinations 1 (1976-1978) to 2 using 4 measures (FEV(1) slope, FEV(1) relative slope, American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine......BACKGROUND: In workplace respiratory disease prevention, a thorough understanding is needed of the relative contributions of lung function loss and respiratory symptoms in predicting adverse health outcomes. METHODS: Copenhagen City Heart Study respiratory data collected at 4 examinations (1976......, the increasing trend in the HR (95% CI) by quartiles of the FEV(1) slope reached a maximum of 3.77 (2.76-5.15) for males, 6.12 (4.63-8.10) for females, and 4.14 (1.57-10.90) for never-smokers. Significant increasing trends were also observed for mortality, with females at higher risk. CONCLUSION: Lung function...

  6. Early diagnosis of fungal infections in lung transplant recipients, colonization versus invasive disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Sabina; Husain, Shahid

    2018-05-21

    The diagnosis of invasive aspergillosis remains challenging in solid organ transplants in general, and in lung transplant recipients, in particular, because of colonization. Lung transplant recipients may be over treated with antifungal drugs because of the lack of appropriate diagnostic tools. A review of the new developments of diagnostic tools and whether this help distinguishing colonization from invasive disease is presented. Efforts are being made to develop new tools that will allow us to identify which patients will develop IPA, and those who will be able to control the disease.

  7. [Evaluation of the course of chronic obstructive lung diseases according to the classifications of the European Respiratory Society and the Global Initiative on Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, V B; Shergina, E A; Popova, L A

    2006-01-01

    In 91 patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD), the severity of this disease according to the Classifications of the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the Global Initiative on Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) was compared with that of pulmonary dysfunction according to the data of a comprehensive study, involving the determination of bronchial patency, lung volumes, capacities, and gas-exchange function. This follows that the ERS and GOLD classifications are to be positively appraised as they provide an eligible group of patients for clinical practice in terms of the severity of pulmonary dysfunction and that of COLD. However, the concomitant clinical use of both classifications cannot be regarded as justifiable due to that there are differences in the number of detectable grades (stages) of COLD and borderline (COLD differentiating grades (stages) values of EFV1). In this connection, both classifications have approximately equally significant merits and shortcomings and it is practically impossible to give preference to one of them as the best one. The optimal way out of the established situation is to develop a new (improved) classification of the severity of COLD on the bases of these two existing classifications.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease prevalence in Lisbon, Portugal: The burden of obstructive lung disease study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bárbara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a great heterogeneity in the prevalence of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD across the world. The Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD initiative was started to measure the prevalence of COPD in a standardized way. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of COPD in Portuguese adults aged 40 years or older of a target population of 2,700,000 in the Lisbon region, in accordance with BOLD protocol. Methods: A stratified, multi-stage random sampling procedure was used which included 12 districts. The survey included a questionnaire with information on risk factors for COPD and reported respiratory disease and a post-bronchodilator spirometry performed at survey centres. Results: For the 710 participants with questionnaires and acceptable spirometry, the overall weighted prevalence of GOLD stage I+ COPD was 14.2% (95% C.I. 11.1, 18.1, and stage II+ was 7.3% (95% C.I. 4.7, 11.3. Unweighted prevalence was 20.2% (95% C.I.17.4, 23.3 for stage I+ and 9.5% (95% C.I. 7.6, 11.9 for stage II+. Prevalence of COPD in GOLD stage II+ increased with age and was higher in men. The prevalence of GOLD stage I+ COPD was 9.2% (95% C.I. 5.9, 14.0 in never smokers versus 27.4% (95% C.I. 18.5, 38.5 in those who had smoked ≥20 pack-years. The agreement between previous doctor diagnosis and spirometric diagnosis was low, with 86.8% of underdiagnosed individuals. Conclusions: The 14.2% of COPD estimated prevalence indicates that COPD is a common disease in the Lisbon region. In addition, a large proportion of underdiagnosed disease was detected. The high prevalence of COPD with a high level of underdiagnosis, points to the need of raising awareness of COPD among health professionals, and requires more use of spirometry in the primary care setting. Resumo: Introdução: A prevalência da doença pulmonar obstrutiva crónica (DPOC apresenta valores muito heterogéneos em todo o mundo. A iniciativa Burden of Obstructive Lung

  9. Obstructive lung disease as a complication in post pulmonary TB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarigan, A. P.; Pandia, P.; Eyanoer, P.; Tina, D.; Pratama, R.; Fresia, A.; Tamara; Silvanna

    2018-03-01

    The case of post TB is a problem that arises in the community. Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) can affect lung function. Therefore, we evaluated impaired pulmonary function in subjects with diagnosed prior pulmonary TB. A Case Series study, pulmonary function test was performed in subjects with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis; aged ≥18 years were included. Exclusion criteria was a subject who had asthma, obesity, abnormal thorax and smoking history. We measured FEV1 and FVC to evaluate pulmonary function. Airflow obstruction was FEV1/FVC%pulmonary TB, 5 subjects (23%) had airflow obstruction with FEV1/FVC% value pulmonary TB.

  10. NFE2L2 pathway polymorphisms and lung function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Andrew J; Malhotra, Deepti; Boezen, H Marike; Siedlinski, Mateusz; Postma, Dirkje S; Wong, Vivien; Akhabir, Loubna; He, Jian-Qing; Connett, John E; Anthonisen, Nicholas R; Paré, Peter D; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-08-01

    An oxidant-antioxidant imbalance in the lung contributes to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) that is caused by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental risk factors. Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NFE2L2 or NRF2) is a critical molecule in the lung's defense mechanism against oxidants. We investigated whether polymorphisms in the NFE2L2 pathway affected the rate of decline of lung function in smokers from the Lung Health Study (LHS)(n = 547) and in a replication set, the Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen cohort (n = 533). We selected polymorphisms in NFE2L2 in genes that positively or negatively regulate NFE2L2 transcriptional activity and in genes that are regulated by NFE2L2. Polymorphisms in 11 genes were significantly associated with rate of lung function decline in the LHS. One of these polymorphisms, rs11085735 in the KEAP1 gene, was previously shown to be associated with the level of lung function in the Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen cohort but not with decline of lung function. Of the 23 associated polymorphisms in the LHS, only rs634534 in the FOSL1 gene showed a significant association in the Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen cohort with rate of lung function decline, but the direction of the association was not consistent with that in the LHS. In summary, despite finding several nominally significant polymorphisms in the LHS, none of these associations were replicated in the Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen cohort, indicating lack of effect of polymorphisms in the NFE2L2 pathway on the rate of decline of lung function.

  11. Mast Cell Coupling to the Kallikrein–Kinin System Fuels Intracardiac Parasitism and Worsens Heart Pathology in Experimental Chagas Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa R. Nascimento

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During the course of Chagas disease, infectious forms of Trypanosoma cruzi are occasionally liberated from parasitized heart cells. Studies performed with tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCTs, Dm28c strain demonstrated that these parasites evoke neutrophil/CXCR2-dependent microvascular leakage by activating innate sentinel cells via toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2. Upon plasma extravasation, proteolytically derived kinins and C5a stimulate immunoprotective Th1 responses via cross-talk between bradykinin B2 receptors (B2Rs and C5aR. Awareness that TCTs invade cardiovascular cells in vitro via interdependent activation of B2R and endothelin receptors [endothelin A receptor (ETAR/endothelin B receptor (ETBR] led us to hypothesize that T. cruzi might reciprocally benefit from the formation of infection-associated edema via activation of kallikrein–kinin system (KKS. Using intravital microscopy, here we first examined the functional interplay between mast cells (MCs and the KKS by topically exposing the hamster cheek pouch (HCP tissues to dextran sulfate (DXS, a potent “contact” activator of the KKS. Surprisingly, although DXS was inert for at least 30 min, a subtle MC-driven leakage resulted in factor XII (FXII-dependent activation of the KKS, which then amplified inflammation via generation of bradykinin (BK. Guided by this mechanistic insight, we next exposed TCTs to “leaky” HCP—forged by low dose histamine application—and found that the proinflammatory phenotype of TCTs was boosted by BK generated via the MC/KKS pathway. Measurements of footpad edema in MC-deficient mice linked TCT-evoked inflammation to MC degranulation (upstream and FXII-mediated generation of BK (downstream. We then inoculated TCTs intracardiacally in mice and found a striking decrease of parasite DNA (quantitative polymerase chain reaction; 3 d.p.i. in the heart of MC-deficient mutant mice. Moreover, the intracardiac parasite load was significantly reduced in WT

  12. Automated diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases and emphysema in MDCT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetita, Catalin; Chang Chien, Kuang-Che; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Prêteux, Françoise

    2007-09-01

    Diffuse lung diseases (DLD) include a heterogeneous group of non-neoplasic disease resulting from damage to the lung parenchyma by varying patterns of inflammation. Characterization and quantification of DLD severity using MDCT, mainly in interstitial lung diseases and emphysema, is an important issue in clinical research for the evaluation of new therapies. This paper develops a 3D automated approach for detection and diagnosis of diffuse lung diseases such as fibrosis/honeycombing, ground glass and emphysema. The proposed methodology combines multi-resolution 3D morphological filtering (exploiting the sup-constrained connection cost operator) and graph-based classification for a full characterization of the parenchymal tissue. The morphological filtering performs a multi-level segmentation of the low- and medium-attenuated lung regions as well as their classification with respect to a granularity criterion (multi-resolution analysis). The original intensity range of the CT data volume is thus reduced in the segmented data to a number of levels equal to the resolution depth used (generally ten levels). The specificity of such morphological filtering is to extract tissue patterns locally contrasting with their neighborhood and of size inferior to the resolution depth, while preserving their original shape. A multi-valued hierarchical graph describing the segmentation result is built-up according to the resolution level and the adjacency of the different segmented components. The graph nodes are then enriched with the textural information carried out by their associated components. A graph analysis-reorganization based on the nodes attributes delivers the final classification of the lung parenchyma in normal and ILD/emphysematous regions. It also makes possible to discriminate between different types, or development stages, among the same class of diseases.

  13. Pulmonary microRNA profiling: implications in upper lobe predominant lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David A; Nymon, Amanda B; Ringelberg, Carol S; Lesseur, Corina; Hazlett, Haley F; Howard, Louisa; Marsit, Carmen J; Ashare, Alix

    2017-01-01

    Numerous pulmonary diseases manifest with upper lobe predominance including cystic fibrosis, smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and tuberculosis. Zonal hypoxia, characteristic of these pulmonary maladies, and oxygen stress in general is known to exert profound effects on various important aspects of cell biology. Lung macrophages are major participants in the pulmonary innate immune response and regional differences in macrophage responsiveness to hypoxia may contribute in the development of lung disease. MicroRNAs are ubiquitous regulators of human biology and emerging evidence indicates altered microRNA expression modulates respiratory disease processes. The objective of this study is to gain insight into the epigenetic and cellular mechanisms influencing regional differences in lung disease by investigating effect of hypoxia on regional microRNA expression in the lung. All studies were performed using primary alveolar macrophages ( n  = 10) or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid ( n  = 16) isolated from human subjects. MicroRNA was assayed via the NanoString nCounter microRNA assay. Divergent molecular patterns of microRNA expression were observed in alternate lung lobes, specifically noted was disparate expression of miR-93 and miR-4454 in alveolar macrophages along with altered expression of miR-451a and miR-663a in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Gene ontology was used to identify potential downstream targets of divergent microRNAs. Targets include cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, molecules that could have a significant impact on pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Our findings show variant regional microRNA expression associated with hypoxia in alveolar macrophages and BAL fluid in the lung-upper vs lower lobe. Future studies should address whether these specific microRNAs may act intracellularly, in a paracrine/endocrine manner to direct the innate immune response or may ultimately be involved in pulmonary host-to-pathogen trans

  14. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A [Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Sook [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  15. Learning with distribution of optimized features for recognizing common CT imaging signs of lung diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ling; Liu, Xiabi; Fei, Baowei

    2017-01-01

    Common CT imaging signs of lung diseases (CISLs) are defined as the imaging signs that frequently appear in lung CT images from patients. CISLs play important roles in the diagnosis of lung diseases. This paper proposes a novel learning method, namely learning with distribution of optimized feature (DOF), to effectively recognize the characteristics of CISLs. We improve the classification performance by learning the optimized features under different distributions. Specifically, we adopt the minimum spanning tree algorithm to capture the relationship between features and discriminant ability of features for selecting the most important features. To overcome the problem of various distributions in one CISL, we propose a hierarchical learning method. First, we use an unsupervised learning method to cluster samples into groups based on their distribution. Second, in each group, we use a supervised learning method to train a model based on their categories of CISLs. Finally, we obtain multiple classification decisions from multiple trained models and use majority voting to achieve the final decision. The proposed approach has been implemented on a set of 511 samples captured from human lung CT images and achieves a classification accuracy of 91.96%. The proposed DOF method is effective and can provide a useful tool for computer-aided diagnosis of lung diseases on CT images.

  16. Mixed Herbal Medicine Induced Diffuse Infiltrative Lung Disease: The HRCT and Histopathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Gyu; Shin, Eun A; Kim, Joung Sook

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the high-resolution CT (HRCT) and pathologic findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse interstitial lung disease. Eight patients (6 women and 2 men, age range: 31 to 81 years, mean age: 51.4 years) who presented with cough or dyspnea after taking mixed herbal medicine were included in this study. All the patients underwent plain chest radiography and HRCT. We obtained pathologic specimens from 7 patients via fluoroscopy guided large bore cutting needle biopsy and transbronchial lung biopsy. All the patients were treated with steroid therapy. The most common HRCT finding was bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity (n=7), followed by peribronchial consolidation (n=5) and inter- or intralobular septal thickening (n=2). For the disease distribution, the lower lung zone was dominantly involved. The pathologic results of 7 patients were nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (n=3), bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (n=2), hypersensitivity pneumonitis (n=1) and eosinophilic pneumonia (n=1). Irrespective of the pathologic results, all 8 patients improved clinically and radiologically after steroid treatment. The HRCT findings of mixed herbal medicine-induced diffuse infiltrative lung disease were mainly bilateral diffuse ground glass opacity, peribronchial consolidation and dominant involvement of the lower lung zone. Those pathologic findings were nonspecific and the differential diagnosis could include interstitial pneumonia, bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis and eosinophilic pneumonia

  17. The evaluation of clinical usefulness of transbrochoscopic lung biopsy in undefined interstitial lung diseases: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Luo, Qun; Chen, Xiaobo; Xie, Jiaxing; Wu, Lulu; Chen, Rongchang

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies mostly focused on the diagnostic accuracy of transbronchoscopic lung biopsy (TBLB) in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). We aimed to explore the clinical usefulness of TBLB results in the diagnostic procedure of undefined ILDs. The retrospective analysis included patients undergoing TBLB for the diagnosis of undefined ILDs from January 2007 to December 2010. The clinically useful TBLB was defined as that lead to a specific histopathological diagnosis or that was consistent with the working diagnosis based on existing clinical and radiological data. A total of 664 patients were included in the study. TBLB failed to obtain lung parenchyma in 155 cases (23.3%). TBLB was considered clinically helpful in 202 procedures (30.4%), including 114 cases that provided definitive histopathological diagnoses and 88 cases that were consistent with working diagnoses. Among 202 cases of clinically useful TBLBs, the majority were diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) (67 cases, 33.2%), connective tissue disease-related ILDs (CTD-ILDs) (65, 32.2%) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (33, 16.3%). Although TBLB could provide definitive histopathological diagnoses in all cases diagnosed as PAP, only few cases of IPF (7, 21.2% of IPF diagnoses) and CTD-ILDs (9, 13.8% of CTD-ILD diagnoses) could be identified by TBLBs. The clinical usefulness of TBLB, in conjunction with thorough clinical and radiological data, in the diagnosis of ILDs may be varied depending on different subtypes. The use of histopathological analysis and the type of biopsy employed should therefore be considered on a case-by-case basis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Number of deaths due to lung diseases: How large is the problem?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagener, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The importance of lung disease as an indicator of environmentally induced adverse health effects has been recognized by inclusion among the Health Objectives for the Nation. The 1990 Health Objectives for the Nation (US Department of Health and Human Services, 1986) includes an objective that there should be virtually no new cases among newly exposed workers for four preventable occupational lung diseases-asbestosis, byssinosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis. This brief communication describes two types of cause-of-death statistics- underlying and multiple cause-and demonstrates the differences between the two statistics using lung disease deaths among adult men. The choice of statistic has a large impact on estimated lung disease mortality rates. The choice of statistics also may have large effect on the estimated mortality rates due to other chromic diseases thought to be environmentally mediated. Issues of comorbidity and the way causes of death are reported become important in the interpretation of these statistics. The choice of which statistic to use when comparing data from a study population with national statistics may greatly affect the interpretations of the study findings

  19. Reorganization of Extracellular Matrix in Placentas from Women with Asymptomatic Chagas Disease: Mechanism of Parasite Invasion or Local Placental Defense?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Duaso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, produced by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, is one of the most frequent endemic diseases in Latin America. In spite the fact that in the past few years T. cruzi congenital transmission has become of epidemiological importance, studies about this mechanism of infection are scarce. In order to explore some morphological aspects of this infection in the placenta, we analyzed placentas from T. cruzi-infected mothers by immunohistochemical and histochemical methods. Infection in mothers, newborns, and placentas was confirmed by PCR and by immunofluorescence in the placenta. T. cruzi-infected placentas present destruction of the syncytiotrophoblast and villous stroma, selective disorganization of the basal lamina, and disorganization of collagen I in villous stroma. Our results suggest that the parasite induces reorganization of this tissue component and in this way may regulate both inflammatory and immune responses in the host. Changes in the ECM of placental tissues, together with the immunological status of mother and fetus, and parasite load may determine the probability of congenital transmission of T. cruzi.

  20. Joint effects of smoking and silicosis on diseases to the lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap Ah Tse

    Full Text Available Smokers are subject to being more susceptible to the long-term effects of silica dust, whilst it remains unclear whether the joint effect of smoking and silicosis differs amongst diseases to the lungs; this study aims to address this knowledge gap. This was a historical cohort study comprised of 3202 silicotics in Hong Kong during 1981-2005 who were followed up till 31/12/2006. We estimated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR in the smoking and never smoking silicotics using the mortality rates of male general population indiscriminately by smoking status, but these SMRs were regarded as biased. We adjusted these biased SMRs using "smoking adjustment factors (SAF". We assessed the multiplicative interaction between smoking and silicosis using 'relative silicosis effect (RSE' that was the ratio of SAF-corrected SMR of smoking silicotics to the never smokers. A RSE differs significantly from one implies the presence of multiplicative interaction. A significant excess SMR was observed for respiratory diseases (lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases [COPD], silicosis and other diseases to the lungs (pulmonary heart disease, tuberculosis. All the 'biased-SMRs' in smokers were higher than those in never smokers, but the SAF-corrected SMRs became higher in never smokers. The RSE was 0.95 (95%CI: 0.37-3.55, 0.94 (95%CI: 0.42-2.60, and 0.81 (95%CI: 0.60-1.19 for lung cancer, COPD, and silicosis; whilst it was 1.21 (95%CI: 0.32-10.26 for tuberculosis and 1.02 (95%CI: 0.16-42.90 for pulmonary heart disease. This study firstly demonstrated the joint effect of smoking and silicosis may differ amongst diseases to the lungs, but power is limited.

  1. Bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease as unusual manifestations of kikuchi-fujimoto disease: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Fernandez-Martinez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kikuchi-Fujimoto's disease (KFD, also called histiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis, is a rare, idiopathic and self-limited condition usually characterized by cervical lymphadenopathy and fever, most often affecting young patients. Aetiology is unknown. Differential diagnosis includes mainly malignant lymphoma, tuberculous lymphadenitis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, so early diagnosis is crucial. Pleuropulmonary involvement due to isolated KFD has been seldom reported. Case Presentation a 32-year-old man, on treatment for iatrogenic hypothyroidism, was admitted due to high grade fever and painful cervical lymphadenopathies. KFD was diagnosed by lymph node biopsy. Some days after admission the patient got worse, he developed generalized lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease. All of them resolved with prednisone and after two years of following up he remains asymptomatic and without evidence of any other associated disease. Conclusion Pleural effusion and interstitial lung disease are very uncommon manifestations of KFD. In our experience, treatment with oral prednisone was effective.

  2. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease.

  3. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease and interstitial lung disease: Trying to define patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, María Laura; Paulin, Francisco; Toledo, Heidegger Mateos; Fernández, Martín Eduardo; Caro, Fabián Matías; Rojas-Serrano, Jorge; Mejía, Mayra Edith

    To identify clinical or immunological features in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) associated interstitial lung disease (ILD), in order to group them and recognize different functional and high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) behavior. Retrospective cohort study. Patients meeting Kinder criteria for UCTD were included. We defined the following predictive variables: 'highly specific' connective tissue disease (CTD) manifestations (Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eyes or arthritis), high antinuclear antibody (ANA) titer (above 1: 320), and 'specific' ANA staining patterns (centromere, cytoplasmic and nucleolar patterns). We evaluated the following outcomes: change in the percentage of the predicted forced vital capacity (FVC%) during the follow-up period, and HRCT pattern. Sixty-six patients were included. Twenty-nine (43.94%) showed at least one 'highly specific' CTD manifestation, 16 (28.57%) had a 'specific' ANA staining pattern and 29 (43.94%) high ANA titer. Patients with 'highly specific' CTD manifestations were younger (mean [SD] 52 years [14.58] vs 62.08 years [9.46], P<.001), were more likely men (10.34% vs 48.65%, P<.001) and showed a smaller decline of the FVC% (median [interquartile range] 1% [-1 to 10] vs -6% [-16 to -4], P<.006). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of highly specific manifestations was associated with improvement in the FVC% (B coefficient of 13.25 [95% confidence interval, 2.41 to 24.09]). No association was observed in relation to the HRCT pattern. The presence of 'highly specific' CTD manifestations was associated with female sex, younger age and better functional behavior. These findings highlight the impact of the clinical features in the outcome of patients with UCTD ILD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  4. [Alveolitis and fibrosis of the lung within the drainage area of a hospital for diseases of the lung (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebetrau, G

    1981-01-01

    Within the drainage area of the Central Hospital for Diseases of Heart and Lungs at Bad Berka/ GDR 337 persons (210 male, 127 female) with alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis were observed during a period of 17 years (1963-1979). The average-age of the patient was 43.5 (11-70) years. The mean duration of the illness was to 9 years. The time elapsing up to the confirmation of the diagnosis amounts to approximately 4.35 years. The yearly incidence of alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis are estimated at one case among 40,000 people. During the last years more attention has been given to these diseases but there seems to be also a true increase of the frequency of these conditions.

  5. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting as Interstitial Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Vali Khojeini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBL is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that resides in the lumen of blood vessels. Patients typically present with nonspecific findings, particularly bizarre neurologic symptoms, fever, and skin lesions. A woman presented with shortness of breath and a chest CT scan showed diffuse interstitial thickening and ground glass opacities suggestive of an interstitial lung disease. On physical exam she was noted to have splenomegaly. The patient died and at autopsy was found to have an IVLBL in her lungs as well as nearly all her organs that were sampled. Although rare, IVLBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of interstitial lung disease and this c