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Sample records for lung cancer stage

  1. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010. Online Version Reviewed September 2013 ATS Patient Education Series © 2010 American Thoracic Society LIVER BONE www.thoracic.org ATS PATIENT INFORMATION SERIES How will my lung cancer be staged? ...

  2. The New Lung Cancer Staging System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Frank C. Detterbeck,MD, FCCP; Daniel J. Boffa, MD; Lynn T, Tanoue, MD, FCCP

    2009-01-01

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) has conducted an extensive initiative to inform the revision of the lung cancer staging system. This involved development of an international database along with extensive analysis of a large population of patients and their prognoses. This article reviews the recommendations of the IASLC International Staging Committee for the definitions for the TNM descriptors and the stage grouping in the new non-small cell lung cancer staging system.

  3. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  4. Transesophageal Ultrasonography for Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke; Vilmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Accurate mediastinal nodal staging is essential for patients with resectable non-small-cell lung cancer and is achieved by combined endobronchial ultrasound and transesophageal endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). Training requirements for EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) for lung cancer staging...

  5. Early diagnosis of early stage lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Debeljak

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: For the detection of premalignant changes of bronchial mucosa and early stages of lung cancer frequent chest X-ray, spiral low dose computed tomography, fluorescence bronchoscopy, sputum cytology (also with automated systems with genetic and molecular changes in the sputum cells and bronchial mucosa were used. These screening methods of the high-risk groups for lung cancer achieved: earlier diagnosis of lung cancer in lower stage, higher operability, longer 5-year survival, but without mortality reduction.Conclusions: In the clinical practice we can examine higher risk groups for lung cancer in randomised control trials with multimodality approach: frequent chest low-dose fast spiral computed tomography, sputum cytology with genetic and molecular examinations and fluorescence bronchoscopy. Smoking cessation remains the best means to achieve mortality reduction from lung cancer.

  6. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  7. Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Parashar, Bhupesh; Arora, Shruthi; Wernicke, A. Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy for early stage lung cancer is a promising modality. It has been traditionally used in patients not considered candidates for standard surgical resection. However, its role has been changing rapidly since the introduction of new and advanced technology, especially in tumor tracking, image guidance, and radiation delivery. Stereotactic radiation therapy is one such advancement that has shown excellent local control rates and promising survival in early stage lung cancer. In a...

  8. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  9. Staging Lung Cancer: Current Controversies and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyad Karmy-Jones

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A consistent approach to staging is required for the rational management of lung cancer. This paper was prepared at the request of the Standards Committee of the Canadian Thoracic Society, and reviews and discusses the relative merits of the available methods of staging. Whichever methods are chosen by a particular institution, the following points must be stressed. No patient can be considered automatically "unresectable" when chest radiography and/ or computed tomography demonstrate adenopathy or only suggest local invasion. Clinical and/or radiographical evidence suggesting extensive local or metastatic disease should be evaluated as completely as possible before subjecting the patient to a possible "nontherapeutic" thoracotomy. Finally, in some cases thoracotomy is required to decide whether the lesion is "completely" resectable.

  10. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colella, Sara; Vilmann, Peter; Konge, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the role of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) and esophageal ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in the pretherapeutic assessment of patients with proven or suspected lung cancer. EUS-FNA and EBUS-TBNA have been shown to have...... a good diagnostic accuracy in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. In the future, these techniques in combination with positron emission tomography/computed tomographic may replace surgical staging in patients with suspected and proven lung cancer, but until then surgical staging remains the gold...

  12. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  13. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    optical absorber which is important for PA imaging. To image the lymph node, the dye or absorber is necessary to generate the acoustic signals for...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Photoacoustic imaging, photoacoustic microscopy, lung cancer 14. ABSTRACT This research is aimed at developing a new endoscopic...imaging approach, called “photoacoustic microscopy (PAM)”, for lung cancer staging. The project will develop imaging hardware and conduct phantom

  14. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Surgery in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1999-01-01

    The role of surgery in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial. Surgery has several potential advantages because it may reduce the frequency of local relapses, it does not impede the intensity of chemotherapy, it does not affect the bone marrow, and surgical staging may be of prognostic...

  16. An actuarial approach to comparing early stage and late stage lung cancer mortality and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Sara W; Mulshine, James L; Hagstrom, Dale; Pyenson, Bruce S

    2010-02-01

    Comparing the mortality characteristics of different cohorts is an essential process in the life insurance industry. Pseudodisease, lead-time bias, and length bias, which are critical to determining the value of cancer screening, have close analogues in life insurance company management, including the temporal impact of underwriting. Ratios of all-cause mortality rates for cancer cohorts relative to standard population mortality rates can provide insights into early stage and late stage mortality differences, differences by age, sex, race, and histology, and allow modeling of biases associated with early stage detection or screening protocols. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data set has characteristics that allow efficient application of actuarial techniques. We show the mortality burden associated with treated early stage lung cancer and that identifying all lung cancers at early stage could reduce US lung cancer deaths by over 70,000 per year.

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the lung. The ... diagnosed, tests are done to find out if cancer cells have spread within the chest or to other ...

  18. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  19. Endobronchial Photoacoustic Microscopy for Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    whereas chemotherapy and radiotherapy could be more effective when contralateral metastases are confirmed by staging. Computed tomography (CT) or...positron emission tomography ( PET ) can only yield presumptive clinical diagnosis for lung cancer, and invasive biopsy is necessary to be carried out for...accurate and minimally invasive method for the biopsy of lymph node. However, the ultrasound-based imaging has an inherently low imaging contrast owning to

  20. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Deformable image registration for multimodal lung-cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Zang, Xiaonan; Bascom, Rebecca; Allen, Thomas W.; Mahraj, Rickhesvar P. M.; Higgins, William E.

    2016-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) serve as major diagnostic imaging modalities in the lung-cancer staging process. Modern scanners provide co-registered whole-body PET/CT studies, collected while the patient breathes freely, and high-resolution chest CT scans, collected under a brief patient breath hold. Unfortunately, no method exists for registering a PET/CT study into the space of a high-resolution chest CT scan. If this could be done, vital diagnostic information offered by the PET/CT study could be brought seamlessly into the procedure plan used during live cancer-staging bronchoscopy. We propose a method for the deformable registration of whole-body PET/CT data into the space of a high-resolution chest CT study. We then demonstrate its potential for procedure planning and subsequent use in multimodal image-guided bronchoscopy.

  2. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-12

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. SBRT in operable early stage lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Johannes; Andratschke, Nicolaus; Guckenberger, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Since decades the gold standard for treatment of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is surgical lobectomy plus mediastinal lymph node dissection. Patients in worse health status are treated with sublobar resection or radiation treatment. With development of stereotactic-body-radiotherapy (SBRT), outcome of patients treated with radiation was substantially improved. Comparison of SBRT and surgical techniques is difficult due to the lack of randomized trials. However, all available evidence in form of case control studies of population based studies show equivalence between sublobar resection and SBRT indicating that SBRT-when performed by a trained and experienced team-should be offered to all high-risk surgical patients. For patients not willing to take the risk of lobectomy and therefore refusing surgery, SBRT is an excellent treatment option.

  4. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...... of demonstrating N2-disease (psampling from several lymph node stations was significantly associated with a decreased probability of demonstrating N2-disease (p=0.015) and volume was significantly larger per station when fewer stations were sampled (p... nodes during mediastinoscopy was significantly associated with the probability of demonstrating N2-disease; however, contrary to common belief, sampling from several lymph node stations was not associated with an increased probability of detecting N2-disease. Although purely speculative, these findings...

  5. Validity of the stage of lung cancer in records of the Maastricht Cancer Registry, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, LJ; Langendijk, JA; Jager, JJ; vandenBrandt, PA

    1997-01-01

    Information collected in a clinical study on a random sample of 99 patients with inoperable lung cancer, treated with radiotherapy, was compared to the staging information in the Maastricht cancer registry. Validity of sex (0% disagreements), date of birth (0%), histology (1% major disagreements) an

  6. Validity of the stage of lung cancer in records of the Maastricht Cancer Registry, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Leo J.; Langendijk, JA; Jager, JJ; vandenBrandt, PA

    Information collected in a clinical study on a random sample of 99 patients with inoperable lung cancer, treated with radiotherapy, was compared to the staging information in the Maastricht cancer registry. Validity of sex (0% disagreements), date of birth (0%), histology (1% major disagreements)

  7. A prospective study of PET/CT in initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Langer, S W

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15%-20% of all lung cancer cases. Accurate and fast staging is mandatory when choosing treatment, but current staging procedures are time consuming and lack sensitivity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study was designed to examine the ro...

  8. The Optimality of Different Strategies for Supplemental Staging of Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Fischer, Barbara Malene B; Mortensen, Jann;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the expected costs and outcomes of alternative strategies for staging of lung cancer to inform a Danish National Health Service perspective about the most cost-effective strategy.......To assess the expected costs and outcomes of alternative strategies for staging of lung cancer to inform a Danish National Health Service perspective about the most cost-effective strategy....

  9. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Circulating Tumor DNA in Predicting Outcomes in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Cancer or Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-18

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  11. The science behind the 7th edition Tumour, Node, Metastasis staging system for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Henry M; Leong, Steven C; Bowman, Rayleen V; Yang, Ian A; Fong, Kwun M

    2012-02-01

    The Tumour, Node, Metastasis (TNM) system for classifying lung cancer is the cornerstone of modern lung cancer treatment and underpins comparative research; yet is continuously evolving through updated revisions. The recently published Union for International Cancer Control 7th Edition TNM Classification for lung cancer addresses many of its predecessor's shortcomings and has been subject to rigorous evidence-based methodology. It is based on a retrospective analysis of over 80 000 lung cancer patients treated between 1990 and 2000 carried out by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. The dataset was truly international and included patients treated by all modalities. Extensive internal and external validation of the findings has ensured that the recommendations are robust and generalizable. For the first time, a single classification system has been shown to be applicable not only to non-small cell lung cancer, but also to be of prognostic significance in small cell lung cancer and bronchopulmonary carcinoid tumours. We review the history of the Union for International Cancer Control TNM staging system, the changes in the most recent 7th edition and the strength of the scientific basis motivating these changes. Limitations of the current staging edition are explored, post-publication independent validation studies are reviewed, and the future of TNM staging for lung cancer is discussed.

  12. Metabolomics provide new insights on lung cancer staging and discrimination from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deja, Stanislaw; Porebska, Irena; Kowal, Aneta; Zabek, Adam; Barg, Wojciech; Pawelczyk, Konrad; Stanimirova, Ivana; Daszykowski, Michal; Korzeniewska, Anna; Jankowska, Renata; Mlynarz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are widespread lung diseases. Cigarette smoking is a high risk factor for both the diseases. COPD may increase the risk of developing lung cancer. Thus, it is crucial to be able to distinguish between these two pathological states, especially considering the early stages of lung cancer. Novel diagnostic and monitoring tools are required to properly determine lung cancer progression because this information directly impacts the type of the treatment prescribed. In this study, serum samples collected from 22 COPD and 77 lung cancer (TNM stages I, II, III, and IV) patients were analyzed. Then, a collection of NMR metabolic fingerprints was modeled using discriminant orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS-DA) and further interpreted by univariate statistics. The constructed discriminant models helped to successfully distinguish between the metabolic fingerprints of COPD and lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.972, AUC test=0.993), COPD and early lung cancer patients (AUC training=1.000, AUC test=1.000), and COPD and advanced lung cancer patients (AUC training=0.983, AUC test=1.000). Decreased acetate, citrate, and methanol levels together with the increased N-acetylated glycoproteins, leucine, lysine, mannose, choline, and lipid (CH3-(CH2)n-) levels were observed in all lung cancer patients compared with the COPD group. The evaluation of lung cancer progression was also successful using OPLS-DA (AUC training=0.811, AUC test=0.904). Based on the results, the following metabolite biomarkers may prove useful in distinguishing lung cancer states: isoleucine, acetoacetate, and creatine as well as the two NMR signals of N-acetylated glycoproteins and glycerol.

  13. Combined endobronchial and oesophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Peter; Clementsen, Paul Frost; Colella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    New guidelines for combined endobronchial and oesophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic...... Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and oesophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence....

  14. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Socioeconomic position and surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard Starr, Laila; Osler, Merete; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine possible associations between socioeconomic position and surgical treatment of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a register-based clinical cohort study, patients with early-stage (stages I-IIIa) NSCLC were identified in the Danish Lung Cancer...... in a health care system with free, equal access to health services, disadvantaged groups are less likely to receive surgery for lung cancer....... was associated with greater odds for no surgery in stage I and stage II patients as was living alone for stage I patients. Comorbidity, a short diagnostic interval and small diagnostic volume were all associated with higher odds for not undergoing surgery; but these factors did not appear to explain...

  16. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Staging Project: Proposals for the Revision of the Clinical and Pathologic Staging of Small Cell Lung Cancer in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Andrew G; Chansky, Kari; Crowley, John; Beyruti, Ricardo; Kubota, Kaoru; Turrisi, Andrew; Eberhardt, Wilfried E E; van Meerbeeck, Jan; Rami-Porta, Ramón

    2016-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is commonly classified as either limited or extensive, but the Union for International Cancer Control TNM Classification of Malignant Tumours seventh edition (2009) recommended tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) staging based on analysis of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) database. Survival analyses were performed for clinically and pathologically staged patients presenting with SCLC from 1999 through 2010. Prognosis was compared in relation to the TNM seventh edition staging to serve as validation and analyzed in relation to proposed changes to the T descriptors found in the eighth edition. There were 5002 patients: 4848 patients with clinical and 582 with pathological stages. Among these, 428 had both. Survival differences were confirmed for T and N categories and maintained in relation to proposed revisions to T descriptors for seventh edition TNM categories and proposed changes in the eighth edition. There were also survival differences, notably at 12 months, in patients with brain-only single-site metastasis (SSM) compared to SSM at other sites, and SSM without a pleural effusion showed a better prognosis than other patients in the M1b category. We confirm the prognostic value of clinical and pathological TNM staging in patients with SCLC, and recommend continued usage for SCLC in relation to proposed changes to T, N, and M descriptors for NSCLC in the eighth edition. However, for M descriptors, it remains uncertain whether survival differences in patients with SSM in the brain simply reflect better treatment options rather than better survival based on anatomic extent of disease. Copyright © 2015 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Current concepts in the mediastinal lymph node staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H; Groen, HJM

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To review the current concepts in the mediastinal staging of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), evaluating traditional and modem staging modalities. Summary Background Data: Staging of NSCLC includes the assessment of mediastinal lymph nodes. Traditionally, computed tomography (CT) and me

  18. [Comparison between clinical and surgical-pathological TNM staging in patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo; Wang, Tianyou; Gong, Min; Lv, Kejie; Tian, Feng; Wang, Zhicheng

    2005-02-20

    The accuracy of clinical TNM staging correlates with appropriate treatment in patients with lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the agreement between clinical and surgical-pathological staging in patients with lung cancer and analyze its cause in detail. One hundred and fifty patients with lung cancer treated surgically from 2000 were enrolled randomly. Clinical and surgical-pathological staging of them were made respectively according to the International System for Staging Lung Cancer newly revised by UICC. Then concordance was determined between the two staging results with Kappa value, and difference in coincident rate was analyzed among subgroups of T staging. For T staging, the agreement was excellent (Kappa value=0.729), however, the coincident rate of T3 or T4 was significantly lower than that in T1 or T2 group (P conformity of TNM staging (Kappa value=0.287). Clinical T staging based on CT can indicate the location and size of primary tumor precisely. But the borderline may be difficult to estimate when tumor site is near chest wall or mediastinum, so some patients with clinical T4 still have chances to receive complete resection. The conformity of N staging is rather poor. The key point to improve the accuracy of clinical TNM staging should be to seek more reliable techniques for evaluating N status.

  19. Effect of body mass index on the survival of patients with early-stage small cell lung cancer after surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kolesnik, A. P.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is an important medico-social problem. It is connected with high level of incidence and mortality of lung cancer. Nowadays we know that obesity has significant influence on cancer development, including lung cancer. Multivariate analysis confirmed that histological type of tumour, kind of operation and body mass index (BMI) influence on prognosis in patients with early stages of mall cell lung cancer. So, now we can use BMI along with other significant prognostic criteria for dete...

  20. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Constantin, Tudor; Quesne, John Le; Moore, David A.; Kirkizlar, Eser; Fraioli, Francesco; Bakir, Maise Al; Zambrana, Francisco; Endozo, Raymondo; Bi, Wenya Linda; Fennessy, Fiona M.; Forster, Martin D.; Hafez, Dina; Ganguly, Apratim; Kareht, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution th...

  1. Understanding quality-of-life while living with late-stage lung cancer: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gail; Brownell, Gracie

    2014-01-01

    U.S. Veterans have a higher prevalence of advanced lung cancer and poorer survival outcomes compared to the general population; yet, no studies exist which specifically explore the psychosocial and existential quality-of-life (QOL) of late-stage lung cancer among this population. This article presents the perspectives of older veterans (N = 12) living with late-stage lung cancer who were receiving chemotherapy, routine hospice care, or both concurrently. Based on individual interviews, themes associated with loss of functionality, close relationships, and communicative acts contributed to veterans' perceptions of diminished or enhanced QOL while living with advanced disease. An overarching theme, loss of the person I know myself to be, suggests that personhood is an important concept to consider in QOL assessment. While findings suggest that the experiences of older Veterans with late-stage lung cancer are similar to other populations of lung cancer patients, and persons with incurable cancer in general, further research regarding the influence of veteran identity at end-of-life is warranted. Further research is needed which explores the influence of a whole person approach to QOL during life-limiting illness and end-of-life decision-making, particularly while receiving late-stage cancer-directed therapy.

  2. Outcome of combination chemotherapy in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Hirsch, F R; Osterlind, K

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades many different treatment regimens of combination chemotherapy have been applied in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This study was carried out to identify whether these modifications have resulted in an improved overall survival for extensive stage during...

  3. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic......Lung cancer is the cause of 32% of all male cancer deaths and 25% of all female cancer deaths. Because the prognosis depends on early diagnosis and staging, continuous evaluation of the diagnostic tools available is important. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of dedicated...

  4. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy performed routinely in lung cancer staging spares futile thoracotomies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Soeren S; Vilmann, Peter; Krasnik, Mark;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 45% of operations with curative intent for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be regarded as futile, apparently because the stage of the disease is more advanced than expected preoperatively. During the past decade several studies have evaluated the usefulness of endoscopic...... ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) in lung cancer staging with promising results. However, no randomised trials have been performed, in which a staging strategy with EUS-FNA performed in all patients is compared with a conventional workup. METHODS: Before surgery (i.e. mediastinoscopy.......3 years (range 0.2-2.4 years). Thoracotomy was regarded as futile if the patient had an explorative thoracotomy without tumour resection or if a resected patient had recurrent disease or died from lung cancer during follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat. RESULTS: Fifty-three patients were randomly...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, ...

  6. Current innovations in sentinel lymph node mapping for the staging and treatment of resectable lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachey, Krista J; Colson, Yolonda L

    2014-01-01

    Despite surgical resectability, early-stage lung cancer remains a challenge to cure. Survival outcomes are hindered by variable performance of adequate lymphadenectomy and the limitations of current pathologic nodal staging. Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping, a mainstay in the management of breast cancer and melanoma, permits targeted nodal sampling for efficient and accurate staging that can influence both intraoperative and adjuvant treatment decisions. Unfortunately, standard SLN identification techniques with blue dye and radiocolloid tracers have not been shown to be reproducible in lung cancer. In more recent years, intraoperative near-infrared image-guided lung SLN mapping has emerged as promising technology for the identification of the tumor-associated lymph nodes most likely to contain metastatic disease. Additionally, the clinical relevance of SLN mapping for lung cancer remains pressing, as the ability to identify micrometastatic disease in SLNs could facilitate trials to assess chemotherapeutic response and the clinical effect of occult nodal disease. This review outlines the status of lung cancer lymphatic mapping and techniques in development that may help close the gap between translational research in this field and routine clinical practice.

  7. Lung cancer: Morphological and functional approach to screening, staging and treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, Emmanuel; Lonneux, Max; Geets, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    Lung cancer is a major problem in public health and constitutes the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Lung cancer screening with low-dose computed tomography is promising but needs to overcome many difficulties, such as the large number of incidentally discovered nodules, the radiation dose delivered to the patient during a whole screening program and its cost. The ultimate target point represented by the reduction of lung cancer-related mortality needs to be proved in large, well-designed, randomized, multicenter, prospective trials. Lung cancer staging by morphological tools seems to be limited owing to the presence of metastases in normal-sized lymph nodes. In this context, multidetector computed tomography cannot be used alone but is useful in conjunction with molecular imaging and MRI. Today, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT appears to be the most accurate method for lung cancer staging and may prevent unnecessary thoracotomies. For treatment planning, flurodeoxglucose PET-CT is playing an increasing role in radiotherapy planning at the target selection and definition steps.

  8. Socioeconomic position, stage of lung cancer and time between referral and diagnosis in Denmark, 2001-2008

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Frederiksen, Flemming B.; Jacobsen, E;

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We investigated the association between socioeconomic position, stage at diagnosis, and length of period between referral and diagnosis in a nationwide cohort of lung cancer patients. METHODS: Through the Danish Lung Cancer Register, we identified 18,103 persons diagnosed with lung...

  9. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leaking from the lung into the chest. Enlarge Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the lung. The patient lies on a ... nodes , or other areas. Enlarge Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy. An endoscope that has an ultrasound probe and ...

  10. Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    1 Í AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0338 TITLE: Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant K-ras Lung... Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: James Kim, MD. PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS SOUTHWESTERN MEDICAL Dallas, TX 75390 REPORT DATE...15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage Mutant

  11. Inhaled cisplatin deposition and distribution in lymph nodes in stage II lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Krauss, Leslie; Huang, Haidong; Zachariadis, George A; Katsavou, Anna; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Vogl, Thomas J; Freitag, Lutz; Stamatis, George; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-09-01

    Lung cancer therapies during the last decade have focused on targeting the genome of cancer cells, and novel routes for administering lung cancer therapies have been investigated for decades. Aerosol therapies for several systematic diseases and systemic infections were introduced into the market a decade ago. One of the main issues of aerosol therapies has been the ability to investigate the deposition of a drug compound throughout the systematic circulation and lymph node circulation. Until now, none of the published studies have efficiently shown the deposition of a chemotherapy pharmaceutical within the lymph node tissue. In our current work we present, for the first time, with the novel CytoViva(®) (AL, USA) technique, the deposition of cisplatin aerosol therapy in surgically resected stage II lymph nodes from lung cancer patients. Finally, we present the distribution of cisplatin in correlation with the cisplatin concentration in different lymph stations and comment on the possible mechanisms of distribution.

  12. Phylogenetic ctDNA analysis depicts early stage lung cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbosh, Christopher; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Wilson, Gareth A.

    2017-01-01

    of early-stage lung cancer is not established. Here we conduct a tumour-specific phylogenetic approach to ctDNA profiling in the first 100 TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy (Rx)) study participants, including one patient co-recruited to the PEACE (Posthumous Evaluation......The early detection of relapse following primary surgery for non-small cell lung cancer and the characterization of emerging subclones seeding metastatic sites might offer new therapeutic approaches to limit tumor recurrence. The potential to non-invasively track tumor evolutionary dynamics in ctDNA...... of Advanced Cancer Environment) post-mortem study. We identify independent predictors of ctDNA release and perform tumor volume limit of detection analyses. Through blinded profiling of post-operative plasma, we observe evidence of adjuvant chemotherapy resistance and identify patients destined to experience...

  13. Patterns of recurrence and second primary lung cancer in early-stage lung cancer survivors followed with routine computed tomography surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Feiran; Huang, James; Sima, Camelia S; Dycoco, Joseph; Rusch, Valerie; Bach, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    At present, there is no consensus on the optimal strategy for follow-up care after curative resection for lung cancer. We sought to understand the patterns of recurrence and second primary lung cancer, and their mode of detection, after resection for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer in patients who were followed by routine surveillance computed tomography scan. We reviewed the outcomes of consecutive patients who underwent resection for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2004 and 2009. A total of 1294 consecutive patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer underwent resection. The median length of follow-up was 35 months. Recurrence was diagnosed in 257 patients (20%), and second primary lung cancer was diagnosed in 91 patients (7%). The majority of new primary cancers (85 [93%]) were identified by scheduled routine computed tomography scan, as were a smaller majority of recurrences (157 [61%]). During the first 4 years after surgery, the risk of recurrence ranged from 6% to 10% per person-year but decreased thereafter to 2%. Conversely, the risk of second primary lung cancer ranged from 3% to 6% per person-year and did not diminish over time. Additional testing after false-positive surveillance computed tomography scan results was performed for 329 patients (25%), but only 4 of these patients (0.3%) experienced complications as a result of subsequent invasive diagnostic procedures. Almost all second primary cancers and the majority of recurrences were detected by post-therapeutic surveillance computed tomography scan. The risk of recurrence for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer survivors persisted during the first 4 years after resection, and vigilance in surveillance should be maintained. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Technical description of endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration for the staging of lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H; van Putten, JWG; Douma, WR; Smidt, AA; van Dullemen, HM; Groen, HJM

    2005-01-01

    Background: Encloscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a novel method for staging of the mediastinum in lung cancer patients. The recent development of linear scanners enables safe and accurate fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of mediastinal and upper abdominal structures under real-time ultrasound guidance.

  15. Technical description of endoscopic ultrasonography with fine-needle aspiration for the staging of lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, H; van Putten, JWG; Douma, WR; Smidt, AA; van Dullemen, HM; Groen, HJM

    2005-01-01

    Background: Encloscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a novel method for staging of the mediastinum in lung cancer patients. The recent development of linear scanners enables safe and accurate fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of mediastinal and upper abdominal structures under real-time ultrasound guidance.

  16. New procedures. Comprehensive staging of lung cancer by MRI; Neue Verfahren. Umfassendes Staging des Lungenkarzinoms mit der MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintze, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kiel (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Dinkel, J. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Biederer, J. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie, Kiel (Germany); Heussel, C.P. [Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Thoraxklinik Heidelberg, Abteilung Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Lung cancer staging according to the TNM system is based on morphological assessment of the primary cancer, lymph nodes and metastases. All aspects of this important oncological classification are measurable with MRI. Pulmonary nodules can be detected at the clinically relevant size of 4-5 mm in diameter. The extent of mediastinal, hilar and supraclavicular lymph node affection can be assessed at the same time. The predominant metastatic spread to the adrenal glands and spine can be detected in coronal orientation during dedicated MRI of the lungs. Search focused whole body MRI completes the staging. Various additional MR imaging techniques provide further functional and clinically relevant information during a single examination. In the oncological context the most important techniques are imaging of perfusion and tumor motion. Functional MRI of the lungs complements the pure staging and improves surgical approaches and radiotherapy planning. (orig.) [German] Das Staging des Lungenkarzinoms nach dem TNM-System basiert auf der morphologischen Einschaetzung des Primarius, der Lymphknoten und Metastasen. Alle Aspekte dieser onkologisch wichtigen Beurteilung lassen sich mit der MRT erfassen. Pulmonale Rundherde sind ab der klinisch relevanten Groesse von 4-5 mm Durchmesser sicher erkennbar. Die Groesse der mediastinalen, hilaeren und supraklavikulaeren Lymphknoten kann in einem Untersuchungsgang bestimmt werden. In der koronaren Schichtfuehrung der dedizierten MRT der Lunge werden die Bereiche der bevorzugten Metastasierung in Nebennieren und weite Teile der Wirbelsaeule miterfasst. Durch eine gezielte Ganzkoerper-MRT als Suchmethode wird der letzte Teil des Stagings erfuellt. Die MRT bietet vielfaeltige Moeglichkeiten, zusaetzliche funktionelle, klinisch relevante Informationen innerhalb einer Untersuchung zu erheben. Im onkologischen Kontext sind die Perfusionsbildgebung der Lunge und die Bewegungsabschaetzung der Tumoren am bedeutendsten. Die funktionelle MRT der

  17. Clinical applicability of staging small cell lung cancer according to the seventh edition of the TNM staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Um, Sang-Won

    2013-07-01

    The two-stage system of limited and extensive disease has been widely employed for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). However, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has proposed that the TNM classification should be incorporated into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) 7th TNM staging system to SCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven SCLC between March 2005 and January 2010. Patients who had other concurrent malignancies or had combined-type SCLC were excluded. We assessed overall survival (OS) according to the T descriptor, N descriptor, M descriptor, and TNM stage grouping. In total, 320 SCLC patients were included. Median age was 65 years and 286 patients (89.4%) were male. Median OS was 12.7 months. There were no significant differences in OS according to the T descriptor (P = 0.880). However, there were significant differences in OS according to the N (P TNM stage grouping (P TNM stage grouping, but not according to the T descriptors. The UICC 7th TNM staging system may contribute to a more precise prognosis in SCLC patients. Further studies are required to evaluate the applicability of the TNM staging system to SCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC....

  19. Upregulation of APE/ref-1 in recurrence stage I, non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Woong; Kang, Shin Kwang; Choi, Songyi; Lee, Choong Sik; Jeon, Byeong Hwa; Lim, Seung Pyung

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related death, still lacks reliable biomarkers. Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 is a multifunctional protein involved in the base excision repair of DNA damaged by oxidative stress or alkylating compounds, as well as in the regulation of multiple transcription factors. To validate apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 as a biomarker for prediction of lung cancer recurrence, we studied 42 patients who received curative resection and mediastinal lymph node dissection for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. They were divided into 2 groups based on recurrence, and compared by immunohistochemistry staining of paraffin-embedded tissues and Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemical staining showed a significant difference between the cytoplasm and nucleus in patients who had a recurrence compared to those with nonrecurrent adenocarcinoma. In Western blot analysis, the recurrent adenocarcinoma group showed increased expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 in cytoplasm, nucleus, and in total. This indicates that apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 is unregulated in recurrent stage I adenocarcinoma. For clinical application as a prognostic marker for non-small-cell lung cancer, further investigation into the role of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/Ref-1 in carcinogenesis is needed in an expanded prospective study.

  20. Lung cancer stage at diagnosis: Individual associations in the prospective VITamins and lifestyle (VITAL cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Au David H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Identifying factors associated with stage of diagnosis can improve our understanding of biologic and behavioral pathways of lung cancer development and detection. We used data from a prospective cohort study to evaluate associations of demographic, health history, and health behaviors with early versus late stage at diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We calculated odds ratios (ORs for the association of patient-level characteristics with advanced stage of diagnosis for NSCLC. The OR's were then adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking status, income, education, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and a comorbidity index. Results We identified 612 cases of NSCLC among 77,719 adults, aged 50 to 76 years from Washington State recruited in 2000-2002, with followup through December 2007. In univariate analyses, subjects who quit smoking Conclusions Smoking status, education, and a screening activity were associated with stage at diagnosis of NSCLC. These results may guide future studies of the underlying mechanisms that influence how NSCLC is detected and diagnosed.

  1. Effect of body mass index on the survival of patients with early-stage small cell lung cancer after surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Kolesnik

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is an important medico-social problem. It is connected with high level of incidence and mortality of lung cancer. Nowadays we know that obesity has significant influence on cancer development, including lung cancer. Multivariate analysis confirmed that histological type of tumour, kind of operation and body mass index (BMI influence on prognosis in patients with early stages of mall cell lung cancer. So, now we can use BMI along with other significant prognostic criteria for detection of unfavorable prognostic group of patients.

  2. Patterns of failure in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: Implications of TNM stage for prophylactic cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Abraham J; Gillis, Andrea; Foster, Amanda; Woo, Kaitlin; Zhang, Zhigang; Gelblum, Daphna Y; Downey, Robert J; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Ong, Leonard; Perez, Carmen A; Pietanza, M Catherine; Krug, Lee; Rudin, Charles M; Rimner, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and patterns of failure in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) remains unclear. We hypothesized that TNM stage predicts brain metastasis risk, and could inform the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation. We reviewed 283 patients with stage I-IIIB SCLC. Competing-risks regression was used to analyze local, distant, and brain failure. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effect of treatment and clinical factors on failure and OS. Patients with stage I or II SCLC (35% of cohort) had significantly better survival and lower risk of distant and brain metastasis, compared with stage III patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of brain metastasis for stage I/II and III were 12% and 26%, respectively. Stage had no correlation with local failure. On multivariate analysis, stage was independently prognostic for survival, distant metastasis risk, and brain metastasis risk. TNM staging predicts likelihood of distant metastasis, brain metastasis, and survival in LS-SCLC. This supports the routine use of TNM staging in clinical practice. The lower risk of brain metastasis in stage I and II SCLC suggests that prophylactic cranial irradiation could play a more limited role in treatment of early-stage disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in How Are Lung Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed? The TNM staging system A staging system is a standard ... cancer – the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) TNM staging system. The TNM system describes 3 key ...

  4. Controversies in the management of stage IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Edgardo S; Castrellon, Aurelio; Blaya, Marcelo; Raez, Luis E

    2008-12-01

    New developments in the management of non-small-cell lung cancer, as well as recent proposals for changing the current lung cancer staging system, are posing a challenge in the therapeutic decision making regarding this disease. For the last two decades, the management of stage IIIA (N2) disease has been controversial and the target for clinical trials has been to determine the best therapeutic approach that may result in better survival outcomes without increasing toxicity. For many years, combined modality treatment (systemic chemotherapy plus radiation therapy) became the standard of care in this setting. However, the poor outcomes seen with combined modality for N2 has obligated us to explore other possibilities. In this sense, recent clinical trials in the neoadjuvant setting using chemotherapy alone or combined modality are providing fruitful results and shifting the paradigm on this stage. A recent, large randomized multicenter trial argues against what has slowly become a current practice in some centers - the use of preoperative modality for N2 disease. Another controversy that we will discuss here is the acceptance of adjuvant therapy for resected stage IB-IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer. It was not long ago that adjuvant radiation therapy was still the standard of care for patients who have pathological nodal disease. We will present the current data on these debatable issues and how to implement this new knowledge into clinical practice.

  5. The seventh tumour-node-metastasis staging system for lung cancer: Sequel or prequel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Janssens, Annelies

    2013-09-01

    Anatomical cancer extent is an important predictor of prognosis and determines treatment choices. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) the tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification developed by Pierre Denoix replaced in 1968 the Veterans Administration Lung cancer Group (VALG) classification, which was still in use for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Clifton Mountain suggested several improvements based on a database of mostly surgically treated United States (US) patients from a limited number of centres. This database was pivotal for a uniform reporting of lung cancer extent by the American Joint Committee of Cancer (AJCC) and the International Union against Cancer (IUCC), but it suffered increasingly from obsolete diagnostic and staging procedures and did not reflect new treatment modalities. Moreover, its findings were not externally validated in large Japanese and European databases, resulting in persisting controversies which could not be solved with the available database. The use of different mediastinal lymph-node maps in Japan, the (US) and Europe facilitated neither the exchange nor the comparison of treatment results. Peter Goldstraw, a United Kingdom (UK) thoracic surgeon, started the process of updating the sixth version in 1996 and brought it to a good end 10 years later. His goals were to improve the TNM system in lung cancer by addressing the ongoing controversies, to validate the modifications and additional descriptors, to validate the TNM for use in staging SCLC and carcinoid tumours, to propose a new uniform lymph-node map and to investigate the prognostic value of non-anatomical factors. A staging committee was formed within the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) - which supervised the collection of the retrospective data from >100,000 patients with lung cancer - treated throughout the world between 1990 and 2000, analyse them with the help of solid statistics and validate externally with the Surveillance

  6. Management of Anorexia-Cachexia in Late Stage Lung Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Grant, Marcia; Koczywas, Marianna; Dorr-Uyemura, Laura A

    2012-08-01

    Nutritional deficiencies are experienced by most adults with advanced lung cancer during the course of their disease and treatment. Well-nourished individuals tolerate cancer treatment with less morbidity, mortality, and increased response to treatment as compared to those who are malnourished. Novel anti-cancer therapies cause many deficits that impact nutritional and functional status during the treatment process. Nutritional deficits include weight loss, malnutrition, and anorexia-cachexia. Anorexia-Cachexia is complex, not well understood and seen in many solid tumors in late stage disease. Assessing adequate nutrition is one of the most challenging problems for nurses, their patients and patient's families. The purpose of this review is to define and describe cancer anorexia-cachexia in late stage lung cancer, through case presentation, and to describe palliative strategies for prevention, assessment, and management in the palliative care setting. Early assessment for nutritional imbalances must be done regularly with re-evaluation for intervention effectiveness and should continue throughout the illness trajectory. Management of adverse effects of cancer and cancer-related treatment is critical to improving quality of life. Palliative care and hospice nurses play a critical role in early assessment, education and prevention to support nutritional needs for patients and their families.

  7. Five-Year Survival Among Stage IIIA Lung Cancer Patients Receiving Two Different Treatment Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilfinger, Thomas; Keresztes, Roger; Albano, Denise; Nemesure, Barbara

    2016-07-21

    BACKGROUND Five-year survival rates among stage IIIA lung cancer patients range between 2% and 15%, and there is currently no consensus regarding optimal treatment approaches for these patients. The current investigation evaluated survival outcomes among stage IIIA lung cancer patients receiving 2 different treatment modalities, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection versus chemoradiation alone. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study is based on 127 patients attending the Lung Cancer Evaluation Center at Stony Brook Cancer Center between 2002 and 2014. Patients were treated either with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by resection or a regimen of chemoradiation alone. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare survival outcomes between groups and Cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate treatment effects on survival, while adjusting for possible confounders. RESULTS Approximately one-fourth (n=33) of patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery, whereas 94 patients received definitive chemoradiation. Patients in the surgical group were found to be significantly younger than those receiving chemoradiation alone (60.1 vs. 67.9 years, respectively; p=0.001). Five-year survival among patients receiving preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection was significantly higher than that among patients receiving chemoradiation alone (63% vs. 19%, respectively; p<0.001), whereas the hazard ratio (HR) was 3-4 times greater in the latter group (HR=3.77, 95% confidence interval=1.87, 7.61). CONCLUSIONS Findings from this study indicate that preoperative chemotherapy followed by resection can improve survival outcomes for stage IIIA lung cancer patients compared with chemoradiation alone. The results reflect a select surgical group of patients; thus, the data highlight the need to develop new therapies that may result in more patients being viable surgical candidates.

  8. Survival after Pneumonectomy for Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibu P. Saha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has a poor prognosis. Reports suggest that five-year survival after current treatment is between 14 to 24 percent. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate the morbidity and mortality of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC and treated with pneumonectomy at the University of Kentucky Medical Center in Lexington, KY. Methods: We reviewed the medical record and tumor registry follow-up data on 100 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer at the University of Kentucky. Results: We identified thirty-six patients in stage III who underwent pneumonectomy. Ten patients had surgery only, eight patients received adjuvant chemotherapy, and eighteen patients received neoadjuvant therapy. There was one surgical death in this series. Mean follow-up was 2.9 years. One-, three-, and five-year survival was 66%, 38%, and 38%, respectively. Five-year survival for the group with adjuvant therapy was 60%. Conclusion: Most lung cancer patients present with advanced disease and the prognosis remains poor. Our experience indicates resection offers an above average chance of long-term survival when supplemented with neoadjuvant and/or adjuvant therapy.

  9. Increased red blood cell distribution width associates with cancer stage and prognosis in patients with lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Koma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red cell distribution width (RDW, one of many routinely examined parameters, shows the heterogeneity in erythrocyte size. We investigated the association of RDW levels with clinical parameters and prognosis of lung cancer patients. METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data from 332 patients with lung cancer in a single institution were retrospectively studied by univariate analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the effect of RDW on survival. RESULTS: THE RDW LEVELS WERE DIVIDED INTO TWO GROUPS: high RDW (>=15%, n=73 vs. low RDW, n=259 (<15%. Univariate analysis showed that there were significant associations of high RDW values with cancer stage, performance status, presence of other disease, white blood cell count, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular volume, platelet count, albumin level, C-reactive protein level, and cytokeratin 19 fragment level. Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed an association of RDW values with cancer stage in patients irrespective of comorbidity (patient with/without comorbidity: p<0.0001, patient without comorbidity: p<0.0001. Stages I-IV lung cancer patients with higher RDW values had poorer prognoses than those with lower RDW values (Wilcoxon test: p=0.002. In particular, the survival rates of stage I and II patients (n=141 were lower in the high RDW group (n=19 than in the low RDW group (n=122 (Wilcoxon test: p<0.001. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed higher RDW is a significant prognostic factor (p=0.040. CONCLUSION: RDW is associated with several factors that reflect inflammation and malnutrition in lung cancer patients. Moreover, high levels of RDW are associated with poor survival. RDW might be used as a new and convenient marker to determine a patient's general condition and to predict the mortality risk of lung cancer patients.

  10. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  11. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: External Validation of the Revision of the TNM Stage Groupings in the Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansky, Kari; Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G; Rusch, Valerie W; Vallières, Eric; Groome, Patti; Kennedy, Catherine; Krasnik, Mark; Peake, Michael; Shemanski, Lynn; Bolejack, Vanessa; Crowley, John J; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramón

    2017-07-01

    Revisions to the TNM stage classifications for lung cancer, informed by the international database (N = 94,708) of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee, need external validation. The objective was to externally validate the revisions by using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeons. Cases presenting from 2000 through 2012 were drawn from the NCDB and reclassified according to the eighth edition stage classification. Clinically and pathologically staged subsets of NSCLC were analyzed separately. The T, N, and overall TNM classifications were evaluated according to clinical, pathologic, and "best" stage (N = 780,294). Multivariate analyses were carried out to adjust for various confounding factors. A combined analysis of the NSCLC cases from both databases was performed to explore differences in overall survival prognosis between the two databases. The databases differed in terms of key factors related to data source. Survival was greater in the IASLC database for all stage categories. However, the eighth edition TNM stage classification system demonstrated consistent ability to discriminate TNM categories and stage groups for clinical and pathologic stage. The IASLC revisions made for the eighth edition of lung cancer staging are validated by this analysis of the NCDB database by the ordering, statistical differences, and homogeneity within stage groups and by the consistency within analyses of specific cohorts. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Ayakawa Shiho; Oda Kyota; Ikeya-Hashizume Chisa; Tomita Natsuo; Shibamoto Yuta; Baba Fumiya; Ogino Hiroyuki; Sugie Chikao

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrenc...

  13. Robotic-Assisted Thoracic Surgery for Early-Stage Lung Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Paula

    2015-07-01

    This review evaluates the benefits and disadvantages associated with the use of robotic-assisted technology in performing lobectomies in patients with early-stage lung cancer. The author conducted a literature search of Ovid®, MEDLINE®, PubMed®, and CINAHL® for articles published from 2005 to 2013. Search criteria included key terms such as robot, robotic, robotic-assisted lobectomy, and lung cancer. Of 922 articles, the author included a total of 12 research-based published studies in the analysis and incorporated the findings into an evidence table. Results showed that robotic-assisted lobectomies are feasible safe procedures for patients with stage 1A or 1B lung cancer; however, there is a steep learning curve and long-term randomized studies evaluating robotic-assisted lobectomy and conventional posterolateral thoracotomy or video-assisted thoracic lobectomy are needed. For patient safety, perioperative nurses should be aware of the length of time and experience required to perform these procedures, the costs, techniques, benefits, and disadvantages.

  14. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  15. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  16. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  17. Circulating micro-RNA expression profiles in early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Schetter, Aaron J; Welsh, Judith A; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Bowman, Elise D; Harris, Curtis C

    2012-03-15

    Circulating micro-RNA (miR) profiles have been proposed as promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer, including lung cancer. We have developed methods to accurately and reproducibly measure micro-RNA levels in serum and plasma. Here, we study paired serum and plasma samples from 220 patients with early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 220 matched controls. We use qRT-PCR to measure the circulating levels of 30 different miRs that have previously been reported to be differently expressed in lung cancer tissue. Duplicate RNA extractions were performed for 10% of all samples, and micro-RNA measurements were highly correlated among those duplicates. This demonstrates high reproducibility of our assay. The expressions of miR-146b, miR-221, let-7a, miR-155, miR-17-5p, miR-27a and miR-106a were significantly reduced in the serum of NSCLC cases, while miR-29c was significantly increased. No significant differences were observed in plasma of patients compared with controls. Overall, expression levels in serum did not correlate well with levels in plasma. In secondary analyses, reduced plasma expression of let-7b was modestly associated with worse cancer-specific mortality in all patients, and reduced serum expression of miR-223 was modestly associated with cancer-specific mortality in stage IA/B patients. MiR profiles also showed considerable differences comparing African American and European Americans. In summary, we found significant differences in miR expression when comparing cases and controls and find evidence that expression of let-7b is associated with prognosis in NSCLC. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  18. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  19. How to choose PET-CT or CT in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. Practical experience in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, T.; Tao, X.; Liu, H.; Liu, S. [Dept. of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China); Zheng, X. [Dept. of Nutrition, ChangHai Hospital, Second Military Medical Univ., SH (China)

    2010-07-01

    How to use CT and PET-CT rationally to raise diagnosis, staging and prognostic assessment of lung cancer to a higher level at the best cost-effect ratio is a subject that Chinese clinicians and radiologists should face conscientiously. We review the rational application of CT and PET-CT in four aspects of lung cancer, including screening and detection, morphologic evaluation, haemodynamic or metabolic feature evaluation, and follow-up, staging and prognostic evaluation. As PET-CT is only available in class III-A hospitals today, CT is the most popular equipment in China. PET-CT is more valuable only in cases where CT presentation of lung cancer is atypical or difficult to determine, or in cases where the diagnosis of lung cancer has been initially confirmed, for which clinical staging and decision concerning on therapeutic regimens are needed. We also recommend the current strategies of CT and PET-CT managing of SPN in China. (orig.)

  20. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  1. Early stage lung cancer detection in systemic sclerosis does not portend survival benefit: a cross sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy B Katzen

    Full Text Available Systemic Sclerosis (SSc is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with an increased risk of malignancy including lung cancer.A single center review of all cases of lung cancer in patients with SSc was conducted. Clinical, radiographic, and detailed pathologic data was collected. Risk factors were compared with our center's SSc Registry. Cancer characteristics were compared with the National Cancer Institute SEER Cancer Statistics (NCI SEER data.17 cases were identified; the majority were females (82% with the lung cancers diagnosed after the onset of SSc (88%. Tobacco use was identified in 65% of cases. Serologic testing showed 50% of cases were Scl-70 positive. Twelve cases had radiographic evidence of SSc lung involvement, however only 6 had restrictive physiology on pulmonary function testing. Thirteen cases had pulmonary nodules preceding lung cancer. Thirteen of the cancers were adenocarcinoma. Ten underwent molecular mutational profiling: 2/8 had KRAS mutation and 1/10 had EGFR mutation. More of the non-small cell lung cancers were diagnosed at localized disease (56% than in the NCI SEER database. However, 5 years survival among the stage I cases was 25% versus an expected survival of 54%.The high proportion of adenocarcinomas seen in our study is different from that reported in the literature. Lung cancers were diagnosed at an early stage, likely due to our center's practice of radiographic screening for SSc associated lung involvement, however this did not confer a survival advantage. A high proportion of patients who developed lung cancer had interstitial lung disease.

  2. POST-OPERATIVE STAGING AND SURVIVAL BASED ON THE REVISED TNM STAGING SYSTEM FOR NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study the factors affecting post-operative staging and survival in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients based on the revised TNM staging system adopted by the UICC in 1977. Methods: Data were collected from 1757 consecutively operated NSCLC patients, including those receiving complete tumor excision, tumor debulking and exploratory thoractomy from April 1969 through Dec. 1993. the end point of follow-up was Nov. 30, 1998. Cumulative survival and its influencing factors were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Cox model of SPSS software. Results: In this series, 30 patients (1.7%) were lost from follow-up. The 5-year cumulative survival was 88.0% for patients in stage I A, and 53.9% in stage IB, 33.5% in stage II, 14.7% in stage IIIA, 5.5% in stage IIIB and 7.0% in stage IV. The overall 5-year survival rate was 28.2%. The 5-year survivals were 39.8%, 14.4% and 4.2% in patients treated with completely tumor resection, tumor debulking and explorative thoractomy, respectively. The 10-year survival rate was 31.4%, 9.5% and 0, respectively. Factors affecting long-term cumulative survival, in the order of decreasing significance, were the type of operation, lymph node status, staging, size and pathological type of the primary tumor. Conclusion: the revised staging system for NSCLC is superior to that used since 1986 as far as the end results of treatment in patients in different stage and the staging specificity are concerned. The T3N1M0 classification and the definition of M1 need to be further studied.

  3. Validation of the Eighth Edition of the TNM Staging System for Lung Cancer in 2043 Surgically Treated Patients With Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kezhong; Chen, Haiqing; Yang, Fan; Sui, Xizhao; Li, Xiao; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-12

    The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has proposed a revision of the Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM) classification for lung cancer. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of the eighth edition of the TNM staging system in surgically treated patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Data from 2043 consecutive patients with non-small-cell lung cancer who underwent surgical treatment in our single center between January 2006 and September 2015 were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the prognostic significance of the T and N descriptors. The reversed overall survival curves of stage IIA and stage IIB in the seventh edition were corrected in the eighth edition. Better prognostic value in predicting overall survival, including a higher log rank test of trend χ(2) statistic (433.6 vs. 414.2), a smaller Akaike Information Criterion value (4759.6 vs. 4768.2), a higher Harrell C-index (0.776 vs. 0.769), and a lower integrated Brier score (0.092 vs. 0.093), was observed for the eighth edition relative to the seventh edition. Recurrence-free survival analysis of subsets of patients stratified by T and N descriptors showed a stepwise deterioration. Significant differences were found between patients of subdivided stage IA (IAI vs. IA2; P = .003 and IA2 vs. IA3; P = .004). The eighth edition of the TNM staging system for lung cancer has prognostic value superior to that of the seventh edition. It was able to predict recurrence-free survival well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Introducing Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer : A Population-Based Time-Trend Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palma, David; Visser, Otto; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Belderbos, Jose; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with high local control rates. The impact of introducing SBRT in patients 75 years of age or older was studied using a population-based cancer registry. Methods The Amsterdam Cancer Registry wa

  5. Clinical studies in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer stage III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman-Maas, K.W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary lung cancer was first recognized as a distinct disease in 1761, long before the advent of cigarette smoking.1 Although it was a rare disease at the start of the 20th century,2,3,4,5 at the end, lung cancer had become one of the leading causes of preventable death. Since the 1930s, lung

  6. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  7. Survival after recurrence of stage I-III breast, colorectal, or lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Michael J; Uno, Hajime; Cronin, Angel M; Carroll, Nikki M; Hornbrook, Mark C; Fishman, Paul; Ritzwoller, Debra P

    2017-08-01

    The experiences of patients with recurrent cancer are assumed to reflect those of patients with de novo stage IV disease; yet, little is truly known because most registries lack recurrence status. Using two databases with excellent recurrence and death information, we examined determinants of survival duration after recurrence of breast (BC), colorectal (CRC), and lung cancers (LC). Recurrence status was abstracted from the medical records of patients who participated in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study and who received care at two Cancer Research Network sites-the Colorado and Northwest regions of Kaiser Permanente. The analysis included 1653 patients who developed recurrence after completing definitive therapy for stages I-III cancer. Multivariable modeling identified independent determinants of survival duration after recurrence, controlling for other factors. Through 60 months' average follow-up, survival after recurrence for BC, CRC, and LC were 28.4, 23.1 and 16.1 months, respectively. Several factors were independently associated with shorter survival for all three cancers, including higher initial stage (III vs. I: BC -9.9 months; CRC -6.9 months; LC -7.4 months; P≤0.01). Factors associated with shorter survival for selected cancers included: distant/regional recurrence for BC and CRC; current/former smoker for LC; high grade for CRC; and recurrence for BC. Initial stage predicts survival duration after recurrence, whereas time-to-recurrence usually does not. The impact of biologic characteristics (e.g., grade, hormone-receptor status) on survival duration after recurrence needs further study. Predictors of survival duration after recurrence may help facilitate patient decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Cancer Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tumor is to grow and spread The TNM Staging System The TNM system is the most widely used cancer staging system. Most hospitals and medical centers use the TNM system as their main method for cancer reporting. ...

  9. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  10. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  11. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  12. Molecular targeted therapy in the treatment of advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumarakulasinghe, Nesaretnam Barr; van Zanwijk, Nico; Soo, Ross A

    2015-04-01

    Historically, patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with chemotherapy alone, but a therapeutic plateau has been reached. Advances in the understanding of molecular genetics have led to the recognition of multiple molecularly distinct subsets of NSCLC. This in turn has led to the development of rationally directed molecular targeted therapy, leading to improved clinical outcomes. Tumour genotyping for EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangement has meant chemotherapy is no longer given automatically as first-line treatment but reserved for when patients do not have a 'druggable' driver oncogene. In this review, we will address the current status of clinically relevant driver mutations and emerging new molecular subsets in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, and the role of targeted therapy and mechanisms of acquired resistance to targeted therapy.

  13. Hospitalization costs of lung cancer diagnosis in Turkey: Is there a difference between histological types and stages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, Murat; Yıldırım, Fatma; Yurdakul, Ahmet Selim; Öztürk, Can

    2016-12-01

    To establish the direct costs of diagnosing lung cancer in hospitalized patients. Hospital data of patients who were hospitalized and diagnosed as lung cancer between September 2013 and August 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who underwent surgery for diagnosis and who were initiated with cancer treatment during the same hospital stay were excluded from study. Histological types and stages of lung cancer were determined. Expenses were grouped as laboratory costs, pathology costs, diagnostic imaging costs, overnight room charges, medication costs, blood center costs, consumable expenditures' costs and inpatient service charges (including consultants' service, electrocardiogram, follow-up, nursing services, diagnostic interventions). Of the 68 patients, 55 (81%) had non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 13 (19%) had small cell lung cancer (SCLC). 47% of patients with NSCLC had stage 4 disease and 86% of patients with SCLC had extensive stage disease. Median total cost per patient was 910 (95% CI= 832-1291) Euros (€). Of all costs, 37% were due to inpatient service charges and 22% were medication costs. Median total cost per patient was 912 (95% CI= 783-1213) € in NSCLC patients and 908 (95% CI= 456-2203) € in SCLC patients (p> 0.05). In NSCLC group, total cost per patient was 873 (95% CI= 591-1143) € in stage 1-2-3 diseases and 975 (95% CI= 847-1536) € in stage 4 disease (p> 0.05). In SCLC group total cost per patient was 937 € in limited stage and 502 (95% CI= 452-2508) € in extensive stage (p> 0.05). There is no significant difference between costs related to diagnosis of different lung cancer types and stages in patients hospitalized in a university hospital.

  14. Recurrence Risk Factors Analysis for Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Feng; Fu, Jui-Ying; Yeh, Chi-Ju; Liu, Yun-Hen; Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Wu, Yi-Cheng; Wu, Ching-Yang; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Even early-stage patients might encounter disease recurrence with relative high risk. Effective postoperative therapy is based on an accurate assessment of treatment failure after surgery. The aim of this study is to construct a disease-free survival (DFS) prediction model and stratify patients into different risk score groups.A total of 356 pathological stage I patients (7th American Joint Committee on Cancer) who underwent lung resection from January 2005 through June 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Of these patients, 63 patients were eliminated for this study. A total of 293 p-stage I patients were included for further univariate and multivariate analysis. Clinical, surgical, and pathological factors associated with high risk of recurrence were analyzed, including age, gender, smoking status, additional primary malignancy (APM), operation method, histology, visceral pleural invasion, angiolymphatic invasion, tumor necrosis, and tumor size.Of the 293 p-stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients examined, 143 were female and 150 were male, with a mean age of 62.8-years old (range: 25-83-years old). The 5-year DFS and overall survival rates after surgery were 58.9% and 75.3%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, current smoker (hazards ratio [HR]: 1.63), APM (HR: 1.86), tumor size (HR: 1.54, 2.03), nonanatomic resections (HR: 1.81), adenocarcinoma histology (HR: 2.07), visceral pleural invasion (HR: 1.54), and angiolymphatic invasion (HR: 1.53) were found to be associated with a higher risk of tumor recurrence. The final model showed a fair discrimination ability (C-statistic = 0.68). According to the difference risk group, we found patients with intermediate or higher risk group had a higher distal relapse tendency as compared with low risk group (P = 0.016, odds ratio: 3.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.21-9.03).Greater than 30% of disease recurrences occurred after surgery

  15. Four-arm robotic lobectomy for the treatment of early-stage lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Giulia; Galetta, Domenico; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Melfi, Franca; Schmid, Ralph Alexander; Borri, Alessandro; Vannucci, Fernando; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the feasibility and safety of four-arm robotic lung lobectomy in patients with lung cancer and described the robotic lobectomy technique with mediastinal lymph node dissection. Over 21 months, 54 patients underwent robotic lobectomy for early-stage lung cancer at our institute. We used a da Vinci Robotic System (Intuitive Surgical, Inc, Mountain View, Calif) with three ports plus one utility incision to isolate hilum elements and perform vascular and bronchial resection using standard endoscopic staplers. Standard mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed subsequently. Surgical outcomes were compared with those in 54 patients who underwent open surgery over the same period and were matched to the robotic group using propensity scores for a series of preoperative variables. Conversion to open surgery was necessary in 7 (13%) cases. Postoperative complications (11/54, 20%, in each group) and median number of lymph nodes removed (17.5 robotic vs 17 open) were similar in the 2 groups. Median robotic operating time decreased by 43 minutes (P = .02) from first tertile (18 patients) to the second-plus-third tertile (36 patients). Median postoperative hospitalization was significantly shorter after robotic (excluding first tertile) than after open operations (4.5 days vs 6 days; P = .002). Robotic lobectomy with lymph node dissection is practicable, safe, and associated with shorter postoperative hospitalization than open surgery. From the number of lymph nodes removed it also appears oncologically acceptable for early lung cancer. Benefits in terms of postoperative pain, respiratory function, and quality of life still require evaluation. We expect that technologic developments will further simplify the robotic procedure. 2010 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Can FDG-PET be used to predict growth of stage I lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tann, M. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Sandrasegaran, K. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)], E-mail: ksandras@iupui.edu; Winer-Muram, H.T. [Department of Radiology, Richard L. Roudebush Veterans' Association Medical Center, Indianapolis (United States); Jennings, S.G.; Welling, M.E.; Fletcher, J.W. [Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Aim: To determine the relationship between the metabolic activity measured by 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT)-derived tumour growth rates for stage 1 lung cancer. Methods: Stage I lung cancer patients at our institution who underwent FDG PET, and who had at least two pre-treatment chest CT examinations (n = 51), were retrospectively identified. Metabolic activity was defined by maximum lesion standardized uptake value (SUV) and maximum lesion-to-mean background activity (LBR). Growth rates were determined from serial CT volume measurements and the doubling time (DT) was calculated. Tumour growth rates were divided into rapid (DT < 180 days), intermediate (DT = 180-270 days), and slow (DT > 270 days) groups. Results: Rapid, moderate, and slow DT were seen in 22, 19, and 10 patients, respectively. Means (standard deviations) of SUV in the three groups (from rapid to slow growth rate) were 8.2 (4.8), 5.5 (4.5), and 2.2 (1.1), respectively and of LBR were 22.7 (10.1), 15.1 (12.6), and 6 (2.6), respectively. There was a significant relationship between SUV and DT (p < 0.05), as well as between LBR and DT (p < 0.05). Conclusions: For stage I lung tumours, there is a significant relationship between growth rates, as measured by serial CT examinations, and the initial pre-treatment metabolic activities, as measured by FDG uptake. This suggests that in patients in whom it is difficult to decide on the aggressiveness on treatment, FDG-PET may be used as additional prognostic tool for determining management.

  17. Outcomes of patients with unresected stage III and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Singh Tiwana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To report on the demographic profile and survival outcomes of North Indian population affected with stage III and stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Materials and Methods: From November 2008 to January 2012, 138 consecutively diagnosed NSCLC patients were included in this study. The patient, tumor and treatment related factors were analyzed. Median overall survival (OS, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, t-test, Cox proportional hazards models were generated by multivariate analysis [MVA] and analyzed on SPSS software (version 19.0; SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL. Results: Median OS of stage III patients was 9.26 ± 1.85 months and 2-year survival rate of 13% while stage IV patients had median OS of 5 ± 1.5 months with a 2-year survival rate of 8%. Cox regression modeling for MVA demonstrated higher biologically equivalent dose (BED ( P = 0.01 in stage III while in stage IV non-squamous histology ( P = 0.01, administration of chemotherapy ( P = 0.02, partial responders to chemotherapy ( P = 0.001, higher BED ( P = 0.02, and those with skeletal metastasis alone ( P = 0.17 showed a better OS. Conclusion: Our data showed that a higher BED is associated with favorable outcomes, indicating a role of dose escalated radiation therapy to the primary lesion in both stage III and essentially in stage IV NSCLC. Additionally, optimal use of chemotherapy relates to better survival. The developing, resource restrained nations need to follow an economically feasible multimodality approach.

  18. Micrometastasis in non-small-cell lung cancer: Detection and staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Mohajeri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The clinical relevance of bone marrow micrometastasis (BMM in non-small-cell lung cancer is undetermined, and the value of such analyses in advanced stage patients has not been clearly assessed previously. This study was conducted to estimate the accuracy of both polymerase chain reaction (PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC in micrometastases detection and determine the best site for bone marrow biopsy in order to find micrometastasis. Methods: This prospective cross-sectional study was performed in the Department of Thoracic Surgery, Alzahra University Hospital from September 2008 to June 2009. To evaluate the bone marrow, a 3-cm rib segment and an aspirated specimen from the iliac bone prior to tumor resection were taken. PCR and IHC were performed for each specimen to find micrometastasis. Results: Of 41 patients, 14 (34% were positive for BMM by PCR compared with two positive IHC (4.8%. All BMMs were diagnosed in rib segments, and iliac specimens were all free from metastatic lesion. Our data showed no significant association between variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, side of tumor, involved lobe, smoking, or weight loss and presence of BMM. Conclusion: PCR could use as a promising method for BMM detection. BMM in a sanctuary site (rib is not associated with advanced stages of lung cancer. In addition, when predictor variables such as age, sex, histology, tumor location, smoking, or weight loss are analyzed, no correlation can be found between micrometastasis prevalence and any of those variables.

  19. Carbon Ion Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Demizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon ion therapy is a type of radiotherapies that can deliver high-dose radiation to a tumor while minimizing the dose delivered to the organs at risk; this profile differs from that of photon radiotherapy. Moreover, carbon ions are classified as high-linear energy transfer radiation and are expected to be effective for even photon-resistant tumors. Recently, high-precision radiotherapy modalities such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, proton therapy, and carbon ion therapy have been used for patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, and the results are promising, as, for carbon ion therapy, local control and overall survival rates at 5 years are 80–90% and 40–50%, respectively. Carbon ion therapy may be theoretically superior to SBRT and proton therapy, but the literature that is currently available does not show a statistically significant difference among these treatments. Carbon ion therapy demonstrates a better dose distribution than both SBRT and proton therapy in most cases of early-stage lung cancer. Therefore, carbon ion therapy may be safer for treating patients with adverse conditions such as large tumors, central tumors, and poor pulmonary function. Furthermore, carbon ion therapy may also be suitable for dose escalation and hypofractionation.

  20. Role of the Endobronchial Landmarks Guiding TBNA and EBUS-TBNA in Lung Cancer Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Arias

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung cancer is the leading cause of malignancy related mortality in the United States. Accurate staging of NSCLC influences therapeutic decisions. Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA and endobronchial ultrasound-guided TBNA (EBUS-TBNA has been accepted as a procedure for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and adequacy of TBNA and EBUS-TBNA for sampling of mediastinal adenopathy using the Wang’s eleven lymph node map stations. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 99 consecutive cases diagnosed with malignancy by EBUS-TBNA and a series 74 patients evaluated for mediastinal adenopathy or a pulmonary lesion using conventional transbronchial needle aspiration. The IASLC lymph node map was correlated with Wang’s map. Results. A total of 182 lymph node stations were sampled using EBUS-TBNA. 96 were positive for nodal metastasis. A total of four cases of samples taken from station 2R showed malignant cells. From the 74 cases series using cTBNA 167 nodes were sampled in 222 passes. Lymphoid or malignant tissue was obtained in 67 (91.8% cases; 55.1% of the nodes were 1 cm or less. Conclusions. The use of the eleven stations described in Wang’s map to guide TBNA of the mediastinal nodes allows sampling of radiologically considered nonpathological nodes. These data suggest that Wang’s map covers the most frequent IASLC nodal stations compromised with metastasis.

  1. A Phase I Trial of an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Karen Kelly, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California...Checkpoint Inhibitor Plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...checkpoint inhibitor MPDL3280A (atezolizumab) in early stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. The trial is comprised of a traditional 3 + 3 phase I

  2. Fluid biopsy for circulating tumor cell identification in patients with early-and late-stage non-small cell lung cancer: a glimpse into lung cancer biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Marco; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Boshuizen, Rogier; Kolatkar, Anand; Honnatti, Meghana; Cho, Edward H.; Marrinucci, Dena; Sandhu, Ajay; Perricone, Anthony; Thistlethwaite, Patricia; Bethel, Kelly; Nieva, Jorge; van den Heuvel, Michel; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) counts are an established prognostic marker in metastatic prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, and recent data suggest a similar role in late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, due to sensitivity constraints in current enrichment-based CTC detection technologies, there are few published data about CTC prevalence rates and morphologic heterogeneity in early-stage NSCLC, or the correlation of CTCs with disease progression and their usability for clinical staging. We investigated CTC counts, morphology and aggregation in early stage, locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC patients by using a fluid-phase biopsy approach that identifies CTCs without relying on surface-receptor-based enrichment and presents them in sufficiently high definition (HD) to satisfy diagnostic pathology image quality requirements. HD-CTCs were analyzed in blood samples from 78 chemotherapy-naïve NSCLC patients. 73% of the total population had a positive HD-CTC count (>0 CTC in 1 mL of blood) with a median of 4.4 HD-CTCs mL-1 (range 0-515.6) and a mean of 44.7 (±95.2) HD-CTCs mL-1. No significant difference in the medians of HD-CTC counts was detected between stage IV (n = 31, range 0-178.2), stage III (n = 34, range 0-515.6) and stages I/II (n = 13, range 0-442.3). Furthermore, HD-CTCs exhibited a uniformity in terms of molecular and physical characteristics such as fluorescent cytokeratin intensity, nuclear size, frequency of apoptosis and aggregate formation across the spectrum of staging. Our results demonstrate that despite stringent morphologic inclusion criteria for the definition of HD-CTCs, the HD-CTC assay shows high sensitivity in the detection and characterization of both early- and late-stage lung cancer CTCs. Extensive studies are warranted to investigate the prognostic value of CTC profiling in early-stage lung cancer. This finding has implications for the design of extensive studies examining screening, therapy and surveillance in

  3. New dilemmas in small-cell lung cancer TNM clinical staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Latsios, Dimitrios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Darwiche, Kaid; Antoniou, Nick; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Eleftheriadou, Ellada; Boutsikou, Efimia; Kontakiotis, Theodoros

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients with limited disease (LD) behave similarly to those with extensive disease (ED) from a prognostic point of view. On the other hand, a proportion of patients with ED small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) behave similarly to those with LD. Patients and methods In this retrospective study analysis, 764 patients with proven SCLC were included and managed with the same therapeutic protocols. Of these patients, 278 (36.4%) had LD, while 486 (63.6%) had ED. Results No statistically significant difference was observed for survival for IA and IB disease stages (P = 0.254) and between IIA and IIB stages (P = 0.256) according to the new tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging classification classification. In addition, no statistical significant difference was observed for survival between patients with (IIA + IIB) and IIIA (P = 0.951), (IIA + IIIA, P = 0.658), and (IIB + IIIA, P = 0.573) stages. Statistical significant difference was observed for survival among the LD SCLC patients with (IA + IB), (IIA + IIB + IIIA), and IIIB stages (P TNM staging system is recommended for more detailed prognostic information and treatment evaluation in these patients. PMID:23700372

  4. Validation of the Stage Groupings in the Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Xizhao; Jiang, Wei; Chen, Haiqing; Yang, Fan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Qun

    2017-08-04

    The aim of this study was to validate stage groupings in the eighth edition of the TNM classification in an independent Chinese cohort. We retrospectively analyzed a total of 3599 patients with pathological stage IA to IIIA (seventh edition of the TNM) NSCLC who underwent surgical treatment in two surgical centers in the People's Republic of China between 2005 and 2012. All patients were reclassified according to the eighth edition of the TNM classification. Survival was compared between adjacent stage groupings by using a log-rank test and a Cox regression model. R(2) was calculated to evaluate the discrimination of the two TNM stage classifications. The median follow-up time was 48.7 months. According to the eighth edition of the TNM classification, the overall survival (OS) of adjacent stage groupings showed significant differences except for IA3 vs. IB. The eighth edition of the TNM classification yielded a slightly higher R(2) than the seventh edition (0.172 vs. 0.162). This study provided an external validation of the stage groupings in the eighth edition of the TNM classification for lung cancer among surgically treated Chinese patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Relationship between tumor size and disease stage in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether tumor size and stage distribution are correlated remains controversial. The objective is to assess the relationship between tumor size and disease stage distribution in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of 917 cases of NSCLC that were resected in the Cancer Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Sixth Hospital between January 2000 and February 2009. Tumor sizes were grouped into five categories: ≤20 mm, 21 to 30 mm, 31 to 50 mm, 51 to 70 mm and ≥71 mm. Results Age and tumor size affected stage distribution: patients 60 years or older had a higher percentage of N0M0 disease than patients younger than 60 years (61.67% vs. 44.85%, p Conclusions There is a statistically significant relationship between tumor size and distribution of disease stage of primary NSCLC tumors: the smaller the tumor, the more likely the disease is N0M0 status.

  6. Comparative study of the anatomic segmentectomy versus lobectomy for clinical stage I A peripheral lung cancer by video assistant thoracoscopic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: For stage I A peripheral lung cancer, the thoracoscopic anatomic segmentectomy was safe and effective just as thoracoscopic lobectomy, and furthermore with faster post-operative recovery.

  7. Prognostic impact of serum albumin levels on the recurrence of stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Zhao, Li; Peng, Fang

    2013-05-01

    Patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who have undergone complete surgical resection harbor a 30% risk for tumor recurrence. Thus, the identification of factors that are predictive for tumor recurrence is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to test the prognostic value of serum albumin levels on tumor recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer. Stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent complete surgical resection of the primary tumor at Zhejiang Hospital were analyzed in this study. Serum albumin levels were measured before surgery and once again after surgery in 101 histologically diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer patients. Correlations between the pre- and post-operative serum albumin levels and various clinical demographics and recurrence-free survival rates were analyzed. Patients with pre-operative hypoalbuminemia (recurrence. Serum albumin levels appear to be a significant independent prognostic factor for tumor recurrence in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer who have undergone complete resection. Patient pre-treatment and post-treatment serum albumin levels provide an easy and early means of discrimination between patients with a higher risk for recurrence and patients with a low risk of recurrence.

  8. Survival Analysis of 1,742 Patients with Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong PENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective At present non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is still the leading cause of death induced by cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic factors of advanced NSCLC. Methods Total 1,742 cases of stage IV NSCLC data from Jan 4, 2000 to Dec 25, 2008 in Shanghai Chest Hospital were collected, confirmed by pathological examinations. Analysis was made to observe the impact of treatment on prognosis in gender, age, smoking history, pathology, classification, clinical TNM stage. Survival rate, survival difference were evaluated by Kaplan-Meire method and Logrank test respectively. The prognosis were analyzed by Cox multivariate regression. Results The median survival time of 1,742 patients was 10.0 months (9.5 months-10.5 months. One, two, three, four, and five-year survival rates were 44%, 22%, 13%, 9%, 6% respectively. The median survivals of single or multiple metastasis were 11 months vs 7 months (P < 0.001. Survival time were different in metastasic organs, with the median survival time as follows: lung for about 12 months (11.0 months-12.9 months, bone for 9 months (8.3 months-9.6 months, brain for 8 months (6.8 months-9.1 months, liver, adrenal gland, distannt lymph node metastasis for 5 months (3.8 months-6.1 months, and subcutaneous for 3 months (1.7 months-4.3 months. The median survival times of adenocarcinoma (n=1,086, 62% and squamous cell carcinoma cases (n=305, 17.5% were 12 months vs 8 months (P < 0.001. The median survival time of chemotherapy and best supportive care were 11 months vs 6 months (P < 0.001; the median survival times of with and without radiotherapy were 11 months vs 9 months (P=0.017. Conclusion Gender, age, gross type, pathological type, clinical T stage, N stage, numbers of metastatic organ, smoking history, treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer were independent prognostic factors.

  9. On the interplay effects with proton scanning beams in stage III lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yupeng [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Applied Research, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kardar, Laleh; Liao, Li; Lim, Gino [Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Li, Xiaoqiang; Li, Heng; Zhu, Ronald X.; Sahoo, Narayan; Gillin, Michael; Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: xizhang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cao, Wenhua [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and Department of Industrial Engineering, The University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Chang, Joe Y.; Liao, Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the dosimetric impact of interplay between spot-scanning proton beam and respiratory motion in intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for stage III lung cancer. Methods: Eleven patients were sampled from 112 patients with stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer to well represent the distribution of 112 patients in terms of target size and motion. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were defined according to the authors' clinical protocol. Uniform and realistic breathing patterns were considered along with regular- and hypofractionation scenarios. The dose contributed by a spot was fully calculated on the computed tomography (CT) images corresponding to the respiratory phase that the spot is delivered, and then accumulated to the reference phase of the 4DCT to generate the dynamic dose that provides an estimation of what might be delivered under the influence of interplay effect. The dynamic dose distributions at different numbers of fractions were compared with the corresponding 4D composite dose which is the equally weighted average of the doses, respectively, computed on respiratory phases of a 4DCT image set. Results: Under regular fractionation, the average and maximum differences in CTV coverage between the 4D composite and dynamic doses after delivery of all 35 fractions were no more than 0.2% and 0.9%, respectively. The maximum differences between the two dose distributions for the maximum dose to the spinal cord, heart V40, esophagus V55, and lung V20 were 1.2 Gy, 0.1%, 0.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. Although relatively large differences in single fraction, correlated with small CTVs relative to motions, were observed, the authors' biological response calculations suggested that this interfractional dose variation may have limited biological impact. Assuming a hypofractionation scenario, the differences between the 4D composite and dynamic doses were well confined even for single fraction. Conclusions

  10. Impact of the new international association for the study of lung cancer staging system in non-small cell lung cancer: With comparison to the union for international cancer control 6th tumor, node, metastasis edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Myung Jae; Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Ryu, Yon Ju; Kim, Yoo Kyung [Mokdong Hospital, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    To investigate the impact of the proposed International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) system on staging and outcome of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With a total of 501 NSCLC patients with staging according to Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 6th TNM (TNM-6) were reclassified according to the IASLC proposed TNM staging (TNM-7). The impact of TNM-7 in comparison with TNM-6 was evaluated at three levels: change in substage, staging, and outcome. The outcome measure was to compare the stage-specific overall survival of NSCLC between the two groups of patients. A total of 214 (42.7%) patients had changed TNM staging, and 101 (20.2%) patients had changed stage groupings in TNM-7 compared to TNM-6. Among 100 patients showing changed stage grouping, 72 (14.4%) showed upstage and 29 (5.8%) demonstrated downstage. The TNM-7 system resulted in better separation of survival curves among stage-specific NSCLC than TNM-6 system, especially in separation of stage IIA vs. IIB (p 0.023) and stage IIIB vs. IV (p < 0.001). TNM-7 for lung cancer appears to be superior in defining stage-specific survival groups than TNM-6, especially between stage IIA vs. stage IIB and stage IIIB vs. stage IV.

  11. Lung cancer imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ravenel, James G

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a guide to the diagnosis, staging and overview of the management of lung cancer relevant to practicing radiologists so that they can better understand the decision making issues and provide more useful communication to treating physicians.

  12. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... with a       central dose of 15 Gy x 3 within 5-8 days. Results: Eight patients (20%)       obtained a complete response, 15 (38%) had a partial response, and 12       (30%) had no change or could not be evaluated. Only 3 patients had a local       recurrence, and the local control rate 2 years after SBRT was 85...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  13. Methylation markers of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaie Lokk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite of intense research in early cancer detection, there is a lack of biomarkers for the reliable detection of malignant tumors, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. DNA methylation changes are common and relatively stable in various types of cancers, and may be used as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers. METHODS: We performed DNA methylation profiling of samples from 48 patients with stage I NSCLC and 18 matching cancer-free lung samples using microarrays that cover the promoter regions of more than 14,500 genes. We correlated DNA methylation changes with gene expression levels and performed survival analysis. RESULTS: We observed hypermethylation of 496 CpGs in 379 genes and hypomethylation of 373 CpGs in 335 genes in NSCLC. Compared to adenocarcinoma samples, squamous cell carcinoma samples had 263 CpGs in 223 hypermethylated genes and 513 CpGs in 436 hypomethylated genes. 378 of 869 (43.5% CpG sites discriminating the NSCLC and control samples showed an inverse correlation between CpG site methylation and gene expression levels. As a result of a survival analysis, we found 10 CpGs in 10 genes, in which the methylation level differs in different survival groups. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a set of genes with altered methylation in NSCLC and found that a minority of them showed an inverse correlation with gene expression levels. We also found a set of genes that associated with the survival of the patients. These newly-identified marker candidates for the molecular screening of NSCLC will need further analysis in order to determine their clinical utility.

  14. Cryotherapy in Treating Patients With Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Other Lung or Parts of the Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-17

    Advanced Malignant Mesothelioma; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Lung Metastases; Recurrent Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. The diagnostic value of indeterminate lung lesions on staging chest computed tomographies in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette Williaume; Bulut, Orhan; Jess, Per

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Selection of pulmonary staging modality in colorectal cancer surgery is controversial. Computed tomography (CT) clearly outperforms x-ray in terms of sensitivity, but findings of indeterminate lung lesions remain a problem. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the significance...... indeterminate lung findings. Four died postoperatively. The remaining 22 were followed for a median period of 26 months. RESULTS: In eight of the 22 patients (36%) lesions progressed. In one patient, the lesion turned out to be a primary lung cancer, in another a lymphoma. In the last six patients (27...... tenth into other lung malignancies, which were most often diagnosed in the second year after surgery. The development of lung metastases was significantly related to positive nodal disease and postoperative CEA elevation....

  16. The prognostic value ofserum C-reactive protein-bound serum amyloid A inearly-stage lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XueYanZhang; GeZhang; YingJiang; DanLiu; ManZhiLi; QianZhong; ShanQiZeng; WanLiLiu; MuShengZeng

    2015-01-01

    Background:Elevated levels of serum C‑reactive protein (CRP) have been reported to have prognostic signiifcance in lung cancer patients. This study aimed to further identify CRP‑bound components as prognostic markers for lung cancer and validate their prognostic value. Methods:CRP‑bound components obtained from the serum samples from lung cancer patients or healthy controls were analyzed by differential proteomics analysis. CRP‑bound serum amyloid A (CRP‑SAA) was evaluated by co‑immunoprecipitation (IP). Serum samples from two independent cohorts with lung cancer (retrospective cohort, 242 patients; prospective cohort, 222 patients) and healthy controls (159 subjects) were used to evaluate the prognostic value of CRP‑SAA by enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Results:CRP‑SAA was identiifed speciifcally in serum samples from lung cancer patients by proteomic analysis. CRP binding to SAA was conifrmed by co‑IP in serum samples from lung cancer patients and cell culture media. The level of CRP‑SAA was signiifcantly higher in patients than in healthy controls (0.37±0.58 vs. 0.03±0.04,P<0.001). Elevated CRP‑SAA levels were signiifcantly associated with severe clinical features of lung cancer. The elevation of CRP‑SAA was associated with lower survival rates for both the retrospective (hazard ration [HR]=2.181, 95% conifdence interval [CI]=1.641–2.897,P<0.001) and the prospective cohorts (HR=2.744, 95% CI=1.810–4.161,P<0.001). Multivariate Cox analysis showed that CRP‑SAA was an independent prognostic marker for lung cancer. Remarkably, in stages I–II patients, only CRP‑SAA, not total SAA or CRP, showed signiifcant association with overall survival in two cohorts. Moreover, univariate and multivariate Cox analyses also showed that only CRP‑SAA could be used as an inde‑pendent prognostic marker for early‑stage lung cancer patients. Conclusion:CRP‑SAA could be a better prognostic marker for lung cancer than total SAA or CRP

  17. Noninvasive staging of lung cancer. Indications and limitations of gallium-67 citrate imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekerman, C.; Caride, V.J.; Hoffer, P.B.; Boles, C.A. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The results of evaluation of the hila and mediastinum with 67Ga scans are contradictory, as are the recommendations by different investigators on the use of 67Ga scintigraphy in the clinical evaluation of patients with primary lung carcinoma. Nevertheless, the economy and logistic simplicity of evaluating local and distant metastases with a single imaging procedure are attractive, especially because the symptoms may not enable the physician to make a correct identification of the organ systems affected by metastases. Neumann and Hoffer state that at present conventional Ga-67 scanning techniques cannot be recommended for preoperative staging of mediastinal lymph node metastases in lung cancer patients. According to Waxman, 67Ga scintigraphy, relative to other imaging modalities, is a sensitive indicator of hilar spread of a tumor. However, because of the normally high background activity within the sternum and spine, mediastinal abnormalities may be poorly detected. Since most pulmonary tumors metastasize via regional nodes to the pulmonary hilum and then to the mediastinum, the high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary hilar abnormalities and the high specificity for detection of mediastinal lesions suggest that gallium scintigraphy is a valuable adjunctive test when used appropriately. The results obtained locally are probably the best guide for individual physicians in the selection of diagnostic tests for their patients. Gallium scans may thus be helpful in the clinical evaluation of patients with lung cancer. Although gallium scans identify mediastinal node involvement, there is considerable controversy over the relationship between the sensitivity and specificity of the method. By detecting distant extrathoracic metastases, the 67Ga scan may identify a small group of patients who can be spared a needless operation. 92 references.

  18. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Takakura, Shunji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takashi; Umeda, Bunichi [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1{+-}2.9 x 10{sup 6}/kg (n=10) and 3.1{+-}1.5 x 10{sup 5}/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  19. Novel treatment options in stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevych, Svitlana; Lauwers, Patrick; Vandaele, Frederik; van Meerbeeck, Jan P

    2014-09-01

    In the last 5 years, the current management of stage I non-small-cell lung cancer has been challenged due to novel surgical approaches and advances in radiation technology. The outcome after a sublobar resection is promising, especially for tumors less than 2 cm. Other treatment opportunities are available for high risk patients with comorbidity and impaired pulmonary function. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy is a good alternative treatment to surgery, especially in elderly and comorbid patients. However, randomized evidence comparing sublobar resection and stereotactic radiotherapy is presently lacking. The most recent development in radiotherapy is hadron therapy with a presumed reduced toxicity because of its peculiar physical and biological effects. Promising thermal and microwave ablative techniques are in development and have specific niche indications.

  20. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post

  1. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  2. Cell cycle progression score is a marker for five-year lung cancer-specific mortality risk in patients with resected stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Takashi; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie; Evans, Brent; Kidd, John; Tan, Kay See; Dycoco, Joe; Kolquist, Kathryn; Davis, Thaylon; Hamilton, Stephanie A.; Yager, Kraig; Jones, Joshua T.; Travis, William D.; Jones, David R.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goals of our study were (a) to validate a molecular expression signature (cell cycle progression [CCP] score and molecular prognostic score [mPS; combination of CCP and pathological stage {IA or IB}]) that identifies stage I lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with a higher risk of cancer-specific death following curative-intent surgical resection, and (b) to determine whether mPS stratifies prognosis within stage I lung ADC histological subtypes. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stage I lung ADC tumor samples from 1200 patients were analyzed for 31 proliferation genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Prognostic discrimination of CCP score and mPS was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression, using 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality as the primary outcome. Results In multivariable analysis, CCP score was a prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.6 per interquartile range; 95% CI, 1.14–2.24; P=0.006). In a multivariable model that included mPS instead of CCP, mPS was a significant prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.77; 95% CI, 1.18–2.66; P=0.006). Five-year lung cancer–specific survival differed between low-risk and high-risk mPS groups (96% vs 81%; P<0.001). In patients with intermediate-grade lung ADC of acinar and papillary subtypes, high mPS was associated with worse 5-year lung cancer–specific survival (P<0.001 and 0.015, respectively), compared with low mPS. Conclusion This study validates CCP score and mPS as independent prognostic markers for lung cancer–specific mortality and provides quantitative risk assessment, independent of known high-risk features, for stage I lung ADC patients treated with surgery alone. PMID:27153551

  3. Family caregiver burden: the burden of caring for lung cancer patients according to the cancer stage and patient quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Lourenço Borges

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Patients with lung cancer experience different feelings and reactions, based on their family, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds, which are a source of great distress, not only for the patients but also for their family caregivers. This study aimed to evaluate the impact that lung cancer stage and quality of life (QoL of lung cancer patients have on caregiver burden. Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Consecutive patient-caregiver dyads were selected and asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item ShortForm Health Survey (SF-36. Family caregivers also completed the Caregiver Burden Scale. Group-based modeling was used in order to identify patients with early- or advanced-stage cancer (IA to IIIA vs. IIIB to IV plus non-impaired or impaired QoL (SF36 total score > 50 vs. ≤ 50. Patient-caregiver dyads were stratified into four groups: early-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; advanced-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; early-stage cancer+impaired QoL; and advanced-stage cancer+impaired QoL. Results: We included 91 patient-caregiver dyads. The majority of the patients were male and heavy smokers. Family caregivers were younger and predominantly female. The burden, QoL, level of anxiety, and level of depression of caregivers were more affected by the QoL of the patients than by their lung cancer stage. The family caregivers of the patients with impaired QoL showed a higher median burden than did those of the patients with non-impaired QoL, regardless of disease stage. Conclusions: Caregiver burden is more affected by patient QoL than by lung cancer stage.

  4. SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER STEREOTACTIC OR 3D-CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY FOR INOPERABLE EARLY-STAGE LUNG CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters

  5. FDG-PET/CT Limited to the Thorax and Upper Abdomen for Staging and Management of Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, A.I.; Postema, J.W.; Schreurs, W.M.; Lafeber, A.; Hendrickx, B.W.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Vogel, W.V.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) of the chest/upper abdomen compared to the generally performed scan from head to upper thighs, for staging and management of (suspected) lung cancer in

  6. SURVIVAL AND QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER STEREOTACTIC OR 3D-CONFORMAL RADIOTHERAPY FOR INOPERABLE EARLY-STAGE LUNG CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Postmus, Douwe; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters afte

  7. MicroRNA profiling and prediction of recurrence/relapse-free survival in stage I lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Wang, Liang; Liu, Peng-yuan; Goodgame, Boone; Wen, Weidong; Sezhiyan, Ananth; Pfeifer, John; Li, Ya-fei; Hua, Xing; Wang, Yian; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-05-01

    About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs of 19-25 nt and play important roles in gene regulation in human cancers. The purpose of this study is to identify miRNA expression profiles that would better predict prognosis of stage I NSCLC. MiRNAs extracted from 527 stage I NSCLC patients were profiled on the human miRNA expression profiling v2 panel (Illumina). The expression profiles were analyzed for their association with cancer subtypes, lung cancer brain metastasis and recurrence/relapse free survival (RFS). MiRNA expression patterns between lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma differed significantly with 171 miRNAs, including Let-7 family members and miR-205. Ten miRNAs associated with brain metastasis were identified including miR-145*, which inhibit cell invasion and metastasis. Two miRNA signatures that are highly predictive of RFS were identified. The first contained 34 miRNAs derived from 357 stage I NSCLC patients independent of cancer subtype, whereas the second containing 27 miRNAs was adenocarcinoma specific. Both signatures were validated using formalin-fixed paraffin embedded and/or fresh frozen tissues in independent data set with 170 stage I patients. Our findings have important prognostic or therapeutic implications for the management of stage I lung cancer patients. The identified miRNAs hold great potential as targets for histology-specific treatment or prevention and treatment of recurrent disease.

  8. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  9. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF THE LYMPH NODE MICRO-METASTASIS IN PATEINTS WITH EARLY STAGE NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ The postoperative 5-year survival rate is about 50-85% in the patient with the stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It is remains unclear how we should give these patients adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy after operation. We performed a postspective study to assess the prognostic and treatment guiding significance of lymph nodes micrometastasis (LMM) in patients with completely resected NSCLC at stage I.

  10. Stereotactic radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardi, Umberto; Badellino, Serena; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Dept. of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) represents a consolidated treatment option for patients with medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The clinical evidence accumulated in the past decade supports its use as an alternative to surgery with comparable survival outcomes. Due to its limited toxicity, SBRT is also applicable to elderly patients with very poor baseline pulmonary function or other severe comorbidities. Recent comparative studies in operable patients raised the issue of the possible use of SBRT also for this subgroup, with quite promising results that still should be fully confirmed by prospective trials with long-term follow-up. Aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the major studies conducted over the years on SBRT and to provide data on the efficacy and toxicity of this radiotherapy technique for stage I NSCLC. Technical aspects and quality of life related issues are also discussed, with the goal to provide information on the current role and limitations of SBRT in clinical practice.

  11. Thoracic radiation therapy for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Lorigan, Paul; West, Catharine; Thatcher, Nick

    2005-07-01

    The role of thoracic radiation therapy (RT; TRT) is now established in the management of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). There is increasing evidence in the literature in favor of early concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and a gold standard of care for patients with a good performance status is twice-daily TRT (45 Gy in 3 weeks) with concurrent cisplatin/etoposide. Five-year survival rates > 20% can be expected with this combined-modality approach. Although current clinical trials are exploring the efficacy of new chemotherapeutic strategies for the disease, essential questions related to the optimization of TRT remain unanswered. In particular, the optimal RT dose, fractionation, and treatment volume have not been defined. This review highlights the need for well-designed multinational trials aimed at the optimization and standardization of RT for limited-stage SCLC. These trials should integrate translational research studies to investigate the molecular basis of RT resistance and to develop biomarker profiles of prognosis.

  12. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  13. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  14. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Hyoung Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Uiversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication.

  15. Standard treatment option in stage III non-small-cell lung cancer: case against trimodal therapy and consolidation drug therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremić, Branislav

    2015-03-01

    Prospective randomized trials and meta-analyses established concurrent radiochemotherapy (RT-CHT) as standard treatment approach in patients with inoperable, locally advanced (stage IIIA and B) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with either clinically (c) or pathologically (p) staged disease (stage IIIA), including those with pN2 disease, trimodal therapy was also frequently practiced in the past and is currently still advocated by large cooperative groups and organizations. Similarly, consolidation CHT provided after concurrent RT-CHT was suggested to be feasible and effective in inoperable stage III NSCLC. Contrasting these practices and suggestions, there is no evidence that trimodal therapy in stage IIIA (clinically or pathologically staged) or consolidation CHT in inoperable stage III NSCLC plays any role in its treatment. In both cases, evidence clearly demonstrates that concurrent RT-CHT is of similar efficacy and less toxic, and it should be considered a standard treatment option for all patients with stage III NSCLC.

  16. Budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography – computed tomography for staging lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Navega Biz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the budget impact from the incorporation of positron emission tomography (PET in mediastinal and distant staging of non-small cell lung cancer.METHODS The estimates were calculated by the epidemiological method for years 2014 to 2018. Nation-wide data were used about the incidence; data on distribution of the disease´s prevalence and on the technologies’ accuracy were from the literature; data regarding involved costs were taken from a micro-costing study and from Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS database. Two strategies for using PET were analyzed: the offer to all newly-diagnosed patients, and the restricted offer to the ones who had negative results in previous computed tomography (CT exams. Univariate and extreme scenarios sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the influence from sources of uncertainties in the parameters used.RESULTS The incorporation of PET-CT in SUS would imply the need for additional resources of 158.1 BRL (98.2 USD million for the restricted offer and 202.7 BRL (125.9 USD million for the inclusive offer in five years, with a difference of 44.6 BRL (27.7 USD million between the two offer strategies within that period. In absolute terms, the total budget impact from its incorporation in SUS, in five years, would be 555 BRL (345 USD and 600 BRL (372.8 USD million, respectively. The costs from the PET-CT procedure were the most influential parameter in the results. In the most optimistic scenario, the additional budget impact would be reduced to 86.9 BRL (54 USD and 103.8 BRL (64.5 USD million, considering PET-CT for negative CT and PET-CT for all, respectively.CONCLUSIONS The incorporation of PET in the clinical staging of non-small cell lung cancer seems to be financially feasible considering the high budget of the Brazilian Ministry of Health. The potential reduction in the number of unnecessary surgeries may cause the available resources to be more efficiently allocated.

  17. Wnt pathway activation predicts increased risk of tumor recurrence in patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Mark; Akiri, Gal; Chin, Cynthia; Wisnivesky, Juan P; Beasley, Mary B; Weiser, Todd S; Swanson, Scott J; Aaronson, Stuart A

    2013-03-01

    To determine the incidence of Wnt pathway activation in patients with stage I NSCLC and its influence on lung cancer recurrence. Despite resection, the 5-year recurrence with localized stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 18.4%-24%. Aberrant Wnt signaling activation plays an important role in a wide variety of tumor types. However, there is not much known about the role the Wnt pathway plays in patients with stage I lung cancer. Tumor and normal lung tissues from 55 patients following resection for stage I NSCLC were subjected to glutathione S-transferase (GST) E-cadherin pulldown and immunoblot analysis to assess levels of uncomplexed β-catenin, a reliable measure of Wnt signaling activation. The β-catenin gene was also screened for oncogenic mutations in tumors with activated Wnt signaling. Cancer recurrence rates were correlated in a blinded manner in patients with Wnt pathway-positive and -negative tumors. Tumors in 20 patients (36.4%) scored as Wnt positive, with only 1 exhibiting a β-catenin oncogenic mutation. Patients with Wnt-positive tumors experienced a significantly higher rate of overall cancer recurrence than those with Wnt-negative tumors (30.0% vs. 5.7%, P = 0.02), with 25.0% exhibiting distal tumor recurrence compared with 2.9% in the Wnt-negative group (P = 0.02). Wnt pathway activation occurred in a substantial fraction of Stage I NSCLCs, which was rarely due to mutations. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation was associated with a significantly higher rate of tumor recurrence. These findings suggest that Wnt pathway activation reflects a more aggressive tumor phenotype and identifies patients who may benefit from more aggressive therapy in addition to resection.

  18. Treatment Burden of Medicare Beneficiaries With Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presley, Carolyn J; Soulos, Pamela R; Tinetti, Mary; Montori, Victor M; Yu, James B; Gross, Cary P

    2016-12-20

    To quantify the burden and complexity associated with treatment of Medicare beneficiaries with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using the SEER-Medicare database, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries who were diagnosed with stage I NSCLC from 2007 to 2011 and who were treated with surgery, stereotactic body radiation therapy, or external beam radiation therapy. Main outcome measures were the number of days a patient was in contact with the health care system (encounter days), the number of physicians involved in a patient's care, and the number of medications prescribed. Logistic regression modeled the association between patient characteristics, treatment type, and high treatment burden (defined as ≥ 66 encounter days). On average, 7,955 patients spent 1 in 3 days interacting with the health care system during the initial 60 days of treatment. Patients experienced a median of 44 encounter days with high variability (interquartile range [IQR], 29 to 66) in the 12 months after treatment initiation. The median number of physicians involved was 20 (IQR, 14 to 28), and the median number of medications prescribed was 12 (IQR, 8 to 17). Patients who were treated with surgery had high treatment burden (predicted probability, 21.6%; 95% CI, 20.2 to 23.1) compared with patients who were treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (predicted probability, 16.1%; 95% CI, 12.9 to 19.3), whereas patients who were treated with external beam radiation therapy had the highest burden (predicted probability, 46.8%; 95% CI, 43.3 to 50.2). The treatment burden imposed on patients with early-stage NSCLC was substantial in terms of the number of encounters, physicians involved, and medications prescribed. Because treatment burden varied markedly across patients and treatment types, future work should identify opportunities to understand and ameliorate this burden.

  19. Presentation and management of a stage Ia lung cancer patient with a paraneoplastic factor VIII inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laselle, Brooks T; Boggio, Lisa N; Blum, Matthew G

    2006-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors to clotting factors most commonly involve factor VIII and are associated with autoimmune disease. Factor VIII inhibitors can cause severe spontaneous and iatrogenic bleeding that is difficult to manage. Factor VIII inhibitors are rarely associated with solid tumors and only three cases of adenocarcinoma of the lung have been reported. This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a factor VIII inhibitor-producing stage Ia lung adenocarcinoma that ultimately resulted in complete resectability.

  20. Use of PET/CT for staging and radiation therapy planning in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Manus, M P

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and more recently PET/computed tomography (CT) scanning represent major advances in the imaging of lung cancer and have an especially high impact on the management of patients who are candidates for potentially curative or "radical" radiotherapy (RT). This article reviews the current status of PET and PET/CT for staging patients before RT and considers the use of PET and PET/CT images for target volume definition. The relevant literature on the use of PET for staging lung cancer is reviewed and placed in the context of patients who are candidates for RT. Research that specifically considers the use of PET for RT planning is considered critically and some promising areas for future research are discussed. The available literature is almost exclusively devoted to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with few relevant studies of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The primary PET radiopharmaceutical shown to have value for staging and RT planning is 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). In prospective studies where PET imaging was used to stage radical RT candidates, 25-30% of patients were excluded from radical therapy because of PET detected advanced disease. In all studies where "PET-assisted" and conventional target or treatment volumes were compared, there were major differences between PET and conventional volumes. Because PET-assisted staging is proven to be significantly more accurate than conventional staging and because all studies show major differences between PET-assisted and conventional treatment volumes in NSCLC, routine use of PET/CT for RT planning is recommended.

  1. Lung Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon R. Pine

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related lethality because of high incidence and recurrence in spite of significant advances in staging and therapies. Recent data indicates that stem cells situated throughout the airways may initiate cancer formation. These putative stem cells maintain protumorigenic characteristics including high proliferative capacity, multipotent differentiation, drug resistance and long lifespan relative to other cells. Stem cell signaling and differentiation pathways are maintained within distinct cancer types, and destabilization of this machinery may participate in maintenance of cancer stem cells. Characterization of lung cancer stem cells is an area of active research and is critical for developing novel therapies. This review summarizes the current knowledge on stem cell signaling pathways and cell markers used to identify the lung cancer stem cells.

  2. FDG-PET/CT Limited to the Thorax and Upper Abdomen for Staging and Management of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arens, Anne I J; Postema, Jan W A; Schreurs, Wendy M J; Lafeber, Albert; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W; Oyen, Wim J G; Vogel, Wouter V

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) of the chest/upper abdomen compared to the generally performed scan from head to upper thighs, for staging and management of (suspected) lung cancer in patients with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax. FDG-PET/CT scans of 1059 patients with suspected or recently proven lung cancer, with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax, were analysed in a retrospective multi-centre trial. Suspect FDG-avid lesions in the chest and upper abdomen, the head and neck area above the shoulder line and in the abdomen and pelvis below the caudal tip of the liver were noted. The impact of lesions detected in the head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis on additional diagnostic procedures, staging and treatment decisions was evaluated. The head and neck area revealed additional suspect lesions in 7.2%, and the abdomen and pelvis in 15.8% of patients. Imaging of the head and neck area and the abdomen and pelvic area showed additional lesions in 19.5%, inducing additional diagnostic procedures in 7.8%. This resulted in discovery of additional lesions considered malignant in 10.7%, changing patient management for lung cancer in 1.2%. In (suspected) lung cancer, PET/CT limited to the chest and upper abdomen resulted in correct staging in 98.7% of patients, which led to the identical management as full field of view PET in 98.8% of patients. High value of FDG-PET/CT for staging and correct patient management is already achieved with chest and upper abdomen. Findings in head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis generally induce investigations with limited or no impact on staging and treatment of NSCLC, and can be interpreted accordingly.

  3. FDG-PET/CT Limited to the Thorax and Upper Abdomen for Staging and Management of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postema, Jan W. A.; Schreurs, Wendy M. J.; Lafeber, Albert; Hendrickx, Baudewijn W.; Oyen, Wim J. G.; Vogel, Wouter V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluates the diagnostic accuracy of [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) of the chest/upper abdomen compared to the generally performed scan from head to upper thighs, for staging and management of (suspected) lung cancer in patients with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax. Methods FDG-PET/CT scans of 1059 patients with suspected or recently proven lung cancer, with no history of malignancy or complaints outside the thorax, were analysed in a retrospective multi-centre trial. Suspect FDG-avid lesions in the chest and upper abdomen, the head and neck area above the shoulder line and in the abdomen and pelvis below the caudal tip of the liver were noted. The impact of lesions detected in the head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis on additional diagnostic procedures, staging and treatment decisions was evaluated. Results The head and neck area revealed additional suspect lesions in 7.2%, and the abdomen and pelvis in 15.8% of patients. Imaging of the head and neck area and the abdomen and pelvic area showed additional lesions in 19.5%, inducing additional diagnostic procedures in 7.8%. This resulted in discovery of additional lesions considered malignant in 10.7%, changing patient management for lung cancer in 1.2%. In (suspected) lung cancer, PET/CT limited to the chest and upper abdomen resulted in correct staging in 98.7% of patients, which led to the identical management as full field of view PET in 98.8% of patients. Conclusion High value of FDG-PET/CT for staging and correct patient management is already achieved with chest and upper abdomen. Findings in head and neck area and abdomen and pelvis generally induce investigations with limited or no impact on staging and treatment of NSCLC, and can be interpreted accordingly. PMID:27556809

  4. Squamous cell carcinoma of pancreas: an unusual site of relapse from early-stage lung cancer: 12-month postsurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anand; Alfa-Wali, Maryam; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Polychronis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A 57-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and backache, weight loss of 10 kg and irregular bowel movements. He was previously diagnosed with Stage IB squamous cell carcinoma of lung and had undergone lobectomy 12 months previously. Investigations including imaging revealed a cystic mass in the body and tail of the pancreas which was biopsied and it was confirmed to be a recurrence of the squamous lung cancer involving the pancreas. He was treated with systemic chemotherapy and has shown a partial response on repeat imaging. This case illustrates a rare and unusual site of relapse in lung cancer after adjuvant therapy and a key message for follow-up surveillance for these patients. PMID:23608858

  5. Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  6. Dual-energy snap-shot perfusion CT in suspect pulmonary nodules and masses and for lung cancer staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarski, Sonja; Hagelstein, Claudia; Weis, Meike; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Apfaltrer, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Dual energy computed tomography (DECT) has proven its clinical usefulness for improved tissue characterization within the past years. In thoracic oncology, DECT can be used to differentiate between benign and malignant pulmonary nodules and masses. In patients with known lung cancer, DECT can add incremental functional information to staging scans, therapeutic response evaluation, as well as to the assessment of lung function. This review aims to give an overview on the current clinical utilities of DECT of the chest, its multiple post-processing applications and dose saving options. Furthermore, this review highlights promising applications of DECT that merit implementation in future clinical routine.

  7. Recurrence and Survival After Segmentectomy in Patients With Prior Lung Resection for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa M; Louie, Brian E; Jackson, Nicole; Farivar, Alexander S; Aye, Ralph W; Vallières, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Lobectomy is the standard of care for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the treatment of choice for patients with prior lung resection and a second primary NSCLC has not been established. We compared rates and patterns of recurrence and survival in patients with and without prior lung resection treated by segmentectomy and determined predictors of recurrence. This was a retrospective cohort study of 90 patients who underwent 91 consecutive segmentectomies for early-stage NSCLC between April 2004 and December 2014. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of recurrence, and Kaplan-Meier curves were used to determine survival. Of the 91 segmentectomies, 21 (23%) had a prior lung cancer resection and 70 (77%) were primary resections. There were 18 recurrences (20%): 9 of 21 (43%) in those with prior lung resection and 9 of 70 (13%) in those without. The 90-day mortality was 0%. The recurrence-free survival and 5-year survival were 61% and 55% in those with prior lung resection (p = 0.09) and 84% and 65% in those without (p = 0.4). Close parenchymal margin and number of lymph nodes examined were significant modifiable predictors of recurrence. Segmentectomy is a reasonable option for patients with early-stage NSCLC who have had a prior lung resection. It results in similar survival but trends toward lower recurrence-free survival compared with patients undergoing primary resection. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Recurrence Patterns and Second Primary Lung Cancers After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Implications for Surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Daniel E; Wu, Abraham J; Adeseye, Victoria; Din, Shaun U; Shaikh, Fauzia; Woo, Kaitlin M; Zhang, Zhigang; Foster, Amanda; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Gewanter, Richard; Huang, James; Rimner, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are subject to locoregional and distant recurrence, as well as the formation of second primary lung cancers (SPLCs). The optimal surveillance regimen for patients treated with SBRT for early-stage NSCLC remains unclear; we therefore investigated the posttreatment recurrence patterns and development of SPLCs. Three hundred sixty-six patients with pathologically proven inoperable early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT between 2006 and 2013 were assessed. Patients underwent a computed tomographic (CT) scan of the chest every 3 months during years 1 and 2, every 6 months during years 3 and 4, and annually thereafter. Competing risk analysis was used for all time-to-event analyses. With a median follow-up of 23 months, the 2-year cumulative incidence of local, nodal, and distant treatment failures were 12.2%, 16.1%, and 15.5%, respectively. In patients with disease progression after SBRT (n = 108), 84% (n = 91) of cases occurred within the first 2 years. Five percent (n = 19) of patients experienced SPLCs. The median time to development of an SPLC was 16.5 months (range, 6.5-71.1 months), with 33% (n = 6) of these patients experiencing SPLCs after 2 years. None of the never smokers, but 4% of former tobacco smokers and 15% of current tobacco smokers, experienced an SPLC (P = .005). Close monitoring with routine CT scans within the first 2 years after SBRT is effective in detecting early disease progression. In contrast, the risk for the development of an SPLC remains elevated beyond 2 years, particularly in former and current smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Improving Well-Being in Patients With Stage III-IV Cancer and Their Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-21

    Malignant Female Reproductive System Neoplasm; Malignant Hepatobiliary Neoplasm; Partner; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Colorectal Cancer; Stage III Lung Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Skin Melanoma; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IV Colorectal Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  10. Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells and Their Microenvironment in Early-Stage MutantK-ras Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ericson J, Morton S, Kawakami A, Roelink H, Jessell TM. Two critical periods of Sonic Hedgehog signaling required for the specification of motor...Non-small cell lung cancer, cancer stem cells, Hedgehog pathway, metastasis, tumor epithelial-stromal interactions 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...cancer cancer stem cells Hedgehog pathway metastasis tumor epithelial-stromal interactions ACCOMPLISHMENTS: I. Major Goals of the Project: AIM 1

  11. The Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Stage N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang DU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The clinical value of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in stage N2 nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is controversy. The aim of this study is to analyze the efficacy of PORT in subgroup of stage N2 NSCLC, which can help clinicians to choose proper patients for PORT. Methods Clinical data of 359 patients with stage N2 NSCLC treated with radical surgery between Mar. 2000 and Jul. 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and one hundred and four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. First, the group of patients were analyzed to evaluate the factors affecting the overall survival. The all patients were divided based on tumor size and the number of lymph node metastasis station (single station or multiple station so as to evaluate the role of PORT. The endpoint was overall survival (OS and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the OS, LRFS and Log-rank was used to compare the difference in OS and LRFS between different groups. Results The median duration of follow-up was 2.3 years. 224 patients died. The median survival was 1.5 years and 1, 3, 5-year survival were 78%, 38% and 26%. Univariate analysis showed tumor size, the number of lymph node metastasis station and PORT were correlated with OS. Among patients, 5-year survival rates in PORT and non-PORT were 29% and 24% (P=0.047 respectively. In subgroups, PORT was related with high survival in patients with multiple station N2 compared to non-PORT: 36% vs 20% (P=0.013 and 33% vs 15% (P=0.002 in patients in patients with tumor size > 3 cm. Also, it was related with low local recurrence compared to non-PORT: 65% vs 48% (P=0.006 and 62% vs 48% (P=0.033. Conclusion PORT can improve overall survival for N2 NSCLC, especially the patients with the factors as follows: tumor size > 3 cm and multiple station N2 can benefit from PORT more or less.

  12. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Do I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Key Points There is no ... lung cancer symptoms, making them worse or better. Nutrition Goals Each person's nutritional needs during lung cancer ...

  13. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. 18F-FDG PET for mediastinal staging of lung cancer: which SUV threshold makes sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwig, Dirk; Graeter, Thomas P; Ukena, Dieter; Groeschel, Andreas; Sybrecht, Gerhard W; Schaefers, Hans-Joachim; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2007-11-01

    (18)F-FDG PET is the most accurate noninvasive modality for staging mediastinal lymph nodes in lung cancer. Besides using visual image interpretation, some institutions use standardized uptake value (SUV) measurements in lymph nodes. Mostly, an SUV of 2.5 is used as the cutoff, but this choice was never deduced from respective studies. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses demonstrated that SUV thresholds of more than 4 resulted in the highest accuracy. But these high cutoffs imply high false-negative rates (FNRs). The aim of our evaluation was to determine an optimal SUV threshold and to compare its diagnostic performance with the results of visual interpretation. This retrospective study included 95 patients with suspected lung cancer who underwent mediastinoscopy/mediastinal lymphadenectomy after (18)F-FDG PET (90-150 min after 250 MBq of (18)F-FDG). Maximum SUV was measured in 371 lymph node regions biopsied afterward and visually interpreted using a 6-level score (- - - through + + +). Diagnostic performance was assessed by ROC analysis. FNR and false-positive rate (FPR), the sum of both error rates (FNR + FPR), and diagnostic accuracy were plotted against a hypothetical SUV threshold to determine the optimum SUV threshold. SUVs in metastatic lymph nodes were higher (mean +/- SD, 7.1 +/- 4.5; range, 1.4-26.9; n = 70) than in tumor-free lymph node stations (2.4 +/- 1.7; range, 0.6-14.9; n = 301; P < 0.01). Inflammatory lymph nodes exhibited slightly increased SUVs (2.7 +/- 2.0; range, 0.8-14.9; n = 146). The plot of error rates featured a minimum of the sum FNR + FPR for an SUV of 2.5. With increasing SUV threshold, the FPR decreased most prominently up to that value whereas a continuous rise of FNR was noticed. Highest diagnostic accuracy was achieved with an SUV of 4.5. The areas under the ROC curves demonstrated that visual interpretation tends to be more accurate than SUV quantification (visual, 0.930 +/- 0.022; SUV, 0.899 +/- 0.025; P = 0

  15. Effect of early chemoradiotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Gyeong Won; Na, Jae Beom; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the effect of early chemoradiotherapy on the treatment of patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Between January 2006 and December 2011, thirty-one patients with histologically proven LS-SCLC who were treated with two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The chemotherapy regimen was composed of etoposide and cisplatin. Thoracic radiotherapy consisted of 50 to 60 Gy (median, 54 Gy) given in 5 to 6.5 weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 53 months (median, 22 months). After chemoradiotherapy, 35.5% of the patients (11 patients) showed complete response, 61.3% (19 patients) showed partial response, 3.2% (one patient) showed progressive disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 96.8% (30 patients). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5%, 41.0%, and 28.1%, respectively, with a median OS of 21.3 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 49.8%, 22.8%, and 13.7%, respectively, with median PFS of 12 months. The patterns of failure were: locoregional recurrences in 29.0% (nine patients), distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients), and both locoregional and distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients). Grade 3 or 4 toxicities of leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 32.2%, 29.0%, and 25.8%, respectively. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis were shown in 12.9% and 6.4%, respectively. We conclude that early chemoradiotherapy for LS-SCLC provides feasible and acceptable local control and safety.

  16. Changes in clinical presentation and staging of lung cancer over two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiro-Fernández, Virginia; Mouronte-Roibás, Cecilia; Ramos-Hernández, Cristina; Botana-Rial, Maribel; González-Piñeiro, Ana; García-Rodríguez, Esmeralda; Represas-Represas, Cristina; Fernández-Villar, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    Important clinical and epidemiological changes have been observed in lung cancer (LC) in our healthcare area compared to the previous decade. In the last 10 years, specific LC care circuits have been implemented and the active search for cases has been stepped up. The aim of this study was to analyze the progress of these changes over the last 20 years. This is a retrospective study comparing clinical and epidemiological changes between 2 historical cohorts of LC patients (1992-1994 [group 1, 164 patients] and 2004-2006 [group 2, 250 patients]) and a current group from the period 2011-2012 (group 3, 209 patients) Two hundred and nine (209) LC patients were included in group 3 (2011-2012 period). After comparing groups 3 and 2, a non-significant rise in smoking was observed in women (59% vs 41%, p=.25), while the prevalence of adenocarcinoma was unchanged (45% vs 44%, p=.9). The main changes observed were the increase in cases with previous malignancies (23% vs 16%, p=.04), the rise in patients with no associated LC symptoms (33% vs 16%, p<.001), and an increased number of localized NSCLC (non-small cell LC) diagnoses (42% vs 24% in series 2, p<.001 and 14.2% in series 1, p<.001). The number of LC patients diagnosed in localized stages has increased significantly. Furthermore, the number of patients with no symptoms associated with LC and with a history of previous malignancy were significantly increased. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Stereotactic body radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Stefan Starup; Schytte, Tine; Jensen, Henrik R

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is now an accepted and patient friendly treatment, but still controversy exists about its comparability to conventional radiation therapy (RT). The purpose of this single...... and SBRT predicted improved prognosis. However, staging procedure, confirmation procedure of recurrence and technical improvements of radiation treatment is likely to influence outcomes. However, SBRT seems to be as efficient as conventional RT and is a more convenient treatment for the patients....

  18. The value of mediastinal staging with endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration in patients with lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ømark, Henrik; Eckardt, Jens; Hakami, Ardeshir

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the diagnostic yield, the learning curve and the safety of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle biopsy (EBUS-TBNA) in mediastinal staging of patients with lung cancer. METHODS: Mediastinal staging was performed with EBUS-TBNA according to the Danish nationa......-TBNA is in accordance with the yield of standard cervical mediastinoscopy reported in the literature. We do not find any indications in the present study of the recommended necessity for mediastinoscopy in all EBUS-TBNA-negative patients....

  19. Preoperative nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer using 99mTc-sestamibi spect/ct imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Muniz Miziara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The proper nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer is important for choosing the best treatment modality. Although computed tomography remains the first-line imaging test for the primary staging of lung cancer, its limitations for mediastinum nodal staging are well known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography using 99mTc-sestamibi in the nodal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and to identify potential candidates for surgical treatment. METHODS: Prospective data were collected for 41 patients from December 2006 to February 2009. The patients underwent chest computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography examinations with 99mTc-sestamibi within a 30-day time period before surgery. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography was considered positive when there was focal uptake of sestamibi in the mediastinum, and computed tomography scan when there was lymph nodes larger than 10 mm in short axis. The results of single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography were correlated with pathology findings after surgery. RESULTS: Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography correctly identified six out of 19 cases involving hilar lymph nodes and one out of seven cases involving nodal metastases in the mediastinum. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for 99mTc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the hilum assessment were 31.6%, 95.5%, 85.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The same values for the mediastinum were 14.3%, 97.1%, 50%, and 84.6%, respectively. For the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, chest tomography showed sensitivity values of 47.4% and 57.1%, specificity values of 95.5% and 91.2%, positive predictive values of 90% and 57.1% and negative

  20. Development of a Diagnostic Tool to Detect DNA Methylation Biomarkers for Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Chongli Yuan CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Purdue University West Lafayette, IN 47907 REPORT DATE: February...DNA methylation with high spatial resolution. Task 2.1 Design a library of DNA constructs in which the location of the single methylated CpG site is...the impact on the development of the principal discipline of the project? This proposal aims to design and demonstrate proof-of-concept for these

  1. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  2. In the hunt for therapeutic targets: mimicking the growth, metastasis, and stromal associations of early-stage lung cancer using a novel orthotopic animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ido D; Ella, Ezra; Dominsky, Omri; Smith, Yoav; Abraham, Michal; Wald, Hanna; Shlomai, Zippora; Zamir, Gideon; Feigelson, Sara W; Shezen, Elias; Bar-Shai, Amir; Alon, Ronen; Izhar, Uzi; Peled, Amnon; Shapira, Oz M; Wald, Ori

    2015-01-01

    The existing shortage of animal models that properly mimic the progression of early-stage human lung cancer from a solitary confined tumor to an invasive metastatic disease hinders accurate characterization of key interactions between lung cancer cells and their stroma. We herein describe a novel orthotopic animal model that addresses these concerns and consequently serves as an attractive platform to study tumor-stromal cell interactions under conditions that reflect early-stage lung cancer. Unlike previous methodologies, we directly injected small numbers of human or murine lung cancer cells into murine's left lung and longitudinally monitored disease progression. Next, we used green fluorescent protein-tagged tumor cells and immuno-fluorescent staining to determine the tumor's microanatomic distribution and to look for tumor-infiltrating immune cells and stromal cells. Finally, we compared chemokine gene expression patterns in the tumor and lung microenvironment. We successfully generated a solitary pulmonary nodule surrounded by normal lung parenchyma that grew locally and spread distally over time. Notably, we found that both fibroblasts and leukocytes are recruited to the tumor's margins and that distinct myeloid cell attracting and CCR2-binding chemokines are specifically induced in the tumor microenvironment. Our orthotopic lung cancer model closely mimics the pathologic sequence of events that characterizes early-stage human lung cancer propagation. It further introduces new means to monitor tumor-stromal cell interactions and offers unique opportunities to test therapeutic targets under conditions that reflect early-stage lung cancer. We argue that for such purposes our model is superior to lung cancer models that are based either on genetic induction of epithelial transformation or on ectopic transplantation of malignant cells.

  3. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiation, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Rice, Thomas W; Rybicki, Lisa A; Greskovich, John F; Ciezki, Jay P; Carroll, Marjorie A; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2002-05-01

    The low surgical cure rate in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer has prompted an exploration of multimodality treatment strategies. Mature results are presented from a phase II trial of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for these patients. Between 1994 and 1997, 45 patients with surgically demonstrated stage III non-small cell lung cancer underwent induction treatment with a 96 h continuous cisplatin infusion (20 mg/m(2) per day) and a 24 h infusion of paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)) given concurrently with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (1.5 Gy twice daily) to a total dose of 30 Gy. Induction was completed in ten treatment (12 total) days. Surgical resection was scheduled 4 weeks later with a second identical course of chemoradiotherapy given 4-6 weeks post-operatively, to a total radiation dose of 60-63 Gy. Thirty-five patients had stage III(A) disease and ten had stage III(B) disease (eight with N(3) tumors). Induction toxicity included nausea in 89%, dysphagia in 89%, and neutropenia tolerable despite significant myelosuppression. Locoregional control is excellent and survival is better than historical expectations. Patients downstaged to mediastinal node negativity have a prognosis similar to those with de novo stage I(B) and II disease. Distant metastases are the major cause of treatment failure.

  4. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  5. Absence of toxicity with hypofractionated 3-dimensional radiation therapy for inoperable, early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Te

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated radiotherapy may overcome repopulation in rapidly proliferating tumors such as lung cancer. It is more convenient for the patients and reduces health care costs. This study reports our results on patients with medically inoperable, early stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with hypofractionation. Materials and methods Stage T1-2N0 NSCLC patients were treated with hypofractionation alone, 52.5 Gy/15 fractions, in 3 weeks, with 3-dimensional conformal planning. T1-2N1 patients with the hilar lymphnode close to the primary tumor were also eligible for this treatment. We did not use any approach to reduce respiratory motion, but it was monitored in all patients. Elective nodal radiotherapy was not performed. Routine follow up included assessment for acute and late toxicity and radiological tumor response. Median follow up time was 29 months for the surviving patients. Results Thirty-two patients with a median age of 76 years, T1 = 15 and T2 = 17, were treated. Median planning target volume (PTV volume was 150cc and median V16 of both lungs was 13%. The most important finding of this study is that toxicity was minimal. Two patients had grade ≤ 2 acute pneumonitis and 3 had mild (grade 1 acute esophagitis. There was no late toxicity. Actuarial 1 and 2-year overall survival rates are 78% and 56%, cancer specific survival rates (CSS are 90% and 74%, and local relapse free survival rates are 93% and 76% respectively. Conclusion 3-D planning, involved field hypofractionation at a dose of 52.5 Gy in 15 daily fractions is safe, well tolerated and easy radiation treatment for medically inoperable lung cancer patients. It shortens by half the traditional treatment. Results compare favorably with previously published studies. Further studies are needed to compare similar technique with other treatments such as surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy.

  6. Screening for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Peter J.; Naidich, David P.; Bach, Peter B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is by far the major cause of cancer deaths largely because in the majority of patients it is at an advanced stage at the time it is discovered, when curative treatment is no longer feasible. This article examines the data regarding the ability of screening to decrease the number of lung cancer deaths. Methods: A systematic review was conducted of controlled studies that address the effectiveness of methods of screening for lung cancer. Results: Several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including a recent one, have demonstrated that screening for lung cancer using a chest radiograph does not reduce the number of deaths from lung cancer. One large RCT involving low-dose CT (LDCT) screening demonstrated a significant reduction in lung cancer deaths, with few harms to individuals at elevated risk when done in the context of a structured program of selection, screening, evaluation, and management of the relatively high number of benign abnormalities. Whether other RCTs involving LDCT screening are consistent is unclear because data are limited or not yet mature. Conclusions: Screening is a complex interplay of selection (a population with sufficient risk and few serious comorbidities), the value of the screening test, the interval between screening tests, the availability of effective treatment, the risk of complications or harms as a result of screening, and the degree with which the screened individuals comply with screening and treatment recommendations. Screening with LDCT of appropriate individuals in the context of a structured process is associated with a significant reduction in the number of lung cancer deaths in the screened population. Given the complex interplay of factors inherent in screening, many questions remain on how to effectively implement screening on a broader scale. PMID:23649455

  7. Staging of recurrent and advanced lung cancer with 18F-FDG PET in a coincidence technique (hybrid PET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, R A; Hautmann, H; Poellinger, B; Kellner, W; Moisseev, A; Brinkbaeumer, K; Weiss, M; Hahn, K; Dresel, S

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose ( F-FDG) imaging of recurrent or inoperable lung cancer using a hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) device of the third generation. Examinations were compared with the results of conventional staging. Thirty-six patients suffering from recurrent or primarily inoperable lung cancer (29 men, seven women; age 64.8+/-12.0 years) were examined using hybrid PET (Marconi Axis gamma-PET ) 60 min after injection of 370 MBq F-FDG. The data obtained were reconstructed iteratively. All patients received a computed tomography (CT) scan using either the spiral or multislice technique. All lesions suspicious for primary or recurrent tumour were verified by biopsy; mediastinal lymph nodes were considered as malignant, when positive histology or a small axis diameter of greater than 1 cm measured with CT in addition to progression of clinical course was found. Distant metastases were diagnosed by CT and bone scintigraphy. Using hybrid PET all lesions showed a focally elevated glucose metabolism. Lymph node involvement of the ipsilateral peribronchial and hilar station (N1) was identified in 24/26 cases (92%), in 26/29 cases (90%) of ipsilateral central manifestation (N2) and in 11/13 (85%) cases of central contralateral or supraclavicular lymphatic infestation (N3). Pulmonary spread in hybrid PET was found in 4/8 cases (50%), whereas mainly lung metastases with a diameter of 1.5 cm and smaller were missed. Pleural involvement diagnosed by CT was verified in 4/5 patients. All four patients with bony metastases in conventional staging also presented with positive findings in hybrid PET (8/9 lesions). Concordance with conventional staging was found in 28/36 of patients (78%). In 4/36 patients (11%) unknown sites of tumour were detected leading to therapeutic consequences in three patients after radiological confirmation. Hybrid PET would have led to an understaging in four cases (11%), resulting theoretically in

  8. Prognostic significance of telomeric repeat length alterations in pathological stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, T; Komiya, T; Nitta, T; Takada, Y; Kobayashi, M; Masuda, N; Matui, K; Takada, M; Kikui, M; Yasumitu, T; Ohno, A; Nakagawa, K; Fukuoka, M; Kawase, I

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the prognostic significance of alteration in telomere length in pathological stage (p-stage) I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Paired cancer and normal lung tissues were obtained from 72 patients with histologically confirmed p-stage I-IIIA NSCLC. Terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length, which indicates telomere length, was measured by Southern blot analysis. Tumor telomerase activity was also assayed by non-radioactive PCR-ELISA in 55 patients. TRF length (mean +/- SD) in normal tissue was 6.2 +/- 1.1 Kb. Therefore, upper and lower limits of normal range in TRF length was set at 8.4 (mean + 2SD) Kb and 4.0 (mean-2SD) Kb, respectively. A tumor showing TRF length over normal range was defined as positive for the alteration. In 72 patients, 25 (34.7%) with alteration in TRF length had significantly shorter survival durations than those of the others. Telomerase activity did not correlate with survival duration. In multivariate analysis, alteration in TRF length (P = 0.0033) was second to p-stage (P = 0.0004) in importance among the various parameters.

  9. Risk factors for both recurrence and survival in patients with pathological stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Yoshiki; Maniwa, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Shoji; Isaka, Mitsuhiro; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Nakajima, Takashi

    2013-07-01

    Even after curative resection, a significant fraction of patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die primarily because of systemic relapse. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the risk factors for both recurrence and poor survival in patients with pathological (p-) stage I NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed 467 consecutive patients from a single institution with completely resected p-stage I NSCLC. Patients with multiple lung tumours or malignancies from other organs and those who had undergone preoperative therapies were excluded. The correlation between clinicopathological factors and surgical outcomes, including disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS), was analysed. The clinicopathological factors examined were age, gender, smoking history, serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, serum cytokeratin 19 fragment levels, surgical procedure, tumour histology, p-stage, angiolymphatic invasion and differentiation grade. The 5-year DFS and OS rates of the total study population were 91.4 and 92.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis results indicated that high serum CEA levels (>5.0 ng/ml) and p-stage IB were independent factors for recurrence, whereas older age (>70 years), high serum CEA levels and p-stage IB were independent factors for poor survival. The risks of recurrence and death in patients with both high serum CEA levels and p-stage IB was 10.3 and 5.2 times higher than those observed in patients with both normal serum CEA levels and p-stage IA, respectively. High serum CEA levels and p-stage IB were independent factors for both recurrence and poor survival in p-stage I NSCLC patients.

  10. Ipsilateral pleural recurrence after diagnostic transthoracic needle biopsy in pathological stage I lung cancer patients who underwent curative resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seong Mi; Lee, Dae Geun; Hwang, Na Young; Ahn, Soohyun; Lee, Hyun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Choi, Yong Soo; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Lee, Kyung Jong

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between transthoracic needle biopsy (TTNB) and pleural recurrence of cancer after curative lung resection remains unclear. We aimed to assess whether TTNB increases the ipsilateral pleural recurrence (IPR) rate and identify other potential risk factors for pleural recurrence after surgery. This retrospective study included 392 patients with p-stage I non-small cell lung cancer with solid or part-solid nodules after curative lung resection in 2009-2010. Imbalances among the characteristics were adjusted using an inverse probability-weighted method based on propensity scoring. Multivariate Cox's regression analysis and the Kaplan-Meier method were used to determine independent risk factors for IPR. A total of 243 (62%) patients received TTNB, while 149 (38%) underwent an alternate, or no, diagnostic technique. IPR was significantly more frequent in the TTNB group (p=0.004), while total recurrence was similar between the groups (p=0.098). After applying the weighted model, diagnostic TTNB (hazard ratio [HR], 5.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-18.69; p=0.010), microscopic visceral pleural invasion (HR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.08-7.01; p=0.033) and microscopic lymphatic invasion (HR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.30-8.10; p=0.012) were associated with an increased frequency of IPR. Among patients who received TTNB, microscopic lymphatic invasion was a risk factor for IPR (HR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.10-6.79; p=0.030). The diagnostic TTNB procedure is associated with pleural recurrence but may be unrelated to overall recurrence-free survival in early lung cancer. Moreover, microscopic lymphatic invasion could be a risk factor for pleural recurrence. TTNB should be carefully considered before lung resection and close follow-up to detect if pleural recurrence is needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Colonias, Athanasios [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Parda, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Trombetta, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Reitz, Bodo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2007-03-07

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  12. Dosimetric and technical aspects of intraoperative I-125 brachytherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Colonias, Athanasios; Parda, David; Trombetta, Mark; Gayou, Olivier; Reitz, Bodo; Miften, Moyed

    2007-03-01

    Initial treatment outcome data from our institution for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients have shown that sublobar resection in combination with iodine-125 (I-125) brachytherapy is associated with recurrence rates of 2.0%, compared to 18.6% with sublobar resection alone. In this work, the technical and dosimetric aspects required to execute this procedure from the radiation oncology perspective as well as an analysis of the dose distributions of patients treated with this technique are presented. In this treatment technique, I-125 seeds in vicryl suture are embedded into vicryl mesh and surgically inserted providing a 2.0 cm margin on each side of the resection staple line. A nomogram is developed to determine the suture spacing in the vicryl mesh, as a function of seed activity in order to deliver 120 Gy at a distance of 0.5 cm above and below the seed array. Post-operative dosimetry consists of a CT-based planning and dose volume analysis. Dose distributions, dose volume histograms and mean dose data for lung are analysed in a group of patients. Dosimetric results show significant lung sparing with only a small volume of lung irradiated for all patients with mean lung dose values ranging from 1.5 Gy to 5.4 Gy. Lung brachytherapy with I-125 at the time of sublobar resection is a highly conformal option of dose delivery for stage I NSCLC patients with compromised physiologic reserve. Patient-related toxicity clinically measured by loss of pulmonary function and radiation-induced pneumonitis have not been linked to this procedure.

  13. Omission of bone scanning according to staging guidelines leads to futile therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schirrmeister, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Kiel, Kiel (Germany); Arslandemir, Coskun; Hetzel, Martin [Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, Robert-Koch-Strasse 8, 89081, Ulm (Germany); Glatting, Gerhard; Buck, Andreas [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Mayer-Steinacker, Regine; Bommer, Martin [Department of Hematology and Oncology, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Dreinhoefer, Karsten [Department of Orthopedics, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The leading European and American professional societies recommend that bone scans (BS) should be performed in the staging of lung cancer only in those patients with bone pain. This prospective study investigated the sensitivity of conventional skeletal scintigraphy in detecting osseous metastases in patients with lung cancer and addressed the potential consequences of failure to use this method in the work-up of asymptomatic patients. Subsequent to initial diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer, 100 patients were examined and questioned regarding skeletal complaints. Two specialists in internal medicine decided whether they would recommend a bone scan on the basis of the clinical evaluation. Skeletal scintigraphy was then performed blinded to the findings of history and physical examination. The combined results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the vertebral column, positron emission tomography (PET) of skeletal bone and the subsequent clinical course served as the gold standard for the identification of osseous metastases. Bone scintigraphy showed an 87% sensitivity in the detection of bone metastases. Failure to perform skeletal scintigraphy in asymptomatic patients reduced the sensitivity of the method, depending on the interpretation of the symptoms, to 19-39%. Without the findings of skeletal scintigraphy and the gold standard methods, 14-22% of patients would have undergone unnecessary surgery or neoadjuvant therapy. On this basis it is concluded that bone scans should not be omitted in asymptomatic patients. (orig.)

  14. A Prospective Randomized Study of Adjuvant Chemotherapy in Completely Resected Stage Ⅲ-N2 Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy on survival after complete resection of stage Ⅲ-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods: From Jan. 1999 to Dec. 2003, one-hundred and fifty patients, who were diagnosed as stage Ⅲ-N2 non-small cell lung cancer after operation, were randomly devided into chemotherapy group and control group. The former received four cycles of chemotherapy with NVB (25 mg/m2,D1, D5)/paclitaxel (175 mg/m2, DI) and Carboplatin (AUC=5, D1). Results: In chemotherapy group, 75.8% (68/79) of patients had finished the 4 cycles of chemotherapy and no one died of toxic effects of chemotherapy.Twenty-five percent of the patients had grade 3-4 neutropenia and 2% had febrile neutropenia. The median survival for the entire 150 patients was 879 d, with 1-year survival rate of 81%, 2-year survival rate of 59% and 3-year survival rate of 43%. There was no significant difference in median survival between chemotherapy and control group (897 d vs 821 d, P=0.0527), but there was significant difference in the 1-year and 2-year overall survival (94.71%, 76.28% vs 512 d, P=0.122), but there was significant difference in the 2-year survival rate between two groups with brain metastases (66.7% vs 37.6% P<0.05). The median survival after brain metastasis appeared was 190 days. Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy does not significantly improve median survival among patients with completely resected stage Ⅱ-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer, but significantly improves the 1-year and 2-year overall survival. It neither decreases the incidence of brain metastasis but put off the time of brain metastasis.

  15. Sarcopenia is a novel poor prognostic factor in male patients with pathological Stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukioka, Takuma; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Mizuguchi, Shinjiro; Komatsu, Hiroaki; Okada, Satoshi; Toda, Michihito; Hara, Kantaro; Ito, Ryuichi; Shibata, Toshihiko

    2017-04-01

    Sarcopenia is the progressive loss of muscle mass and strength, and has a risk of adverse outcomes such as disability, poor quality of life and death. As prognosis depends not only on disease aggressiveness, but also on a patient's physical condition, sarcopenia can predict survival in patients with various cancer types. However, its effects on postoperative prognosis in patients with localized non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) have never been reported. We retrospectively investigated 215 male patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC. L3 muscle index is defined as the cross-section area of muscle at the third lumbar vertebra level, normalized for height, and is a clinical measurement of sarcopenia. We then investigated the effect of preoperative sarcopenia on their postoperative prognosis. Our 215 subjects included 30 patients with sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was significantly associated with body mass index, nutritional condition, serum CYFRA 21-1 level and pathological stage, but not with preoperative respiratory function or performance status. Frequency of postoperative complications, length of postoperative hospital stay, thoracic drainage period or causes of death were not correlated with the presence of sarcopenia. The sarcopenia group had a significantly shorter median overall survival (32 months) than the no-sarcopenia group. Sarcopenia might not affect short-term outcomes in patients with early-stage lung cancer. Sarcopenia was a predictor of poor prognosis in male patients with Stage I NSCLC. As sarcopenic patients with NSCLC patients are at risk for significantly worse outcomes, their treatments require careful planning, even for those with Stage I disease.

  16. MRI detection of brain metastases at initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, M. van de [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oosterhout, A.G. van [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Wilmink, J.T. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Velde, G.P.M. ten [Dept. of Pulmonology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands); Twijnstra, A. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    1996-04-01

    We prospectively investigated 40 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) for signs of brain metastasis by neurological examination and MRI of the brain, to determine the significance of MRI for staging. MRI could not be completed in one patient, who was excluded from the study. The MRI studies of the remaining patients showed no abnormalities in 12, cerebral infarcts in 2 and brain metastases in 11 patients, of whom 3 no relevant symptoms. Nonenhancing white matter lesions were found in 14 patients. In 3 of the 4 patients with an abnormal neurological examination at diagnosis, nonenhancing white matter lesions later developed into contrast enhancing lesions compatible with breain metastases; in 2, this occurred during the course of the chemotherapy. MRI did not change the clinical staging in patients with asymptomatic brain metastases. (orig.)

  17. [Postoperative results under the new stage classification of lung cancer: the additional reports for those of JACS in 1996].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakusa, T

    2000-10-01

    This time, in 3008 lung cancer patients, the postoperative results were analyzed under the new stage grouping of TNM classification. All of those patients underwent the operation in 1989, and the 5 year-survival rates had beeb surveyed in 1996 by JACS (The Japanese Association for Chest Surgery). Under the new TNM classification established in 1996 worldwidey, T3N0M0 was transferred from IIIA to IIB. This report is the additional one in the focus of the results accompanied with the change of TNM classification.

  18. Preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer: prospective comparison of PET/MR and PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Chang Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Soon Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Tae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Sik [Seoul National University Hospital, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    To prospectively compare the accuracies of PET/MR and PET/CT in the preoperative staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Institutional review board approval and patients' informed consents were obtained. 45 patients with proven or radiologically suspected lung cancer which appeared to be resectable on CT were enrolled. PET/MR was performed for the preoperative staging of NSCLC followed by PET/CT without contrast enhancement on the same day. Dedicated MR images including diffusion weighted images were obtained. Readers assessed PET/MR and PET/CT with contrast-enhanced CT. Accuracies of PET/MR and PET/CT for NSCLC staging were compared. Primary tumour stages (n = 40) were correctly diagnosed in 32 patients (80.0 %) on PET/MR and in 32 patients (80.0 %) on PET/CT (P = 1.0). Node stages (n = 42) were correctly determined in 24 patients (57.1 %) on PET/MR and in 22 patients (52.4 %) on PET/CT (P = 0.683). Metastatic lesions in the brain, bone, liver, and pleura were detected in 6 patients (13.3 %). PET/MR missed one patient with pleural metastasis while PET/CT missed one patient with solitary brain metastasis and two patients with pleural metastases (P = 0.480). This study demonstrated that PET/MR in combination with contrast-enhanced CT was comparable to PET/CT in the preoperative staging of NSCLC while reducing radiation exposure. (orig.)

  19. The relationship between stage 1 and 2 non-small cell lung cancer and lung function in men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man SF Paul

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 has been linked to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, it is unclear whether all or only certain histological subtypes of NSCLC are associated with reduced FEV1. Moreover, there is little information on whether gender modifies this relationship. Using a large tissue registry, we sought to determine the relationship between FEV1 and subtypes of NSCLC and determine whether this relationship is modified by gender. Methods We used data from patients who underwent tumor resection for NSCLC at a teaching hospital in Vancouver and had various pre-operative clinical measurements including FEV1. We divided the cohort into quartiles of predicted FEV1 and using both logistic and linear regression modeling techniques determined whether FEV1 was related to the occurrence of adeno or squamous cell carcinoma in men and women. Results There were 610 patients in the study (36% females. On average, women were more likely to have adenocarcinoma than were men (72% of all cases of NSCLC in women versus 40% in men; p 1 and the risk of any histological subtypes of NSCLC. In men, however, there was an inverse relationship between the risk of adenocarcinoma and FEV1 such that the lowest quartile of FEV1 was 47% less likely to have adenocarcinoma compared with the highest FEV1 quartile (adjusted odds ratio, 0.52; 0.28 to 0.98; p for trend, 0.028. The reverse was observed for squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion In individuals undergoing lung resection for NSCLC, the risk of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung varies as a function of FEV1, independent of smoking intensity in men but not in women. Clinical Implications These data indicate that women are much more susceptible to adenocarcinoma than are men especially when they have normal or near normal lung function. It may thus be useful to conduct periodic surveillance chest radiographs in asymptomatic female smokers (or ex

  20. Gene-expression signature predicts postoperative recurrence in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Wang, Liang; Liu, Pengyuan; Yang, Ping; You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset -142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = -0.83, P85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients.

  1. Gene-expression signature predicts postoperative recurrence in stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lu

    Full Text Available About 30% stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients undergoing resection will recur. Robust prognostic markers are required to better manage therapy options. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a novel gene-expression signature that can predict tumor recurrence of stage I NSCLC patients. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify recurrence-related genes and a partial Cox regression model was used to generate a gene signature of recurrence in the training dataset -142 stage I lung adenocarcinomas without adjunctive therapy from the Director's Challenge Consortium. Four independent validation datasets, including GSE5843, GSE8894, and two other datasets provided by Mayo Clinic and Washington University, were used to assess the prediction accuracy by calculating the correlation between risk score estimated from gene expression and real recurrence-free survival time and AUC of time-dependent ROC analysis. Pathway-based survival analyses were also performed. 104 probesets correlated with recurrence in the training dataset. They are enriched in cell adhesion, apoptosis and regulation of cell proliferation. A 51-gene expression signature was identified to distinguish patients likely to develop tumor recurrence (Dxy = -0.83, P85%. Multiple pathways including leukocyte transendothelial migration and cell adhesion were highly correlated with recurrence-free survival. The gene signature is highly predictive of recurrence in stage I NSCLC patients, which has important prognostic and therapeutic implications for the future management of these patients.

  2. Value of 18F-FDG PET in Clinical Staging of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suwen Liu; Jinming Yu; Ligang Xing

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).METHODS 105 patients with NSCLC had been examined by 18F-FDG PET before radiotherapy. The results of the 18F-FDG PET examination were compared with those of CT:RESULTS The staging was changed in 38 patients because of 18F-FDG PET findings, with PET resulting in upstaging in 31 patients and downstaging in seven patients. Because of distant metastasis detected by PET, 21 patients received palliative treatment. Six of the seven downstaged patients underwent radical surgery, among which the PET findings were concordant with the pathological findings in five patients. Distant metastasis detected by PET elevated the pre-PET stage: at stage 110.0% (2/20), stage Ⅱ 14.3% (3/21 ) and stage Ⅲ 25.0% (16/64), respectively.CONCLUSION 18F-FDG PET, by changing clinical staging in 36.2% (38/105)of NSCLC patients, has an impact on treatment strategy in NSCLC patients.

  3. Detection of Recurrence Patterns After Wedge Resection for Early Stage Lung Cancer: Rationale for Radiologic Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billè, Andrea; Ahmad, Usman; Woo, Kaitlin M; Suzuki, Kei; Adusumilli, Prasad; Huang, James; Jones, David R; Rizk, Nabil Pierre

    2016-10-01

    Wedge resection for selected patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer is considered to be a valid treatment option. The aim of this study was to evaluate the recurrence patterns after wedge resection, to analyze the survival of patients under routine follow-up, and to recommend a follow-up regimen. A retrospective analysis was done of 446 consecutive patients between May 2000 and December 2012 who underwent a wedge resection for clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. All patients were followed up with a computed tomography scan with or without contrast. The recurrence was recorded as local (involving the same lobe of wedge resection), regional (involving mediastinal or hilar lymph nodes or a different lobe), or distant (including distant metastasis and pleural disease). Median follow-up for survivors (n = 283) was 44.6 months. In all, 163 patients died; median overall survival was 82.6 months. Thirty-six patients were diagnosed with new primary non-small cell lung cancer, and 152 with recurrence (79 local, 45 regional, and 28 distant). There was no difference in the incidence of recurrence detection detected by computed tomography scans with versus without contrast (p = 0.18). The cumulative incidence of local recurrences at 1, 2, and 3 years was higher than the cumulative incidence for local, regional, and distant recurrences: 5.2%, 11.1%, and 14.9% versus 3.7%, 6.6%, and 9.5% versus 2.3%, 4.7%, and 6.4%, respectively. Primary tumor diameter was associated with local recurrence in univariate analysis. Wedge resection for early stage non-small cell lung cancer is associated with a significant risk for local and regional recurrence. Long-term follow-up using noncontrast computed tomography scans at consistent intervals is appropriate to monitor for these recurrences. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dosimetric comparison of carbon ion and X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the dose–volume histograms of patients with Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with carbon ion radiotherapy with those of patients treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach) were enrolled. Both radiotherapy plans were calculated with the same targets and organs at risk on the same CT. The treatment plan for the prophylactic lymph node and primary tumor (PTV1) delivered 40 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 40 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The total doses for the primary tumor and clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV2) were 60 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 60 Gy (RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The homogeneity indexes for PTV1 and PTV2 were superior for carbon ion radiotherapy in comparison with X-ray radiotherapy (PTV1, 0.57 vs 0.65, P = 0.009; PTV2, 0.07 vs 0.16, P = 0.005). The normal lung mean dose, V5, V10 and V20 for carbon ion radiotherapy were 7.7 Gy (RBE), 21.4%, 19.7% and 17.0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding doses for X-ray radiotherapy were 11.9 Gy, 34.9%, 26.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Maximum spinal cord dose, esophageal maximum dose and V50, and bone V10, V30 and V50 were lower with carbon ion radiotherapy than with X-ray radiotherapy. The present study indicates that carbon ion radiotherapy provides a more homogeneous target dose and a lower dose to organs at risk than X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:27242341

  5. Multimodality approach to mediastinal staging in non-small cell lung cancer. Faults and benefits of PET-CT: a randomised trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Mortensen, Jann; Hansen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    Correct mediastinal staging is a cornerstone in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. A large range of methods is available for this purpose, making the process of adequate staging complex. The objective of this study was to describe faults and benefits of positron emission t...

  6. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3 tria

  7. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3

  8. Scalpel or SABR for Treatment of Early-Stage Lung Cancer: Clinical Considerations for the Multidisciplinary Team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Y. Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for early-stage (T1-2 N0 non-small cell lung cancer are often limited by the patient’s advanced age, poor performance status, and comorbidities. Despite these challenges, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR provides a highly effective and safe therapy for intrathoracic tumors and has become the standard of care for delivering definitive treatment in medically inoperable patients. High-quality treatment, which includes reliable immobilization, accurate tumor targeting, and precise verification of dose delivery, is essential both to achieve successful cure and to avoid debilitating toxicities. Generally, SABR is well tolerated in patients with peripherally located tumors, but even centrally or superiorly located lesions can be treated if there is adequate conformal avoidance of normal structures and/or modified fractionation to meet dose constraints. While several preliminary studies suggest that SABR is as efficacious as surgery in operable patients, results of randomized data will illuminate whether the indications for SABR can be expanded to include patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Herein, we review the rationale for using SABR and its application in treating different patient populations with early-stage lung cancer.

  9. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  10. Total antioxidant status in lung cancer is associated with levels of endogenous antioxidants and disease stage rather than lifestyle factors – preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porębska, Irena; Gołecki, Marcin; Kosacka, Monika; Pawełczyk, Konrad; Pawlik-Sobecka, Lilla; Zarębska, Katarzyna; Grajeta, Halina

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC) has been reported in different neoplasms, including lung cancer. However, no study concerning the relationship between endogenous antioxidants, lifestyle factors, and TAC has been conducted among lung cancer patients. The purpose of the study was to investigate the associations between endogenous antioxidants, severity of disease, lifestyle factors, and TAC in lung cancer patients. Material and methods The study was conducted among 59 lung cancer patients. The levels of total antioxidant status (ATBS method), endogenous antioxidants, and C-reactive protein were measured in patients’ sera automatically. Dietary habits of the subjects were evaluated based on the Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) on the day of admission to hospital. Results We found a positive correlation between serum albumin, uric acid (UA), and TAC and a negative correlation between CRP and TAC. Moreover, TAC was significantly positively associated with disease stage. We did not find any significant relationship between the frequency of selected food consumption and TAC in lung cancer patients, except for a positive correlation between the frequency of refined cereal products consumption and TAC level. Smoking status did not correlate with TAC. Conclusions Total antioxidant status of lung cancer patients results from their disease stage and levels of endogenous antioxidants rather than from lifestyle factors. The lack of influence of diet and smoking on the TAC presumably result from disturbed homeostasis in which cancer, while developing, could determine the redox state to a greater extent than lifestyle factors. PMID:27688727

  11. Stages of Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... liver cancer . The following stages are used for gastric cancer: Stage 0 (Carcinoma in Situ) In stage 0 , abnormal cells are ... check-ups. Treatment Options by Stage Stage 0 (Carcinoma in ... Stage I Gastric Cancer Treatment of stage I gastric cancer may ...

  12. [Prognostic value of AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: validation in 437 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjue; Zhu, Hui; Zhou, Zongmei; Feng, Qinfu; Chen, Dongfu; Zhang, Hongxing; Xiao, Zefen; Wang, Lühua

    2015-12-01

    To explore the impact of AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition on survival outcome of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Four hundred and thirty-seven SCLC patients with completed diagnosis and treatment data treated in our department between January 1996 and December 2006 were reclassified according to the AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition. The patients of stages IA, IB, IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB were 8, 44, 7, 64, 192 cases, respectively. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis and log-rank test was used to identify the prognostic factors. The survival rate was determined using chi-square test. The median follow-up time was 64 months. The median survival time was 26.2 months and median progression free survival time was 13.7 months. The 1-, 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 86.0%, 52.7%, and 29.7%, respectively. The log-rank test showed that TNM stage is a statistically significant prognostic factor for OS in LS-SCLC (PTNM staging system generally allowed a good separation in pairwise comparison for OS between successive stages except there was no significant difference between stages I and II (P=0.061). The 5-year progression free survival rates of patients of stage I, II, IIIA and IIIB were 53.2%, 43.2%, 16.8%, and 10.9%, respectively. TNM stage also was a statistically significant prognostic factor for PFS in LS-SCLC (P0.05 for all). The T staging confirmed significant influence on OS (P0.05 for all), while T stage was not a significant prognostic factor for PFS in the LS-SCLC patients (P=0.194). N stage also had a significant influence on OS (P0.05) except that between the 5-year survival rates of N2 and N3 cases (P=0.013). The cumulative brain metastasis rates of stages I, II, IIIA, and stage IIIB were 17.3%, 28.6%, 33.3%, and 35.8%, respectively(P=0.072), and were 12.8% and 30.8% for pathological stage I and clinical stage I (P=0.203). AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition criteria for LS-SCLC patients have a high prognostic impact and therefore are

  13. EGFR mutation positive stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer : Treatment beyond progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrijn eVan Assche

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the leading cause of death from cancer for both men en women. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease, but is only marginally effective. In about 30% of patients with advanced NSCLC in East Asia and in 10-15% in Western countries, EGFR mutations are found. In this population, first-line treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI erlotinib, gefitinib or afatinib is recommended. The treatment beyond progression is less well-defined. In this paper we present 3 patients, EGFR mutation positive, with local progression after an initial treatment with TKI. These patients were treated with local radiotherapy. TKI was temporarily stopped and restarted after radiotherapy. We give an overview of the literature and discuss the different treatment options in case of progression after TKI: TKI continuation with or without chemotherapy, TKI continuation with local therapy, alternative dosing or switch to next-generation TKI or combination therapy. There are different options for treatment beyond progression in EGFR mutation positive metastatic NSCLC, but the optimal strategy is still to be defined. Further research on this topic is ongoing.

  14. Adherence to Survivorship Care Guidelines in Health Care Providers for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer Survivor Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Signet Ring Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  15. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  16. Long-term treatment with the oncolytic ECHO-7 virus Rigvir of a melanoma stage IV M1c patient, a small cell lung cancer stage IIIA patient, and a histiocytic sarcoma stage IV patient-three case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Pēteris; Olmane, Evija; Brokāne, Linda; Krastiņa, Zanda; Romanovska, Māra; Kupčs, Kārlis; Isajevs, Sergejs; Proboka, Guna; Erdmanis, Romualds; Nazarovs, Jurijs; Venskus, Dite

    2016-10-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a recent addition to cancer treatment. Here, we describe positive treatment outcomes in three patients using Rigvir virotherapy. One of the patients is diagnosed with melanoma stage IV M1c, one with small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and one with histiocytic sarcoma stage IV. The diagnoses of all patients are verified by histology or cytology. All patients started Rigvir treatment within a few months after being diagnosed and are currently continuing Rigvir treatment. The degree of regression of the disease has been determined by computed tomography. Safety assessment of adverse events graded according to NCI CTCAE did not show any value above grade 1 during Rigvir(®) treatment. Using current standard treatments, the survival of patients with the present diagnoses is low. In contrast, the patients described here were diagnosed 3.5, 7.0, and 6.6 years ago, and their condition has improved and been stabile for over 1.5, 6.5, and 4 years, respectively. These observations suggest that virotherapy using Rigvir can successfully be used in long-term treatment of patients with melanoma stage IV M1c, small cell lung cancer stage IIIA, and histiocytic sarcoma stage IV and therefore could be included in prospective clinical studies.

  17. Impact of [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET on the primary staging of small-cell lung cancer

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    Brink, I.; Mix, M.; Ruhland, S.; Moser, E. [University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Schumacher, T. [Diakonie Clinic Freiburg, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Stoelben, E. [University Hospital, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Digel, W. [University Hospital, Division of Oncology and Hematology, Freiburg (Germany); Henke, M. [University Hospital, Division of Radiation Therapy, Freiburg (Germany); Ghanem, N. [University Hospital, Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Nitzsche, E.U. [University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) on the primary staging of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). FDG-PET was performed in 120 consecutive patients with SCLC during primary staging. In addition, brain examinations with both FDG-PET and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) were performed in 91 patients. Results of FDG-PET were compared with those of conventional staging procedures. FDG-PET detected markedly increased FDG uptake in the primary tumours of all 120 patients (sensitivity 100%). Complete agreement between FDG-PET results and other staging procedures was observed in 75 patients. Differences occurred in 45 patients at 65 sites. In 47 sites the FDG-PET results were proven to be correct, and in ten, incorrect. In the remaining eight sites, the discrepancies could not be clarified. In 14/120 patients, FDG-PET caused a stage migration, correctly upstaging ten patients to extensive disease and downstaging three patients by not confirming metastases of the adrenal glands suspected on the basis of CT. Only 1/120 patients was incorrectly staged by FDG-PET, owing to failure to detect brain metastases. In all cases the stage migration led to a significant change in the treatment protocol. Sensitivity of FDG-PET was significantly superior to that of CT in the detection of extrathoracic lymph node involvement (100% vs 70%, specificity 98% vs 94%) and distant metastases except to the brain (98% vs 83%, specificity 92% vs 79%). However, FDG-PET was significantly less sensitive than cranial MRI/CT in the detection of brain metastases (46% vs 100%, specificity 97% vs 100%). The introduction of FDG-PET in the diagnostic evaluation of SCLC will improve the staging results and affect patient management, and may reduce the number of tests and invasive procedures. (orig.)

  18. Experience of segmentectomy from 36 Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer at stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Li-qiang; ZHAO Xiao-jing; LUO Qing-quan; HUANG Jia

    2013-01-01

    Background Although video-assisted radical operation for lung cancer has been widely accepted for treatment of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC),the debate over video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) segmentectomy still remains.This study analyzed the clinical outcomes using VATS segmentectomy for stage Ⅰ NSCLC patients to explore the safety and efficacy of VATS segmentectomy for la NSCLC.Methods Retrospective review was conducted of patients who underwent VATS segmentectomy for clinical stage Ⅰ NSCLC at Shanghai Chest Hospital between November 2009 and May 2012.VATS segmentectomy was performed on 36 patients.Analyses of the patient group were performed on patient demographics and clinical characteristics,intraoperative parameters,complications,and postoperative survival.Results Thirty-five of thirty-six patients underwent VATS segmentectomy with only one conversion to open thoracic surgery.There was one peri-operative mortality from the segmentectomy group and all other patients are alive with a median follow up of 327 days.The mean volume of chest tube drainage after operation for segmentectomy was 1021.4 ml.Among other parameters,the mean blood loss was 162.5 ml (50.0-1600.0 ml),the mean operation time 124.8 minutes (75.0-271.0 minutes),chest tube duration 4.1 days (2-8 days),and the mean length of hospital stay 6.2 days (4-11 days).There was one (2.8%) locoregional recurrence after segmentectomy.Two patients successfully underwent bilateral segmentectomies and are still disease free.Conclusion For patients with stage Ⅰ NSCLC,VATS segmentectomy offers a safe and equally effective option and can be applied to complicated operations such as bilateral segmentectomy.

  19. Second lung cancers in patients successfully treated for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B E; Cortazar, P; Chute, J P

    1997-08-01

    The rate of developing second lung cancers and other aerodigestive tumors in patients who have been treated for both small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is approximately 10-fold higher than other adult smokers. The risk of second lung cancers in patients surviving resection of NSCLC is approximately 1% to 2% per year. The series reported show that the patients who develop second NSCLCs tend to have early-stage NSCLC (predominantly stage I and II). The survival of patients after the second resection of lung cancer is similar to that of patients presenting with initial NSCLC. The risk of second lung cancers in patients surviving SCLC is 2% to 14% per patient per year and increases two- to seven-fold with the passage of time from 2 to 10 years. The risk of second lung cancers in patients treated for SCLC appears to be higher than that found in patients with NSCLC who were treated only with surgical resection. In addition, the chances of successful resection of second primary NSCLCs in patients who were treated for SCLC is much less than that for patients with metachronous lung cancers after an initial NSCLC. Patients treated for SCLC who continue to smoke cigarettes increase their rate of developing second lung cancers. The contribution of chest radiation and chemotherapy administration to the risk of developing second lung tumors remain to be defined but may be responsible for some of the increased risk in patients treated for SCLC compared to patients undergoing a surgical resection for NSCLC.

  20. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  1. The impact of ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration of no palpable supraclavicular lymph nodes on diagnosis and staging in advanced lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gülcihan; Tutar, Mehmet; Bayram, Mehmet; Bakan, Dilek; Gür, Aygün; Camsari, Güngör

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis and accurate staging of lung cancer is essential for selection of appropriate curative or palliative therapy and affects patient prognosis. Both invasive and non-invasive procedures are used for this purpose. We aimed to assess the frequency of no palpable supraclavicular lymph node metastases in lung cancer patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes, and their impact on diagnosis and staging using ultrasound in this study. Lung cancer patients with no palpable supraclavicular lymph nodes and at least 2 enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes on computerized tomography underwent supraclavicular ultrasound examination. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-guided FNA) was performed when enlarged lymph nodes were present. Supraclavicular lymph node metastasis was confirmed cytologically via US-guided FNA in 16 (40%) of 40 patients. Upper paratracheal lymphadenomegaly was significantly higher in patients with supraclavicular metastases than in those without. No statistical significant differences were observed in the stage, cell types, and metastases of patients with or without supraclavicular metastases. In 3 patients US-guided FNA was used for diagnosis. More than one-third of lung cancer patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes had supraclavicular lymph node metastases in present study. US-guided FNA is an easier, safer, and less invasive procedure than standard techniques used to diagnose lung cancer patients with enlarged mediastinal lymph nodes.

  2. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

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    ... historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: 756x576 ... Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; drawing and inset ...

  3. Establishment of a biomarker model for predicting bone metastasis in resected stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Zhen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting bone metastasis in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods The model consists of 105 cases of stage III NSCLC, who were treated and followed up. The patients were divided into bone metastasis group (n = 45 and non-bone metastasis group (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence (n = 60. Tissue microarrays were constructed for immunohistochemical study of 10 molecular markers associated with bone metastasis, based on which a model was established via logistic regression analysis for predicting the risk of bone metastases. The model was prospectively validated in another 40 patients with stage III NSCLC. Results The molecular model for predicting bone metastasis was logit (P = − 2.538 + 2.808 CXCR4 +1.629 BSP +0.846 OPN-2.939 BMP4. ROC test showed that when P ≥ 0.408, the sensitivity was up to 71% and specificity of 70%. Model validation in the 40 cases in clinical trial (NCT 01124253 demonstrated that the prediction sensitivity of the model was 85.7%, specificity 66.7%, Kappa: 0.618, with a high degree of consistency. Conclusion The molecular model combining CXCR4, BSP, OPN and BMP4 could help predict the risk of bone metastasis in stage IIIa and IIIb resected NSCLC.

  4. Comparison of PG-SGA, SGA and body-composition measurement in detecting malnutrition among newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and benign conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rong; Wu, Jing; Ma, Meili; Pei, Jun; Song, Yiyi; Zhang, Xueyan; Han, Baohui

    2011-09-01

    Assessment tools and body-composition measurements are useful in diagnosing malnutrition. Which one is better for lung disease patients is unclear. The objectives of the present study are: to assess relationships between different methods of nutritional measurements in lung diseases patients; to determine which one is better in diagnosing malnutrition for lung disease patients; and to determine whether lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign lung disease patients using different measurements. A total of 96 newly diagnosed primary lung cancer patients in stage IIIB/IV and 52 benign lung disease patients nutritional status were assessed according to the SGA, the scored PG-SGA, and serum albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, body mass index (BMI), and weight. A total of 40% of lung cancer patients were severely malnourished, with men or elder having a higher rate of malnutrition. Significantly lower values of weight, BMI, total lymphocyte count, transferrin, prealbumin and serum albumin were found for them. Age, sex, weight, weight half year ago and prealbumin are in the regression equation to predict them. For benign lung disease patients, 21.2% were severely malnourished with significantly lower values of weight and transferrin. Age and prealbumin are in the equation to predict severely malnourished benign lung disease patients. The highest receiver operation characteristic area under the curve was found for the PG-SGA score, BMI and weight. PG-SGA global rating, age and iron-transferring protein are in the equation for predicting disease status. The SGA and PG-SGA are appropriate for identifying malnutrition in lung disease patients. Lung cancer patients can be differentiated from benign conditions by PG-SGA.

  5. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  6. Socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis, and in time intervals on the lung cancer pathway from first symptom to treatment: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Lynne F; Sowden, Sarah; Rubin, Greg; White, Martin; Adams, Jean

    2017-05-01

    Cancer diagnosis at an early stage increases the chance of curative treatment and of survival. It has been suggested that delays on the pathway from first symptom to diagnosis and treatment may be socio-economically patterned, and contribute to socio-economic differences in receipt of treatment and in cancer survival. This review aimed to assess the published evidence for socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis of lung cancer, and in the length of time spent on the lung cancer pathway. MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases were searched to locate cohort studies of adults with a primary diagnosis of lung cancer, where the outcome was stage at diagnosis or the length of time spent within an interval on the care pathway, or a suitable proxy measure, analysed according to a measure of socio-economic position. Meta-analysis was undertaken when there were studies available with suitable data. Of the 461 records screened, 39 papers were included in the review (20 from the UK) and seven in a final meta-analysis for stage at diagnosis. There was no evidence of socio-economic inequalities in late stage at diagnosis in the most, compared with the least, deprived group (OR=1.04, 95% CI=0.92 to 1.19). No socio-economic inequalities in the patient interval or in time from diagnosis to treatment were found. Socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis are thought to be an important explanatory factor for survival inequalities in cancer. However, socio-economic inequalities in stage at diagnosis were not found in a meta-analysis for lung cancer. CRD42014007145. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. The chimeric transcript RUNX1-GLRX5: a biomarker for good postoperative prognosis in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Rie; Amano, Yosuke; Kawakami, Masanori; Sunohara, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Kousuke; Kage, Hidenori; Ohishi, Nobuya; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nakajima, Jun; Fukayama, Masashi; Nagase, Takahide; Takai, Daiya

    2016-02-01

    Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer cases have been recognized as having a low risk of relapse; however, occasionally, relapse may occur. To predict clinical outcome in Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients, we searched for chimeric transcripts that can be used as biomarkers and identified a novel chimeric transcript, RUNX1-GLRX5, comprising RUNX1, a transcription factor, and GLRX5. This chimera was detected in approximately half of the investigated Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients (44/104 cases, 42.3%). Although there was no significant difference in the overall survival rate between RUNX1-GLRX5-positive and -negative cases (P = 0.088), a significantly lower relapse rate was observed in the RUNX1-GLRX5-positive cases (P = 0.039), indicating that this chimera can be used as a biomarker for good prognosis in Stage IA patients. Detection of the RUNX1-GLRX5 chimeric transcript may therefore be useful for the determination of a postoperative treatment plan for Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

  8. A Case of Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Korean Medicine Therapy Alone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-hyun Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This report presents a case that shows a significant anticancer effect of Korean medicine therapy (KMT. A 79-year-old man, who was diagnosed as stage Ⅳ non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in December 2012, was treated with KMT including intravenous pharmacopunctures and oral herbal medicine from February 22, 2013, until September 2013 without any surgical intervention, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The intravenous pharmacopunctures were the wild ginseng pharmacopuncture, Cordyceps sinensis pharmacopuncture and Trichosanthes kirilowii pharmacopuncture. The oral herbal medicine used was soramdan, made of cultivated wild ginseng. The effectiveness of this therapy was evaluated with computed tomography and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG performance scale. The size of the tumor mass was markedly decreased and the ECOG performance scale was also improved. These results suggest that KMT alone can be an effective method to treat NSCLC.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neoplasm of lung malignant tumor of lung pulmonary cancer pulmonary carcinoma pulmonary neoplasms respiratory carcinoma Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources ... Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Non-Small Cell Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Small Cell ...

  10. Lung cancer: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Stefan; Wirtz, Hubert

    2009-12-01

    Much progress has been made in the treatment of lung cancer in the last ten years (adjuvant chemotherapy, targeted therapy, individualized therapy). Nonetheless, lung cancer is still the leading cause of death due to cancer and thus remains a major medical, scientific, and social problem. This review is based on national and international recommendations and selected articles from the literature. Cigarette smoking is the major pathogenic factor for lung cancer. Lung cancer can be divided into two major types that differ in their biological behavior, small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Whenever possible, the diagnosis should be confirmed by biopsy, the extent of disease should be documented in detail (international TNM classification/staging), and the patient's functional level should be assessed with a view toward treatment planning. Surgery for non-small cell lung cancer with curative intent is possible up to stage IIIA, while stage IIIB is the domain of radiotherapy. Surgery for small cell lung cancer with curative intent is possible for rare cases in early stages (T1N0 and T2N0, i.e., stage IA and IB). As long as small cell lung cancer is restricted to one side of the chest, simultaneous radiation therapy and chemotherapy are indicated. If a malignant pleural effusion or distant metastases are present, both lung cancers are treated palliatively with platinum-based chemotherapy.

  11. Survival and Quality of Life After Stereotactic or 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy for Inoperable Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@rt.umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Postmus, Douwe [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate survival and local recurrence after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) or three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) administered for early-stage primary lung cancer and to investigate longitudinal changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters after either treatment. Methods and Materials: Two prospective cohorts of inoperable patients with T1-2N0M0 primary lung tumors were analyzed. Patients received 70 Gy in 35 fractions with 3D-CRT or 60 Gy in three to eight fractions with SABR. Global quality of life (GQOL), physical functioning (PF), and patient-rated dyspnea were assessed using the respective dimensions of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire-C30 and LC13. HRQOL was analyzed using multivariate linear mixed-effects modeling, survival and local control (LC) using the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards analysis, and Fine and Gray multivariate competing risk analysis as appropriate. Results: Overall survival (OS) was better after SABR compared with 3D-CRT with a HR of 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5-4.8; p < 0.01). 3D-CRT conferred a subhazard ratio for LC of 5.0 (95% CI: 1.7-14.7; p < 0.01) compared with SABR. GQOL and PF were stable after SABR (p = 0.21 and p = 0.62, respectively). Dyspnea increased after SABR by 3.2 out of 100 points (95% CI: 1.0-5.3; p < 0.01), which is clinically insignificant. At 1 year, PF decreased by an excess of 8.7 out of 100 points (95% CI: 2.8-14.7; p < 0.01) after 3D-CRT compared with SABR. Conclusion: In this nonrandomized comparison of two prospective cohorts of medically inoperable patients with Stage I lung cancer, OS and LC were better after SABR. GQOL, PF, and patient-rated dyspnea were stable after SABR, whereas PF decreased after 3D-CRT approaching clinical significance already at 1 year.

  12. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

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    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table ... you should know about six of the most common cancers and some of the NCI funded research ...

  14. FGFR1, 2 and 3 protein overexpression and molecular aberrations of FGFR3 in early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, Willemijn Sme; Mittempergher, Lorenza; Willems, Stefan M; Bosma, Astrid J; Peters, Dennis Dgc; van der Noort, Vincent; Japenga, Eva J; Peeters, Ton; Koole, Koos; Šuštić, Tonći; Blaauwgeers, J L; van Noesel, Carel J; Bernards, René; van den Heuvel, Michel M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine protein expression levels of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) 1, 2 and 3 in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Additionally, a screen to define the frequency of FGFR3-TACC3 translocation and FGFR3 amplification was performed. Archived tissues from

  15. COMPARISON OF COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY AND CO-57 BLEOMYCIN SCINTIGRAPHY IN STAGING THE MEDIASTINAL LYMPH-NODES OF PATIENTS WITH NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLAAN, JG; VANDENBRINK, A; PIERS, DA; BEEKHUIS, H; KENGEN, RA

    1990-01-01

    The value of computed tomography (CT) and of Co-57-bleomycin scintigraphy (Co-57-BLM) in staging the mediastinal lymph nodes was compared in 28 patients suffering from non-small-cell lung cancer. The results were assessed against the pathological findings obtained during thoracotomy or

  16. Randomized controlled trial of resection versus radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy in stage IIIA-N2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. van Meerbeeck (Jan); G.W.P.M. Kramer (Gijs); P.E.Y. van Schil (Paul); C. Legrand; E.F. Smit (Egbert); F.M.N.H. Schramel (Franz); V.C.G. Tjan-Heijnen (Vivianne); B. Biesma (Bonne); C. Debruyne (Channa); N. van Zandwijk (Nico); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Induction chemotherapy before surgical resection increases survival compared with surgical resection alone in patients with stage IIIA-N2 non - small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We hypothesized that, following a response to induction chemotherapy, surgical resection would be su

  17. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  18. The Therapeutic Effects of the Radiotherapy Plus TCM Treatment Observed in Senile Non-Parvicellular Lung Cancer Patients at the Late Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝孝筑; 姜玉华

    2003-01-01

    @@ 47 senile non-parvicellular lung cancer patients at stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ were randomly divided into a treatment group (26 cases) treated by radiotherapy plus traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and a control group (21 cases) treated only by radiotherapy for observation of the therapeutic effects.

  19. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  20. FDG PET for staging of advanced non-small cell lung cancer prior to neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eschmann, S.M.; Harer-Mouline, C.; Dohmen, B.M.; Bares, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany); Friedel, G. [Schillerhoehe-Hospital for Lung Diseases, Gerlingen (Germany); Paulsen, F.; Budach, W. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) for the staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) before combined neoadjuvant, i.e. preoperative, radio-chemotherapy (RCT). From November 1998 until September 2001, 101 patients with NSCLC were investigated prospectively. The inclusion criterion was a histologically proven NSCLC of stage IIIA or B according to conventional staging including biopsy. The results of PET were compared with those obtained by mediastinoscopy, computed tomography (CT), bone scan and abdominal ultrasonography. Validation of discrepant findings was achieved by biopsy or repeated CT. PET proved to be highly accurate for the detection of lymph node metastases (sensitivity 96%, specificity 73%, positive predictive value 88%, negative predictive value 89%, accuracy 88%) as well as distant metastases (in 25/101 patients, all previously unknown). PET findings changed further treatment in 29/101 patients (29%). Twenty-five were excluded from RCT due to the presence of previously unknown distant metastases. One patient was free of metastases and therefore was operated on without pre-treatment. Two patients did not receive any further treatment because a malignant tumour could be excluded after PET. In the final patient PET demonstrated a tumour pattern not typical for NSCLC which could be attributed to a seminoma after repeated biopsy. FDG PET is the most accurate non-invasive diagnostic procedure for the staging of advanced NSCLC. Therefore use of FDG PET is highly recommended in order to select patients for neoadjuvant or other stage-dependent treatment modalities. (orig.)

  1. Clinical significance of preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen level in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takashi; Hachimaru, Ayumi; Tochii, Daisuke; Tochii, Sachiko; Takagi, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to assess the preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level in patients with clinical stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to evaluate its clinical significance. Methods Between January 2005 and December 2014, a total of 378 patients with clinical stage IA NSCLC underwent complete resection with systematic node dissection. The survival rate was estimated starting from the date of surgery to the date of either death or the last follow-up by the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate analyses by log-rank tests were used to determine prognostic factors. Cox proportional hazards ratios were used to identify independent predictors of poor prognosis. Clinicopathological predictors of lymph node metastases were evaluated by logistic regression analyses. Results The 5-year survival rate of patients with an elevated preoperative serum CEA level was significantly lower than that of patients with a normal CEA level (75.5% vs. 87.7%; P=0.02). However, multivariate analysis did not show the preoperative serum CEA level to be an independent predictor of poor prognosis. Postoperative pathological factors, including lymphatic permeation, visceral pleural invasion, and lymph node metastases, tended to be positive in patients with an elevated preoperative serum CEA level. In addition, the CEA level was a statistically significant independent clinical predictor of lymph node metastases. Conclusions The preoperative serum CEA level was not an independent predictor of poor prognosis in patients with pathological stage IA NSCLC but was an important clinical predictor of tumor invasiveness and lymph node metastases in patients with clinical stage IA NSCLC. Therefore, measurement of the preoperative serum CEA level should be considered even for patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  2. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... late stages: Bone pain or tenderness Eyelid drooping Facial paralysis Hoarseness or changing voice Joint pain Nail problems Shoulder pain Swallowing difficulty Swelling of the face or arms Weakness These symptoms can also be ...

  3. Fractal dimension (df) as a new structural biomarker of clot microstructure in different stages of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nia Anne; Harrison, Nicholas Kim; Morris, Roger H Keith; Noble, Simon; Lawrence, Matthew James; D'Silva, Lindsay Antonio; Broome, Laura; Brown, Martin Rowan; Hawkins, Karl M; Williams, Phylip Rhodri; Davidson, Simon; Evans, Phillip Adrian

    2015-11-25

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is common in cancer patients, and is the second commonest cause of death associated with the disease. Patients with chronic inflammation, such as cancer, have been shown to have pathological clot structures with modulated mechanical properties. Fractal dimension (df) is a new technique which has been shown to act as a marker of the microstructure and mechanical properties of blood clots, and can be performed more readily than current methods such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We measured df in 87 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed lung cancer prior to treatment and 47 matched-controls. Mean group values were compared for all patients with lung cancer vs controls and for limited disease vs extensive disease. Results were compared with conventional markers of coagulation, fibrinolysis and SEM images. Significantly higher values of df were observed in lung cancer patients compared with controls and patients with extensive disease had higher values than those with limited disease (p< 0.05), whilst conventional markers failed to distinguish between these groups. The relationship between df of the incipient clot and mature clot microstructure was confirmed by SEM and computational modelling: higher df was associated with highly dense clots formed of smaller fibrin fibres in lung cancer patients compared to controls. This study demonstrates that df is a sensitive technique which quantifies the structure and mechanical properties of blood clots in patients with lung cancer. Our data suggests that df has the potential to identify patients with an abnormal clot microstructure and greatest VTE risk.

  4. FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism may affect the clinical stage of patients with lung cancer by modulating the transcriptional profile of normal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvella, Felicia S; Frullanti, Elisa; Galvan, Antonella; Spinola, Monica; Noci, Sara; De Cecco, Loris; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Incarbone, Matteo; Alloisio, Marco; Calabrò, Elisa; Pastorino, Ugo; Skaug, Vidar; Haugen, Aage; Taioli, Emanuela; Dragani, Tommaso A

    2009-06-15

    The association of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) Gly388Arg polymorphism with clinical stage and overall survival in a series of 541 Italian lung adenocarcinoma (ADCA) patients indicated a significantly decreased survival in patients carrying the rare Arg388 allele as compared to that in Gly/Gly homozygous patients [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.9], with the decrease related to the association of the same polymorphism with clinical stage (HR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6). By contrast, no significant association was detected in small series of either Norwegian lung ADCA patients or Italian lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of known FGFR4 ligands expressed in lung (FGF9, FGF18 and FGF19) were not associated with clinical stage or survival and showed no interaction with FGFR4. Analysis of gene expression profile in normal lungs according to FGFR4 genotype indicated a specific transcript pattern associated with the allele carrier status, suggesting a functional role for the FGFR4 polymorphism already detectable in normal lung. These findings confirm the significant association of the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism with clinical stage and overall survival in an Italian lung ADCA population and demonstrate a FGFR4 genotype-dependent transcriptional profile present in normal lung tissue.

  5. A Population-Based Comparative Effectiveness Study of Radiation Therapy Techniques in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Jeremy P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Murphy, James D. [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Science, University of California– San Diego, Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, California (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Concerns have been raised about the potential for worse treatment outcomes because of dosimetric inaccuracies related to tumor motion and increased toxicity caused by the spread of low-dose radiation to normal tissues in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We therefore performed a population-based comparative effectiveness analysis of IMRT, conventional 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional radiation therapy (2D-RT) in stage III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database to identify a cohort of patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC from 2002 to 2009 treated with IMRT, 3D-CRT, or 2D-RT. Using Cox regression and propensity score matching, we compared survival and toxicities of these treatments. Results: The proportion of patients treated with IMRT increased from 2% in 2002 to 25% in 2009, and the use of 2D-RT decreased from 32% to 3%. In univariate analysis, IMRT was associated with improved overall survival (OS) (hazard ratio [HR] 0.90, P=.02) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) (HR 0.89, P=.02). After controlling for confounders, IMRT was associated with similar OS (HR 0.94, P=.23) and CSS (HR 0.94, P=.28) compared with 3D-CRT. Both techniques had superior OS compared with 2D-RT. IMRT was associated with similar toxicity risks on multivariate analysis compared with 3D-CRT. Propensity score matched model results were similar to those from adjusted models. Conclusions: In this population-based analysis, IMRT for stage III NSCLC was associated with similar OS and CSS and maintained similar toxicity risks compared with 3D-CRT.

  6. MYC and Human Telomerase Gene (TERC) Copy Number Gain in Early-stage Non–small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flacco, Antonella; Ludovini, Vienna; Bianconi, Fortunato; Ragusa, Mark; Bellezza, Guido; Tofanetti, Francesca R.; Pistola, Lorenza; Siggillino, Annamaria; Vannucci, Jacopo; Cagini, Lucio; Sidoni, Angelo; Puma, Francesco; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Crinò, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the frequency of MYC and TERC increased gene copy number (GCN) in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and evaluated the correlation of these genomic imbalances with clinicopathologic parameters and outcome. Materials and Methods Tumor tissues were obtained from 113 resected NSCLCs. MYC and TERC GCNs were tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) according to the University of Colorado Cancer Center (UCCC) criteria and based on the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) classification. Results When UCCC criteria were applied, 41 (36%) cases for MYC and 41 (36%) cases for TERC were considered FISH-positive. MYC and TERC concurrent FISH-positive was observed in 12 cases (11%): 2 (17%) cases with gene amplification and 10 (83%) with high polysomy. By using the ROC analysis, high MYC (mean ≥2.83 copies/cell) and TERC (mean ≥2.65 copies/cell) GCNs were observed in 60 (53.1%) cases and 58 (51.3%) cases, respectively. High TERC GCN was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) histology (P = 0.001). In univariate analysis, increased MYC GCN was associated with shorter overall survival (P = 0.032 [UCCC criteria] or P = 0.02 [ROC classification]), whereas high TERC GCN showed no association. In multivariate analysis including stage and age, high MYC GCN remained significantly associated with worse overall survival using both the UCCC criteria (P = 0.02) and the ROC classification (P = 0.008). Conclusions Our results confirm MYC as frequently amplified in early-stage NSCLC and increased MYC GCN as a strong predictor of worse survival. Increased TERC GCN does not have prognostic impact but has strong association with squamous histology. PMID:25806711

  7. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation......Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  8. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  9. Methylation of breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) predicts recurrence in patients with curatively resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Hiroaki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Nakano, Kikuo; Taniyama, Kiyomi; Miyata, Yoshihiro; Ohdan, Hideki; Okada, Morihito

    2013-02-15

    Even after early detection and curative resection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a significant fraction of patients develop recurrent disease. Molecular biomarkers that can predict the risk of recurrence thus need to be identified to improve clinical outcomes. Using the methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, promoter methylation of the breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) was assessed in cancer tissues from 70 patients with curatively resected stage I NSCLC. The clinical relevance of BRCA1 methylation status was evaluated in terms of outcome of the disease. Methylation of the BRCA1 promoter was detected in 13 of 70 patients (18.6%). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that BRCA1 methylation was an independent risk factor for recurrence (P = .0197) and that patients with BRCA1 methylation demonstrated significantly poorer recurrence-free survival compared to those without (P = .0139). Cox's proportional hazard regression analysis revealed that BRCA1 methylation was an independent risk factor for recurrence-free survival (P = .0155). Methylated BRCA1 can be a potential biomarker that predicts the prognosis after curative resection of stage I NSCLC. Considering that BRCA1 plays a role in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis, it is plausible that identification of methylated BRCA1 could provide information that is clinically relevant to tailored adjuvant therapy. Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  10. Completeness of TNM staging of small-cell and non-small-cell lung cancer in the Danish cancer registry, 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleuran, Thomas; Søgaard, Mette; Frøslev, Trine; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Jensen, Henrik Kirstein; Friis, Søren; Olsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    We examined the completeness of TNM staging of small-cell (SCLC) and nonsmall- cell (NSCLC) lung cancer in the national Danish Cancer Registry (DCR) and whether staging varied by year of diagnosis, gender, age, degree of comorbidity, or presence of histopathological diagnosis. We identified all patients with SCLCs and NSCLCs registered in the DCR during 2004-2009 and examined the completeness of their TNM registrations. Completeness was defined as the number of recorded individuals with TNM divided by the total number of patients. Completeness was calculated for TNM, T, N, and M individually, overall, and by year of diagnosis, gender, age at diagnosis, and comorbidity. Data regarding comorbidity was obtained from the Danish National Patient Register (DNPR). We performed separate analyses for patients with a histopathologically verified diagnosis of NSCLC. Finally, we designed an algorithm to categorize tumors with missing TNM components as limited, extensive, or distant disease. Overall TNM staging completeness was 77.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 76.1%-78.8%) for SCLC and 77.9% (95% CI: 77.3%-78.4%) for NSCLC. Completeness did not vary by gender and increased during the study period. The proportion of staged patients was lower among patients above 80 years of age or with medium to high levels of comorbidity. Overall TNM completeness for SCLC and NSCLC in the Danish Cancer Registry is high, but decreases with increasing levels of comorbidity and at ages greater than 80 years. Researchers should be aware of these potential sources of bias.

  11. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... are only ameliorated to a minor degree by a healthy diet....

  12. Understanding cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide more detailed information about the cancer stage. TNM Staging System The most common system for staging ... in the form of solid tumor is the TNM system. Most providers and cancer centers use it ...

  13. Risk factors of brain metastases in completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Xiao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain metastases (BM is one of the most common failures of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC after combined-modality therapy. The outcome of trials on prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI has prompted us to identify the highest-risk subset most likely to benefit from PCI. Focusing on patients with completely resected pathological stage IIIA-N2 (pIIIA-N2 NSCLC, we aimed to assess risk factors of BM and to define the highest-risk subset. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, the records of 217 consecutive patients with pIIIA-N2 NSCLC in our institution were reviewed. The cumulative incidence of BM was estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method, and differences between the groups were analyzed using log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was applied to assess risk factors of BM. Results Fifty-three (24.4 % patients developed BM at some point during their clinical course. On multivariate analysis, non-squamous cell cancer (relative risk [RR]: 4.13, 95 % CI: 1.86–9.19; P = 0.001 and the ratio of metastatic to examined nodes or lymph node ratio (LNR ≥ 30 % (RR: 3.33, 95 % CI: 1.79–6.18; P = 0.000 were found to be associated with an increased risk of BM. In patients with non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 %, the 5-year actuarial risk of BM was 57.3 %. Conclusions In NSCLC, patients with completely resected pIIIA-N2 non-squamous cell cancer and LNR ≥ 30 % are at the highest risk for BM, and are most likely to benefit from PCI. Further studies are warranted to investigate the effect of PCI on this subset of patients.

  14. Telomere length of tumor tissues and survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hyo-Sung; Choi, Yi Young; Choi, Jin Eun; Lee, Won Kee; Lee, Eungbae; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Lee, Jaehee; Cha, Seung Ick; Kim, Chang Ho; Park, Jae Yong

    2014-04-01

    Telomere shortening leads to genomic instability that drives oncogenesis through the activation of telomerase and the generation of other mutations necessary for tumor progression. This study was conducted to determine the impact of telomere shortening on the survival of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Relative telomere length in tumor tissues was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in 164 patients with surgically resected NSCLC. The association between telomere length and overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed. When the patients were categorized into quartiles based on telomere length, those patients with the 1st quartile (shortest) of telomere length had a significantly worse OS and DFS compared to patients with the 2nd to the 4th quartiles of telomere length (adjusted hazard ratio for OS = 2.67, 95% confidence interval = 1.50-4.75, P = 0.001; and adjusted hazard ratio for DFS = 1.92, 95% confidence interval = 1.17-3.14, P = 0.01). An association between telomere length and survival outcome was more pronounced in squamous cell carcinomas than adenocarcinomas (P-value of test for homogeneity for OS and DFS = 0.05 and 0.02, respectively). Telomere length of tumor tissues is an independent prognostic factor in patients with surgically resected early stage NSCLC.

  15. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Summary of Proposals for Revisions of the Classification of Lung Cancers with Multiple Pulmonary Sites of Involvement in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G; Franklin, Wilbur A; Marom, Edith M; Travis, William D; Girard, Nicolas; Arenberg, Douglas A; Bolejack, Vanessa; Donington, Jessica S; Mazzone, Peter J; Tanoue, Lynn T; Rusch, Valerie W; Crowley, John; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramón

    2016-05-01

    Patients with lung cancer who harbor multiple pulmonary sites of disease have been challenging to classify; a subcommittee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee was charged with developing proposals for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification to address this issue. A systematic literature review and analysis of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer database was performed to develop proposals for revision in an iterative process involving multispecialty international input and review. Details of the evidence base are summarized in other articles. Four patterns of disease are recognized; the clinical presentation, pathologic correlates, and biologic behavior of these suggest specific applications of the TNM classification rules. First, it is proposed that second primary lung cancers be designated with a T, N, and M category for each tumor. Second, tumors with a separate tumor nodule of the same histologic type (either suspected or proved) should be classified according to the location of the separate nodule relative to the index tumor-T3 for a same-lobe, T4 for a same-side (different lobe), and M1a for an other-side location-with a single N and M category. Third, multiple tumors with prominent ground glass (imaging) or lepidic (histologic) features should be designated by the T category of the highest T lesion, the number or m in parentheses (#/m) to indicate the multiplicity, and a collective N and M category for all. Finally, it is proposed that diffuse pneumonic-type lung cancers be designated by size (or T3) if in one lobe, T4 if involving multiple same-side lobes, and M1a if involving both lungs with a single N and M category for all areas of involvement. We propose to tailor TNM classification of multiple pulmonary sites of lung cancer to reflect the unique aspects of four different patterns of presentation. We hope that this will lead to

  16. Who should be admitted to the intensive care unit? The outcome of intensive care unit admission in stage IIIB-IV lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Mi-Jung; Cho, Young-Jae; Park, Jong Sun; Kim, Jin Won; Chang, Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Yoon, Ho Il; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jae Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Lee, Jong Seok

    2014-03-01

    Critical care for advanced lung cancer patients is still controversial, and the appropriate method for the selection of patients who may benefit from intensive care unit (ICU) care is not clearly defined. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of stage IIIB-IV lung cancer patients admitted to the medical ICU of a university hospital in Korea between 2003 and 2011. Of 95 patients, 64 (67%) had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS)≥2, and 79 (84%) had non-small-cell lung cancer. In total, 28 patients (30%) were newly diagnosed or were receiving first-line treatment, and 22 (23%) were refractory or bedridden. Mechanical ventilation was required in 85 patients (90%), and ICU mortality and hospital mortality were 57 and 78%, respectively. According to a multivariate analysis, a PaO2/FiO2 ratiocare. Oncologists should try to discuss palliative care and end-of-life issues in advance to avoid futile care.

  17. Nodal Stage of Surgically Resected Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Its Effect on Recurrence Patterns and Overall Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varlotto, John M., E-mail: john.varlotto@umassmemorial.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Yao, Aaron N. [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); DeCamp, Malcolm M. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ramakrishna, Satvik [Northwestern University School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Recht, Abe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Flickinger, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Andrei, Adin [Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Reed, Michael F. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Heart and Vascular Institute, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Toth, Jennifer W. [Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Pennsylvania State University-Hershey, Hershey, Pennsylvania (United States); Fizgerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Higgins, Kristin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Zheng, Xiao [Department of Healthcare Policy and Research, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Shelkey, Julie [Department of Anesthesiology, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); and others

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for patients with resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with N2 involvement. We investigated the relationship between nodal stage and local-regional recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR) and overall survival (OS) for patients having an R0 resection. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional database of consecutive patients undergoing R0 resection for stage I-IIIA NSCLC from 1995 to 2008 was used. Patients receiving any radiation therapy before relapse were excluded. A total of 1241, 202, and 125 patients were identified with N0, N1, and N2 involvement, respectively; 161 patients received chemotherapy. Cumulative incidence rates were calculated for LR and DR as first sites of failure, and Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for OS. Competing risk analysis and proportional hazards models were used to examine LR, DR, and OS. Independent variables included age, sex, surgical procedure, extent of lymph node sampling, histology, lymphatic or vascular invasion, tumor size, tumor grade, chemotherapy, nodal stage, and visceral pleural invasion. Results: The median follow-up time was 28.7 months. Patients with N1 or N2 nodal stage had rates of LR similar to those of patients with N0 disease, but were at significantly increased risk for both DR (N1, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-2.59; P=.001; N2, HR = 2.32, 95% CI: 1.55-3.48; P<.001) and death (N1, HR = 1.46, 95% CI: 1.18-1.81; P<.001; N2, HR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.78-3.04; P<.001). LR was associated with squamous histology, visceral pleural involvement, tumor size, age, wedge resection, and segmentectomy. The most frequent site of LR was the mediastinum. Conclusions: Our investigation demonstrated that nodal stage is directly associated with DR and OS but not with LR. Thus, even some patients with, N0-N1 disease are at relatively high risk of local recurrence. Prospective

  18. Prevalence of and risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with early-stage COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim ES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Sun Kim,1 Young Tae Kim,2 Chang Hyun Kang,2 In Kyu Park,2 Won Bae,1 Sun Mi Choi,1 Jinwoo Lee,1 Young Sik Park,1 Chang-Hoon Lee,1 Sang-Min Lee,1 Jae-Joon Yim,1 Young Whan Kim,1 Sung Koo Han,1 Chul-Gyu Yoo1 1Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether the prevalence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is even higher in the early stages of COPD than in such patients with normal lung function and to verify the usefulness of symptom- or quality of life (QoL-based scores in predicting risk for PPCs.Patients and methods: Patients undergoing pulmonary resection for NSCLC between July 2012 and October 2014 were prospectively enrolled. Preoperative measurements of lung function, dyspnea, and QoL, operative characteristics, PPCs, duration of postoperative hospitalization, and in-hospital mortality were assessed.Results: Among 351 consecutive patients with NSCLC, 343 patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 ≥70% of predicted value were enrolled. At least one PPC occurred in 57 (16.6% patients. Prevalence of PPC was higher in patients with COPD (30.1% than in those with normal spirometry (10.0%; P<0.001. However, in patients with COPD, the prevalence of PPC was not different in patients with FEV1 ≥70% compared to those with FEV1 <70% and between group A (low risk and less symptoms and group B (low risk and more symptoms patients with COPD, based on the new Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease 2011 guidelines. In patients with COPD, body mass index (odds ratio [OR]: 0.80, P=0.007, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung (DLCO, % predicted value (OR: 0.97, P=0.024, and operation time (OR: 1.01, P=0.003, but not COPD assessment test or St

  19. An Overview: Treatment of Lung Cancer on Researcher Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javeria Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers is defined as the uncontrolled cell divisions. Cell does not grow maturely and destined to uncontrolled cell growth. When these cells of lungs grow uncontrolled it is called lung cancer. Nowadays mortality rate due to lung cancer is increasing day by day. Many treatment and diagnoses are now a day’s available to deal with lung cancer. Here we disused different method for diagnosis the common types of lung cancer Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer Limited Stage, Small Cell Lung Cancer - Extensive Stage, Lung Adenocarcinoma, Squamous Cell Carcinoma,Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC, Metastatic lung cancer.

  20. Ovarian Cancer Stage IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and tissues outside the abdomen, including the lung, liver, bone, and lymph nodes in the groin. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Ovarian Cancer Cells or Tissue -- ...

  1. Actualización de la estadificación del cáncer de pulmón Lung cancer staging: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian González

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC, junto con The International Union Against Cancer (UICC y The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC, crearon un Comité Internacional de Estadificación (ISC que recopiló retrospectivamente y analizó los datos procedentes de pacientes de diferentes partes del mundo, con el propósito de efectuar cambios en la 6a edición del TNM de cáncer de pulmón. La misma había sido publicada en el 2002 y no había tenido modificaciones desde 1997 (5a edición, por lo que con la actualización se buscó establecer una estadificación adecuada y segura, necesaria para describir en forma estandarizada la extensión de la enfermedad, predecir el pronóstico, seleccionar la terapéutica y evaluar los resultados en ensayos clínicos retrospectivos. La 7a edición del TNM de cáncer de pulmón, publicada a fines de 2009 y vigente desde el 1° de enero de 2010, ha incorporado en la estadificación del cáncer de pulmón cambios sustanciales (especialmente referidos al tamaño tumoral y mapeo ganglionar, proponiendo además una nueva agrupación de estadios.The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC together with The International Union Against Cancer (UICC and The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC created an International Staging Committee (ISC that retrospectively collected and analyzed data from patients worldwide with the purpose of introducing changes to the 6th edition of the TNM staging for lung cancer published in 2002, which was not changed since 1997 (5th Edition. The updating was intended to provide an adequate and safe staging, which is necessary to describe, in a standardized manner, the extent of disease, predict prognosis, select therapy, and assess outcomes in prospective clinical trials. The 7th edition of the TNM staging for lung cancer published in late 2009 and effective as of January 1, 2010, have incorporated substantial changes in the staging

  2. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Prognostic factors for post-recurrence survival in patients with completely resected Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In Hag; Yeom, Sung Won; Heo, Seohee; Choi, Won Suk; Yang, Hee Chul; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwhanmien; Cho, Sukki

    2014-02-01

    The clinical course from recurrence to cancer-related death after curative resection has not been clearly elucidated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study examined the clinical outcomes after postoperative recurrence in patients with completely resected Stage I NSCLC. This study included patients who had recurrence after complete resection for pathological Stage I NSCLC between 2003 and 2009. Clinical data evaluated in this study included the diagnostic process of recurrence, recurrence pattern, treatment process and prognosis. A number of clinicopathological factors were analysed for post-recurrence survival by univariate and multivariate analyses. Seventy-two patients experienced recurrence during a median follow-up period of 37.5 months. Thirteen patients (18%) presented symptoms at the initial recurrence. Tumour markers, computed tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography/CT were chosen as the initial diagnostic tools and detected recurrences in 1 (1%), 51 (71%) and 7 (10%) patients, respectively. The mean recurrence-free interval (RFI) was 15.4 months (≤12 months in 34, >12 months in 38 patients). The patterns of recurrence were presented as loco-regional recurrence in 36 (50%) and distant metastasis in 36 patients (50%). Types of the initial treatment included operations in 28 (39%), chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in 38 (53%) and radiofrequency ablation in 2 patients (3%). Four patients (6%) rejected treatment. Forty-three patients (62%) presented a good response to the initial treatment. Thirty-seven patients (51%) died, and the cause of death in all of these patients was cancer-related. The median survival duration after recurrence was 43.6 (1-136) months. Univariate analysis identified no recurrence of symptoms, a good response to treatment and a longer RFI as good prognostic factors, while a good response to treatment and a longer RFI were independent prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Most postoperative recurrences were

  4. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

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    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  5. 30 Gy or 34 Gy? Comparing 2 Single-Fraction SBRT Dose Schedules for Stage I Medically Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Videtic, Gregory M.M., E-mail: videtig@ccf.org; Stephans, Kevin L.; Woody, Neil M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhuang, Tingliang; Magnelli, Anthony; Djemil, Toufik

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To review outcomes of 2 single-fraction lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) schedules used for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients in our institution have been treated on and off protocols using single-fraction SBRT (30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively). All patients had node-negative lung cancer measuring ≤5 cm and lying ≥2 cm beyond the trachea-bronchial tree and were treated on a Novalis/BrainLAB system with the ExactTrac positioning system for daily image guidance. Results: For the interval from 2009 to 2012, 80 patients with 82 lesions were treated with single-fraction lung SBRT. Fifty-five patients (69%) and 25 patients (31%) received 30 Gy and 34 Gy, respectively. In a comparison of 30 Gy and 34 Gy cohorts, patient and tumor characteristics were balanced and median follow-up in months was 18.7 and 17.8, respectively. The average heterogeneity-corrected mean doses to the target were 33.75 Gy and 37.94 Gy for the 30-Gy and 34-Gy prescriptions, respectively. Comparing 30-Gy and 34-Gy cohorts, 92.7% and 84.0% of patients, respectively, experienced no toxicity (P was not significant), and had neither grade 3 nor higher toxicities. For the 30-Gy and 34-Gy patients, rates of 1-year local failure, overall survival, and lung cancer-specific mortality were 2.0% versus 13.8%, 75.0% versus 64.0%, and 2. 1% versus 16.0%, respectively (P values for differences were not significant). Conclusions: This is the largest single-fraction lung SBRT series yet reported. and it confirms the safety, efficacy, and minimal toxicity of this schedule for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

  6. Prognosis and staging of superficial endobronchial lung cancer: the impact of invasion depth, tumor diameter, and coexistent pneumonitis or atelectasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang; ZHENG Hui; GAO Wen; ZHOU Ying; JIANG Sen; SUEN Hon-chi

    2010-01-01

    Background There are few reports discussing the surgical pathological characteristics of superficial endobronchial lung cancer (SELC) defined as cancer growth limited to the bronchial wall. Its prognosis and corresponding TNM staging have not been fully clarified. Little is known as to whether T status is impacted by the existence of associated atelectasis or pneumonia (which might be controversial, indicating either T1 or T2), and circumstantial invasion depth.Methods Between 1988 and 2007, 81 out of 8817 surgically treated patients met SELC criteria; there was no detectable invasion beyond the bronchial wall. A retrospective review was performed and follow-up information was collected.Results The overall five-year survival rate of 81 patients was 85.6%; for NOM0 (n=67), N1M0 (n=7) and N2M0 (n=7)patients, they were 89.3%, 75.0% and 60.0%, respectively. Intraluminal tumor size measured from 0.4 to 3.0 cm;obstructive atelectasis or pneumonia was noted in 14 patients. The presence of tumor-associated obstructive atelectasis or pneumonia did not have a significant impact upon prognosis (P=0.96), nor did the greatest diameter of the tumor (P=0.70). Histology showed carcinoma in situ (level one) in 13 cases; invasion of the submucosal layer (level two) in 12,involvement of the muscular layer (level three) in 20, invasion into the space between the muscular layer and cartilage (level four) in 21, and bronchial cartilage infiltration in 15 (level five). In cases without lymphnode metastases, five-year survival was 100% for the first three levels and 84.0% and 61.3% for the level four and level five.Conclusions Relative to TNM-based prognostic data, superficial endobronchial lung cancer exhibits increased five-year survival rates, and therefore should be placed at the forefront among tumors in the T1 class, regardless of tumor size or the presence of secondary obstructive atelectasis or pneumonia. Lymphnode metastasis is associated with a worse prognosis. Survival is

  7. Video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy is associated with greater recurrence-free survival than stereotactic body radiotherapy for clinical stage I lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, Lorraine D; Echeverria, Alfredo E; Samuelian, Jason; Mayor, Jessica; Casal, Roberto F; Bakaeen, Faisal G; Omer, Shuab; Preventza, Ourania; Mai, Weiyuan; Chen, George; Simpson, Katherine H; Moghanaki, Drew; Zhu, Angela W

    2017-08-16

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy is the standard treatment for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Recent data suggest that in operable patients, stereotactic body radiotherapy produces outcomes comparable to those of surgical resection. In veterans with early non-small cell lung cancer, we compared the outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy and video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy. We retrospectively reviewed data from 183 patients (94.0% male) with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (n = 56) or video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (n = 127) from 2009 to 2014. Propensity matching was used to produce more comparable groups. Primary end points were tumor control and overall, recurrence-free, and lung-cancer-specific survival, as estimated by Kaplan-Meier actuarial analysis. Multivariable analysis was used to identify independent predictors. In the overall cohort, the patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy were older than the patients who received video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (median age, 79.5 vs 64 years) and had more comorbidities. In the 37 propensity-matched pairs, the 3-year actuarial tumor control rate was 54.3% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 90.6% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P = .0038). Actuarial lung cancer-specific 3-year survival was 78.1% (stereotactic body radiotherapy) versus 93.6% (video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy) (P = .055). One-year overall, 3-year overall, and 3-year recurrence-free survivals were 89.2%, 52.9%, and 38.5% after stereotactic body radiotherapy and 94.6%, 85.7%, and 82.8% after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy (P recurrence and poorer survival. In veteran patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy resulted in better disease control and survival than stereotactic body radiotherapy. Although prior reports suggest that stereotactic

  8. Long-term Survival of Personalized Surgical Treatment of Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Based on Molecular Staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua ZHOU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Approximately 35%-40% of patients with newly diagnosed non-small cell Lung cancer have locally advanced disease. The average survival time of these patients only have 6-8 months with chemotherapy. The aim of this study is to explore and summarize the probability of detection of micrometastasis in peripheral blood for molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment, and beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in locally advanced lung cancer; to summarize the long-time survival result of personalized surgical treatment of 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Methods CK19 mRNA expression of peripheral blood samples was detected in 516 lung cancer patients by RT-PCR before operation for molecular diagnosis of micrometastasis, personalized molecular staging, and for selection of indication of surgical treatment and the beneficiary of neoadjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative adjuvant therapy in patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer invaded heart, great vessels or both. The long-term survival result of personalized surgical treatment was retrospectively analyzed in 516 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer based on molecular staging methods. Results There were 322 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 194 cases with adenocarcinoma in the series of 516 patients with locally advanced lung cancer involved heart, great vessels or both. There were 112 patients with IIIA disease and 404 cases with IIIB disease according to P-TNM staging. There were 97 patients with M-IIIA disease, 278 cases with M-IIIB disease and 141 cases with III disease according to our personalized molecular staging. Of the 516 patients, bronchoplastic procedures and pulmonary artery reconstruction was carried out in 256 cases; lobectomy combined with resection and reconstruction of partial left

  9. Metformin exposure is associated with improved progression-free survival in diabetic patients after resection for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medairos, Robert A; Clark, James; Holoubek, Simon; Kubasiak, John C; Pithadia, Ravi; Hamid, Fatima; Chmielewski, Gary W; Warren, William H; Basu, Sanjib; Borgia, Jeffrey A; Liptay, Michael J; Seder, Christopher W

    2016-07-01

    There are little clinical data assessing the antineoplastic effect of metformin in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that in diabetic patients undergoing pulmonary resection for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, metformin exposure is associated with improved survival. An institutional database was used to identify patients with stage I or II non-small cell lung cancer who underwent pulmonary resection between 2004 and 2013. Patients were divided into 3 cohorts: type II diabetic patients with metformin exposure (cohort A, n = 81), type II diabetic patients without metformin exposure (cohort B, n = 57), and nondiabetic individuals (cohort C, n = 77). Univariate, multivariate, and propensity-matched analyses were performed to assess progression-free and overall survivals between groups. A total of 215 patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer treated with surgical resection were identified for analysis with a median follow-up of 19.5 months. Patients in cohort A had lower T- and N-stage tumors than those in cohorts B or C. However, on multivariate analysis adjusting for age, gender, and T and N stage, progression-free survival was greater for cohort A than cohort B (hazard ratio [HR], 0.410; 95% confidence interval, 0.199-0.874; P = .022) or cohort C (HR, 0.415; 95% confidence interval, 0.201-0.887; P = .017). Likewise, when propensity-matched analyses were performed, cohort A demonstrated a trend toward improved progression-free survival compared with cohort B (P = .057; HR, 0.44; c-statistic = 0.832) and improved progression-free survival compared with cohort C (P = .02; HR, 0.41; c-statistic = 0.843). No differences were observed in overall survival. Metformin exposure in diabetic patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer may be associated with improved progression-free survival, but no effect was seen on overall survival. Further studies are warranted to evaluate if there is a therapeutic

  10. Minimally Invasive Methods for Staging in Lung Cancer: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Labarca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS is a procedure that provides access to the mediastinal staging; however, EBUS cannot be used to stage all of the nodes in the mediastinum. In these cases, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS is used for complete staging. Objective. To provide a synthesis of the evidence on the diagnostic performance of EBUS + EUS in patients undergoing mediastinal staging. Methods. Systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic yield of EBUS + EUS compared with surgical staging. Two researchers performed the literature search, quality assessments, data extractions, and analyses. We produced a meta-analysis including sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio analysis. Results. Twelve primary studies (1515 patients were included; two were randomized controlled trials (RCTs and ten were prospective trials. The pooled sensitivity for combined EBUS + EUS was 87% (CI 84–89% and the specificity was 99% (CI 98–100%. For EBUS + EUS performed with a single bronchoscope group, the sensitivity improved to 88% (CI 83.1–91.4% and specificity improved to 100% (CI 99-100%. Conclusion. EBUS + EUS is a highly accurate and safe procedure. The combined procedure should be considered in selected patients with lymphadenopathy noted at stations that are not traditionally accessible with conventional EBUS.

  11. Family caregiver burden: the burden of caring for lung cancer patients according to the cancer stage and patient quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Eliana Lourenço; Franceschini, Juliana; Costa, Luiza Helena Degani; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; Jamnik, Sérgio; Santoro, Ilka Lopes

    2017-01-01

    Patients with lung cancer experience different feelings and reactions, based on their family, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds, which are a source of great distress, not only for the patients but also for their family caregivers. This study aimed to evaluate the impact that lung cancer stage and quality of life (QoL) of lung cancer patients have on caregiver burden. This was a prospective cross-sectional study. Consecutive patient-caregiver dyads were selected and asked to complete the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item ShortForm Health Survey (SF-36). Family caregivers also completed the Caregiver Burden Scale. Group-based modeling was used in order to identify patients with early- or advanced-stage cancer (IA to IIIA vs. IIIB to IV) plus non-impaired or impaired QoL (SF36 total score > 50 vs. ≤ 50). Patient-caregiver dyads were stratified into four groups: early-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; advanced-stage cancer+non-impaired QoL; early-stage cancer+impaired QoL; and advanced-stage cancer+impaired QoL. We included 91 patient-caregiver dyads. The majority of the patients were male and heavy smokers. Family caregivers were younger and predominantly female. The burden, QoL, level of anxiety, and level of depression of caregivers were more affected by the QoL of the patients than by their lung cancer stage. The family caregivers of the patients with impaired QoL showed a higher median burden than did those of the patients with non-impaired QoL, regardless of disease stage. Caregiver burden is more affected by patient QoL than by lung cancer stage. Pacientes com câncer de pulmão vivenciam diferentes sentimentos e reações, dependendo de sua formação familiar, social, cultural e religiosa, que são fonte de grande sofrimento, não só para os pacientes mas também para seus cuidadores familiares. Este estudo objetivou avaliar o impacto do estágio do câncer de pulmão e da qualidade de vida (QV) dos

  12. [Metastatic characteristics of lymph node in supraclavicular zone and radiotherapy target volume for limited-stage small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen-xing; Zhao, Lu-jun; Guan, Yong; Sun, Yao; Ji, Kai; Wang, Ping

    2013-05-21

    To explore the reasonable radiotherapy range by analyzing the characteristics of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). From January 2005 to December 2011, patients of LS-SCLC were reviewed. Supraclavicular zone was further divided into five subgroups including para-recurrent laryngeal nerve (region I and region II ), para-internal jugular vein (region III ), supraclavicular region (region IV), as well as the other regions except for the mentioned above (region V). The characteristics of the lymph nodes in each region were analyzed. The supraclavicular lymph node metastasis was found in 60 patients, with a positive rate of 34.5%. In multivariate Logistic regression analysis,intra-thoracic lymph node metastasis in the lymph node stations of level 2 and 3 were found to be the risk factors of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis (P = 0.006,P = 0.000). Our data suggests that the frequencies of metastasis in region I and III were much higher than those in the other areas.Among the sixty patients with supraclavicular lymph node metastasis, 95.0% were found at region I or III while the incidence of skip metastasis was only 5.0%. It is advisable to contain the bilateral supraclavicular nodes in patients with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis to the level 2 or 3 for elective radiation target volume.The clinical target volume (CTV) exterior margin containing the outer margin of internal jugular vein may be suitable.

  13. Methods for staging non-small cell lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Gerard A; Gonzalez, Anne V; Jantz, Michael A; Margolis, Mitchell L; Gould, Michael K; Tanoue, Lynn T; Harris, Loren J; Detterbeck, Frank C

    2013-05-01

    Correctly staging lung cancer is important because the treatment options and prognosis differ significantly by stage. Several noninvasive imaging studies and invasive tests are available. Understanding the accuracy, advantages, and disadvantages of the available methods for staging non-small cell lung cancer is critical to decision-making. Test accuracies for the available staging studies were updated from the second iteration of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Systematic searches of the MEDLINE database were performed up to June 2012 with the inclusion of selected meta-analyses, practice guidelines, and reviews. Study designs and results are summarized in evidence tables. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scanning for identifying mediastinal lymph node metastasis were approximately 55% and 81%, respectively, confirming that CT scanning has limited ability either to rule in or exclude mediastinal metastasis. For PET scanning, estimates of sensitivity and specificity for identifying mediastinal metastasis were approximately 77% and 86%, respectively. These findings demonstrate that PET scanning is more accurate than CT scanning, but tissue biopsy is still required to confirm PET scan findings. The needle techniques endobronchial ultrasound-needle aspiration, endoscopic ultrasound-needle aspiration, and combined endobronchial ultrasound/endoscopic ultrasound-needle aspiration have sensitivities of approximately 89%, 89%, and 91%, respectively. In direct comparison with surgical staging, needle techniques have emerged as the best first diagnostic tools to obtain tissue. Based on randomized controlled trials, PET or PET-CT scanning is recommended for staging and to detect unsuspected metastatic disease and avoid noncurative resections. Since the last iteration of the staging guidelines, PET scanning has assumed a more prominent role both in its use prior to surgery and when evaluating for metastatic disease. Minimally invasive

  14. Integrin expression profiling identifies integrin alpha5 and beta1 as prognostic factors in early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Suylen Robert-Jan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients with a high risk of recurrence is warranted in order to select patients who will benefit from adjuvant treatment strategies. We evaluated the prognostic value of integrin expression profiles in a retrospective study on frozen primary tumors of 68 patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods A retrospective study was performed on frozen primary tumors of 68 early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients with a follow up of at least 10 years. From all tumor tissues, RNA was isolated and reverse transcribed into cDNA. qPCR was used to generate mRNA expression profiles including integrins alpha1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, and V as well as integrins beta1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8. Results The expression levels of integrins alpha5, beta1 and beta3 predicted overall survival and disease free survival in early stage NSCLC patients. There was no association between integrin expression and lymph node metastases. Comparison between the histological subtypes revealed a distinct integrin signature for squamous cell carcinoma while the profiles of adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma were largely the same. Conclusion Integrin expression in NSCLC is important for the development and behavior of the tumor and influences the survival of the patient. Determining the integrin expression profile might serve as a tool in predicting the prognosis of individual patients.

  15. Breast cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  16. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banat, G-Andre; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Wilhelm, Jochen; Weigert, Andreas; Olesch, Catherine; Ebel, Katharina; Stiewe, Thorsten; Grimminger, Friedrich; Seeger, Werner; Fink, Ludger; Savai, Rajkumar

    2015-01-01

    .... We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic...

  17. Disease-specific survival for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer affected by statistical method of assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Fei

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, prognosis and impact of prognostic/predictive factors are assessed with Kaplan-Meier plots and/or the Cox proportional hazard model. There might be substantive differences from the results using these models for the same patients, if different statistical methods were used, for example, Boag log-normal (cure-rate model, or log-normal survival analysis. Methods Cohort of 244 limited-stage small-cell lung cancer patients, were accrued between 1981 and 1998, and followed to the end of 2005. The endpoint was death with or from lung cancer, for disease-specific survival (DSS. DSS at 1-, 3- and 5-years, with 95% confidence limits, are reported for all patients using the Boag, Kaplan-Meier, Cox, and log-normal survival analysis methods. Factors with significant effects on DSS were identified with step-wise forward multivariate Cox and log-normal survival analyses. Then, DSS was ascertained for patients with specific characteristics defined by these factors. Results The median follow-up of those alive was 9.5 years. The lack of events after 1966 days precluded comparison after 5 years. DSS assessed by the four methods in the full cohort differed by 0–2% at 1 year, 0–12% at 3 years, and 0–1% at 5 years. Log-normal survival analysis indicated DSS of 38% at 3 years, 10–12% higher than with other methods; univariate 95% confidence limits were non-overlapping. Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction significantly impacted DSS. DSS assessed by the Cox and log-normal survival analysis methods for four clinical risk groups differed by 1–6% at 1 year, 15–26% at 3 years, and 0–12% at 5 years; multivariate 95% confidence limits were overlapping in all instances. Conclusion Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction all significantly impacted DSS. Apparent DSS for patients was influenced by the

  18. Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) for verification of target position in early stage lung cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sörnsen de Koste, John R. van; Dahele, Max; Senan, Suresh; Weide, Lineke van der; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F. A. R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center (VUMC), Amsterdam, Noord-Holland 1081 HV (Netherlands); Mostafavi, Hassan [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The ability to verify intrafraction tumor position is clinically useful for hypofractionated treatments. Short arc kV digital tomosynthesis (DTS) could facilitate more frequent target verification. The authors used DTS combined with triangulation to determine the mean temporal position of small-volume lung tumor targets treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. DTS registration results were benchmarked against online clinical localization using registration between free-breathing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and the average intensity projection (AvIP) of the planning 4DCT.Methods: In this retrospective study, 76 sets of kV-projection images from online CBCT scans of 13 patients were used to generate DTS image slices (CB-DTS) with nonclinical research software (DTS Toolkit, Varian Medical Systems). Three-dimensional tumor motion was 1.3–4 mm in six patients and 6.1–25.4 mm in seven patients on 4DCT (significant difference in the mean of the groups, P < 0.01). The 4DCT AvIP was used to digitally reconstruct the Reference-DTS. DTS registration and DTS registration combined with triangulation were investigated. Progressive shortening of total DTS arc lengths from 95° to 35° around 0° gantry position was evaluated for different scenarios: DTS registration using the entire arc; DTS registration plus triangulation using two nonoverlapping arcs; and for 55° and 45° total gantry rotation, DTS registration plus triangulation using two overlapping arcs. Finally, DTS registration plus triangulation performed at eight gantry angles, each separated by 45° was evaluated using full fan kV projection data for one patient with an immobile tumor and five patients with mobile tumors.Results: For DTS registration alone, shortening arc length did not influence accuracy in X- and Y-directions, but in Z-direction, mean deviations from online CBCT localization systematically increased for shorter arc length (P < 0.05). For example, using a 95° arc mean DTS

  19. Computed tomographic features predictive of local recurrence in patients with early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpenny, Darragh; Ridge, Carole A; Hayes, Sara; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Rimner, Andreas; Ginsberg, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify computed tomography (CT) features of local recurrence (LR) after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Two hundred eighteen patients underwent SBRT for lung cancer from January 1st, 2006 to March 1st, 2011. Signs of LR recorded: opacity with new bulging margin, opacification of air bronchograms, enlarging pleural effusion, new or enlarging mass, and increased lung density at the treatment site. A new bulging margin at the treatment site was the only feature significantly associated with LR (P<.005). Most CT features classically associated with LR following conventional radiation therapy are unreliable for predicting LR following SBRT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The distress thermometer as a predictor for survival in stage III lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Mark; den Oudsten, Brenda L; Aarts, Mieke; Aerts, Joachim G J V

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Depression and Health Related Quality of Life have been associated with prognosis in lung cancer. As the Distress Thermometer measures emotional problems and may share similarities with aspects of Health Related Quality of Life, we aimed to retrospectively assess the prognostic value of

  1. Probabilistic evaluation of target dose deterioration in dose painting by numbers for stage II/III lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontanarosa, Davide; Witte, Marnix; Meijer, Gert; Shakirin, Georgy; Steenhuijsen, Jacco; Schuring, Danny; van Herk, Marcel; Lambin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Non-small cell lung cancer is typically irradiated with 60-66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Local control could be improved by increasing dose to the more radiation-resistant areas (eg, based on the standardized uptake values of a pretreatment [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography s

  2. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; drawing ...

  5. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Agolli, Linda, E-mail: lindaagolli@yahoo.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  6. Is there a role for surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul E. VAN SCHIL; Michèle DE WAELE; Jeroen M. HENDRIKS; Patrick R. LAUWERS

    2008-01-01

    The role of surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial.Most important prognostic factors are mediastinal downstaging and complete surgical resection. Different restaging techniques exist to evaluate response after induction therapy and these are subdivided into non-invasive, invasive and alternative or minimally invasive techniques. In contrast to imaging or functional studies, remediastinoscopy provides pathological evidence of response after induction therapy. Although technically more challenging than a first procedure,remediastinoscopy can select patients for subsequent thoracotomy and provides prognostic information. An alternative approach consists of the use of minimally invasive staging procedures as endobronchial or endoscopic esophageal ultrasound to obtain an initial proof of mediastinal nodal involvement. Mediastinoscopy is subsequently performed after induction therapy to evaluate response. In this way, a technically more difficult remediastinoscopy can be avoided. Stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC represents a heterogenous spectrum of locally advanced disease and different subsets exist. When N2 disease is discovered during thoracotomy after negative, careful preoperative staging a resection should be performed if this can be complete. Postoperative radiotherapy will decrease local recurrence rate but not overall survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy increases survival and is presently recommended in these cases. Most patients with pathologically proven N2 disease detected during preoperative work-up will be treated by induction therapy followed by surgery or radiotherapy.In two large, recently completed, phase Ill trials there was no difference in overall survival between the surgical and radiotherapy arm, but in one trial there was a difference in progression-free survival in favor of the surgical arm. In the surgery ann the rate of local recurrences was also lower in beth trials. Surgical resection may be recommended in those

  7. Strategies of Individual Surgical Treatment for Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and the Guidance of Intraoperative Frozen Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin HU

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, especially those who presented small GGO on image, are increasing in Asia population. Retrospective clinical data indicated that the efficacy of sub-lobectomy for these patients may be non-inferior to that of lobectomy. Meanwhile, sub-lobectomy could preserve more pulmonary function for the patients. Researches have demonstrated that careful evaluation for the image manifestation is essential before sub-lobectomy and those who diagnosed as adenocarcinoma in situ or minimally invasive adenocarcinoma may be more appropriate for this procedure. Precise diagnosis of Intraoperative frozen section is an effective method toward personalization of surgical care for early-stage non-smallcell lung cancer.

  8. Lung cancer in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Rodriguez R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Raúl Barrera-Rodriguez,1 Jorge Morales-Fuentes2 1Biochemistry and Environmental Medicine Laboratory, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, 2Lung Cancer Medical Service, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, Tlalpan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, women, genetic susceptibility, genetic differences, tobacco

  9. New positron emission tomography derived parameters as predictive factors for recurrence in resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, G; Gajate, A M S; Sestini, S; Gallivanone, F; Bandiera, A; Landoni, C; Muriana, P; Gianolli, L; Zannini, P

    2013-11-01

    The recurrence rate for stage I non-small cell lung cancer is high, with 20-40% of patients that relapse after surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate new F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) derived parameters, such as standardized uptake value index (SUVindex), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), as predictive factors for recurrence in resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 99 resected stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients that were grouped by SUVindex, TLG and MTV above or below their median value. Disease free survival was evaluated as primary end point. The 5-year overall survival and the 5-year disease free survival rates were 62% and 73%, respectively. The median SUVindex, MTL and TLG were 2.73, 2.95 and 9.61, respectively. Patients with low SUVindex, MTV and TLG were more likely to have smaller tumors (p ≤ 0.001). Univariate analysis demonstrated that SUVindex (p = 0.027), MTV (p = 0.014) and TLG (p = 0.006) were significantly related to recurrence showing a better predictive performance than SUVmax (p = 0.031). The 5-year disease free survival rates in patients with low and high SUVindex, MTV and TLG were 84% and 59%, 86% and 62% and 88% and 60%, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that only TLG was an independent prognostic factor (p = 0.014) with a hazard ratio of 4.782. Of the three PET-derived parameters evaluated, TLG seems to be the most accurate in stratifying surgically treated stage I non-small cell lung cancer patients according to their risk of recurrence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictive Impact for Postoperative Recurrence of Preoperative Serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 Concentration in Pathologic Stage IA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Yamazaki, Koji; Kouso, Hidenori; Mori, Ryo; Takeo, Sadanori

    2016-05-01

    Although stage IA non-small cell lung cancer has an optimistic survival rate, up to 10% of these patients relapse after surgical procedures and die. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic features of patients with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer to identify recurrence predictors and to investigate effects of preoperative serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (PS-KL-6) concentrations. We selected 204 consecutive patients with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer treated from December 2003 to December 2009 for this study and tested their PS-KL-6 concentrations in univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses of recurrence-free survival (RFS). High PS-KL-6 concentration (PS-KL6(High)) was significantly associated with sex (p = 0.0006), smoking status (p = 0.0438), histology (p = 0.0049), and postoperative recurrence (p = 0.0058). Both intratumoral blood vessel invasion (p = 0.0345) and PS-KL6(High) (p = 0.0021) were identified as independent predictors of shorter RFS. Relative risk of patients with PS-KL6(High) was 3.478 compared with patients with low PS-KL-6 concentration (PS-KL6(Low); 95% confidence interval: 1.576 to 8.013). Among patients with tumors larger than 2 cm (T1b), the PS-KL6(High) group had significantly shorter RFS than the PS-KL6(Low) group (p = 0.0040). PS-KL-6 concentration is a simple and novel predictor of recurrence in patients with stage IA non-small cell lung cancer and might help to identify patients who will need more careful follow-up among T1bN0M0 series. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Three-week schedule of irinotecan plus cisplatin in patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y S; Lee, H R; Park, S; Lee, S C; Hwang, I G; Park, B-B; Lee, J; Ahn, J S; Ahn, M-J; Lim, H Y; Park, K

    2006-01-01

    Irinotecan and cisplatin demonstrated promising outcomes in extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. According to the dosage and schedule of irinotecan, efficacy and toxicity profiles showed subtle differences. This study was designed to evaluate efficacy and toxicity of 3-week schedule of irinotecan/cisplatin in patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. The primary objective was to evaluate response rate and secondary objectives were overall survival and progression-free survival. Patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer were enrolled. Irinotecan 65 mg m−2 was administered on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin 60 mg m−2 on day 1. Treatment was repeated every 3 weeks. Seven out of 54 patients (13.0%) had complete response, and partial response was observed in 33 (61.1%). The overall response rate was 74.1% (95% CI; 62.0–82.2%). Stable disease was observed in eight (14.8%) and no progressive disease was observed. After a median follow-up duration of 28.7 months, the median overall survival and progressive-free survival were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. Major grade 3/4 toxicities were neutropenia (50.0%), anorexia (42.6%), diarrhoea (29.6%), fatigue (29.6%) and vomiting (13.0%). There was one treatment-related death owing to pneumonia. Three-week schedule of irinotecan/cisplatin showed effective antitumour activity and moderate toxicities in patients with previously untreated extensive-stage small-cell lung cancer. PMID:17133266

  12. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hope, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Guckenberger, Matthias [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  13. Lung cancer screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazerooni, E.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Lung cancer screening with CT remains controversial. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. To date, no screening test has been demonstrated to reduce mortality. Given the large population of adult cigarette smokers and former smokers worldwide, there is a large population at risk for lung cancer. While a lot has been learned from prospective single-arm cohort studies about the feasibility of performing annual CT to screen for lung cancer, many questions have also been raised. While we know that screening for lung cancer with CT detects many small nodules, with up to half the subjects having a positive baseline screen, and up to 75% of subjects having a positive screen at least once if screened annually for 5 years, the great majority of these nodules exhibit benign biologic behavior. The innumerable small nodules detected with screening CT, and diagnostic chest CT in general, present a daily clinical challenge, and result in extensive medical resource utilization and additional radiation exposure. Algorithms for how and when to follow small nodules detected on CT are in evolution. Ongoing studies are designed to determine if lung cancer screening with CT reduces lung cancer mortality. (orig.)

  14. Effects of multidisciplinary team care on the survival of patients with different stages of non-small cell lung cancer: a national cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chou Pan

    Full Text Available In Taiwan, cancer is the top cause of death, and the mortality rate of lung cancer is the highest of all cancers. Some studies have demonstrated that multidisciplinary team (MDT care can improve survival rates of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. However, no study has discussed the effect of MDT care on different stages of NSCLC. The target population for this study consisted of patients with NSCLC newly diagnosed in the 2005-2010 Cancer Registry. The data was linked with the 2002-2011 National Health Insurance Research Database and the 2005-2011 Cause of Death Statistics Database. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to explore whether the involvement of MDT care had an effect on survival. This study applied the propensity score as a control variable to reduce selection bias between patients with and without involvement of MDT care. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR of death of MDT participants with stage III & IV NSCLC was significantly lower than that of MDT non-participants (adjusted HR = 0.87, 95% confidence interval = 0.84-0.90. This study revealed that MDT care are significantly associated with higher survival rate of patients with stage III and IV NSCLC, and thus MDT care should be used in the treatment of these patients.

  15. [Lung cancer screening and management of small pulmonary nodules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Worldwide lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer. Most lung cancers are diagnosed at an advanced stage, so survival after lung cancer is generally poor. Diagnosis of lung cancer at earlier stages may be associated with an increased survival rate. This indicates that the implementation of lung cancer screening programs at the population level by means of low dose computed tomography might helpful to improve the outcome and mortality of lung cancer patients. By means of rapid advances in imaging technologies over the last decades it became possible to detect small lung nodules as small as a couple of millimeters. This recent developments require management algorithms to guide the clinical management of suspicious and indeterminate lung nodules found in computer tomography during lung cancer screening or by incidental finding.This review will focus on both, the recent advances in lung cancer screening and the guidelines for the management of small pulmonary nodules.

  16. Circulating tumor cells correlate with recurrence in stage III small-cell lung cancer after systemic chemoradiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lei; Liu, Fang; Fu, Hui; Liu, Liqing; Yuan, Shuanghu; Gao, Yongsheng; Fu, Zheng; Yu, Jinming

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the correlation between circulating tumor cells and the incidence of brain metastases as a first site of recurrence among patients with small-cell lung cancer after systemic chemoradiotherapy and prophylactic cranial irradiation. In addition, we assessed the contribution of circulating tumor cells for planning the appropriate total dose of prophylactic cranial irradiation for small-cell lung cancer. Patients (n = 112) with diagnosed Stage III small-cell lung cancer were treated with four cycles of platinum-based regimen and concurrent chest irradiation, and then prophylactic cranial irradiation. Blood samples for circulating tumor cell analysis were obtained before the initiation of chemotherapy and after the first and fourth cycle of chemotherapy. Circulating tumor cells after the first cycle of chemotherapy correlated with tumor response after completion of chemotherapy (P = 0.012). Patients with brain as the first site suffered a higher rate of further metastases to other organs, and local recurrence, compared with those whose first site was the other organs (P lung cancer. For patients with circulating tumor cells >218, prophylactic cranial irradiation at a total dose of 30 Gy in 15 fractions is insufficient. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Staging of lung cancer in a tertiary care setting in Sri Lanka, using TNM 7th edition. A comparison against TNM6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Sri Lanka and throughout the world. The latest staging system for lung cancer is the tumor node metastasis (TNM) 7th edition in which there are major changes to the previous version. The objective of our study was to find out the implications of TNM7th edition on lung cancer staging in a resource limited setting, and to compare it with the previous TNM 6th edition. Methods Patients with histologically proven lung cancer consecutively presented to respiratory unit of Teaching Hospital Kandy, Sri Lanka were recruited to the study over a period of one year from April 2010 to March 2011. They were staged using CT, ultrasound scan of abdomen, bronchoscopy and CT spine and brain when necessary. Staging was done using TNM 7 as well as TNM6. Surgical or non-surgical treatment arms were decided on staging and the number of patients in each treatment arm was compared between the two staging systems. Results Out of 62 patients, thirty four patients (54%) had metastatic disease and 19 (30%) of them had pleural effusions (M1a), while 15 (24%) had distant metastasis (M1b). When compared to TNM6 there was no difference in the number of patients in T1 category, but the number in T2 was higher in TNM7 (25 Vs 20). Similarly the number in T3 group was higher in TNM7 (11 Vs 5) and the number in M category was doubled (34 Vs 17 [Chi-6.46, p = 0.011]) compared to TNM 6. The number of patients suitable for surgery were 17(27.5%) in TNM 7 and 18(29%) [Chi-0.02, p = 0.88] in TNM6. Conclusions This study shows that a significant proportion of patients were having advanced disease with distant metastasis on presentation. The number of patients falling to stage IV is significantly higher when staged with TNM7 but there was no significant difference in the number of patients undergoing surgery when TNM 7 was used compared to TNM6. PMID:22414168

  18. Comparative effectiveness of 5 treatment strategies for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, Shervin M; Jiang, Jing; Chang, Joe Y; Welsh, James W; Gomez, Daniel R; Swisher, Stephen; Buchholz, Thomas A; Smith, Benjamin D

    2012-12-01

    The incidence of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among older adults is expected to increase because of demographic trends and computed tomography-based screening; yet, optimal treatment in the elderly remains controversial. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare cohort spanning 2001-2007, we compared survival outcomes associated with 5 strategies used in contemporary practice: lobectomy, sublobar resection, conventional radiation therapy, stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), and observation. Treatment strategy and covariates were determined in 10,923 patients aged ≥ 66 years with stage IA-IB NSCLC. Cox regression, adjusted for patient and tumor factors, compared overall and disease-specific survival for the 5 strategies. In a second exploratory analysis, propensity-score matching was used for comparison of SABR with other options. The median age was 75 years, and 29% had moderate to severe comorbidities. Treatment distribution was lobectomy (59%), sublobar resection (11.7%), conventional radiation (14.8%), observation (12.6%), and SABR (1.1%). In Cox regression analysis with a median follow-up time of 3.2 years, SABR was associated with the lowest risk of death within 6 months of diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.63; referent is lobectomy). After 6 months, lobectomy was associated with the best overall and disease-specific survival. In the propensity-score matched analysis, survival after SABR was similar to that after lobectomy (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.45-1.12; referent is SABR). Conventional radiation and observation were associated with poor outcomes in all analyses. In this population-based experience, lobectomy was associated with the best long-term outcomes in fit elderly patients with early-stage NSCLC. Exploratory analysis of SABR early adopters suggests efficacy comparable with that of surgery in select populations. Evaluation of these therapies in randomized trials

  19. Killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy onⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-Sheng Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the killing effect of EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy onⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer tissue.Methods:A total of 78 patients withⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer were randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=39), control group received EGFR-TKI treatment and observation group received EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy. Differences in apoptosis gene, invasion gene and autophagy gene expression in lung tissue were compared between two groups after 1 month of treatment.Results:Apoptosis genesPDCD5, bax andbcl-xSmRNA expression levels in lung tissue of observation group after 1 month of treatment were higher than those of control group whileBag-1, survivin andbcl-xL mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group; invasion genesCD147, EGFRandDDX17 mRNA expression levels were lower than those of control group while Bin1, E-cadherin andOvol2mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group; autophagy genes ARHI, Beclin1, Atg5, LC3B, pULK andPI3KC3 mRNA expression levels were higher than those of control group.Conclusions: EGFR-TKI combined with 125I seed implantation therapy can enhance the tumor killing effect on patients withⅢB-Ⅳ stage lung cancer, and contribute to the optimization of overall condition and the extension of survival time.

  20. Dosimetric comparison of flattened and unflattened beams for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrbacek, Jan, E-mail: jan.hrbacek@psi.ch [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland and Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Lang, Stephanie; Graydon, Shaun N.; Klöck, Stephan; Riesterer, Oliver [Klinik für Radio-Onkologie, UniversitätsSpital Zürich, 8091 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To compare contribution and accuracy of delivery for two flattening filter free (FFF) beams of the nominal energy 6 and 10 MV and a 6 MV flattened beam for early stage lung cancer. Methods: For each of 11 patients with stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer three volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were prepared utilizing a 6 MV flattened photon beam (X6FF) and two nonflattened beams of nominal energy 6 and 10 MV (X6FFF, X10FFF). Optimization constraints were set to produce dose distributions that meet the criteria of the RTOG-0915 protocol. The radiation schedule used for plan comparison in all patients was 50 Gy in five fractions. Dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk and delivery times were assessed and compared. All plans were subject to verification using Delta{sup 4} unit (Scandidos, Sweden) and absolutely calibrated gafchromic films in a thorax phantom. Results: All plans had a qualitatively comparable outcome. Obtained dose distributions were conformal (CI < 1.17) and exhibited a steep dose fall-off outside the PTV. The ratio of monitor units for FFF versus FF plans in the authors' study ranged from 0.95 to 1.21 and from 0.93 to 1.25 for X6FFF/X6FF and X10FFF/X6FF comparisons, respectively. The ratio systematically increased with increasing size of the PTV (up to +25% for 150 cm{sup 3} PTV). Yet the integral dose to healthy tissue did not follow this trend. Comparison of cumulative dose volume histograms for a patient's body showed that X6FFF plans exhibit improved conformity and reduced the volume of tissue that received more than 50% of the prescription dose. Parameters related to dose gradient showed statistically significant improvement. CI{sub 50%}, CI{sub 60%}, CI{sub 80%}, and CI{sub 100%} were on average reduced by 4.6% (p < 0.001), 4.6% (p = 0.002), 3.1% (p = 0.002), and 1.2% (p = 0.039), respectively. Gradient measure was on average reduced by 4.2% (p < 0.001). Due to dose reduction in the

  1. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline update on chemotherapy for stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzoli, Christopher G; Baker, Sherman; Temin, Sarah; Pao, William; Aliff, Timothy; Brahmer, Julie; Johnson, David H; Laskin, Janessa L; Masters, Gregory; Milton, Daniel; Nordquist, Luke; Pfister, David G; Piantadosi, Steven; Schiller, Joan H; Smith, Reily; Smith, Thomas J; Strawn, John R; Trent, David; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2009-12-20

    The purpose of this article is to provide updated recommendations for the treatment of patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer. A literature search identified relevant randomized trials published since 2002. The scope of the guideline was narrowed to chemotherapy and biologic therapy. An Update Committee reviewed the literature and made updated recommendations. One hundred sixty-two publications met the inclusion criteria. Recommendations were based on treatment strategies that improve overall survival. Treatments that improve only progression-free survival prompted scrutiny of toxicity and quality of life. For first-line therapy in patients with performance status of 0 or 1, a platinum-based two-drug combination of cytotoxic drugs is recommended. Nonplatinum cytotoxic doublets are acceptable for patients with contraindications to platinum therapy. For patients with performance status of 2, a single cytotoxic drug is sufficient. Stop first-line cytotoxic chemotherapy at disease progression or after four cycles in patients who are not responding to treatment. Stop two-drug cytotoxic chemotherapy at six cycles even in patients who are responding to therapy. The first-line use of gefitinib may be recommended for patients with known epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation; for negative or unknown EGFR mutation status, cytotoxic chemotherapy is preferred. Bevacizumab is recommended with carboplatin-paclitaxel, except for patients with certain clinical characteristics. Cetuximab is recommended with cisplatin-vinorelbine for patients with EGFR-positive tumors by immunohistochemistry. Docetaxel, erlotinib, gefitinib, or pemetrexed is recommended as second-line therapy. Erlotinib is recommended as third-line therapy for patients who have not received prior erlotinib or gefitinib. Data are insufficient to recommend the routine third-line use of cytotoxic drugs. Data are insufficient to recommend routine use of molecular markers to select chemotherapy.

  2. [Imaging protocols for the management of respiratory motions in the radiotherapy planning for early stage lung cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pócza, Tamás; Pesznyák, Csilla; Lövey, József; Bajcsay, András; Szilágyi, András; Almády, Balázs; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    The aim of our work is to present the imaging techniques used at the National Institute of Oncology for taking into consideration the breathing motion at radiation therapy treatment planning. Internationally recommended imaging techniques, such as 4D CT, respiratory gating and ITV (Internal Target Volume) definition were examined. The different imaging techniques were analysed regarding the delivered dose during imaging, the required time to adapt the technique, and the necessary equipment. The differences in size of PTVs (Planning Target Volume) due to diverse volume defining methods were compared in 5 cases. For 4D CT breath monitoring is crucial, which requires special equipment. To decrease the relatively high exposure of 4D CT it is possible to scan only a few predefined breathing phases. The possible positions of the tumour can be well approximated with CT scans taken in the inhale maximum, the exhale maximum and in intermediate phase. The intermediate phase can be exchanged with an ordinary CT image set, and the extreme phase CT images can be ensured by given verbal instructions for the patient. This way special gating equipment is not required. Based on these 3 breathing phases an ITV can be defined. Using this ITV definition method the margin between the CTV (Clinical Target Volume) and the PTV can be reduced by 1 cm. Using this imaging protocol PTV can be reduced by 30%. A further 10% PTV reduction can be achieved with respiratory gating. In the routine clinical practice respiratory motion management with a 3-phase CT-imaging protocol the PTV for early-stage lung cancer can be significantly reduced without the use of 4D CT and/or respiratory gating. For special, high precision treatment techniques 4D CT is recommended.

  3. Preoperative nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer using {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi SPECT/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miziara, Juliana Muniz; Rocha, Euclides Timoteo da; Miziara, Jose Elias Abrao; Garcia, Gustavo Fabene; Simoes, Maria Izilda Previato; Lopes, Marco Antonio; Kerr, Ligia Maria [Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, Barretos, SP (Brazil); Buchpiguel, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: julimiziara@ig.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade da Sao Paulo, Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Objectives: The proper nodal staging of non-small cell lung cancer is important for choosing the best treatment modality. Although computed tomography remains the first-line imaging test for the primary staging of lung cancer, its limitations for mediastinum nodal staging are well known. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of hybrid single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography using {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi in the nodal staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and to identify potential candidates for surgical treatment. Methods: Prospective data were collected for 41 patients from December 2006 to February 2009. The patients underwent chest computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography examinations with {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi within a 30-day time period before surgery. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography was considered positive when there was focal uptake of sestamibi in the mediastinum, and computed tomography scan when there was lymph nodes larger than 10 mm in short axis. The results of single-photon emission computed tomography and computed tomography were correlated with pathology findings after surgery. Results: Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography correctly identified six out of 19 cases involving hilar lymph nodes and one out of seven cases involving nodal metastases in the mediastinum. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the hilum assessment were 31.6%, 95.5%, 85.7%, and 61.8%, respectively. The same values for the mediastinum were 14.3%, 97.1%, 50%, and 84.6%, respectively. For the hilar and mediastinal lymph nodes, chest tomography showed sensitivity values of 47.4% and 57.1%, specificity values of 95.5% and 91.2%, positive predictive values of 90% and 57.1% and negative

  4. Lung cancer biomarkers in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Corradi, Massimo; Mazzone, Peter; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Methods for early detection of lung cancer, such as computerized tomography scanning technology, often discover a large number of small lung nodules, posing a new problem to radiologists and chest physicians. The vast majority of these nodules will be benign, but there is currently no easy way to determine which nodules represent very early lung cancer. Adjuvant testing with PET imaging and nonsurgical biopsies has a low yield for these small indeterminate nodules, carries potential morbidity and is costly. Indeed, purely morphological criteria seem to be insufficient for distinguishing lung cancer from benign nodules at early stages with sufficient confidence, therefore false positives undergoing surgical resection frequently occur. A molecular approach to the diagnosis of lung cancer through the analysis of exhaled breath could greatly improve the specificity of imaging procedures. A biomarker-driven approach to signs or symptoms possibly due to lung cancer would represent a complementary tool aimed at ruling out (with known error probability) rather than diagnosing lung cancer. Volatile and nonvolatile components of the breath are being studied as biomarkers of lung cancer. Breath testing is noninvasive and potentially inexpensive. There is promise that an accurate lung cancer breath biomarker, capable of being applied clinically, will be developed in the near future. In this article, we summarize some of the rationale for breath biomarker development, review the published literature in this field and provide thoughts regarding future directions.

  5. Lung cancer: Biology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemjabbar-Alaoui, Hassan; Hassan, Omer Ui; Yang, Yi-Wei; Buchanan, Petra

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer mortality in men and women in the U.S. and worldwide. About 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking and the use of tobacco products. However, other factors such as radon gas, asbestos, air pollution exposures, and chronic infections can contribute to lung carcinogenesis. In addition, multiple inherited and acquired mechanisms of susceptibility to lung cancer have been proposed. Lung cancer is divided into two broad histologic classes, which grow and spread differently: small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs). Treatment options for lung cancer include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Therapeutic-modalities recommendations depend on several factors, including the type and stage of cancer. Despite the improvements in diagnosis and therapy made during the past 25 years, the prognosis for patients with lung cancer is still unsatisfactory. The responses to current standard therapies are poor except for the most localized cancers. However, a better understanding of the biology pertinent to these challenging malignancies, might lead to the development of more efficacious and perhaps more specific drugs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent developments in lung cancer biology and its therapeutic strategies, and discuss the latest treatment advances including therapies currently under clinical investigation.

  6. How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Ovarian Cancer Staged? Staging is the process of finding out ... Ask Your Doctor About Ovarian Cancer? More In Ovarian Cancer About Ovarian Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  7. Phase II proof-of-concept study of pazopanib monotherapy in treatment-naive patients with stage I/II resectable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altorki, Nasser; Lane, Maureen E; Bauer, Thomas; Lee, Paul C; Guarino, Michael J; Pass, Harvey; Felip, Enriqueta; Peylan-Ramu, Nili; Gurpide, Alfonso; Grannis, Frederic W; Mitchell, John D; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Swann, R Suzanne; Huff, Anne; Roychowdhury, Debasish F; Reeves, Anthony; Ottesen, Lone H; Yankelevitz, David F

    2010-07-01

    Patients with early-stage, resectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at risk for recurrent disease, and 5-year survival rates do not exceed 75%. Angiogenesis inhibitors have shown clinical activity in patients with late-stage NSCLC, raising the possibility that targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in earlier-stage disease may be beneficial. This proof-of-concept study examined safety and efficacy of short-term, preoperative pazopanib monotherapy in patients with operable stage I/II NSCLC. Patients scheduled for resection received oral pazopanib 800 mg/d for 2 to 6 weeks preoperatively. Tumor response was measured by high-resolution computed tomography, permitting estimation of change in tumor volume and diameter. Gene-expression profiling was performed on 77 pre- and post-treatment lung samples from 34 patients. Of 35 patients enrolled, 33 (94%) had clinical stage I NSCLC and two (6%) had clinical stage II NSCLC. Median treatment duration was 16 days (range, 3 to 29 days). Thirty patients (86%) achieved tumor-volume reduction after pazopanib treatment. Two patients achieved tumor-volume reduction > or = 50%, and three patients had partial response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events included grade 2 hypertension, diarrhea, and fatigue. One patient developed pulmonary embolism 11 days after surgery. Several pazopanib target genes and other angiogenic factors were dysregulated post-treatment. Short-duration pazopanib was generally well tolerated and demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with early-stage NSCLC. Several target genes were dysregulated after pazopanib treatment, validating target-specific response and indicating a persistent pazopanib effect on lung cancer tissue. Further clinical evaluation of pazopanib in NSCLC is planned.

  8. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Proposals for Coding T Categories for Subsolid Nodules and Assessment of Tumor Size in Part-Solid Tumors in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D; Asamura, Hisao; Bankier, Alexander A; Beasley, Mary Beth; Detterbeck, Frank; Flieder, Douglas B; Goo, Jin Mo; MacMahon, Heber; Naidich, David; Nicholson, Andrew G; Powell, Charles A; Prokop, Mathias; Rami-Porta, Ramón; Rusch, Valerie; van Schil, Paul; Yatabe, Yasushi

    2016-08-01

    This article proposes codes for the primary tumor categories of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) and a uniform way to measure tumor size in part-solid tumors for the eighth edition of the tumor, node, and metastasis classification of lung cancer. In 2011, new entities of AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma were defined, and they were later incorporated into the 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. To fit these entities into the T component of the staging system, the Tis category is proposed for AIS, with Tis (AIS) specified if it is to be distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma in situ (SCIS), which is to be designated Tis (SCIS). We also propose that MIA be classified as T1mi. Furthermore, the use of the invasive size for T descriptor size follows a recommendation made in three editions of the Union for International Cancer Control tumor, node, and metastasis supplement since 2003. For tumor size, the greatest dimension should be reported both clinically and pathologically. In nonmucinous lung adenocarcinomas, the computed tomography (CT) findings of ground glass versus solid opacities tend to correspond respectively to lepidic versus invasive patterns seen pathologically. However, this correlation is not absolute; so when CT features suggest nonmucinous AIS, MIA, and lepidic predominant adenocarcinoma, the suspected diagnosis and clinical staging should be regarded as a preliminary assessment that is subject to revision after pathologic evaluation of resected specimens. The ability to predict invasive versus noninvasive size on the basis of solid versus ground glass components is not applicable to mucinous AIS, MIA, or invasive mucinous adenocarcinomas because they generally show solid nodules or consolidation on CT.

  9. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 cervical ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical ...

  11. Ovarian Cancer Stage II

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage II Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage II Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  12. Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1530x1350 View Download Large: 3060x2700 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC Description: Drawing of stage IIIC shows ...

  13. Ovarian Cancer Stage I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Ovarian Cancer Stage I Add to My Pictures View /Download : ... 1650x675 View Download Large: 3300x1350 View Download Title: Ovarian Cancer Stage I Description: Three-panel drawing of stage ...

  14. Robotic stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam SD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,1 Robert L Hong,1,2 Nimrah Baig,1 Gregory J Gagnon,4 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr1,21Department of Radiation Oncology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA; 4Department of Radiation Oncology, Frederick Memorial Hospital, Frederick, MD, USAIntroduction: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is being increasingly applied in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC because of its high local efficacy. This study aims to examine survival outcomes in elderly patients with inoperable stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT.Methods: A total of 31 patients with single lesions treated with fractionated SBRT from 2008 to 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A median prescribed dose of 48 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line, over a median of four treatments. The median biologically effective dose (BED was 105.6 (range 37.50–180, and the median age was 73 (65–90 years. No patient received concurrent chemotherapy.Results: With a median follow up of 13 months (range, 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were 32 months, and 19 months, respectively. The actuarial median local control (LC time was not reached. The survival outcomes at median follow up of 13 months were 80%, 68%, and 70% for LC, PFS, and OS, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed a BED of >100 Gy was associated with improved LC rates (P = 0.02, while squamous cell histology predicted for worse LC outcome at median follow up time of 13 months (P = 0.04. Increased tumor volume was a worse prognostic indicator of both LC and OS outcomes (P < 0.05. Finally, female gender was a better prognostic factor for OS than male gender (P = 0.006. There were no prognostic indicators of PFS that reached

  15. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  16. No Clinically Significant Changes in Pulmonary Function Following Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early- Stage Peripheral Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Analysis of RTOG 0236

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanic, Sinisa, E-mail: sinisa.stanic@carle.com [Carle Cancer Center and University of Illinois College of Medicine, Urbana, Illinois (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Timmerman, Robert D. [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, Robert B. [Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Bezjak, Andrea [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate pulmonary function test (PFT) results and arterial blood gas changes (complete PFT) following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to see whether baseline PFT correlates with lung toxicity and overall survival in medically inoperable patients receiving SBRT for early stage, peripheral, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: During the 2-year follow-up, PFT data were collected for patients with T1-T2N0M0 peripheral NSCLC who received effectively 18 Gy × 3 in a phase 2 North American multicenter study (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] protocol 0236). Pulmonary toxicity was graded by using the RTOG SBRT pulmonary toxicity scale. Paired Wilcoxon signed rank test, logistic regression model, and Kaplan-Meier method were used for statistical analysis. Results: At 2 years, mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in the first second and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide declines were 5.8% and 6.3%, respectively, with minimal changes in arterial blood gases and no significant decline in oxygen saturation. Baseline PFT was not predictive of any pulmonary toxicity following SBRT. Whole-lung V5 (the percentage of normal lung tissue receiving 5 Gy), V10, V20, and mean dose to the whole lung were almost identical between patients who developed pneumonitis and patients who were pneumonitis-free. Poor baseline PFT did not predict decreased overall survival. Patients with poor baseline PFT as the reason for medical inoperability had higher median and overall survival rates than patients with normal baseline PFT values but with cardiac morbidity. Conclusions: Poor baseline PFT did not appear to predict pulmonary toxicity or decreased overall survival after SBRT in this medically inoperable population. Poor baseline PFT alone should not be used to exclude patients with early stage lung cancer from treatment with SBRT.

  17. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  18. Polonium and lung cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma...

  19. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma...

  20. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  1. The Impact of a Multidimensional Exercise Intervention on Physical and Functional Capacity, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients With Advanced-Stage Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Adamsen, Lis; Rørth, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    of the present study was to investigate the benefits of a 6-week supervised group exercise intervention and to outline the effect on aerobic capacity, strength, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety, and depression. Methods: VO2peak was assessed using an incremental exercise test. Muscle strength......Introduction: Patients with advanced-stage lung cancer face poor survival and experience co-occurring chronic physical and psychosocial symptoms. Despite several years of research in exercise oncology, few exercise studies have targeted advanced lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim....... Forty-three patients dropped out. No serious adverse events were reported. Exercise adherence in the group training was 68%. Improvements in VO2peak (P

  2. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) Españ ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) ...

  4. Analysis of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigen expression in early stage non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen E; Ditzel, Henrik J

    2013-10-08

    The unique expression pattern and immunogenic properties of cancer/testis antigens make them ideal targets for immunotherapy of cancer. The MAGE-A3 cancer/testis antigen is frequently expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and vaccination with MAGE-A3 in patients with MAGE-A3-positive NSCLC has shown promising results. However, little is known about the expression of other cancer/testis antigens in NSCLC. In the present study the expression of cancer/testis antigens GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was investigated in patients with completely resected, early stage, primary NSCLC. Tumor biopsies from normal lung tissue and from a large cohort (n = 169) of NSCLC patients were examined for GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 protein expression by immunohistochemical analysis. The expression of these antigens was further matched to clinical and pathological features using univariate cox regression analysis. GAGE and NY-ESO-1 cancer/testis antigens were not expressed in normal lung tissue, while SP17 was expressed in ciliated lung epithelia. The frequency of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 expression in NSCLC tumors were 26.0% (44/169), 11.8% (20/169) and 4.7% (8/169), respectively, and 33.1% (56/169) of the tumors expressed at least one of these antigens. In general, the expression of GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 was not significantly associated with a specific histotype (adenocarcinoma vs. squamous cell carcinoma), but high-level GAGE expression (>50%) was more frequent in squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.02). Furthermore, the frequency of GAGE expression was demonstrated to be significantly higher in stage II-IIIa than stage I NSCLC (17.0% vs. 35.8%; p = 0.02). Analysis of the relation between tumor expression of GAGE and NY-ESO-1 and survival endpoints revealed no significant associations. Our study demonstrates that GAGE, NY-ESO-1 and SP17 cancer/testis antigens are candidate targets for immunotherapy of NSCLC and further suggest that multi-antigen vaccines may be beneficial.

  5. Immunotherapy for Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yi Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although treatment methods in surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy have improved, prognosis remains unsatisfactory and developing new therapeutic strategies is still an urgent demand. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach wherein activated immune cells can specifically kill tumor cells by recognition of tumor-associated antigens without damage to normal cells. Several lung cancer vaccines have demonstrated prolonged survival time in phase II and phase III trials, and several clinical trials are under investigation. However, many clinical trials involving cancer vaccination with defined tumor antigens work in only a small number of patients. Cancer immunotherapy is not completely effective in eradicating tumor cells because tumor cells escape from host immune scrutiny. Understanding of the mechanism of immune evasion regulated by tumor cells is required for the development of more effective immunotherapeutic approaches against lung cancer. This paper discusses the identification of tumor antigens in lung cancer, tumor immune escape mechanisms, and clinical vaccine trials in lung cancer.

  6. MSH2/BRCA1 expression as a DNA-repair signature predicting survival in early–stage lung cancer patients from the IFCT-0002 Phase 3 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levallet, Guénaëlle; Dubois, Fatéméh; Fouret, Pierre; Antoine, Martine; Brosseau, Solenn; Bergot, Emmanuel; Beau-Faller, Michèle; Gounant, Valérie; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Debieuvre, Didier; Molinier, Olivier; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Mazieres, Julien; Quoix, Elisabeth; Pujol, Jean-Louis; Moro-Sibilot, Denis; Langlais, Alexandra; Morin, Franck; Westeel, Virginie; Zalcman, Gérard

    2017-01-01

    Introduction DNA repair is a double-edged sword in lung carcinogenesis. When defective, it promotes genetic instability and accumulated genetic alterations. Conversely these defects could sensitize cancer cells to therapeutic agents inducing DNA breaks. Methods We used immunohistochemistry (IHC) to assess MSH2, XRCC5, and BRCA1 expression in 443 post-chemotherapy specimens from patients randomized in a Phase 3 trial, comparing two neoadjuvant regimens in 528 Stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (IFCT-0002). O6MGMT promoter gene methylation was analyzed in a subset of 208 patients of the same trial with available snap-frozen specimens. Results Median follow-up was from 90 months onwards. Only high BRCA1 (n = 221, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.07-2.34], p = 0.02) and low MSH2 expression (n = 356, HR = 1.52, 95% CI [1.11-2.08], p = 0.008) significantly predicted better overall survival (OS) in univariate and multivariate analysis. A bootstrap re-sampling strategy distinguished three patient groups at high (n = 55, low BRCA1 and high MSH2, median OS >96 months, HR = 2.5, 95% CI [1.45-4.33], p = 0.001), intermediate (n = 82, median OS = 73.4 p = 0.0596), and low (high BRCA1 and low MSH2, n = 67, median OS = ND, HR = 0.51, 95% CI [0.31-0.83], p = 0.006) risk of death. Interpretation DNA repair protein expression assessment identified three different groups of risk of death in early-stage lung cancer patients, according to their tumor MSH2 and BRCA1 expression levels. These results deserve prospective evaluation of MSH2/BRCA1 theranostic value in lung cancer patients treated with combinations of DNA-damaging chemotherapy and drugs targeting DNA repair, such as Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. PMID:28008145

  7. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Early-stage Non-small-cell Lung Cancer in Patients 80 Years and Older: A Multi-center Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Richard J; Patel, Pretesh R; Zhang, Xinyan; Press, Robert H; Switchenko, Jeffrey M; Pillai, Rathi N; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Fernandez, Felix G; Force, Seth D; Curran, Walter J; Higgins, Kristin A

    2017-09-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is the standard of care for medically inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. Despite the limited number of octogenarians and nonagenarians on trials of SBRT, its use is increasingly being offered in these patients, given the aging cancer population, medical fragility, or patient preference. Our purpose was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and survival of patients ≥ 80 years old treated with definitive lung SBRT. Patients who underwent SBRT were reviewed from 2009 to 2015 at 4 academic centers. Patients diagnosed at ≥ 80 years old were included. Kaplan-Meier and multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed. Recursive partitioning analysis was done to determine a subgroup of patients most likely to benefit from therapy. A total of 58 patients were included, with a median age of 84.9 years (range, 80.1-95.2 years), a median follow-up time of 19.9 months (range, 6.9-64.9 months), a median fraction size of 10.0 Gy (range, 7.0-20.0 Gy), and a median number of fractions of 5.0 (range, 3.0-8.0 fractions). On multivariate analysis, higher Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was associated with higher local recurrence-free survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.92; P patients with KPS ≥ 75 had improved 3-year cancer-specific and overall survival (99.4% and 91.9%, respectively) compared with patients with KPS lung SBRT for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer was efficacious and safe in patients ≥ 80 years old. Patients with a KPS of ≥ 75 derived the most benefit from therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reduced expression of cyclin D2 is associated with poor recurrence-free survival independent of cyclin D1 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Eunkyung; Kim, Yujin; Park, Seong-Eun; Cho, Eun Yoon; Han, Jungho; Shim, Young Mog; Park, Joobae; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2012-08-01

    Compared to well-known function of cyclin D1 in lung cancer, the role of cyclin D2 is not clear. This study was aimed at understanding the clinicopathological significance of cyclin D2 in primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We retrospectively analyzed expression statuses of cyclin D1, cyclin D2, p16, p21, p27, Ki-67, and phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) using immunohistochemistry in 626 NSCLCs. Cyclin D2 was expressed in normal lung tissue, and its expression was reduced in 170 (27%) of 626 NSCLCs with a median duration of follow-up of 64 months. Mean phospho-pRb (Ser-807/811) levels were not associated with expression levels of cyclin D2 (P=0.15). The relationship between recurrence and the reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not homogenous by stage (Breslow-Day test for homogeneity, P=0.04). Reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with patient's prognosis in 370 stage I, 112 stage II, and 18 stage IV NSCLCs. However, for 126 stage III NSCLCs, reduced expression of cyclin D2 was adversely associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) (hazard ratio [HR]=3.71, 95% CI=1.54-13.17; P=0.01), independent of histology and expression of cyclin D1. The reduced expression of cyclin D2 was not associated with the overexpression of cyclin D1 (P=0.65). The present study suggests that reduced expression of cyclin D2 in stage III NSCLC may be associated with poor RFS. And, cyclin D2 may have a distinct role from cyclin D1 in NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stages of Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stage 0 , abnormal cells are found in the mucosa or submucosa layer of the esophagus wall. These ... found. Stage IA : Cancer has formed in the mucosa or submucosa layer of the esophagus wall. The ...

  10. [Innovation in Surgery for Advanced Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Yasunori, Sohara; Endo, Shunsuke

    2016-07-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery can be one of less invasive surgical interventions for early stage lung cancer. Locally advanced lung cancer, however, cannot avoid aggressive procedures including pneumonectomy and/or extended combined resection of chest wall, aorta, esophagus, etc. for complete resection. Surgical approach even for advanced lung cancer can be less invasive by benefit from new anti-cancer treatment, innovated manipulations of bronchoplasty and angioplasty, and bench surgery( lung autotransplantation technique). We herein reviewed the strategy to minimize invasive interventions for locally advanced lung cancer, introducing 2 successful cases with advanced lung cancer. The 1st patient is a 62-year old man with centrally advanced lung cancer invading to mediastinum. Right upper sleeve lobectomy with one-stoma carinoplasty following induction chemoradiation therapy was successful. The operation time was 241 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 60 months after surgery. The 2nd is a 79-year old man with advanced lung cancer invading to the distal aortic arch. Left upper segmentectomy following thoracic endovascular aortic repair with stentgraft was successful with no extracorporeal circulation. The operation time was 170 minutes. The performance status is good with no recurrence for 30 months after surgery. The invasiveness of surgical interventions for local advanced lung cancer can be minimized by innovated device and new anti-cancer drugs.

  11. A case of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of limited stage small cell lung cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Mohammad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential diagnosis of altered mental status and behavioral change is very extensive. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare cause of cognitive impairment, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case presentation A 64-year-old British Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with a 12-week history of confusion and short-term memory loss. She was hyponatremic with a serum sodium level of 128mmol/L. Moreover, there was evidence of left hilar prominence on the chest radiograph. A thoracic computed tomography scan showed left hilar opacity with confluent lymphadenopathy. A percutaneous biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. There was no radiological evidence of brain metastasis on the computed tomography scan. In view of continued cognitive impairment, which was felt to be disproportionate to hyponatremia, a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain was undertaken. It showed hyperintense signals from both hippocampi, highly suggestive of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of small cell lung cancer. She had a significant radiological and clinical response following chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of considering paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with neurological symptoms in the context of lung malignancy. If initial investigations fail to reveal the cause of cognitive impairment in a patient with malignancy, magnetic resonance imaging may be invaluable in the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis. The clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques and management of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis are discussed in this case report.

  12. Myeloid clusters are associated with a pro-metastatic environment and poor prognosis in smoking-related early stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to understand the role of myeloid cell clusters in uninvolved regional lymph nodes from early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients. METHODS: Uninvolved regional lymph node sections from 67 patients with stage I-III resected non-small cell lung cancer were immunostained to detect myeloid clusters, STAT3 activity and occult metastasis. Anthracosis intensity, myeloid cluster infiltration associated with anthracosis and pSTAT3 level were scored and correlated with patient survival. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was performed with prognostic variables. Human macrophages were used for in vitro nicotine treatment. RESULTS: CD68+ myeloid clusters associated with anthracosis and with an immunosuppressive and metastasis-promoting phenotype and elevated overall STAT3 activity were observed in uninvolved lymph nodes. In patients with a smoking history, myeloid cluster score significantly correlated with anthracosis intensity and pSTAT3 level (P<0.01. Nicotine activated STAT3 in macrophages in long-term culture. CD68+ myeloid clusters correlated and colocalized with occult metastasis. Myeloid cluster score was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.049 and was associated with survival by Kaplan-Maier estimate in patients with a history of smoking (P = 0.055. The combination of myeloid cluster score with either lymph node stage or pSTAT3 level defined two populations with a significant difference in survival (P = 0.024 and P = 0.004, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Myeloid clusters facilitate a pro-metastatic microenvironment in uninvolved regional lymph nodes and associate with occult metastasis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer. Myeloid cluster score is an independent prognostic factor for survival in patients with a history of smoking, and may present a novel method to inform therapy choices in the adjuvant setting. Further validation studies are warranted.

  13. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  14. Thyroid Cancer Staging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Kim, Soo Jin; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kwak, Jin Young [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    The current prevalence of thyroid cancer in women is high. Likewise, other cancers and thyroid cancer have been based on the TNM classification system. Staging of thyroid cancer has an important role in determining the extent of surgical excision and lymph node dissection, planning the adjuvant therapy after surgery and predicting the recurrence rate and the prognosis of patients. Ultrasonography is the basic imaging modality to identify the tumor size and the extent of lymph node metastasis. More recently, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography provide additional help for the staging of thyroid cancer. So, this article describes the 7th edition of the TNM staging of thyroid cancer, as proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and the details of radiologic evaluation of the T, N and M stages

  15. Staging for vaginal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Shalini; Maheshwari, Amita; Srivastava, Astha

    2015-08-01

    Vaginal cancer is a rare cancer comprising about 3% of all gynecologic cancers. Primary vaginal cancer should be carefully assigned as spread from cervix, vulva, and other metastatic tumors to vagina can occur. Although vaginal cancer traditionally occurs in older postmenopausal women, the incidence of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced cancers is increasing in younger women. Squamous cell carcinoma is still the most common histopathologic type followed by adenocarcinoma. With decreasing use of diethylstilbestrol in pregnancy, non-diethylstilbestrol-associated cancers are described. The Federation Internationale de Gynecologie et d'Obstetrique (FIGO) staging of vaginal cancer (2009) follows the same rules as cervical cancer; it is clinically staged and allows the use of routine investigative modalities for staging. Although FIGO encourages the use of advanced imaging modalities, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), to guide therapy, the imaging findings may not be used to change or reassign the stage. TNM staging is the pathologic staging system proposed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer, and information available from examination of the resected specimen, including pelvic and inguinal lymph nodes, may be used for staging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A meta-analysis of the Timing of Chest Radiotherapy in Patients with Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui ZHAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although evidence for a significant survival benefit of chest radiotherapy has been proven, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the optimal timing of chest radiation. The aim of this study is to explore whether the timing of chest radiation may influence the survival of the patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSSCLC by performing a literature-based meta-analysis. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, CBM, and CNKI, et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents about randomized trials comparing different timing chest radiotherapy in patients with LS-SCLC. Early chest radiation was regarded as beginning within 30 days after the start of chemotherapy. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct meta-analysis on the trials. The combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated to estimate the mortality in 2 or 3 years and toxicity of the two treatments. The statistical heterogeneity was determined by cochran’s Chi-square test (Q test. The Begg’ test was used to determine the publication bias. Results Six trials that included a total of 1 189 patients were analyzed in the meta-analysis 587 patients were in the early radiation group and 602 patients were in the late radiation group. Considering all 6 eligible trials, the overall survival at 2/3 years was not significantly different between early and late chest radiation (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.55-1.05, Z=1.68, P=0.093. For the toxicity, no obvious difference was observed for early chest radiotherapy compared with late irradiation in pneumonitis (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 0.97-3.86, P=0.797, esophagitis (OR=1.43, 95%CI: 0.95-2.13, P=0.572 and thrombocytopenia (OR=1.23, 95%CI: 0.88-1.77, P=0.746, respectively. Conclusion No statistical difference was observed in 2/3 years survival and toxicity, including pneumonitis, esophagitis and thrombocytopenia, between

  17. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  18. Long-term respiratory function recovery in patients with stage I lung cancer receiving video-assisted thoracic surgery versus thoracotomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) and thoracotomy are standard treatment methods for early lung cancer. We compared their effects on the long-term recovery of pulmonary function in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We retrospectively reviewed 203 patients with early NSCLC who underwent VATS or thoracotomy at Seoul University Hospital from January 2005 to December 2010. Two matched groups (VATS and thoracotomy) each consisting of 60 patients were created via propensity score matching according to TNM stage, age, sex, smoking history, lung disease history, and preoperative pulmonary function. Results There were no significant differences in the recovery of forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the forced vital capacity (FVC), or the peak flow rate (PFR), presented as the postoperative value/predicted value, between the VATS and thoracotomy groups during the 12-month follow-up period. The standardized functional loss ratio [(measured postoperative value – predicted postoperative value)/(predicted postoperative value × 100)] did not differ between the two groups at 6 and 12 months. In an intragroup analysis, the postoperative FVC in the thoracotomy group remained below predicted postoperative value during the follow-up period and did not reach the predicted postoperative FVC (6 months/12 months: –6.58%/–2.43%). The analgesic requirements and pain procedures were similar in the VATS and thoracotomy groups during the 12-month follow-up period. Conclusions There were no significant differences in pulmonary function recovery during the late postoperative period in NSCLC patients receiving VATS versus thoracotomy. We suggest that the volume of the resected lung and preoperative lung function are the main determinants of late recovery, rather than postoperative pain. PMID:26904225

  19. Clinical outcome and predictors of survival and pneumonitis after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Joe Y

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR can achieve excellent local control rates in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and has emerged as a standard treatment option for patients who cannot undergo surgery or those with isolated recurrences. However, factors that may predict toxicity or survival are largely unknown. We sought here to identify predictors of survival and pneumonitis after SABR for NSCLC in a relatively large single-institution series. Methods Subjects were 130 patients with stage I NSCLC treated with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT –planned, on-board volumetric image–guided SABR to 50 Gy in 4 fractions. Disease was staged by positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT and scans were obtained again at the second follow-up after SABR. Results At a median follow-up time of 26 months, the 2-year local control rate was 98.5%. The median overall survival (OS time was 60 months, and OS rates were 93.0% at 1 year, 78.2% at 2 years, and 65.3% at 3 years. No patient experienced grade 4–5 toxicity; 15 had radiation pneumonitis (12 [9.3%] grade 2 and 3 [2.3%] grade 3. Performance status, standardized uptake value (SUVmax on staging PET/CT, tumor histology, and disease operability were associated with OS on univariate analysis, but only staging SUVmax was independently predictive on multivariate analysis (P = 0.034. Dosimetric factors were associated with radiation pneumonitis on univariate analysis, but only mean ipsilateral lung dose ≥9.14 Gy was significant on multivariate analysis (P = 0.005. Conclusions OS and radiation pneumonitis after SABR for stage I NSCLC can be predicted by staging PET SUVmax and ipsilateral mean lung dose, respectively.

  20. small Cell Lung Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment response in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methodology: A single-center ..... groupings in the forthcoming (7th) edition of the TNM. Classification of ... overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. J Clin Oncol ...

  1. Lung Cancer Survivorship

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    A lung cancer survivor shares her story about diagnosis, treatment, and community support. She also gives advice for other cancer survivors.  Created: 10/20/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  2. Application of imaging postprocessing of spiral CT in the staging of lung cancer%螺旋CT后处理技术在肺癌新分期中的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Xiang; Fang Huang; Cuimei Liang; Xiangdong Xu; Lilian Tan

    2008-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the role of spiral CT imaging postprocessing techniques in preoperative TNM staging of lung cancer.Methods:106 patients with pathologically confirmed lung cancer received spiral CT examinations with a new revised TNM staging method of lung cancer which was taken as criterion of diagnosis.The images were reconstructed by using different postprecessing techniques such as MPR,MIP,SSD,VR,and their TNM staging capabilities were assessed by using postprocessing imaging and the results with axial CT images were compared.Results:In T staging,the accurate rates of axial CT images in T1-T4 staging were 77.3%,60.6%,60.7%,and 60.3% respectively; for postprocessing images,the accurate rates were 86.4%,90.9%,89.3%,and 87.0% respectively.In N staging,the accurate rates of axial CT images were 84.6%,68.1%,63.6%,and 64.2% in NO-N3 staging,respectively; but they were 92.3%,90.9%,90.9%,and 85.7% in postprocessing images,respectively.The postprocessing images were superior to axial CT images in T1-T3 and N1-N3 staging of lung cancer but there were no significant differences in T1 and NO staging.For metastasis,the postprocessing images may be helpful for the TNM staging of lung cancer.Conclusion:The postprocessing techniques of the spiral CT could improve the accurate rates of TNM staging of lung cancer,and represent a useful complement to the axial CT.

  3. Lack of a Dose-Effect Relationship for Pulmonary Function Changes After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, Matthias, E-mail: Guckenberger_M@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Klement, Rainer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kestin, Larry L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Hope, Andrew J. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Belderbos, Jose [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yan, Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Sonke, Jan-Jakob [The Netherlands Cancer Institute–Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Xiao, Ying [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of tumor size, prescription dose, and dose to the lungs on posttreatment pulmonary function test (PFT) changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: The analysis is based on 191 patients treated at 5 international institutions: inclusion criteria were availability of pre- and post-SBRT PFTs and dose-volume histograms of the lung and planning target volume (PTV); patients treated with more than 1 SBRT course were excluded. Correlation between early (1-6 months, median 3 months) and late (7-24 months, median 12 months) PFT changes and tumor size, planning target volume (PTV) dose, and lung doses was assessed using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristics analysis, and Lyman's normal tissue complication probability model. The PTV doses were converted to biologically effective doses and lung doses to 2 Gy equivalent doses before correlation analyses. Results: Up to 6 months after SBRT, forced expiratory volume in 1 second and carbon monoxide diffusion capacity changed by −1.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], −3.4% to 0) and −7.6% (95% CI, −10.2% to −3.4%) compared with pretreatment values, respectively. A modest decrease in PFTs was observed 7-24 months after SBRT, with changes of −8.1% (95% CI, −13.3% to −5.3%) and −12.4% (95% CI, −15.5% to −6.9%), respectively. Using linear regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis, and normal tissue complication probability modeling, all evaluated parameters of tumor size, PTV dose, mean lung dose, and absolute and relative volumes of the lung exposed to minimum doses of 5-70 Gy were not correlated with early and late PFT changes. Subgroup analysis based on pre-SBRT PFTs (greater or equal and less than median) did not identify any dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: This study failed to demonstrate a significant dose-effect relationship for

  4. Exploring Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: development of a prognostic model predicting 5-year survival after surgical resection†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Errico, Luca; Evangelista, Andrea; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Ruffini, Enrico; Lisi, Elena; Bora, Giulia; Asteggiano, Elena; Olivetti, Stefania; Lausi, Paolo; Ardissone, Francesco; Oliaro, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Despite impressive results in diagnosis and treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), more than 30% of patients with Stage I NSCLC die within 5 years after surgical treatment. Identification of prognostic factors to select patients with a poor prognosis and development of tailored treatment strategies are then advisable. The aim of our study was to design a model able to define prognosis in patients with Stage I NSCLC, submitted to surgery with curative intent. A retrospective analysis of two surgical registries was performed. Predictors of survival were investigated using the Cox model with shared frailty (accounting for the within-centre correlation). Candidate predictors were: age, gender, smoking habit, morbidity, previous malignancy, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, clinical N stage, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)), forced expiratory volume in 1 s, carbon monoxide lung diffusion capacity (DLCO), extent of surgical resection, systematic lymphadenectomy, vascular invasion, pathological T stage, histology and histological grading. The final model included predictors with P fair discrimination ability (C-statistic = 0.69): the calibration of the model indicated a good agreement between observed and predicted survival. We designed an effective prognostic model based on clinical, pathological and surgical covariates. Our preliminary results need to be refined and validated in a larger patient population, in order to provide an easy-to-use prognostic tool for Stage I NSCLC patients. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  5. Patterns of abnormal FDG uptake by various histological types of non-small cell lung cancer at initial staging by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, C.O.; Nunez, R.; Bohdiewicz, P.; Fink-Bennett, D.; Balon, H.; Dickinson, C.; Dworkin, H.J. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Welsh, R.J.; Chmielewski, G.W.; Pursel, S.E. [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Ravikrishnan, K.P. [Dept. of Pulmonary Medicine, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Hill, J.C. [Information Service, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify useful patterns of abnormal fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake by different types of non-small cell (NSC) lung cancer and to assess their clinical implications. One hundred and three sequential patients with newly diagnosed, pathology-proven NSC lung cancer were included. FDG positron emission tomography (PET) images were acquired using a dedicated PET scanner. There were 35 squamous cell carcinomas (SQC), 17 large cell cancers (LGC), 38 adenocarcinomas (ADC), 1 bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and 12 non-classified NSC cancers. PET images were categorized into detectable patterns of necrotic center in the primary tumor, satellite lesions (T4), hilar lymph nodes (N1), and N2, N3, and M1 lesions by visual interpretation of PET images for SQC, LGC, and ADC (n=90; BAC and non-classified NSC cancers were excluded). The PET lesions were correlated with surgical pathology and with CT findings in inoperable cases. Necrosis was more commonly present in the primary tumors of LGC (53%) and SQC (43%) than in those of ADC (26%) (P<0.0001 and <0.01, respectively). The frequencies of nodal uptake in ADC, SQC and LGC were similar (71%, 60%, and 59%, respectively). However, M1 lesions were present significantly more often in LGC (41%) and ADC (34%) than in SQC (3%) (both P<0.0001). Significantly more surgically inoperable cases were found by PET (T4, N3, M1) in ADC (50%) and LGC (41%) than in SQC (26%) (P<0.001 and <0.02, respectively). Our results suggest a wide variation of PET findings for different types of NSC lung cancer. Identification of these patterns is useful in clinical PET interpretation, in that knowledge of the most probable association between the PET patterns and the histological types will facilitate initial staging and planning of management. (orig.)

  6. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Chemoprevention Trial of Selenium Supplementation in Patients With Resected Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: ECOG 5597

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Daniel D.; Lee, Sandra J.; Keller, Steven M.; Wright, Gail Shaw; Aisner, Seena; Belinsky, Steven Alan; Johnson, David H.; Johnston, Michael R.; Goodman, Gary; Clamon, Gerald; Okawara, Gordon; Marks, Randolph; Frechette, Eric; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Lippman, Scott M.; Ruckdeschel, John; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Selenium has been reported to have chemopreventive benefits in lung cancer. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with resected non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving selenium supplementation. Patients and Methods Patients with completely resected stage I NSCLC were randomly assigned to take selenized yeast 200 μg versus placebo daily for 48 months. Participation was 6 to 36 months postoperatively and required a negative mediastinal node biopsy, no excessive vitamin intake, normal liver function, negative chest x-ray, and no other evidence of recurrence. Results The first interim analysis in October 2009, with 46% of the projected end points accumulated, showed a trend in favor of the placebo group with a low likelihood that the trial would become positive; thus, the study was stopped. One thousand seven hundred seventy-two participants were enrolled, with 1,561 patients randomly assigned. Analysis was updated in June 2011 with the maturation of 54% of the planned end points. Two hundred fifty-two SPTs (from 224 patients) developed, of which 98 (from 97 patients) were lung cancer (38.9%). Lung and overall SPT incidence were 1.62 and 3.54 per 100 person-years, respectively, for selenium versus 1.30 and 3.39 per 100 person-years, respectively, for placebo (P = .294). Five-year disease-free survival was 74.4% for selenium recipients versus 79.6% for placebo recipients. Grade 1 to 2 toxicity occurred in 31% of selenium recipients and 26% of placebo recipients, and grade ≥ 3 toxicity occurred in less than 2% of selenium recipients versus 3% of placebo recipients. Compliance was excellent. No increase in diabetes mellitus or skin cancer was detected. Conclusion Selenium was safe but conferred no benefit over placebo in the prevention of SPT in patients with resected NSCLC. PMID:24002495

  7. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III chemoprevention trial of selenium supplementation in patients with resected stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: ECOG 5597.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Daniel D; Lee, Sandra J; Keller, Steven M; Wright, Gail Shaw; Aisner, Seena; Belinsky, Steven Alan; Johnson, David H; Johnston, Michael R; Goodman, Gary; Clamon, Gerald; Okawara, Gordon; Marks, Randolph; Frechette, Eric; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Lippman, Scott M; Ruckdeschel, John; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-11-20

    Selenium has been reported to have chemopreventive benefits in lung cancer. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving selenium supplementation. Patients with completely resected stage I NSCLC were randomly assigned to take selenized yeast 200 μg versus placebo daily for 48 months. Participation was 6 to 36 months postoperatively and required a negative mediastinal node biopsy, no excessive vitamin intake, normal liver function, negative chest x-ray, and no other evidence of recurrence. The first interim analysis in October 2009, with 46% of the projected end points accumulated, showed a trend in favor of the placebo group with a low likelihood that the trial would become positive; thus, the study was stopped. One thousand seven hundred seventy-two participants were enrolled, with 1,561 patients randomly assigned. Analysis was updated in June 2011 with the maturation of 54% of the planned end points. Two hundred fifty-two SPTs (from 224 patients) developed, of which 98 (from 97 patients) were lung cancer (38.9%). Lung and overall SPT incidence were 1.62 and 3.54 per 100 person-years, respectively, for selenium versus 1.30 and 3.39 per 100 person-years, respectively, for placebo (P = .294). Five-year disease-free survival was 74.4% for selenium recipients versus 79.6% for placebo recipients. Grade 1 to 2 toxicity occurred in 31% of selenium recipients and 26% of placebo recipients, and grade ≥ 3 toxicity occurred in less than 2% of selenium recipients versus 3% of placebo recipients. Compliance was excellent. No increase in diabetes mellitus or skin cancer was detected. Selenium was safe but conferred no benefit over placebo in the prevention of SPT in patients with resected NSCLC.

  8. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Ru Chen,1,* Jian-Zhong Liang,2,* Shu-Xiang Ma,1 Wen-Feng Fang,1 Ning-Ning Zhou,1 Hai Liao,1 De-Lan Li,1 Li-Kun Chen1 1Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the standard treatment for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC. However, the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT in LD-SCLC remains controversial despite several studies that were performed in the early years of CCT use. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the effectiveness and toxicities associated with CCT. Methods: This retrospective analysis evaluated 177 patients with stage IIIA and IIIB small-cell lung cancer (SCLC who underwent CCRT from January 2001 to December 2013 at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze patient prognosis factors. Results: Among the 177 patients, 72 (41% received CCT and 105 (59% did not receive CCT. PFS was significantly better for patients in the CCT group compared to that for patients in the non-CCT group (median PFS: 17.0 vs 12.9 months, respectively, P=0.031, whereas the differences in OS were not statistically significant (median OS: 31.6 vs 24.8 months, respectively, P=0.118. The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 33.3% and 20.8% for patients in the CCT group and 27.6% and 6.7% for patients in the non-CCT group, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level <5 ng/mL (P=0.035, having undergone prophylactic cranial irradiation (P<0.001, and having received CCT (P=0.002 could serve as favorable independent prognostic factors

  9. Lung cancer screening: Update

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    Kim, Hyea Young [Dept. of Radiology, Center for Lung Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers.

  10. Lymphovascular space invasion and tumor differentiation are predictors for postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yi; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Tsai, Wen-Chiuan; Lin, Li-Fan; Cheng, Jian-Bo; Lee, Shih-Chun; Chang, Hung

    2014-08-01

    We investigated factors predicting postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients with clinical Stage I NSCLC who underwent surgical resection at Tri-Service General Hospital in Taiwan between January 2002 and June 2006 were reviewed retrospectively. All study patients underwent standard staging workups. We reviewed the records of 261 patients with an average follow-up of 93 months; we then included 179 patients with pathological Stage I. Two hundred sixty-one patients with clinical Stage I NSCLC were eligible. There were no significant differences in sex, tumor histopathology, location, and age between the two groups (recurrence and nonrecurrence), except for tumor differentiation (p = 0.002), survival rate (p recurrence (p recurrences developed in 11.17%. Only 179 patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC, including 20 patients with postoperative recurrences, were selected. Tumor differentiation (odds ratio 3.581, p = 0.058) and LVSI (odds ratio 5.374, p = 0.020) were independent factors predicting recurrence. Tumor differentiation and LVSI were predictors of postoperative relapse for patients with pathological stage I NSCLC. Risk factors of postoperative recurrence in patients with pathological Stage I NSCLC may enable us to optimize the patient selection for postoperative adjuvant therapies to prevent possibly occult micrometastases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. [Factors influencing survival and recurrence and potential significance of postoperative radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy for stage ⅢA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, W; Song, Y Z; He, M; Li, J; Zhang, R; Qiao, X Y

    2016-11-23

    Objective: To investigate the survival, recurrence patterns and risk factors in patients with stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC treated with curative surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and to explore the significance of postoperative radiation therapy. Methods: The clinical data of 290 patients with pathologically diagnosed stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC after curative resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from January 2010 to December 2014 at our department were retrospectively analyzed. The survival and recurrence patterns were observed, and the factors affecting locoregional recurrence were analyzed. Results: The median survival time was 31.5 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year survival rates were 88.3%, 46.0% and 33.2%, respectively. The median locoregional control time was 38.5 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year locoregional control rates were 78.6%, 55.2% and 41.0%, respectively. The median distant metastasis-free survival was 26.8 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year distant metastasis-free survival rates were 76.4%, 45.5% and 39.5%, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 19.1 months. The 1-, 3-and 5-year progression-free survival rates were 64.1%, 32.5% and 23.8%, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that clinical N status, histological type, pathological T stage, operation mode, the number of positive N2 lymph nodes and the number of positive N2 lymph node stations had a significant influence on overall survival; clinical N status, histological type, the number of positive N2 lymph nodes and the number of positive N2 lymph node stations had a significant influence on locoregional control. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the number of N2 positive lymph nodes (P= 0.017) was an independent factor for overall survival of stage ⅢA-N2 patients; the number of N2 positive lymph nodes (P=0.009) and histological type (P=0.005) were independent factors for locoregional recurrence. For left-sided lung cancer, the lymph node station failure sites were mostly in 2R, 4R, 5, 6 and 7, and

  12. How well does the new lung cancer staging system predict for local/regional recurrence after surgery?: A comparison of the TNM 6 and 7 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepek, Joseph M; Chino, Junzo P; Marks, Lawrence B; D'amico, Thomas A; Yoo, David S; Onaitis, Mark W; Ready, Neal E; Hubbs, Jessica L; Boyd, Jessamy; Kelsey, Chris R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate how well the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) 6 and TNM 7 staging systems predict rates of local/regional recurrence (LRR) after surgery alone for non-small cell lung cancer. All patients who underwent surgery for non-small cell lung cancer at Duke between 1995 and 2005 were reviewed. Those undergoing sublobar resections, with positive margins or involvement of the chest wall, or those who received any chemotherapy or radiation therapy (RT) were excluded. Disease recurrence at the surgical margin, or within ipsilateral hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes, was considered as a LRR. Stage was assigned based on both TNM 6 and TNM 7. Rates of LRR were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. A Cox regression analysis evaluated the hazard ratio of LRR by stage within TNM 6 and TNM 7. A total of 709 patients were eligible for the analysis. Median follow-up was 32 months. For all patients, the 5-year actuarial risk of LRR was 23%. Conversion from TNM 6 to TNM 7 resulted in 21% stage migration (upstaging in 13%; downstaging in 8%). Five-year rates of LRR for stages IA, IB, IIA, IIB, and IIIA disease using TNM 6 were 16%, 26%, 43%, 35%, and 40%, respectively. Using TNM 7, corresponding rates were 16%, 23%, 37%, 39%, and 30%, respectively. The hazard ratios for LRR were statistically different for IA and IB in both TNM 6 and 7 but were also different for IB and IIA in TNM 7. LRR risk increases monotonically for stages IA to IIB in the new TNM 7 system. This information might be valuable when designing future studies of postoperative RT.

  13. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle in clinical practice: implications for prognosis in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grutsch James F

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent manifestation of advanced lung cancer is malnutrition, timely identification and treatment of which can lead to improved patient outcomes. Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA is an easy-to-use and non-invasive technique to evaluate changes in body composition and nutritional status. We investigated the prognostic role of BIA-derived phase angle in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A case series of 165 stages IIIB and IV NSCLC patients treated at our center. The Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival. Cox proportional hazard models were constructed to evaluate the prognostic effect of phase angle, independent of stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history. Results 93 were males and 72 females. 61 had stage IIIB disease at diagnosis while 104 had stage IV. The median phase angle was 5.3 degrees (range = 2.9 – 8. Patients with phase angle 5.3 had 12.4 months (95% CI: 10.5 to 18.7; n = 84; (p = 0.02. After adjusting for age, stage at diagnosis and prior treatment history we found that every one degree increase in phase angle was associated with a relative risk of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64 to 0.97, P = 0.02. Conclusion We found BIA-derived phase angle to be an independent prognostic indicator in patients with stage IIIB and IV NSCLC. Nutritional interventions targeted at improving phase angle could potentially lead to an improved survival in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  14. The liquid biopsy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Junaid; Yun, Jungmi W; Kompelli, Anvesh R; Moufarrej, Youmna E; Alexander, Jonathan S; Herrera, Guillermo A; Shackelford, Rodney E

    2016-11-01

    The incidence of lung cancer has significantly increased over the last century, largely due to smoking, and remains the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. This is often due to lung cancer first presenting at late stages and a lack of curative therapeutic options at these later stages. Delayed diagnoses, inadequate tumor sampling, and lung cancer misdiagnoses are also not uncommon due to the limitations of the tissue biopsy. Our better understanding of the tumor microenvironment and the systemic actions of tumors, combined with the recent advent of the liquid biopsy, may allow molecular diagnostics to be done on circulating tumor markers, particularly circulating tumor DNA. Multiple liquid biopsy molecular methods are presently being examined to determine their efficacy as surrogates to the tumor tissue biopsy. This review will focus on new liquid biopsy technologies and how they may assist in lung cancer detection, diagnosis, and treatment.

  15. Risk factors for brain metastases in surgically staged IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Marina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. Lung cancer is a leading cause of mortality among patients with carcinomas. The aim of this study was to point out risk factors for brain metastases (BM appearance in patients with IIIA (N2 stage of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with three-modal therapy. Methods. We analyzed data obtained from 107 patients with IIIA (N2 stage of NSCLC treated surgically with neoadjuvant therapy. The frequency of brain metastases was examined regarding age, sex, histological type and the size of tumor, nodal status, the sequence of radiotherapy and chemotherapy application and the type of chemotherapy. Results. Two and 3-year incidence rates of BM were 35% and 46%, respectively. Forty-six percent of the patients recurred in the brain as their first failure in the period of three years. Histologically, the patients with nonsquamous cell lung carcinoma had significantly higher frequency of metastases in the brain compared with the group of squamous cell lung carcinoma (46% : 30%; p = 0.021. Examining treatment-related parameters, treatment with taxane-platinum containing regimens was associated with a lower risk of brain metastases, than platinum-etoposide chemotherapy regimens (31% : 52%; p = 0.011. Preoperative radiotherapy, with or without postoperative treatment, showed lower rate of metastases in the brain compared with postoperative radiotherapy treatment only (33% : 48%; p = 0.035. Conclusion. Brain metastases are often site of recurrence in patients with NSCLC (IIIA-N2. Autonomous risk factors for brain metastases in this group of patients are non-squamous NSCLC, N1-N2 nodal status, postoperative radiotherapy without preoperative radiotherapy.

  16. Genetic variants of the Wnt signaling pathway as predictors of recurrence and survival in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coscio, Angela; Chang, David W; Roth, Jack A; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Yang, Ping; Wu, Xifeng

    2014-06-01

    Early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is potentially curative. Nevertheless, many patients will show disease recurrence after curative treatment. The Wnt signaling pathway is a developmental and stem cell pathway that plays an important role in tumorigenesis and may affect cancer progression. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Wnt pathway may influence clinical outcome in early-stage NSCLC patients. We genotyped 441 functional and tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 54 genes of the Wnt pathway in 535 early-stage NSCLC patients treated with curative intent therapy including surgery and chemotherapy. For validation, 4 top SNPs were genotyped in 301 early-stage NSCLC patients from the Mayo Clinic. Cox proportional hazard model and combined SNP analyses were performed to identify significant SNPs correlated with recurrence-free and overall survival. Results from discovery group showed a total of 40 SNPs in 20 genes correlated with disease recurrence (P recurrence-free and overall survival. Joint SNP analyses identified predictive markers for recurrence stratified by treatment. Our findings suggest inherited genetic variation in the Wnt signaling pathway may contribute to variable clinical outcomes for patients with early-stage NSCLC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Survival by histologic subtype in stage IV nonsmall cell lung cancer based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei Y

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Karynsa Cetin1, David S Ettinger2, Yong-jiang Hei3, Cynthia D O'Malley11Center for Observational Research, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 2Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Global Development, Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USABackground: The role of histology in the targeted management of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC has garnered renewed attention in recent years. We provide contemporary population-based estimates of survival and an assessment of important prognostic factors in stage IV NSCLC by major histologic subtype.Methods: Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER Program, we stratified 51,749 incident stage IV NSCLC patients (1988–2003 with follow-up through 2006 by major histologic subtype. We used Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards methods to describe overall survival and the prognostic influence of select patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics for each histologic subgroup.Results: Survival was highest in patients with bronchioloalveolar adenocarcinoma (1-year survival: 29.1% and lowest in those with large cell tumors (1-year survival: 12.8%. Diagnosis in later years, female gender, younger age, either Asian/Pacific Islander or Hispanic race/ethnicity, lower tumor grade, and surgery or beam radiation as part of first-line treatment were generally independently associated with a decreased risk of death, but the prognostic significance of some of these factors (age, ethnicity, tumor grade varied according to histologic subtype.Conclusion: Findings demonstrate a poor prognosis across histologic subtypes in stage IV NSCLC patients but highlight differences in both absolute survival and the relative importance of select prognostic factors by histologic subclassification. More research using other sources of population-based data could help clarify the role of histology in the presentation, management, and prognosis of late-stage

  18. Penetration of Recommended Procedures for Lung Cancer Staging and Management in the United States Over 10 Years: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Survey

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    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khalid, Najma [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Owen, Jean B.; Crozier, Cheryl L. [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wilson, J. Frank [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wei, Xiong [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To document the penetration of clinical trial results, practice guidelines, and appropriateness criteria into national practice, we compared the use of components of staging and treatment for lung cancer among patients treated in 2006-2007 with those used in patients treated in 1998-1999. Methods and Materials: Patient, staging work-up, and treatment characteristics were extracted from the process survey database of the Quality Research in Radiation Oncology (QRRO), consisting of records of 340 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) at 44 institutions and of 144 patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) at 39 institutions. Data were compared for patients treated in 2006-2007 versus those for patients treated in 1998-1999. Results: Use of all recommended procedures for staging and treatment was more common in 2006-2007. Specifically, disease was staged with brain imaging (magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography) and whole-body imaging (positron emission tomography or bone scanning) in 66% of patients with LA-NSCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 42% in 1998-1999, P=.0001) and in 84% of patients with LS-SCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 58.3% in 1998-1999, P=.0011). Concurrent chemoradiation was used for 77% of LA-NSCLC patients (vs 45% in 1998-1999, P<.0001) and for 90% of LS-SCLC patients (vs 62.5% in 1998-1999, P<.0001). Use of the recommended radiation dose (59-74 Gy for NSCLC and 60-70 Gy as once-daily therapy for SCLC) did not change appreciably, being 88% for NSCLC in both periods and 51% (2006-2007) versus 43% (1998-1999) for SCLC. Twice-daily radiation for SCLC was used for 21% of patients in 2006-2007 versus 8% in 1998-1999. Finally, 49% of patients with LS-SCLC received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in 2006-2007 (vs 21% in 1998-1999). Conclusions: Although adherence to all quality indicators improved over time, brain imaging and recommended radiation doses for stage III NSCLC were used in <90% of cases. Use

  19. The association of race with timeliness of care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients with late-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 William R Carpenter,2 Dawn T Provenzale,1,3 Morris Weinberger,1,2 Bryce B Reeve,2 Christina D Williams,1 George L Jackson1,4 1Center of Excellence for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Health Policy and Management, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; 3Division of Gastroenterology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Background: Non-small cell lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States. Patients with late-stage disease (stage 3/4 have five-year survival rates of 2%–15%. Care quality may be measured as time to receiving recommended care and, ultimately, survival. This study examined the association between race and receipt of timely non-small cell lung cancer care and survival among Veterans Affairs health care system patients. Methods: Data were from the External Peer Review Program, a nationwide Veterans Affairs quality-monitoring program. We included Caucasian or African American patients with pathologically confirmed late-stage non-small cell lung cancer in 2006 and 2007. We examined three quality measures: time from diagnosis to (1 treatment initiation, (2 palliative care or hospice referral, and (3 death. Unadjusted analyses used log-rank and Wilcoxon tests. Adjusted analyses used Cox proportional hazard models. Results: After controlling for patient and disease characteristics using Cox regression, there were no racial differences in time to initiation of treatment (72 days for African American versus 65 days for Caucasian patients, hazard ratio 1.04, P = 0.80 or palliative care or hospice referral (129 days versus 116 days, hazard ratio 1.10, P = 0.34. However, the adjusted model found longer survival for African American patients than for Caucasian patients (133 days versus 117 days, hazard ratio 0

  20. NELSON lung cancer screening study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Zhao (Yingru); X. Xie (Xueqian); H.J. de Koning (Harry); W.P. Mali (Willem); R. Vliegenthart (Rozemarijn); M. Oudkerk (Matthijs)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe Dutch-Belgian Randomized Lung Cancer Screening Trial (Dutch acronym: NELSON study) was designed to investigate whether screening for lung cancer by low-dose multidetector computed tomography (CT) in high-risk subjects will lead to a decrease in 10-year lung cancer mortality of at

  1. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy, Nelfinavir Mesylate, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Lung, or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-08

    Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  2. Staging of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  3. Lung Cancer Screening and clinical implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. van 't Westeinde (Susan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed major cancer worldwide and the leading cause of death from cancer. Lung cancer is divided into two subgroups: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), accounting for 10-20% and 75% of lung cancer cases, respectivel

  4. Nutrition aspects of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranganu, Andreea; Camporeale, Jayne

    2009-12-01

    Lung cancer is the most common type of cancer, excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer, and is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Notable carcinogens involved in the development of lung cancer include smoking, secondhand smoke, and radon. Lung cancer is divided into 2 major types: non-small-cell lung cancer, the most prevalent, and small-cell lung cancer. Treatment includes surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the same. Medical nutrition therapy is often required for nutrition-related side effects of cancer treatment, which include but are not limited to anorexia, nausea and vomiting, and esophagitis. The best protection against lung cancer is avoidance of airborne carcinogens and increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. Studies have shown that smokers taking large amounts of beta-carotene and vitamin A supplements had increased lung cancer incidence and mortality. However, ingestion of beta-carotene from foods, along with a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, has a protective role against lung disease. The use of complementary and alternative medicine by lung cancer patients is prevalent; therefore, clinicians should investigate whether complementary and alternative therapies are used by patients and advise them on the use of these therapies to avoid any potential side effects and interactions with conventional therapies. The article concludes with a case study of a patient with non-small-cell lung cancer and illustrates the use of medical nutrition therapy in relation to cancer treatment side effects.

  5. Application of the new 8th TNM staging system for non-small cell lung cancer: treated with curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoon Sik; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Hojin; Lee, Yun Hee; Ha, In Bong; Song, Jin Ho; Kang, Ki Mun

    2017-07-21

    The eighth tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) staging system (8-TNM) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was newly released in 2015. This system had limitation because most patients included in the analysis were treated with surgery. Therefore, it might be difficult to reflect prognosis of patients treated with curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Purpose of this study was to investigate clinical impact of the newly published 8-TNM compared to the current seventh TNM staging system (7-TNM) for locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with CCRT. New 8-TNM was applied to 64 patients with locally advanced NSCLC who were treated with CCRT from 2010 to 2015. Changes in T category and stage group by 8-TNM were recorded and patterns of change were evaluated. Survival was analyzed according to T category, N category, and stage group in each staging system, respectively. Among the total of 64 patients, 38 (59.4%) patients showed change in T category while 22 (34.4%) patients showed change in stage group using 8-TNM compared to 7-TNM. Survival curves were significantly separated in the 8-TNM stage group (p = 0.001) than those in the 7-TNM (p > 0.05). Especially, survival of newly introduced stage IIIC by 8-TNM was significantly lower than that of others. On the other hand, there was no significant survival difference between T categories in each staging system. Subdivision of stage III into IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC by 8-TNM for patients treated with CCRT better reflected prognosis than 7-TNM. However, subdivision of T category according to tumor size in 8-TNM might be less significant.

  6. Accelerated split-course (Type B) thoracic radiation therapy plus vinorelbine/carboplatin combination chemotherapy in Stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iaffaioli, R.V.; Tortoriello, A.; Facchini, G.; Maccauro, M.; Dimitri, P. [Cagliari Univ. (Italy). Ist. Medicina Interna; Caponigro, F. [Istituto Medico Legale, Milan (Italy); Ravo, V.; Muto, P. [Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. Scienze Radiologiche; Crovella, F. [Ospedale Oliveto, Citra (Italy). Div. Chirurgia Generale

    1996-10-01

    43 patients with stage III NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) entered a phase II study aimed at evaluating the toxicity and the activity of a combined modality programme including an accelerated split-course schedule (type B) of thoracic radiation therapy and a combination chemotherapy with vinorelbine and carboplatin. An objective response was achieved in 18/42 evaluable patients (5 complete and 13 partial responses), for an overall response rate of 43% (95% confidence interval, 28-58%). Four complete responses had a duration which exceeded 16 months. Treatment was well tolerated; grade III myelotoxicity occurred in only 14% of patients and treatment was delayed in only 2 cases because of grade 3 oesophagitis. Both tolerability and efficacy data suggest that this regimen holds promise for the treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC. (author).

  7. Macrophage Inhibitory Cytokine-1 (MIC-1 as A Biomarker for Diagnosis 
and Prognosis of Stage I-II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuning LIU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Increased macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1, member of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, was found in patients serum with epithelial tumors. Therefore, our aim was to delineate the diagnostic and prognostic value of serum MIC-1 in patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods A total of 152 consecutive patients with stage I–II NSCLC were prospectively enrolled and underwent follow up after total resection of tumor. Serum MIC-1 level was detected in lung cancer patients by ELISA, 48 benign pulmonary disease patients and 105 healthy controls, and was correlated with clinical features and prognosis of patients. Results The level of MIC-1 of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that of controls (P<0.001 and benign pulmonary disease patients (P<0.001. A threshold of 1,000 pg/mL could be used to diagnose early-stage NSCLC with 70.4% sensitivity and 99.0% specificity. The level of MIC-1 was associated with elder age (P=0.001, female (P=0.03 and T2 (P=0.022. A threshold of 1,465 pg/mL could identify patients with early poor outcome with 72.2% sensitivity and 66.1% specificity. The overall 3-year survival rate in patients with high level of MIC-1 (≥1,465 pg/mL was significantly lower than that of patients with low MIC-1 level (77.6% vs 94.8%. Multivariable Cox regression revealed that a high level of MIC-1 was an independent risk factor for compromised overall survival (HR=3.37, 95%CI: 1.09-10.42, P=0.035. Conclusion High level of serum MIC-1 could be served as a potential biomarker for diagnosis and poorer outcome in patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  8. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org; D' Agostino, Harry [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Pham, Dat C. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Bajwa, Abubakr A. [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  9. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David, E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lagerwaard, Frank [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh [VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with severe COPD, as defined by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria, and performed a systematic review of the literature on outcomes after SBRT or surgery in these patients. Methods: A single-institution cohort of 176 patients with COPD GOLD III-IV and Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SBRT was evaluated. A systematic review identified studies reporting outcomes after SBRT or surgery for Stage I NSCLC in patients with GOLD III-IV or a predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) of {<=}40%. Results: In the single-institution cohort, median follow-up was 21 months and median overall survival (OS) was 32 months. Actuarial 3-year local control was 89%, and 1- and 3-year OS were 79% and 47%, respectively. COPD severity correlated with OS (p = 0.01). The systematic review identified four other studies (two surgical, two SBRT, n = 196 patients). SBRT studies were published more recently and included older patients than surgical studies. Mean 30-day mortality was 0% post-SBRT and 10% after surgery. Local or locoregional control was high ({>=}89%) after both treatments. Post-SBRT, actuarial OS was 79-95% at 1 year and 43-70% at 3 years. Postsurgical actuarial OS was 45-86% at 1 year and 31-66% at 3 years. Conclusions: SBRT and surgery differ in risk of 30-day mortality in patients with severe COPD. Despite the negative selection of SBRT patients, survival at 1 and 3 years is comparable between the two treatments.

  10. Socioeconomic position and survival after lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne O; Steding-Jessen, Marianne; Jakobsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    with stepwise inclusion of possible mediators. RESULTS: For both low- and high-stage lung cancer, adjusted ORs for first-line treatment were reduced in patients with short education and low income, although the OR for education did not reach statistical significance in men with high-stage disease. Patients...... by differences in stage, treatment and comorbidity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the Danish Lung Cancer Register, we identified 13 045 patients with lung cancer diagnosed in 2004-2010, with information on stage, histology, performance status and first-line treatment. We obtained age, gender, vital status, comorbid...... conditions and socioeconomic information (education, income and cohabitation status) from nationwide population-based registers. Associations between SEP and receipt of first-line treatment were analysed in multivariate logistic regression models and those with overall mortality in Cox regression models...

  11. Increasing Radiation Therapy Dose Is Associated With Improved Survival in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshy, Matthew, E-mail: mkoshy@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Malik, Renuka [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Weichselbaum, Ralph R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sher, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the comparative effectiveness of different stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) dosing regimens for early-stage non–small-cell lung cancer, using a large national database, focusing on the relative impact of dose as a function of tumor stage. Methods and Materials: The study included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n=498). The biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated according to the linear quadratic formula using an α/β ratio of 10. High versus lower-dose (HD vs LD) SBRT was defined as a calculated BED above or below 150 Gy. Overall survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The 5 most common dose fractionation schemes (percentage of cohort) used were 20 Gy × 3 (34%), 12 Gy × 4 (16%), 18 Gy × 3 (10%), 15 Gy × 3 (10%), and 16 Gy × 3 (4%). The median calculated BED was 150 Gy (interquartile range 106-166 Gy). The 3-year overall survival (OS) for patients who received HD versus LD was 55% versus 46% (log–rank P=.03). On subset analysis of the T1 cohort there was no association between calculated BED and 3-year OS (61% vs 60% with HD vs LD, P=.9). Among the T2 cohort, patients receiving HD experienced superior 3-year OS (37% vs 24%, P=.01). On multivariable analysis, factors independently prognostic for mortality were female gender (hazard ratio [HR] 0.76, P=.01), T2 tumor (HR 1.99, P=.0001), and HD (HR 0.68, P=.001). Conclusions: This comparative effectiveness analysis of SBRT dose for patients with stage I non–small-cell lung cancer suggests that higher doses (>150 Gy BED) are associated with a significant survival benefit in patients with T2 tumors.

  12. Thoracic staging of non-small-cell lung cancer using integrated {sup 18}F-FDG PET/MR imaging: diagnostic value of different MR sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaarschmidt, Benedikt [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Buchbender, Christian; Rubbert, Christian; Hild, Florian; Antoch, Gerald; Heusch, Philipp [University of Dusseldorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Medical Faculty, Duesseldorf (Germany); Gomez, Benedikt; Ruhlmann, Verena [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Koehler, Jens [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Grueneisen, Johannes; Wetter, Axel [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Reis, Henning [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Pathology, Medical Faculty, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    To compare the accuracy of different MR sequences in simultaneous PET/MR imaging for T staging in non-small-cell lung cancer in relation to histopathology. The study included 28 patients who underwent dedicated thoracic PET/MR imaging before tumour resection. Local tumour staging was performed separately by three readers with each of the following MR sequences together with PET: transverse T2 BLADE, transverse non-enhanced and contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, coronal T2 HASTE, and coronal TrueFISP. The staging results were compared with histopathology after resection as the reference standard. Differences in the accuracy of T staging among the MR sequences were evaluated using McNemar's test. Due to multiple testing, Bonferroni correction was applied to prevent accumulation of α errors; p < 0.0024 was considered statistically significant. Compared with histopathology, T-staging accuracy was 69 % with T2 BLADE, 68 % with T2 HASTE, 59 % with contrast-enhanced T1 FLASH, 57 % with TrueFISP, 50 % with non-enhanced T1 FLASH, and 45 % and 48 % with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientation, respectively. Staging accuracy with T2 BLADE was significantly higher than with non-enhanced T1 FLASH and with T1 3D Dixon VIBE in transverse and coronal orientations (p < 0.0024). T2 HASTE had a significantly higher T-staging accuracy than transverse T1 3D-Dixon-VIBE (p < 0.0024). Transverse T2 BLADE images provide the highest accuracy for local tumour staging and should therefore be included in dedicated thoracic PET/MR protocols. As T1 3D Dixon VIBE images acquired for attenuation correction performed significantly worse, this sequence cannot be considered sufficiently accurate for local tumour staging in the thorax. (orig.)

  13. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China); Wang Ping, E-mail: Doctorwang66@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin (China)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  14. Lung Cancer Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Pamela; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2017-02-01

    The molecular characterization of lung cancer has changed the classification and treatment of these tumors, becoming an essential component of pathologic diagnosis and oncologic therapy decisions. Through the recognition of novel biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor mutations and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocations, it is possible to identify subsets of patients who benefit from targeted molecular therapies. The success of targeted anticancer therapies and new immunotherapy approaches has created a new paradigm of personalized therapy and has led to accelerated development of new drugs for lung cancer treatment. This article focuses on clinically relevant cancer biomarkers as targets for therapy and potential new targets for drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Keratin 34betaE12/keratin7 expression is a prognostic factor of cancer-specific and overall survival in patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhl, Mette; Olsen, Karen Ege; Holst, Rene

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Carcinomas and their metastases often retain the keratin patterns of their epithelial origin, and are therefore useful as lineage-specific markers in diagnostic pathology. Recently, it has become clear that intermediate filaments composed by keratins play a role in modulation of cell...... proliferation, migration, and possibly cancer invasion, factors impacting prognosis in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Tumor tissue from a retrospective Danish cohort of 177 patients with completely resected NSCLC, stage I-IIIA tumors, were analyzed for keratin 7 (K7......) and keratin 34βE12 expression by immunohistochemistry and validated in a comparable independent Norwegian cohort of 276 stage I-IIIA NSCLC patients. RESULTS: Based on keratin 34βE12/K7 expression, three subgroups with significantly different median cancer-specific survival rates were identified (34βE12+/K7...

  16. Clinical efficacy of concurrent carboplatin, etoposide, and definitive radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Consideration as to therapeutic outcomes and morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Kouji; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki [Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Matsubara, Kazuhito; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1998-08-01

    To improve the therapeutic outcome for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer, we applied definitive thoracic radiotherapy combined with concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide. We retrospectively analyzed 55 eligible patients with Stage III disease. The one-year rate of overall survival (OAS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of the total group were 46.1% and 36.1%, respectively. Twenty-nine patients developed thoracic failures (52.7%) and 23 (41.8%) distant failures. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, radiation dose, performance status and LDH were revealed as significant prognostic factors of OAS, and LDH had a strong adverse effect on DMFS. Leucopenia of Grade 3 or higher was noted in 75.9%, anemia in 55.6%, thrombocytopenia in 59.3%, esophagitis in 20.4%, and lung injury in 10.9%. Sufficient gain was not obtained by out strategy, and higher morbidity, especially of lung, was noted than was expected. It was suspected that simultaneous use of oral etoposide might increase radiation pneumonitis, so one should take special care of unexpected toxicity in concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Both the hyperfractionated technique of radiotherapy and the time-dose modification of anti-tumor drugs should be considered in further steps. (author)

  17. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Background Data and Proposals for the Application of TNM Staging Rules to Lung Cancer Presenting as Multiple Nodules with Ground Glass or Lepidic Features or a Pneumonic Type of Involvement in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank C; Marom, Edith M; Arenberg, Douglas A; Franklin, Wilbur A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Travis, William D; Girard, Nicolas; Mazzone, Peter J; Donington, Jessica S; Tanoue, Lynn T; Rusch, Valerie W; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramón

    2016-05-01

    Application of tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification is difficult in patients with lung cancer presenting as multiple ground glass nodules or with diffuse pneumonic-type involvement. Clarification of how to do this is needed for the forthcoming eighth edition of TNM classification. A subcommittee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee conducted a systematic literature review to build an evidence base regarding such tumors. An iterative process that included an extended workgroup was used to develop proposals for TNM classification. Patients with multiple tumors with a prominent ground glass component on imaging or lepidic component on microscopy are being seen with increasing frequency. These tumors are associated with good survival after resection and a decreased propensity for nodal and extrathoracic metastases. Diffuse pneumonic-type involvement in the lung is associated with a worse prognosis, but also with a decreased propensity for nodal and distant metastases. For multifocal ground glass/lepidic tumors, we propose that the T category be determined by the highest T lesion, with either the number of tumors or m in parentheses to denote the multifocal nature, and that a single N and M category be used for all the lesions collectively-for example, T1a(3)N0M0 or T1b(m)N0M0. For diffuse pneumonic-type lung cancer we propose that the T category be designated by size (or T3) if in one lobe, as T4 if involving an ipsilateral different lobe, or as M1a if contralateral and that a single N and M category be used for all pulmonary areas of involvement. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of people getting lung cancer or dying from lung cancer varies by race ...

  19. The role of consolidation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer with persistent N2 disease after induction chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Arya; Correa, Arlene M; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y; Tsao, Anne S; Roth, Jack A; Swisher, Stephen G; Rice, David C; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Lin, Steven H

    2012-09-01

    Persistent pathologic mediastinal nodal involvement after induction chemotherapy and surgical resection is a negative prognostic factor for stage III-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients. This population has high rates of local-regional failure and distant failure, yet the effectiveness of additional therapies is not clear. We assessed the role of consolidative therapies (postoperative radiation therapy and chemotherapy) for such patients. In all, 179 patients with stage III-N2 non-small cell lung cancer at MD Anderson Cancer Center were treated with induction chemotherapy followed by surgery from 1998 through 2008; 61 patients in this cohort had persistent, pathologically confirmed, mediastinal nodal disease, and were treated with postoperative radiation therapy. Local-regional failure was defined as recurrence at the surgical site or lymph nodes (levels 1 to 14, including supraclavicular), or both. Overall survival was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and survival outcomes were assessed by log rank tests. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors influencing local-regional failure, distant failure, and overall survival. All patients received postoperative radiation therapy after surgery, but approximately 25% of the patients also received additional chemotherapy: 9 (15%) with concurrent chemotherapy, 4 (7%) received adjuvant sequential chemotherapy, and 2 (3%) received both. Multivariate analysis indicated that additional postoperative chemotherapy significantly reduced distant failure (hazard ratio 0.183, 95% confidence interval: 0.052 to 0.649, p=0.009) and improved overall survival (hazard ratio 0.233, 95% confidence interval: 0.089 to 0.612, p=0.003). However, additional postoperative chemotherapy had no affect on local-regional failure. Aggressive consolidative therapies may improve outcomes for patients with persistent N2 disease after induction chemotherapy and surgery. Copyright © 2012 The

  20. [Analyses of risk factors for postoperative recurrence after curative resection of stage III A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Guangliang; Guo, Yongqing; Xiao, Fei; Yu, Qiduo; Liang, Chaoyang; Song, Zhiyi; Tian, Yanchu; Shi, Bin; Liu, Deruo

    2014-11-11

    To explore the patterns of mediastinal lymph node metastases and prognostic factors of recurrence in patients undergoing curative resection of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 92 patients underwent curative operation and pathologically diagnosed as stage IIIA-N2 NSCLC were retrospectively reviewed. The clinicopathological data were compared between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. And the potential prognostic factors were included for multivariate analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. The 3 and 5-year recurrence rates were 61.0% and 70.2% respectively. For univariate analysis, the prognostic factors were number of metastatic lymph nodes, positive lymph node ratio, number of metastatic mediastinal lymph nodes (MLN), positive MLN ratio, number of MLN metastasis > 3, multiple station metastasis, trans-regional metastasis and multi-zonal metastasis. A multivariate analysis using Cox regression identified 2 independent factors of prognosis: trans-regional MLN metastasis (P = 0.035) and number of MLN metastasis >3 (P = 0.045). The recurrence risk of patients with trans-regional MLN metastasis was 2.0 times higher than those with regional MLN metastasis while the recurrence risk of patients with number of MLN metastasis >3 was 2.2 times higher than those with number of MLN metastasis of 1-3. Recurrence risk of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after curative resection may be estimated by location and number of MLN metastasis. And the subgroup with trans-regional MLN metastasis and number of MLN metastasis >3 carries the highest risk of recurrence.

  1. Influence of Body Mass Index on the Prognostic Value of Tumor ¹⁸F-FDG Uptake in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seung Hyup; Lee, Kyung-Han; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae; Kim, Jhingook; Zo, Jae Ill; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Ahn, Hee Kyung

    2015-01-01

    The impact of host energy balance status on outcome of lung cancer has not been fully explored. It is also unknown if there is a potential modifying effect of body mass index (BMI) on tumor cell behavior in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We therefore investigated the interactive effects of tumor [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) avidity and BMI. We investigated 1,197 patients with stage I NSCLC who underwent preoperative FDG positron emission tomography followed by curative resection. The primary outcome measure was disease-free survival (DFS). A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the potential independent effects of the prognostic variables. A stratified Cox regression analysis was also performed to assess the potential modifying effects of BMI on the relationship between tumor FDG uptake and patient survival. There were 145 tumor recurrences and 19 deaths during a median follow-up of 30 months. Tumor-related variables, including tumor size, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), histologic cell type, differentiation, lymphovascular invasion, and visceral pleural invasion, did not differ significantly according to BMI status. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, overweight or obesity [hazard ratio (HR), 0.59; 95% CI, 0.43-0.81; P = 0.001] and tumor SUVmax (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.43-2.07; P obese patients (HR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.58-4.31; P obese patients. These results suggest that the host-tumor interaction between host energy balance status and tumor glucose metabolism plays an important role in the outcome of early-stage NSCLC.

  2. Factors important for efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy of medically inoperable stage I lung cancer. A retrospective analysis of patients treated in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, Pia; Nyman, Jan; Lax, Ingmar;

    2006-01-01

    We reviewed results of SBRT treatment of 138 patients with medically inoperable stage I NSCLC treated during 1996-2003 at five different centres in Sweden and Denmark. Mean age was 74 years (range 56-90) with 69 men and 72 women. SBRT was delivered using a 3D conformal multifield technique...... and a stereotactic body frame. Doses delivered were 30-48 Gy (65% isodose at the periphery of planning target volume, PTV) in 2-4 fractions. Equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) was in the range of 50-100 Gy. Mean gross tumour volume (GTV) was 39 cm3 (2-436), and planning target volume was 101 cm3 (11...... proximity. Distant metastases occurred in 25% (35/138) of the patients. Ninety-one (65%) patients died during follow-up of which 55 patients (60%) died of other causes than lung cancer. Three- and 5-year overall survival was 52 and 26% respectively. Lung cancer specific 3- and 5-year overall survival was 66...

  3. SU-E-T-591: Optimizing the Flattening Filter Free Beam Selection in RapidArc-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B-T; Lu, J-Y [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To optimize the flattening filter free (FFF) beam energy selection in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) treatment for stage I lung cancer with different fraction schemes. Methods: Twelve patients suffering from stage I lung cancer were enrolled in this study. Plans were designed using 6XFFF and 10XFFF beams with the most widely used fraction schemes of 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy, respectively. The plan quality was appraised in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, conformity of the prescribed dose (CI100%), intermediate dose spillage (R50% and D2cm), organs at risk (OARs) sparing and beam-on time. Results: The 10XFFF beam predicted 1% higher maximum, mean dose to the PTV and 4–5% higher R50% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the three fraction schemes, whereas the CI100% and D2cm was similar. Most importantly, the 6XFFF beam exhibited 3–10% lower dose to all the OARs. However, the 10XFFF beam reduced the beam-on time by 31.9±7.2%, 38.7±2.8% and 43.6±4.0% compared with the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy, 3*18 Gy and 1*34 Gy schemes, respectively. Beam-on time was 2.2±0.2 vs 1.5±0.1, 3.3±0.9 vs 2.0±0.5 and 6.3±0.9 vs 3.5±0.4 minutes for the 6XFFF and 10XFFF one in the three fraction schemes. Conclusion: The 6XFFF beam obtains better OARs sparing in SBRT treatment for stage I lung cancer, but the 10XFFF one provides improved treatment efficiency. To balance the OARs sparing and intrafractional variation as a function of prolonged treatment time, the authors recommend to use the 6XFFF beam in the 4*12 Gy and 3*18 Gy schemes for better OARs sparing. However, for the 1*34 Gy scheme, the 10XFFF beam is recommended to achieve improved treatment efficiency.

  4. Differences between pulmonologists, thoracic surgeons and radiation oncologists in deciding on the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer: A binary choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopmans, Wendy; Zwaan, Laura; Senan, Suresh; van der Wulp, Ineke; Damman, Olga C; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2015-06-01

    Surgery is the standard of care in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is increasingly used to treat patients at high-risk for surgical complications. We studied which patient- and clinician-related characteristics influenced treatment recommendations. A binary choice experiment with hypothetical cases was conducted. Cases varied on five patient-related characteristics: patient age, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD GOLD) score, Charlson co-morbidity index, World Health Organization performance status (WHO-PS) and patient treatment preference (surgery/SABR). Clinician characteristics were recorded. Responses were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models. 126 clinicians completed the survey. All patient-related characteristics, the clinician speciality, and whether clinicians considered outcomes of surgery comparable to SABR, significantly influenced treatment recommendations. Pulmonologists were most influenced by WHO-PS and comorbidity, whereas comorbidity and age had greatest influence on radiation oncologists and surgeons. Clinicians were less influenced by stated patient preference and COPD GOLD score. Limited consistency was observed in treatment recommendations. This study suggests that more efforts are needed to develop uniform approaches for making treatment recommendations, and also to incorporate patient preferences when making treatment decisions for stage I NSCLC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT for lymph node staging in non-small-cell lung cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bao-jun; DONG Jing-cheng; XU Chang-qing; ZUO Chuan-tao; LE Jing-jing; GUAN Yi-hui; ZHAO Jun; WU Jin-feng; DUAN Xiao-hong; CAO Yu-xue

    2009-01-01

    Background This retrospective study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of 2-(F18)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose-positron emission tomography(18F-FDG-PET)/COmputed tomography(PET/CT)in the preoperative diagnosis of metastatic mediastinal and hilar lymph node in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods A total of 39 patients received preoperative 18F-FDG PET/CT and the postoperative biopsy.We compared preoperative PET/CT scan results with corresponding intraoperative histopathalogic findings in 39 NSCLC patients.The sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive and negative predictive value of 18F-FDG PET/CT were assessed.Results Histopathologic examination confirmed metastasis in 57 out of the 208 excised lymph nodes;23 of the 57 nodes were mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes.The sensitivity,specificity,accuracy,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of PET/CT in the preoperative diagnosis of mediastinal lymph node metastasis in NSCLC patients were 65%,96.8%,92%,78.5%and 90%,respectively.Conclusions PET/CT scan showed good accuracy in the preoperative diagnosis of mediastinal and hilar lymph node metastasis in the patients with NSCLC.We recommend that PET/CT scanning be used as a first-line evaluation tool for tumor diagnosis,therapy evaluation and follow-up.

  6. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  7. The Danish randomized lung cancer CT screening trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper H; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (CT) has not yet been evaluated in randomized clinical trials, although several are underway. METHODS: In The Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial, 4104 smokers and previous smokers from 2004 to 2006 were randomized to either...... lung cancer. Ten of these had stage I disease. Eleven of 17 lung cancers at baseline were treated surgically, eight of these by video assisted thoracic surgery resection. CONCLUSIONS: Screening may facilitate minimal invasive treatment and can be performed with a relatively low rate of false......-positive screen results compared with previous studies on lung cancer screening....

  8. A prospective study of tumor suppressor gene methylation as a prognostic biomarker in surgically-resected stage I-IIIA non-small cell lung cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilon, Alexander; Sugita, Hirofumi; Sima, Camelia S.; Zauderer, Marjorie; Rudin, Charles M.; Kris, Mark G.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction While retrospective analyses support an association between early tumor recurrence and tumor suppressor gene (TSG) promoter methylation in early-stage non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), few studies have investigated this question prospectively. Methods Primary tumor tissue from patients with resected pathologic stage I-IIIA NSCLCs was collected at the time of surgery and analyzed for promoter methylation via methylation-specific reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (MethyLight). The primary objective was to determine an association between promoter methylation of 10 individual TSGs (CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1, APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, SOCS3, and ADAMTS8) and recurrence-free survival (RFS), with the secondary objectives of determining association with overall survival (OS), and relation to clinical or pathologic features. Results 107 patients had sufficient tumor tissue for successful promoter methylation analysis. Majority of patients were former/current smokers (88%) with lung adenocarcinoma (78%) and pathologic stage I disease (66%). Median follow-up was 4 years. When controlled for pathologic stage, promoter methylation of the individual genes CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1, APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, and ADAMTS8 was not associated with RFS. Promoter methylation of the same genes was not associated with OS except for DAPK1 which was associated with improved OS (p=0.03). The total number of genes with methylated promoters did not correlate with RFS (p=0.89) or OS (p=0.55). Conclusions Contrary to data established by previous retrospective series, TSG promoter methylation (CDKN2A, CDH13, RASSF1,APC, MGMT, GSTP1, DAPK1, WIF1, and ADAMTS8) was not prognostic for early tumor recurrence in this prospective study of resected NSCLCs. PMID:25122424

  9. Surgical management of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamousa Ahmed

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgery plays a major role in the management of patients with lung cancer. Surgery is not only the main curative treatment modality in patients with early-stage lung cancer but it also has a significant role in the initial workup for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer. This article describes the surgical management of patients with lung cancer. Surgical resection for lung cancer is still regarded as the most effective method for controlling the primary tumor, provided it is resectable for cure and the risks of the procedure are low. The 5-year survival rare following complete resection (R0 of a lung cancer is stage dependent [Table 1]. [1-3] Incomplete resection (R1, R2 rarely, if ever, cures the patient.

  10. Bricklayers and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article ‘Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case–control studies’ in the International Journal of Cancer publishes findings of an epidemiological study (in the frame of a SYNERGY-project) dedicated to the lung cancer risk among bricklayers. The authors conclude that a foc

  11. Postoperative pain and quality of life after lobectomy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery or anterolateral thoracotomy for early stage lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Morten; Jørgensen, Ole Dan; Kronborg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    (1:1) to lobectomy via four-port VATS or anterolateral thoracotomy. After surgery, we applied identical surgical dressings to ensure masking of patients and staff. Postoperative pain was measured with a numeric rating scale (NRS) six times per day during hospital stay and once at 2, 4, 8, 12, 26...... died during the follow-up period (three in the VATS group and six in the thoracotomy group). INTERPRETATION: VATS is associated with less postoperative pain and better quality of life than is anterolateral thoracotomy for the first year after surgery, suggesting that VATS should be the preferred......BACKGROUND: Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is used increasingly as an alternative to thoracotomy for lobectomy in the treatment of early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer, but remains controversial and worldwide adoption rates are low. Non-randomised studies have suggested that VATS...

  12. Intratumoral Metabolic Heterogeneity for Prediction of Disease Progression After Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Saeryung; Song, Hochun; Byun, Byung Hyun and others

    2014-03-15

    We evaluated the value of variable {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT parameters for the prediction of disease progression after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One hundred sixteen pretreatment FDG PET/CT scans of inoperable stage III NSCLC were retrospectively reviewed (stage IIIA: 51; stage IIIB: 65). The volume of interest was automatically drawn for each primary lung tumor, and PET parameters were assessed as follows: maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using the boundaries presenting SUV intensity exceeding 3.0, and the area under the curve of the cumulative SUV-volume histograms (AUC-CSH), which is known to reflect the tumor heterogeneity. Progression-free survival (PFS), locoregional recurrence-free survival (LRFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared with each PET and clinical parameters by univariate and multivariate survival analysis.In the ROC analysis, the optimal cutoff values of SUV{sub max}, MTV (cm{sup 3}), and AUC-CSH for prediction of PFS were determined as 21.5, 27.7, and 4,800, respectively. In univariate analysis, PFS was statistically significantly reduced in those with AUC-CSH<4,800 (p =0.004). In multivariate analysis, AUC-CSH and SUV{sub max} were statistically significant independent prognostic factors (HR 3.35, 95 % CI 1.79.6.28, p <0.001; HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.09.0.70, p =0.008, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that AUC-CSH was the most significant independent prognostic factor for LRFS and DMFS (HR 3.27, 95 % CI 1.54.6.94, p =0.002; HR 2.79, 95 % CI 1.42.5.50, p =0.003). Intratumoral metabolic heterogeneity of primary lung tumor in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can predict disease progression after CCRT in inoperable stage III NSCLC.

  13. A Panel of Genetic Polymorphism for the Prediction of Prognosis in Patients with Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer after Surgical Resection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yup Lee

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate whether a panel of eight genetic polymorphisms can predict the prognosis of patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC after surgical resection.We selected eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs which have been associated with the prognosis of lung cancer patients after surgery in our previous studies. A total of 814 patients with early stage NSCLC who underwent curative surgical resection were enrolled. The association of the eight SNPs with overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS was analyzed.The eight SNPs (CD3EAP rs967591, TNFRSF10B rs1047266, AKT1 rs3803300, C3 rs2287845, HOMER2 rs1256428, GNB2L1 rs3756585, ADAMTSL3 rs11259927, and CD3D rs3181259 were significantly associated with OS and/or DFS. Combining those eight SNPs, we designed a prognostic index to predict the prognosis of patients. According to relative risk of death, a score value was assigned to each genotype of the SNPs. A worse prognosis corresponded to a higher score value, and the sum of score values of eight SNPs defined the prognostic index of a patient. When we categorized the patients into two groups based on the prognostic index, high risk group was significantly associated with worse OS and DFS compared to low risk group (aHR for OS = 2.21, 95% CI = 1.69-2.88, P = 8.0 x 10-9, and aHR for DFS = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.29-1.94, P = 1.0 x 10-5.Prognostic index using eight genetic polymorphisms may be useful for the prognostication of patients with surgically resected NSCLC.

  14. Could new reconstruction CT techniques challenge MRI for the detection of brain metastases in the context of initial lung cancer staging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millon, Domitille; Byl, David; Collard, Philippe; Cambier, Samantha E; Van Maanen, Aline G; Vlassenbroek, Alain; Coche, Emmanuel E

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of brain CT images reconstructed with a model-based iterative algorithm performed at usual and reduced dose. 115 patients with histologically proven lung cancer were prospectively included over 15 months. Patients underwent two CT acquisitions at the initial staging, performed on a 256-slice MDCT, at standard (CTDIvol: 41.4 mGy) and half dose (CTDIvol: 20.7 mGy). Both image datasets were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and iterative model-based reconstruction (IMR) algorithms. Brain MRI was considered as the reference. Two blinded independent readers analysed the images. Ninety-three patients underwent all examinations. At the standard dose, eight patients presented 17 and 15 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. At half-dose, seven patients presented 15 and 13 lesions on IMR and FBP CT images, respectively. The test could not highlight any significant difference between the standard dose IMR and the half-dose FBP techniques (p-value = 0.12). MRI showed 46 metastases on 11 patients. Specificity, negative and positive predictive values were calculated (98.9-100 %, 93.6-94.6 %, 75-100 %, respectively, for all CT techniques). No significant difference could be demonstrated between the two CT reconstruction techniques. • No significant difference between IMR100 and FBP50 was shown. • Compared to FBP, IMR increased the image quality without diagnostic impairment. • A 50 % dose reduction combined with IMR reconstructions could be achieved. • Brain MRI remains the best tool in lung cancer staging.

  15. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  16. Stages of Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the oropharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  17. Stages of Hypopharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the hypopharynx . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ . Enlarge Tumor sizes. The size of a tumor may be compared to the size of a pea (1 cm), peanut (2 cm), grape (3 cm), walnut (4 cm), lime (5 cm), ...

  18. Optimization of nodule management in CT lung cancer screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelmans, Marjolein Anne

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer-related cause of death. Through computed tomography (CT) screening, cancer can be detected at the earliest stage, with a much greater probability of cure. After the positive outcome of the US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening with low-dose CT in heavy

  19. Analysis of Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha in Patients Operated on Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honguero Martínez, Antonio Francisco; Arnau Obrer, Antonio; Figueroa Almánzar, Santiago; León Atance, Pablo; Guijarro Jorge, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Recent studies show that expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α) favours expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), and these biomarkers are linked to cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis in different cancers. We analyze expression of HIF-1α and VEGF-A to clinicopathologic features and survival of patients operated on stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. Methodology. Prospective study of 52 patients operated on with stage I. Expression of VEGF-A and HIF-1α was performed through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results. Mean age was 64.7 and 86.5% of patients were male. Stage IA represented 23.1% and stage IB 76.9%. Histology classification was 42.3% adenocarcinoma, 34.6% squamous cell carcinoma, and 23.1% others. Median survival was 81.0 months and 5-year survival 67.2%. There was correlation between HIF-1α and VEGF-A (P = 0.016). Patients with overexpression of HIF-1α had a tendency to better survival with marginal statistical significance (P = 0.062). Patients with overexpression of VEGF-A had worse survival, but not statistically significant (P = 0.133). Conclusion. The present study revealed that VEGF-A showed correlation with HIF-1α. HIF-1α had a tendency to protective effect with a P value close to statistical significance. VEGF-A showed a contrary effect but without statistical significance. PMID:26316946

  20. Analysis of Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1alpha in Patients Operated on Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francisco Honguero Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Recent studies show that expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α favours expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A, and these biomarkers are linked to cellular proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis in different cancers. We analyze expression of HIF-1α and VEGF-A to clinicopathologic features and survival of patients operated on stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. Methodology. Prospective study of 52 patients operated on with stage I. Expression of VEGF-A and HIF-1α was performed through real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results. Mean age was 64.7 and 86.5% of patients were male. Stage IA represented 23.1% and stage IB 76.9%. Histology classification was 42.3% adenocarcinoma, 34.6% squamous cell carcinoma, and 23.1% others. Median survival was 81.0 months and 5-year survival 67.2%. There was correlation between HIF-1α and VEGF-A (P=0.016. Patients with overexpression of HIF-1α had a tendency to better survival with marginal statistical significance (P=0.062. Patients with overexpression of VEGF-A had worse survival, but not statistically significant (P=0.133. Conclusion. The present study revealed that VEGF-A showed correlation with HIF-1α. HIF-1α had a tendency to protective effect with a P value close to statistical significance. VEGF-A showed a contrary effect but without statistical significance.

  1. Current patterns of care for patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Survey of US radiation oncologists on their recommendations regarding thoracic consolidation radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Timur; Jain, Aditya; Degnin, Catherine; Chen, Yiyi; Henderson, Mark; Thomas, Charles R

    2016-10-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend thoracic consolidation radiation therapy (TCRT) for patients with Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (ES-SCLC) with response to systemic chemotherapy, based on two randomized clinical trials, which varied in patient selection and radiation therapy doses administered. The current pattern of practice among US radiation oncologists is unknown. We have surveyed practicing US radiation oncologist via a short online questionnaire. Respondents' characteristics and their self-rated knowledge base were analyzed for association with their treatment recommendations. We received 473 responses from practicing US radiation oncologists. Over half of respondents were practicing for over 10 years after completing residency training and 70% treated more than 10 lung cancer patients per year. 96% of respondents recommend TCRT for patients with ES-SCLC after systemic chemotherapy. Patient selection and radiation therapy doses vary greatly. High self-rated knowledge of individual clinical trials is associated with lower TCRT recommended doses. Patients treated at academic centers are less likely to receive TCRT than patients treated in private clinics (p=0.0101). Our analysis revealed that among the respondents, there was a very high adherence to current NCCN guidelines, which recommend TCRT for ES-SCLC patients with clinical response to systemic chemotherapy. The great variability in patient selection and radiation therapy doses is concerning and calls for future clinical trials to standardize treatment approaches and improve treatment outcomes among patients with ES-SCLC. Until such data exists and in light of poor long-term survival of patients with ES-SCLC, the shorter and less toxic regimen of 30Gy in 10 fractions should be used as the standard of care and the more aggressive regimens studied on clinical protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed...... a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral....

  3. Lung cancer: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pass, Harvey I

    2005-01-01

    "A comprehensive review of lung cancer, from screening, early detection, and prevention, to management strategies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy, as well...

  4. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  5. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  6. Using machine learning to predict radiation pneumonitis in patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Gilmer; Solberg, Timothy D.; Heskel, Marina; Ungar, Lyle; Simone, Charles B., II

    2016-08-01

    To develop a patient-specific ‘big data’ clinical decision tool to predict pneumonitis in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 61 features were recorded for 201 consecutive patients with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT, in whom 8 (4.0%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Pneumonitis thresholds were found for each feature individually using decision stumps. The performance of three different algorithms (Decision Trees, Random Forests, RUSBoost) was evaluated. Learning curves were developed and the training error analyzed and compared to the testing error in order to evaluate the factors needed to obtain a cross-validated error smaller than 0.1. These included the addition of new features, increasing the complexity of the algorithm and enlarging the sample size and number of events. In the univariate analysis, the most important feature selected was the diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO adj%). On multivariate analysis, the three most important features selected were the dose to 15 cc of the heart, dose to 4 cc of the trachea or bronchus, and race. Higher accuracy could be achieved if the RUSBoost algorithm was used with regularization. To predict radiation pneumonitis within an error smaller than 10%, we estimate that a sample size of 800 patients is required. Clinically relevant thresholds that put patients at risk of developing radiation pneumonitis were determined in a cohort of 201 stage I NSCLC patients treated with SBRT. The consistency of these thresholds can provide radiation oncologists with an estimate of their reliability and may inform treatment planning and patient counseling. The accuracy of the classification is limited by the number of patients in the study and not by the features gathered or the complexity of the algorithm.

  7. Survival Outcome After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Surgery for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiangpeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Biostatistics, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kidwell, Kelley [Department of Biostatistics, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ren, Yanping [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chang, Andrew [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lv, Fanzhen [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Orringer, Mark [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Spring Kong, Feng-Ming, E-mail: Fkong@gru.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: This study compared treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with those of surgery in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies of SBRT and surgery were retrieved through extensive searches of the PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library databases from 2000 to 2012. Original English publications of stage I NSCLC with adequate sample sizes and adequate SBRT doses were included. A multivariate random effects model was used to perform a meta-analysis to compare survival between treatments while adjusting for differences in patient characteristics. Results: Forty SBRT studies (4850 patients) and 23 surgery studies (7071 patients) published in the same period were eligible. The median age and follow-up duration were 74 years and 28.0 months for SBRT patients and 66 years and 37 months for surgery patients, respectively. The mean unadjusted overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years with SBRT were 83.4%, 56.6%, and 41.2% compared to 92.5%, 77.9%, and 66.1% with lobectomy and 93.2%, 80.7%, and 71.7% with limited lung resections. In SBRT studies, overall survival improved with increasing proportion of operable patients. After we adjusted for proportion of operable patients and age, SBRT and surgery had similar estimated overall and disease-free survival. Conclusions: Patients treated with SBRT differ substantially from patients treated with surgery in age and operability. After adjustment for these differences, OS and DFS do not differ significantly between SBRT and surgery in patients with operable stage I NSCLC. A randomized prospective trial is warranted to compare the efficacy of SBRT and surgery.

  8. A Gene Signature Combining the Tissue Expression of Three Angiogenic Factors is a Prognostic Marker in Early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanmartín, Elena; Sirera, Rafael; Usó, Marta; Blasco, Ana; Gallach, Sandra; Figueroa, Santiago; Martínez, Nieves; Hernando, Cristina; Honguero, Antonio; Martorell, Miguel; Guijarro, Ricardo; Rosell, Rafael; Jantus-Lewintre, Eloisa; Camps, Carlos

    .... The aim of this study was to analyze relative expression levels of angiogenic markers in resectable non-small cell lung cancer patients in order to asses a prognostic signature that could improve...

  9. Lung Cancer in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozicic Mirela

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although the incidence of malignancy has increased after solid organ transplantation, data on lung cancer in this group of patients is scarce. The aim of this study was to determine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients who developed lung cancer after renal transplantation. Methods. Among a cohort of 1658 patients who received a transplant at our institution and were followedup between 1973 and 2014, five patients developed lung cancer. We analyzed risk factors, transplantation characteristics, treatment options and survival. Results. Lung cancer was diagnosed in 5 patients (0.3%. Time to diagnosis after the transplant procedure ranged from 26 to 156 months (mean 115 months. All of them had a smoking history. Tumors were classified as IIB (20%, IIIA (40%, and IV (40%. Histological types included adenocarcinoma (80% and there was one case of sarcomatoid carcinoma (20%. One patient had concomitant thyroid papillary carcinoma. Radiotherapy was applied in 2 patients, 2 underwent chemotherapy (erlotinib and combination of carboplatinum and etopozide in one patient each, and 2 died within one month after the diagnosis from disseminated malignant disease. Patients with stage IIIA survived 14 and 24 months after the diagnosis. The patient with sarcomatoid cancer underwent thoracotomy with a complete resection, lost his graft function and died 7 months after the diagnosis. Conclusion. Lung cancer is relatively rare malignancy in renal transplant recipients, but associated with high mortality. Smoking is a significant risk factor, thus smoking cessation should be promoted among renal transplant recipients, as well as regular screening for lung cancer.

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in stage I non-small cell lung cancer that underwent anatomic resection: the role of a recurrence promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chih-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Yang; Lee, Kang-Yun; Lin, Shu-Min; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Lo, Yu-Lun; Liu, Chien-Ying; Hsiung, Te-Chih; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Wu, Yi-Cheng

    2014-08-01

    Despite the use of anatomic resection, the post-surgical recurrence rate remains high in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chronic inflammation plays a role in the mechanism that promotes tumor initiation. This study aimed to investigate the association between recurrence outcome and chronic inflammation-related co-morbidities in early-stage resected NSCLC. A review of medical records for recurrence outcome and co-morbidities, in terms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), DM, asthma and cardiovascular diseases, was performed with 181 patients with stage I NSCLC that underwent anatomic resection. Subjects with T descriptors as T2a disease (49.5 vs. 28.0%, p recurrence. Univariate analysis for recurrence-free survival showed T descriptor as T2a (21.5 months vs. NR, p recurrence-free survival in the Cox regression model. Patients with COPD were at higher risk of brain recurrence (OR: 7.88; 95% CI, 1.50-41.3, p recurrence in bone and liver (OR: 4.13; 95% CI, 1.08-15.8, p = 0.05). Subjects with COPD and T2a disease had a higher risk of recurrence. The role of COPD as a recurrence promoter merits further prospective investigation.

  11. Effect of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy on Improvement of Surgical Resectibility and Survival of Patients with Stage ⅢA Non Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIJian; YULichao; 等

    2002-01-01

    Ojbective To assess the effect of neoadjuvant chemotherapy on surgical resectibility and survival in patients with stage ⅢA non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods 42 patients with stage ⅢA NSCLC were randomized to receive either two cycles chemotherapy followed by surgery(neoadjuvant chemotherapy group)or surgery alone(surgery alone group).All patients received four cycles chemotherapy after surgery.Results The overall response to chemotherapy was 42.9%(38.1% partial response and 4.8% complete response).Toxicity of chemotherapy was minor and consisted mainly of gastroenterological side effects and myelosuppression.Patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy had estimated surgical resection rate of 95.2%(n=20)and a complete resection rate in 52.4%(n=11) compared to 66.7%(n=14)and 28.6%(n=6)respectively,for patients with surgery alone(P<0.05).None of the patients died from the operation.The median survival was 24.6 months in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy group as compared to only 10.8 months in the surgery alone group(P<0.05).The 2-year survival rate was 57.1% in the chemotherapy group as compared to 28.6% in the surgery alone group(P<0.05).Conclusion Neoadjuvant chemotherapy improves the surgical resectibility and increases the median survival and 2-year survival rate of patients with stage ⅢA NSCLC.

  12. Improved specificity of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT for lymph node staging of non-small cell lung cancer considering calcified lymph node as benign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong Young; Seo, Young Soon; Min, Jung Joon; Song, Ho Chun; Na, Kook Joo; Choi, Chan; Kim, Young Chul; Kim, Yun Hyun; Bom, Hee Seung [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT (PET/CT) in lymph node staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) considering calcification and histologic types as well as FDG uptake. Fifty-three patients (38 men, 15 women; mean age, 62 years) with NSCLC underwent surgical resection (tumor resection and lymph node dissection) after PET/CT. After surgery, we compared PET/CT results with the biopsy results, and analyzed lymph node metastases, based on histologic types. PET diagnosis of lymph node metastasis was determined by maximum SUV (maxSUV) > 3.0, and PET/CT diagnosis was determined by maxSUV > 3.0 without lymph node calcification. By PET diagnosis, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of overall lymph node staging were 45% (13 of 29), 91% (228 of 252), and 86% (241 of 281). Specificity was 91% in both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, while sensitivity was 71% in squamous cell carcinoma and 36% in adenocarcinoma. When we excluded calcified lymph node with maxSUV > 3.0 from metastasis by PET/CT diagnosis, specificity improved to 98% in squamous cell carcinoma and 97% in adenocarcinoma. The degree of improvement was not dependent on histologic types. PET/CT improved specificity of lymph node staging by reducing false positive lymph node regardless of histologic types of NSCLC.

  13. Comprehensive dosimetric planning comparison for early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer with SABR: fixed-beam IMRT versus VMAT versus TomoTherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xhaferllari, Ilma; El-Sherif, Omar; Gaede, Stewart

    2016-09-08

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is emerging as a leading technology in treating early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). However, two other modalities capable of deliver-ing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) include fixed-beam and helical TomoTherapy (HT). This study aims to provide an extensive dosimetric compari-son among these various IMRT techniques for treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR. Ten early-stage NSCLC patients were retrospectively optimized using three fixed-beam techniques via nine to eleven beams (high and low modulation step-and-shoot (SS), and sliding window (SW)), two VMAT techniques via two partial arcs (SmartArc (SA) and RapidArc (RA)), and three HT techniques via three different fan beam widths (1 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5 cm) for 80 plans total. Fixed-beam and VMAT plans were generated using flattening filter-free beams. SS and SA, HT treatment plans, and SW and RA were optimized using Pinnacle v9.1, Tomoplan v.3.1.1, and Eclipse (Acuros XB v11.3 algorithm), respectively. Dose-volume histogram statistics, dose conformality, and treatment delivery efficiency were analyzed. VMAT treatment plans achieved significantly lower values for contralat-eral lung V5Gy (p ≤ 0.05) compared to the HT plans, and significantly lower mean lung dose (p VMAT techniques, a significant reduction in the total monitor units (p = 0.05) was found in the SA plans, while a significant decrease was observed in the dose falloff parameter, D2cm, (p = 0.05), for the RA treatments. The maximum cord dose was significantly reduced (p = 0.017) in grouped RA&SA plans com-pared to SS. Estimated treatment time was significantly higher for HT and fixed-beam plans compared to RA&SA (p VMAT is dosimetrically advantageous in treating early-stage NSCLC with SABR compared to fixed-beam, while providing significantly shorter treatment times.

  14. A Case Series of Survival Outcomes in Patients with Advanced-stage IIIb/IV Non-small-cell Lung Cancer Treated with HangAm-Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bang Sun-Hwi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents approximately 80% of all lung cancers. Unfortunately, at their time of diagnosis, most patients have advanced to unresectable disease with a very poor prognosis. The oriental herbal medicine HangAm-Plus (HAP has been developed for antitumor purposes, and several previous studies have reported its therapeutic effects. In this study, the efficacy of HAP was evaluated as a third-line treatment for advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC. Methods: The study involved six patients treated at the East- West Cancer Center (EWCC from April 2010 to October 2011. Inoperable advanced-stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients received 3,000 or 6,000 mg of HAP on a daily basis over a 12-week period. Computed tomography (CT scans were obtained from the patients at the time of the initial administration and after 12 weeks of treatment. We observed and analyzed the patients overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Results: Of the six patients, three expired during the study, and the three remaining patients were alive as of October 31, 2011. The OS ranged from 234 to 512 days, with a median survival of 397 days and a one-year survival rate of 66.7%. In the 12-week-interval chest CT assessment, three patients showed stable disease (SD, and the other three showed progressive disease (PD. The PFS of patients ranged from 88 to 512 days, the median PFS being 96 days. Longer OS and PFS were correlated with SD. Although not directly comparable, the OS and the PFS of this study were greater than those of the docetaxel or the best supportive care group in other studies. Conclusion: HAP may prolong the OS and the PFS of inoperable stage IIIb/IV NSCLC patients without significant adverse effects. In the future, more controlled clinical trials with larger samples from multi-centers should be conducted to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of HAP.

  15. Increasing the accuracy of 18F-FDG PET/CT interpretation of "mildly positive" mediastinal nodes in the staging of non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, F

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify radiological factors that may reduce false-positive results and increase diagnostic accuracy when staging the mediastinum of patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC).

  16. Carboplatin and paclitaxol (Taxol) as an induction regimen for patients with biopsy-proven stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer. an EORTC phase II study (EORTC 08958).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Brien, ME; Splinter, T; Smit, E.F.; Biesma, B.; Krzakowski, M; Tjan-Heijnen, VC; Bochove, A Van; Stigt, J; Smid-Geirnaerdt, MJ; Debruyne, C.; Legrand, C; Giaccone, G.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to document the activity and toxicity of paclitaxel (Taxol)/carboplatin when used as induction chemotherapy in patients with stage IIIA N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) prior to definitive local treatment within a large, ongoing comparative study (EORTC 08941). 52 elig

  17. Diagnóstico e estadiamento do câncer de pulmão Diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGELO FERNANDEZ

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available O câncer do pulmão pode apresentar-se sob diversas formas e vários são os meios de diagnosticá-lo. A escolha do melhor método para o seu diagnóstico depende de diferentes aspectos relacionados ao tumor, ao paciente e à habilidade da equipe médica. Dentre os métodos mais comumente utilizados para o diagnóstico do câncer do pulmão, podemos contar, além dos exames radiológicos, que não serão abordados neste artigo, a citologia do escarro, a broncofibroscopia, a punção aspirativa transtorácica e a toracoscopia, entre outros. O estadiamento reflete a extensão anatômica do câncer. As regras de estadiamento propostas por Denoix foram adaptadas de maneira satisfatória para o câncer do pulmão e, embora tenham sofrido diversas modificações, devidas ao avanço tecnológico dos métodos de diagnóstico, são importantes para orientar o tratamento e estimar o prognóstico. Com o advento de novas modalidades de tratamento, principalmente as combinadas, o estadiamento tende a assumir importância cada vez maior, tanto na escolha da modalidade terapêutica mais adequada quanto na comparação dos resultados.Carcinoma of the lung can present in a number of guises and a number of possible and often complementary diagnostic approaches are available. The choice of procedure should reflect the presentation of the tumor, local expertise, intended management and patient preference. There are different methods of investigation: sputum cytology, fiberbronchoscopy, transbronchial biopsy, transbronchial needle aspiration, transthoracic fine needle aspiration, etc. The association of all of these methods increases the power of diagnosis. Staging is the measurement of the anatomical extent of a tumor in any given patient. The staging of cancer began with Denoix's TNM classification system, and, although several modifications were developed, it remains the basis of lung cancer staging systems up to now. Assigning patients to a particular TNM stage

  18. Influence of Body Mass Index on the Prognostic Value of Tumor ¹⁸F-FDG Uptake in Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hyup Hyun

    Full Text Available The impact of host energy balance status on outcome of lung cancer has not been fully explored. It is also unknown if there is a potential modifying effect of body mass index (BMI on tumor cell behavior in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We therefore investigated the interactive effects of tumor [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG avidity and BMI.We investigated 1,197 patients with stage I NSCLC who underwent preoperative FDG positron emission tomography followed by curative resection. The primary outcome measure was disease-free survival (DFS. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the potential independent effects of the prognostic variables. A stratified Cox regression analysis was also performed to assess the potential modifying effects of BMI on the relationship between tumor FDG uptake and patient survival.There were 145 tumor recurrences and 19 deaths during a median follow-up of 30 months. Tumor-related variables, including tumor size, maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax, histologic cell type, differentiation, lymphovascular invasion, and visceral pleural invasion, did not differ significantly according to BMI status. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, overweight or obesity [hazard ratio (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.43-0.81; P = 0.001] and tumor SUVmax (HR, 1.72; 95% CI, 1.43-2.07; P < 0.001 were significantly associated with DFS. There was a significant modifying effect of BMI (P for interaction < 0.001 in multivariable analysis. High tumor SUVmax was more strongly associated with worse DFS in normal weight patients (HR, 4.72; 95% CI, 2.77-8.06; P < 0.001 than in overweight or obese patients (HR, 2.61; 95% CI, 1.58-4.31; P < 0.001.Tumor FDG avidity is an independent predictor of DFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC and this prognostic value was strengthened in normal weight patients than in overweight or obese patients. These results suggest that the host-tumor interaction between

  19. Second-line Chemotherapy and Its Survival Analysis of 181 Patients with
Extensive-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer in a Single Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjiao MA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is the most malignant neuroendocrine tumor and sensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, most patients who receive first-line chemotherapy will relapse within one to two years. Once recurrent, it indicates poor prognosis. Currently, the standard first-line chemotherapy regimen of extensive-stage SCLC is platinum combined etoposide regimen while the standard second-line chemotherapy regimen is open to debate. The aim of this study is to analysis the prognostic factors of second-line chemotherapy in extensive-stage SCLC and to compare the differences of objective response rate, side effects and survival among different second-line chemotherapy regimens. Methods 181 patients who were diagnosed as extensive-stage SCLC and received second-line chemotherapy were collected. χ2 test was used to analysis the differences of enumeration data and between different groups. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS. Univariate analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to detect the prognostic factors. Objective response rate was evaluated by RECIST criteria and side effects were evaluated by WHO criteria. Results The patients who received second-line chemotherapy can be divided into 6 groups, namly group A (CE/EP regimen 27 cases, group B (regimens containing TPT 44 cases, group C (regimens containing CPT-11 33 cases, group D (regimens containing TAX/DXL 20 cases, group E (regimens containing IFO 28 cases and group F (other regimens 29 cases. The median OS in second-line chemotherapy as 7.0 months and was relevant with smoking history (P=0.004, ECOG PS (P<0.001, liver metastasis (P=0.019 and bone metastasis (P=0.028 independently. The median PFS in second-line chemotherapy as 3.0 months and was relevant with smoking history (P=0.034, ECOG PS (P=0.011 and bone metastasis (P=0.005. The response rate among six regimens was

  20. A Validated Prediction Model for Overall Survival From Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Toward Survival Prediction for Individual Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberije, Cary, E-mail: cary.oberije@maastro.nl [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Universitaire Ziekenhuizen Leuven, KU Leuven (Belgium); Houben, Ruud [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Heuvel, Michel van de; Uyterlinde, Wilma [Department of Thoracic Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deasy, Joseph O. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, University Hospital Maastricht, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rimner, Andreas; Din, Shaun [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States); Lambin, Philippe [Radiation Oncology, Research Institute GROW of Oncology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Although patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are homogeneous according to the TNM staging system, they form a heterogeneous group, which is reflected in the survival outcome. The increasing amount of information for an individual patient and the growing number of treatment options facilitate personalized treatment, but they also complicate treatment decision making. Decision support systems (DSS), which provide individualized prognostic information, can overcome this but are currently lacking. A DSS for stage III NSCLC requires the development and integration of multiple models. The current study takes the first step in this process by developing and validating a model that can provide physicians with a survival probability for an individual NSCLC patient. Methods and Materials: Data from 548 patients with stage III NSCLC were available to enable the development of a prediction model, using stratified Cox regression. Variables were selected by using a bootstrap procedure. Performance of the model was expressed as the c statistic, assessed internally and on 2 external data sets (n=174 and n=130). Results: The final multivariate model, stratified for treatment, consisted of age, gender, World Health Organization performance status, overall treatment time, equivalent radiation dose, number of positive lymph node stations, and gross tumor volume. The bootstrapped c statistic was 0.62. The model could identify risk groups in external data sets. Nomograms were constructed to predict an individual patient's survival probability ( (www.predictcancer.org)). The data set can be downloaded at (https://www.cancerdata.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2015.02.048). Conclusions: The prediction model for overall survival of patients with stage III NSCLC highlights the importance of combining patient, clinical, and treatment variables. Nomograms were developed and validated. This tool could be used as a first building block for a decision support system.

  1. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IIIC Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Cutaneous Melanoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  2. Tamaño del tumor y supervivencia en carcinoma de pulmón, estadio IA Tumor size and survival in lung cancer, stage IA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Lyons

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available El estadio determinado por el sistema TNM (tumor, ganglios, metástasis sigue siendo el factor predictor de supervivencia más importante en el carcinoma de pulmón. Sin embargo, varios estudios demostraron que el tamaño del tumor tenía valor pronóstico en sí mismo, aunque la relación entre tamaño tumoral y supervivencia dentro del grupo de tumores T1 todavía no es clara. El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar el valor del tamaño del tumor como factor pronóstico para la supervivencia en pacientes con carcinoma de pulmón de estadio IA, resecado quirúrgicamente. Se revisaron 79 pacientes con carcinoma de pulmón de células no pequeñas. En 34.4% de los pacientes (n = 28 el tamaño fue igual o menor a 1.5 cm. La mortalidad operatoria fue de 1.3%. Hubo recurrencia de la enfermedad en el 19%. Los pacientes con tumores de hasta 15 mm tuvieron una supervivencia a los 5 años de 95% (IC: 0.05 y con más de 15 mm, de 77%. (IC: 0.07, siendo la diferencia estadísticamente significativa (log-rank test: 0.035. La supervivencia libre de enfermedad fue de 95% en los tumores de hasta 15 mm y de 72% (IC: 0.09 en los de más de 15 mm. El análisis multivariado (Cox mostró que el mayor determinante del riesgo de mortalidad fue el tamaño mayor de 15 mm (riesgo relativo 25.9, IC: 2.3-292, p = 0.004. Este estudio demuestra la influencia del tamaño del tumor en estadio IA, lo cual puede tener importancia práctica en función de las recientes propuestas de investigación sistemática de pacientes con alto riesgo de cáncer pulmonar.TNM staging is an important long-term predictor for survival of lung cancer patients. Some studies have shown, however, that tumor size may have intrinsic prognostic value independent of TNM stage. The relationship between tumor size and survival is particularly unclear in T1 tumors. The objective of this study was to assess the prognostic value of tumor size in surgically resected stage I of non-small cell lung cancer

  3. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  4. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the lung cancer and your overall health. Radiation Therapy Radiation is a high-energy X-ray that can ... surgery, chemotherapy or both depending upon the circumstances. Radiation therapy works within cancer cells by damaging their ...

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation.

  6. The Preoperative Controlling Nutritional Status Score Predicts Survival After Curative Surgery in Patients with Pathological Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Fumihiro; Haratake, Naoki; Akamine, Takaki; Takamori, Shinkichi; Katsura, Masakazu; Takada, Kazuki; Toyokawa, Gouji; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-02-01

    The prognostic Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) score is used to evaluate immuno-nutritional conditions and is a predictive factor of postoperative survival in patients with digestive tract cancer. We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathological features of patients with pathological stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify predictors or prognostic factors of postoperative survival and to investigate the role of preoperative CONUT score in predicting survival. We selected 138 consecutive patients with pathological stage I NSCLC treated from August 2005 to August 2010. We measured their preoperative CONUT score in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analyses of postoperative survival. A high CONUT score was positively associated with preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen level (p=0.0100) and postoperative recurrence (p=0.0767). In multivariate analysis, the preoperative CONUT score [relative risk (RR)=6.058; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.068-113.941; p=0.0407), increasing age (RR=7.858; 95% CI=2.034-36.185; p=0.0029), and pleural invasion (RR=36.615; 95% CI=5.900-362.620; pcancer-specific survival (CS), and overall survival (OS), the group with high CONUT score had a significantly shorter RFS, CS, and OS than did the low-CONUT score group by log-rank test (p=0.0458, p=0.0104 and p=0.0096, respectively). The preoperative CONUT score is both a predictive and prognostic factor in patients with pathological stage I NSCLC. This immuno-nutritional score can indicate patients at high risk of postoperative recurrence and death. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Which Is the Optimal Biologically Effective Dose of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jian; Yang Fujun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Li Baosheng, E-mail: baoshli@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Li Hongsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China); Liu Jing [School of Public Health, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Huang Wei; Wang Dongqing; Yi Yan; Wang Juan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan (China); Shandong' s Key Laboratory of Radiation Oncology, Jinan (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between biologically effective dose (BED) and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and to explore the optimal BED range for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies were identified on Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and the proceedings of annual meetings through June 2010. According to the quartile of included studies, BED was divided into four dose groups: low (<83.2 Gy), medium (83.2-106 Gy), medium to high (106-146 Gy), high (>146 Gy). To obtain pooled estimates of overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and local control rate (LCR), data were combined in a random effect model. Pooled estimates were corrected for the percentage of small tumors (<3 cm). Results: Thirty-four observational studies with a total of 2,587 patients were included in the meta-analysis. Corrected pooled estimates of 2- or 3-year OS in the medium BED (76.1%, 63.5%) or the medium to high BED (68.3%, 63.2%) groups were higher than in the low (62.3%, 51.9%) or high groups (55.9%, 49.5%), respectively (p {<=} 0.004). Corrected 3-year CSS in the medium (79.5%), medium to high (80.6%), and high groups (90.0%) were higher than in the low group (70.1%, p = 0.016, 0.018, 0.001, respectively). Conclusion: The OS for the medium or medium to high BED groups were higher than those for the low or high BED group for SBRT in Stage I NSCLC. The medium or medium to high BED (range, 83.2-146 Gy) for SBRT may currently be more beneficial and reasonable in Stage I NSCLC.

  8. The potential role of respiratory motion management and image guidance in the reduction of severe toxicities following stereotactic ablative radiation therapy for patients with centrally located early stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eChi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Image guidance allows delivery of very high doses of radiation over a few fractions, known as stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR. This treatment is associated with excellent outcome for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and metastases to the lungs. In the delivery of SABR, central location constantly poses a challenge due to the difficulty of adequately sparing critical thoracic structures that are immediately adjacent to the tumor if an ablative dose of radiation is to be delivered to the tumor target. As of current, various respiratory motion management and image guidance strategies can be used to ensure accurate tumor target localization prior and/ or during daily treatment, which allows for maximal and safe reduction of set up margins. The incorporation of both may lead to the most optimal normal tissue sparing and the most accurate SABR delivery. Here, the clinical outcome, treatment related toxicities, and the pertinent respiratory motion management/image guidance strategies reported in the current literature on SABR for central lung tumors are reviewed.

  9. Association between environmental dust exposure and lung cancer in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettini, Giuliano; Morini, Maria; Marconato, Laura; Marcato, Paolo Stefano; Zini, Eric

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between the accumulation of black dust matter in lungs (anthracosis) and primary lung cancer in dogs. A retrospective study was carried out on material from 35 dogs with primary lung cancer and 160 controls. The amount, histological appearance and birefringence of anthracosis were assessed in pulmonary specimens by light microscopy, and the odds ratio (OR) calculated for dogs with primary lung cancer. The same factors were analysed to identify an association between tumour histotype, histological grade, and clinical stage. Papillary adenocarcinoma was most commonly diagnosed (45.7%). The majority of tumours were of histological grade II, and the lung cancer was more often localised (clinical stage I). An increased risk of lung cancer was observed in dogs with higher amounts of anthracosis (OR: 2.11, CI 95%: 1.20-3.70; P cancer in dogs.

  10. CyberKnife radiosurgery for inoperable stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography serial tumor response assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To report serial 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET/computed tomography (CT tumor response following CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods Patients with biopsy-proven inoperable stage IA NSCLC were enrolled into this IRB-approved study. Targeting was based on 3-5 gold fiducial markers implanted in or near tumors. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volumes (PTVs. Doses ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 equal fractions. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed prior to and at 3-6-month, 9-15 months and 18-24 months following treatment. The tumor maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax was recorded for each time point. Results Twenty patients with an average maximum tumor diameter of 2.2 cm were treated over a 3-year period. A mean dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the PTV in 3 to 11 days (mean, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended an average of 2 cm from the GTV. At a median follow-up of 43 months, the 2-year Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimate was 90% and the local control estimate was 95%. Mean tumor SUVmax before treatment was 6.2 (range, 2.0 to 10.7. During early follow-up the mean tumor SUVmax remained at 2.3 (range, 1.0 to 5.7, despite transient elevations in individual tumor SUVmax levels attributed to peritumoral radiation-induced pneumonitis visible on CT imaging. At 18-24 months the mean tumor SUVmax for controlled tumors was 2.0, with a narrow range of values (range, 1.5 to 2.8. A single local failure was confirmed at 24 months in a patient with an elevated tumor SUVmax of 8.4. Conclusion Local control and survival following CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage IA NSCLC is exceptional. Early transient increases in tumor SUVmax are likely related to radiation-induced pneumonitis. Tumor SUVmaxvalues return to background levels at 18-24 months, enhancing 18F-FDG PET

  11. Varying recurrence rates and risk factors associated with different definitions of local recurrence in patients with surgically resected, stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlotto, John M; Recht, Abram; Flickinger, John C; Medford-Davis, Laura N; Dyer, Anne-Marie; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of different definitions of local recurrence on the reported patterns of failure and associated risk factors in patients who undergo potentially curative resection for stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The study included 306 consecutive patients who were treated from 2000 to 2005 without radiotherapy. Local recurrence was defined either as 'radiation' (r-LR) (according to previously defined postoperative radiotherapy fields), including the bronchial stump, staple line, ipsilateral hilum, and ipsilateral mediastinum; or as 'comprehensive' (c-LR), including the same sites plus the ipsilateral lung and contralateral mediastinal and hilar lymph nodes. All recurrences that were not classified as "local" were considered to be distal. The median follow-up was 33 months. The proportions of c-LR and r-LR at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 14%, 21%, and 29%, respectively, and 7%, 12%, and 16%, respectively. Significant risk factors for c-LR on multivariate analysis were diabetes, lymphatic vascular invasion, and tumor size; and significant factors for r-LR were resection of less than a lobe and lymphatic vascular invasion. The proportions of distant (non-local) recurrence using these definitions at 2 years, 3 years, and 5 years were 10%, 12%, and 18%, respectively, and 14%, 19%, and 29%, respectively. Significant risk factors for distant failure were histology when using the c-LR definition and tumor size when using the r-LR definition. Local recurrence increased nearly 2-fold when a broad definition was used instead of a narrow definition. The definition also affected which factors were associated significantly with both local and distant failure on multivariate analysis. Comparable definitions must be used when analyzing different series. (c) 2010 American Cancer Society.

  12. Positron-emission tomography CT to identify local recurrence in stage I lung cancer patients 1 year after stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essler, M.; Wantke, J.; Mayer, B.; Scheidhauer, K. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Bundschuh, R.A. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Haller, B. [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie; Astner, S.T.; Molls, M.; Andratschke, N. [Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of positron-emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in stage I lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), who have suspicious or unclear local recurrence findings in CT 1 year after treatment. Patients and methods: A group of 29 patients with unclear or suspicious CT findings 1 year after SBRT were examined with PET/CT. The ability of standard uptake values (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean} and posttherapeutic reduction in SUV) to detect local failure and identify patients at a high risk of disease-specific death was evaluated using logrank statistics. Histology and clinical follow-up were the gold standards for local recurrence. Results: SUV{sub mean} greater than 3.44 (p = 0.001); SUV{sub max} greater than 5.48 (p = 0.009) or a relative reduction in SUV{sub mean} or SUV{sub max} of less than 43 (p = 0.030) or 52 % (p = 0.025), respectively, was indicative of local recurrence. These parameters also correlated with an increased risk of disease-specific death: SUV{sub mean} greater than 2.81 (p = 0.023); SUV{sub max} greater than 3.45 (p = 0.007) or a relative reduction in SUV{sub mean} or SUV{sub max} of less than 32 (p = 0.015) or 52 % (p = 0.013), respectively, was indicative of an increased risk of disease-specific death. Conclusion: PET/CT performed 1 year after SBRT can reliably identify local recurrence and therefore help to clarify unclear CT findings. As posttherapeutic glucose metabolism also correlates with disease-specific survival, PET/CT may help to stratify lung cancer patients for additional treatment 1 year after SBRT. (orig.)

  13. Epigenetic Therapy in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic dysregulation of gene function has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis and is one of the mechanisms contributing to the development of lung cancer. The inherent reversibility of epigenetic alterations makes them viable therapeutic targets. Here, we review the therapeutic implications of epigenetic changes in lung cancer, and recent advances in therapeutic strategies targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation.

  14. Immune and Inflammatory Cell Composition of Human Lung Cancer Stroma: e0139073

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G-Andre Banat; Aleksandra Tretyn; Soni Savai Pullamsetti; Jochen Wilhelm; Andreas Weigert; Catherine Olesch; Katharina Ebel; Thorsten Stiewe; Friedrich Grimminger; Werner Seeger; Ludger Fink; Rajkumar Savai

    2015-01-01

    .... We comprehensively assessed the number of stromal cells, especially immune/inflammatory cells, in lung cancer and evaluated their infiltration in cancers of different stages, types and metastatic...

  15. Effects of icotinib on early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer as neoadjuvant treatment with different epidermal growth factor receptor phenotypes

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    Wang T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tao Wang,1 Yang Liu,1 Bin Zhou,1 Zhi Wang,1 Naichao Liang,1 Yundong Zhang,1 Zhouhuan Dong,2 Jie Li2 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, 2Department of Pathology, People’s Liberation Army General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor–tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR–TKIs have demonstrated efficacy in treating advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Preliminary findings suggested that EGFR–TKIs might also be beneficial in neoadjuvant therapy in treating NSCLC. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of neoadjuvant therapy with icotinib in patients with early-stage NSCLC.Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical history of patients who were initially diagnosed with stage IA–IIIA NSCLC and were under icotinib administration before surgery between December 2011 and December 2014. Tumor assessment was conducted between the second and fourth week from initial icotinib treatment. The association between personal characteristics, smoking status, disease stage, EGFR mutation status, and clinical outcomes were investigated using multivariate logistic regression analysis.Results: A total of 67 patients with NSCLC were reviewed, and approximately half (38/67 of them were identified as having EGFR-mutant tumors. The overall response rate of all patients was 26.7% at 2–4 weeks’ assessment. Multivariate analysis showed that female sex (38.5% versus 10.7% in males, P=0.028 and EGFR mutation status (42.1% versus 6.9% in EGFR wild type, P=0.011 were independent predictive factors. The analysis also showed that the most common adverse effects were rash (43.3% and dry skin (34.4%, which were tolerable.Conclusion: Icotinib induced clinical response with minimal toxicity as neoadjuvant treatment in early NSCLC, especially in patients with common EGFR mutations. Further studies are warranted to confirm our findings. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer

  16. Classification and Risk-factor Analysis of Postoperative Cardio-pulmonary 
Complications after Lobectomy in Patients with Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutian LAI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective There are incresing lung cancer patients detected and diagnosed at the intermediate stage when the pre-malignant or early lesions are amenable to resection and cure, owing to the progress of medical technology, the renewal of detection methods, the popularity of medical screening and the improvement of social health consciousness. The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors of the occurrence of postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications in stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, based on routine laboratory tests, basic characteristics, and intraoperative variables in hospital. Methods The 421 patients after lobectomy in patients with stage I NSCLC at the West China Hospital of Sichuan University from January 2012 to December 2013 were included into the study and stratified into complication group and non-complication group, according to whether to occur postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications after lobectomy in 30 days. Results Of them, 64 (15.2% patients were finally identified and selected into the complication group, compared with 357 (84.8% in non-complication group: pneumonia (8.8%, 37/421 was the primary complication, and other main complications included atelectasis (5.9%, 25/421, pleural effusion (≥middle (5.0%, 21/421, persistent air leak (3.6%, 15/421; The operation time (P=0.007, amount of blood loss (P=0.034, preoperative chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (P=0.027, white blood cell (WBC count (P<0.001, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR (P<0.001 were significantly different between the two groups. According to the binary logistics regression analysis, preoperative COPD (OR=0.031, 95%CI: 0.012-0.078, P<0.001 and WBC count (OR=1.451, 95%CI: 1.212-1.736, P<0.001 were independent risk factors for postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications. Conclusion Among an array of clinical variables in hospital, operation time, preoperative white blood cell count, preoperative COPD

  17. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Tianlin XIAO

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is regarded as the standard care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer at present. This paper is designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low-dose weekly docetaxel (DTX with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with DTX and cisplatin for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Methods 44 previously untreated patients with stage III NSCLC were randomized into low-dose weekly DTX group and control group concomitant with radiotherapy. Both groups were treated by the standard fractionation schedule with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. An involved-field irradiation technique was performed. Gross tumor and metastatic lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 66 Gy~70 Gy. Patients in the former group received chemotherapy with DTX 20mg. m-2.w-1,and the other group patients received DTX 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and DDP 30 mg/m2 on day 1~3 every 21 days. All patients received consolidation chemotherapy with DP regime after chemoradiotherapy for no more than 4 cycles. Results The overall response rates of patients in the low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 81.8% with 27.3% CR(complete response and 86.4% with 27.3% CR respectively (Chisquare=0.120, P=0.942. After a median follow-up of 20months, the median survival time was 20 months and 17 months respectively. The 1-, 2- year survival rates of patients in low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 69.8%, 48.1% versus 66.5%, 40.2% respectively;there was no difference between two groups. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and esophagitis occurred in 26.3%, 14.3% and 15.8%, 28.6% respectively (Chiquare=0.765,P =0.382(Chiquare=1.108,P =0.292.Grade 3 and 4 pulmonary toxicity was unusual.Conclusion Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin is highly active with manageable toxicity in patients

  18. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  19. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Francesco; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Salvi, Sandra; Puzone, Roberto; Pfeffer, Ulrich; Fontana, Vincenzo; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Genova, Carlo; Sini, Claudio; Ratto, Giovanni Battista; Taviani, Mario; Truini, Mauro; Merlo, Domenico Franco

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1), breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2), subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS), and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3). Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients. PMID:26663950

  20. Oral nutritional supplements containing (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids affect the nutritional status of patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer during multimodality treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Barbara S; Langius, Jacqueline A E; Smit, Egbert F; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Heijboer, Annemieke C; Paul, Marinus A; van Leeuwen, Paul A M

    2010-10-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), (n-3) fatty acids from fish oil, have immune-modulating effects and may improve nutritional status in cancer. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of an oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids on nutritional status and inflammatory markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) undergoing multimodality treatment. In a double-blind experiment, 40 patients with stage III NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive 2 cans/d of a protein- and energy-dense oral nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids (2.0 g EPA + 0.9 g DHA/d) or an isocaloric control supplement. EPA in plasma phospholipids, energy intake, resting energy expenditure (REE), body weight, fat free mass (FFM), mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC), and inflammatory markers were assessed. Effects of intervention were analyzed by generalized estimating equations and expressed as regression coefficients (B). The intervention group (I) had a better weight maintenance than the control (C) group after 2 and 4 wk (B = 1.3 and 1.7 kg, respectively; P nutritional supplement containing (n-3) fatty acids beneficially affects nutritional status during multimodality treatment in patients with NSCLC.

  1. Expression of Ribonucleotide Reductase Subunit-2 and Thymidylate Synthase Correlates with Poor Prognosis in Patients with Resected Stages I–III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Grossi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers can help to identify patients with early-stages or locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC who have high risk of relapse and poor prognosis. To correlate the expression of seven biomarkers involved in DNA synthesis and repair and in cell division with clinical outcome, we consecutively collected 82 tumour tissues from radically resected NSCLC patients. The following biomarkers were investigated using IHC and qRT-PCR: excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1, breast cancer 1 (BRCA1, ribonucleotide reductase subunits M1 and M2 (RRM1 and RRM2, subunit p53R2, thymidylate synthase (TS, and class III beta-tubulin (TUBB3. Gene expression levels were also validated in an available NSCLC microarray dataset. Multivariate analysis identified the protein overexpression of RRM2 and TS as independent prognostic factors of shorter overall survival (OS. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a trend in shorter OS for patients with RRM2, TS, and ERCC1, BRCA1 overexpressed tumours. For all of the biomarkers except TUBB3, the OS trends relative to the gene expression levels were in agreement with those relative to the protein expression levels. The NSCLC microarray dataset showed RRM2 and TS as biomarkers significantly associated with OS. This study suggests that high expression levels of RRM2 and TS might be negative prognostic factors for resected NSCLC patients.

  2. Predictive value of 18F-FDG PET and CT morphologic features for recurrence in pathological stage IA non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kai-Hsiung; Hsu, Hsian-He; Huang, Tsai-Wang; Gao, Hong-Wei; Cheng, Cheng-Yi; Hsu, Yi-Chih; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chen, Jia-Hong; Lee, Shih-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pathological stage IA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may relapse despite complete surgical resection without lymphovascular invasion. A method of selecting a high-risk group for adjuvant therapy is necessary. The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake and the morphologic features of computed tomography (CT) for recurrence in pathological stage IA NSCLC.One hundred forty-five patients with pathological stage IA NSCLC who underwent pretreatment with FDG positron emission tomography and CT evaluations were retrospectively enrolled. The associations among tumor recurrence and patient characteristics, maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of primary tumors, and CT imaging features were investigated using univariate and multivariate analyses. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to quantify the predictive value of these factors.Tumor recurrence developed in 21 (14.5%) of the 145 patients, and the 5-year recurrence-free survival rate was 77%. The univariate analysis demonstrated that SUVmax, the grade of histological differentiation, tumor size, and the presence of bronchovascular bundle thickening were significant predictive factors (P recurrence in the multivariate analysis. The use of this predictive model yielded a greater area under the ROC curve (0.877), which suggests good discrimination.The combined evaluation of FDG uptake and CT morphologic features may be helpful in the prediction of recurrence in patients with pathological stage IA NSCLC and in the stratification of a high-risk group for postoperative adjuvant therapy or prospective clinical trials.

  3. Long-term outcome of phase I/II prospective study of dose-escalated proton therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joe Y; Zhang, Wencheng; Komaki, Ritsuko; Choi, Noah C; Chan, Shen; Gomez, Daniel; O'Reilly, Michael; Jeter, Melenda; Gillin, Michael; Zhu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen; Hahn, Stephen; Cox, James D

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this phase I/II study was to assess the long-term clinical benefits and toxicities of proton beam therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From June 2006 to September 2011, 35 patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central or superior location, 12 patients) or T2-3N0M0 (any location, 23 patients) NSCLC were treated with 87.5Gy at 2.5Gy/fraction of proton therapy. Toxicities were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up time was 83.1months (95% CI: 69.2-97.1months). For all 35 patients, the 1, 3, and 5-year overall survival rates were 85.7%, 42.9%, and 28.1%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence-free, regional recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 85.0%, 89.2%, and 54.4%, respectively. Different T stages had no effect on local and regional recurrence (p=0.499, p=1.00). However, with the increase in T stages, the distant metastasis rate increased significantly (p=0.006). The most common adverse effects were dermatitis (grade 2, 51.4%; grade 3, 2.9%) and radiation pneumonitis (grade 2, 11.4%; grade 3, 2.9%). Other grade 2 toxicities included esophagitis (2.9%), rib fracture (2.9%), heart toxicities (5.7%), and chest wall pain (2.9%). According to our long-term follow-up data, proton therapy with ablative doses is well tolerated and effective in medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC. Systemic therapy should be considered to reduce the rate of distant metastasis in cases of T2 and T3 lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Intraoperative methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotope tracing for sentinel node mapping in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Shen, Xueyuan; Chen, Jiangyong

    2014-06-01

    To compare the accuracy of intaoperative methylene blue alone and in combination with (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotopic tracing for detection of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Sixty-one patients with operable NSCLC who did not receive previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy were enrolled. Methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid were injected into the subserosal layer adjacent to the tumor, and SLNs were defined as those with blue staining or those containing 3 times more radioactivity than the surrounding tissue detected with a gamma probe. The SLN were removed with systematic lymph node dissection. All the removed lymph nodes were examined histopathologically with HE staining and immunohistochemistry. Methylene blue alone showed a low detection rate (60.0%) and sensitivity (58.33%) for SLNs compared with the combination of methylene blue and isotope tracing (96.15% and 92.86%, respectively). The combination of methylene blue and (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid isotopic tracing allows accurate detection of the SLNs in early-stage NSCLC.

  5. Concurrent pemetrexed and radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of completed and ongoing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Hak; Gerber, David E; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Iyengar, Puneeth; Monberg, Matthew; Treat, Joseph; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Koustensis, Andrew; Barker, Scott; Obasaju, Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Current standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is combined concurrent therapy with a platinum-based regimen. Preclinical synergistic activity of pemetrexed with radiation therapy (RT) and favorable toxicity profile has led to clinical trials evaluating pemetrexed in chemoradiation regimens. This literature search of concurrent pemetrexed and RT treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC included MEDLINE database, meeting abstracts, and the clinical trial registry database. Nineteen unique studies were represented across all databases including 11 phase I studies and eight phase II studies. Of the six phase II trials with mature data available, median overall survival ranged from 18.7 to 34 months. Esophagitis and pneumonitis occurred in 0-16% and 0-23% of patients, respectively. Of the ongoing trials, there is one phase III and four phase II trials with pemetrexed in locally advanced NSCLC. Pemetrexed can be administered safely at full systemic doses with either cisplatin or carboplatin concomitantly with radical doses of thoracic radiation therapy. While results from the ongoing phase III PROCLAIM trial are needed to address definitively the efficacy of pemetrexed-cisplatin plus RT in stage III NSCLC, available results from phase II trials suggest that this regimen has promising activity with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  6. Survival prognostic value of morphological and metabolic variables in patients with stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domachevsky, L. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Beilinson Hospital, Petah Tikva (Israel); Groshar, D.; Bernstine, H. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Petah Tikva (Israel); Tel Aviv University, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv (Israel); Galili, R. [Lady Davis-Carmel Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Haifa (Israel); Saute, M. [Rabin Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Petah Tiqva (Israel)

    2015-11-15

    The prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important, as patients with resectable disease and poor prognostic variables might benefit from neoadjuvant therapy. The goal of this study is to evaluate SUVmax, SUVmax ratio, CT volume (CTvol), metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolisis (TLG) as survival prognostic markers. In addition, we defined two variables; MTV x SUVmax (MTVmax) and CTvol x SUVmax (CTvolmax) and assessed whether they can be used as prognostic markers. Patients with stage I-II NSCLC who underwent 18 F FDG PET/CT and surgery were evaluated. Cox proportional-hazard model was used to determine the association between variables and survival. Similar analysis was performed in cases with no lymph node (LN) involvement. One hundred and eighty-one patients were included (at the end of the study, 140 patients were alive). SUVmax with a cut-off value of 8.2 was significant survival prognostic factor regardless of LN involvement (P = 0.012). In cases with no LN involvement, SUVmax and CTvol (≥7.1 ml) were significant survival prognostic factors with P = 0.004 and 0.03, respectively. SUVmax may be a useful prognostic variable in stage I-II NSCLC while morphologic tumour volume might be useful in cases with no lymph node involvement. (orig.)

  7. Review on Immunotherapies for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha JIN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, most cases are diagnosed at a very late stage. More effective medications or therapies should be developed to improve its prognosis. The advancement of tumor immunity and tumor immunosuppression facilitated the feasibility of immunotherapies for lung cancer. Ipilimumab, antibody to Programmed death-1 (PD-1, Toll-like receptor agonists, liposomal BLP25 (L- BLP25, belagenpumatucel-L, melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3 vaccine and talactoferrin have been proved to be effective for lung cancer through early clinical trials, most of the drugs have moved forward to phase III trials, so as to collect much higher level evidence to support the immunotherapies incorporated into the multidisciplinary treatment of lung cancer. The selection of target patients at appropriate stages, breaking down of tumor immunosuppression as well as the objective measurement of tumor response to the therapy are major challenges for the development of immunotherapies for lung cancer. The clarifying of the mechanism of immune escape led to the above drug development, and immune-senescence has already become the hotspot in this field.

  8. Polonium and Lung Cancer

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    Vincenzo Zagà

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210 is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226 and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210 and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  9. Polonium and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  10. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  11. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Verstegen (Naomi); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F.J. Lagerwaard (Frank); M.A. Paul (Marinus); M. Versteegh (Michel); J.J. Joosten (Joris); W. Lastdrager (Willem); E.F. Smit (Egbert); B.J. Slotman (Ben); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost); S. Senan (Suresh)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence

  12. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  13. PET/CT vs. non-contrast CT alone for surveillance 1-year post lobectomy for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Bari; Grechushkin, Vadim; Plank, April; Moore, William; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT was compared with non-contrast chest CT in monitoring for recurrence 1-year after lobectomy of stage 1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). For surveillance after treatment with curative intent, current (April 2012) National Comprehensive Cancer network guidelines recommend chest CT with or without contrast every 6-12 months for 2 years, then non-contrast chest CT annually. PET/CT is not currently indicated for routine follow-up. One hundred patients receiving surveillance PET/CT 1-year after lobectomy for the treatment of stage 1a or 1b NSCLC were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included the presence or interval diagnosis of a second malignancy, or surgical treatment more radical than single lobectomy. The non-contrast CT obtained from the 1-year PET/CT was interpreted by an experienced chest radiologist blinded to the PET/CT for evidence of recurrence using the following findings: pulmonary nodule, pleural effusion, pleural mass, adenopathy, and extrathoracic mass. The ecision about recurrence was made solely from the non-contrast CT without PET/CT findings. This was compared with the determination made with PET/CT. The reference standard for determination of recurrence was the multi-disciplinary tumor board who had access to all imaging and clinical data. Recurrence at 1 year was documented in 16 of 90 patients. All 16 recurrences were documented with PET/CT and 9 were found with non-contrast CT. Five of the 7 recurrences missed with non-contrast CT were extrathoracic metastases. Sensitivity of CT and PET/CT for recurrence was 56.3% and 100%, respectively (p = 0.015). Specificity of CT and PET/CT for recurrence was 95.9% and 93.2%, respectively (p = 0.62).

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2-A Predictor of Outcome for Patients Irradiated for Stage II-III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk, E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Setter, Cornelia [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany); Dahl, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schild, Steven E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); Noack, Frank [Institute of Pathology, University of Lubeck, Lubeck (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The prognostic value of the tumor cell expression of the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The present study investigated the effect of tumor cell expression of FGF-2 on the outcome of 60 patients irradiated for Stage II-III NSCLC. Methods and Materials: The effect of FGF-2 expression and 13 additional factors on locoregional control (LRC), metastasis-free survival (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were retrospectively evaluated. These additional factors included age, gender, Karnofsky performance status, histologic type, histologic grade, T and N category, American Joint Committee on Cancer stage, surgery, chemotherapy, pack-years, smoking during radiotherapy, and hemoglobin during radiotherapy. Locoregional failure was identified by endoscopy or computed tomography. Univariate analyses were performed with the Kaplan-Meier method and the Wilcoxon test and multivariate analyses with the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: On univariate analysis, improved LRC was associated with surgery (p = .017), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .036), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of LRC, surgery (relative risk [RR], 2.44; p = .037), and FGF-2 expression (RR, 5.06; p <.001) maintained significance. On univariate analysis, improved MFS was associated with squamous cell carcinoma (p = .020), greater hemoglobin levels (p = .007), and FGF-2 negativity (p = .001). On multivariate analysis of MFS, the hemoglobin levels (RR, 2.65; p = .019) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.05; p = .004) were significant. On univariate analysis, improved OS was associated with a lower N category (p = .048), greater hemoglobin levels (p <.001), and FGF-2 negativity (p <.001). On multivariate analysis of OS, greater hemoglobin levels (RR, 4.62; p = .002) and FGF-2 expression (RR, 3.25; p = .002) maintained significance. Conclusions: Tumor cell expression of FGF-2 appeared to be an independent negative predictor

  15. Câncer de pulmão: histologia, estádio, tratamento e sobrevida Lung cancer: histology, staging, treatment and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Trocoli Novaes

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os principais tipos histológicos, estádio, tratamento e sobrevida dos portadores de câncer de pulmão. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo a partir da análise dos prontuários de pacientes acompanhados no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, num período de seis anos. RESULTADOS: De janeiro de 2000 a janeiro de 2006, foram acompanhados 240 doentes com câncer de pulmão, com predominância do sexo masculino (64%. O tipo histológico mais freqüente foi o carcinoma escamoso (37,5%, seguido pelo adenocarcinoma (30%, carcinoma neuroendócrino (19,6% e carcinoma de grandes células (6,6%. Apenas 131 pacientes (54,6% foram tratados. Destes, 52 pacientes (39,7% foram submetidos à quimioterapia exclusiva, 32 (24,4% realizaram quimioterapia associada à radioterapia e 47 (35,9% foram submetidos à cirurgia associada ou não à quimioterapia exclusiva e/ou radioterapia. Somente 27 pacientes (20,6% foram submetidos à cirurgia exclusiva.Em relação ao estadiamento, 34,4% apresentavam, no momento do diagnóstico, estádio IV, 20,6% estádio IIIB, 16,8% estádio IIIA e os outros 28,2% pertenciam aos estádios I e II. A sobrevida em cinco anos foi de 65% para o estádio I e 25% para os estádios remanescentes. CONCLUSÕES: O tipo histológico predominante foi o carcinoma escamoso e o de menor freqüência foi o carcinoma de grandes células. A maioria se encontrava em estádio avançado ao diagnóstico, estando nos estádios iniciais menos de 30% dos casos. Isto justifica a baixa sobrevida e a pequena quantidade de pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico exclusivo, em comparação à maioria que foi submetida à quimioterapia exclusiva.OBJECTIVE: To analyze principal histological types of lung cancer, as well as the staging, treatment and survival of lung cancer patients. METHODS: This was a retrospective study based on the analysis of medical charts of patients treated at the Botucatu School of Medicine

  16. Feasibility of perfusion CT technique integrated into conventional {sup 18}FDG/PET-CT studies in lung cancer patients: clinical staging and functional information in a single study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ippolito, Davide; Capraro, Cristina; Sironi, Sandro [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, H.S. Gerardo Monza, Via Pergolesi 11, Monza, Milan (Italy); Guerra, Luca [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Unit - Molecular Bioimaging Centre, Monza (Italy); De Ponti, Elena [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Monza (Italy); Messa, Cristina [University of Milano-Bicocca, School of Medicine, Milan (Italy); San Gerardo Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Unit - Molecular Bioimaging Centre, Monza (Italy); Tecnomed Foundation, University of Milano-Bicocca, Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, National Research Council, Milan (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    To assess the additional functional vascular information and the relationship between perfusion measurements and glucose metabolism (SUVmax) obtained by including a perfusion CT study in a whole-body contrast-enhanced PET/CT protocol in primary lung cancer lesions. Enrolled in this prospective study were 34 consecutive patients with a biopsy-proven diagnosis of lung cancer who were referred for contrast-enhanced PET/CT staging. This prospective study was approved by our institutional review board, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. Perfusion CT was performed with the following parameters: 80 kV, 200 mAs, 30 scans during intravenous injection of 50 ml contrast agent, flow rate 5 ml/s. Another bolus of contrast medium (3.5 ml/s, 80 ml, 60-s delay) was administered to ensure a full diagnostic contrast-enhanced CT scan for clinical staging. The perfusion CT data were used to calculate a range of tumour vascularity parameters (blood flow, blood volume and mean transit time), and tumour FDG uptake (SUVmax) was used as a metabolic indicator. Quantitative and functional parameters were compared and in relation to location, histology and tumour size. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test was used for statistical analysis. A cut-off value of 3 cm was used according to the TNM classification to discriminate between T1 and T2 tumours (i.e. T1b vs. T2a). There were significant perfusion differences (lower blood volumes and higher mean transit time) between tumours with diameter >30 mm and tumours with diameter <30 mm (p < 0.05; blood volume 5.6 vs. 7.1 ml/100 g, mean transit time 8.6 vs. 3.9 s, respectively). Also there was a trend for blood flow to be lower in larger lesions (p < 0.053; blood flow 153.1 vs. 98.3 ml/100 g tissue/min). Significant inverse correlations (linear regression) were found between blood volume and SUVmax in tumours with diameter >30 mm in diameter. Perfusion CT combined with PET/CT is feasible technique that may provide

  17. Research on Postoperative Radiotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer of Stage IIIA (N2 according to the Failure Patterns after Pulmonary Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiyan QIN

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT after complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has been introduced in order to reduce locoregional recurrence, but it remains controversy whether PORT can improve survival. Therefore, we want to investigate the effect of PORT and the relationship between failure patterns and primarily location of stage IIIA (N2 in NSCLC. Methods This retrospective analysis included 233 patients who underwent resection of NSCLC, first recurrence involving a local-regional site. It illustrated the factors affecting local recurrence and the sites of failure on the basis of lobe of primary tumor. Results Multivariable analysis demonstrated the number of positive lymph nodes (P=0.003, T stage (P<0.001, histological type (P=0.038, modus operandi (P=0.013 and the number of mediastinal lymph node stations involved (P=0.018 were the independent factors. For all patients, the most common site of failure was the bronchial stump/staple line, which was present more often in those who had a wedge resection than in those who had a more radical procedure (P<0.001. The local-region frequency of squamous was higher than adenocarcinoma carcinoma (P=0.025. The recurrence frequency of mediastinal lymph node among T1 and T2-3 were 36.4%, 62.0% (P=0.009 respectively. The localregion recurrence among primarily tumor location were different. Conclusion The number of positive lymph nodes, T stage, histological type, modus operations and the number of mediastinal lymph node stations involved were the independent factors in IIIA (N2 NSCLC.

  18. Diagnostic impact of integrated 18F-FDG PET/MRI in cerebral staging of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, Cornelius; Nensa, Felix; Grueneisen, Johannes; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Sawicki, Lino M; Heusch, Philipp; Gramsch, Carolin; Mönninghoff, Christoph; Quick, Harald H; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale; Schlamann, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Background Integrated positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems are increasingly being available and used for staging examinations. Brain metastases (BM) are frequent in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and decisive for treatment strategy. Purpose To assess the diagnostic value of integrated 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D glucose (18F-FDG) PET/MRI in initial staging in patients with NSCLC for BM in comparison to MRI alone. Material and Methods Eighty-three patients were prospectively enrolled for an integrated 18F-FDG PET/MRI examination. The 3 T MRI protocol included a fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery sequence (FLAIR) and a contrast-enhanced three-dimensional magnetization prepared rapid acquisition GRE sequence (MPRAGE). Two neuroradiologists evaluated the datasets in consensus regarding: (i) present lesions; (ii) size of lesions; and (iii) number of lesions detected in MRI alone, compared to the PET component when reading the 18F-FDG PET/MRI. Results Based on MRI alone, BM were detected in 15 out of the 83 patients, comprising a total of 39 metastases. Based on PET alone, six patients out of the 83 patients were rated positive for metastatic disease, revealing a total of 15 metastases. PET detected no additional BM. The size of the BM correlated positively with sensitivity of detection in PET. Conclusion The sensitivity of PET in detection of BM depends on their size. 18F-FDG PET/MRI does not lead to an improvement in diagnostic accuracy in cerebral staging of NSCLC patients, as MRI alone remains the gold standard.

  19. Survival Benefit of Surgery after Chemoradiotherapy for Stage III (N0-2) Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Is Dependent on Pathologic Nodal Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziel, Ellis; Hermann, Gregory; Sen, Neilayan; Bonomi, Philip; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo; Batus, Marta; Warren, William H; Chmielewski, Gary; Sher, David J

    2015-10-01

    The benefit of surgery (trimodality therapy [TMT]) after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is controversial, but nodal pathologic complete response (N-PCR) is accepted as a strong predictor of overall survival (OS). We compared the outcomes of patients treated with TMT versus CRT, focusing on the importance of N-PCR. Patients with stage III NSCLC treated with CRT or TMT from December 2004 through December 2012 were included; patients with N3 disease were excluded. Pathologic nodal response dichotomized surgical patients into N-PCR versus residual nodal disease (RND) groups. Actuarial OS, progression-free survival (PFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) were compared between patients treated with CRT and TMT and between CRT and N-PCR/RND. The cohort was composed of 138 patients (52% CRT and 48% TMT). The median OS was significantly higher after TMT than after CRT (81 versus 31.8 mo, p = 0.0068). This benefit was restricted to N-PCR (n = 50, 83.2 versus 31.8 mo, p = 0.0004), as RND (n = 19) experienced poor OS (16.1 mo). On multivariable analyses, N-PCR had superior OS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.38; p = 0.0012), PFS (HR, 0.42; p = 0.0005), and DMFS (HR, 0.42; p = 0.0007) compared with CRT. Conversely, there were trends for worse OS and PFS for RND versus CRT, although only inferior DMFS was significant (HR, 1.83; p = 0.04). Surgical patients with complete nodal clearance experienced superior survival, but those with RND fared no better than CRT alone. Mediastinal response may play an important role in the decision to proceed with surgical resection after CRT for stage III NSCLC.

  20. Prognosis of Lung Cancer: Heredity or Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    body mass index ( BMI ), cigarettes per day, disease stage, treatment, education, and family history of lung cancer (we refer to...After adjusting for disease stage, pack-years of smoking, age at diagnosis , sex, education, baseline body mass index , health insurance status, and...disease, after adjusting for pack-years of smoking, education, body mass index , and age of diagnosis . DISCUSSION This survival analysis of

  1. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagn

  2. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is diagn

  3. Bioimpedance Spectroscopy in Detecting Lower-Extremity Lymphedema in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Vulvar Cancer Undergoing Surgery and Lymphadenectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-09

    Lymphedema; Perioperative/Postoperative Complications; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  4. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as a Malar Mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Veerappan

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lung cancer metastasizing to the face has rarely been reported and is an even more unusual presentation. Case: This is the case of a 49-year-old man diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the face, scheduled for resection. Preoperative radiographs revealed a left upper lobe mass, found to be squamous cell carcinoma. Diagnosis was changed to Stage IV primary lung cancer. The patient did not undergo resection. Discussion: No previous cases of primary lung cancer presenting as a malar mass have been reported. Facial lesions can be the presenting feature of primary lung cancer. Discovery of the true primary lesion can alter therapy and prognosis.

  5. Advancements in radiotherapy for lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lujun Zhao; Luhua Wang

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in China. In recent years, great progress has been made in radiotherapy for lung cancer patients in China. The main advance-ments include the fol owing aspects:(1) stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-smal cel lung cancer (NSCLC), (2) post-operative radiotherapy for NSCLC, (3) combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for local y advanced NSCLC, (4) improved radiotherapy for advanced NSCLC, and 5) prediction of radiation-induced lung toxicity.

  6. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Cutaneous metastasis from lung cancer. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratus, Giorgio; Tagliabue, Fabio; Mariani, Pierpaolo; Bottazzi, Enrico Coppola; Spinelli, Luisella; Novellino, Lorenzo

    2014-07-21

    Lung cancer is the most common neoplasm diagnosed worldwide. Metastatic presentation of the disease is frequent. Apart from the usual sites of metastatic disease (bone, adrenals, liver, brain), a particular site for metastases is represented by skin. The case we report is about a 66 year-old man with cutaneous metastasis from lung cancer. A 66 year-old man, with a previous history of abdominal aortic aneurism, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cardiopathy, diabetes mellitus, was admitted to our institution for left lower lobe lung cancer. After accurate preoperative staging, patient underwent a thoracotomic left lower lobectomy. Histological examination revealed a squamocellular carcinoma: G2-3, pT2bN0. Patient underwent oncological evaluation for the scheduled follow up. After 6 months patient went back to our observation for the appearance of a skin nodule, firm, dischromic, painful and ulcerated, localized in right iliac fossa. Biopsies demonstrated the nodule to be squamocellular carcinoma. Patient underwent a CT scan of the abdomen and thorax, which revealed the absence of infiltration of the deep fascial and muscular planes by the neoplasm. Patient underwent surgical removal of the lesion. Final histological examination confirmed the lesion to be metastasis of squamocellular lung cancer. Metastases from lung cancer occur in about 2,5-7,5% of cases. Median survival for these patients is 2,9 months. The most common type of neoplasm, according to Japanese Authors, is adenocarcinoma followed by squamocellular carcinoma. Some studies demonstrated the adequacy of surgery followed by chemotherapy, in case of single lesion. In case of multiple cutaneous metastases, many Authors suggest only chemotherapy, although the ideal scheme hasn't been discovered yet. Cutaneous metastases from lung cancer are rare; however the appearance of skin lesions, in patients with a positive oncological history, requires much attention. Accurate evaluation of the patient is

  8. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer ...... patients with advanced stages of disease, during treatment. The patients experienced physical, functional and emotional benefits. This study confirmed that supervised training in peer-groups was beneficial, even in a cancer population with full-blown symptom burden and poor prognosis....

  9. Narcissus, the Beam, and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocco, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    In the management of lung cancer, the rules of engagement of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are not clearly defined. The potential for SABR to affect to an unprecedented level current protocols and in all disease stages emerges vehemently from the literature. However, in a time when the role of surgery is being reassessed, surgeons need to take a closer look at the evidence for the use of SABR in lung cancer patients and clearly define their indisputable role within the context of multidisciplinary teams. The myth of Narcissus exemplified in the absolute masterpiece by Caravaggio seems to represent an ideal metaphor to explain the ever-evolving interaction between surgery and SABR in lung cancer management.

  10. History of Depression in Lung Cancer Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iachina, M; Brønserud, M M; Jakobsen, E

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the influence of a history of depression in the process of diagnostic evaluation and the choice of treatment in lung cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The analysis was based on all patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were registered in 2008-2014; in total, 27 234 patients....... To estimate the effect of depression on the diagnostic process and the choice of treatment in lung cancer we fitted a logistic regression model and a Cox regression model adjusting for age, gender, resection and stage. RESULTS: Depression in a patient's anamnesis had no significant effect on the delay...... in diagnostic evaluation (hazard ratio = 0.99 with 95% confidence interval 0.90; 1.09). Patients with a history of periodic depression had a 33% lower treatment rate (odds ratio = 0.66 with 95% confidence interval 0.51; 0.85) than patients without a history of depression. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows...

  11. Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or