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Sample records for lung cancer radiotherapy

  1. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  2. Hypo fractionated radiotherapy in advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa de; Saito, Newton Heitetsu; Gomes, Herbeni Cardoso; Aguilar, Patricia Bailao; Nadalin, Wladimir

    1996-01-01

    Patients with advanced lung cancers have bad prognosis and, many times, are submitted to prolonged and not always efficient treatments. We present a study where 51 patients were treated with hypo fractionated radiotherapy, based on two distinct schemes, according to the performance status and social conditions of each patient: continuous treatment: 30 Gy, 10 fractions of 3 Gy, 5 days/week (37 cases); weekly treatment: 30 Gy, 6 fractions of 5 Gy, once a week (14 cases). Symptoms relief and impact in survival were evaluated. In both groups, we observed improvement of symptoms in about 70% of the occurrences with a medium survival of three months. We conclude that hypo fractionation is an effective palliative treatment for lung cancers, in patients with short life-expectancy and must be considered as a option in advanced cases, in patients with short life-expectancy that deserve some kind of treatment. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs

  3. Small cell lung cancer: chemo- and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drings, P.

    1992-01-01

    Small-Cell Lung Cancer - Chemo- and Radiotherapy: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) should be regarded as a systematic disease for which systematic therapy, i.e. chemotherapy, is considered as the cornerstone of treatment. Combination chemotherapy consisting of 2 or mostly 3 active drugs, given at an adequate dose, should be used. Thoracic radiation therapy promises both survival and local-regional control benefits to patients though its optimal role remains to be definitively established. The results of treatment have reached a plateau with a remission rate of up to 90% in stage 'limited disease' and 60% in stage 'extensive disease'. But considering long-term results diseasefree survival and cure only seem possible in 5-10% of patients with limited disease. (orig.) [de

  4. Rehabilitation of patients with laryngeal and lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strashinin, A.I.; Gerasimyak, V.G.; Vladimirova, V.A.; Ivanova, L.V.

    1980-01-01

    The ways of medical and social-occupational rehabilitation after a course of radiotherapy in patients with respiratory system cancer have been determined. Medical rehabilitation in patients with lung cancer comprises expedient planning of radiotherapy by means of systematic medicamental treatment. It is shown that it is necessary to place the patients in special rehabilitation departments after radiotherapy of carry out the treatment of pneumonities

  5. Image-guided radiotherapy and motion management in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine

    2015-01-01

    In this review, image guidance and motion management in radiotherapy for lung cancer is discussed. Motion characteristics of lung tumours and image guidance techniques to obtain motion information are elaborated. Possibilities for management of image guidance and motion in the various steps...

  6. Treatment planning of radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerbi, B.J.; Levitt, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    Carcinomas of the lung is the most common form of cancer in men in the United States and many other countries. In the American Cancer Society Survey 1986, cancer of the lung made up 22% of all cancer in men and 11% of all cancer in women. The age-adjusted incidence rate was 70.6 and 14.4 for white men and women, respectively, and 89.6 and 14.4 for black men and women/100,000 population. The disease is more common in older individuals, particularly in the 5th and 6th decade, but rises to its highest incidence in the 7th decade. The proportion of women with carcinoma of the lung has been increasing steadily, while that of the males has been decreasing somewhat. Pathologic classification of carcinoma of the lung includes squamous cell, small-cell, adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma and adenosquamous carcinoma. Most of the patients, practically 48%, have squamous cell carcinoma, 16% adenocarcinoma and 15% large-cell and 19.9% small-cell carcinoma. Recent studies have shown an increase in incidence of adenocarcinoma so that it may be the most common histologic type

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy in lung cancer: an update

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    Abreu, Carlos Eduardo Cintra Vita; Ferreira, Paula Pratti Rodrigues; Moraes, Fabio Ynoe de; Neves Junior, Wellington Furtado Pimenta; Carvalho, Heloisa de Andrade, E-mail: heloisa.carvalho@hc.fm.usp.br [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Gadia, Rafael [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Brasilia, DF (Brazil). Departamento de Radioterapia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Radiologia e Oncologia. Servico de Radioterapia

    2015-07-15

    For early-stage lung cancer, the treatment of choice is surgery. In patients who are not surgical candidates or are unwilling to undergo surgery, radiotherapy is the principal treatment option. Here, we review stereotactic body radiotherapy, a technique that has produced quite promising results in such patients and should be the treatment of choice, if available. We also present the major indications, technical aspects, results, and special situations related to the technique. (author)

  8. The possibility of heavy ion radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, Takehiko

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among malignant tumors in Japan and statisticians predict that the death rate by lung cancer will increase twice or 2.5 times within 10 years. Early detection and early resection are the first task to decrease the death rate, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy should be improved. In this paper, the present status of surgical treatment for lung cancer was summarized and the possibility of heavy ion therapy for lung cancer was discussed in comparison with surgical result. Overall 5-year survival rates in stages I, II, III and IV were 78%, 42% 29% and 16% respectively. The survival rate in stage I was correlated with tumor size and that in lung cancer of tumor size 2 cm or less was about 90%. If lung cancer is found at early stage, lung cancer can be cured. Limitation of detection of lung cancer is 2.3 mm in hilar squamous cell carcinoma by autofluorescence bronchoscopy and 5-10 mm in peripheral adenocarcinoma by high resolution CT. Less invasive surgery by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery was applied to stage I lung cancer and the result was satisfactory. However, most lung cancer patients are heavy smokers with underlying lung diseases including chronic obstructive plumonary disease (COPD) and there are many patients not indicative for less invasive surgery. Preliminary results of heavy ion therapy showed remarkable improvement compared with that with conventional radiation therapy. Three-year survival rate of stage I in Protocol 9802 is 80%, almost the same with that in surgical result, indicating the possibility becoming the established therapeutic modality in stage I lung cancers, in patients with marginal biological function for surgical treatment, in particular. (authors)

  9. 5 years survival after radiotherapy for lung cancer

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    Kujawska, J; Strzeszynski, J [Instytut Onkologii, Krakow (Poland)

    1973-01-01

    Radiotherapy was applied to 256 patients with lung cancer treated in the Institute of Oncology in Krakow in the years 1959-1967. Malignancy had been confirmed throughout in organs of the chest cavity, and diagnosed by microscopic examination. Eleven patients, i.e. 4%, survived 5 years. Survival rate was related to the stage of the disease and the microscopic pattern. Some patients were cured after irradiation of lung cancer, using nominal doses lower than the lethal dose for squamous cell cancer. The specific physical conditions of radiation absorption in the chest cavity evidently made the effective dose inside the cavity much higher than the nominal dose.

  10. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  11. Combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, M.

    1992-01-01

    In the past decade the prognosis of patients with locally advanced lung cancer has not been altered significantly. In both small and non-small cell lung cancer cure rates are poor and 5-year survival rate still has not exceeded the 5% borderline. Despite of initially high response rates, a vast majority of patients suffered from tumor progression within 2 years after the start of treatment. Sites of tumor progression are either the primary tumor or the occurrence of distant metastases. Therefore, improvements of both local and systemic tumor control are necessary to increase long-term survival rate in lung cancer. Combined chemo- and radiotherapy may be an appropriate treatment approach to reach these aims. In patients with locally advanced lung cancer combined chemo-radiotherapy aims at overcoming radio- and chemo-therapy resistance as a cause of local treatment failure and at early eradication of distant micrometastases as a cause of systemic treatment failure. (author). 29 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Definitive Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Young; Park, Kyung Ran

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The effect of dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy on local control and survival was investigated in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Materials and Methods : Ninety eight patients with biopsy-proven unresectable non-small cell lung cancer without distant metastases or medically inoperable patients with lower-stage were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone. Group A were treated by thoracic irradiation, 6000 cGy or less in total tumor dose with daily fractions of 180 to 200 cGy: and group B was treated with 6500 cGy of same daily fractions. Results : The actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group was 54% at 1 year, 26.6% at 2 years and 16.4% at 3 years with a median survival time of 13 months. Statistically significant prognostic factors that affect survival rate were stage and N-stage. However, no improvement in local control and survival has been seen with higher dose radiotherapy(group B). Conclusion : Dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy was no effect on local control and survival rate. To increase the survival rate of non-small cell lung cancer hyperfractionated radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be considered

  13. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

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    Kang, Kylie H. [School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Lo@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  14. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie H. Kang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta, lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis, and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  15. Effect of radiotherapy on lymphocyte populations in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gava, A.; Coghetto, F.; Marazzato, G.; Fantin, P.L.; Patrese, P.; Moro, L.; De Angeli, S.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report on the results of the immune monitoring of a study population of 31 patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiotherapy. Asynthetic thymic pentapeptide, Thymopentin, was employed-whose effect was evaluated on the immunological parameters analyzed. After radiotherapy, a considerable and homogeneous decrement was observed in several lymphocytic subset (less sensible in activated T-cells), together with a progressive decrement in the helper/suppressor ratio, in the long run. Monocytes and null cells showed more radioresistance. Thymopentin had no influence on the tested immunological parameters up tp 6 months after radiotherapy; later on, a slightly more balanced helper/suppressor ratio could be noticed in the surviving patients who had benn treated with Thymopentin

  16. [Effects of radiotherapy on lymphocyte populations in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gava, A; Moro, L; De Angeli, S; Coghetto, F; Marazzato, G; Fantin, P; Patrese, P

    1988-11-01

    The authors report on the results of the immune monitoring of a study population of 31 patients with lung cancer who were treated with radiotherapy. A synthetic thymic pentapeptide, thymopentin, was employed whose effect was evaluated on the immunological parameters analyzed. After radiotherapy, a considerable and homogeneous decrement was observed in several lymphocytic subsets (less sensible in activated T-cells), together with a progressive decrement in the helper/suppressor ratio, in the long run. Monocytes and null cells showed more radioresistance. Thymopentin had no influence on the tested immunological parameters up to 6 months after radiotherapy; later on, a slightly more balanced helper/suppressor ratio could be noticed in the surviving patients who had been treated with thymopentin.

  17. [Principles of radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esik, Olga; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Hideghéty, Katalin; Agócs, László; Pikó, Béla; Lengyel, Zsolt; Petrányi, Agota; Pisch, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The long-term survival probability for Hungarian lung cancer patients is 10% worse than the best results published in the most highly developed countries (the mean 5-year survival probability in Hungary is 5%, in contrast with the 15% survival probability in the USA). On the basis of the international recommendations and personal experience, an attempt was made to formulate the guidelines for radiotherapy as one of the fundamental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment modalities for national use. An expert panel was set up comprising physicians from 6 radiotherapeutic centers (the National Institute of Oncology / Semmelweis University, Budapest; the Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; the University of Kaposvár; the University of Essen; the University of Debrecen; and the County Hospital of Gyula). Experts in two important medical fields closely related to radiotherapy (surgery and diagnostic imaging) were also engaged in the elaboration of the manuscript. Discussion of the most important principles of the radiotherapy and an overview of the prognostic factors was followed by a critical analysis of the protocols applied in the radiotherapy of Hungarian NSCLC patients during recent decades. The new guidelines suggested for the radiotherapy of NSCLC are presented separately for the postoperative period, marginally resectable tumors, and the aggressive or non-aggressive radiotherapy of inoperable tumors. Detailed accounts are given of the techniques of external irradiation and brachytherapy, and of the acute and late radiation-induced damage of normal tissues. The authors believe that this document may be instrumental in improving the survival index of Hungarian NSCLC patients in the near future.

  18. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsaker, V.; Dale, E.; Bruland, O.S.; Olsen, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p 40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  19. Application of CT perfusion imaging in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Guangrong; Liu Guimei; He Wen; Jin Guohua; Xie Ruming; Xu Yongxiang; Li Xiaobo; Li Xuebing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of CT perfusion imaging in evaluation of therapeutic effect and prognosis in radiotherapy for lung cancer. Methods: Fifty-one cases of lung cancer who were unable or refused to be operated on, 36 males and 15 females, aged 37-80, underwent CT perfusion imaging, 29 of which only before radiotherapy and 22 before and after radiotherapy twice. The images were collected by cine dynamic scanning (5 mm/4 slices) and input into the GE AW4.0 workstation for data processing. The slice positions of CT imaging were determined according to the largest tumor size in CT scan. Regions of interest of tumor were drawn at the region corresponding to the original images of CT perfusion. Radiotherapy was performed after CT perfusion imaging. Relevant parameters, including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT), and permeability surface (PS) were calculated. The treatment response after radiotherapy was evaluated by RECIST. At 2 -4 weeks after the treatment, CT examination was conducted once more. Results: The tests of the 51 patients showed that the BV was 13.6 ml·100 g -1 , the BF was 129.5 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , the MTT was 9.1 s, and the PS was 10.0 ml· min -1 · 100 g -1 before radiotherapy. The tests of the 22 of the 51 patients showed that the values of BV and BF after radiotherapy were 7.6 ml· 100 g -1 and 97.8 ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, both lower than those before radiotherapy (11.2 and 108.7 ml·min -1 ·100 g -1 , respectively), however, both not significantly (t=1.28, 0.40, P>0.05); and the values of MTT and PS after radiotherapy were 8.9 s and 7.8 ml·min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, both not significantly higher than those before radiotherapy (7.2 s and 6.8 ml· min -1 · 100 g -1 , respectively, t=-1.15, -0.57, P>0.05). The mean area of tumor after radiotherapy was 1189.6 mm 2 , significantly less than that before radiotherapy (1920.3 mm 2 , t=3.98, P<0.05). The MTT of the SCLC patients was 12

  20. Guidelines for the treatment of lung cancer using radiotherapy

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    Chen, Michael J.; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo; Gadia, Rafael; Motta, Rodrigo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this guideline is to evaluate the most appropriate radiotherapy technique to treat patients with lung cancer. Description of evidence collection method Through the elaboration of four relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy techniques. The study population consisted of male and female patients of all ages with lung cancer, regardless of histological type, staging or presence of comorbidities. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (Medline – PubMed; Embase – Elsevier; Lilacs – Bireme; Cochrane Library – Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through April 31, 2015 were considered. The search terms used in the research were: ((lung cancer) OR (lung carcinoma)) and (IMRT OR intensity modulation OR intensity modulated) and (conventional OR 2D OR two dimensional OR bidimensional OR standard OR conformal OR 3D OR tridimensional OR CRT OR three dimensional). The articles were selected based on critical evaluation using the instruments (scores) proposed by Jadad and Oxford. The references with greater degree of evidence were used. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days, and the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  1. Risk of second primary lung cancer in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grantzau, Trine; Thomsen, Mette Skovhus; Væth, Michael; Overgaard, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several epidemiological studies have reported increased risks of second lung cancers after breast cancer irradiation. In this study we assessed the effects of the delivered radiation dose to the lung and the risk of second primary lung cancer. Methods: We conducted a nested case–control study of second lung cancer in a population based cohort of 23,627 early breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy from 1982 to 2007. The cohort included 151 cases diagnosed with second primary lung cancer and 443 controls. Individual dose-reconstructions were performed and the delivered dose to the center of the second lung tumor and the comparable location for the controls were estimated, based on the patient specific radiotherapy charts. Results: The median age at breast cancer diagnosis was 54 years (range 34–74). The median time from breast cancer treatment to second lung cancer diagnosis was 12 years (range 1–26 years). 91% of the cases were categorized as ever smokers vs. 40% among the controls. For patients diagnosed with a second primary lung cancer five or more years after breast cancer treatment the rate of lung cancer increased linearly with 8.5% per Gray (95% confidence interval = 3.1–23.3%; p < 0.001). This rate was enhanced for ever smokers with an excess rate of 17.3% per Gray (95% CI = 4.5–54%; p < 0.005). Conclusions: Second lung cancer after radiotherapy for early breast cancer is associated with the delivered dose to the lung. Although the absolute risk is relative low, the growing number of long-time survivors after breast cancer treatment highlights the need for advances in normal tissue sparing radiation techniques

  2. Combination radiotherapy and chemotherapy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Takao; Takeuchi, Midori; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Fifty-six patients with carcinoma of the lung treated with radiotherapy alone or combination of chemotherapy were reviewed. Radiation was given with a 10MV photon beam by a linear accelerator. A fraction dose of 2Gy (200 rad) was given routinely 5 times a week. Combined durgs consist of 5FU or FT-207 in monochemotherapy and METT, MFC, or METVFC in combination chemotherapy. 5 year survival rate of all patients was 3.8%. As for the stage classification, 5 year survival rate is 30% in Stage I and II cancer, but there was no 3 year survivor in Stage III cancer and 2 year survivor in Stage IV cancer. As for the cell types, cases of adenocarcinoma had worse prognosis than them of squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma. The prognosis of patients treated with combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was similar to that of patients treated with radiotherapy alone. These results suggest that combined chemotherapy did not influence tumor control. Some discussion on the treatment modality of chemotherapy are made, emphasizing untoward effect of chemotherapy on immunopotency. (author)

  3. Palliative radiotherapy for lung cancer: two versus five fractions

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    Rees, G.J.G.; Devrell, C.E.; Barley, V.L.; Newman, H.F.V. [Bristol Oncology Centre (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    The aim of this prospective randomized trial was to compare the symptomatic effects of two different regimens of palliative radiotherapy for lung cancer. Two hundred and sixteen patients needing palliation were randomized to receive either a 17 Gy mid-point dose in two fractions 1 week apart or 22.5 gy in five daily fractions. Both toxicity and efficacy were evaluated by postal questionnaires. This small study was intended to identify any clinically important differences in toxicity of efficacy between the two regimens. We detected no such difference, although there was a tendency for iatrogentic dysphagia and improvement in chest pain and cough to be more common with the two fraction regimen. The only symptom that was improved in over 50% for 8 or more was haemoptysis. Haemoptysis and chest pain appeared to be the best indications for treatment. The relief of other symptoms was disappointing in both degree and duration. (author).

  4. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer: how much does it really cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Obyn, Caroline; Mertens, Anne-Sophie; Van Halewyck, Dries; Hulstaert, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Despite the lack of randomized evidence, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being accepted as superior to conventional radiotherapy for patients with T1-2N0 non-small-cell lung cancer in the periphery of the lung and unfit or unwilling to undergo surgery. To introduce SBRT in a system of coverage with evidence development, a correct financing had to be determined. A time-driven activity-based costing model for radiotherapy was developed. Resource cost calculation of all radiotherapy treatments, standard and innovative, was conducted in 10 Belgian radiotherapy centers in the second half of 2012. The average cost of lung SBRT across the 10 centers (6221&OV0556;) is in the range of the average costs of standard fractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy (5919&OV0556;) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (7379&OV0556;) for lung cancer. Hypofractionated 3D-conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy schemes are less costly (3993&OV0556; respectively 4730&OV0556;). The SBRT cost increases with the number of fractions and is highly dependent of personnel and equipment use. SBRT cost varies more by centre than conventional radiotherapy cost, reflecting different technologies, stages in the learning curve and a lack of clear guidance in this field. Time-driven activity-based costing of radiotherapy is feasible in a multicentre setup, resulting in real-life resource costs that can form the basis for correct reimbursement schemes, supporting an early yet controlled introduction of innovative radiotherapy techniques in clinical practice.

  5. The treatment Results of Radiotherapy for nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jong Chul; Sohn, Seung Chang; Suh, Hyun Suk; Jaun, Woo Ki; Kim, Dong Soon; Sohn, Kwang Hyun

    1986-01-01

    From Nov. 1983 through Jan. 1986, 43 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer were treated by radiation therapy at Inje Medical College Paik Hospital. 38 patients were available for the analysis of this study. 33 patients received definite irradiation with curative intent, while 5 patients received postoperative irradiation. Chemotherapy was added in 12 patients before, during and after radio-therapy. 28 patients were squamous cell carcinoma and 10 patients were adenocarcinoma. There were 29 men and 9 women (median age, 58 years; range 34 to 74 years). Stage I was 1 patient, Stage 11, 7 patient, and Stage 111, 30 patients. Among 33 patients who received radiotherapy with curative intent, follow up radiological study revealed complete response in 12 patients (36%), partial response, in 9 patients (27%), and minimal response, in 5 patients (15%), while 7 patients (21%) were nonresponders. Median survival for all patients was 6.9 months; squamous cell carcinoma, 7.3 months, adenocarcinoma, 5.9 months. Responders survived median 7 months, while nonresponders survived median 1.9 months. Improved complete response rate and survival were shown in high radiation dose group. As prognostic factors, age, initial performance status, sex, histology and tumor location were evaluated

  6. Lung cancer in Hodgkin's disease: association with previous radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    List, A.F.; Doll, D.C.; Greco, F.A.

    1985-01-01

    Seven cases of lung cancer were observed in patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) since 1970. The risk ratio for the development of lung cancer among HD patients was 5.6 times that expected in the general population. The pertinent clinical data from these patients are described and compared to 28 additional patients reported from other institutions. Small-cell lung cancer represented the predominant histologic type of lung cancer encountered in both smoking and nonsmoking patients with HD, accounting for 42% of cases overall and greater than 55% of cases reported in reviews of second malignancies. Tobacco use was noted in only 53% of patients. Twenty-eight (94%) of 30 patients developing metachronous lung cancer received supradiaphragmatic irradiation as primary therapy for HD. Nineteen (68%) of these patients received subsequent chemotherapy salvage. The median age at diagnosis of HD and lung cancer was 39 and 45 years, respectively. The interval between diagnosis of HD and metachronous lung cancer averaged seven years but appeared to vary inversely with age. HD patients treated with supradiaphragmatic irradiation or combined modality therapy may be at increased risk for developing lung cancer. The high frequency of in-field malignancies that the authors observed and the prevalence of small-cell lung cancer in both smoking and nonsmoking patients suggests that chest irradiation may influence the development of metachronous lung cancer in these patients. The finding of a mean latent interval in excess of seven years emphasizes the need for close long-term observation

  7. Tumor motion in lung cancers: An overview of four-dimensional radiotherapy treatment of lung cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusheel Munshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most modern radiotherapy centers have adopted contouring based treatment. Sparing of the normal structures has been made more achievable than ever before by use of technologies such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT. However, unlike, sites such as brain or head neck, thorax is a site in active motion, mostly contributed by patient's respiratory movement. 4 D radiotherapy, that addresses the issues of motion in thoracic tumours answers this critical question. The present article outlines the scope of need for 4 D radiotherapy and discusses the options available for 4 D treatments of cancer patients.

  8. Radiotherapy in non-oat cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga T, O.; Echegaray, A.; Barriga T, L.; Mayer Z, T.

    1995-01-01

    96 clinical histories of patients with non-oat cell lung cancer treated with Rt or Rt post surgery from 1988 to 1990 in the National Institute of Neoplasmic Diseases were revised. most of the patients were in their is 60 and the range was between 30 and 91 years; 776 were male and 20 female. Epidermoid carcinoma was found in 53 cases, adenocarcinoma in 37, others in 4 and 2 have no histological data. Most were advanced cases with following distribution by clinical stages: I:0, II:3, IIIA: 21, IIIB:37, IV:33 and 2 no determined. In the present evaluation patients treated with systemic therapy had not been considered. All patients have been treated with external radiotherapy with Co-60 with different fractionation schedules. The present study evaluates the completion and the results about the clinical response making an intent to establish the best schedule because most of the patients have advanced illness with short hope of life. The clinical improvement was obtained in 53.12% with similar over life for the different fractionation schedules being only 4 patients alive. (authors). 9 refs., 9 tabs

  9. Usefulness of pulmonary scintigraphy in primary lung cancer patients treated by radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomo, Osamu

    1994-01-01

    To assess the pulmonary function of lung cancer patients treated by radiotherapy, we tried qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of pulmonary scintigrams using 133 Xe and 99m Tc-MAA. Individual scores for ventilation, perfusion and the ventilation-perfusion ratio of tumor-bearing lungs were calculated on the basis of healthy control cases in order to analyze whether, and to what degree, the tumor-bearing lung was functionally impaired. The score was proportional to the severity of impairment, and when the ventilation and perfusion of tumor-bearing lungs had a score of one or greater than one, the tumor-bearing lung was functionally defined as an 'impaired lung'. Impaired lungs were demonstrated in 68% of tumor-bearing lungs. Hilar and left hilar-type cancers, clinically more advanced cancers, patients whose tumors were confirmed by bronchofiberscopy, small-cell and epidermoid cancers, etc., had higher rates of impairment and more severe impairment. Many patients with impaired lungs had a worse prognosis, but patients in whom scintigraphy showed improvement after radiotherapy had a better prognosis. It can be concluded that pulmonary scintigraphy scoring is capable of semiquantitatively indicating the degree of pulmonary impairment and is useful in deciding on a radiotherapeutic plan and predicting the outcome in pre- and post-radiotherapy lung cancer patients. (author)

  10. Factors affecting the local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamamoto, Yasushi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Yamashita, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting local control of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumors including primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors. Between June 2006 and June 2009, 159 lung tumors in 144 patients (primary lung cancer, 128; metastatic lung tumor, 31) were treated with SBRT with 48-60 Gy (mean 50.1 Gy) in 4-5 fractions. Higher doses were given to larger tumors and metastatic tumors in principle. Assessed factors were age, gender, tumor origin (primary vs. metastatic), histological subtype, tumor size, tumor appearance (solid vs. ground glass opacity), maximum standardized uptake value of positron emission tomography using 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and SBRT doses. Follow-up time was 1-60 months (median 18 months). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year local failure-free rates of all lesions were 90, 80, and 77%, respectively. On univariate analysis, metastatic tumors (p<0.0001), solid tumors (p=0.0246), and higher SBRT doses (p=0.0334) were the statistically significant unfavorable factors for local control. On multivariate analysis, only tumor origin was statistically significant (p=0.0027). The 2-year local failure-free rates of primary lung cancer and metastatic lung tumors were 87 and 50%, respectively. A metastatic tumor was the only independently significant unfavorable factor for local control after SBRT. (author)

  11. Enhanced pulmonary toxicity with bleomycin and radiotherapy in oat cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einhorn, L.; Krause, M.; Hornback, N.; Furnas, B.

    1976-01-01

    In a recently completed study, combination chemotherapy consisting of bleomycin, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, and vincristine was given to 29 patients with oat cell lung cancer. There were no cases of pulmonary fibrosis in these 29 patients. Although several of these patients had prior radiotherapy, none had concomitant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. This same four-drug chemotherapy regimen was combined with concomitant radiotherapy in 13 patients with oat cell lung cancer. There were three cases of fatal pulmonary fibrosis and two other cases of clinically significant pulmonary fibrosis. All five cases of pulmonary fibrosis occurred several weeks after completion of a six-week course of bleomycin (total dosage 90 units). It is concluded that bleomycin cannot be safely administered while patients are receiving radiotherapy of the lung

  12. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasuo; Chohtoh, Shuichi; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Hirose, Jin-ichiro; Kamimura, Ryoichi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Konishi, Hideo; Miyata, Samon.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment results of 49 patients (25, limited disease, LD, 24, extensive disease, ED) with small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifteen patients received chemotherapy with Cyclophosphamide (CPM) and Vincristine (VCR) following thoracic radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-two patients were given induction chemotherapy with CPM, Adriamycin (ADM), and VCR and were followed by thoracic RT. Other chemotherapy consisted of CPM, VCR, Methotrexate, and ADM in 2 patients, 5-FU, CPM, Mitomycin C, and Toyomycin in 1 patient. The remaining 9 patients (2, LD, 7, ED) were treated with RT alone. The response rate was 80 % (64 % CR; 16 % PR) for LD patients and 33 % (4 % CR; 29 % PR) for ED patients (P < 0.001). The three-year survival (Kaplan-Meier's product) of all patients was 14 %, with a median survival time (MST) of 8 months. For patients with LD, the 3-year survival was 27 % (MST 15 months). Survival of patients with ED was 14 % at 1 year, 0 % at 2 year (MST 5.5 months). The difference between these figures was statistically significant (P < 0.0003). The 3-year survival and relapse-free survival for complete responders with LD were 43 % (MST 21 months) and 36 % (median CR duration, 11.5 months) respectively. Six of 16 complete responders with LD are alive and well at over 2 years. Local recurrence rate of the complete responders with LD was 28.8 %. None of the 7 complete responders given more than 48 Gy relapsed within the radiation field. We believe that the addition of thoracic RT to patients with LD is necessary for the control of the primary tumors and for long-term disease-free survival. (author)

  13. Daily Megavoltage Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: Correlation Between Volumetric Changes and Local Outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bral, Samuel; De Ridder, Mark; Duchateau, Michael; Gevaert, Thierry; Engels, Benedikt; Schallier, Denis; Storme, Guy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the predictive or comparative value of volumetric changes, measured on daily megavoltage computed tomography during radiotherapy for lung cancer. Patients and Methods: We included 80 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiotherapy was combined with concurrent chemotherapy, combined with induction chemotherapy, or given as primary treatment. Patients entered two parallel studies with moderately hypofractionated radiotherapy. Tumor volume contouring was done on the daily acquired images. A regression coefficient was derived from the volumetric changes on megavoltage computed tomography, and its predictive value was validated. Logarithmic or polynomial fits were applied to the intratreatment changes to compare the different treatment schedules radiobiologically. Results: Regardless of the treatment type, a high regression coefficient during radiotherapy predicted for a significantly prolonged cause-specific local progression free-survival (p = 0.05). Significant differences were found in the response during radiotherapy. The significant difference in volumetric treatment response between radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy plus induction chemotherapy translated to a superior long-term local progression-free survival for concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03). An enhancement ratio of 1.3 was measured for the used platinum/taxane doublet in comparison with radiotherapy alone. Conclusion: Contouring on daily megavoltage computed tomography images during radiotherapy enabled us to predict the efficacy of a given treatment. The significant differences in volumetric response between treatment strategies makes it a possible tool for future schedule comparison.

  14. Late regional density changes of the lung after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagane, Randi; Danielsen, Turi; Fossa, Sophie Dorothea; Lokkevik, Erik; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate density changes in lung tissue, 3-4 years after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy for breast cancer, based on dose dependence and regional differences. Material and methods: Sixty-one breast cancer patients, who had received computed tomography (CT) based postoperative radiotherapy, were included. CT scans were performed 35-51 months after start of radiotherapy. Dose information and CT scans from before and after radiotherapy were geometrically aligned in order to analyse changes in air-filled fraction (derived from CT density) as a function of dose for different regions of the lung. Results: Dose-dependent reduction of the air-filled fraction was shown to vary between the different regions of the lung. For lung tissue receiving about 50 Gy, the largest reduction in air-filled fraction was found in the cranial part of the lung. An increased air-filled fraction was observed for lung tissue irradiated to doses below 20 Gy, indicating compensatory response. Conclusions: The treatment-induced change in whole-lung density is a weighted response, involving the different regions, the irradiated volumes, and dose levels to these volumes. Simplistic models may therefore not be appropriate for describing the whole-lung dose-volume-response relationship following inhomogeneous irradiation

  15. Results of concomitant cisplatin and radiotherapy in non-operable non small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, E.; Mazeron, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The Radiotherapy and Lung Cancer Cooperative Groups of the EORTC performed a randomized study in patients with non-metastatic inoperable non small-cell lung cancer to compare the results of radiotherapy alone (radiation was administered for two wk at a dose of 3 Gy given 10 times followed by a three-wk rest period and then radiotherapy for two more wk at a dose of 2.5 Gy given 10 times) with radiotherapy on the same schedule combined with cisplatin given either on the first day of each treatment week at a dose of 30 mg/m 2 , or daily before radiotherapy at a dose of 6 mg/m 2 . Preliminary results showed a significantly improved three-yr survival rate in the radiotherapy-daily cisplatin group as compared with the radiotherapy group (16% versus 2%; P = 0.009) and without major increase in toxicity. This survival benefit was due to improved control of local disease; survival without local recurrence was 31% at two yr in the radiotherapy-daily cisplatin group as compared with 19% in the radiotherapy (P = 0.003)

  16. Radiotherapy of elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kumagai, Kazuhiko; Tukamoto, Yuji; Furonaka, Makoto; Hayakawa, Masanobu; Nakamura, Kenji

    1996-01-01

    Treatment results of patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) with non-small-cell lung cancer were compared with those of patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). In patients with stage III disease, radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival of 11.5 months in the younger group and 5.5 months in the elderly group. There was a significant difference in survival rate between the two groups (P=0.0008). Moreover, the elderly group patients more frequently died of pneumonia and radiation pneumonitis than the younger group patients. However, results of radiotherapy were similar in the two groups of patients with stage I and II disease. Accordingly, these findings suggested that radiotherapy is an appropriate treatment modality for elderly lung cancer patients, but that individualized radiotherapy is needed for those with locally advanced stage. (author)

  17. Effect of radiotherapy on lymphocyte cytotoxicity against allogeneic lung cancer cells in patients with bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohira, Ken; Yasumoto, Kosei; Manabe, Hideo; Ohta, Mitsuo; Terashima, Hiromi

    1979-01-01

    Cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes against allogeneic target cells of bronchogenic carcinoma was examined by a microcytotoxicity test before, during, and after radiotherapy in primary lung cancer patients. Before the treatment, cytotoxicity was depressed only slightly in patients in stage III and strikingly in those in stage IV, as compared to the values in patients at earlier stages of lung cancer such as stages I and II. Local irradiation scarcely affected cytotoxicity at stages II and III, but augmented remarkably at stage IV. The number of peripheral blood lymphocytes decreased profoundly during and after radiotherapy in all cases of stages II, III, and IV. Although radiotherapy exhibited various effects on the cytotoxic activity of lymphocytes and the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes, only the cytotoxic activity at the end of radiotherapy correlated well with the reduction in tumor size. (author)

  18. Association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in limited small cell lung cancers: interest of alternating protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Chevalier, T.; Arriagada, R.; Ruffie, P.; Cremoux, H. de; Douillard, J.Y.; Tuchais, C.; Chomy, P.; Riviere, A.; Tarayre, M.

    1992-01-01

    From 1980, alternating protocols of chemotherapy and thorax radiotherapy in limited small cell lung cancers have been elaborated in order to control locally the disease, to improve the total survival and to reduce the toxicity that are bound the simultaneous treatments of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thanks to these protocols, the two-year survival rate is 27% and the five-year survival rate, 16%

  19. Patient-reported quality of life after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early-stage lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerwaard, F.J.; Aaronson, N.K.; Gundy, C.M.; Haasbeek, C.J.A.; Slotman, B.J.; Senan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Deterioration in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is frequently observed after surgery for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. As stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) can result in local control percentages exceeding 90%, we studied baseline and post-treatment HRQOL in SABR

  20. Liquid fiducial marker performance during radiotherapy of locally advanced non small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhög, Jonas Scherman; Mortensen, Steen Riisgaard; Larsen, Klaus Richter

    2016-01-01

    We analysed the positional and structural stability of a long-term biodegradable liquid fiducial marker (BioXmark) for radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced lung cancer. Markers were injected via endoscopic- or endobronchial ultrasound in lymph nodes and reachable primary tumours. Marker...

  1. Concurrent radiotherapy and fotemustine for brain metastases of non small cell cancer of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignon, T.; Ruggieri, S.; Orabona, P.; Muracciole, X.; Juin, P.; Astoul, P.; Vialette, J.P.; Boutin, C.

    1994-01-01

    The radiotherapy is the most employed in the treatment of cerebral metastases, even if results are deceptive. The tests with chemotherapy are not better and the nitrosoureas remain the most employed drugs. The fotemustin is a new one which can give good results for bearing cerebral metastases patients's response. The associations radiotherapy and chemotherapy are developing to potentiate radiotherapy action but are still a little studied in the cases of cerebral metastases; that is why we choose to treat in an open study the patients bearers of cerebral metastases in lungs cancers with no little cells. 18 refs

  2. Peripheral blood count in preoperative radiotherapy (with radiomodificators) of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demidchik, Yu.E.; Zharkov, V.V.; Prokhorova, V.I.; Rubanova, C.Z.

    1989-01-01

    Indices of peripheral blood in 215 patients with lung cancer during preoperative radiation using hyperglycemia or metronidazole are studied. It is shown that after preoperative radiotherapy, when radiomodifying effects are not used, the content of erythrocytes, thrombocytes, leukocytes, the concentration of hemoglobin in peripheral blood, as well as erythrocyte sedimentation rare didn't change. Functional disorders of the leukopoietic function and the thrombopoietic function of bone marrow when using metronidazole are registered when applying various types of preoperative radiotherapy. Lymphopenia is established when using various types of radiotherapy with radiomodificators

  3. Activation of lavage lymphocytes in lung injuries caused by radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yasuhiro; Makino, Shigeki; Fukuda, Yasuki; Min, Kyong-Yob; Shimizu, Akira; Ohsawa, Nakaaki

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation pneumonitis sometimes extends beyond the irradiated area of a lung and can also affect the opposite lung. Some immunological mechanisms, in addition to simple direct injury of the lungs by radiation, seem to be involved in the onset of radiation pneumonitis. To clarify such mechanisms, the effects of radiation on local inflammatory cells in lungs, in particular, lymphocytes, were examined. Methods and Materials: A comparison was made of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) findings from 13 irradiated patients (RT group) and 15 nonirradiated patients (non-RT group) with lung cancer. Patients who later developed radiation pneumonitis (RP group) and those who did not (RP-free group) were also compared. Using a two-color flowcytometer, radiation-induced changes in local inflammatory cells in lungs were analyzed. This included analyses of human leukocyte-associated antigen (HLADR) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on T-cells, which are thought to be involved in cell activation and interactions between cells. Results: The following aspects of BALF were higher in the RT group than in the non-RT group: (a) the percentage of lymphocytes and eosinophiles; (b) the incidence of HLADR-positive CD4+T-cells and HLADR-positive CD8+T-cells; and (c) the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T-cells. The following aspects of BALF were higher in the RP group than in the RP-free group: (a) the total cell counts; (b) the percentage of lymphocytes; and (c) the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T-cells. A significant relationship was seen between the incidence of ICAM-1 expression on T-cells and the number of days from the initiation of radiotherapy to the onset of radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion: These data suggest that irradiation can induce accumulation of activated T-cells (HLADR and ICAM-1-positive T-cells) in the lung. This accumulation may be closely linked to radiation-induced lung injury. It is also suggested that the incidence of ICAM-1-positive T

  4. Postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer: Is it worth the controversy?

    OpenAIRE

    Billiet, Charlotte; Peeters, Stephanie; Decaluwe, Herbert; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Mebis, Jeroen; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2) remains unclear. Despite a reduction of local recurrence (LR), its effect on overall survival (OS) remains unproven. Therefore we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: To investigate the benefit and safety of modern PORT, we identified published phase III trials for PORT. We investiga...

  5. The incorporation of SPECT functional lung imaging into inverse radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; McNair, Helen A.; Cronin, Bernadette; Courbon, Frederic; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often have inhomogeneous lung perfusion. Radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans have been accurately co-registered with lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to design radiotherapy treatments which limit dose to healthy 'perfused' lung. Patients and methods: Patients with localised NSCLC had CT and SPECT scans accurately co-registered in the planning system. The SPECT images were used to define a volume of perfused 'functioning' lung (FL). Inverse planning software was used to create 3D-conformal plans, the planning objective being either to minimise the dose to whole lungs (WL) or to minimise the dose to FL. Results: Four plans were created for each of six patients. The mean difference in volume between WL and FL was 1011.7 cm 3 (range 596.2-1581.1 cm 3 ). One patient with bilateral upper lobe perfusion deficits had a 16% reduction in FLV 2 (the percentage volume of functioning lung receiving ≥20 Gy). The remaining patients had inhomogeneous perfusion deficits such that inverse planning was not able to sufficiently optimise beam angles to avoid functioning lung. Conclusion: SPECT perfusion images can be accurately co-registered with radiotherapy planning CT scans and may be helpful in creating treatment plans for patients with large perfusion deficits

  6. Two cases with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroyuki; Yukawa, Susumu; Nomoto, Hiroshi (Wakayama Medical Coll. (Japan)); Minakata, Yoshiaki; Yamagata, Toshiyuki

    1992-05-01

    Two patients with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field are reported. Lung abscesses occurred during the term of leukopenia following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer. Both patients were diagnosed as small cell lung cancer, and were treated concurrently with chemotherapy (Cisplatin + Etoposide) and radiotherapy (total 40-50 Gy). Case 1 was a 59 years old male. Seven weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated in the lung field with radiation pneumonitis, and giant bronchial fistula was formed, that showed the specific bronchofiberscopic findings. Case 2 was a 67 years old male. Twelve weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa originated in the irradiated lung field following the formation of a pneumatocele. MRSA and pseudomonas aeruginosa are important as cause of hospital infection, and both can cause lung abscess. However, in our cases, lung abscess were formed just in the irradiated lung field and rapidly enlarged. These clinical findings suggested that myelosuppression and radiation injury of lung tissue might cause such giant lung abscess. (author).

  7. Two cases with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Takeshi; Inui, Hiroyuki; Yukawa, Susumu; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Minakata, Yoshiaki; Yamagata, Toshiyuki.

    1992-01-01

    Two patients with giant lung abscess originating in the irradiated lung field are reported. Lung abscesses occurred during the term of leukopenia following the concurrent chemo-radiotherapy of lung cancer. Both patients were diagnosed as small cell lung cancer, and were treated concurrently with chemotherapy (Cisplatin + Etoposide) and radiotherapy (total 40-50 Gy). Case 1 was a 59 years old male. Seven weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) originated in the lung field with radiation pneumonitis, and giant bronchial fistula was formed, that showed the specific bronchofiberscopic findings. Case 2 was a 67 years old male. Twelve weeks after the first irradiation, a giant lung abscess was caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa originated in the irradiated lung field following the formation of a pneumatocele. MRSA and pseudomonas aeruginosa are important as cause of hospital infection, and both can cause lung abscess. However, in our cases, lung abscess were formed just in the irradiated lung field and rapidly enlarged. These clinical findings suggested that myelosuppression and radiation injury of lung tissue might cause such giant lung abscess. (author)

  8. Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, N.; Mornex, F.

    2011-01-01

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation micro-beams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. (authors)

  9. Results of radiotherapy for brain metastases from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuno, Ikuro; Tada, Akira; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Choto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Kihichiro

    1987-01-01

    Ten patients with brain metastases from lung cancer treated by irradiation between 1982 and 1985 were reviewed. Neurologic improvement by irradiation was obtained in all patients. The median duration of neurologic function control by irradiation and the median survival from the diagnosis of brain metastases were 9 months and 11 months, respectively. General performance status, neurologic function class and the presence or absence of other sites of metastases were important prognostic factors for survival. More than 50 Gy brain irradiation except small cell carcinoma was thought to be necessary to control the brain metastases. CT examinations were useful but limited to evaluate the effectiveness of irradiation. (author)

  10. Results of radiotherapy for brain metastases from lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Ikuro; Tada, Akira; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi; Choto, Shuichi; Watanabe, Kihichiro

    1987-02-01

    Ten patients with brain metastases from lung cancer treated by irradiation between 1982 and 1985 were reviewed. Neurologic improvement by irradiation was obtained in all patients. The median duration of neurologic function control by irradiation and the median survival from the diagnosis of brain metastases were 9 months and 11 months, respectively. General performance status, neurologic function class and the presence or absence of other sites of metastases were important prognostic factors for survival. More than 50 Gy brain irradiation except small cell carcinoma was thought to be necessary to control the brain metastases. CT examinations were useful but limited to evaluate the effectiveness of irradiation.

  11. Target volume determination in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer-facts and questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, L.; Bujko, K.

    2003-01-01

    Although the precise target volume definition in conformal radiotherapy is required by ICRU Report 50 and 62, this task in radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often controversial and strict accordance with ICRU requirements is hard to achieve. The Gross Tumour Volume (GTV) definition depends mainly on the imaging method used. We discuss the use of new imaging modalities, like PET, in GTV definition. The Clinical Target Volume (CTV) definition remains a separate, and still unresolved problem, especially in the part concerning the Elective Nodal Irradiation (ENI). Nowadays, there is no unified attitude among radiation oncologists regarding the necessity and extent of ENI. The common use of combined treatment modalities and the tendency to dose escalation, both increasing the potential toxicity, result in the more frequent use of involved-fields techniques. Problems relating to margins during Planning Target Volume (PTV) of lung cancer irradiation are also discussed. Another issue is the Interclinician variability in target volumes definition, especially when there is data indicating that the GTV, as defined by 3 D-treatment planning in NSCLC radiotherapy, may be highly prognostic for survival. We postulate that special attention should be paid to detailed precision of target volume determination in departmental and trial protocols. Careful analysis of patterns of failures from ongoing protocols will enable us to formulate the guidelines for target volume definition in radiotherapy for lung cancer. (author)

  12. Long term outcomes after salvage radiotherapy for postoperative locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The outcomes and toxicities of locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy were evaluated in the modern era. Fifty-seven patients receiving radical radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent NSCLC without distant metastasis after surgery from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Forty-two patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and 15 patients with radiotherapy alone. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 45 to 70 Gy). Lung function change after radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing pulmonary function tests before and at 1, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range, 12.0 to 107.5 months) among the survivors. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54.8 months (range, 3.0 to 116.9 months) and 12.2 months (range, 0.8 to 100.2 months), respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that single locoregional recurrence focus and use of concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.048 and p = 0.001, respectively) and PFS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was no significant change in predicted forced expiratory volume in one second after radiotherapy. Although diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide decreased significantly at 1 month after radiotherapy (p < 0.001), it recovered to pretreatment levels within 12 months. Acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were observed in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. There was no chronic complication observed in all patients. Salvage radiotherapy showed good survival outcomes without severe complications in postoperative locoregionally recurrent NSCLC patients. A single locoregional recurrent focus and the use of CCRT chemotherapy were associated with improved survival. CCRT should be considered as a salvage treatment in patients with good prognostic factors.

  13. Radiotherapy alone for elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Kikuo; Hiramoto, Takehiko; Kanehara, Masasi; Doi, Mihoko; Furonaka, Osamu; Miyazu, Yuka; Hada, Yosihiro

    1999-01-01

    We undertook a retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated solely with radiotherapy during the period 1986 to 1995. Our study was designed to assess the influence of age on survival and malnutrition in patients aged 75 years or older (elderly group) and patients aged 74 years or younger (younger group). Radiotherapy alone resulted in a median survival period of 11.5 months in the younger group and 6.3 months in the elderly group (p=0.0043). With the Cox multivariate model, good performance status, age less than 75 years, and good response were significant favorable independent predictors. Furthermore, the elderly group patients more frequently died of respiratory infections and had lower prognostic nutritional indexes than the younger group patients before and after radiotherapy. These findings suggested elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer who had been treated with radiotherapy alone had a poor prognosis and that malnutrition caused by radiotherapy was a factor contributing to the risk of death from respiratory infection in such patients. (author)

  14. Outcome following radiotherapy for loco-regionally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foo, K.; Yeghiaian-Alvandi, R.; Foroudi, F.

    2005-01-01

    Local and regional recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer is reported to occur in 13-20% of treatment failures after resection. Reported post-recurrent median survival following radiotherapy ranges from 9 to 14 months. This study examines survival following radiotherapy alone for patients with loco-regionally recurring non-small cell lung cancer after initial surgery. Fifty-five patients, receiving radiotherapy at Westmead Hospital between 1979 and 1997, were eligible for study. Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing patient records. The end-point was overall survival. Symptom control was also recorded. Prognostic factors for analysis included age, sex, original presenting stage, disease-free interval (DFI), performance status, site of recurrence, treatment intent and dose. The median overall survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval: 8.1-13.0). Survival following treatment with radical intent was 26 months compared to 10.5 months for patients treated with palliative intent (P = 0.025). There was no significant difference in survival for short (<2 years) or long DFI, performance status, radiation dose, age, sex, site of recurrence or stage. Most patients (55%) had partial or complete resolution of symptoms. Radiotherapy results in overall post-recurrence median survival of nearly 1 year, consistent with previous published data. Radical treatment intent predicts better prognosis as a result of patient selection and higher dose. Radiotherapy is effective at palliating symptoms of this disease Copyright (2005) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  15. Could 3-D conformal radiotherapy improve the overall survival for non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, P.; Helfre, S.; Lavole, A.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The conformal radiotherapy approach, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), is based on modern imaging modalities, efficient 3-D treatment planning systems, sophisticated immobilization devices and demanding quality assurance and treatment verification. The main goal of conformal radiotherapy is to ensure a high dose distribution tailored to the limits of the target volume while reducing exposure of healthy tissues. These techniques would then allow a further dose escalation increasing local control and survival. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most difficult malignant tumors to be treated. It combines geometrical difficulties due to respiratory motion, and number of low tolerance neighboring organs, and dosimetric difficulties because of the presence of huge inhomogeneities. This localization is an attractive and ambitious example for the evaluation of new techniques. However, the published clinical reports in the last years described very heterogeneous techniques and, in the absence of prospective randomized trials, it is somewhat difficult at present to evaluate the real benefits drawn from those conformal radiotherapy techniques. After reviewing the rationale for 3DCRT for NSCLC, this paper will describe the main studies of 3DCRT, in order to evaluate its impact on lung cancer treatment Then the current state-of-the-art of IMRT and the last technical and therapeutic innovations in NSCL will be discussed. (authors)

  16. Clinical study of the histologic host response of the patients with lung cancer during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gose, Kyuhei

    1984-01-01

    Serial bronchofiberscopic biopsies were performed during radiotherapy in 28 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. The effect of radiotherapy on tumor tissue was examined histologically as to the responsiveness of the host against tumor cells. The mononuclear cell infiltration induced in the tumor by irradiation correlated well with its direct effect on the tumor cells. The most remarkable infiltration was observed at the dose of 2000 rad and in the polypoid type. Indirect immunofluonescent technique with monoclonal anti OKT 3 and OKIa revealed that most of the infiltrated cells were T-lymphocytes. There was a good relationship between the grade of mononuclear cell infiltration and the survival period. These facts suggest that the mononuclear cells in the irradiated tumor tissues represent host resistance against cancer and the intensity of the infiltration correlates with the clinical course and prognosis of the lung cancer patients. (author)

  17. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Guangfei; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Feng Qinfu; Zhou Zongmei; Lv Jima; Liang Jun; Wang Mei; Yin Weibo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  18. Randomized study: small cell anaplastic lung cancer treated by combination chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.M.; Woods, R.L.; Brodie, G.N.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    1980-01-01

    Chemotherapy and primary site radiation therapy were compared to chemotherapy alone in a randomized study of 125 patients with small cell cancer of the lung. The sites of initial relapse, as well as disease free and overall survival were analyzed. Radiotherapy to the primary site reduced the rate of local relapse, but median survival was not prolonged in patients with either limited or extensive disease, when the radiation therapy-chemotherapy group was compared to the group that received chemotherapy alone

  19. Relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy in treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Junkoh; Ohtsuka, Sinichi; Yamasaki, Toshiki; Gi, Hidefuku; Ha, Young-Soo; Handa, Hajime

    1983-01-01

    One hundred and sixteen cases of brain metastases of lung cancer were retrospectively analysed with special reference to the relative significance of surgery and radiotherapy. The median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastases was 1.2 months in 27 cases without treatment, 2.5 months in 51 cases treated by surgery alone, 4.2 months in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy alone and 6.5 months in 7 cases treated by surgery and radiotherapy. The survival rate in patients treated by radiotherapy was significantly better than in those not treated by radiotherapy. However, the effect of surgery was not significant in prolongation of survival time. On the other hand, the rate of improvement in neurological symptoms assessed at one month after the initiation of treatment was 80.9% in 47 cases treated by surgery and 19.4 % in 31 cases treated by radiotherapy. The result suggested that surgery is superior to radiotherapy in alleviating neurological symptoms. It is important to understand the nature of effect of each treatment. A better result will be anticipated by proper selection or combination of these treatments. (author)

  20. [Efficacy of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Tiankui; Zhou, Daoan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xianglian

    2004-12-20

    To observe the effects of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy for stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. Sixty-two patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer were randomized into two groups, concurrent radiochemotherapy group and MVP che-motherapy group. All patients in two groups were treated with MVP regimen (mitomycin C 6 mg/m² on day 1, vindesine 2 mg/m² on days 1, 8, and cisplatin 80-100 mg/m²). Patients in concurrent radiochemotherapy group received concurrent radiotherapy (46-56 Gy in 5-6 weeks). All patients received 2-4 cycles of MVP chemotherapy. The response rate was 48.4% and 19.4% in concurrent radiochemotherapy group and MVP group respectively (P MVP group.. The results show that efficacy of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy is significantly higher than that of MVP chemotherapy alone for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  1. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang SW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shu-wen Wang,1 Juan Ren,1 Yan-li Yan,2 Chao-fan Xue,2 Li Tan,2 Xiao-wei Ma2 1Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital of Xian Jiaotong University, 2Medical School of Xian Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05. The local failure rate (P<0.05 and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05 were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03, and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05. The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05. Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, segmentation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiation therapy technology

  2. Radiotherapy for stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Murakami, Masao; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nakajima, Toshifumi; Kuroda, Yasumasa

    1999-01-01

    Surgery has been regarded as the standard treatment for patients with non-small cell lung cancer in the early stage, while radiotherapy has become an effective alternative for medically inoperable patients and those who refuse surgery. We reviewed the records of 31 patients with stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer treated by radiotherapy between 1980 and 1997. There were 15 patients in stage I and 16 in stage II. The variables analyzed for influence on cause-specific survival and loco-regional control were: age, performance status, clinical stage, tumor size, tumor site, radiation field, radiation dose, and combination with chemotherapy. The overall and cause-specific 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-years survival rates were 71% and 77%; 63% and 73%; 34% and 48%; and 17% and 32%, respectively. Five-year survival rate for patients with peripheral tumor in the lung was 72%, with 70% loco-regional control, while the 5-year survival rate of patients whose tumor originated in the central region was 20%, with 25% loco-regional control. These differences had marginal significance on univariate analysis (P=0.07), but only tumor site (central vs peripheral) showed marginal significant influence on cause-specific survival (P=0.08) and loco-regional control (P=0.07) on multivariate analysis. There were no fatal complications, including radiation-induced myelopathy. The present series showed satisfactory results with definitive radiotherapy for patients with medically inoperable stage I-II non-small cell lung cancer, with results similar to those in recent reports of radiotherapy. The only significant variable was that patients with peripheral tumors had a better prognosis than patients with central tumors. (author)

  3. Lung cancer: Value of computed tomography in radiotherapy planning and evaluation of tumour remission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyerabend, T.; Schmitt, R.; Richter, E.; Bohndorf, W.

    1990-01-01

    434 CT examinations of 133 patients with histologically proven bronchogenic carcinoma (22 out of 133 with small cell lung cancer) were analysed before and after radiotherapy. The study evaluates the use of CT for determining target volume, tumour volume and remission rate: 1. Concerning determination of target volume conventional roentgendiagnostic simulator methods are much inferior to CT aided planning; as for our patients changes of the target volume were necessary in 50%, in 22% the changes were crucial. This happened more often in non-small cell lung cancer than in small cell carcinomas. 2. The response rate (CR + PR) after radiotherapy (based on the calculated tumour volumes by CT) was 70 to 80%. The rate of CR of the primary was 45% (non-small cell carcinoma) and 67% (small cell carcinoma). 3. The crucial point for the evaluation of tumour remission after radiotherapy is the point of time. One to three months and four to nine months after irradiation we found complete remissions in 19% and 62%, respectively. Hence, the evaluation of treatment results earlier than three months after radiotherapy may be incorrect. We deem it indispensable to use CT for determination of target, calculation of dose distribution and accurate evaluation of tumour remission and side effects during and after irradiation of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. (orig.) [de

  4. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  5. Control of Respiratory Motion by Hypnosis Intervention during Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Xie, Yaoqin

    2013-01-01

    The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy. PMID:24093100

  6. Control of Respiratory Motion by Hypnosis Intervention during Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongmao Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncertain position of lung tumor during radiotherapy compromises the treatment effect. To effectively control respiratory motion during radiotherapy of lung cancer without any side effects, a novel control scheme, hypnosis, has been introduced in lung cancer treatment. In order to verify the suggested method, six volunteers were selected with a wide range of distribution of age, weight, and chest circumference. A set of experiments have been conducted for each volunteer, under the guidance of the professional hypnotist. All the experiments were repeated in the same environmental condition. The amplitude of respiration has been recorded under the normal state and hypnosis, respectively. Experimental results show that the respiration motion of volunteers in hypnosis has smaller and more stable amplitudes than in normal state. That implies that the hypnosis intervention can be an alternative way for respiratory control, which can effectively reduce the respiratory amplitude and increase the stability of respiratory cycle. The proposed method will find useful application in image-guided radiotherapy.

  7. Obstruction of the esophagus 5 months after radiotherapy for a central lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zips, D.; Baumann, M.; Herrmann, T.

    2001-01-01

    Dysphagia after radiotherapy of thoracic tumors may be caused by recurrences or by radiation damage to the esophagus. Case Report: A 75-year-old patient presented with a complete obstruction of the esophagus 5 months after CHARTWEL radiotherapy for a non-small cell lung cancer. During the last week of radiotherapy mild dysphagia (Grade 1 EORTC/RTOG, Grade 2 MRC-CHART-Score) occurred that persisted over the following months. X-ray and endoscopic investigations revealed an easily removable food bolus without evidence of esophageal stricture or ulceration. Conclusion: The case report describes a mild but prolonged early radiation reaction of the esophagus. In comparison with conventional fractionation the incidence of dysphagia is higher after accelerated fractionation schedules. The pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying persistent dysphagia are currently unknown. Beside of recurrences, radiation effects to the esophagus should be considered if dysphagia after irradiation of thoracic tumors occurs, because, as in this case, therapy may rapidly improve the symptoms. (orig.) [de

  8. Palliative radiotherapy in asymptomatic patients with locally advanced, unresectable, non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Skolyszewski, J.; Kowalska, T.; Rzepecki, W.; Kociolek, D.

    1993-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1990, 332 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were referred to short-time, split-course palliative thoracic radiotherapy. The group consisted of patients with locally advanced (III o ), unresectable cancer, not suitable for curative radiotherapy, asymptomatic or having only minimal symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The therapeutic plan involved two series of irradiation. Tumor dose delivered in each series was 20 Gy given in five daily fractions over five treatment days. There were four weeks interval between series. Of 332 patients initially qualified to thoracic radiotherapy only 170 patients received the treatment; the other 162 patients were not irradiated because of treatment refusal or logistic problems concerning therapy. They made the control group of the study, receiving the best possible symptomatic care. Twelve-month survivals in the radiotherapy and control groups were 32.4% and 9.3%, respectively; 24-month survivals 11.2% and 0%, respectively. Improvement of survival after palliative thoracic radiotherapy was observed only in patients with clinical stage IIIA and Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) ≥ 70. (orig.) [de

  9. Effectiveness of palliative radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, E.; Jaskiewicz, P.

    2001-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most frequent malignant neoplasm in Poland. During the last 25 years it has become the first reason of death of men and the second of women in Poland. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer constitute 75% of all lung cancer patients. The therapy of choice for the advanced, non-small cell lung cancer is radiotherapy with palliative assumption. Many papers indicate that this therapy has no influence on long-term survival, hence it is aimed at reducing the symptoms. The therapy brings relief to 70-80% of patients. At present no other method with similar effectiveness is known. The aim of the is study was to assess the effectiveness of palliative radiotherapy as a treatment of the advanced, non-small cell lung cancel, applied as a remedy for the symptoms resulting from the growth of a lung tumour: Improvement of the quality of life and long-term survivals were assessed and prognostic factors were analysed. Between 1990 and 1995, 2330 patients with lung cancer attended the Outpatient Clinic of the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center in Warsaw. There were 1948 patients with the non-small cell lung cancer. From this group 832 patients were qualified to palliative radiotherapy that included the primary tumour. The documentation was found for 803 patients and this group was analysed. The group constituted of 115 women (14.3%) and 688 men (85.7%), aged 28 to 91 (mean 61). In the majority of cases a significant advancement of the disease was found: stage III A in 388 patients (48.3%) and stage III B in 358 patients (44.6%). Retrospective analysis of the results of the treatment was carried out. The material contained information on 803 patients. The basis for the analysis was the survival time. It was measured from the starting date of the irradiation to the date of death or the date of the last available information that the patient lives. The survival probability was calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Multidimensional analysis of the

  10. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  11. Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, T.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was projected to account for 20%-25% of the greater than 140,000 newly diagnosed lung cancers in 1985. If considered a separate disease entity, it would be the fourth leading cause of death by cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clinical and biologic features of small cell lung cancer, and early therapeutic trial results have demonstrated a high sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More recent results demonstrated a marked survival improvement with the use of combination chemotherapy, which potentially cured a small minority of patients. Unfortunately, in most patients, drug resistance usually develops, as do chronic, often debilitating toxicities in the few long-term survivors. Although therapeutic advances have plateaued, new and important insights into the basic biology of the disease made the last several years offer the possibility of exciting new treatment approaches within the next decade. This chapter addresses our current understanding of therapy for small cell lung cancer, the current therapy questions under investigation, and potential future directions in clinical research

  12. Treatment results of non-operated lung cancer by radiotherapy and radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Yasuo; Watarai, Jiro; Kobayashi, Mitsuru; Sashi, Ryuji; Shindo, Masaaki; Kato, Toshio

    1993-01-01

    The treatment results of 152 non-operated lung cancer patients were analyzed. Median survival times (MST; months) for all patients based on the stage (UICC'87) were 28 M (n=12) for stage I, 18 M (n=16) for stage II, 8 M (n=58) for stage III A, 6 M (n=46) for stage III B, and 4 M (n=20) for stage IV. The effect of combined radiochemotherapy was quite evident in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. Here, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=11) was 5 M, whereas that of radiochemotherapy group (n=14) was 12 M (p<0.05). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the effect of radiochemotherapy was recognized only in stage III A and III B patients. In this case, the MST of the radiotherapy alone group (n=50) was 6 M, whereas that of the radiochemotherapy group (n=38) was 9 M (p<0.05). The duration of time from the initial therapy to the occurrence of distant metastasis in stage III A and III B patients was longer in the radiochemotherapy group than in the radiotherapy alone group (p<0.05). As for the metastatic sites, a delay in the occurrence of brain, lung and pleural metastasis was also recognized in the radiochemotherapy group (p<0.05). In this retrospective study, the value of combined radiochemotherapy was evident in SCLC and stage III-NSCLC patients. However, there was considerable case to case variation in the dosage, combination of agents and timing of chemotherapy. Recently, more aggressive chemotherapy is now being applied. (author)

  13. Long-term local control with radiofrequency ablation or radiotherapy for second, third, and fourth lung tumors after lobectomy for primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokouchi, Hideoki; Murata, Kohei; Miyazaki, Masaki; Miyamoto, Takeaki; Minami, Takafumi; Tsuji, Fumio; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman developed second, third, and fourth lung tumors at intervals of 1-3 years after left upper lobectomy for primary lung cancer. The tumors were controlled with radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or conventional conformal radiotherapy for 9 years postoperatively. For the treatment of second primary lung cancer or lung metastasis after surgical resection of the primary lung cancer, reoperation is not recommended because of the impaired respiratory reserve. Thus, local therapy such as radiotherapy or RFA is applied in some cases. Among these, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a feasible option because of its good local control and safety, which is comparable with surgery. On the other hand, for cases of multiple lesions that are not suitable for radiotherapy or combination therapy, RFA could be an option because of its short-term local control, easiness, safety, and repeatability. After surgery for primary lung cancer, a second lung tumor could be controlled with highly effective and minimally invasive local therapy if it is recognized as a local disease but is medically inoperable. Therefore, long-term postoperative follow-up for primary lung cancer is beneficial. (author)

  14. Image-guided radiotherapy for fifty-eight patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jun; Zhang Tao; Wang Wenqin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in lung cancer. Methods: From Mar. 2007 to Dec. 2007,58 patients with lung cancer were treated with IGRT. Set-up errors in each axial direction was calculated based on IGRT images of each patient. The change of GTV was evaluated on both cone-beam CT and CT simulator images. Results: Twenty-two patients with left lung cancer,30 with right lung cancer, 5 with mediastinal lymphanode metastasis and one with vertebra metastasis were included. The set-up error in x, y and z axes was (0.02±0.26) cm, (0.14±0.49) cm and ( -0.13± 0.27) cm, respectively,while the rotary set-up error in each axis was -0.15 degree ± 1.59 degree, -0.01 degree ± 1.50 degree and 0.12 degree ±1.08 degree, respectively. The set-up errors were significantly decreased by using of IGRT. GTV movement was observed in 15 patients (25.9%) ,including 5 with left upper lung cancer. GTV moving to the anterior direction was observed in 9 patients,including 4 with]eft upper lung cancer. GTV reduced in 23 (44.2%) patients during treatment. Asymmetric GTV reduction of 22 lesions was observed,with a mean reductive volume of 4.9 cm 3 . When GTV began to shrink,the irradiation dose was 4 -46 Gy, with 20 -30 Gy in 9 patients. Conclusions: The use of IGRT can significantly reduce set-up errors. GTV movement and reduction are observed in some cases. The time to modify the target volume needs to be further studied. (authors)

  15. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  16. Clinical outcome of stage III non-small-cell lung cancer patients after definitive radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsuya; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kodaira, Takeshi; Tachibana, Hiroyuki; Tomoda, Takuya; Nakahara, Rie; Inokuchi, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Primarily combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy are used to treat unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer; however, the results are not satisfactory. In this study treatment results were retrospectively analyzed and the prognostic factors related to survival were identified. From March 1999 to January 2004, 102 patients with stage IIIA/IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy. Radiotherapy involved a daily dose of 1.8-2.0 Gy five times a week; 60 Gy was set as the total dose. Maximal chemotherapy was given to patients with normal kidney, liver, and bone marrow functions. The 5-year overall survival rate was 22.2%; the median survival was 18 months. The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53 months. The complete or partial response rate was 85%. At the time of the last follow-up, 21 patients were alive and 81 patients had died, including 5 patients who had died due to radiation pneumonitis. There were significant differences in survival and in the fatal radiation pneumonitis rate between patients with superior lobe lesions and those with middle or inferior lobe lesions. Patients whose primary tumor is located in the superior lobe appear to have a better clinical outcome.

  17. Internal Motion Estimation by Internal-external Motion Modeling for Lung Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibin; Zhong, Zichun; Yang, Yiwei; Chen, Jiawei; Zhou, Linghong; Zhen, Xin; Gu, Xuejun

    2018-02-27

    The aim of this study is to develop an internal-external correlation model for internal motion estimation for lung cancer radiotherapy. Deformation vector fields that characterize the internal-external motion are obtained by respectively registering the internal organ meshes and external surface meshes from the 4DCT images via a recently developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm. A composite matrix is constructed by combing the estimated internal phasic DVFs with external phasic and directional DVFs. Principle component analysis is then applied to the composite matrix to extract principal motion characteristics, and generate model parameters to correlate the internal-external motion. The proposed model is evaluated on a 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) synthetic phantom and 4DCT images from five lung cancer patients. For tumor tracking, the center of mass errors of the tracked tumor are 0.8(±0.5)mm/0.8(±0.4)mm for synthetic data, and 1.3(±1.0)mm/1.2(±1.2)mm for patient data in the intra-fraction/inter-fraction tracking, respectively. For lung tracking, the percent errors of the tracked contours are 0.06(±0.02)/0.07(±0.03) for synthetic data, and 0.06(±0.02)/0.06(±0.02) for patient data in the intra-fraction/inter-fraction tracking, respectively. The extensive validations have demonstrated the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed model in motion tracking for both the tumor and the lung in lung cancer radiotherapy.

  18. Assesment of prognostic factors in radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, E.

    2000-01-01

    Lung cancer is still the most severe problem of oncology throughout the word. In Poland there are some 20 000 new cases per annum, among them non-small cell lung cancer accounts for about 16 000 cases. The basic method of therapy of non-small cell lung cancers is surgery; however, in Polish conditions only about 15% of patients qualify for it. Therefore, there remains a large group of patients who are potential candidates for radiotherapy. Evaluation of a group of patients qualified for radical radiotherapy according to uniform rules, treated with the same protocol and assesed by the same group of physicians. The obtained results of therapy allow to evaluate the usefulness of radical radiotherapy in patients with non-operable non-small cell lung cancer and serve as a basis of search for more effective radiotherapy protocols. The aim of the study is to attempt to define the prognostic, therapeutical, clinical-and population-related factors for survival and local control in patients with non-operable, non-small cell lung cancer. Between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 1995, there were 2330 patients with non-small cell lung in the Ambulatory of the Cancer Centre in Warsaw. Basing on the results of clinical examination and additional examination, 260 patients qualified for radical radiotherapy. In this group there were 31 women (12%) and 229 men (88%). In a majority of cases the stage of the disease was advanced: stage IIIA was found in 114 patients (44%), and stage IIIB in 73 patients (28%). Retrospective analysis of the results of treatment was carried out. The material covered 260 patients. The survival time and the time to local progression were the basis for the analysis. The survival probability was calculated whit the Kaplan-Meier method. Multidimensional analysis of the prognostic factors (age, clinical advancement of the disease, performance status, loss of weight, LDH and haemoglobin level, tumour size, pulmonary function, prior exploratory thoracotomy

  19. Respiratory gating during stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer reduces tumor position variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tetsuo; Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Toya, Ryo; Fukugawa, Yoshiyuki; Toyofuku, Takamasa; Semba, Akiko; Oya, Natsuo

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of respiratory gating on treatment accuracy in lung cancer patients undergoing lung stereotactic body radiotherapy by using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. Our study population consisted of 30 lung cancer patients treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (48 Gy/4 fractions/4 to 9 days). Of these, 14 were treated with- (group A) and 16 without gating (group B); typically the patients whose tumors showed three-dimensional respiratory motion ≧5 mm were selected for gating. Tumor respiratory motion was estimated using four-dimensional computed tomography images acquired during treatment simulation. Tumor position variability during all treatment sessions was assessed by measuring the standard deviation (SD) and range of tumor displacement on EPID images. The two groups were compared for tumor respiratory motion and position variability using the Mann-Whitney U test. The median three-dimensional tumor motion during simulation was greater in group A than group B (9 mm, range 3-30 mm vs. 2 mm, range 0-4 mm; psimulation, tumor position variability in the EPID images was low and comparable to patients treated without gating. This demonstrates the benefit of respiratory gating.

  20. Correlating metabolic and anatomic responses of primary lung cancers to radiotherapy by combined F-18 FDG PET-CT imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grills Inga

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To correlate the metabolic changes with size changes for tumor response by concomitant PET-CT evaluation of lung cancers after radiotherapy. Methods 36 patients were studied pre- and post-radiotherapy with18FDG PET-CT scans at a median interval of 71 days. All of the patients were followed clinically and radiographically after a mean period of 342 days for assessment of local control or failure rates. Change in size (sum of maximum orthogonal diameters was correlated with that of maximum standard uptake value (SUV of the primary lung cancer before and after conventional radiotherapy. Results There was a significant reduction in both SUV and size of the primary cancer after radiotherapy (p Conclusion Correlating and incorporating metabolic change by PET into size change by concomitant CT is more sensitive in assessing therapeutic response than CT alone.

  1. Quality of Life After Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voort van Zyp, Noelle C. van der; Prevost, Jean-Briac; Holt, Bronno van der; Braat, Cora; Klaveren, Robertus J. van; Pattynama, Peter M.; Levendag, Peter C.; Nuyttens, Joost J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of stereotactic radiotherapy on the quality of life of patients with inoperable early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Overall survival, local tumor control, and toxicity were also evaluated in this prospective study. Methods and Materials: From January 2006 to February 2008, quality of life, overall survival, and local tumor control were assessed in 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1 to 2N0M0 NSCLC. These patients were treated with stereotactic radiotherapy. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ) C30 and the QLQ LC13 lung cancer-specific questionnaire were used to investigate changes in quality of life. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, and at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment, until death or progressive disease. Toxicity was evaluated using common terminology criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Emotional functioning improved significantly after treatment. Other function scores and QLQ C30 and QLQ LC13 lung symptoms (such as dyspnea and coughing) showed no significant changes. The overall 2-year survival rate was 62%. After a median follow-up of 17 months, 1 patient had a local recurrence (3%). No grade 4 or 5 treatment-related toxicity occurred. Grade 3 toxicity consisted of thoracic pain, which occurred in 1 patient within 4 months of treatment, while it occurred thereafter in 2 patients. Conclusions: Quality of life was maintained, and emotional functioning improved significantly after stereotactic radiotherapy for stage I NSCLC, while survival was acceptable, local tumor control was high, and toxicity was low.

  2. Markerless gating for lung cancer radiotherapy based on machine learning techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Tong; Li Ruijiang; Tang Xiaoli; Jiang, Steve B; Dy, Jennifer G

    2009-01-01

    In lung cancer radiotherapy, radiation to a mobile target can be delivered by respiratory gating, for which we need to know whether the target is inside or outside a predefined gating window at any time point during the treatment. This can be achieved by tracking one or more fiducial markers implanted inside or near the target, either fluoroscopically or electromagnetically. However, the clinical implementation of marker tracking is limited for lung cancer radiotherapy mainly due to the risk of pneumothorax. Therefore, gating without implanted fiducial markers is a promising clinical direction. We have developed several template-matching methods for fluoroscopic marker-less gating. Recently, we have modeled the gating problem as a binary pattern classification problem, in which principal component analysis (PCA) and support vector machine (SVM) are combined to perform the classification task. Following the same framework, we investigated different combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques (PCA and four nonlinear manifold learning methods) and two machine learning classification methods (artificial neural networks-ANN and SVM). Performance was evaluated on ten fluoroscopic image sequences of nine lung cancer patients. We found that among all combinations of dimensionality reduction techniques and classification methods, PCA combined with either ANN or SVM achieved a better performance than the other nonlinear manifold learning methods. ANN when combined with PCA achieves a better performance than SVM in terms of classification accuracy and recall rate, although the target coverage is similar for the two classification methods. Furthermore, the running time for both ANN and SVM with PCA is within tolerance for real-time applications. Overall, ANN combined with PCA is a better candidate than other combinations we investigated in this work for real-time gated radiotherapy.

  3. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy versus 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Strategies for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Selek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemoradiotherapy is the current standard of care in patients with advanced inoperable stage IIIA or IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT has been a trusted method for a long time and has well-known drawbacks, most of which could be improved by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT. IMRT is not currently the standard treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, but almost all patients could benefit to a degree in organ at risk sparing, dose coverage conformality, or dose escalation. The most critical step for a radiation oncology department is to strictly evaluate its own technical and physical capabilities to determine the ability of IMRT to deliver an optimal treatment plan. This includes calculating the internal tumor motion (ideally 4DCT or equivalent techniques, treatment planning software with an up-to-date heterogeneity correction algorithm, and daily image guidance. It is crucial to optimise and individualise the therapeutic ratio for each patient during the decision of 3DCRT versus IMRT. The current literature rationalises the increasing use of IMRT, including 4D imaging plus PET/CT, and encourages the applicable knowledge-based and individualised dose escalation using advanced daily image-guided radiotherapy.

  4. 99mTc-HL91 SPECT detects the relation between hypoxic changes and radiotherapy response of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ling; Yu Jinming; Xing Ligang; Zhu Hui; Li Guoliang; Fang Yongcun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate relation between hypoxia, hypoxic changes detected by 99m Tc-HL91 SPECT and the response to radiotherapy. Methods: Thirty-five patients with pathologically proven non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy were entered into the study. All patients were examined by examined by 99m Tc-HL9l SPECT imaging one or two days before radiotherapy. Twenty patients were monitored during radiotherapy(30-40 Gy) and one or two days after radiotherapy. Anterior', posterior and lateral planar images were collected 2 hours, 4 hours and 6 hours after intravenous injection approximately 740 MBq 99m Tc-HL91. Regions of interest(ROIs) were ch awn in the tumor and contralateral position and the radioactivity ratios of tumor to normal(T/N) were calculated. The response to radiotherapy was evaluated by solid tumor' s effect evaluation criterion (WHO) 3-6 months after radiotherapy. The correlations between T/N before radiotherapy, the T/N changes during radiotherapy and the response to radiotherapy were analyzed. Results: The T/N value gradually decreased before, during and after radiotherapy. The average T/N value before, during and after radiotherapy was 1.56±0.19, 1.40±0.12 and 1.29±0.13, respectively (F=10.13, P=0.010). The lower T/N ratio be- fore radiotherapy, the higher the response rate of radiotherapy (P=0.040). The larger change of T/N ratio before and after radiotherapy resulted in higher radiotherapy response, but with no statistical significance (P>0.05). Conclusions: The hypoxia status and hypoxic changes can be observed by HL91 SPECT imaging during radiotherapy which can predict the response to radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Radiotherapy alone for medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: The Duke experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibley, Gregory S.; Jamieson, Timothy A.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Prosnitz, Leonard R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To review our experience treating clinical Stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma with radiotherapy alone using modern techniques and staging. The effect of dose and volume on outcome is to be analyzed. Methods: Between January 1980 and December 1995, 156 patients with Stage I medically inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer were irradiated at Duke University Medical Center and the Durham Veterans Administration Medical Center. Fifteen patients were excluded from analysis (7 treated with palliative intent, and 8 lost to follow-up immediately following radiation). Characteristics of the 141 evaluable patients were as follows: Median age 70 years (range 46-95); gender: male 83%, female 17%; institution: DUMC 65%, DVAMC 35%; T1N0 54%, T2N0 46%; median size 3 cm (range 0.5 to 8); pathology: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 18%, large cell carcinoma 19%, not otherwise specified 11%; presenting symptoms: weight loss 26%, cough 23%, none (incidental diagnosis) 57%. All patients underwent simulation prior to radiotherapy using linear accelerators of ≥4 MV. No patients received surgery or chemotherapy as part of their initial treatment. The median dose of radiotherapy (not reflecting lung inhomogeneity corrections) was 64 Gy (50 to 80 Gy) given in 1.2 bid to 3 Gy qid fractionation. The majority of cases included some prophylactic nodal regions (73%). Results: Of the 141 patients, 108 have died; 33% of intercurrent death, 35% of cancer, and 7% of unknown causes. At last follow-up, 33 patients were alive (median 24 months, range 7-132 months). The 2- and 5-year overall survival was 39% and 13%, respectively (median 18 months). The corresponding cause-specific survival was 60%, and 32% (median 30 months). On multivariate analysis, significant factors influencing overall and/or cause-specific survival were age, squamous cell histology, incidental diagnosis, and pack-years of smoking. There was a nonsignificant trend towards improved cause-specific survival

  6. SU-F-J-67: Dosimetric Changes During Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer Patients with Atelectasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy, C; Weiss, E; Jan, N; Reshko, L; Hugo, G [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Christensen, G [University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Large geometric changes which occur during thoracic radiotherapy alter normal anatomy and target position and may induce clinically important dose changes. This study investigates variation of organ-at-risk (OAR) dose caused by atelectasis resolution during radiotherapy. Methods: 3D IMRT treatment plans were obtained for 14 non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Dose of the clinical plan was recalculated on a baseline scan in which lung was collapsed and on a midtreatment scan in which lung re-aeration had occurred. The changes in OAR doses were compared between the two time points. RTOG-0617 and inhouse dose-volume constraints were chosen for investigation and included spinal cord, esophagus, heart, and healthy lung. Results: 17 dose metrics were evaluated. The mean (SD) of change in mean lung dose, from baseline to mid-treatment (average taken across all patients), was 0.2 Gy (2.2 Gy) and ranged from −3.2 Gy to 6.0 Gy. 50% of patients experienced relative changes in mean lung dose of greater than 5% of baseline value. The mean (SD) of changes in heart V{sub 40}, V{sub 45}, and V{sup 60} were 3.2% (3.4%), 3.0% (2.9%), and 1.4% (2.1%), respectively, and were significant for the study cohort (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p=0.0107 for V{sub 40}, p=0.0052 for V{sub 45}, and p= 0.0353 for V{sub 60}. Ranges in changes of Heart V{sub 40}, V{sub 45}, and V{sub 60} were −1.9% to 8.6%, −1.7% to 7.5%, and −2.1% to 4.5%, respectively. The mean (SD) of changes in Esophagus PRV Dmean and V{sub 60} were 0.3 Gy (3.3 Gy) and 0.8% (7.7%), respectively, and ranged from −4.8 Gy to 6.8 Gy for Dmean and −15.2% to 14.6% for V{sub 60}. Conclusion: Patients with atelectasis present at the start of radiotherapy experience significant increases in heart dose. Substantial increases in mean lung dose also occur in a subset of patients. This work supported by the National Cancer Institute of National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01CA166119. Disclosures: Phillips

  7. MRI-guided tumor tracking in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Laura I; Jiang, Steve B [Center for Advanced Radiotherapy Technology and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3960 Health Sciences Dr., La Jolla, CA 92093-0865 (United States); Du, Jiang, E-mail: lcervino@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, 200 West Arbor Dr., San Diego, CA 92103-8226 (United States)

    2011-07-07

    Precise tracking of lung tumor motion during treatment delivery still represents a challenge in radiation therapy. Prototypes of MRI-linac hybrid systems are being created which have the potential of ionization-free real-time imaging of the tumor. This study evaluates the performance of lung tumor tracking algorithms in cine-MRI sagittal images from five healthy volunteers. Visible vascular structures were used as targets. Volunteers performed several series of regular and irregular breathing. Two tracking algorithms were implemented and evaluated: a template matching (TM) algorithm in combination with surrogate tracking using the diaphragm (surrogate was used when the maximum correlation between the template and the image in the search window was less than specified), and an artificial neural network (ANN) model based on the principal components of a region of interest that encompasses the target motion. The mean tracking error e and the error at 95% confidence level e{sub 95} were evaluated for each model. The ANN model led to e = 1.5 mm and e{sub 95} = 4.2 mm, while TM led to e = 0.6 mm and e{sub 95} = 1.0 mm. An extra series was considered separately to evaluate the benefit of using surrogate tracking in combination with TM when target out-of-plane motion occurs. For this series, the mean error was 7.2 mm using only TM and 1.7 mm when the surrogate was used in combination with TM. Results show that, as opposed to tracking with other imaging modalities, ANN does not perform well in MR-guided tracking. TM, however, leads to highly accurate tracking. Out-of-plane motion could be addressed by surrogate tracking using the diaphragm, which can be easily identified in the images.

  8. Current Status of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR for Early-stage 
Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anhui SHI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High level evidence from randomized studies comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR to surgery is lacking. Although the results of pooled analysis of two randomized trials for STARS and ROSEL showed that SABR is better tolerated and might lead to better overall survival than surgery for operable clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, SABR, however, is only recommended as a preferred treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who cannot or will not undergo surgery. We, therefore, are waiting for the results of the ongoing randomized studies [Veterans affairs lung cancer surgery or stereotactic radiotherapy in the US (VALOR and the SABRTooth study in the United Kingdom (SABRTooths]. Many retrospective and case control studies showed that SABR is safe and effective (local control rate higher than 90%, 5 years survival rate reached 70%, but there are considerable variations in the definitions and staging of lung cancer, operability determination, and surgical approaches to operable lung cancer (open vs video-assisted. Therefore, it is difficult to compare the superiority of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of early staged lung cancer. Most studies demonstrated that the efficacy of the two modalities for early staged lung cancer is equivalent; however, due to the limited data, the conclusions from those studies are difficult to be evidence based. Therefore, the controversies will be focusing on the safety and invasiveness of the two treatment modalities. This article will review the ongoing debate in light of these goals.

  9. Therapeutic effect analysis of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen; Zhang Wenxue; Liang Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the treatment effect of non-small cell lung cancer of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and to study the effect of patient survival related factors. Methods: Retrospective analysis was mack for 136 cases of non-small cell lung cancer, all accept 3D-CRT, through the case data collection and long-term follow-up, using the single factor and multiple factor analysis survival time and its influencing factors. Results: The recent curative effects of 136 cases of patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy: Complete response (CR) 14.7% (20/136), partial response (PR) 60.3 (82/136), stable disease(SD) 19.9% (27/136), progression disease (PD) 5.1% (7/136), total effective rate is 75% (102/136). One, two, three, five year survival rate is 79.4%, 45.4%, 22.1%, 12.5%. Side effects: Class 1 radiated esophagitis 35 cases, Class 2 radiated esophagitis 16 cases, Class 3 and above radiated esophagitis 0 case. Class I radiated pneumonia 20 cases, Class 2 radiated pneumonia 9 cases, Class 3 radiated pneumonia 0 case. Single factor analysis shows the influence of gender, age, pathology, phase, dose, and first-phase curative effect to the survival time are of a statistical significance, Multiple factor analysis showed KPS score, phase, dose, first-phase curative effect are the survival time independent factors. Conclusion: 3D-CRT for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma is a safe, effective treatment method, Side effects are relatively low, and the patients survival time is long after radiotherapy. (authors)

  10. Chest radiotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: facts, questions, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, D.; Vansteenkiste, J.

    2000-01-01

    Limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) is initially very sensitive to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the 5-year survival is generally only 10-15%, with most patients failing with therapy refractory relapses, both locally and in distant sites. The addition of chest irradiation to chemotherapy increases the absolute survival by approximately 5%. We reviewed the many controversies regarding optimal timing and irradiation technique. No strong data support total radiation doses over 50 Gy. According to one phase III trial and several retrospective studies, increasing the volume of the radiation fields to the pre-chemotherapy turnout volume instead of the post-chemotherapy volume does not improve local control. The total time in which the entire combined-modality treatment is delivered may be important. From seven randomized trials, it can be concluded that the timing of the radiotherapy as such is not very important. Some phase III trials support the use of accelerated chest radiation together with cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy, delivered from the first day of treatment, although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the available data. The best results are reported in studies in which the time from the start of treatment to the end of the radiotherapy was less than 30 days. This has to be taken into consideration when treatment modalities incorporating new chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy are considered. (author)

  11. Clinical investigation on the feature of immunological parameters following radiotherapy in patients with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyohira, Ken

    1984-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate five systemic immunological parameters; the number of peripheral blood lymphocytes (number of lymphocytes), percentage of cytotoxicity of peripheral blood lymphocytes against allogeneic target cells of bronchogenic carcinoma (percentage of cytotoxicity), stimulation index of lymphocyte blastoid transformation with phytohemagglutinin (stimulation index with PHA) and reactivities of PPD skin test and PHA skin test in 174 patients with primary lung cancer receiving radiotherapy alone. Percentage of cytotoxicity showed a significant increase and the other four parameters showed a significant decrease when compared with values before radiotherapy. The number of lymphocytes, percentage of cytotoxicity and stimulation index with PHA appeared to have no relation with histologic types of pulmonary cancer. The number of lymphocytes showed a significant decrease through radiotherapy in both groups with and without irradiation for mediastinal region. A decrease in stimulation index with PHA and reactivity of PPD skin test and an increase in percentage of cytotoxicity were significant after radiotherapy in the group with mediastinal irradiation. Significant differences in percentage of cytotoxicity, stimulation index with PHA and reactivity of PPD skin test were observed between the groups receiving 2 Gy/day and 1.5 Gy/day. Stimulation index with PHA, reactivity of PPD skin test and percentage of cytotoxicity appeared to be correlated with tumor regression following radiotherapy. The reactivity of PPD skin test measured after irradiation was correlated with prognosis as a single parameter. Survival time was well correlated with grades using the combination of three parameters (the number of lymphocytes, and reactivities of PPD skin test and PHA skin test). (J.P.N.)

  12. The evaluation of the degree of impairment of pulmonary perfusion in lung cancer patients treated by radiotherapy by the quantification of nonuniform distribution of lung perfusion scintigraphy SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomo, Osamu; Tsunoda, Takashi; Kuwabara, Hidemasa

    2004-01-01

    By means of quantifying the nonuniform distribution of pulmonary perfusion in Lung Perfusion Scintigraphy SPECT (single photon emission tomography), which is called ''SPECT'' for short, we evaluated the degree of functional impairment of pulmonary perfusion in non-operated lung cancer patients treated by the radiotherapy. Sixty-eight patients with non-operated lung cancer treated with radiotherapy, and who either received or did not receive chemotherapy, from February, 1996 to August, 2002, were examined using SPECT within 6 weeks prior to, or within 2 weeks following radiotherapy. This group was called ''irradiated lung cancer patients''. Twenty-six patients, who were called ''follow-up irradiated lung cancer patients'', were reexamined within four weeks after radiotherapy. On the other hand, 323 patients without lung cancer, who were subdivided into four groups; pulmonary, cardiac, cardio-pulmonary, and non-cardiopulmonary. The SPECT was examined in the supine position after infusing Tc-99m-MAA, 185 MBq in a bolus, mainly into an antecubital vein with the patient's arm elevated. From reconstructed SPECT images, the volume of lung as a whole calculated at 10% of thresholds was assumed to be the ''Baseline Lung Perfusion Volume'' (BPV), and the functional volume rates were calculated in 10% threshold widths from 10% to 100% of the threshold. Assuming the total absolute differences in functional volume rate between each subject and the control to be the distribution index of the lung as a whole (D index), we quantified the degree of nonuniform distribution of the lung as a whole in each subject. In the same way, the distribution index of the left or right lung respectively was calculated as D l or D r index assuming the volume of left or right lung were calculated at 10% of the threshold as left or right BPV and calculating the functional volume rates of each lung in 10% threshold widths from 10% to 100% of the threshold. The D index of irradiated lung cancer

  13. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  14. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, James; Amini, Arya; Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt; Soh, Hendrick; Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y.

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V 20 , V 30 , or V 40 ) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within 20 was 364.0 cm 3 and 160.0 cm 3 (p 30 was 144.6 cm 3 vs 77.0 cm 3 (p = 0.0012), V 35 was 93.9 cm 3 vs 57.9 cm 3 (p = 0.005), V 40 was 66.5 cm 3 vs 45.4 cm 3 (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures

  15. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    Based on the own experience and world literatures, contribution of radiation in the treatment of lung cancer was reviewed and discussed. Although the patients with advanced cancer were referred to radiation usually, the results of radiotherapy were superior to those by chemotherapy. Of course the radiotherapy was a local one, radiation combined with chemotherapy was highly recommended, besides systemic administration of chemotherapeutics, special methods such as bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) and chemoembolization would be more favourable in selected patients. Treatment of undifferentiated small cell carcinoma was becoming more dependent on chemotherapy, radiation showed as excellent local control as ever. To treat locally extended cancer patients with involvement of the thoracic wall and Pancoast's syndrome, external radiation alone were not successful, interstitial radiation or a single exposure with a large dose during the thoracotomy would be promising. Finally, data indicated that aged and poor risk patients in early stage of cancer might be treated by radiation instead of unjustifiable operation. (author)

  16. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi [Hyogo Medical Center for Adult Disease, Akashi (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m{sup 2}) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author).

  17. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Ryuji; Takada, Yoshiki; Obayashi, Kayoko; Kado, Tetsuji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Suzuki, Yasushi; Mimura, Fumitoshi

    1994-01-01

    In patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer, we performed chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. Thirty-five registered patients were intravenously treated with cisplatin (80mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vindesine (3mg/m 2 ) on days 1, 3 and were irradiated from days 1 to 10 with single doses of 2.5 Gy up to a total dosage of 20 Gy. Each course lasted 28 days. Patients received 3 courses, and a total dosage of 60 Gy was delivered. Response to this treatment was evaluable in terms of results in 35 patients. Twenty-two patients showed partial response (response rate 62.9%), 10 had no change, and 3 cases had progressive disease. In 7.5 to 37.8 months observation, three PR patients are alive for more than 24 months without recurrence, but eight PR patients died of local relapse, and the median survival time was 15.7 months. Throughout this treatment course, grade 4 leukopenia was noted in 66% and grade 3 thrombocytopenia was observed in 3%. However all were reversible condition and no treatment-related death was observed. However, two cases died due to complications of pulmonary abscess, which occurred in the area of radiation pulmonary fibrosis about one year later after treatment. Although this concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is a tolerable treatment for non-small cell lung cancer and obtained a good response rate, it did not improve the survival rate. (author)

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for oligometastatic lung tumors from colorectal cancer and other primary cancers in comparison with primary lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Kunieda, Etsuo; Ohashi, Toshio; Aoki, Yousuke; Koike, Naoyoshi; Takeda, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze local control of oligometastatic lung tumors (OLTs) compared with that of primary lung cancer after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Materials and methods: Retrospective record review of patients with OLTs who received SBRT with 50 Gy in 5 fractions. Local control rates (LCRs), toxicities, and factors of prognostic significance were assessed. Results: Twenty-one colorectal OLTs, 23 OLTs from other origins, and 188 primary lung cancers were included. Multivariate analysis revealed only tumor origin was prognostically significant (p < 0.05). The 1-year/2-year LCRs in colorectal OLTs and OLTs from other origins were 80%/72% and 94%/94%, respectively. The LCR in colorectal OLTs was significantly worse than that in OLTs from the other origins and primary lung cancers with pathological and clinical diagnosis (p < 0.05, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.005). Among 44 OLT patients, Grades 2 and 3 radiation pneumonitis were identified in 2 and 1 patients, respectively. No other toxicities of more than Grade 3 occurred. Conclusion: SBRT for OLTs is tolerable. The LCR for OLTs from origins other than colorectal cancer is excellent. However, LCR for colorectal OLTs is worse than that from other origins. Therefore dose escalation should be considered to achieve good local control for colorectal OLTs.

  19. Gemcitabine, cisplatin, and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitter, Matjaz; Kovac, Viljem; Smrdel, Uros; Strojan, Primoz

    2006-09-01

    Due to potent radiosensitization and potential serious or fatal toxicity, concurrent gemcitabine and irradiation should only be applied within clinical trials. We here present experience from a phase I-II clinical trial for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent low-dose gemcitabine. Eligible patients had locally advanced inoperable NSCLC without pleural effusion, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, were chemotherapy naïve and had no previous radiotherapy to the chest, and had adequate hematopoietic, liver, and kidney function. Routine brain computed tomography was not performed, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography was not available. Treatment consisted of three parts: induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in standard doses, local treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Patients were irradiated with opposed AP-PA and oblique fields, using 2.5-D treatment planning. Although corrections for inhomogeneous tissue were made, volume of total lung receiving > or =20 Gy (V20) could not be determined. The trial started as phase I, aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximal tolerated dose (MTD) for concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.4 Gy twice daily) and gemcitabine 55 mg/m twice weekly as a radiosensitizer. Phase II of the trial then continued at the level of MTD. Twenty-eight patients with NSCLC, nine patients with stage IIIA, 16 patients with IIIB, and three patients with an inoperable recurrence after previous surgery, entered the trial. The first 12 patients entered Phase I of the trial at the initial level of 42 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity was acute esophagitis; 47.6 Gy in 34 fractions in 3.5 weeks was the MTD for this regimen of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In phase II of the trial, this dose was applied

  20. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...

  1. Effect of Radiotherapy Planning Complexity on Survival of Elderly Patients With Unresected Localized Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang H.; Bonomi, Marcelo; Cesaretti, Jamie; Neugut, Alfred I.; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether complex radiotherapy (RT) planning was associated with improved outcomes in a cohort of elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 1998 patients aged >65 years with histologically confirmed, unresected stage I-II NSCLC. Patients were classified into an intermediate or complex RT planning group using Medicare physician codes. To address potential selection bias, we used propensity score modeling. Survival of patients who received intermediate and complex simulation was compared using Cox regression models adjusting for propensity scores and in a stratified and matched analysis according to propensity scores. Results: Overall, 25% of patients received complex RT planning. Complex RT planning was associated with better overall (hazard ratio 0.84; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.95) and lung cancer-specific (hazard ratio 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.93) survival after controlling for propensity scores. Similarly, stratified and matched analyses showed better overall and lung cancer-specific survival of patients treated with complex RT planning. Conclusions: The use of complex RT planning is associated with improved survival among elderly patients with unresected Stage I-II NSCLC. These findings should be validated in prospective randomized controlled trials.

  2. Impact of Fraction Size on Lung Radiation Toxicity: Hypofractionation may be Beneficial in Dose Escalation of Radiotherapy for Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Jinyue; Kong Fengming; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ajlouni, Munther; Ryu, Samuel; Ten Haken, Randall; Movsas, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess how fraction size impacts lung radiation toxicity and therapeutic ratio in treatment of lung cancers. Methods and Materials: The relative damaged volume (RDV) of lung was used as the endpoint in the comparison of various fractionation schemes with the same normalized total dose (NTD) to the tumor. The RDV was computed from the biologically corrected lung dose-volume histogram (DVH), with an α/β ratio of 3 and 10 for lung and tumor, respectively. Two different (linear and S-shaped) local dose-effect models that incorporated the concept of a threshold dose effect with a single parameter D L50 (dose at 50% local dose effect) were used to convert the DVH into the RDV. The comparison was conducted using four representative DVHs at different NTD and D L50 values. Results: The RDV decreased with increasing dose/fraction when the NTD was larger than a critical dose (D CR ) and increased when the NTD was less than D CR . The D CR was 32-50 Gy and 58-87 Gy for a small tumor (11 cm 3 ) for the linear and S-shaped local dose-effect models, respectively, when D L50 was 20-30 Gy. The D CR was 66-97 Gy and 66-99 Gy, respectively, for a large tumor (266 cm 3 ). Hypofractionation was preferred for small tumors and higher NTDs, and conventional fractionation was better for large tumors and lower NTDs. Hypofractionation might be beneficial for intermediate-sized tumors when NTD = 80-90 Gy, especially if the D L50 is small (20 Gy). Conclusion: This computational study demonstrated that hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy is a better regimen than conventional fractionation in lung cancer patients with small tumors and high doses, because it generates lower RDV when the tumor NTD is kept unchanged.

  3. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  4. Postoperative adjuvant MVP Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : Since February 1991, a prospective study for non-small cell lung cancer patients who underwent radical resection and had a risk factor of positive resection margin or regional lymph node metastasis has been conducted to evaluated the effect of MVP chemotherapy and radiotherapy on the pattern of failure, disease free and overall survival, and tolerance of combined treatment. Materials and Methods : Twenty nine patients were registered to this study until Sep. 1993 ; of these 26 received planned therapy. Within 3 weeks after radical resection, two cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 ) chemotherapy was given with 4 weeks intervals. Radiotherapy (5040 cGy tumor bed dose and 900 cGy boost to high risk area) was started 3 to 4 weeks after chemotherapy. Results : One and two year overall survival rates were 76.5% and 8.6% respectively. Locoregional failure developed in 6 patients (23.1%) and distant failure in 9 patients(34.6%). Number of involved lymph nodes, resection margin positivity showed some correlation with failure pattern but T-stage and N-stage showed no statistical significance. The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. Postoperative combined therapy were well tolerated without definite increase of complication rate, and compliance rate in this study was 90%. Conclusion : 1) MVP chemotherapy showed no effect on locoregional recurrence, ut appeared to decrease the distant metastasis rate and 2) combined treatments were well tolerated in all patients. 3) The group of patients who received chemotherapy within 2 weeks postoperatively and radiotherapy within 70 days showed lower incidence of distant metastasis. 4) Addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy failed to increase the overall or disease free survival

  5. Functional image-based radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer: A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, Emma L.; Bragg, Christopher M.; Wild, Jim M.; Hatton, Matthew Q.F.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the incorporation of data from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or hyperpolarized helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging ( 3 He-MRI) into intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Material and methods: Seven scenarios were simulated that represent cases of NSCLC with significant functional lung defects. Two independent IMRT plans were produced for each scenario; one to minimise total lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ), and the other to minimise only the functional lung volume receiving ≥20 Gy (FV 20 ). Dose-volume characteristics and a plan quality index related to planning target volume coverage by the 95% isodose (V PTV95 /FV 20 ) were compared between anatomical and functional plans using the Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: Compared to anatomical IMRT plans, functional planning reduced FV 20 (median 2.7%, range 0.6-3.5%, p = 0.02), and total lung V 20 (median 1.5%, 0.5-2.7%, p = 0.02), with a small reduction in mean functional lung dose (median 0.4 Gy, 0-0.7 Gy, p = 0.03). There were no significant differences in target volume coverage or organ-at-risk doses. Plan quality index was improved for functional plans (median increase 1.4, range 0-11.8, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Statistically significant reductions in FV 20 , V 20 and mean functional lung dose are possible when IMRT planning is supplemented by functional information derived from SPECT or 3 He-MRI.

  6. Adaptive radiotherapy of lung cancer patients with pleural effusion or atelectasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Møller, Ditte Sloth; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Hoffmann, Lone

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Changes in lung density due to atelectasis, pleural effusion and pneumonia/pneumonitis are observed in lung cancer patients. These changes may be an indication for adaptive radiotherapy in order to maintain target coverage and avoid increased risk of normal tissue complications. Material and methods: CBCT scans of 163 patients were reviewed to score lung changes and find the incidence, the impact of geometric and dosimetric changes and the timing of appearance and disappearance of changes. Results: 23% of the patients had changes in the lung related to pleural effusion, atelectasis or pneumonia/pneumonitis. In 9% of all patients, the appearance or disappearance of a change introduced a shift of the tumor or lymph nodes relative to the spine >5 mm. Only major density changes affected the dose distribution, and 9% of all patients needed adaptive treatment planning due to density changes. In total, 12% of all patients did benefit from an adaptive treatment plan and in 85% of these patients, an atelectasis did change. Conclusions: An adaptive strategy was indicated for 12% of the patients due to atelectasis, pleural effusion or pneumonia/pneumonitis. The predominant cause for adaptation was atelectasis. No systematic pattern in the appearance and disappearance of the changes were observed and hence weekly evaluation is preferable

  7. The Japan Lung Cancer Society–Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology consensus-based computed tomographic atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itazawa, Tomoko; Tamaki, Yukihisa; Komiyama, Takafumi; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Nakayama, Yuko; Ito, Hiroyuki; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Sakai, Shuji; Suzuki, Kenji; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a consensus-based computed tomographic (CT) atlas that defines lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer based on the lymph node map of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC). A project group in the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) initially prepared a draft of the atlas in which lymph node Stations 1–11 were illustrated on axial CT images. Subsequently, a joint committee of the Japan Lung Cancer Society (JLCS) and the Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology (JASTRO) was formulated to revise this draft. The committee consisted of four radiation oncologists, four thoracic surgeons and three thoracic radiologists. The draft prepared by the JROSG project group was intensively reviewed and discussed at four meetings of the committee over several months. Finally, we proposed definitions for the regional lymph node stations and the consensus-based CT atlas. This atlas was approved by the Board of Directors of JLCS and JASTRO. This resulted in the first official CT atlas for defining regional lymph node stations in radiotherapy for lung cancer authorized by the JLCS and JASTRO. In conclusion, the JLCS–JASTRO consensus-based CT atlas, which conforms to the IASLC lymph node map, was established.

  8. Feasibility of escalating daily doses of cisplatin in combination with accelerated radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; van de Vaart, P. J.; Schaake-Koning, C. C.; Benraadt, J.; Koolen, M. G.; González González, D.; Bartelink, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to reduce the overall treatment time from 7 to 4 weeks in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving radiotherapy with cisplatin. This follows an EORTC phase III randomised trial (08844) in which cisplatin given before

  9. Potential clinical predictors of outcome after postoperative radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buetof, R. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Kirchner, K.; Appold, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Loeck, S. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Rolle, A. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Coswig (Germany); Hoeffken, G. [Lungenfachklinik Coswig, Department of Pneumology, Coswig (Germany); Krause, M.; Baumann, M. [Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medical Faculty and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    The aim of this analysis was to investigate the impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on local control and survival after postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), with special focus on waiting and overall treatment times. For 100 NSCLC patients who had received postoperative radiotherapy, overall, relapse-free and metastases-free survival was retrospectively analysed using Kaplan-Meier methods. The impact of tumour-, treatment- and patient-related cofactors on treatment outcome was evaluated in uni- and multivariate Cox regression analysis. No statistically significant difference between the survival curves of the groups with a short versus a long time interval between surgery and radiotherapy could be shown in uni- or multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall survival times for patients with prolonged overall radiotherapy treatment times exceeding 42 days (16 vs. 36 months) and for patients with radiation-induced pneumonitis (8 vs. 29 months). Radiation-induced pneumonitis and prolonged radiation treatment times significantly reduced overall survival after adjuvant radiotherapy in NSCLC patients. The negative impact of a longer radiotherapy treatment time could be shown for the first time in an adjuvant setting. The hypothesis of a negative impact of longer waiting times prior to commencement of adjuvant radiotherapy could not be confirmed. (orig.) [German] Das Ziel der vorliegenden Analyse war, den Einfluss von tumor-, patienten- und therapieabhaengigen Kofaktoren auf die lokoregionale Tumorkontrolle und das Ueberleben nach postoperativer adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patienten mit einem nicht-kleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) zu untersuchen. Ein spezieller Fokus lag dabei auf der Wartezeit zwischen Operation und Beginn der Strahlentherapie sowie der Gesamtbehandlungszeit der Strahlentherapie. Fuer 100 Patienten, die eine postoperative

  10. Dose-volume histogram analysis as predictor of radiation pneumonitis in primary lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fay, Michael; Tan, Alex; Fisher, Richard; Mac Manus, Michael; Wirth, Andrew; Ball, David

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the relationship between various parameters derived from lung dose-volume histogram analysis and the risk of symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients undergoing radical radiotherapy for primary lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 156 patients with lung cancer who had been treated with radical radiotherapy (≥45 Gy) and for whom dose-volume histogram data were available were reviewed. The incidence of symptomatic RP was correlated with a variety of parameters derived from the dose-volume histogram data, including the volume of lung receiving 10 Gy (V 10 ) through 50 Gy (V 50 ) and the mean lung dose (MLD). Results: The rate of RP at 6 months was 15% (95% confidence interval 9-22%). On univariate analysis, only V 30 (p = 0.036) and MLD (p = 0.043) were statistically significantly related to RP. V 30 correlated highly positively with MLD (r = 0.96, p 30 and MLD can be used to predict the risk of RP in lung cancer patients undergoing radical radiotherapy

  11. Computed Tomography Assessment of Ablation Zone Enhancement in Patients With Early-Stage Lung Cancer After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, William; Chaya, Yair; Chaudhry, Ammar; Depasquale, Britney; Glass, Samantha; Lee, Susan; Shin, James; Mikhail, George; Bhattacharji, Priya; Kim, Bong; Bilfinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) offers a curative treatment for lung cancer in patients who are marginal surgical candidates. However, unlike traditional surgery the lung cancer remains in place after treatment. Thus, imaging follow-up for evaluation of recurrence is of paramount importance. In this retrospective designed Institutional Review Board-approved study, follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) exams were performed on sixty one patients to evaluate enhancement pattern in the ablation zone at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after SABR. Eleven patients had recurrence within the ablation zone after SABR. The postcontrast enhancement in the recurrence group showed a washin and washout phenomenon, whereas the radiation-induced lung injury group showed continuous enhancement suggesting an inflammatory process. The textural feature of the ablation zone of enhancement and perfusion as demonstrated in computed tomography nodule enhancement may allow early differentiation of recurrence from radiation-induced lung injury in patients' status after SABR or primary lung cancer.

  12. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  13. Impact of low skeletal muscle mass on non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Shintani, Takashi; Iizuka, Yusuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2018-05-17

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate impact of pre-treatment skeletal muscle mass (SMM) on overall survival and non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One-hundred and eighty-six patients whose abdominal CT before the treatment was available were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups of SMM according to gender-specific thresholds for unilateral psoas area. Operability was judged by the treating physician or thoracic surgeon after discussion in a multi-disciplinary tumor board. Patients with low SMM tended to be elderly and underweight in body mass index compared with the high SMM. Overall survival in patients with the low SMM tended to be worse than that in the high SMM (41.1% and 55.9% at 5 years, P = 0.115). Cumulative incidence of non-lung cancer death was significantly worse in the low SMM (31.3% at 5 years compared with 9.7% in the high SMM, P = 0.006). Multivariate analysis identified SMM and operability as significant factors for non-lung cancer mortality. Impact of SMM on lung cancer death was not significant. No difference in rate of severe treatment-related toxicity was observed between the SMM groups. Low SMM is a significant risk factor for non-lung cancer death, which might lead to worse overall survival, after SBRT for stage I NSCLC. However, the low SMM does not increase lung cancer death or severe treatment-related toxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Quality of Curative-intent Radiotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAleese, J; Baluch, S; Drinkwater, K

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the UK. The quality of curative-intent radiotherapy is associated with better outcomes. National quality standards from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) on patient work-up and treatment selection were used, with guidance from the Royal College of Radiologists on the technical delivery of radiotherapy, to assess the quality of curative-intent non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy and to describe current UK practice. Radiotherapy departments completed one questionnaire for each patient started on curative-intent radiotherapy for 8 weeks in 2013. Eighty-two per cent of centres returned a total of 317 proformas. Patient selection with positron emission tomography/computed tomography, performance status and Forced Expiratory Volume in 1 second (FEV1) was usually undertaken. Fifty-six per cent had pathological confirmation of mediastinal lymph nodes and 22% staging brain scans; 20% were treated with concurrent chemoradiation, 12% with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) and 8% with Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy (CHART). Sixty-three per cent of patients received 55 Gy/20 fractions. Although respiratory compensation was routinely undertaken, only 33% used four-dimensional computed tomography. Seventy per cent of patients were verified with cone beam computed tomography. There was consistency of practice in dosimetric constraints for organs at risk and follow-up. This audit has described current UK practice. The latest recommendations for patient selection with pathological confirmation of mediastinal lymph nodes, brain staging and respiratory function testing are not universally followed. Although there is evidence of increasing use of newer techniques such as four-dimensional computed tomography and cone beam image-guided radiotherapy, there is still variability in access. Efforts should be made to improve access to modern technologies and quality

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Centrally Located Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming WAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A few study has proven that about 90% of local control rates might be benefit from stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, it is reported SBRT associated overall survival and tumor specific survival is comparable with those treated with surgery. SBRT has been accepted as the first line treatment for inoperable patients with peripheral located stage I NSCLC. However, the role of SBRT in centrally located lesions is controversial for potential toxic effects from the adjacent anatomical structure. This paper will review the definition, indication, dose regimens, dose-volume constraints for organs at risk, radiation technology, treatment side effect of centrally located NSCLC treated with SBRT and stereotactic body proton therapy.

  16. Redox-responsive manganese dioxide nanoparticles for enhanced MR imaging and radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi Hyeon; Choi, Eun-Seok; Kim, Sehee; Goh, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yongdoo

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we synthesized manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2 NPs) stabilized with biocompatible polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylic acid) and analyzed their effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with or without gefitinib resistance in vitro. MnO2 NPs showed glutathione (GSH)-responsive dissolution and subsequent enhancement in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Of note, treatment with MnO2 NPs induced significant cytotoxic effects on NSCLC cells, and additional dose-dependent therapeutic effects were obtained upon X-ray irradiation. Normal cells treated with MnO2 NPs were viable at the tested concentrations. In addition, increased therapeutic efficacy could be achieved when the cells were treated with MnO2 NPs in hypoxic conditions. Therefore, we conclude that the use of MnO2 NPs in MR imaging and combination radiotherapy may be an efficient strategy for the imaging and therapy of NSCLC.

  17. Characteristics of female patients with primary lung cancer treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiojima, Kazumi; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Nakayama, Yuko; Saito, Yoshihiro; Mitomo, Osamu; Katano, Susumu; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    1993-01-01

    From 1976 to 1985, 402 patients with primary lung cancer were treated with radiotherapy at our hospital. There were 75 female patients who formed the basis of our analysis. Comparing the characteristics of female and male patients, the predominant characteristics of the female patients were as follows; 1) larger proportion of the patients with adenocarcinoma, 2) higher percentage of stage 4 patients, 3) lower average age, 4) better performance status (PS), 5) lower frequency of lethal complications, and 6) higher frequency of more than two admissions. The prognosis of female patients was better than that of males. The favorable characteristics of female patients for prognosis, were lower average age, better PS, and lower frequency of lethal complications. A higher frequency of admission to hospital might be a favorable characteristics for female patients to extend survival in patients with recurrence disease. (author)

  18. Treatment of Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Surgery or Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esengül Koçak Uzel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The management of early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC has improved recently due to advances in surgical and radiation modalities. Minimally-invasive procedures like Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS lobectomy decreases the morbidity of surgery, while the numerous methods of staging the mediastinum such as endobronchial and endoscopic ultrasound-guided biopsies are helping to achieve the objectives much more effectively. Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR has become the frontrunner as the standard of care in medically inoperable early stage NSCLC patients, and has also been branded as tolerable and highly effective. Ongoing researches using SABR are continuously validating the optimal dosing and fractionation schemes, while at the same time instituting its role for both inoperable and operable patients.

  19. Proton-Based Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Grant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, a recent implementation in the practice of radiation oncology, has been shown to confer high rates of local control in the treatment of early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This technique, which involves limited invasive procedures and reduced treatment intervals, offers definitive treatment for patients unable or unwilling to undergo an operation. The use of protons in SABR delivery confers the added physical advantage of normal tissue sparing due to the absence of collateral radiation dose delivered to regions distal to the target. This may translate into clinical benefit and a decreased risk of clinical toxicity in patients with nearby critical structures or limited pulmonary reserve. In this review, we present the rationale for proton-based SABR, principles relating to the delivery and planning of this modality, and a summary of published clinical studies.

  20. Short-Term Results of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Curative Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Sung Ja; Park, Seung Jin; Chung, Woong Ki; Nah, Byung Sik

    1990-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 102 patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received the curative radiotherapy from August 1985 to October 1988 at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology of Chonnam University Hospital. The follow-up period was ranged from 1 to 37 months and the median follow-up time was 15 months. The actuarial 1 and 2 year survival rate of all the patients was 28% and 5%, respectively. The median survival was 10 months for stage II, 6 months for stage III A, and 9 for III B and the actuarial 2 year survival tate was 12.5%, 12.1%, and 0% respectively. The treatment failure was identified in 32 patients and the locoregional failure was seem in 9 patients (28%) and the distant failure in 23 patients (72%). The initial performance status was related to the survival with statistical significance (p 0.05)

  1. Implementation of single-breath-hold cone beam CT guided hypofraction radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Renming; Lu, You; Wang, Jin; Zhou, Lin; Xu, Feng; Liu, Li; Zhou, Jidan; Jiang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Nianyong; Bai, Sen

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the feasibility of active breath control (ABC), the lung tumor reproducibility and the rationale for single-breath-hold cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided hypofraction radiotherapy. Single-breath-hold CBCT images were acquired using ABC in a cohort of 83 lung cancer patients (95 tumors) treated with hypofraction radiotherapy. For all alignments between the reference CT and CBCT images (including the pre-correction, post-correction and post-treatment CBCT images), the tumor reproducibility was evaluated via online manual alignment of the tumors, and the vertebral bone uncertainties were evaluated via offline manual alignment of the vertebral bones. The difference between the tumor reproducibility and the vertebral bone uncertainty represents the change in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone. The relative tumor positions along the coronal, sagittal and transverse axes were measured based on the reference CT image. The correlations between the vertebral bone uncertainty, the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility were evaluated using the Pearson correlations. Pre-correction, the systematic/random errors of tumor reproducibility were 4.5/2.6 (medial-lateral, ML), 5.1/4.8 (cranial-caudal, CC) and 4.0/3.6 mm (anterior-posterior, AP). These errors were significantly decreased to within 3 mm, both post-correction and post-treatment. The corresponding PTV margins were 4.7 (ML), 7.4 (CC) and 5.4 (AP) mm. The changes in the tumor position relative to the vertebral bone displayed systematic/random errors of 2.2/2.0 (ML), 4.1/4.4 (CC) and 3.1/3.3 (AP) mm. The uncertainty of the vertebral bone significantly correlated to the reproducibility of the tumor position (P < 0.05), except in the CC direction post-treatment. However, no significant correlation was detected between the relative tumor position, the total treatment time and the tumor reproducibility (P > 0.05). Using ABC for single-breath-hold CBCT guidance is an

  2. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  3. Prognostic factors of inoperable localized lung cancer treated by high dose radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake-Koning, C.S.; Schuster-Uitterhoeve, L.; Hart, G.; Gonzalez, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective study was made of the results of high dose radiotherapy (greater than or equal to 50 Gy) given to 171 patients with inoperable, intrathoracic non small cell lung cancer from January 1971-April 1973. Local control was dependent on the total tumor dose: after one year local control was 63% for patients treated with >65 Gy, the two year local control was 35%. If treated with 2 , the one year local control was 72%; the two year local control was 44%. Local control was also influenced by the performance status, by the localization of the primary tumor in the left upper lobe and in the periphery of the lung. Local control for tumors in the left upper lobe and in the periphery of the lung was about 70% after one year, and about 40% after two years. The one and two years survival results were correlated with the factors influencing local control. The dose factor, the localization factors and the performance influenced local control independently. Tumors localized in the left upper lobe did metastasize less than tumors in the lower lobe, or in a combination of the two. This was not true for the right upper lobe. No correlation between the TNM system, pathology and the prognosis was found

  4. Pre-radiotherapy FDG PET predicts radiation pneumonitis in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, Richard; Guerrero, Thomas; Pham, Ngoc; Ansari, Sobiya; Meshkov, Dmitriy; Castillo, Sarah; Li, Min; Olanrewaju, Adenike; Hobbs, Brian; Castillo, Edward

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective analysis is performed to determine if pre-treatment [ 18 F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) image derived parameters can predict radiation pneumonitis (RP) clinical symptoms in lung cancer patients. We retrospectively studied 100 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging before initiation of radiotherapy (RT). Pneumonitis symptoms were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4) from the consensus of 5 clinicians. Using the cumulative distribution of pre-treatment standard uptake values (SUV) within the lungs, the 80th to 95th percentile SUV values (SUV 80 to SUV 95 ) were determined. The effect of pre-RT FDG uptake, dose, patient and treatment characteristics on pulmonary toxicity was studied using multiple logistic regression. The study subjects were treated with 3D conformal RT (n = 23), intensity modulated RT (n = 64), and proton therapy (n = 13). Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated pre-RT lung FDG uptake on staging FDG PET was related to development of RP symptoms after RT. A patient of average age and V 30 with SUV 95 = 1.5 was an estimated 6.9 times more likely to develop grade ≥ 2 radiation pneumonitis when compared to a patient with SUV 95 = 0.5 of the same age and identical V 30 . Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed the area under the curve was 0.78 (95% CI = 0.69 – 0.87). The CT imaging and dosimetry parameters were found to be poor predictors of RP symptoms. The pretreatment pulmonary FDG uptake, as quantified by the SUV 95 , predicted symptoms of RP in this study. Elevation in this pre-treatment biomarker identifies a patient group at high risk for post-treatment symptomatic RP

  5. Preliminary results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingjie; Wang Luhua; Wang Xin; Feng Qinfu; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Yin Weibo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects and complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between March 1999 and September 2003, 91 NSCLC patients treated with 3DCRT were reviewed at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This patient cohort consisted of 73 men and 18 women. The median age was 66 years. Radio-therapy was delivered at 2 Gy fraction, 5 fractions per week. The median total dose was 60 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up time of 17 months, the response rate after 3DCRT was 57.1%, with complete remission 11.0% (10/91) and partial remission 46.2%(42/91). The median survival time (MST) was 16 months, with 1- and 2- year overall survivals (OS) of 67.0% and 32.6%, 1- and 2-year local progression free survivals (LPFS) of 82.6% and 53.0%, respectively. The independent adverse prognostic factors by univariate analysis and multivariate analysis was weight loss ≥5%. Grade 2 acute radiation pneumonitis was observed in 2 patients and grade 3 in 4 patients. Late lung injury developed in 1 patient with grade 2, 1 patient with grade 3, respectively. Acute radiation esophagitis was observed in 8 patients with grade 2. Acute grade 2 hematologic toxicity developed in 5 patients. Conclusions: 3DCRT was feasible in the treatment of NSCLC with good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complication. The total dose may potentially be increased. (authors)

  6. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: Any room left for elective mediastinal irradiation in 2011?; Radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques: place de l'irradiation mediastinale prophylactique en 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Houtte, P.; Roelandts, M. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, institut Jules-Bordet, 121, boulevard de Waterloo, 1000 Bruxelles (Belgium); Faculte de medecine, universite libre de Bruxelles, campus erasme, route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles (Belgium); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69310 Pierre-Benite (France); EA3738, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon-1, domaine Rockefeller, 8, avenue Rockefeller, 69373 Lyon cedex 08 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Traditionally, the target volumes of curative-intent radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer include all uninvolved mediastinal nodes. However, an improvement in tumour control requires an increase of the total dose to the macroscopic target volume. This is only achievable if the irradiation of the organs at risk is reduced, i.e. elective irradiation of the mediastinum is omitted. The available data suggest that elective mediastinal irradiation may be safely omitted, provided that an adequate staging procedure, including FDG PET-CT, has been performed. (authors)

  7. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer using Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Heng-Jui; Ko, Hui-Ling; Lee, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Ren-Hong; Yeh, Yu-Wung; Jiang, Jiunn-Song; Kao, Shang-Jyh; Chi, Kwan-Hwa

    2012-01-01

    To retrospectively review the outcome of patients with primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer, treated with hypofractionated Tomotherapy. Between April 2007 and June 2011, a total of 33 patients with oligometastatic intrapulmonary lesions underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy by Tomotherapy along with appropriate systemic therapy. There were 24 primary, and 9 secondary lung cancer cases. The radiation doses ranged from 4.5 to 7.0 Gy per fraction, multiplied by 8–16 fractions. The median dose per fraction was 4.5 Gy (range, 4.5-7.0 Gy), and the median total dose was 49.5 Gy (range, 45–72 Gy). The median estimated biological effective dose at 10 Gy (BED 10 ) was 71.8 Gy (range, 65.3–119.0 Gy), and that at 3 Gy (BED 3 ) was 123.8 Gy (range, 112.5–233.3 Gy). The mean lung dose (MLD) was constrained mainly under 1200 cGy. The median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 27.9 cm 3 (range: 2.5–178.1 cm 3 ). The median follow-up period was 25.8 months (range, 3.0–60.7 months). The median overall survival (OS) time was 32.1 months for the 24 primary lung cancer patients, and >40 months for the 9 metastatic lung patients. The median survival time of the patients with extra-pulmonary disease (EPD) was 11.2 months versus >50 months (not reached) in the patients without EPD (p < 0.001). Those patients with smaller GTV (≦27.9 cm 3 ) had a better survival than those with larger GTV (>27.9 cm 3 ): >40 months versus 12.85 months (p = 0.047). The patients with ≦2 lesions had a median survival >40 months, whereas those with ≧3 lesions had 26 months (p = 0.065). The 2-year local control (LC) rate was 94.7%. Only 2 patients (6.1%) developed ≧grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. Using Tomotherapy in hypofractionation may be effective for selected primary or secondary lung oligometastatic diseases, without causing significant toxicities. Pulmonary oligometastasis patients without EPD had better survival outcomes than those with EPD. Moreover, GTV is more significant than

  8. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer using Tomotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To retrospectively review the outcome of patients with primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer, treated with hypofractionated Tomotherapy. Methods Between April 2007 and June 2011, a total of 33 patients with oligometastatic intrapulmonary lesions underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy by Tomotherapy along with appropriate systemic therapy. There were 24 primary, and 9 secondary lung cancer cases. The radiation doses ranged from 4.5 to 7.0 Gy per fraction, multiplied by 8–16 fractions. The median dose per fraction was 4.5 Gy (range, 4.5-7.0 Gy), and the median total dose was 49.5 Gy (range, 45–72 Gy). The median estimated biological effective dose at 10 Gy (BED10) was 71.8 Gy (range, 65.3–119.0 Gy), and that at 3 Gy (BED3) was 123.8 Gy (range, 112.5–233.3 Gy). The mean lung dose (MLD) was constrained mainly under 1200 cGy. The median gross tumor volume (GTV) was 27.9 cm3 (range: 2.5–178.1 cm3). Results The median follow-up period was 25.8 months (range, 3.0–60.7 months). The median overall survival (OS) time was 32.1 months for the 24 primary lung cancer patients, and >40 months for the 9 metastatic lung patients. The median survival time of the patients with extra-pulmonary disease (EPD) was 11.2 months versus >50 months (not reached) in the patients without EPD (p 27.9 cm3): >40 months versus 12.85 months (p = 0.047). The patients with ≦2 lesions had a median survival >40 months, whereas those with ≧3 lesions had 26 months (p = 0.065). The 2-year local control (LC) rate was 94.7%. Only 2 patients (6.1%) developed ≧grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion Using Tomotherapy in hypofractionation may be effective for selected primary or secondary lung oligometastatic diseases, without causing significant toxicities. Pulmonary oligometastasis patients without EPD had better survival outcomes than those with EPD. Moreover, GTV is more significant than lesion number in

  9. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer using Tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Heng-Jui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To retrospectively review the outcome of patients with primary or secondary oligometastatic lung cancer, treated with hypofractionated Tomotherapy. Methods Between April 2007 and June 2011, a total of 33 patients with oligometastatic intrapulmonary lesions underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy by Tomotherapy along with appropriate systemic therapy. There were 24 primary, and 9 secondary lung cancer cases. The radiation doses ranged from 4.5 to 7.0 Gy per fraction, multiplied by 8–16 fractions. The median dose per fraction was 4.5 Gy (range, 4.5-7.0 Gy, and the median total dose was 49.5 Gy (range, 45–72 Gy. The median estimated biological effective dose at 10 Gy (BED10 was 71.8 Gy (range, 65.3–119.0 Gy, and that at 3 Gy (BED3 was 123.8 Gy (range, 112.5–233.3 Gy. The mean lung dose (MLD was constrained mainly under 1200 cGy. The median gross tumor volume (GTV was 27.9 cm3 (range: 2.5–178.1 cm3. Results The median follow-up period was 25.8 months (range, 3.0–60.7 months. The median overall survival (OS time was 32.1 months for the 24 primary lung cancer patients, and >40 months for the 9 metastatic lung patients. The median survival time of the patients with extra-pulmonary disease (EPD was 11.2 months versus >50 months (not reached in the patients without EPD (p 3 had a better survival than those with larger GTV (>27.9 cm3: >40 months versus 12.85 months (p = 0.047. The patients with ≦2 lesions had a median survival >40 months, whereas those with ≧3 lesions had 26 months (p = 0.065. The 2-year local control (LC rate was 94.7%. Only 2 patients (6.1% developed ≧grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion Using Tomotherapy in hypofractionation may be effective for selected primary or secondary lung oligometastatic diseases, without causing significant toxicities. Pulmonary oligometastasis patients without EPD had better survival outcomes than those with

  10. Quantification of Tumor Volume Changes During Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Jana; Ford, Eric; Redmond, Kristin; Zhou, Jessica; Wong, John; Song, Danny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for lung cancer is limited by normal tissue toxicity. We evaluated sequential computed tomography (CT) scans to assess the possibility of adaptively reducing treatment volumes by quantifying the tumor volume reduction occurring during a course of radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: A total of 22 patients underwent RT for Stage I-III non-small-cell lung cancer with conventional fractionation; 15 received concurrent chemotherapy. Two repeat CT scans were performed at a nominal dose of 30 Gy and 50 Gy. Respiration-correlated four-dimensional CT scans were used for evaluation of respiratory effects in 17 patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on simulation and all individual phases of the repeat CT scans. Parenchymal tumor was evaluated unless the nodal volume was larger or was the primary. Subsequent image sets were spatially co-registered with the simulation data for evaluation. Results: The median GTV reduction was 24.7% (range, -0.3% to 61.7%; p 100 cm 3 vs. 3 , and hilar and/or mediastinal involvement vs. purely parenchymal or pleural lesions. A tendency toward a greater volume reduction with increasing dose was seen, although this did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion: The results of this study have demonstrated significant alterations in the GTV seen on repeat CT scans during RT. These observations raise the possibility of using an adaptive approach toward RT of non-small-cell lung cancer to minimize the dose to normal structures and more safely increase the dose directed at the target tissues.

  11. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  12. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy alone for clinical stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Acimovic, Ljubisa; Milisavljevic, Slobodan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Among patients with Stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), those treated with conventional radiotherapy show poorer prognosis than those treated by surgery. To improve the prognosis of such patients, we have used hyperfractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 1993, 49 patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy with 1.2 Gy twice daily to a total dose of 69.6 Gy. All patients were technically operable, but 29 had medical problems and 20 refused surgery. The median age and Karnofsky Performance Status was 63 years and 90, respectively. No patient received chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Prophylactic mediastinal irradiation was not given. Results: The median survival time was 33 months, and the 5-year survival rate was 30%. The rate at 5 years for freedom from each of relapse, local recurrence, mediastinal lymphnode metastasis, and distant metastasis was 41%, 55%, 89%, and 75%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that higher Karnofsky Performance Status score, absence of weight loss before treatment, and T1 stage were associated with better survival, although the T stage became insignificant on multivariate analysis. There were two Grade 3 acute toxicities and three Grade 3 late toxicities, but there was no Grade 4-5 toxicity. Conclusion: The results of this study compare favorably with those of most previous studies employing conventional fractionation. Further studies on hyperfractionation seem to be warranted for Stage I NSCLC

  13. Toxicity and dosimetric analysis of non-small cell lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy with 4DCT and image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy: a regional centre's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gareth C; Last, Andrew J; Shakespeare, Thomas P; Dwyer, Patrick M; Westhuyzen, Justin; McKay, Michael J; Connors, Lisa; Leader, Stephanie; Greenham, Stuart

    2016-09-01

    For patients receiving radiotherapy for locally advance non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the probability of experiencing severe radiation pneumonitis (RP) appears to rise with an increase in radiation received by the lungs. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) provides the ability to reduce planned doses to healthy organs at risk (OAR) and can potentially reduce treatment-related side effects. This study reports toxicity outcomes and provides a dosimetric comparison with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Thirty curative NSCLC patients received radiotherapy using four-dimensional computed tomography and five-field IMRT. All were assessed for early and late toxicity using common terminology criteria for adverse events. All plans were subsequently re-planned using 3DCRT to the same standard as the clinical plans. Dosimetric parameters for lungs, oesophagus, heart and conformity were recorded for comparison between the two techniques. IMRT plans achieved improved high-dose conformity and reduced OAR doses including lung volumes irradiated to 5-20 Gy. One case each of oesophagitis and erythema (3%) were the only Grade 3 toxicities. Rates of Grade 2 oesophagitis were 40%. No cases of Grade 3 RP were recorded and Grade 2 RP rates were as low as 3%. IMRT provides a dosimetric benefit when compared to 3DCRT. While the clinical benefit appears to increase with increasing target size and increasing complexity, IMRT appears preferential to 3DCRT in the treatment of NSCLC.

  14. Carbon ion radiotherapy for oligo-recurrent lung metastases from colorectal cancer: a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Wataru; Nakajima, Mio; Yamamoto, Naoyoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Yamashita, Hideomi; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of carbon ion radiotherapy (CIRT) for oligo-recurrent lung tumors from colorectal cancer (CRC). From May 1997 to October 2012, 34 consecutive patients with oligo-recurrent pulmonary metastases from CRC were treated with CIRT. The patients were not surgical candidates for medical reasons or patient refusal. Using a respiratory-gated technique, carbon ion therapy was delivered with curative intent using 4 coplanar beam angles. A median dose of 60 GyE (range, 44–64.8 GyE) was delivered to the planning target volume (PTV), with a median daily dose of 15 GyE (range, 3.6–44 GyE). Treatment outcome was analyzed in terms of local control rate (LCR), survival rate, and treatment-related complications. In total, 34 patients with 44 oligo-recurrent pulmonary lesions were treated with CIRT. Median follow-up period was 23.7 months. The 2- and 3-year actuarial LCRs of the treated patients were 85.4% ± 6.2% and 85.4% ± 6.2%, respectively. Overall survival was 65.1% ± 9.5% at 2 years, and 50.1% ± 10.5% at 3 years. Although survival rates were relatively worse in the subsets of patients aged < 63 years or with early metastasis (< 36 months after resection of primary site), these factors were not significantly correlated with overall survival (P = 0.13 and 0.19, respectively). All treatment-related complications were self-limited, without any grade 3–5 toxicity. CIRT is one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for colorectal lung metastases, which are relatively resistant to stereotactic body radiotherapy. CIRT is considered to be the least invasive approach even in patients who have undergone repeated prior thoracic metastasectomies

  15. Quality of life after curative radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langendijk, Johannes A.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Jong, Jos M.A. de; Velde, Guul P.M. ten; Muller, Martin J.; Slotman, Ben J.; Wouters, Emiel F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate changes in quality of life (QOL) among medically inoperable Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: The study sample was composed of 46 patients irradiated for Stage I NSCLC. Quality of life was assessed before, during, and after radiotherapy using the European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-LC13. Changes in symptom and QOL scores over time were evaluated with a repeated measurement analysis of variance using the mixed effect modeling procedure, SAS Proc Mixed. Twenty-seven patients were treated only at the primary site, whereas for 19 patients, the regional lymph nodes were included in the target volume as well. Results: The median follow-up time of patients alive was 34 months. The median survival was 19.0 months. None of the locally treated patients developed regional recurrence. A significant, gradual increase over time was observed for dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss. A significant, gradual deterioration was observed also for role functioning. No significant changes were noted for the other symptoms or the functioning scales. Significantly higher levels of dysphagia, which persisted up to 12 months, were observed in those in which the regional lymph nodes were treated, as compared to the locally treated patients. Radiation-induced pulmonary changes assessed with chest radiograph were more pronounced in the group treated with locoregional radiotherapy. Conclusions: After curative radiotherapy for Stage I medically inoperable NSCLC, a gradual increase in dyspnea, fatigue, and appetite loss, together with a significant deterioration of role functioning, was observed, possibly because of pre-existing, slowly progressive chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and radiation-induced pulmonary changes. Taking into account the low incidence of regional recurrences after local irradiation, the higher incidence

  16. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O.; Andratschke, N.; Alheit, H.; Holy, R.; Moustakis, C.; Nestle, U.

    2014-01-01

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [de

  17. Left-sided breast cancer and risks of secondary lung cancer and ischemic heart disease. Effects of modern radiotherapy techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Stefanie; Ballhausen, Hendrik; Weingandt, Helmut; Freislederer, Philipp; Schoenecker, Stephan; Niyazi, Maximilian; Belka, Claus [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Simonetto, Cristoforo; Eidemueller, Markus [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [University Hospital, LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Medical University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2018-03-15

    Modern breast cancer radiotherapy techniques, such as respiratory-gated radiotherapy in deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) or volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) have been shown to reduce the high dose exposure of the heart in left-sided breast cancer. The aim of the present study was to comparatively estimate the excess relative and absolute risks of radiation-induced secondary lung cancer and ischemic heart disease for different modern radiotherapy techniques. Four different treatment plans were generated for ten computed tomography data sets of patients with left-sided breast cancer, using either three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) or VMAT, in free-breathing (FB) or DIBH. Dose-volume histograms were used for organ equivalent dose (OED) calculations using linear, linear-exponential, and plateau models for the lung. A linear model was applied to estimate the long-term risk of ischemic heart disease as motivated by epidemiologic data. Excess relative risk (ERR) and 10-year excess absolute risk (EAR) for radiation-induced secondary lung cancer and ischemic heart disease were estimated for different representative baseline risks. The DIBH maneuver resulted in a significant reduction of the ERR and estimated 10-year excess absolute risk for major coronary events compared to FB in 3D-CRT plans (p = 0.04). In VMAT plans, the mean predicted risk reduction through DIBH was less pronounced and not statistically significant (p = 0.44). The risk of radiation-induced secondary lung cancer was mainly influenced by the radiotherapy technique, with no beneficial effect through DIBH. VMAT plans correlated with an increase in 10-year EAR for radiation-induced lung cancer as compared to 3D-CRT plans (DIBH p = 0.007; FB p = 0.005, respectively). However, the EARs were affected more strongly by nonradiation-associated risk factors, such as smoking, as compared to the choice of treatment technique. The results indicate that 3D-CRT plans in DIBH pose the lowest

  18. Radiotherapy as an alternative to surgery in elderly patients with resectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordijk, E.M.; Poest Clement, E. v.d.; Hermans, J.; Wever, A.M.J.; Leer, J.W.H.

    1988-01-01

    From 1978 to 1983, 50 patients with a peripherally located non-small cell tumor of the lung were irradiated with curative intent. These patients were not operated upon because of poor cardiac or pulmonary condition, old age or refusal to operate. Mean age was 74 years, 40 patients being over 70 years of age. All patients had T 1-2 N 0 M 0 tumors according to the AJC classification and received 60 Gy to the primary tumor only. The overall response rate was 90%, with 50% complete responses in tumors smaller than 4 cm. The crude overall survival rates were 56% at 2 years and 16% at 5 years, with a median survival of 27 months. Age did not influence survival. There was a strong correlation of survival to tumour size. These results compared favorably to a group of 86 patients over 70 years of age who were selected for operation in the same hospital. The authors conclude that in patients over 70 years of age with resectable lung cancer, radiotherapy with curative intent should be offered as an alternative to operation, especially if the tumor is not larger than 4 cm. The wait-and-see policy in operable patients of this age group must be abandoned. 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 4 tabs

  19. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Hope, Andrew; Moseley, Douglas; Brink, Carsten

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT markers to predict lung density changes induced by radiotherapy was investigated. Age and CBCT markers extracted at 10th, 20th, and 30th treatment fraction significantly predicted lung density changes in a multivariable analysis, and a set of response models based on these parameters were established. The correlation coefficient for the models was 0.35, 0.35, and 0.39, when based on the markers obtained at the 10th, 20th, and 30th fraction, respectively. The study indicates that younger patients without lung tissue reactions early into their treatment course may have minimal radiation induced lung density increase at follow-up. Further investigations are needed to examine the ability of the models to identify patients with low risk of symptomatic toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Role of perfusion SPECT in prediction and measurement of pulmonary complications after radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farr, Katherina P.; Khalil, Azza A.; Grau, Cai [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Kramer, Stine; Morsing, Anni [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of baseline perfusion defect score (DS) on SPECT to predict the development of severe symptomatic radiation pneumonitis (RP) and to evaluate changes in perfusion on SPECT as a method of lung perfusion function assessment after curative radiotherapy (RT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with NSCLC undergoing curative RT were included prospectively. Perfusion SPECT/CT and global pulmonary function tests (PFT) were performed before RT and four times during follow-up. Functional activity on SPECT was measured using a semiquantitative perfusion DS. Pulmonary morbidity was graded by the National Cancer Institute's Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4 for pneumonitis. Patients were divided into two groups according to the severity of RP. A total of 71 consecutive patients were included in the study. Baseline DS was associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A significant inverse correlation was found between baseline DS and forced expiratory volume in 1 s and diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide. Patients with severe RP had significantly higher baseline total lung DS (mean 5.43) than those with no or mild symptoms (mean DS 3.96, p < 0.01). PFT results were not different between these two groups. The odds ratio for total lung DS was 7.8 (95 % CI 1.9 - 31) demonstrating the ability of this parameter to predict severe RP. Adjustment for other potential confounders known to be associated with increased risk of RP was performed and did not change the odds ratio. The median follow-up time after RT was 8.4 months. The largest DS increase of 13.3 % was associated with severe RP at 3 months of follow-up (p < 0.01). The development of severe RP during follow-up was not associated with changes in PFT results. Perfusion SPECT is a valuable method for predicting severe RP and for assessing changes in regional functional perfusion after curative RT comparable with

  1. Effect of 3D radiotherapy planning compared to 2D planning within a conventional treatment schedule of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, P.; Spahn, U.; Oetzel, D.; Wannenmacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The effect of 3D radiotherapy planning (3D RTP) in comparison to 2D radiotherapy planning (2D RTP) was evaluated in a usually practiced treatment schedule (starting by v./d. opposing portals, continued with computer-planned portals) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer the computer-planned part of the treatment schedule was calculated 2- and 3-dimensionally. Target volume were the primary tumor, the involved and the electively irradiated mediastinal lymph nodes. The results of the 2D RTP were recalculated 3-dimensionally and the mean doses to target volume and organs at risk were defined. Further, the normal tissue complications were calculated. Results: Under the prerequisite of 44 Gy maximally allowed to the spinal cord and a dose to the reference point of 50 Gy a small, but significant advantage with 2.1 Gy to the target (p=0.004) and a reduction of 3.6 Gy to the heart (p=0.05) was achievable for 3D RTP. The dose to the lungs did not differ significantly (19.7 Gy for 2D RTP, 20.3 Gy for 3D RTP). The dose to the heart was not estimated critical by NTCP (normal tissue complication probability). The NTCP for the ipsilateral lung was 16.1 and 18.7% for 2D RTP and 3D RTP, respectively. Regarding the simulator-planned ap/pa fields at the start of the radiotherapy the advantage of 3D RTP was further reduced but remained significant. Favorable with respect to the mean lung dose and the NTCP (18.7% NTCP ipsilateral lung for early onset of 3D planned radiotherapy vs 31.7% for late onset of 3D planned radiotherapy) but not significantly measurable is the early start of the treatment by computerized RTP. Conclusion: The main advantage of 3D RTP in treatment of advanced lung cancer is the better coverage of the target volume. A reduction of the mean lung dose cannot be expected. A dose escalation by 3D RTP to target volumes as described here seems not to be possible because of

  2. Present and future of the Image Guided Radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) and its applications in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Ferreira, I.; Isambert, A.; Le Pechoux, C.; Mornex, F.

    2007-01-01

    These last years, the new irradiation techniques as the conformal 3D radiotherapy and the IMRT are strongly correlated with the technological developments in radiotherapy. The rigorous definition of the target volume and the organs at risk required by these irradiation techniques, imposed the development of various image guided patient positioning and target tracking techniques. The availability of these imaging systems inside the treatment room has lead to the exploration of performing real-time adaptive radiation therapy. In this paper we present the different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and the adaptive radiotherapy (ART) approaches. IGRT developments are focused in the following areas: 1) biological imaging for better definition of tumor volume; 2) 4D imaging for modeling the intra-fraction organ motion; 3) on-board imaging system or imaging devices registered to the treatment machines for inter-fraction patient localization; and 4) treatment planning and delivery schemes incorporating the information derived from the new imaging techniques. As this paper is included in the 'Cancer Radiotherapie' special volume dedicated to the lung cancers, in the description of the different IGRT techniques we try to present the lung tumors applications when this is possible. (author)

  3. A Phase 1 Trial of an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Karen Kelly, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of California...Inhibitor plus Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0063...immune checkpoint inhibitor MPDL3280A (atezolizumab) in early stage inoperable non-small cell lung cancer . The trial is comprised of a traditional 3 + 3

  4. EF5 PET of Tumor Hypoxia: A Predictive Imaging Biomarker of Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-01

    SABR) for Early Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Billy W Loo Jr, MD PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Leland Stanford Junior University...Response to Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Early Lung Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Billy W Loo Jr, MD...for early stage lung cancer in patients who are not candidates for surgery because of excessive surgical risk, and will be an important treatment option

  5. Neuropsychological evaluation of patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with combination chemotherapy or radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasa, S; Olsnes, B T; Mastekaasa, A

    1988-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests were used to evaluate possible central nervous system dysfunction in patients treated with chemotherapy. Ninety-five patients with non-small cell lung cancer limited disease were randomized to either radiotherapy (2.8 Gyx15) or combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide. In order to evaluate cognitive functions three neuropsychological tests were applied: Trail Making, Benton Visual Retention Test and Verbal Learning. Changes in the patients' test scores before and after treatment were compared. The chemotherapy patients showed reduced performance on some of the neuropsychological tests compared to the radiotherapy group. This indicates a treatment related effect on the central nervous system, possibly caused by the combination chemotherapy.

  6. Neuropsychological evaluation of patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer treated with combination chemotherapy or radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Olsnes, B.T.; Mastekaasa, A.

    1988-01-01

    Neuropsychological tests were used to evaluate possible central nervous system dysfunction in patients treated with chemotherapy. Ninety-five patients with non-small cell lung cancer limited disease were randomized to either radiotherapy (2.8 Gyx15) or combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide. In order to evaluate cognitive functions three neuropsychological tests were applied: Trail Making, Benton Visual Retention Test and Verbal Learning. Changes in the patients' test scores before and after treatment were compared. The chemotherapy patients showed reduced performance on some of the neuropsychological tests compared to the radiotherapy group. This indicates a treatment related effect on the central nervous system, possibly caused by the combination chemotherapy. (orig.)

  7. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > ... Cancer Learn About Lung Cancer What Is Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Basics Causes & Risk Factors Lung Cancer Staging ...

  8. [Mechanism and Prospect of Radiotherapy Combined with Apotatinib
in the Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohui; Wang, Chunbo; E, Mingyan

    2017-12-20

    Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the most commom malignant tumor being harmful to people's life and health. Most of the patients have developed to the last stage which not suitable for surgical indications, so radiation and chemotherapy is the main treatment strategy. In recent years, with the theory of anti-angiogenesis therapy for malignant tumors, apatinib as a promising novel medicine to treat malignant tumors, represents synergistic antitumor effects in combination with radiotherapy. The underlying mechanisms may include make blood vessel normalization, alleviating inner hypoxia, and angiogenic factors regulation. Apatinib in combination with radiotherapy may become a new and effective treatment strategy of non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Dosimetric comparison between CT and X-ray simulation of radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kali Ayguli, Zhang Jinrong; Wang Juwu; Ge Feng; Wang Haifeng; Xu Suling

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare radiotherapy plan of conventional X-ray simulation with CT simulation by 3D-TPS for lung cancer. Methods: Thirty-three patients were allotted to receive both conventional X-ray simulation and CT simulation in the same treatment position. 3D-TPS was used to design 4-field conventional plan of X-ray simulation (RT), 4-field two dimensional plan(2D)and three dimensional conformal radiation plan(3DCRT) of CT simulation for all patients. The total dose was 50 Gy. Dose volume histogram(DVH) was applied to evaluate the difference of target coverage, dose distribution and normal tissue protection among the three plans. Results: 3DCRT and 2D based on CT simulation were superior to RT in the target coverage, target conformity index (TCI) and target homogeneity (TH) (P 20 , V 30 and mean lung dose were similar among 3DCRT, 2D and RT plans. Moreover, the maximum doses of spinal cord were significantly different among the three plans. No statistical differences of doses to 30% of the heart and esophagus volume among the three plans were observed. Conclusions: There is significantly better tumour volume coverage in CT simulation when compared with X-ray conventional simulation. Target volume delineation by CT simulation is improved significantly. The dose distribution is improved by using three dimensional treatment planning system. 3DCRT plan is superior to 2D plans in target conformity index and target homogeneity. Doses delivered to organs surrounding the target such as lung and heart were reduced significantly in 3DCRT. (authors)

  10. Effectiveness of different rescanning techniques for scanned proton radiotherapy in lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwall, E.; Glimelius, L.; Hynning, E.

    2018-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a tumour type thought to be well-suited for proton radiotherapy. However, the lung region poses many problems related to organ motion and can for actively scanned beams induce severe interplay effects. In this study we investigate four mitigating rescanning techniques: (1) volumetric rescanning, (2) layered rescanning, (3) breath-sampled (BS) layered rescanning, and (4) continuous breath-sampled (CBS) layered rescanning. The breath-sampled methods will spread the layer rescans over a full breathing cycle, resulting in an improved averaging effect at the expense of longer treatment times. In CBS, we aim at further improving the averaging by delivering as many rescans as possible within one breathing cycle. The interplay effect was evaluated for 4D robustly optimized treatment plans (with and without rescanning) for seven NSCLC patients in the treatment planning system RayStation. The optimization and final dose calculation used a Monte Carlo dose engine to account for the density heterogeneities in the lung region. A realistic treatment delivery time structure given from the IBA ScanAlgo simulation tool served as basis for the interplay evaluation. Both slow (2.0 s) and fast (0.1 s) energy switching times were simulated. For all seven studied patients, rescanning improves the dose conformity to the target. The general trend is that the breath-sampled techniques are superior to layered and volumetric rescanning with respect to both target coverage and variability in dose to OARs. The spacing between rescans in our breath-sampled techniques is set at planning, based on the average breathing cycle length obtained in conjunction with CT acquisition. For moderately varied breathing cycle lengths between planning and delivery (up to 15%), the breath-sampled techniques still mitigate the interplay effect well. This shows the potential for smooth implementation at the clinic without additional motion monitoring equipment.

  11. Hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for primary and metastatic lung cancers with small dimension. Efficacy and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirri, Maria Alessandra; Arcangeli, Giorgio; Pinzi, Valentina; Benassi, Marcello; D'Angelo, Annelisa; Strigari, Lidia; Caterino, Mauro; Rinaldi, Massimo; Ceribelli, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to report on the clinical outcome of hypofractionated conformal radiotherapy (HCRT) for medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) or limited pulmonary metastases ≤ 5 cm in diameter. Patients and methods: from June 2003 to March 2007, 40 patients (42 lesions) underwent HCRT consisting of 40 Gy in five fractions over 2.5 weeks received by at least 95% of planning target volume. All patients underwent CT simulation and treatment under free shallow breathing. To evaluate target displacement under respiratory activity, two additional CT scans were performed with breath-holding during the expiratory and inspiratory phases. Of all patients enrolled, those with a follow-up ≥ 4 months were considered suitable for analysis. Local response was evaluated with CT imaging 4 months after the end of HCRT and every 3 months thereafter. Local relapse-free survival (LRFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated with the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: local response to the treatment was complete response, partial response, no change, and progressive disease as seen in 29%, 43%, 14%, and 7% of tumors, respectively. LRFS at 1 year and 3 years was 76% and 63%, respectively. Lung toxicities ≥ grade 2 were observed in 4/40 patients, but no grade 4. Pericardial effusion occurred in one patient. In stage I NSCLC patients (n = 15) with a median follow-up of 25 months, the 1-year LRFS and OS rates were 88% and 81%, respectively, and the 3-year rates 72% and 61%, respectively. Conclusion: HCRT is an effective and low-toxic treatment for medically inoperable early-stage lung cancers and pulmonary metastases for all clinicians lacking the aid of a dedicated stereotactic system. (orig.)

  12. An analysis of anatomic landmark mobility and setup errors in radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, M.J.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Boer, J.C.J. de; Tankink, J.J.; Verstraate, M.B.J.; Essers, M.; Visser, A.G.; Senan, S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To identify visible structures in the thorax which exhibit little internal motion during irradiation and, to determine random and systematic setup deviations in lung cancer patients with the use of these structures. Methods: Ten patients with lung cancer were set up in the supine position, and aligned using lasers. No immobilization devices were used. With an electronic portal imaging device (Siemens Beam View PLUS ), 12 sequential images (exposure 0.54 sec.; processing time 1.5 sec.) were obtained during a single fraction of radiotherapy. These 'movie loops' were generated for the A-P fields during each of 3-5 fractions. In order to determine the mobility of internal structures during each fraction, visible structures such as the trachea, carina, the upper chest wall, aortic arch, clavicle and paraspinal line were contoured manually in each image and matched with the first image of the corresponding movie loop by means of a cross-correlation algorithm. Translations in the cranial and lateral directions and in-plane rotations were determined for each structure separately. As the reference image represents a random position, relative movements were determined by comparing the translations and rotation for every image to the calculated means per movie-loop. Standard deviations of the relative movements were determined for each structure and each patient. Patient setup was evaluated for 15 patients with lung cancer. Setup was not corrected at any time during the treatment. The electronic portal images of each fraction were matched with the digitized simulator films by using a combination of the structures which had been determined to be relatively stable in the infra-fractional analysis. Results: In the infra-fractional analysis 120 to 380 matches were made per structure (a total of 1400). The standard deviation (SD) of translations in the lateral direction was small (≤1 mm) for the trachea, thoracic wall, paraspinal line and aortic arch. This was also the

  13. Survival and prognostic factors after moderately hypofractionated palliative thoracic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oorschot, B. van; Assenbrunner, B.; Beckmann, G.; Flentje, M.; Schuler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Survival and prognostic variables in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring thoracic palliative radiotherapy using a moderately hypofractionated regime (13-15 x 3 Gy) were evaluated. From March 2006 to April 2012, 120 patients with a physician estimated prognosis of 6-12 months were treated with this regime using CT-based 3D conformal radiotherapy. We collected data on patient characteristics, comorbidities, toxicity, and treatment parameters. Radiotherapy was completed as prescribed in 114 patients (95.0 %, premature termination 5.0 %). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen in 6.4 % of patients. The median survival of all patients was 5.8 months. Nonmetastatic patients survived significantly longer than patients with metastatic disease (median 11.7 months vs 4.7 months, p = 0.0001) and 18.6 % of nonmetastatic patients survived longer than 2 years. In 12.7 % radiotherapy started less than 30 days before death and 14.2 % of patients received radiotherapy within 14 days before death. In the multivariate analysis, good general condition, nonmetastatic disease, and a stable or improved general condition at the end of radiotherapy were significant. The treatment parameters, age, and comorbidities were not statistically significant. Our data confirm considerable effectiveness of 13 x 3 Gy with conformal radiotherapy for patients with locally confined NSCLC not fit for radical treatment and raise doubt for this regimen in metastatic patients and ECOG ≥ 2 when burden, acute toxicity, and resources are considered. (orig.) [de

  14. Difficulties encountered and solutions found when implementing stereotactic radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assouline, A.; Halley, A.; Belghith, B.; Mazeron, J.J.; Feuvret, L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the difficulties encountered when implementing stereotactic radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (T1-T2, N0, M0) using a voluntary breath-hold technique. From 25/03/2010 to 22/02/2011, eight patients with a non-small cell lung cancer were selected for treatment. CT images were obtained with the patient maintaining breath-hold using a spirometer. Treatment was delivered when the patient maintains this level of breath-hold. Treatment was performed with a 4 MV and 10 MV photon beams from a linear accelerator Varian 2100CS, equipped with a 120 leaves collimator. 60 Gy or 48 Gy were delivered, in four sessions, to the 80% isodose. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined by adding a 5 mm margin to the internal target volume (ITV), the ITV corresponding to the gross tumour volume (GTV) plus a 3 mm margin. CTV is considered equal to GTV. The non-understanding of the gating technique, the great number of beams and the limited breath-hold times led to the failure of some treatments. It can be explained by some patients insufficient respiratory abilities and the low dose rate of one of the beams used for treatment, thus forcing some radiation fields to be delivered in two or three times. Implementing such a technique can be limited by the patients' physical abilities and the materials used. Some solutions were found: a training phase more intense with a coaching of the breath-hold technique more precise, or the use of an abdominal compression device. (authors)

  15. Impact of FDG-PET on lung cancer delineation for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morarji, Kavita; Fowler, Allan; Vinod, Shalini K.; Shon, Ivan Ho; Laurence, Jerome M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of fused diagnostic F-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and planning FDG-PET/CT scans on voluming of lung cancer for radiotherapy. Five radiation oncologists (ROs), five radiation oncology trainees and a radiologist contoured five cases of non-small cell lung cancer. The CT alone, the diagnostic FDG-PET/CT and planning FDG-PET/CT each registered to the CT, were used to contour three volumes. The concordance index (CI) was used to compare each volume with a reference RO. Although there was considerable inter-observer variability in CT contouring, there was no significant difference between mean volumes of the gross tumour volume for the RO and radiation oncology trainees using any technique. There was no increase in CI with the addition of PET/CT, either diagnostic or planning, for the RO. However, the volumes of the radiation oncology trainees showed a significant increase in CI from 65.8% with CT alone to 68.0% and 72.3% with diagnostic PET/CT and planning PET/CT, respectively (P = 0.028). Mean variation at the tumour/mediastinum interface was significantly reduced with addition of registered PET/CT. The concordance of RO with the reference RO did not significantly increase with use of integrated FDG PET/CT images. However, the contouring of radiation oncology trainees' became more concordant with the reference.

  16. Evaluating proton stereotactic body radiotherapy to reduce chest wall dose in the treatment of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, James, E-mail: jwelsh@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Amini, Arya [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); UC Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Ciura, Katherine; Nguyen, Ngoc; Palmer, Matt [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Soh, Hendrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Allen, Pamela K.; Paolini, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bluett, Jaques; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Gomez, Daniel; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can produce excellent local control of several types of solid tumor; however, toxicity to nearby critical structures is a concern. We found previously that in SBRT for lung cancer, the chest wall (CW) volume receiving 20, 30, or 40 Gy (V{sub 20}, V{sub 30}, or V{sub 40}) was linked with the development of neuropathy. Here we sought to determine whether the dosimetric advantages of protons could produce lower CW doses than traditional photon-based SBRT. We searched an institutional database to identify patients treated with photon SBRT for lung cancer with tumors within < 2.5 cm of the CW. We found 260 cases; of these, chronic grade ≥ 2 CW pain was identified in 23 patients. We then selected 10 representative patients from this group and generated proton SBRT treatment plans, using the identical dose of 50 Gy in 4 fractions, and assessed potential differences in CW dose between the 2 plans. The proton SBRT plans reduced the CW doses at all dose levels measured. The median CW V{sub 20} was 364.0 cm{sup 3} and 160.0 cm{sup 3} (p < 0.0001), V{sub 30} was 144.6 cm{sup 3}vs 77.0 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0012), V{sub 35} was 93.9 cm{sup 3}vs 57.9 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.005), V{sub 40} was 66.5 cm{sup 3}vs 45.4 cm{sup 3} (p = 0.0112), and mean lung dose was 5.9 Gy vs 3.8 Gy (p = 0.0001) for photons and protons, respectively. Coverage of the planning target volume (PTV) was comparable between the 2 sets of plans (96.4% for photons and 97% for protons). From a dosimetric standpoint, proton SBRT can achieve the same coverage of the PTV while significantly reducing the dose to the CW and lung relative to photon SBRT and therefore may be beneficial for the treatment of lesions closer to critical structures.

  17. The Impact of Colleague Peer Review on the Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Process in the Radical Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, K P; McAleese, J; Crockett, C; Harney, J; Eakin, R L; Young, V A L; Dunn, M A; Johnston, R E; Hanna, G G

    2015-09-01

    Modern radiotherapy uses techniques to reliably identify tumour and reduce target volume margins. However, this can potentially lead to an increased risk of geographic miss. One source of error is the accuracy of target volume delineation (TVD). Colleague peer review (CPR) of all curative-intent lung cancer plans has been mandatory in our institution since May 2013. At least two clinical oncologists review plans, checking treatment paradigm, TVD, prescription dose tumour and critical organ tolerances. We report the impact of CPR in our institution. Radiotherapy treatment plans of all patients receiving radical radiotherapy were presented at weekly CPR meetings after their target volumes were reviewed and signed off by the treating consultant. All cases and any resultant change to TVD (including organs at risk) or treatment intent were recorded in our prospective CPR database. The impact of CPR over a 13 month period from May 2013 to June 2014 is reported. One hundred and twenty-two patients (63% non-small cell lung carcinoma, 17% small cell lung carcinoma and 20% 'clinical diagnosis') were analysed. On average, 3.2 cases were discussed per meeting (range 1-8). CPR resulted in a change in treatment paradigm in 3% (one patient proceeded to induction chemotherapy, two patients had high-dose palliative radiotherapy). Twenty-one (17%) had a change in TVD and one (1%) patient had a change in dose prescription. In total, 6% of patients had plan adjustment after review of dose volume histogram. The introduction of CPR in our centre has resulted in a change in a component of the treatment plan for 27% of patients receiving curative-intent lung radiotherapy. We recommend CPR as a mandatory quality assurance step in the planning process of all radical lung plans. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Optimal dose and volume for postoperative radiotherapy in brain oligometastases from lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Seung Yeun; Kim, Hye Ryun; Cho, Byoung Chul; Lee, Chang Geol; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Jong Hee [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate intracranial control after surgical resection according to the adjuvant treatment received in order to assess the optimal radiotherapy (RT) dose and volume. Between 2003 and 2015, a total of 53 patients with brain oligometastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent metastasectomy. The patients were divided into three groups according to the adjuvant treatment received: whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) ± boost (WBRT ± boost group, n = 26), local RT/Gamma Knife surgery (local RT group, n = 14), and the observation group (n = 13). The most commonly used dose schedule was WBRT (25 Gy in 10 fractions, equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions [EQD2] 26.04 Gy) with tumor bed boost (15 Gy in 5 fractions, EQD2 16.25 Gy). The WBRT ± boost group showed the lowest 1-year intracranial recurrence rate of 30.4%, followed by the local RT and observation groups, at 66.7%, and 76.9%, respectively (p = 0.006). In the WBRT ± boost group, there was no significant increase in the 1-year new site recurrence rate of patients receiving a lower dose of WBRT (EQD2) <27 Gy compared to that in patients receiving a higher WBRT dose (p = 0.553). The 1-year initial tumor site recurrence rate was lower in patients receiving tumor bed dose (EQD2) of ≥42.3 Gy compared to those receiving <42.3 Gy, although the difference was not significant (p = 0.347). Adding WBRT after resection of brain oligometastases from NSCLC seems to enhance intracranial control. Furthermore, combining lower-dose WBRT with a tumor bed boost may be an attractive option.

  19. Feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy to improve lung sparing in treatment planning for distal esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Anurag; Guerrero, Thomas M.; Liu, H. Helen; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Wang Xiaochun; Murshed, Hasan; Bonnen, Mark D.; Garg, Amit K.; Stevens, Craig W.; Chang, Joe Y.; Jeter, Melinda D.; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the feasibility whether intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) can be used to reduce doses to normal lung than three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in treating distal esophageal malignancies. Patients and methods: Ten patient cases with cancer of the distal esophagus were selected for a retrospective treatment-planning study. IMRT plans using four, seven, and nine beams (4B, 7B, and 9B) were developed for each patient and compared with the 3DCRT plan used clinically. IMRT and 3DCRT plans were evaluated with respect to PTV coverage and dose-volumes to irradiated normal structures, with statistical comparison made between the two types of plans using the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-rank test. Results: IMRT plans (4B, 7B, 9B) reduced total lung volume treated above 10 Gy (V 1 ), 20 Gy (V 2 ), mean lung dose (MLD), biological effective volume (V eff ), and lung integral dose (P 1 , 5% for V 2 , and 2.5 Gy for MLD. IMRT improved the PTV heterogeneity (P<0.05), yet conformity was better with 7B-9B IMRT plans. No clinically meaningful differences were observed with respect to the irradiated volumes of spinal cord, heart, liver, or total body integral doses. Conclusions: Dose-volume of exposed normal lung can be reduced with IMRT, though clinical investigations are warranted to assess IMRT treatment outcome of esophagus cancers

  20. Lung cancer in elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagnerova, M.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Europe and USA. The median age of diagnosis is currently 69 years, however this is gradually increasing with the aging population. Patients over age of 70 represent 40 % of all patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Age alone has not been found to be a significant prognostic factor in many malignancies, including lung cancer with performance status and stage being of greater importance. In lung cancer it is also evident that older patients gain equivalent benefit from cancer therapies as their younger counterparts. Elderly patients are under-treated in all aspects of their disease course from histological diagnosis to active therapy with surgical resection, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, irrespective of performance status or co-morbidities. Elderly patients are also underrepresented in lung cancer clinical trials. In this review is presented knowledge about lung cancer in elderly. (author)

  1. The impact of virtual simulation in palliative radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJury, Mark; Fisher, Patricia M.; Pledge, Simon; Brown, Gillian; Anthony, Catherine; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Conway, John; Robinson, Martin H.

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: Radiotherapy is widely used to palliate local symptoms in non-small-cell lung cancer. Using conventional X-ray simulation, it is often difficult to accurately localize the extent of the tumour. We report a randomized, double blind trial comparing target localization with conventional and virtual simulation. Methods: Eighty-six patients underwent both conventional and virtual simulation. The conventional simulator films were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) produced from the computed tomography (CT) data. The treatment fields defined by the clinicians using each modality were compared in terms of field area, position and the implications for target coverage. Results: Comparing fields defined by each study arm, there was a major mis-match in coverage between fields in 66.2% of cases, and a complete match in only 5.2% of cases. In 82.4% of cases, conventional simulator fields were larger (mean 24.5±5.1% (95% confidence interval)) than CT-localized fields, potentially contributing to a mean target under-coverage of 16.4±3.5% and normal tissue over-coverage of 25.4±4.2%. Conclusions: CT localization and virtual simulation allow more accurate definition of the target volume. This could enable a reduction in geographical misses, while also reducing treatment-related toxicity

  2. Patients' preference for radiotherapy fractionation schedule in the palliation of symptomatic unresectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J. I.; Lu, J. J.; Wong, L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The palliative radiotherapeutic management of unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer is controversial, with various fractionation (F x) schedules available. We aimed to determine patient's choice of F x schedule after involvement in a decision-making process using a decision board. A decision board outlining the various advantages and disadvantages apparent in the Medical Research Council study of F x schedules (17 Gy in two fractions vs 39 Gy in 13 fractions) was discussed with patients who met Medical Research Council eligibility criteria. Patients were then asked to indicate their preferred F x schedules, reasons and their level of satisfaction with being involved in the decision making process. Radiation oncologists (R O ) could prescribe radiotherapy schedules irrespective of patients' preferences. Of 92 patients enrolled, 55% chose the longer schedule. English-speaking patients were significantly more likely to choose the longer schedule (P 0.02, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-7.6). Longer F x was chosen because of longer survival (90%) and better local control (12%). Shorter F x was chosen for shorter overall treatment duration (80%), cost (61%) and better symptom control (20%). In all, 56% of patients choosing the shorter schedule had their treatment altered by the treating R O , whereas only 4% of patients choosing longer F x had their treatment altered (P O 's own biases.

  3. Sequential radiotherapy after induction chemotheray for limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimura, Takahisa; Kushima, Takeyuki; Kodama, Akihisa

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with limited small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were treated by induction chemotherapy (IC) and sequential radiotherapy (RT). To clear the benefit of RT, response was evaluated separately after IC and after RT. The CR rate was : 19% after IC, and 50% after RT. The response rate was: 77% after IC and 85% after RT. Thus, RT had an impact on upgrading the response after IC, however, two patients became worse during RT because of the progression of out-of-field disease. The patients were also divided into two groups by their responses to IC; five patients had a CR to IC (CR-IC) and 21 patients had a PR or NC (PR, NC-IC). The two groups were compared to determine the optimal status of response for RT. Comparing CR-IC and PR, NC-IC patients; survival was 100% versus 56% at 1 year and 20% versus 10% at 3 years, respectively. Median duration of response (MDR) in the local sites for the CR-IC patients was 14 months versus 8 months for the PR, NC-IC patients. MDR in the distant sites was 12 months for the CR-IC patients and 9 months for the PR, NC-IC patients. The results lead to the conclusion that RT after IC is more beneficial to CR-IC patients than to PR, NC-IC patients in the treatment of limited SCLC. (author)

  4. Immune Responses following Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Primary Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyasu Maehata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Immune responses following stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC were examined from the point of view of lymphocyte subset counts and natural killer cell activity (NKA. Patients and Methods. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 62 patients at 4 time points between pretreatment and 4 weeks post-treatment for analysis of the change of total lymphocyte counts (TLC and lymphocyte subset counts of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, CD56+, and NKA. In addition, the changes of lymphocyte subset counts were compared between patients with or without relapse. Further, the correlations between SBRT-related parameters and immune response were analyzed for the purpose of revealing the mechanisms of the immune response. Results. All lymphocyte subset counts and NKA at post-treatment and 1 week post-treatment were significantly lower than pre-treatment (P<0.01. No significant differences in the changes of lymphocyte subset counts were observed among patients with or without relapse. The volume of the vertebral body receiving radiation doses of 3 Gy or more (VV3 significantly correlated with the changes of nearly all lymphocyte subset counts. Conclusions. SBRT for stage I NSCLC induced significant immune suppression, and the decrease of lymphocyte subset counts may be associated with exposure of the vertebral bone marrow.

  5. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Metastatic Lung Cancer as Oligo-Recurrence: An Analysis of 42 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the outcome and toxicity of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with oligo-recurrence cancer in the lung (ORCL. Methods and Materials. A retrospective review of 42 patients with ORCL who underwent SBRT in our two hospitals was conducted. We evaluated the outcome and adverse effects after SBRT for ORCL. Results. All patients finished their SBRT course without interruptions of toxicity reasons. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1–90 months. The 2-year local control rate and overall survival were 87% (95% CI, 75–99% and 65% (95% CI, 48–82%. As for prognostic factor, the OS of patients with a short disease-free interval (DFI months, between the initial therapy and SBRT for ORCL, was significantly worse than the OS of long DFI months (. The most commonly observed late effect was radiation pneumonitis. One patient had grade 4 gastrointestinal toxicity (perforation of gastric tube. No other ≧ grade 3 acute and late adverse events occurred. There were no treatment-related deaths during this study. Conclusions. In patients with ORCL, radical treatment with SBRT is safe and provides a chance for long-term survival by offering favorable local control.

  6. Target position uncertainty during visually guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman; de Blanck, Steen Riisgaard; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in voluntary deep-inspiration breath hold (DISH) radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Methods: Perpendicular fluoroscopic movies were acquired in free breathing (FB) and DIBH during a course...... of visually guided DIBH radiotherapy of nine patients with NSCLC. Patients had liquid markers injected in mediastinal lymph nodes and primary tumours. Excursion, systematic- and random errors, and inter-breath-hold position uncertainty were investigated using an image based tracking algorithm.Results: A mean...... small in visually guided breath-hold radiotherapy of NSCLC. Target motion could be substantially reduced, but not eliminated, using visually guided DIBH. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Early prediction of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy using second order texture statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Benign radiation-induced lung injury is a common finding following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer, and is often difficult to differentiate from a recurring tumour due to the ablative doses and highly conformal treatment with SABR. Current approaches to treatment response assessment have shown limited ability to predict recurrence within 6 months of treatment. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of second order texture statistics for prediction of eventual recurrence based on computed tomography (CT) images acquired within 6 months of treatment, and compare with the performance of first order appearance and lesion size measures. Consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) regions were manually delineated on post-SABR CT images. Automatic consolidation expansion was also investigated to act as a surrogate for GGO position. The top features for prediction of recurrence were all texture features within the GGO and included energy, entropy, correlation, inertia, and first order texture (standard deviation of density). These predicted recurrence with 2-fold cross validation (CV) accuracies of 70-77% at 2- 5 months post-SABR, with energy, entropy, and first order texture having leave-one-out CV accuracies greater than 80%. Our results also suggest that automatic expansion of the consolidation region could eliminate the need for manual delineation, and produced reproducible results when compared to manually delineated GGO. If validated on a larger data set, this could lead to a clinically useful computer-aided diagnosis system for prediction of recurrence within 6 months of SABR and allow for early salvage therapy for patients with recurrence.

  8. Texture analysis of automatic graph cuts segmentations for detection of lung cancer recurrence after stereotactic radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2015-03-01

    Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a treatment for early-stage lung cancer with local control rates comparable to surgery. After SABR, benign radiation induced lung injury (RILI) results in tumour-mimicking changes on computed tomography (CT) imaging. Distinguishing recurrence from RILI is a critical clinical decision determining the need for potentially life-saving salvage therapies whose high risks in this population dictate their use only for true recurrences. Current approaches do not reliably detect recurrence within a year post-SABR. We measured the detection accuracy of texture features within automatically determined regions of interest, with the only operator input being the single line segment measuring tumour diameter, normally taken during the clinical workflow. Our leave-one-out cross validation on images taken 2-5 months post-SABR showed robustness of the entropy measure, with classification error of 26% and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.77 using automatic segmentation; the results using manual segmentation were 24% and 0.75, respectively. AUCs for this feature increased to 0.82 and 0.93 at 8-14 months and 14-20 months post SABR, respectively, suggesting even better performance nearer to the date of clinical diagnosis of recurrence; thus this system could also be used to support and reinforce the physician's decision at that time. Based on our ongoing validation of this automatic approach on a larger sample, we aim to develop a computer-aided diagnosis system which will support the physician's decision to apply timely salvage therapies and prevent patients with RILI from undergoing invasive and risky procedures.

  9. A feasibility study of dynamic adaptive radiotherapy for nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minsun, E-mail: mk688@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States); Phillips, Mark H. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-6043 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The final state of the tumor at the end of a radiotherapy course is dependent on the doses given in each fraction during the treatment course. This study investigates the feasibility of using dynamic adaptive radiotherapy (DART) in treating lung cancers assuming CBCT is available to observe midtreatment tumor states. DART adapts treatment plans using a dynamic programming technique to consider the expected changes of the tumor in the optimization process. Methods: DART is constructed using a stochastic control formalism framework. It minimizes the total expected number of tumor cells at the end of a treatment course, which is equivalent to maximizing tumor control probability, subject to the uncertainty inherent in the tumor response. This formulation allows for nonstationary dose distributions as well as nonstationary fractional doses as needed to achieve a series of optimal plans that are conformal to the tumor over time, i.e., spatiotemporally optimal plans. Sixteen phantom cases with various sizes and locations of tumors and organs-at-risk (OAR) were generated using in-house software. Each case was planned with DART and conventional IMRT prescribing 60 Gy in 30 fractions. The observations of the change in the tumor volume over a treatment course were simulated using a two-level cell population model. Monte Carlo simulations of the treatment course for each case were run to account for uncertainty in the tumor response. The same OAR dose constraints were applied for both methods. The frequency of replanning was varied between 1, 2, 5 (weekly), and 29 times (daily). The final average tumor dose and OAR doses have been compared to quantify the potential dosimetric benefits of DART. Results: The average tumor max, min, mean, and D95 doses using DART relative to these using conventional IMRT were 124.0%–125.2%, 102.1%–114.7%, 113.7%–123.4%, and 102.0%–115.9% (range dependent on the frequency of replanning). The average relative maximum doses for the

  10. Development of the techniques of radiotherapy of lung cancer in the republic of belarus (1970-1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muravskaya, G.V.; Artemova, N.A.; Golub, G.D.; Krutilina, N.I.; Minajlo, I.I.; Sinajko, V.V.; Suravikina, V.V.; Ulitskij, P.I.

    1996-01-01

    A 25-year (1970-1995) experience in clinical employment of original and improved techniques of radiation treatment in the management of more than 12,000 lung cancer patients is assessed. The employment of the new methods of radiotherapy of operable stage III squamous-cell lung cancer patients increased their 5-year survival rate from 8±3% to 42±5%, and that of inoperable stage II-III patients - from 5 to 9%. An original method of chemoradiotherapy of stage II-III small-cell cancer enabled to raise 5-year survival rate from 4 to 12%. Owing to the reduction in the number of patients declining special treatment (from 32 to 13.7%) and widening the range of indications to treatment (from 65 to 83%) the rate of clinical group II lung cancer patients administered special treatment rose more than twice (from 32.4 to 69.3%) over the past 15 years. The proportion of lung cancer patients among all cancer patients being on the register for more than 5 years in the Republic of Belarus increased more than 3-fold (from 8 to 26.7%) over the past 20 years

  11. The late effect of radical radiotherapy for lung cancer on pulmonary function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.L.

    1985-01-01

    At the Peter MacCallum Hospital it is the policy to treat patients with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung with radical intent if there are no adverse prognostic factors. Spirometric testing was carried out before and at least three months after the completion of radiotherapy in 25 patients who were so treated. The results indicate that high dose radiotherapy (50-60 Gy) to the primary site and mediastinum is well tolerated; although 64% of patients experienced a decrease in vital capacity, this was usually of acceptable degree and in the remaining 36% the vital capacity actually increased

  12. 4D imaging for target definition in stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotman, Ben J; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Senan, Suresh

    2006-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of Stage I lung tumors has been reported to result in high local control rates that are far superior to those obtained with conventional radiotherapy techniques, and which approach those achieved with primary surgery. Breathing-induced motion of tumor and target tissues is an important issue in this technique and careful attention should be paid to the contouring and the generation of individualized margins. We describe our experience with the use of 4DCT scanning for this group of patients, the use of post-processing tools and the potential benefits of respiratory gating.

  13. The polymorphism and haplotypes of XRCC1 and survival of non-small-cell lung cancer after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Min; Hong, Yun-Chul; Park, Heon Joo; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Sang Yoon; Kim, Jong Hoon; Lee, Sang-Wook; Park, So-Yeon; Lee, Jung Shin; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The X-ray repair cross-complementing Group 1 (XRCC1) protein is involved mainly in the base excision repair of the DNA repair process. This study examined the association of 3 polymorphisms (codon 194, 280, and 399) of XRCC1 and lung cancer in terms of whether or not these polymorphisms have an effect on the survival of lung cancer patients who have received radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and April 2004, 229 lung cancer patients with non-small-cell lung cancer in Stages I-III were enrolled. Genotyping was performed by single base primer extension assay using the SNP-IT Kit with genomic DNA samples from all patients. The haplotype of the XRCC1 polymorphisms was estimated by PHASE version 2.1. Results: The patients consisted of 191 (83.4%) males and 38 (16.6%) females with a median age of 62 (range, 26-88 years). Sixty percent of the patients were included in Stage I-IIIa. The median progression-free and overall survival was 13 months and 16 months, respectively. The XRCC1 codon 194, histology, and stage were shown to be significant predictors of the progression-free survival. The 6 haplotypes among the XRCC1 polymorphisms (194, 280, and 399) were estimated by PHASE v.2.1. The patients with haplotype pairs other than the homozygous TGG haplotype pairs survived significantly longer (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Polymorphisms of XRCC1 have an effect on the survival of lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy, and this effect seems to be more significant after the haplotype pairs are considered

  14. Prognostic indices in stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, David; Angelidis, Alexander; Budach, Volker; Ghadjar, Pirus; Kufeld, Markus; Badakhshi, Harun

    2015-11-26

    Our purpose was to analyze the long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) on patients with brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We performed a retrospective analysis of survival on 90 patients who underwent SRS or FSRT of intracranial NSCLC metastases between 04/2004 and 05/2014 that had not undergone prior surgery or whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for BM. Follow-up data was analyzed until May 2015. Potential prognostic factors were examined in univariable and multivariable analyses. The Golden Grading System (GGS), the disease-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA), the RADES II prognostic index as well as the NSCLC-specific index proposed by Rades et al. in 2013 (NSCLC-RADES) were calculated and their predictive values were tested in univariable analysis. The median follow-up time of the surviving patients was 14 months. The overall survival (OS) rate was 51 % after 6 months and 29.9 % after 12 months. Statistically significant factors of better OS after univariable analysis were lower International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage at first diagnosis, histology of adenocarcinoma, prior surgery of the primary tumor and lower total BM volume. After multivariable analysis adenocarcinoma histology remained a significant factor; higher Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) and the presence of extracranial metastases (ECM) were also significant. The RADES II and the NSCLC-RADES indices were significant predictors of OS. However, the NSCLC-RADES failed to differentiate between intermediate- and low-risk patients. The DS-GPA and GGS were not statistically significant predictors of survival in univariable analysis. The ideal prognostic index has not been defined yet. We believe that more specific indices will be developed in the future. Our results indicate that the histologic subtype of NSCLC could add to the prognostic

  15. Individualized margins in 3D conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer: analysis of physiological movements and their dosimetric impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, François; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, André

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage.

  16. Individualized Margins in 3D Conformal Radiotherapy Planning for Lung Cancer: Analysis of Physiological Movements and Their Dosimetric Impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germain, Francois; Beaulieu, Luc; Fortin, Andre

    2008-01-01

    In conformal radiotherapy planning for lung cancer, respiratory movements are not taken into account when a single computed tomography (CT) scan is performed. This study examines tumor movements to design individualized margins to account for these movements and evaluates their dosimetric impacts on planning volume. Fifteen patients undergoing CT-based planning for radical radiotherapy for localized lung cancer formed the study cohort. A reference plan was constructed based on reference gross, clinical, and planning target volumes (rGTV, rCTV, and rPTV, respectively). The reference plans were compared with individualized plans using individualized margins obtained by using 5 serial CT scans to generate individualized target volumes (iGTV, iCTV, and iPTV). Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy was used for plan generation using 6- and 23-MV photon beams. Ten plans for each patient were generated and dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated. Comparisons of volumetric and dosimetric parameters were performed using paired Student t-tests. Relative to the rGTV, the total volume occupied by the superimposed GTVs increased progressively with each additional CT scans. With the use of all 5 scans, the average increase in GTV was 52.1%. For the plans with closest dosimetric coverage, target volume was smaller (iPTV/rPTV ratio 0.808) but lung irradiation was only slightly decreased. Reduction in the proportion of lung tissue that received 20 Gy or more outside the PTV (V20) was observed both for 6-MV plans (-0.73%) and 23-MV plans (-0.65%), with p = 0.02 and p = 0.04, respectively. In conformal RT planning for the treatment of lung cancer, the use of serial CT scans to evaluate respiratory motion and to generate individualized margins to account for these motions produced only a limited lung sparing advantage

  17. Pattern of loco-regional failure after definitive radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Nielsen, Tine Bjørn; Brink, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    , and occurrence of distant metastasis. It is challenging to evaluate loco-regional control after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC since it is difficult to distinguish between radiation-induced damage to the lung tissue and tumour progression/recurrence. In addition it may be useful to distinguish between...... intrapulmonary failure and mediastinal failure to be able to optimize radiotherapy in order to improve loco-regional control even though it is not easy to discriminate between the two sites of failure. Material and methods. This study is a retrospective analysis of 331 NSCLC patients treated with definitive...... with mediastinal relapse. Conclusion. We conclude that focus should be on increasing doses to intrapulmonary tumour volume, when dose escalation is applied to improve local tumour control in NSCLC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy, since most recurrences are located here....

  18. Alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy schedules in small cell lung cancer, limited disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arriagada, R.; Le Chevalier, T.; Baldeyrou, P.

    1985-01-01

    Sixty-three evaluable patients with limited small cell lung carcinoma were entered into two pilot studies alternating 6 cycles of combination chemotherapy with 3 courses of mediastinal radiotherapy as induction treatment. The first course of radiotherapy started 10 days after the second cycle of chemotherapy; there was a 7 day rest between chemotherapy and radiotherapy courses. This 6 month induction treatment was followed by a maintenance chemotherapy. The total mediastinal radiation dose was increased from 4500 rad in the first study to 5500 rad in the second. Both protocols obtained a complete response (CR) rate of greater than 85%. Local control at 2 years was 61% in the first study and 82% in the second. Acute and delayed toxicity effects are discussed

  19. Estimating the Need for Radiotherapy for Patients With Prostate, Breast, and Lung Cancers: Verification of Model Estimates of Need With Radiotherapy Utilization Data From British Columbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyldesley, Scott; Delaney, Geoff; Foroudi, Farshad; Barbera, Lisa; Kerba, Marc; Mackillop, William

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Estimates of the need for radiotherapy (RT) using different methods (criterion based benchmarking [CBB] and the Canadian [C-EBEST] and Australian [A-EBEST] epidemiologically based estimates) exist for various cancer sites. We compared these model estimates to actual RT rates for lung, breast, and prostate cancers in British Columbia (BC). Methods and Materials: All cases of lung, breast, and prostate cancers in BC from 1997 to 2004 and all patients receiving RT within 1 year (RT 1Y ) and within 5 years (RT 5Y ) of diagnosis were identified. The RT 1Y and RT 5Y proportions in health regions with a cancer center for the most recent year were then calculated. RT rates were compared with CBB and EBEST estimates of RT needs. Variation was assessed by time and region. Results: The RT 1Y in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 51%, 58%, and 33% compared with 45%, 57%, and 32% for C-EBEST and 41%, 61%, and 37% for CBB models. The RT 5Y rates in regions with a cancer center for lung, breast, and prostate cancers were 59%, 61%, and 40% compared with 61%, 66%, and 61% for C-EBEST and 75%, 83%, and 60% for A-EBEST models. The RT 1Y rates increased for breast and prostate cancers. Conclusions: C-EBEST and CBB model estimates are closer to the actual RT rates than the A-EBEST estimates. Application of these model estimates by health care decision makers should be undertaken with an understanding of the methods used and the assumptions on which they were based.

  20. Interest of FDG-PET for lung cancer radiotherapy; Interet de la TEP au FDG pour la radiotherapie des cancers bronchiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thureau, S.; Mezzani-Saillard, S.; Dubray, B. [Departement de radiotherapie et de physique medicale et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France); Modzelewski, R.; Edet-Sanson, A.; Vera, P. [Departement de medecine nucleaire et QuantIF - Litis, EA 4108, CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, 1, rue d' Amiens, 76038 Rouen (France)

    2011-10-15

    The recent advances in medical imaging have profoundly altered the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). A meta-analysis has confirmed the superiority of FDG PET-CT over CT for initial staging. FDG PET-CT improves the reproducibility of target volume delineation, especially close to the mediastinum or in the presence of atelectasis. Although not formally validated by a randomized trial, the reduction of the mediastinal target volume, by restricting the irradiation to FDG-avid nodes, is widely accepted. The optimal method of delineation still remains to be defined. The role of FDGPET-CT in monitoring tumor response during radiotherapy is under investigation, potentially opening the way to adapting the treatment modalities to tumor radiation sensitivity. Other tracers, such as F-miso (hypoxia), are also under clinical investigation. To avoid excessive delays, the integration of PET-CT in routine practice requires quick access to the imaging equipment, technical support (fusion and image processing) and multidisciplinary delineation of target volumes. (authors)

  1. Literature-based recommendations for treatment planning and execution in high-dose radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senan, Suresh; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Giraud, Philippe; Mirimanoff, Rene; Budach, Volker

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To review the literature on techniques used in high-dose radiotherapy of lung cancer in order to develop recommendations for clinical practice and for use in research protocols. Patients and methods: A literature search was performed for articles and abstracts that were considered both clinically relevant and practical to use. The relevant information was arbitrarily categorized under the following headings: patient positioning, CT scanning, incorporating tumour mobility, definition of target volumes, radiotherapy planning, treatment delivery, and scoring of response and toxicity. Results: Recommendations were made for each of the above steps from the published literature. Although most of the recommended techniques have yet to be evaluated in multicenter clinical trials, their use in high-dose radiotherapy to the thorax appears to be rational on the basis of current evidence. Conclusions: Recommendations for the clinical implementation of high-dose conformal radiotherapy for lung tumours were identified in the literature. Procedures that are still considered to be investigational were also highlighted

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  3. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  4. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

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    Saito Ryo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT, appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%. Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months. Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%, of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present.

  5. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Tominaga, Lichto; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryo

    2011-01-01

    Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT), appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%). Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months). Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%), of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present

  6. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy on follow-up thin-section computed tomography in 177 primary lung cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer has recently been reported. However, its detailed imaging findings are not clarified. So this study aimed to fully characterize the findings on computed tomography (CT), appearance time and frequency of chest wall injury after stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for primary lung cancer Materials and methods A total of 177 patients who had undergone SRT were prospectively evaluated for periodical follow-up thin-section CT with special attention to chest wall injury. The time at which CT findings of chest wall injury appeared was assessed. Related clinical symptoms were also evaluated. Results Rib fracture was identified on follow-up CT in 41 patients (23.2%). Rib fractures appeared at a mean of 21.2 months after the completion of SRT (range, 4 -58 months). Chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis were findings frequently associated with, and tending to precede rib fractures. No patients with rib fracture showed tumors > 16 mm from the adjacent chest wall. Chest wall pain was seen in 18 of 177 patients (10.2%), of whom 14 patients developed rib fracture. No patients complained of Grade 3 or more symptoms. Conclusion Rib fracture is frequently seen after SRT for lung cancer on CT, and is often associated with chest wall edema, thinning of the cortex and osteosclerosis. However, related chest wall pain is less frequent and is generally mild if present. PMID:21995807

  7. Evaluation of oxygenation status during fractionated radiotherapy in human nonsmall cell lung cancers using [F-18]fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wui-Jin, Koh; Bergman, Kenneth S.; Rasey, Janet S.; Peterson, Lanell M.; Evans, Margaret L.; Graham, Michael M.; Grierson, John R.; Lindsley, Karen L.; Lewellen, Thomas K.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Griffin, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Recent clinical investigations have shown a strong correlation between pretreatment tumor hypoxia and poor response to radiotherapy. These observations raise questions about standard assumptions of tumor reoxygenation during radiotherapy, which has been poorly studied in human cancers. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of [F-18]fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) uptake allows noninvasive assessment of tumor hypoxia, and is amenable for repeated studies during fractionated radiotherapy to systematically evaluate changes in tumor oxygenation. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancers underwent sequential [F-18]FMISO PET imaging while receiving primary radiotherapy. Computed tomograms were used to calculate tumor volumes, define tumor extent for PET image analysis, and assist in PET image registration between serial studies. Fractional hypoxic volume (FHV) was calculated for each study as the percentage of pixels within the analyzed imaged tumor volume with a tumor:blood [F-18]FMISO ratio ≥ 1.4 by 120 min after injection. Serial FHVs were compared for each patient. Results: Pretreatment FHVs ranged from 20-84% (median 58%). Subsequent FHVs varied from 8-79% (median 29%) at midtreatment, and ranged from 3-65% (median 22%) by the end of radiotherapy. One patient had essentially no detectable residual tumor hypoxia by the end of radiation, while two others showed no apparent decrease in serial FHVs. There was no correlation between tumor size and pretreatment FHV. Conclusions: Although there is a general tendency toward improved oxygenation in human tumors during fractionated radiotherapy, these changes are unpredictable and may be insufficient in extent and timing to overcome the negative effects of existing pretreatment hypoxia. Selection of patients for clinical trials addressing radioresistant hypoxic cancers can be appropriately achieved through single pretreatment evaluations of tumor hypoxia

  8. A case of rectal cancer successfully treated with surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy for metachronous lung metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Yu; Hosoda, Yohei; Tachi, Hidekazu

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman underwent polypectomy for a rectal polyp (Isp). Pathological findings were invasion of the submucosa (3,500 μm diameter), and she underwent anterior resection for rectal cancer (RS, pT1b, pN0, cM0, Stage I ) without adjuvant chemotherapy. Lung masses were found in her right (8 mm) and left lung (7 mm). The tumors enlarged during the 4 month follow-up period. We decided to perform left partial pneumonectomy. The tumor was diagnosed as a lung metastasis from colon cancer by pathology. Because the right tumor was located towards the center, performing right pneumonectomy would have been quite invasive and we feared occult metastases. We decided to apply SRT (50 Gy) to the right tumor. The tumor shrunk and became a scar after treatment. There were no complications such as radiation pneumonitis. The patient was in good health without any recurrence for 12 months after SRT. Surgical resection is an optimal method to control lung metastasis from colon cancer if the lesion is operable. However, in the case of a tumor centrally located, surgical resection may cause deterioration of lung function. There are also cases with contraindications for surgery due to co-morbidities. In addition, there is no consensus on observation periods to exclude occult metastases. SRT can be an effective treatment for lung metastases from colon cancer when there are bilateral lung metastases and no metastases outside the lungs. (author)

  9. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Screening Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  10. A randomised comparison of radical radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer: Results from the Big Lung Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairlamb, David; Milroy, Robert; Gower, Nicole; Parmar, Mahesh; Peake, Michael; Rudd, Robin; Souhami, Robert; Spiro, Stephen; Stephens, Richard; Waller, David

    2005-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis of trials comparing primary treatment with or without chemotherapy for patients with non-small cell lung cancer published in 1995 suggested a survival benefit for cisplatin-based chemotherapy in each of the primary treatment settings studied, but it included many small trials, and trials with differing eligibility criteria and chemotherapy regimens. Methods: The Big Lung Trial was a large pragmatic trial designed to confirm the survival benefits seen in the meta-analysis, and this paper reports the findings in the radical radiotherapy setting. The trial closed before the required sample size was achieved due to slow accrual, with a total of 288 patients randomised to receive radical radiotherapy alone (146 patients) or sequential radical radiotherapy and cisplatin-based chemotherapy (142 patients). Results: There was no evidence that patients allocated sequential chemotherapy and radical radiotherapy had a better survival than those allocated radical radiotherapy alone, HR 1.07 (95% CI 0.84-1.38, P=0.57), median survival 13.0 months for the sequential group and 13.2 for the radical radiotherapy alone group. In addition, exploratory analyses could not identify any subgroup that might benefit more or less from chemotherapy. Conclusions: Despite not suggesting a survival benefit for the sequential addition of chemotherapy to radical radiotherapy, possibly because of the relatively small sample size and consequently wide confidence intervals, the results can still be regarded as consistent with the meta-analysis, and other similarly designed recently published large trials. Combining all these results suggests there may be a small median survival benefit with chemotherapy of between 2 and 8 weeks

  11. Concurrent radiotherapy and carboplatin in non small-cell lung cancer: a pilot study using conventional and accelerated fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, D.; Bishop, J.; Crennan, E.; Olver, I.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen patients with unresectable non small cell lung cancer were treated with radical radiotherapy and carboplatin administered in order to ascertain the toxicity of concurent carboplatin/radiotherapy. The first 6 patients were treated to a total dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 6 weeks, with carboplatin 70 mg/m 2 /day on days 1 to 5 during weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. The remaining 7 patients were given 60 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks, treating twice a day (accelerated fractionation). Carboplatin was given as above but only during week 1 of radiotherapy. Twelve patients completed radiotherapy without interruption but 2 patients developed grade 3 neutropenia. Major toxicity was oesophagitis, one patient requiring nasogastric feeding. Average duration of dysphagia (any grade) in the accelerated fractionation group was 21 weeks. Four patients achieved good partial responses even though initial tumour volume was large. It is concluded that this treatment is associated with increased but acceptable early mucosal toxicity. 6 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  12. Fluoroscopic gating without implanted fiducial markers for lung cancer radiotherapy based on support vector machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Ying; Dy, Jennifer G; Alexander, Brian; Jiang, Steve B

    2008-01-01

    Various problems with the current state-of-the-art techniques for gated radiotherapy have prevented this new treatment modality from being widely implemented in clinical routine. These problems are caused mainly by applying various external respiratory surrogates. There might be large uncertainties in deriving the tumor position from external respiratory surrogates. While tracking implanted fiducial markers has sufficient accuracy, this procedure may not be widely accepted due to the risk of pneumothorax. Previously, we have developed a technique to generate gating signals from fluoroscopic images without implanted fiducial markers using template matching methods (Berbeco et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4481-90, Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). In this note, our main contribution is to provide a totally different new view of the gating problem by recasting it as a classification problem. Then, we solve this classification problem by a well-studied powerful classification method called a support vector machine (SVM). Note that the goal of an automated gating tool is to decide when to turn the beam ON or OFF. We treat ON and OFF as the two classes in our classification problem. We create our labeled training data during the patient setup session by utilizing the reference gating signal, manually determined by a radiation oncologist. We then pre-process these labeled training images and build our SVM prediction model. During treatment delivery, fluoroscopic images are continuously acquired, pre-processed and sent as an input to the SVM. Finally, our SVM model will output the predicted labels as gating signals. We test the proposed technique on five sequences of fluoroscopic images from five lung cancer patients against the reference gating signal as ground truth. We compare the performance of the SVM to our previous template matching method (Cui et al 2007b Phys. Med. Biol. 52 741-55). We find that the SVM is slightly more accurate on average (1-3%) than

  13. The Role of Postoperative Radiotherapy on Stage N2 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Fangfang DU

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The clinical value of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT in stage N2 nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is controversy. The aim of this study is to analyze the efficacy of PORT in subgroup of stage N2 NSCLC, which can help clinicians to choose proper patients for PORT. Methods Clinical data of 359 patients with stage N2 NSCLC treated with radical surgery between Mar. 2000 and Jul. 2005 were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and seven patients received adjuvant chemotherapy and one hundred and four patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. First, the group of patients were analyzed to evaluate the factors affecting the overall survival. The all patients were divided based on tumor size and the number of lymph node metastasis station (single station or multiple station so as to evaluate the role of PORT. The endpoint was overall survival (OS and local recurrence-free survival (LRFS. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the OS, LRFS and Log-rank was used to compare the difference in OS and LRFS between different groups. Results The median duration of follow-up was 2.3 years. 224 patients died. The median survival was 1.5 years and 1, 3, 5-year survival were 78%, 38% and 26%. Univariate analysis showed tumor size, the number of lymph node metastasis station and PORT were correlated with OS. Among patients, 5-year survival rates in PORT and non-PORT were 29% and 24% (P=0.047 respectively. In subgroups, PORT was related with high survival in patients with multiple station N2 compared to non-PORT: 36% vs 20% (P=0.013 and 33% vs 15% (P=0.002 in patients in patients with tumor size > 3 cm. Also, it was related with low local recurrence compared to non-PORT: 65% vs 48% (P=0.006 and 62% vs 48% (P=0.033. Conclusion PORT can improve overall survival for N2 NSCLC, especially the patients with the factors as follows: tumor size > 3 cm and multiple station N2 can benefit from PORT more or less.

  14. Concurrent radiotherapy and fotemustine for brain metastases of non small cell cancer of the lung. Association concomitante de radiotherapie et de fotemustine dans le traitement des metastases cerebrales des cancers du poumon non a petites cellules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignon, T.; Ruggieri, S.; Orabona, P.; Muracciole, X.; Juin, P. (Hopital de la Timone, 13 - Marseille (France)); Astoul, P.; Vialette, J.P.; Boutin, C. (Hopital de la Conception, 13 - Marseille (France))

    1994-01-01

    The radiotherapy is the most employed in the treatment of cerebral metastases, even if results are deceptive. The tests with chemotherapy are not better and the nitrosoureas remain the most employed drugs. The fotemustin is a new one which can give good results for bearing cerebral metastases patients's response. The associations radiotherapy and chemotherapy are developing to potentiate radiotherapy action but are still a little studied in the cases of cerebral metastases; that is why we choose to treat in an open study the patients bearers of cerebral metastases in lungs cancers with no little cells. 18 refs.

  15. Surgery or stereotactic body radiotherapy for elderly stage I lung cancer? A propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Takuro; Yamazaki, Takuya; Nakamura, Daisuke; Sato, Shuntaro; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Kamohara, Ryotaro; Hatachi, Go; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of surgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for elderly clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients ≥80 years of age with clinical stage I NSCLC between August 2008 and December 2014 were treated either surgery or SBRT. Propensity score matching was performed to reduce bias in various clinicopathological factors. Surgery was performed in 57 cases and SBRT in 41 cases. In the surgery group, the operations included 34 lobectomies and 23 sublobar resections. In the SBRT group, 27 cases were given 48 Gy in 4 fractions, and 14 were given 60 Gy in 10 fractions. Similar characteristics were identified in age (82 years), gender (male:female ratio 2:1), tumor size (2.2 cm), carcinoembryonic antigen (3.6 ng/ml), Charlson comorbidity index (1), Glasgow prognostic scale (0), and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (1.7 L) after matching. Before matching, the 5-year overall survival (OS) in surgery (68.3%) was significantly better than that in SBRT (47.4%, p = 0.02), and the 5-year disease-specific survival (DSS) (94.1%, 78.2%, p = 0.17) was not significantly different between the groups. The difference in the 5-year OS became non-significant between the matched pairs (57.0%, 49.1%, p = 0.56). The outcomes of surgery and SBRT for elderly patients with the early stage NSCLC were roughly the same.

  16. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  17. Lived experiences of everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer: A phenomenological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Petri

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To explore and describe the essential meaning of lived experiences of the phenomenon: Everyday life during curative radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Background: Radiotherapy treatment in patients with NSCLC is associated with severe side effects such as fatigue, anxiety, and reduced quality of life. However, little is known about the patients’ experience of everyday life during the care trajectory. Design: This study takes a reflective lifeworld approach using an empirical application of phenomenological philosophy described by Dahlberg and colleagues. Method: A sample of three patients treated with curative radiotherapy for NSCLC was interviewed 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy treatment about their experiences of everyday life during their treatment. Data were collected in 2014 and interviews and analysis were conducted within the descriptive phenomenological framework. Findings: The essential meaning structure of the phenomenon studied was described as “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” which was a guide for the patients through the radiotherapy treatment to support their efforts in coping with side effects. The constituents of the structure were: Radiotherapy as a life priority, A struggle for acceptance of an altered everyday life, Interpersonal relationships for better or worse, and Meeting the health care system. Conclusion: The meaning of hope was essential during radiotherapy treatment and our results suggest that interpersonal relationships can be a prerequisite to the experience of hope. “Hope for recovery serving as a compass in a changed everyday life,” furthermore identifies the essentials in the patients’ assertive approach to believing in recovery and thereby enabling hope in a serious situation.

  18. Radiotherapy following bronchial artery infusion (BAI) chemotherapy for lung cancer. Analysis of long-term treatment results of 168 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaji, Noriaki

    1995-01-01

    Local control is known to contribute to a better survival for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Radiotherapy with bronchial artery infusion (BAI) of anticancer agents was employed to improve the response rate and prognosis of lung cancer. One hundred and sixty-eight patients of lung cancer were treated by this combined therapy. There were 138 with NSCLC and 30 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The overall cumulative 5-year survival rate of NSCLC was 11.3% and median survival time (MST) was 12 months. The response rate of 84% was obtained by this combined therapy. CR cases showed a better result of 35% of 5-year survival. Histology did not influence survival. Stage IIIA patients showed a significantly better survival than stage IIIB patients (p<0.05). No significant difference in survival was observed in the MMC/ADM group and the CDDP group. In SCLC patients, the overall cumulative 5-year survival was 4% and MST was 12 months. In limited disease (LD) group, MST was 13 months and extensive disease (ED) showed 11 months of MST. Two-year survival of LD was 18%. The response rate of this combined therapy was 94% and CR rate was 31%. On patterns of failure, the lower local recurrence rate of 6% (1/18) suggested contribution of BAI in SCLC. However, the long-term survival of SCLC was not greatly improved by radiotherapy combined with BAI. Thus these results suggest that it is necessary for improvement of survival to achieve CR in NSCLC patients, but local control may not contribute to it in SCLC patients. (author)

  19. Maximizing Benefits from Maintenance Pemetrexed with Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Oligoprogressive Non-Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Lun Lu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance pemetrexed offers survival benefit with well-tolerated toxicities for advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We present 3 consecutively enrolled patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC, receiving stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR for oligoprogressive disease during maintenance pemetrexed. All of them had sustained local control of thoracic oligoprogression after the SABR, while maintenance pemetrexed were kept for additionally long progression-free interval. SABR targeting oligoprogression with continued pemetrexed is an effective and safe approach to extend exposure of maintenance pemetrexed, thus maximizing the benefit from it.

  20. Partial stereotactic ablative boost radiotherapy in bulky non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Y

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Yun Bai,1 Xian-shu Gao,1 Shang-bin Qin,1 Jia-yan Chen,1 Meng-meng Su,1 Qing Liu,2 Xiu-bo Qin,2 Ming-wei Ma,1 Bo Zhao,1 Xiao-bin Gu,1 Mu Xie,1 Ming Cui,1 Xin Qi,1 Xiao-ying Li1 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China; 2Department of Medical Imaging, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China Purpose: Bulky non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is difficult to achieve effective local control by conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (CRT. The present work aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of partial stereotactic ablative boost radiotherapy (P-SABR in bulky NSCLC. Patients and methods: From December 2012 through August 2017, 30 patients with bulky NSCLC treated with P-SABR technique were analyzed. The P-SABR plan consisted of one partial SABR plan (5–9 Gy/f, 3–6 fractions to gross tumor boost (GTVb, followed by one CRT plan to the planning target volume (PTV. GTVb was the max volume receiving SABR to guarantee the dose of organs-at-risks (OARs falloff to about 3 Gy/f. The total dose of PTV margin was planned to above 60 Gy. The simply CRT plans were created using the same planning parameters as the original plan, with the goal to achieve comparable OARs doses and PTV margin dose to the P-SABR plan. Dosimetric variables were acquired in both P-SABR and compared CRT plans. Toxicity, local control, and survival were also evaluated. Results: Median follow-up in survivors was 10.3 months (range=2.3–39.4 months. Eleven patients (36.7% had partial response (PR and ten patients (33.3% had stable disease (SD. Two-year overall survival was 55.6%. Two-year local control rate was 85.7%. No severe acute side effects .CTCAE Grade III were observed. Compared to the simply CRT plan, P-SABR plans achieved similar doses to the OARs and Dmin, but increased dose at the isocenter, Dmean, Dmax, and biological equivalent dose (BED significantly (P<0.05. BED in the tumor center could reach 107.3 Gy (93.2–132

  1. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  2. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma secondary to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a long-term survivor of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Teruo; Takeshita, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    A 68 year-old man was given a diagnosis of lung cancer of the right upper lobe (small cell carcinoma, T 4 N 2 M 0, stage IIIB) in February 1991. The tumor diminished after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In February 1992, a partial resection of the lower lobe of the right lung was performed because of the appearance of a metastatic tumor. In September 1994, squamous cell carcinoma developed in the lower part of the esophagus, but disappeared after radiotherapy. In February 1998, a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. Two months later, the patient had an attack of acute myelocytic leukemia and died of cardiac tamponade. An autopsy determined that both the lung cancer and esophageal cancer had disappeared. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma of lymph nodes in the irradiated area were confirmed. These were regarded as secondary malignancies induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma secondary to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a long-term survivor of small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunishi, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Teruo; Takeshita, Atsushi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1999-05-01

    A 68 year-old man was given a diagnosis of lung cancer of the right upper lobe (small cell carcinoma, T 4 N 2 M 0, stage IIIB) in February 1991. The tumor diminished after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In February 1992, a partial resection of the lower lobe of the right lung was performed because of the appearance of a metastatic tumor. In September 1994, squamous cell carcinoma developed in the lower part of the esophagus, but disappeared after radiotherapy. In February 1998, a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. Two months later, the patient had an attack of acute myelocytic leukemia and died of cardiac tamponade. An autopsy determined that both the lung cancer and esophageal cancer had disappeared. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma of lymph nodes in the irradiated area were confirmed. These were regarded as secondary malignancies induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  4. Pluridirectional High-Energy Agile Scanning Electron Radiotherapy (PHASER): Extremely Rapid Treatment for Early Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    esophagus , and anal cancer cases. We performed Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and we optimized the dose in a research version of RayStation... esophagus , and anal cancer cases. We 44 performed Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations and we optimized the dose in a research version of...clinical cases were: acoustic neuroma, and liver, lung, esophagus and anal cancer 120 cases. Target sizes ranged from 1.2 cm3 to 990.4 cm3 (Table 1

  5. Histopathologic Consideration of Fiducial Gold Markers Inserted for Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy Against Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, Mikado; Yamazaki, Koichi; Kubota, Kanako C.; Itoh, Tomoo; Onimaru, Rikiya; Cho, Yasushi; Hida, Yasuhiro; Kaga, Kichizo; Onodera, Yuya; Ogura, Shigeaki; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Internal fiducial gold markers, safely inserted with bronchoscopy, have been used in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy for lung cancer. We investigated the histopathologic findings at several points after the insertion of the gold markers. Methods and Materials: Sixteen gold markers were inserted for preoperative marking in 7 patients who subsequently underwent partial resection of tumors by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery within 7 days. Results: Fibrotic changes and hyperplasia of type 2 pneumocytes around the markers were seen 5 or 7 days after insertion, and fibrin exudation without fibrosis was detected 1 or 2 days after insertion. Conclusions: Because fibroblastic changes start approximately 5 days after gold marker insertion, real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy should be started >5 days after gold marker insertion

  6. Geometric uncertainties in voluntary deep inspiration breath hold radiotherapy for locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, G F; Dueck, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) increases lung volume and can potentially reduce treatment-related toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer. We estimated geometric uncertainties in visually guided voluntary DIBH and derived the appropriate treatment margins for different...... image-guidance strategies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seventeen patients were included prospectively. An optical marker-based respiratory monitoring with visual guidance enabled comfortable DIBHs, adjusted to each patient's performance. All patients had three consecutive DIBH CTs at each of the treatment...

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases from the RSSearch® patient registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Joanne N.; Medbery, Clinton; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pablo, John; Kimsey, Frank; Perry, David; Muacevic, Alexander; Mahadevan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastases from the RSSearch ® Patient Registry, an international, multi-center patient registry dedicated to radiosurgery and SBRT. Eligible patients included those with centrally located lung tumors clinically staged T1-T2 N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed NSCLC or lung metastases treated with SBRT between November 2004 and January 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to report patient demographics and treatment patterns. Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was reported using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. In total, 111 patients with 114 centrally located lung tumors (48 T1-T2,N0,M0 NSCLC and 66 lung metastases) were treated with SBRT at 19 academic and community-based radiotherapy centers in the US and Germany. Median follow-up was 17 months (range, 1–72). Median age was 74 years for primary NSCLC patients and 65 years for lung metastases patients (p < 0.001). SBRT dose varied from 16 – 60 Gy (median 48 Gy) delivered in 1–5 fractions (median 4 fractions). Median dose to centrally located primary NSCLC was 48 Gy compared to 37.5 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0001) and median BED 10 was 105.6 Gy for primary NSCLC and 93.6 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0005). Two-year OS for T1N0M0 and T2N0M0 NSCLC was 79 and 32.1 %, respectively (p = 0.009) and 2-year OS for lung metastases was 49.6 %. Two-year LC was 76.4 and 69.8 % for primary NSCLC and lung metastases, respectively. Toxicity was low with no Grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities. Overall, patients with centrally located primary NSCLC were older and received higher doses of SBRT than those with lung metastases. Despite these differences, LC and OS was favorable for patients with central lung tumors treated with SBRT. Reported toxicity

  8. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. → Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. → Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. → Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  9. Lung cancer: Diagnostic procedures and therapeutic management, with special reference to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarantino, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book on lung cancer provides a good overview of this very common cause of death in both men and women. The eight chapters in this book review a number of aspects of the disease including epidemiology, pathology, diagnostic workup, and treatment by radiation and chemotherapy. The two introductory chapters provide a summary of the epidemiology of this disease and an approach to each individual patient. Included are chapters on the many methods of treating lung cancer and the results of clinical trials as well as a brief discussion given to surgical treatment. A chapter on clinical research is directed primarily at ideas relating to chemotherapy. This brief book provides an overview of the many aspects involved in diagnosing and treating lung cancer

  10. [Optimization of radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using 18FDG-PET].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S; Nestle, U; Walter, K; Licht, N; Ukena, D; Schnabel, K; Kirsch, C M

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most causes (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm2, after redefinition using PET 166 cm2. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectasis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation.

  11. Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghfoor, Irfan; Perry, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Since tobacco smoking is the cause in vast majority of cases, the incidence of lung cancer is expected to rise in those countries with high or rising incidence of tobacco smoking. Even though population at a risk of developing lung cancer are easily identified, mass screening for lung cancer is not supported by currently available evidence. In case of non-small cell lung cancer, a cure may be possible with surgical resection followed by post-operative chemotherapy in those diagnosed at an early stage. A small minority of patients who present with locally advanced disease may also benefit from preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to down stage the tumor to render it potentially operable. In a vast majority of patients, however, lung cancer presents at an advanced stage and a cure is not possible with currently available therapeutic strategies. Similarly small cell lung cancer confined to one hemi-thorax may be curable with a combination of chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation, if complete remission is achieved at the primary site. Small cell lung cancer that is spread beyond the confines of one hemi-thorax is however, considered incurable. In this era of molecular targeted therapies, new agents are constantly undergoing pre-clinical and clinical testing with the aim of targeting the molecular pathways thought to involved in etiology and pathogenesis of lung cancer. (author)

  12. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: From concept to clinical reality. 2011 update; Radiotherapie stereotaxique des cancers broncho-pulmonaires non a petites cellules: d'un concept a une realite clinique. Actualites en 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, N. [Service de pneumologie, hopital Louis-Pradel, hospices civils de Lyon, 28, avenue du Doyen-Jean-Lepine, 69500 Bron (France); UMR 754, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, 165, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69495 Pierre-Benite cedex (France); EA 37-38, universite Claude-Bernard Lyon 1, 43, boulevard du 11-Novembre-1918, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2011-10-15

    Only 60% of patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a priori bearing a favorable prognosis, undergo radical resection because of the very frequent co-morbidities occurring in smokers, precluding surgery to be safely performed. Stereotactic radiotherapy consists of the use of multiple radiation micro-beams, allowing high doses of radiation to be delivered to the tumour (ranging from 7.5 to 20 Gy per fraction) in a small number of fractions (one to eight on average). Several studies with long-term follow-up are now available, showing the effectiveness of stereotactic radiotherapy to control stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer in medically inoperable patients. Local control rates are consistently reported to be above 95% with a median survival of 34 to 45 months. Because of these excellent results, stereotactic radiation therapy is now being evaluated in operable patients in several randomized trials with a surgical arm. Ultimately, the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy in early-stage tumours leads to hypothesize that it may represent an opportunity for locally-advanced tumors. The specific toxicities of stereotactic radiotherapy mostly correspond to radiation-induced chest wall side effects, especially for peripheral tumours. The use of adapted fractionation schemes has made feasible the use of stereotactic radiotherapy to treat proximal tumours. Overall, from a technical concept to the availability of specific treatment devices and the publication of clinical results, stereotactic radiotherapy represents a model of implementation in thoracic oncology. (authors)

  14. External hyperalimentation: its role in radiotherapy/chemotherapy of lung cancer - a preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabic, I.

    1991-01-01

    Radiation and chemotherapy can result in further deterioration of the nutritional status of lung cancer patients who frequently are malnourished as a consequence of their underlying malignancy. Nutritional support of these individuals should be based on a complete assessment of each patient's requirements as well as providing such requirements through a safe efficacious eternal hyperalimentaton program. This investigation was designed to study whether clinically significant palliation maybe achieved by nutritional rehabilitation of the cachetic lung cancer patient as an adjuvant to conventional antitumor therapy. (auth.). 13 refs.; 4 tabs

  15. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, Ling; Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  16. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Ling [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 4100 John R, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun, E-mail: jun.zhou@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, 3601 West Thirteen Mile Road, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the

  17. Long-term change in pulmonary function after definitive radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, T.; Bentzen, S. M.; Brink, C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Radiotherapy (RT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may cause late toxicities, such as heart toxicity, changes in pulmonary function (PF) and lung fibrosis, but late toxicity data are scarce in the literature for this category of patients. The objective of this study...... with 3063 pairs of pulmonary function test (PFTs) were screened for eligibility for inclusion in the analysis of late changes in PF. To be eligible, patients had at least 3 PFTs after baseline. In this study, baseline was defined as 12 months after RT commencement to overcome a possible effect of tumor...... finding was that high V60 was associated with less decline in FVC, but FVC may be a less reliable parameter for pulmonary damage. (Figure Presented) Conclusions: Patients experience a decline in FEV1 after the 12-month value following definitive RT for NSCLC. In a multivariable analysis, deterioration...

  18. Nontargeted Effect after Radiotherapy in a Patient with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Bullous Pemphigoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Nieder

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe tumor shrinkage of nonirradiated lung metastases in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer. Case Report. The patient had a concurrent autoimmune condition, bullous pemphigoid, which was clinically exacerbated during radiotherapy of mediastinal and axillary lymph node metastases. He also developed a series of infections during and after irradiation, and we hypothesize that the immunological events during this phase might have influenced the size of the nonirradiated metastases. Conclusion. Ionizing radiation generates inflammatory signals and, in principle, could provide both tumor-specific antigens from dying cells and maturation stimuli that are necessary for dendritic cells’ activation of tumor-specific T cells. Even if the detailed mechanisms causing nontargeted immune modulatory effects in individual patients are poorly understood, clinical development of radioimmunotherapy is underway.

  19. Radiotherapy of lung cancer: the inspiration breath hold with a spirometric monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, R.; Oozeer, R.; Le Thanh, H.; Chastel, D.; Doyen, J.C.; Chauvet, B.; Reboul, F.

    2002-01-01

    A CT acquisition during a free breathing examination generates images of poor quality. It creates an uncertainty on the reconstructed gross tumour volume and dose distribution. The aim of this study is to test the feasibility of a breath hold method applied in all preparation and treatment days. Five patients received a thoracic radiotherapy with the benefit of this procedure. The breathing of the patient was measured with a spirometer. The patient was coached to reproduce a constant level of breath-hold in a deep inspiration. Video glasses helped the patients to fix the breath-hold at the reference level. The patients followed the coaching during preparation and treatment, without any difficulty. The better quality of the CT reconstructed images resulted in an easier contouring. No movements of the gross tumour volume lead to a better coverage. The deep breath hold decreased the volume of irradiated lung. This method improves the reproducibility of the thoracic irradiation. The decrease of irradiated lung volume offers prospects in dose escalation and intensity modulation radiotherapy. (authors)

  20. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shareable Graphics Infographics “African-American Men and Lung Cancer” “Lung Cancer Is the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ...

  1. TH-CD-207A-03: A Surface Deformation Driven Respiratory Model for Organ Motion Tracking in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L; Gu, X

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To propose and validate a novel real-time surface-mesh-based internal organ-external surface motion and deformation tracking method for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Deformation vector fields (DVFs) which characterizes the internal and external motion are obtained by registering the internal organ and tumor contours and external surface meshes to a reference phase in the 4D CT images using a recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). A composite matrix is constructed by combing the estimated internal and external DVFs. Principle component analysis (PCA) is then applied on the composite matrix to extract principal motion characteristics and finally yield the respiratory motion model parameters which correlates the internal and external motion and deformation. The accuracy of the respiratory motion model is evaluated using a 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) synthetic phantom and three lung cancer cases. The center of mass (COM) difference is used to measure the tumor motion tracking accuracy, and the Dice’s coefficient (DC), percent error (PE) and Housdourf’s distance (HD) are used to measure the agreement between the predicted and ground truth tumor shape. Results: The mean COM is 0.84±0.49mm and 0.50±0.47mm for the phantom and patient data respectively. The mean DC, PE and HD are 0.93±0.01, 0.13±0.03 and 1.24±0.34 voxels for the phantom, and 0.91±0.04, 0.17±0.07 and 3.93±2.12 voxels for the three lung cancer patients, respectively. Conclusions: We have proposed and validate a real-time surface-mesh-based organ motion and deformation tracking method with an internal-external motion modeling. The preliminary results conducted on a synthetic 4D NCAT phantom and 4D CT images from three lung cancer cases show that the proposed method is reliable and accurate in tracking both the tumor motion trajectory and deformation, which can serve as a potential tool for real-time organ motion and deformation

  2. TH-CD-207A-03: A Surface Deformation Driven Respiratory Model for Organ Motion Tracking in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Zhen, X; Zhou, L [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong (China); Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To propose and validate a novel real-time surface-mesh-based internal organ-external surface motion and deformation tracking method for lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Deformation vector fields (DVFs) which characterizes the internal and external motion are obtained by registering the internal organ and tumor contours and external surface meshes to a reference phase in the 4D CT images using a recent developed local topology preserved non-rigid point matching algorithm (TOP). A composite matrix is constructed by combing the estimated internal and external DVFs. Principle component analysis (PCA) is then applied on the composite matrix to extract principal motion characteristics and finally yield the respiratory motion model parameters which correlates the internal and external motion and deformation. The accuracy of the respiratory motion model is evaluated using a 4D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) synthetic phantom and three lung cancer cases. The center of mass (COM) difference is used to measure the tumor motion tracking accuracy, and the Dice’s coefficient (DC), percent error (PE) and Housdourf’s distance (HD) are used to measure the agreement between the predicted and ground truth tumor shape. Results: The mean COM is 0.84±0.49mm and 0.50±0.47mm for the phantom and patient data respectively. The mean DC, PE and HD are 0.93±0.01, 0.13±0.03 and 1.24±0.34 voxels for the phantom, and 0.91±0.04, 0.17±0.07 and 3.93±2.12 voxels for the three lung cancer patients, respectively. Conclusions: We have proposed and validate a real-time surface-mesh-based organ motion and deformation tracking method with an internal-external motion modeling. The preliminary results conducted on a synthetic 4D NCAT phantom and 4D CT images from three lung cancer cases show that the proposed method is reliable and accurate in tracking both the tumor motion trajectory and deformation, which can serve as a potential tool for real-time organ motion and deformation

  3. Deformable image registration for geometrical evaluation of DIBH radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Lykkegaard Andersen, J. A.; Borrisova, S.

    2014-01-01

    locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients were included, each with a planning-, midterm- and final CT (pCT, mCT, fCT) and 7 CBCTs acquired weekly and on the same day as the mCT and fCT. All imaging were performed in both FB and DIBH, using Varian RPM system for respiratory tracking...

  4. Effects of concomitant cisplatin and radiotherapy on inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van den Bogaert, W.; Dalesio, O.; Festen, J.; Hoogenhout, J.; van Houtte, P.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Koolen, M.; Maat, B.; Nijs, A.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) has been reported to enhance the cell-killing effect of radiation, an effect whose intensity varies with the schedule of administration. We randomly assigned 331 patients with nonmetastatic inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer to one

  5. S-1 plus cisplatin with concurrent radiotherapy versus cisplatin alone with concurrent radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Lei; Xu, Shidong; Xu, Jianyu; Yang, Chaoyang; Wang, Junfeng; Sun, Dawei

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy and safety of S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation (SCCR) over cisplatin alone plus concurrent thoracic radiation (CCR) for unresectable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between January 2009 and November 2011, 40 eligible patients with NSCLC were included and divided randomly into two groups. Twenty patients received SCCR with S-1 (orally at 40 mg/m 2 per dose, b.i.d.) on days 1 through 14, cisplatin (60 mg/m 2 on day 1) every 4 weeks for two cycles, and radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions over 6 weeks) beginning on day 1. Twenty subjects received CCR (cisplatin and radiotherapy, the same as for SCCR). The 3-year overall response rate was 59.3% and 52.4% for the SCCR and CCR groups, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant, while the median overall survival was 33 months (range, 4–41 months) and 24 months (range, 2–37 months), respectively (P = 0.048). The median progression-free survival was 31 months for SCCR (range, 5–39 months), whereas it was 20 months (range, 2–37 months) for CCR (P = 0.037). The toxicity profile was similar in both groups. In summary, we demonstrated that S-1 and cisplatin with concurrent thoracic radiation was more effective than cisplatin plus radiotherapy in NSCLC patients with acceptable toxicity

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Intensity-Modulated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy for Lung Cancer and Lung Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Nagai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT proved to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity for lung tumors. However, the use of helical intensity-modulated (IM SBRT is controversial. We investigated the outcome of lung tumor patients treated by IMSBRT using helical tomotherapy with a Japanese standard fractionation schedule of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (n=37 or modified protocols of 50–60 Gy in 5–8 fractions (n=35. Median patient’s age was 76 years and median follow-up period for living patients was 20 months (range, 6–46. The median PTV was 6.9 cc in the 4-fraction group and 14 cc in the 5- to 8-fraction group (P=0.001. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis was seen in 2 of 37 patients in the 4-fraction group and in 2 of 35 patients in the 5- to 8-fraction group (log-rank P=0.92. Other major complications were not observed. The LC rates at 2 years were 87% in the 4-fraction group and 83% in the 5- to 8-fraction group. Helical IMSBRT for lung tumors is safe and effective. Patients with a high risk of developing severe complications may also be safely treated using 5–8 fractions. The results of the current study warrant further studies of helical IMSBRT.

  7. Phase II study. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy with nitroglycerin in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Blake, Mónika; Mata-Moya, María Dolores de la; Corona, Francisco; Turcott, Jenny; Orta, David; Alexander-Alatorre, Jorge; Gallardo-Rincón, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nitroglycerin, a nitric oxide donor agent, reduces the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and could be a normalizer of the tumor microenvironment. Both factors are associated with chemo-radio-resistance. The aim of this study was to determine the safety profile and efficacy of nitroglycerin administration with chemo-radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: This is a phase II trial of locally advanced NSCLC patients treated with cisplatin and vinorelbine plus concurrent nitroglycerin with radiotherapy. A 25-mg NTG patch was administered to the patients for 5 days (1 day before and 4 days after chemotherapy induction and consolidation) and all day during chemo-radiotherapy. VEGF plasmatic level was determined before and after two cycles of chemotherapy. Results: Thirty-five patients were enrolled in this trial. Sixty-three percent of patients achieved an overall response after induction of chemotherapy, and 75% achieved an overall response after chemo-radiotherapy. The median progression-free survival was 13.5 months (95% CI, 8.8–18.2), and the median overall survival was 26.9 months (95% CI, 15.3–38.5). Reduction of VEGF level was associated with better OS. The toxicity profile related to nitroglycerin included headache (20%) and hypotension (2.9%). Conclusions: The addition of nitroglycerin to induction chemotherapy and concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC has an acceptable toxicity profile and supports the possibility to add nitroglycerin to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. A randomized trial is warranted to confirm these findings

  8. Definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy. Principles and practice for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Sauer, O. [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Wuerzburg (Germany); Andratschke, N. [University of Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Rostock (Germany); Alheit, H. [Distler Radiation Oncology, Bautzen/Pirna (Germany); Holy, R. [RWTH Aachen University, Department of Radiation Oncology, Aachen (Germany); Moustakis, C. [University of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany); Nestle, U. [University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    This report from the Stereotactic Radiotherapy Working Group of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO) provides a definition of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) that agrees with that of other international societies. SBRT is defined as a method of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) that accurately delivers a high irradiation dose to an extracranial target in one or few treatment fractions. Detailed recommendations concerning the principles and practice of SBRT for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are given. These cover the entire treatment process; from patient selection, staging, treatment planning and delivery to follow-up. SBRT was identified as the method of choice when compared to best supportive care (BSC), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy and radiofrequency ablation. Based on current evidence, SBRT appears to be on a par with sublobar resection and is an effective treatment option in operable patients who refuse lobectomy. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeitsgruppe ''Stereotaktische Radiotherapie'' der Deutschen Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie (DEGRO) erarbeitete eine Definition der Koerperstereotaxie (SBRT), die sich an vorhandene internationale Definitionen anlehnt: Die SBRT ist eine Form der perkutanen Strahlentherapie, die mit hoher Praezision eine hohe Bestrahlungsdosis in einer oder wenigen Bestrahlungsfraktionen in einem extrakraniellen Zielvolumen appliziert. Zur Praxis der SBRT beim nichtkleinzelligen Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im fruehen Stadium werden detaillierte Empfehlungen gegeben, die den gesamten Ablauf der Behandlung von der Indikationsstellung, Staging, Behandlungsplanung und Applikation sowie Nachsorge umfassen. Die Koerperstereotaxie wurde als Methode der Wahl im Vergleich zu Best Supportive Care, zur konventionell fraktionierten Strahlentherapie sowie zur Radiofrequenzablation identifiziert. Die Ergebnisse nach SBRT und sublobaerer Resektion

  9. Reducing dose to the lungs through loosing target dose homogeneity requirement for radiotherapy of non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Junjie; Yan, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Ma, Pan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Minghui; Ren, Wenting; Chen, Jiayun; Zhang, Ye; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    It is important to minimize lung dose during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, an approach was proposed to reduce lung dose by relaxing the constraint of target dose homogeneity during treatment planning of IMRT. Ten NSCLC patients with lung tumor on the right side were selected. The total dose for planning target volume (PTV) was 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction). For each patient, two IMRT plans with six beams were created in Pinnacle treatment planning system. The dose homogeneity of target was controlled by constraints on the maximum and uniform doses of target volume. One IMRT plan was made with homogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was within 95%-107% of the prescribed dose), while another IMRT plan was made with inhomogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was more than 95% of the prescribed dose). During plan optimization, the dose of cord and heart in two types of IMRT plans were kept nearly the same. The doses of lungs, PTV and organs at risk (OARs) between two types of IMRT plans were compared and analyzed quantitatively. For all patients, the lung dose was decreased in the IMRT plans with inhomogeneous target dose. On average, the mean dose, V5, V20, and V30 of lung were reduced by 1.4 Gy, 4.8%, 3.7%, and 1.7%, respectively, and the dose to normal tissue was also reduced. These reductions in DVH values were all statistically significant (P target dose could protect lungs better and may be considered as a choice for treating NSCLC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  10. Radiotherapy in bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozan, R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1992, the problem of the vesical radiotherapy is not resolved. The author presents the situation and the different techniques of radiotherapy in bladder cancers: external radiotherapy, only and associated with surgery, interstitial curietherapy and non-classical techniques as per operative radiotherapy, neutron therapy and concurrent radiotherapy with chemotherapy. In order to compare their efficiency, the five-year survival are given in all cases.(10 tabs)

  11. Bystander effects in radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.R.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Australia Objectives The bystander effect causes a response in unirradiated cells that are in communication with cells that receive a radiation dose. In recent work we have shown that there are 3 types bystander effect and that the expression of these effects follows a Ii course. The aim of this work is to identify the conditions for the three types of bystander effects in radiotherapy of non-small cell II cancer. A human non small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460) was irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam produced from a Varian I i near accelerator to doses of 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy. These cells v termed donor cells. At selected time intervals after exposure (5,15 and 60 min), the medium was transferred to receiver cells of the cell line in separate flasks. The clonogenic survival fraction of the receiver cells was determined following 5 days of incubation comparing cells receiving transfer of medium from exposed cells to cell receiving transfer from sham exposed cells. The experimental design controlled for the density of cells in the donor flask, the e of irradiation on the medium alone and on the donor cell metabolites. The results show a strong time course for the bystander signal expression, which is dependent on the density of cells in the donor receiver flasks. Sub lethal doses of radiation resulted in a proliferative response at short time intervals after exposure [15 min] but a toxic response when medium transfer was carried out after 60 min. A higher cell density in the donor flasks produces an increased response in the receiver flasks for the same volume of medium transferred. The latter response corresponds to Bystander Effect type 1 in which a reduced survival is observed in cells receiving medium from cells that receive a high but not lethal dose. The proliferative response, corresponding to Bystander Effect type 3 is more general and is not strongly dependent on dose. Following a lethal dose of

  12. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka

    2017-01-01

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  13. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  14. Chest Reirradiation With External Beam Radiotherapy for Locally Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Videtic, Gregory M.M.

    2011-01-01

    appropriately characterize the historic practice relevant to thoracic reirradiation of recurrent lung cancer, we carried out a comprehensive search of the English-language literature to identify and review relevant studies of the use of EBRT in the treatment of locally recurrent cancer. We limited our scope to treatment of NSCLC and excluded other RT modalities such as brachytherapy and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The goal of this systematic review was to better inform current practice in order to ultimately generate appropriate future research endeavors in this setting.

  15. Comparison of dose evaluation index by pencil beam convolution and anisotropic analytical algorithm in stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Masayuki; Noguchi, Yoshitaka; Fukunaga, Jyunichi; Hirano, Naomi; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Hirose, Takaaki

    2009-01-01

    We previously studied dose distributions of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) for lung cancer. Our aim is to compare in combination pencil beam convolution with the inhomogeneity correction algorithm of Batho power low [PBC (BPL)] to the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) by using the dose evaluation indexes. There were significant differences in D95, planning target volume (PTV) mean dose, homogeneity index, and conformity index, V10, and V5. The dose distributions inside the PTV calculated by PBC (BPL) were more uniform than those of AAA. There were no significant differences in V20 and mean dose of total lung. There was no large difference for the whole lung. However, the surrounding high-dose region of PTV became smaller in AAA. The difference in dose evaluation indexes extended between PBC (BPL) and AAA that as many as low CT value of lung. When the dose calculation algorithm is changed, it is necessary to consider difference dose distributions compared with those of established practice. (author)

  16. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3

  17. Residual F-18-FDG-PET Uptake 12 Weeks After Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Predicts Local Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Widder, Joachim; Pruim, Jan; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) uptake at 12 weeks after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: From November 2006 to February 2010, 132 medically

  18. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...

  19. Once-Weekly, High-Dose Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer: 6-Year Analysis of 60 Early-Stage, 42 Locally Advanced, and 7 Metastatic Lung Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, Omar M.; Sandhu, Taljit S.; Lattin, Paul B.; Chang, Jung H.; Lee, Choon K.; Groshko, Gayle A.; Lattin, Cheryl J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To explore once-weekly stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in nonoperable patients with localized, locally advanced, or metastatic lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 primary (89 untreated plus 13 recurrent) and 7 metastatic tumors were studied. The median follow-up was 38 months, the average patient age was 75 years. Of the 109 tumors studied, 60 were Stage I (45 IA and 15 IB), 9 were Stage II, 30 were Stage III, 3 were Stage IV, and 7 were metastases. SBRT only was given in 73% (40 Gy in four fractions to the planning target volume to a total dose of 53 Gy to the isocenter for a biologically effective dose of 120 Gy 10 ). SBRT was given as a boost in 27% (22.5 Gy in three fractions once weekly for a dose of 32 Gy at the isocenter) after 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the primary plus the mediastinum. The total biologically effective dose was 120 Gy 10 . Respiration gating was used in 46%. Results: The overall response rate was 75%; 33% had a complete response. The overall response rate was 89% for Stage IA patients (40% had a complete response). The local control rate was 82%; it was 100% and 93% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The failure rate was 37%, with 17% within the planning target volume. No Grade 3-4 acute toxicities developed in any patient; 12% and 7% of patients developed Grade 1 and 2 toxicities, respectively. Late toxicity, all Grade 2, developed in 3% of patients. The 5-year cause-specific survival rate for Stage I was 70% and was 74% and 64% for Stage IA and IB patients, respectively. The 3-year Stage III cause-specific survival rate was 30%. The patients with metastatic lung cancer had a 57% response rate, a 27% complete response rate, an 86% local control rate, a median survival time of 19 months, and 23% 3-year survival rate. Conclusions: SBRT is noninvasive, convenient, fast, and economically attractive; it achieves results similar to surgery for early or metastatic lung cancer patients who are older

  20. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Higashimura, Kyoji; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-08-01

    To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ± 3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm(2) field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ± 3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124-358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42-94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5-9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. In the phantom evaluations, AXB and XVMC agreed better with

  1. Acute tumor vascular effects following fractionated radiotherapy in human lung cancer: In vivo whole tumor assessment using volumetric perfusion computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Q.-S.; Goh, Vicky; Milner, Jessica; Padhani, Anwar R.; Saunders, Michele I.; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess the in vivo acute vascular effects of fractionated radiotherapy for human non-small-cell lung cancer using volumetric perfusion computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, undergoing palliative radiotherapy delivering 27 Gy in 6 fractions over 3 weeks, were scanned before treatment, and after the second (9 Gy), fourth (18 Gy), and sixth (27 Gy) radiation fraction. Using 16-detector CT, multiple sequential volumetric acquisitions were acquired after intravenous contrast agent injection. Measurements of vascular blood volume and permeability for the whole tumor volume were obtained. Vascular changes at the tumor periphery and center were also measured. Results: At baseline, lung tumor vascularity was spatially heterogeneous with the tumor rim showing a higher vascular blood volume and permeability than the center. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vascular blood volume increased by 31.6% (paired t test, p = 0.10), 49.3% (p = 0.034), and 44.6% (p = 0.0012) respectively at the tumor rim, and 16.4% (p = 0.29), 19.9% (p = 0.029), and 4.0% (p = 0.0050) respectively at the center of the tumor. After the second, fourth, and sixth fractions of radiotherapy, vessel permeability increased by 18.4% (p = 0.022), 44.8% (p = 0.0048), and 20.5% (p = 0.25) at the tumor rim. The increase in permeability at the tumor center was not significant after radiotherapy. Conclusion: Fractionated radiotherapy increases tumor vascular blood volume and permeability in human non-small-cell lung cancer. We have established the spatial distribution of vascular changes after radiotherapy; greater vascular changes were demonstrated at the tumor rim compared with the center

  2. A potential to reduce pulmonary toxicity: The use of perfusion SPECT with IMRT for functional lung avoidance in radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Niotsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Parker, Michelle; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: The study aimed to examine specific avoidance of functional lung (FL) defined by a single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion scan, using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: Patients with NSCLC underwent planning computerized tomography (CT) and lung perfusion SPECT scan in the treatment position using fiducial markers to allow co-registration in the treatment planning system. Radiotherapy (RT) volumes were delineated on the CT scan. FL was defined using co-registered SPECT images. Two inverse coplanar RT plans were generated for each patient: 4-field 3-DCRT and 5-field step-and-shoot IMRT. 3-DCRT plans were created using automated AutoPlan optimisation software, and IMRT plans were generated employing Pinnacle 3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems). All plans were prescribed to 64 Gy in 32 fractions using data for the 6 MV beam from an Elekta linear accelerator. The objectives for both plans were to minimize the volume of FL irradiated to 20 Gy (fV 20 ) and dose variation within the planning target volume (PTV). A spinal cord dose was constrained to 46 Gy. Volume of PTV receiving 90% of the prescribed dose (PTV 90 ), fV 20 , and functional mean lung dose (fMLD) were recorded. The PTV 90 /fV 20 ratio was used to account for variations in both measures, where a higher value represented a better plan. Results: Thirty-four RT plans of 17 patients with stage I-IIIB NSCLC suitable for radical RT were analysed. In 6 patients with stage I-II disease there was no improvement in PTV 90 , fV 20 , PTV/fV 20 ratio and fMLD using IMRT compared to 3-DCRT. In 11 patients with stage IIIA-B disease, the PTV was equally well covered with IMRT and 3-DCRT plans, with IMRT producing better PTV 90 /fV 20 ratio (mean ratio - 7.2 vs. 5.3, respectively, p = 0.001) and reduced f

  3. Radiotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer in the era of EGFR gene mutations and EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschini, Ilaria; Dell'Anna, Cristina; Losardo, Pier Luigi; Bordi, Paola; D'Abbiero, Nunziata; Tiseo, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) occurs, approximately, in 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. The majority of patients present locally advanced or metastatic disease when diagnosed, with poor prognosis. The discovery of activating mutations in the EGFR gene has started a new era of personalized treatment for NSCLC patients. To improve the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable NSCLC and, in particular, EGFR mutated, a combined strategy of radiotherapy and medical treatment can be undertaken. In this review we will discuss preclinical data regarding EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and radiotherapy, available clinical trials investigating efficacy and toxicity of combined treatment (thoracic or whole brain radiotherapy and EGFR-TKIs) and, also, the role of local radiation in mutated EGFR patients who developed EGFR-TKI resistance.

  4. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  5. Cine Computed Tomography Without Respiratory Surrogate in Planning Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegel, Adam C. B.A.; Chang, Joe Y.; Vedam, Sastry S.; Johnson, Valen; Chi, Pai-Chun Melinda; Pan, Tinsu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether cine computed tomography (CT) can serve as an alternative to four-dimensional (4D)-CT by providing tumor motion information and producing equivalent target volumes when used to contour in radiotherapy planning without a respiratory surrogate. Methods and Materials: Cine CT images from a commercial CT scanner were used to form maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets. These image sets then were used together to define the targets for radiotherapy. Phantoms oscillating under irregular motion were used to assess the differences between contouring using cine CT and 4D-CT. We also retrospectively reviewed the image sets for 26 patients (27 lesions) at our institution who had undergone stereotactic radiotherapy for Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer. The patients were included if the tumor motion was >1 cm. The lesions were first contoured using maximum intensity projection and respiratory-averaged CT image sets processed from cine CT and then with 4D-CT maximum intensity projection and 10-phase image sets. The mean ratios of the volume magnitude were compared with intraobserver variation, the mean centroid shifts were calculated, and the volume overlap was assessed with the normalized Dice similarity coefficient index. Results: The phantom studies demonstrated that cine CT captured a greater extent of irregular tumor motion than did 4D-CT, producing a larger tumor volume. The patient studies demonstrated that the gross tumor defined using cine CT imaging was similar to, or slightly larger than, that defined using 4D-CT. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that cine CT is a promising alternative to 4D-CT for stereotactic radiotherapy planning

  6. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer using a lung density correction: the University of Michigan experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Strawderman, Myla H.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Although an abundance of reports detail the successful use of definitive radiotherapy of the breast in the treatment in Stage I or II breast cancer, little data have been published concerning the use of lung density correction and its effect upon long-term outcome. As it has been the practice at the University of Michigan to routinely use lung density correction in the dose calculations to the breast, we retrospectively analyzed our results for local control, relapse-free, and overall survival. Methods and Materials: Clinical records were reviewed of 429 women with Stage I or II breast cancer treated with lumpectomy, axillary dissection, and breast irradiation with or without systemic chemo/hormonal therapy. Tangential radiotherapy fields delivering 45 to 50 Gy were used to treat the entire breast. A boost was delivered in 95% of cases for a total tumor bed dose of 60 to 66 Gy. All treatment plans were calculated using a lung density correction. Results: With a median follow up of 4.4 years, the 5-year actuarial rate of local control with local failure as the only site of first failure was 96% (95% CI 94-98%). Univariate analysis for local failure as only first failure found the following factors to statistically predict for increased risk of breast recurrence: young age (≤35 years old), premenopausal status, tumor size >2 cm, positive family history, and positive microscopic margins. Multivariate analysis revealed young age and margin status to be the only factors remaining significant for local failure. The 5-year actuarial relapse-free survival was 85% (95% CI 81-89%); overall survival at 5 years was 90% (95% CI 87-94%). Conclusions: Lung density correction results in rates of local control, disease-free, and overall survival at 5 years that compare favorably with series using noncorrected unit density calculations. While we will continue to update our results with increasing follow-up, our 5-year data indicate that the use of lung-density correction

  7. Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer using Real-Time Tumor Tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.C.M-G. van der Voort van Zyp (Noëlle)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer world-wide (1.61 million; 12.7% of the total) and also the leading cause of cancer death (1.38 million; 18.2% of the total). In the Netherlands, lung cancer was diagnosed in almost 11,000 patients in 2007 (website Netherlands Cancer

  8. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  9. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gi tte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Sp echt, Lena

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (±0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (±0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (±0.19) and 0.72cm (±0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos

  10. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causing chemicals such as uranium, beryllium, vinyl chloride, nickel chromates, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, gasoline, and diesel exhaust Exposure to radon gas Family history of lung cancer ...

  11. TU-CD-304-06: Using FFF Beams Improves Tumor Control in Radiotherapy of Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassiliev, O [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Wang, H [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electron disequilibrium at the lung-tumor interface results in an under-dosage of tumor regions close to its surface. This under-dosage is known to be significant and can compromise tumor control. Previous studies have shown that in FFF beams, disequilibrium effects are less pronounced, which is manifested in an increased skin dose. In this study we investigate the improvement in tumor dose coverage that can be achieved with FFF beams. The significance of this improvement is evaluated by comparing tumor control probabilities of FFF beams and conventional flattened beams. Methods: The dosimetric coverage was investigated in a virtual phantom representing the chest wall, lung tissue and the tumor. A range of tumor sizes was investigated, and two tumor locations – central and adjacent to the chest wall. Calculations were performed with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. Parallel-opposed and multiple coplanar 6-MV beams were simulated. The tumor control probabilities were calculated using the logistic model with parameters derived from clinical data for non-small lung cancer patients. Results: FFF beams were not entirely immune to disequilibrium effects. They nevertheless consistently delivered more uniform dose distribution throughout the volume of the tumor, and eliminated up to ∼15% of under-dosage in the most affected by disequilibrium 1-mm thick surface region of the tumor. A voxel-by-voxel comparison of tumor control probabilities between FFF and conventional flattened beams showed an advantage of FFF beams that, depending on the set up, was from a few to ∼9 percent. Conclusion: A modest improvement in tumor control probability on the order of a few percent can be achieved by replacing conventional flattened beams with FFF beams. However, given the large number of lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, these few percent can potentially prevent local tumor recurrence for a significant number of patients.

  12. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-02-07

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1-10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  13. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, Atsushi; Marino, Kan; Koshiishi, Tsuyota; Sawada, Eiichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Onishi, Hiroshi; Aoki, Shinichi; Tominaga, Licht; Kuriyama, Kengo; Araya, Masayuki; Saito, Ryoh; Maehata, Yoshiyasu; Komiyama, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients

  14. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nambu Atsushi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT. The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy. Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41, and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients.

  15. Rib fracture after stereotactic radiotherapy for primary lung cancer: prevalence, degree of clinical symptoms, and risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background As stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is a highly dose-dense radiotherapy, adverse events of neighboring normal tissues are a major concern. This study thus aimed to clarify the frequency and degree of clinical symptoms in patients with rib fractures after SBRT for primary lung cancer and to reveal risk factors for rib fracture. Appropriate α/β ratios for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture groups were also investigated. Methods Between November 2001 and April 2009, 177 patients who had undergone SBRT were evaluated for clinical symptoms and underwent follow-up thin-section computed tomography (CT). The time of rib fracture appearance was also assessed. Cox proportional hazard modeling was performed to identify risk factors for rib fracture, using independent variables of age, sex, maximum tumor diameter, radiotherapeutic method and tumor-chest wall distance. Dosimetric details were analyzed for 26 patients with and 22 randomly-sampled patients without rib fracture. Biologically effective dose (BED) was calculated with a range of α/β ratios (1–10 Gy). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was used to define the most appropriate α/β ratio. Results Rib fracture was found on follow-up thin-section CT in 41 patients. The frequency of chest wall pain in patients with rib fracture was 34.1% (14/41), and was classified as Grade 1 or 2. Significant risk factors for rib fracture were smaller tumor-chest wall distance and female sex. Area under the curve was maximal for BED at an α/β ratio of 8 Gy. Conclusions Rib fracture is frequently seen on CT after SBRT for lung cancer. Small tumor-chest wall distance and female sex are risk factors for rib fracture. However, clinical symptoms are infrequent and generally mild. When using BED analysis, an α/β ratio of 8 Gy appears most effective for discriminating between fracture and non-fracture patients. PMID:23391264

  16. Preliminary analysis of the risk factors for radiation pneumonitis in patients with non- small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang H

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hongqing Zhuang,* Hailing Hou,* Zhiyong Yuan, Jun Wang, Qingsong Pang, Lujun Zhao, Ping WangDepartment of Radiotherapy, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, and Tianjin Lung Cancer Center, Tianjin, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: The aim of this study was to investigate radiation pneumonitis and its associated risk factors in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with concurrent erlotinib and thoracic radiotherapy.Materials and methods: We conducted an analysis of patients with nonoperable stage IIIA–IV non-small-cell lung cancer who were treated with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy and erlotinib (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00973310. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 grading system was applied to evaluate the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. The lung dosimetric parameters were recorded in accordance with the treatment plan, and the study endpoint was radiation pneumonitis at grade 2 or more.Results: Among the 24 selected clinical cases, nine were identified with radiation pneumonitis of grade 2 or above (37.5%. This included four cases with grade 2 (16.7%, two cases with grade 3 (8.3%, and three cases with grade 5 (12.5%. The results showed that the planning target volume was a significant factor affecting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. All lung dosimetric parameters exhibited statistically significant differences between patients with pneumonitis and patients without pneumonitis. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis showed that all lung dosimetric parameters were useful in predicting the incidence of radiation pneumonitis. In addition, the threshold values of V5, V10, V15, V20, V30, and mean lung dose were >4%, >29%, >27%, >22%, >17% and >1,027 cGy, respectively.Conclusion: Special attention

  17. Hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, E.K.; Ahn, S.D.; Yi, B.Y.; Chang, H.S.; Lee, J.H.; Suh, C.W.; Lee, J.S.; Kim, S.H.; Koh, Y.S.; Kim, W.S.; Kim, D.S.; Kim, W.D.; Sohn, K.H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: This phase II study has been conducted to determine the feasibility, toxicity, response rate, local control, distant metastasis, and survival of hyperfractionated 3D conformal radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy with mitomycin C, vinblastine, and cisplatin in unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and also to find the most ideal 3D conformal radiotherapy technique. Materials and Methods: From Aug 1993, 173 patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC were entered into this trial and 146 (84%) completed the treatment. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy was given to a total dose of 65-70 Gy (120 cGy/fx, bid) with concurrent 2 cycles of MVP chemotherapy (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 d2 and d29, Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 d1 and d28). Of these 146 patients who completed the treatment, 78 received noncoplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy using 4-6 fields and 17 received coplanar segmented conformal radiotherapy. Clinical tumor response was assessed one month after the completion of radiotherapy by computerized tomography (CT) scan. Toxicity was graded by RTOG and SWOG criteria. Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for lung was calculated to find the correlation with radiation pneumonitis. Results: Nineteen (13%) had stage IIIa and 127 (87%) had IIIb disease including 16 with pleural effusion and 20 with supraclavicular lymph node metastases. Response rate was 74%, including 20% complete response and 54% partial response. With a minimum follow up of 12 months, overall survival was 60% at 1 year, 30% at 2 years and median survival was 15 months. Patients achieving a complete response (n=29) had a 2-year overall survival of 46.5% compared to 28.7% for partial responders (n=79) (p=.001). Actuarial local control was 66.7% at 1 year and 43.7% at 2 years. Actuarial distant free survival was 52.3% at 1 year and 39.8% at 2 years. Major hematologic toxicity (Gr 3-4) occurred in 33% of the patients but treatment delay

  18. Management of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer using stereotactic ablative radiotherapy: Controversies, insights, and changing horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, Alexander V.; Palma, David A.; Dahele, Max; Rodrigues, George B.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    The use of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer is growing rapidly, particularly since it has become the recommended therapy for unfit patients in current European and North American guidelines. As three randomized trials comparing surgery and SABR closed prematurely because of poor accrual, clinicians are faced with a dilemma in individual patient decision-making. Radiation oncologists, in particular, should be aware of the data from comparative effectiveness studies that suggest similar survival outcomes irrespective of local treatment modality. The necessity of obtaining a pathological diagnosis, particularly in frail patients prior to treatment remains a challenge, and this topic was addressed in recent European recommendations. Awareness of the high incidence of a second primary lung cancer in survivors, as well as other competing causes of mortality, is needed. The challenges in distinguishing focal scarring from recurrence after SABR also need to be appreciated by multidisciplinary tumor boards. With a shift in focus toward patient-centered decision-making, clinicians will need to be aware of these new developments and communicate effectively with patients, to ensure that treatment decisions are reflective of patient preferences. Priorities for additional research in the area are proposed

  19. Comparison of two dimensional and three dimensional radiotherapy treatment planning in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Elena M.; Joy Williams, Frances; Ethan Lyn, Basil; Aird, Edwin G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer being treated with continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy weekend less (CHARTWEL) were planned and treated with a three dimensional (3D) conformal protocol and comparison made with two dimensional (2D) planning, as used previously, to compare past practice and methods. Patients and methods: Twenty-four patients were planned initially using 3D and then replanned using a 2D system. The 2D plans were transferred onto the 3D system and recalculated. Dose volume histograms could then be constructed of planning target volumes for phases 1 and 2 (PTV 1 and 2, respectively), lung and spinal cord for the 2D plans and compared with the 3D plans. Results: There was a significantly lower absolute dose to the isocentre with 2D compared to 3D planning with dose reductions of 3.9% for phase 1, 4.4% for phase 2 and 4.7% for those treated with a single phase. Maximum dose to spinal cord was greater in 17 of the 24 2D plans with a median dose reduction of 0.82 Gy for 3D (P=0.04). The percentage volume of whole lung receiving ≥20 Gy (V 20 ) was greater in 16 of the 24 2D plans with a median reduction in V 20 of 2.4% for 3D (P=0.03). Conclusions: A lower dose to tumour was obtained using 2D planning due to the method of dose calculation and spinal cord and lung doses were significantly higher

  20. Comparison of Toxicity Between Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-small-cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Diane C; Hess, Clayton B; Chen, Allen M; Daly, Megan E

    2016-01-01

    The role of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in reducing treatment-related toxicity for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains incompletely defined. We compared acute toxicity and oncologic outcomes in a large cohort of patients treated with IMRT or 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT), with or without elective nodal irradiation (ENI). A single-institution retrospective review was performed evaluating 145 consecutive patients with histologically confirmed stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy. Sixty-five (44.8%) were treated with 3-DCRT using ENI, 43 (30.0%) with 3-DCRT using involved-field radiotherapy (IFRT), and 37 (25.5%) with IMRT using IFRT. All patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Comparison of acute toxicities by treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3-DCRT) and extent of nodal irradiation (3-DCRT-IFRT vs. 3-DCRT-ENI) was performed for grade 2 or higher esophagitis or pneumonitis, number of acute hospitalizations, incidence of opioid requirement, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy utilization, and percentage weight loss during treatment. Local control and overall survival were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. We identified no significant differences in any measures of acute toxicity by treatment technique or extent of nodal irradiation. There was a trend toward lower rates of grade 2 or higher pneumonitis among IMRT patients compared to 3-DCRT patients (5.4% vs. 23.0%; P = .065). Local control and overall survival were similar between cohorts. Acute and subacute toxicities were similar for patients treated with IMRT and with 3-DCRT with or without ENI, with a nonsignificant trend toward a reduction in pneumonitis with IMRT. Larger studies are needed to better define which patients will benefit from IMRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dosimetric comparison of Acuros XB, AAA, and XVMC in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Yusuke; Nakata, Manabu; Higashimura, Kyoji; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Matsuo, Yukinori; Monzen, Hajime; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric performance of Acuros XB (AXB), anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA), and x-ray voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) in heterogeneous phantoms and lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) plans. Methods: Water- and lung-equivalent phantoms were combined to evaluate the percentage depth dose and dose profile. The radiation treatment machine Novalis (BrainLab AG, Feldkirchen, Germany) with an x-ray beam energy of 6 MV was used to calculate the doses in the composite phantom at a source-to-surface distance of 100 cm with a gantry angle of 0°. Subsequently, the clinical lung SBRT plans for the 26 consecutive patients were transferred from the iPlan (ver. 4.1; BrainLab AG) to the Eclipse treatment planning systems (ver. 11.0.3; Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The doses were then recalculated with AXB and AAA while maintaining the XVMC-calculated monitor units and beam arrangement. Then the dose-volumetric data obtained using the three different radiation dose calculation algorithms were compared. Results: The results from AXB and XVMC agreed with measurements within ±3.0% for the lung-equivalent phantom with a 6 × 6 cm 2 field size, whereas AAA values were higher than measurements in the heterogeneous zone and near the boundary, with the greatest difference being 4.1%. AXB and XVMC agreed well with measurements in terms of the profile shape at the boundary of the heterogeneous zone. For the lung SBRT plans, AXB yielded lower values than XVMC in terms of the maximum doses of ITV and PTV; however, the differences were within ±3.0%. In addition to the dose-volumetric data, the dose distribution analysis showed that AXB yielded dose distribution calculations that were closer to those with XVMC than did AAA. Means ± standard deviation of the computation time was 221.6 ± 53.1 s (range, 124–358 s), 66.1 ± 16.0 s (range, 42–94 s), and 6.7 ± 1.1 s (range, 5–9 s) for XVMC, AXB, and AAA, respectively. Conclusions: In the phantom

  2. Effect of Increased Radiotoxicity on Survival of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Curatively Intended Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Liv, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Edlund, Per; Blomberg, Carl; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Ekman, Simon; Asklund, Thomas; Henriksson, Roger; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the impact of different forms of radiation toxicities (esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, mucositis and hoarseness), on the survival of patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data were individually collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with NSCLC subjected to curatively intended radiotherapy (≥50 Gy) in Sweden during the time period 1990 to 2000. Esophagitis was the only radiation-induced toxicity with an impact on survival (hazard ratio=0.83, p=0.016). However, in a multivariate model, with clinical- and treatment-related factors taken into consideration, the impact of esophagitis on survival was no longer statistically significant (hazard ratio=0.88, p=0.17). The effect on survival seen in univariate analysis may be related to higher radiation dose and to the higher prevalence of chemotherapy in this group. The results do not suggest that the toxicities examined have any detrimental effect on overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: honishi@yamanashi.ac.jp [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Nagata, Yasushi [School of Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fujino, Masaharu [School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Gomi, Kotaro [Cancer Institute Suwa Red-Cross Hospital, Suwa (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru [Kitasato University, Kanagawa (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [School of Medicine, Hirosaki University, Hirosaki (Japan); Kimura, Tomoki [School of Medicine, Kagawa University, Hiroshima (Japan); Takeda, Atsuya [Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Ouchi, Atsushi [Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [School of Cancer Institute Ariake Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Arimoto, Takuro [Kitami Red Cross Hospital, Kitami (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [National Institute of Radiological Science, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Jun [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Araki, Tsutomu [School of Medicine, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45-72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3-10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100-141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  4. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Operable Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Can SBRT Be Comparable to Surgery?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Shirato, Hiroki; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Fujino, Masaharu; Gomi, Kotaro; Karasawa, Katsuyuki; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Yuzuru; Takai, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Takeda, Atsuya; Ouchi, Atsushi; Hareyama, Masato; Kokubo, Masaki; Kozuka, Takuyo; Arimoto, Takuro; Hara, Ryusuke; Itami, Jun; Araki, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To review treatment outcomes for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in medically operable patients with Stage I non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using a Japanese multi-institutional database. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004, a total of 87 patients with Stage I NSCLC (median age, 74 years; T1N0M0, n = 65; T2N0M0, n = 22) who were medically operable but refused surgery were treated using SBRT alone in 14 institutions. Stereotactic three-dimensional treatment was performed using noncoplanar dynamic arcs or multiple static ports. Total dose was 45–72.5 Gy at the isocenter, administered in 3–10 fractions. Median calculated biological effective dose was 116 Gy (range, 100–141 Gy). Data were collected and analyzed retrospectively. Results: During follow-up (median, 55 months), cumulative local control rates for T1 and T2 tumors at 5 years after SBRT were 92% and 73%, respectively. Pulmonary complications above Grade 2 arose in 1 patient (1.1%). Five-year overall survival rates for Stage IA and IB subgroups were 72% and 62%, respectively. One patient who developed local recurrences safely underwent salvage surgery. Conclusion: Stereotactic body radiotherapy is safe and promising as a radical treatment for operable Stage I NSCLC. The survival rate for SBRT is potentially comparable to that for surgery.

  5. Investigating the Feasibility of Rapid MRI for Image-Guided Motion Management in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sawant

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner. A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter, tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter, tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  6. Investigating the feasibility of rapid MRI for image-guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Amit; Keall, Paul; Pauly, Kim Butts; Alley, Marcus; Vasanawala, Shreyas; Loo, Billy W; Hinkle, Jacob; Joshi, Sarang

    2014-01-01

    Cycle-to-cycle variations in respiratory motion can cause significant geometric and dosimetric errors in the administration of lung cancer radiation therapy. A common limitation of the current strategies for motion management is that they assume a constant, reproducible respiratory cycle. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using rapid MRI for providing long-term imaging of the thorax in order to better capture cycle-to-cycle variations. Two nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients were imaged (free-breathing, no extrinsic contrast, and 1.5 T scanner). A balanced steady-state-free-precession (b-SSFP) sequence was used to acquire cine-2D and cine-3D (4D) images. In the case of Patient 1 (right midlobe lesion, ~40 mm diameter), tumor motion was well correlated with diaphragmatic motion. In the case of Patient 2, (left upper-lobe lesion, ~60 mm diameter), tumor motion was poorly correlated with diaphragmatic motion. Furthermore, the motion of the tumor centroid was poorly correlated with the motion of individual points on the tumor boundary, indicating significant rotation and/or deformation. These studies indicate that image quality and acquisition speed of cine-2D MRI were adequate for motion monitoring. However, significant improvements are required to achieve comparable speeds for truly 4D MRI. Despite several challenges, rapid MRI offers a feasible and attractive tool for noninvasive, long-term motion monitoring.

  7. Radiation-induced esophagitis in local advanced non-small cell lung cancer after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Dandan; Wang Yuxiang; Qiu Rong; Zhu Shuchai; Tian Xiuming; Qiao Xueying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore radiation-induced esophagitis and its related factors in the patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods: From January 2001 to December 2008, 203 patients who suffered from stage Ⅲ NSCLC were achieved, including 163 males and 40 females, with a median age of 63 years old, while 79 cases were in stage Ⅲ_a and 124 in stage Ⅲ_b. The equivalent median dose of tumor was 62 Gy(range of 50-78 Gy). Among them, 74 cases were administered with radiotherapy alone, 45 with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy, 87 cases with concurrent radiochemotherapy. Radiation esophagitis was evaluated with RTOG standard. The dosimetric parameters was estimated from dose volume histogrma (DVH). The clinical and dosimetric parameters of radiation esophagitis were evaluated by spearman correlatived univariate and Logistic multivariable analysis.Results After radiotherapy, out of 203 patients, 87 had acute radiation esophagitis(RE), 47 in grade 1, 37 in grade 2, and 3 in grade 3 RE. According to spearman correlatived analysis, the correlatived factors included ages, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, the mean doses of PTV and lung, the max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0, V_4_5, V_5_0, V_5_5, V_6_0, length of esophagus (total circumference) treated with 45 Gy (LETT_4_5), and LETT_5_0 (r = -0.162-0.235, P 0.05). There were 21 factors, such as gender, age, smoking, clinical stage, site of tumor, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, mean dose of PTV and lung, max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0-V_6_0 of esophagus, LETT_4_5_-_6_0, incorporated into multivariable analysis, only chemotherapy and V_4_5 of esophagus were independent predicted factors(Wald = 4.626, 9.882, P < 0.05). Conclusions: In local advanced NSCLC after 3D-CRT, chemotherapy(especially concurrent radiochemotherapy) could increase radiation-induced esophagitis. The parameter of DVH could also be used to predict

  8. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  9. Randomized Study of Concurrent Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Radiotherapy with or Without Prior Induction Chemotherapy in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouda, Y.S.; Eldeeb, N.A.; Omar, A.M.; Kohail, H.M.; El-Geneidy, M.M.; Elkerm, Y.M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Multiple concepts of combined modality therapy for locally advanced inoperable non-small cell lung cancer have been investigated. These include induction chemotherapy, concomitant chemo-radiotherapy, and radiation only. To date, combined modality therapy specially the use of concomitant chemo-radiotherapy has led to promising results and was shown to be superior to radiotherapy alone in phase II studies. However the optimum chemo-therapeutic regimen to be used as well as the benefit of induction chemotherapy before concomitant chemo-radiotherapy are yet to be determined. Based on these observations, we investigated the use of paclitaxel and carboplatin concomitantly with radiotherapy and the benefit of prior two cycles induction chemotherapy. Materials and Methods: In this trial 50 patients with locally advanced inoperable non small cell lung cancer, good performance status and minimal weight loss have been randomized into 3 groups each of 20 patients. Group A received induction 2 cycles paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6) on day I and 28 th followed by concomitant paclitaxel (45 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 2) weekly with radiotherapy. Group B received concomitant carboplatin, paclitaxel (same doses as in group A) and radiotherapy with no prior induction chemotherapy. Group C received only radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in conventional fractionation. Results: A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study between 1998 and 2000. Pretreatment characteristics, including age, gender, performance status, histological features and stage were comparable in each group. The incidence of oesophagi tis was significantly higher in group A and B than in group C (ρ=0.023). Hematological toxicities was also significantly higher in group A and B than in group C (ρ=0.003). The response rate was significantly higher in group A and B than in group C (75%,79%, and 40% respectively) (ρ =0.020). The time to in-field progresion was significantly

  10. Cancer research and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzawa, Taiju

    1978-01-01

    An actual condition of cancer, and the basis and a future view of radiotherapy were described by adding generally established biological and biochemical knowledge to the author's research. It was described that the relapse of cancer after irradiation was induced from outside of cancerous mass, and the nature of relapsed cancerous cells group was also stated. The histological structure of cancer from a view of cell movement and radioresistant cancerous cells group were described. The differentiation of cancerous cells were described, and a study of inhibition of cancer by redifferentiation was considered. It is important to grasp characteristics and a limit of radiotherapy for cancer, to systematize and materialize reasonable therapy which uses drug and immunotherapy together with surgery, and to use radiotherapy reasonably together with redifferentiation therapy of cancerous cells by extracting characteristics and a limit of radiationtherapy from an actual condition of cancer. (Serizawa, K.)

  11. Dose–Response for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy in Early-Stage Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R.; Robinson, Clifford G.; El Naqa, Issam; Creach, Kimberly M.; Drzymala, Robert E.; Bloch, Charles; Parikh, Parag J.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the efficacy of three lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) regimens in a large institutional cohort. Methods: Between 2004 and 2009, 130 patients underwent definitive lung cancer SBRT to a single lesion at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. We delivered 18 Gy × 3 fractions for peripheral tumors (n = 111) and either 9 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 8) or 10 Gy × 5 fractions (n = 11) for tumors that were central or near critical structures. Univariate and multivariate analysis of prognostic factors was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results: Median follow-up was 11, 16, and 13 months for the 9 Gy × 5, 10 Gy × 5, and 18 Gy × 3 groups, respectively. Local control statistics for Years 1 and 2 were, respectively, 75% and 50% for 9 Gy × 5, 100% and 100% for 10 Gy × 5, and 99% and 91% for 18 Gy × 3. Median overall survival was 14 months, not reached, and 34 months for the 9 Gy × 5, 10 Gy × 5, and 18 Gy × 3 treatments, respectively. No difference in local control or overall survival was found between the 10 Gy × 5 and 18 Gy × 3 groups on log–rank test, but both groups had improved local control and overall survival compared with 9 Gy × 5. Treatment with 9 Gy × 5 was the only independent prognostic factor for reduced local control on multivariate analysis, and increasing age, increasing tumor volume, and poor performance status predicted independently for reduced overall survival. Conclusion: Treatment regimens of 10 Gy × 5 and 18 Gy × 3 seem to be efficacious for lung cancer SBRT and provide superior local control and overall survival compared with 9 Gy × 5.

  12. Clinical results of stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I small-cell lung cancer. A single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Asai, Kaori; Terashima, Koutarou; Matsumoto, Keiji; Hirata, Hideki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the treatment outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). From April 2003 to September 2009, a total of eight patients with Stage I SCLC were treated with SBRT in our institution. In all patients, the lung tumors were proven as SCLC pathologically. The patients' ages were 58-84 years (median: 74). The T-stage of the primary tumor was T1a in two, T1b in two and T2a in four patients. Six of the patients were inoperable because of poor cardiac and/or pulmonary function, and two patients refused surgery. SBRT was given using 7-8 non-coplanar beams with 48 Gy in four fractions. Six of the eight patients received 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy using carboplatin (CBDCA) + etoposide (VP-16) or cisplatin (CDDP) + irinotecan (CPT-11). The follow-up period for all patients was 6-60 months (median: 32). Six patients were still alive without any recurrence. One patient died from this disease and one died from another disease. The overall and disease-specific survival rate at three years was 72% and 86%, respectively. There were no patients with local progression of the lesion targeted by SBRT. Only one patient had nodal recurrence in the mediastinum at 12 months after treatment. The progression-free survival rate was 71%. No Grade 2 or higher SBRT-related toxicities were observed. SBRT plus chemotherapy could be an alternative to surgery with chemotherapy for inoperable patients with Stage I small-cell lung cancer. However, further investigation is needed using a large series of patients. (author)

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for stage I lung cancer and small lung metastasis: evaluation of an immobilization system for suppression of respiratory tumor movement and preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayakawa Shiho

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for lung tumors, reducing tumor movement is necessary. In this study, we evaluated changes in tumor movement and percutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 levels, and preliminary clinical results of SBRT using the BodyFIX immobilization system. Methods Between 2004 and 2006, 53 consecutive patients were treated for 55 lesions; 42 were stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 10 were metastatic lung cancers, and 3 were local recurrences of NSCLC. Tumor movement was measured with fluoroscopy under breath holding, free breathing on a couch, and free breathing in the BodyFIX system. SpO2 levels were measured with a finger pulseoximeter under each condition. The delivered dose was 44, 48 or 52 Gy, depending on tumor diameter, in 4 fractions over 10 or 11 days. Results By using the BodyFIX system, respiratory tumor movements were significantly reduced compared with the free-breathing condition in both craniocaudal and lateral directions, although the amplitude of reduction in the craniocaudal direction was 3 mm or more in only 27% of the patients. The average SpO2 did not decrease by using the system. At 3 years, the local control rate was 80% for all lesions. Overall survival was 76%, cause-specific survival was 92%, and local progression-free survival was 76% at 3 years in primary NSCLC patients. Grade 2 radiation pneumonitis developed in 7 patients. Conclusion Respiratory tumor movement was modestly suppressed by the BodyFIX system, while the SpO2 level did not decrease. It was considered a simple and effective method for SBRT of lung tumors. Preliminary results were encouraging.

  14. 3D tumor localization through real-time volumetric x-ray imaging for lung cancer radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H; Jia, Xun; Gu, Xuejun; Folkerts, Michael; Men, Chunhua; Song, William Y; Jiang, Steve B

    2011-05-01

    To evaluate an algorithm for real-time 3D tumor localization from a single x-ray projection image for lung cancer radiotherapy. Recently, we have developed an algorithm for reconstructing volumetric images and extracting 3D tumor motion information from a single x-ray projection [Li et al., Med. Phys. 37, 2822-2826 (2010)]. We have demonstrated its feasibility using a digital respiratory phantom with regular breathing patterns. In this work, we present a detailed description and a comprehensive evaluation of the improved algorithm. The algorithm was improved by incorporating respiratory motion prediction. The accuracy and efficiency of using this algorithm for 3D tumor localization were then evaluated on (1) a digital respiratory phantom, (2) a physical respiratory phantom, and (3) five lung cancer patients. These evaluation cases include both regular and irregular breathing patterns that are different from the training dataset. For the digital respiratory phantom with regular and irregular breathing, the average 3D tumor localization error is less than 1 mm which does not seem to be affected by amplitude change, period change, or baseline shift. On an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 graphic processing unit (GPU) card, the average computation time for 3D tumor localization from each projection ranges between 0.19 and 0.26 s, for both regular and irregular breathing, which is about a 10% improvement over previously reported results. For the physical respiratory phantom, an average tumor localization error below 1 mm was achieved with an average computation time of 0.13 and 0.16 s on the same graphic processing unit (GPU) card, for regular and irregular breathing, respectively. For the five lung cancer patients, the average tumor localization error is below 2 mm in both the axial and tangential directions. The average computation time on the same GPU card ranges between 0.26 and 0.34 s. Through a comprehensive evaluation of our algorithm, we have established its accuracy in 3D

  15. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  16. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  17. Image-guided adaptive gating of lung cancer radiotherapy: a computer simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Rottmann, Joerg; Park, Sang-June; Berbeco, Ross I [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nishioka, Seiko [Department of Radiology, NTT Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki, E-mail: maristophanous@lroc.harvard.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2010-08-07

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect that image-guided adaptation of the gating window during treatment could have on the residual tumor motion, by simulating different gated radiotherapy techniques. There are three separate components of this simulation: (1) the 'Hokkaido Data', which are previously measured 3D data of lung tumor motion tracks and the corresponding 1D respiratory signals obtained during the entire ungated radiotherapy treatments of eight patients, (2) the respiratory gating protocol at our institution and the imaging performed under that protocol and (3) the actual simulation in which the Hokkaido Data are used to select tumor position information that could have been collected based on the imaging performed under our gating protocol. We simulated treatments with a fixed gating window and a gating window that is updated during treatment. The patient data were divided into different fractions, each with continuous acquisitions longer than 2 min. In accordance to the imaging performed under our gating protocol, we assume that we have tumor position information for the first 15 s of treatment, obtained from kV fluoroscopy, and for the rest of the fractions the tumor position is only available during the beam-on time from MV imaging. The gating window was set according to the information obtained from the first 15 s such that the residual motion was less than 3 mm. For the fixed gating window technique the gate remained the same for the entire treatment, while for the adaptive technique the range of the tumor motion during beam-on time was measured and used to adapt the gating window to keep the residual motion below 3 mm. The algorithm used to adapt the gating window is described. The residual tumor motion inside the gating window was reduced on average by 24% for the patients with regular breathing patterns and the difference was statistically significant (p-value = 0.01). The magnitude of the residual tumor motion

  18. Outcomes of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy in Patients With Potentially Operable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J., E-mail: fj.lagerwaard@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verstegen, Naomi E.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Paul, Marinus A. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smit, Egbert F. [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-05-01

    Background: Approximately two-thirds of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in The Netherlands currently undergo surgical resection. As an increasing number of fit patients have elected to undergo stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) in recent years, we studied outcomes after SABR in patients with potentially operable stage I NSCLC. Methods and Materials: In an institutional prospective database collected since 2003, 25% of lung SABR cases (n = 177 patients) were found to be potentially operable when the following patients were excluded: those with (1) synchronous lung tumors or other malignancy, (2) prior high-dose radiotherapy/pneumonectomy, (3) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a severity score of 3-4 according to the Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease classification. (4) a performance score of {>=}3, and (5) other comorbidity precluding surgery. Study patients included 101 males and 76 females, with a median age of 76 years old, 60% of whom were staged as T1 and 40% of whom were T2. Median Charlson comorbidity score was 2 (range, 0-5). A SABR dose of 60 Gy was delivered using a risk-adapted scheme in 3, 5, or 8 fractions, depending on tumor size and location. Follow-up chest computed tomography scans were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months and yearly thereafter. Results: Median follow-up was 31.5 months; and median overall survival (OS) was 61.5 months, with 1- and 3-year survival rates of 94.7% and 84.7%, respectively. OS rates at 3 years in patients with (n = 59) and without (n = 118) histological diagnosis did not differ significantly (96% versus 81%, respectively, p = 0.39). Post-SABR 30-day mortality was 0%, while predicted 30-day mortality for a lobectomy, derived using the Thoracoscore predictive model (Falcoz PE et al. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2007;133:325-332), would have been 2.6%. Local control rates at 1 and 3 years were 98% and 93%, respectively. Regional and distant failure rates at 3 years were each

  19. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verstegen, Naomi E.; Maat, Alexander P. W. M.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Paul, Marinus A.; Versteegh, Michel I; Joosten, Joris J.; Lastdrager, Willem; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Senan, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence following SABR for early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients who underwent surgical salvage for a local recurrence following SABR for NSCLC were identified from two Dutch institutional databases. Complications were scored using the Dindo-Clavien-classification. Nine patients who underwent surgery for a local recurrence were identified. Median time to local recurrence was 22 months. Recurrences were diagnosed with CT- and/or 18FDG-PET-imaging, with four patients also having a pre-surgical pathological diagnosis. Extensive adhesions were observed during two resections, requiring conversion from a thoracoscopic procedure to thoracotomy during one of these procedures. Three patients experienced complications post-surgery; grade 2 (N = 2) and grade 3a (N = 1), respectively. All resection specimens showed viable tumor cells. Median length of hospital stay was 8 days (range 5–15 days) and 30-day mortality was 0 %. Lymph node dissection revealed mediastinal metastases in 3 patients, all of whom received adjuvant therapy. Our experience with nine surgical procedures for local recurrences post-SABR revealed two grade IIIa complications, and a 30-day mortality of 0 %, suggesting that salvage surgery can be safely performed after SABR

  20. Quality of life during 5 years after stereotactic radiotherapy in stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubels, Rutger J; Mokhles, Sahar; Andrinopoulou, Eleni R; Braat, Cornelia; Voort van Zyp, Noëlle C van der; Aluwini, Shafak; Aerts, Joachim G J V; Nuyttens, Joost J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the long-term impact of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) on the quality of life (QoL) of inoperable patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From January 2006 to February 2008, 39 patients with pathologically confirmed T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SRT. QoL, overall survival and local tumor control were assessed. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ)-C30 and the lung cancer-specific questionnaire QLQ-LC13 were used to investigate changes in QoL. Assessments were done before treatment, at 3 weeks, every 2–3 months during the first two years, and then every 6 months until 5 years after the treatment or death or progressive disease. The median follow up was 38 months. During the 5 years after treatment with SRT for stage I NSCLC, the level of QoL was maintained: There was a slow decline (slope: −0.015) of the global health status over the 5 years (p < 0.0001). The physical functioning and the role functioning improved slowly (slope: 0.006 and 0.004, resp.) over the years and this was also significant (p < 0.0001). The emotional functioning (EF) improved significantly at 1 year compared to the baseline. Two years after the treatment dyspnea slowly increased (slope: 0.005, p = 0.006). The actuarial overall survival was 62% at 2 years and 31% at 5-years. QoL was maintained 5 years after SRT for stage I NSCLC and EF improved significantly. Dyspnea slowly increased 2 years after the treatment

  1. A study of tumor motion management in the conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, Stuart S.C.; Sixel, Katharina E.; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Hoisak, Jeremy D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the benefit derived from the reduction of planning target volumes (PTVs) afforded by tumor motion management in treatment planning for lung cancer. Methods: We use a simple formula that combines measurements of tumor motion and set-up error for 7 patients to determine PTVs based on the following scenarios: standard uniform 15 mm margin, individualized PTVs (no gating), spirometry-based gating, and active breath-control (ABC). We compare the percent volumes of lung receiving at least 20 Gy (V20) for a standard prescription, and the maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) at fixed V20. In anticipation of improvements in set-up accuracy, we repeat the analysis assuming a reduced set-up margin of 3 mm. Results: Relative to the standard, the average percent reductions in V20 (±1 standard deviation) for the ungated and gated scenarios are 17 ± 5 and 21 ± 8; the percent gains in MTD are 25 ± 12 and 33 ± 11, respectively. For the 3 mm set-up margin, the corresponding results for V20 are 28 ± 7 and 36 ± 7, and for MTD are 57 ± 23 and 79 ± 31. Conclusions: Any form of motion management provides a benefit over the use of a standard margin. The benefit derived from gating compared to the use of ungated individualized PTVs increases with tumor mobility but is generally modest. While motion management may benefit patients with highly mobile tumors, we expect efforts to reduce set-up error to be of greater overall significance. The practical limit for lung PTV margins is likely around 4-5 mm, provided set-up error can be reduced sufficiently

  2. Clinical outcomes of a phase I/II study of 48 Gy of stereotactic body radiotherapy in 4 fractions for primary lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Takayama, Kenji; Matsuo, Yukinori; Norihisa, Yoshiki; Mizowaki, Takashi; Sakamoto, Takashi; Sakamoto, Masato; Mitsumori, Michihide; Shibuya, Keiko; Araki, Norio; Yano, Shinsuke; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes of 48 Gy of three-dimensional stereotactic radiotherapy in four fractions for treating Stage I lung cancer using a stereotactic body frame. Methods and Materials: Forty-five patients who were treated between September 1998 and February 2004 were included in this study. Thirty-two patients had Stage IA lung cancer, and the other 13 had Stage IB lung cancer where tumor size was less than 4 cm in diameter. Three-dimensional treatment planning using 6-10 noncoplanar beams was performed to maintain the target dose homogeneity and to decrease the irradiated lung volume >20 Gy. All patients were irradiated using a stereotactic body frame and received four single 12 Gy high doses of radiation at the isocenter over 5-13 (median = 12) days. Results: Seven tumors (16%) completely disappeared after treatment (CR) and 38 tumors (84%) decreased in size by 30% or more (PR). Therefore, all tumors showed local response. During the follow-up of 6-71 (median = 30) months, no pulmonary complications greater than an National Cancer Institute-Common Toxicity Criteria of Grade 3 were noted. No other vascular, cardiac, esophageal, or neurologic toxicities were encountered. Forty-four (98%) of 45 tumors were locally controlled during the follow-up period. However, regional recurrences and distant metastases occurred in 3 and 5 of T1 patients and zero and 4 of T2 patients, respectively. For Stage IA lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates after 1 and 3 years were 80% and 72%, and 92% and 83%, respectively, whereas for Stage IB lung cancer, the disease-free survival and overall survival rates were 92% and 71%, and 82% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: Forty-eight Gy of 3D stereotactic radiotherapy in 4 fractions using a stereotactic body frame is useful for the treatment of Stage I lung tumors

  3. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): An update of a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V 20 and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung.

  4. Cone-beam CT-guided radiotherapy in the management of lung cancer. Diagnostic and therapeutic value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsayad, Khaled; Kriz, Jan; Reinartz, Gabriele; Scobioala, Sergiu; Ernst, Iris; Haverkamp, Uwe; Eich, Hans Theodor [University Hospital of Muenster, Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenster (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated an increase in the necessity of adaptive planning over the course of lung cancer radiation therapy (RT) treatment. In this study, we evaluated intrathoracic changes detected by cone-beam CT (CBCT) in lung cancer patients during RT. A total of 71 lung cancer patients treated with fractionated CBCT-guided RT were evaluated. Intrathoracic changes and plan adaptation priority (AP) scores were compared between small cell lung cancer (SCLC, n = 13) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, n = 58) patients. The median cumulative radiation dose administered was 54 Gy (range 30-72 Gy) and the median fraction dose was 1.8 Gy (range 1.8-3.0 Gy). All patients were subjected to a CBCT scan at least weekly (range 1-5/week). We observed intrathoracic changes in 83 % of the patients over the course of RT [58 % (41/71) regression, 17 % (12/71) progression, 20 % (14/71) atelectasis, 25 % (18/71) pleural effusion, 13 % (9/71) infiltrative changes, and 10 % (7/71) anatomical shift]. Nearly half, 45 % (32/71), of the patients had one intrathoracic soft tissue change, 22.5 % (16/71) had two, and three or more changes were observed in 15.5 % (11/71) of the patients. Plan modifications were performed in 60 % (43/71) of the patients. Visual volume reduction did correlate with the number of CBCT scans acquired (r = 0.313, p = 0.046) and with the timing of chemotherapy administration (r = 0.385, p = 0.013). Weekly CBCT monitoring provides an adaptation advantage in patients with lung cancer. In this study, the monitoring allowed for plan adaptations due to tumor volume changes and to other anatomical changes. (orig.) [German] Neuere Studien haben eine zunehmende Notwendigkeit der adaptiven Bestrahlungsplanung im Verlauf der Bestrahlungsserie bei Patienten mit Lungenkrebs nachgewiesen. In der vorliegenden Studie haben wir intrathorakale Aenderungen mittels Cone-beam-CT (CBCT) bei Lungenkrebspatienten waehrend der Radiotherapie (RT) analysiert. Analysiert wurden

  5. Survival and prognostic factors after moderately hypofractionated palliative thoracic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, B. van; Assenbrunner, B.; Beckmann, G.; Flentje, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum Palliativmedizin, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Schuler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Abteilung fuer Medizinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Soziologie und Rehabilitationswissenschaften, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Survival and prognostic variables in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring thoracic palliative radiotherapy using a moderately hypofractionated regime (13-15 x 3 Gy) were evaluated. From March 2006 to April 2012, 120 patients with a physician estimated prognosis of 6-12 months were treated with this regime using CT-based 3D conformal radiotherapy. We collected data on patient characteristics, comorbidities, toxicity, and treatment parameters. Radiotherapy was completed as prescribed in 114 patients (95.0 %, premature termination 5.0 %). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen in 6.4 % of patients. The median survival of all patients was 5.8 months. Nonmetastatic patients survived significantly longer than patients with metastatic disease (median 11.7 months vs 4.7 months, p = 0.0001) and 18.6 % of nonmetastatic patients survived longer than 2 years. In 12.7 % radiotherapy started less than 30 days before death and 14.2 % of patients received radiotherapy within 14 days before death. In the multivariate analysis, good general condition, nonmetastatic disease, and a stable or improved general condition at the end of radiotherapy were significant. The treatment parameters, age, and comorbidities were not statistically significant. Our data confirm considerable effectiveness of 13 x 3 Gy with conformal radiotherapy for patients with locally confined NSCLC not fit for radical treatment and raise doubt for this regimen in metastatic patients and ECOG ≥ 2 when burden, acute toxicity, and resources are considered. (orig.) [German] Analyse der Ueberlebenszeiten und prognoserelevanter Variablen von Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenem und metastasiertem nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkrebs nach moderat hypofraktionierter Strahlentherapie (13- bis 15-mal 3 Gy). Zwischen Maerz 2006 und April 2012 wurden 120 Patienten mit aerztlich eingeschaetzter Lebenserwartung von 6-12 Monaten mit diesem Regime mittels CT-basierter 3-D

  6. Mean esophageal radiation dose is predictive of the grade of acute esophagitis in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgen, A.; Hayran, M.; Kahraman, F.

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this research was to define the predictive factors for acute esophagitis (AE) in lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The data for 72 lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy between 2008 and 2010 were prospectively evaluated. Mean lung dose, mean dose of esophagus, volume of esophagus irradiated and percentage of esophagus volume treated were analysed according to esophagitis grades. The mean esophageal dose was associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P<0.001). However, the mean lung dose and the volume of esophagus irradiated were not associated with an increased risk of esophageal toxicity (Kruskal-Wallis test, P=0.50 and P=0.41, respectively). The mean radiation dose received by the esophagus was found to be highly correlated with the duration of Grade 2 esophagitis (Spearman test, r=0.82, P<0.001). The mean dose of esophagus ≥28 Gy showed statistical significance with respect to AE Grade 2 or worse (receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.929-1.014). In conclusion, the mean esophageal dose was significantly associated with a risk of esophageal toxicity in patients with lung cancer treated with concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy. (author)

  7. A meta-analysis of the Timing of Chest Radiotherapy in Patients with Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui ZHAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although evidence for a significant survival benefit of chest radiotherapy has been proven, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the optimal timing of chest radiation. The aim of this study is to explore whether the timing of chest radiation may influence the survival of the patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSSCLC by performing a literature-based meta-analysis. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, CBM, and CNKI, et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents about randomized trials comparing different timing chest radiotherapy in patients with LS-SCLC. Early chest radiation was regarded as beginning within 30 days after the start of chemotherapy. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct meta-analysis on the trials. The combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated to estimate the mortality in 2 or 3 years and toxicity of the two treatments. The statistical heterogeneity was determined by cochran’s Chi-square test (Q test. The Begg’ test was used to determine the publication bias. Results Six trials that included a total of 1 189 patients were analyzed in the meta-analysis 587 patients were in the early radiation group and 602 patients were in the late radiation group. Considering all 6 eligible trials, the overall survival at 2/3 years was not significantly different between early and late chest radiation (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.55-1.05, Z=1.68, P=0.093. For the toxicity, no obvious difference was observed for early chest radiotherapy compared with late irradiation in pneumonitis (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 0.97-3.86, P=0.797, esophagitis (OR=1.43, 95%CI: 0.95-2.13, P=0.572 and thrombocytopenia (OR=1.23, 95%CI: 0.88-1.77, P=0.746, respectively. Conclusion No statistical difference was observed in 2/3 years survival and toxicity, including pneumonitis, esophagitis and thrombocytopenia, between

  8. Cardiopulmonary morbidity and quality of life in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with or without postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Orlowski, Tadeusz M.; Jagiello, Robert; Salata, Andrzej; Matecka-Nowak, Miroslawa; Janowski, Henryk; Rogowska, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To prospectively assess the cardiopulmonary morbidity and quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in comparison to those not receiving PORT. Materials and methods: From 2003 to 2007, 291 patients entered the study; 171 pN2 patients received 3D-planned PORT (PORT group), 120 pN1 patients (non-PORT group) did not. One month after surgery, all patients completed EORTC QLQ C-30 questionnaire and had pulmonary function tests (PFT); cardiopulmonary symptoms were assessed by modified LENT-SOM scale. Two years later, disease-free patients repeated the same examinations. The differences between baseline values and values recorded at two years in QLQ, LENT-SOM and the PFT of the two groups were compared. Results: In the whole cohort, the rate of non-cancer related deaths was 5.3% and 5.0% in PORT and non-PORT group, respectively. Ninety-five patients (47 - PORT group, 48 - non-PORT group) were included into the final analysis. The differences in the QLQ and cardiopulmonary function (LENT/SOM, PFT) between both groups were insignificant. The forced expiratory volume in one second was on average 12.2% and 1.3% better in the PORT and the non-PORT group, respectively, p = 0.2. Conclusions: Our findings support the hypothesis about insignificant morbidity of 3D-planned PORT.

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for malignant tumors of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Ю. Аникеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used for 26 patients at medically inoperable stage I of non-small cell lung cancer with dose escalation of 48-54 Gy prescribed at 90 or 95% isodose level in 3-4 fractions. Nine-months local control and cancer-specific survival were 82.0 and 66.8% respectively, with minimal toxicity. For metastatic lung tumors local control was obtained in 92% cases. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT is safe and feasible for the treatment of inoperable primary lung cancer and single lung metastasis.

  10. MVP Chemotherapy and Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy for Stage III Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer - Randomized for maintenance Chemotherapy vs. Observation; Preliminary Report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Euk Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Suh, Cheol Won

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of MVP chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiotherapy in Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), authors have conducted a prospective randomized study since January 1991. Stage IIIa or IIIb unresectable NSCLC patients were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID) up to 6500 cGY following 3 cycles of induction MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , vinblastine 6 mg/m 2 , Cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 ) and randomized for either observation or 3 cycles of maintenance MVP chemotherapy. Until August 1991, 18 patients were registered to this study. 4 cases were stage IIIa and 14 were stage IIIb. Among 18 cases 2 were lost after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, and 16 were analyzed for this preliminary report. The response rate of induction chemotherapy was 62.5%; partial response, 50% and minimal response, 12.5%. Residual tumor of the one partial responder was completely disappeared after radiotherapy. Among 6 cases who were progressed during induction chemotherapy, 4 of them were also progressed after radiotherapy. All patients were tolerated BID radiotherapy without definite increase of acute complications, compared with conventional radiotherapy group. But at the time of this report, one patient expired in two month after the completion of the radiotherapy because of treatment related complication. Although the longer follow up is needed, authors are encouraged with higher response rate and acceptable toxicity of this treatment. Authors believe that this study is worthwhile to continue

  11. Effectiveness of surgery and individualized high-dose hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy on survival in clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer. A propensity score matched analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Marcelo F.; Baardwijk, Angela van; Aerts, Hugo J.W.L.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Novoa, Nuria M.; Varela, Gonzalo; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Surgery is considered the treatment of choice for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with poor pulmonary function or other comorbidities are treated with radiotherapy. The objective of this investigation is to compare the 3-year survival of two early-stage NSCLC populations treated in two different hospitals, either by surgical resection (lobectomy) or by individualized high-dose accelerated radiotherapy, after matching patients by propensity scoring analysis. Methods: A retrospective comparative study has been performed on two series of consecutive patients with cytohistological diagnosis of NSCLC, clinically staged IA by means of PET-scan (radiotherapy group) and pathologically staged IA (surgery group). Results: A total of 157 cases were initially selected for the analysis (110 operated and 47 treated by radiotherapy). Patients in the radiotherapy group were older, with higher comorbidity and lower FEV1% with 3-years probability of survival for operated patients higher than that found for patients treated by radiotherapy. After matching by propensity scoring (using age and FEV1%), differences disappear and 3-years probability of survival had no statistical differences. Conclusions: Although this is a non-randomized retrospective analysis, we have not found 3-years survival differences after matching cases between surgery and radiotherapy. Nevertheless, data presented here support the continuous investigation for non-surgical alternatives in this disease.

  12. Prognostic index to identify patients who may not benefit from whole brain radiotherapy for multiple brain metastases from lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaresan, P.; Yeghiaian, R.; Gebski, V.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Palliative whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is often recommended in the management of multiple brain metastases. Allowing for WBRT waiting time, duration of the WBRT course and time to clinical response, it may take 6 weeks from the point of initial assessment for a benefit from WBRT to manifest. Patients who die within 6 weeks ('early death') may not benefit from WBRT and may instead experience a decline in quality of life. This study aimed to develop a prognostic index (PI) that identifies the subset of patients with lung cancer with multiple brain metastases who may not benefit from WBRT because of'early death'. The medical records of patients with lung cancer who had WBRT recommended for multiple brain metastases over a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were classified as either having died within 6 weeks or having lived beyond 6 weeks. Potential prognostic indicators were evaluated for correlation with 'early death'. A PI was constructed by modelling the survival classification to determine the contribution of these factors towards shortened survival. Of the 275 patients recommended WBRT, 64 (23.22%) died within 6 weeks. The main prognostic factor predicting early death was Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status >2. Patients with a high PI score (>13) were at higher risk of'early death'. Twenty-three per cent of patients died prior to benefit from WBRT. ECOG status was the most predictive for 'early death'. Other factors may also contribute towards a poor outcome. With further refinement and validation, the PI could be a valuable clinical decision tool.

  13. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional support team today. Learn More . Find more lung cancer resources. Learn More Donate Today! What is Lung ... to Give How Your Support Helps Events Lung Cancer Awareness © Lung Cancer Alliance. The information presented in this website ...

  14. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Stage III Unascertainable Non Small Cell Lung Cancer : Preliminary Report for Response and Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Jong Hoon; Chang, Hye Sook

    1995-01-01

    Lung cancer study group at Asan Medical Center has conducted the second prospective study to determine the efficacy and feasibility of MVP chemotherapy with concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy for patients with stage III unresectable non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). All eligible patients with stage III unresectable NSCLC were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy( 120 cGy/fx BID, 6480 cGY/54fx) and concurrent 2 cycles of MVP(Motomycin C 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Vinblastin 6 mg/m 2 , d2 and d29, Cisplatin 6 mg/m 2 , d1 and d28) chemotherapy. Between Aug. 1993 and Nov. 1994, 62 patients entered this study ; 6(10%) had advanced stage IIIa and 56(90%) had IIIb disease including 1 with pleural effusion and 10 with supraclavicular metastases. Among 62 Patients, 48(77%) completed planned therapy. Fourteen patients refused further treatment during chemoradiotherapy. Of 46 patients evaluable for response, 34(74%) showed major response including 10(22%) with complete and 24(52%) with partial responses. Of 48 patients evaluable for toxicity, 13(27%) showed grade IV hematologic toxicity but treatment delay did not exceed 5 days. Two patients died of sepsis during chemoradiotherapy. Server weight(more than 10%) occurred in 9 patients(19%) during treatment. Nine patients(19%) developed radiation pneumonitis. Six of these patients had grad I(mild) pneumonitis with radiographic changes within the treatment fields. Three other patients had grade II pneumonitis, but none of theses patients had continuous symptoms after steroid treatment. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with advanced NSCLC was well tolerated with acceptable toxicity and achieved higher response rates than the first study, but rather low compliance rate(7%) in this study is worrisome. We need to improve nutritional support during treatment and to use G-CSF to improve leukopenia and if necessary, supportive care will given as in patients. Longer follow-up and larger sample size is needed to

  15. Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: setup reproducibility with novel arms-down immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Karen; Paterson, Claire; Hicks, Jonathan; Harrow, Stephen; McJury, Mark

    2016-12-01

    A clinical evaluation of the intrafraction and interfraction setup accuracy of a novel thermoplastic mould immobilization device and patient position in early-stage lung cancer being treated with stereotactic radiotherapy at the Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. 35 patients were immobilized in a novel, arms-down position, with a four-point Klarity ™ (Klarity Medical Products, Ohio, US) clear thermoplastic mould fixed to a SinMed (CIVCO Medical solutions, lowa, US) head and neck board. A knee support was also used for patient comfort and support. Pre- and post-treatment kilovoltage cone beam CT (CBCT) images were fused with the planning CT scan to determine intra- and interfraction motion. A total of 175 CBCT scans were analysed in the longitudinal, vertical and lateral directions. The mean intrafraction errors were 0.05 ± 0.77 mm (lateral), 0.44 ± 1.2 mm (superior-inferior) and -1.44 ± 1.35 mm (anteroposterior), respectively. Mean composite three-dimensional displacement vector was 2.14 ± 1.2 mm. Interfraction errors were -0.66 ± 2.35 mm (lateral), -0.13 ± 3.11 mm (superior-inferior) and 0.00 ± 2.94 mm (anteroposterior), with three-dimensional vector 4.08 ± 2.73 mm. Setup accuracy for lung image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy using a unique immobilization device, where patients have arms by their sides, has been shown to be safe and favourably comparable to other published setup data where more complex and cumbersome devices were utilised. There was no arm toxicity reported and low arm doses. Advances in knowledge: We report on the accuracy of a novel patient immobilization device.

  16. Respiration-Correlated Image Guidance Is the Most Important Radiotherapy Motion Management Strategy for Most Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte; Brink, Carsten; Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population. Materials and Methods: Images were acquired from 46 lung cancer patients participating in four separate protocols at three institutions in Europe and the United States. Seven patients were imaged using fluoroscopy, and 39 patients were imaged using 4DCT. The magnitude of respiratory tumor motion was measured. The required treatment field margins were calculated using a statistical recipe (van Herk M, et al. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2000;474:1121–1135), with magnitudes of all uncertainties, except respiratory peak-to-peak displacement, the same for all patients, taken from literature. Required margins for respiratory motion management were calculated using the residual respiratory tumor motion for each patient for various motion management strategies. Margin reductions for respiration management were calculated using 4DCT, 4D-IG, and gated beam delivery. Results: The median tumor motion magnitude was 4.4 mm for the 46 patients (range 0–29.3 mm). This value corresponded to required treatment field margins of 13.7 to 36.3 mm (median 14.4 mm). The use of 4DCT, 4D-IG, and beam gating required margins that were reduced by 0 to 13.9 mm (median 0.5 mm), 3 to 5.2 mm (median 5.1 mm), and 0 to 7 mm (median 0.2 mm), respectively, to a total of 8.5 to 12.4 mm (median 8.6 mm). Conclusion: A respiratory management strategy for lung cancer radiotherapy including planning on 4DCT scans and daily image guidance provides a potential reduction of 37% to 47% in treatment field margins. The 4D image guidance strategy was the most effective strategy for >85% of the patients.

  17. Salvage surgery for local failures after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Verstegen (Naomi); A.W.P.M. Maat (Alex); F.J. Lagerwaard (Frank); M.A. Paul (Marinus); M. Versteegh (Michel); J.J. Joosten (Joris); W. Lastdrager (Willem); E.F. Smit (Egbert); B.J. Slotman (Ben); J.J.M.E. Nuyttens (Joost); S. Senan (Suresh)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ The literature on surgical salvage, i.e. lung resections in patients who develop a local recurrence following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), is limited. We describe our experience with salvage surgery in nine patients who developed a local recurrence

  18. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

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    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  19. Comparative Survival in Patients With Postresection Recurrent Versus Newly Diagnosed Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xuwei; Xu Luying; Wang Li; Hayman, James A.; Chang, Andrew C.; Pickens, Allan; Cease, Kemp B.; Orringer, Mark B.; Kong, F.-M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the survival of postresection recurrent vs. newly diagnosed non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study population consisted of 661 consecutive patients with NSCLC registered in the radiation oncology databases at two medical centers in the United States between 1992 and 2004. Of the 661 patients, 54 had postresection recurrent NSCLC and 607 had newly diagnosed NSCLC. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used for the survival analyses. Results: The distribution of relevant clinical factors between these two groups was similar. The median survival time and 5-year overall survival rates were 19.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.9-25.7) and 14.8% (95% confidence interval, 5.4-24.2%) vs. 12.2 months (95% CI, 10.8-13.6) and 11.0% (95% CI, 8.5-13.5%) for recurrent vs. newly diagnosed patients, respectively (p = .037). For Stage I-III patients, no significant difference was observed in the 5-year overall survival (p = .297) or progression-free survival (p = .935) between recurrent and newly diagnosed patients. For the 46 patients with Stage I-III recurrent disease, multivariate analysis showed that chemotherapy was a significant prognostic factor for 5-year progression-free survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.224-0.914; p = .027). Conclusion: Our institutional data have shown that patients with postresection recurrent NSCLC achieved survival comparable to that of newly diagnosed NSCLC patients when they were both treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. These findings suggest that patients with postresection recurrent NSCLC should be treated as aggressively as those with newly diagnosed disease.

  20. Outcomes of Risk-Adapted Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J.A.; Smit, Egbert F.; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: High local control rates can be achieved using stereotactic radiotherapy in Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but reports have suggested that toxicity may be of concern. We evaluated early clinical outcomes of 'risk-adapted' fractionation schemes in patients treated in a single institution. Methods and Materials: Of 206 patients with Stage I NSCLC, 81% were unfit to undergo surgery and the rest refused surgery. Pathologic confirmation of malignancy was obtained in 31% of patients. All other patients had new or growing 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography positive lesions with radiologic characteristics of malignancy. Planning four-dimensional computed tomography scans were performed and fractionation schemes used (3 x 20 Gy, 5 x 12 Gy, and 8 x 7.5 Gy) were determined by T stage and risk of normal tissue toxicity. Results: Median overall survival was 34 months, with 1- and 2-year survivals of 81% and 64%, respectively. Disease-free survival (DFS) at 1 and 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively, and DFS correlated with T stage (p = 0.002). Local failure was observed in 7 patients (3%). The crude regional failure rate was 9%; isolated regional recurrence was observed in 4%. The distant progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 85% and 77%, respectively. SRT was well tolerated and severe late toxicity was observed in less than 3% of patients. Conclusions: SRT is well tolerated in patients with extensive comorbidity with high local control rates and minimal toxicity. Early outcomes are not inferior to those reported for conventional radiotherapy. In view of patient convenience, such risk-adapted SRT schedules should be considered treatment of choice in patients presenting with medically inoperable Stage I NSCLC

  1. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy after concomitant chemoradiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: A TITE-CRM phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Jérôme; Poudenx, Michel; Gal, Jocelyn; Otto, Josiane; Guerder, Caroline; Naghavi, Arash O; Gérard, Anais; Leysalle, Axel; Cohen, Charlotte; Padovani, Bernard; Ianessi, Antoine; Schiappa, Renaud; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves

    2018-05-01

    Platinum based chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With evidence that NSCLC can have a dose dependent response with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), we hypothesize that a SABR boost on residual tumor treated with chemoradiotherapy could increase treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine feasibility of such an approach. A prospective phase I trial was performed including 26 patients. Time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM) was used for dose escalation which ranged from 3 × 7 to 3 × 12 Gy for the stereotactic boost, after 46 Gy (2 Gy per day) of chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was of 37.1 months (1.7-60.7), and 3, 4, 3, 3, 9 and 4 patients were included at the dose levels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. During chemoradiotherapy, 9 patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. After stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 patient experienced an esophageal fistula (with local relapse) at the 3 × 11 Gy level, and 1 patient died from hemoptysis at the 3 × 12 Gy level. The 2-year rate of local control, locoregional free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival was 70.3%, 55.5%, 44.5% and 50.8%, respectively. In the treatment of NSCLC with chemoradiotherapy followed by a stereotactic boost, the safe recommended dose in our protocol was a boost dose of 3 × 11 Gy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. What margins should be added to the clinical target volume in radiotherapy treatment planning of lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, L.; Wittgren, L.; Holmberg, O.

    1995-01-01

    When defining the planning target volume (PTV) in radiotherapy treatment planning, it is vital to add geometrical margins of normal tissue around the clinical target volume (CTV). This is to ensure that the whole CTV will receive the planned absorbed dose taking into account both set-up deviations and target movements as well as other geometrical variations in the treatment chain. The problem is our limited knowledge of how large these margins should be. To assess the size of needed margins around the CTV in conformal radiotherapy of lung cancer, electronic portal imaging was employed in 232 irradiation field set-ups of 14 patients. This was done in order to quantify the uncertainty in the execution of treatment considering patient movement and set-up displacements. For an estimation of the added geometrical variation from target movement during irradiation, fluoroscopy was used at the simulation of the irradiation fields. The set-up study showed an average systematic deviation for all individual fields of 3.1 mm and an average maximal systematic deviation (in either transversal or craniocaudal direction) of 4.8 mm. The random errors can be described by an average standard deviation of 2.8 mm for all fields in either direction. Major gradual displacements as a function of time was also detected in one of the patients. CTV-movements of several millimetres during respiration could be observed. It was also seen that heartbeats could add to CTV-movements during irradiation with an equal magnitude. The combined effect of these factors are considered when making an overall estimation of margins that should be added to the CTV

  3. Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Early-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Long-Term Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, Hany; Cheung, Patrick; Yeung, Latifa; Poon, Ian; Balogh, Judith; Barbera, Lisa; Spayne, Jacqueline; Danjoux, Cyril; Dahele, Max; Ung, Yee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of a single-institution series of accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are medically inoperable or who refuse surgery. Methods and Materials: Peripherally located T1 to T3 N0 M0 tumors were treated with 48 to 60 Gy in 12 to 15 fractions between 1996 and 2007. No elective nodal irradiation was delivered. Patient, tumor, and treatment information was abstracted from the medical records. Results: A total of 124 tumors were treated in 118 patients (56 male and 62 female). Median age at diagnosis was 76.3 years (range, 49-90 years). In all, 113 patients (95.8%) were not surgical candidates because of medical comorbidities. The 2- and 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 51.0% and 23.3%, respectively, and the 2- and 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS) rates were 67.6% and 59.8%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year actuarial local control (LC) rates were 76.2% and 70.1%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed that tumor size less than 3cm compared with greater than 3 cm resulted in significantly improved OS (40.0% vs. 5.0% at 5 years; p = 0.0002), CSS (69.7% vs. 45.1% at 5 years; p = 0.0461), and a trend toward better LC (82.5% vs. 66.9% at 2 years, 76.6% vs. 60.8% at 5 years; p = 0.0685). Treatment was well tolerated and there were no treatment delays because of acute toxicity. Conclusions: Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy with 48 to 60 Gy using fractions of 4 Gy per day provides very good results for small tumors in medically inoperable patients with early-stage NSCLC.

  4. Correlation between dose and tumor response in the radiotherapy of lung cancer of various histological types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Asada, Keiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Correlation between dose and tumor response by cell types was determined in 50 patients with lung cancer in order to predict the possibility of further tumor regression. The TDF (time-dose-fractionation) concept was used as dose factor. The radiation source was a cobalt-60 γ-ray or linear accelerator 10 MV X-ray. As a routine regime a fraction dose of 2 Gy five times per week was given to 39 of the 50 patients, but a dose of 2 Gy three times per week or of 1.5 Gy five times per week was given to seven and four patients, respectively. Radiation response was the best in small cell carcinoma and better in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma, showing a tumor regression rate of 50% or more in 90%, 80% and 58% of the patients, respectively. The correlation between tumor regression rate and TDF values was good in squamous cell carcinoma (r = 0.73) and small cell carcinoma (r = - 0.72), but poor in adenocarcinoma (r = - 0.10). These results suggest that in squamous cell carcinoma improvement of tumor regression can be expected by increasing TDF values, and in adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma the optimal TDF values are about 100 and 60 to 80, respectively. (author)

  5. Age factor relevant to the development of radiation pneumonitis in radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, K.; Kusumoto, S.; Watanabe, K.; Nishikawa, K.; Harada, K.; Ebihara, H.

    1988-01-01

    The significance of age factor for the development of radiation pneumonitis is evaluated in 62 patients with lung cancer between 1977 and 1985. The younger group consists of those less than 70 years old and the elderly group of those 70 years old or more. Radiation doses ranged from 1.5 to 2 Gy, 3 to 5 times per week, therefore the delivered doses were converted to nominal single doses (rets dose). Severe radiation pneumonitis was more often observed in the elderly than in the younger regardless of radiation field size and chemotherapy (n.s.). The onset of radiation pneumonitis occurred earlier in a field size of 90 sq cm or more than in that of less than 90 sq cm in both age groups; there was no significant difference between the two age groups in each field size. The pneumonitis was more frequently noted with increasing rets dose in both age groups (n.s.) regardless of field size and chemotherapy. It is concluded that there is no significant difference in the development of radiation pneumonitis between the younger group and the elderly group, but the pneumonitis is inclined to be more severe in the latter

  6. Dexamethasone and supportive care with or without whole brain radiotherapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases unsuitable for resection or stereotactic radiotherapy (QUARTZ): results from a phase 3, non-inferiority, randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mulvenna, Paula; Nankivell, Matthew; Barton, Rachael; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Wilson, Paula; McColl, Elaine; Moore, Barbara; Brisbane, Iona; Ardron, David; Holt, Tanya; Morgan, Sally; Lee, Caroline; Waite, Kathryn; Bayman, Neil; Pugh, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and dexamethasone are widely used to treat brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), although there have been no randomised clinical trials showing that WBRT improves either quality of life or overall survival. Even after treatment with WBRT, the prognosis of this patient group is poor. We aimed to establish whether WBRT could be omitted without a significant effect on survival or quality of life. Methods The Quality of Life a...

  7. Radiotherapy indications - rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    This document is addressed to oncologists radiotherapists and to any health professional concerned by rectum cancer treatment. Rectum cancer therapy is based on various technical procedures including surgery, radiotherapy and systemic treatments defined for each patient according to his clinical situation. This document precises the specific situations where radiotherapy can be employed. However, the radiotherapy decision must be taken with respect to other therapeutic alternatives. Such a decision must be validated and must be the object of a discussion in the framework of a pluri-disciplinary consultation. (J.S.)

  8. Influence of radiation therapy on lung tissue in breast cancer patients. CT-assessed density changes 4 years after completion of radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svane, G.; Rotstein, S.; Lax, I.

    1995-01-01

    CT-assessed density changes in lung tissues were measured in 22 disease-free breast cancer patients 4 years after completion of radiation therapy. All patients had previously undergone similar CT-examinations before treatment, 3 months, and 9 months after radiotherapy. In patients with visible areas of increased lung density at earlier CT-examinations a decrease of focal findings was observed at 4 years. In patients without focal findings, an increase in density relative to that before therapy was observed. The difference between the mean lung density values among those with visible radiological findings and those without was statistically significant both at 3 and 9 months after therapy. However, this difference did not persist at 4 years. These results may indicate a 2-phase development of radiation-induced lung damages - an acute phase and a late phase; the late phase emerging slowly, and in this study detectable 4 years after completion of radiation therapy. (orig.)

  9. Toxicity, physical function and everyday activity reported by patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer in a randomized trial (chemotherapy versus radiotherapy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaasa, S.; Mastekaasa, A.; Thorud, E.

    1988-01-01

    In a randomized trial, patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer with limited disease were randomly given either radiotherapy (42 Gy) or combination chemotherapy with cisplatin, 70 mg/m 2 , and etoposide, 100 mg/m 2 , given every third week with a maximum of 4 cycles. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire concerning psychosocial well-being, medical and treatment related symptoms, physical function and everyday activity. Of the chemotherapy patients 61% reported nausea 5 weeks after their last chemotherapy session and 44% had spells of vomiting. Only 14% of the radiotherapy patients had nausea and 5% vomited 14 weeks after start of treatment. Of the radiotherapy patients 64% experienced dysphagia compared to 8% of the chemotherapy patients 6 weeks after the start of treatment. (orig.)

  10. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  11. Role of Radiotherapy in Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Faria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has had important role in the palliation of NSCLC. Randomized trials tend to suggest that, in general, short regimens give similar palliation and toxicity compared to longer regimens. The benefit of combining chemotherapy to radiosensitize the palliative radiation treatment is an open question, but so far it has not been proved to be very useful in NSCLC. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants careful consideration for every single case and probably should not be used as a routine management.Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT are modern techniques being used each time more frequently in the treatment of single or oligometastases. In general, they offer good tumour control with little toxicity (with a more expensive cost compared to the traditionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens.

  12. Second cancers following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.

    1983-01-01

    Published reports have shown that there is an increased incidence of second malignancies, particularly sarcomas, following high dose radiotherapy in cancer treatment. However, this increased risk is very small and is relatively negligeable when one considers the beneficial effects of radiotherapy in cancer treatment. This incidence of radiation induced cancer appears to be higher in certain groups of patients, such as children and patients with Hodgkin's disease. In view of scarcity of published data, controlled surveys remain necessary for the quantitative assessment of the cancer risk in various subgroups of irradited patients [fr

  13. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaesmann, Lukas; Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel; Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene; Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike; Dobiasch, Sophie; Eze, Chukwuka; Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne; Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa; Hausmann, Jan; Henkenberens, Christoph; Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H.; Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela; Maeurer, Matthias; Panje, Cedric M.; Suess, Christoph; Ziegler, Sonia; Ebert, Nadja; Medenwald, Daniel; Ostheimer, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  14. Dosimetric selection for helical tomotherapy based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Chi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: No selection criteria for helical tomotherapy (HT based stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR to treat early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or solitary lung metastases has been established. In this study, we investigate the dosimetric selection criteria for HT based SABR delivering 70 Gy in 10 fractions to avoid severe toxicity in the treatment of centrally located lesions when adequate target dose coverage is desired. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 78 HT-SABR plans for solitary lung lesions were created to prescribe 70 Gy in 10 fractions to the planning target volume (PTV. The PTV was set to have ≥95% PTV receiving 70 Gy in each case. The cases for which dose constraints for ≥1 OAR could not be met without compromising the target dose coverage were compared with cases for which all target and OAR dose constraints were met. RESULTS: There were 23 central lesions for which OAR dose constraints could not be met without compromising PTV dose coverage. Comparing to cases for which optimal HT-based SABR plans were generated, they were associated with larger tumor size (5.72±1.96 cm vs. 3.74±1.49 cm, p<0.0001, higher lung dose, increased number of immediately adjacent OARs ( 3.45±1.34 vs. 1.66±0.81, p<0.0001, and shorter distance to the closest OARs (GTV: 0.26±0.22 cm vs. 0.88±0.54 cm, p<0.0001; PTV 0.19±0.18 cm vs. 0.48±0.36 cm, p = 0.0001. CONCLUSION: Delivery of 70 Gy in 10 fractions with HT to meet all the given OAR and PTV dose constraints are most likely when the following parameters are met: lung lesions ≤3.78 cm (11.98 cc, ≤2 immediately adjacent OARs which are ≥0.45 cm from the gross lesion and ≥0.21 cm from the PTV.

  15. High-dose radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation in lung cancer patients only induces a temporary, reversible decline in QoL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Houben, Ruud; Boersma, Liesbeth; Grutters, Janneke; Seghers, Katarina; Lambin, Philippe; Wanders, Rinus; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Aggressive radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation therapy for lung cancer leads to a high incidence of severe, mostly esophageal, toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the evolution of quality of life (QoL) in patients with lung cancer, selected for curative radiotherapy (RT) or chemo-RT. Methods: Seventy-five lung cancer patients completed a longitudinal the EORTC QLQ-C30 and LC13. Linear mixed regression models were fitted to investigate the impact of different factors on overall QoL. Results: Overall QoL decreased shortly after the end of RT (4 points, p = 0.19), but increased back to baseline within 3 months. Mean scores of role functioning (p = 0.018), cognitive functioning (p = 0.002), dyspnoea (EORTC QLQ-LC13; p = 0.043), dysphagia (p = 0.005) and hoarseness (p = 0.029), showed a significant worsening over time. Emotional functioning (p = 0.033) improved significantly over time. Severe esophagitis (≥grade 2) was reported in only 12% of the patients. Next to maximal esophageal toxicity ≥grade 2 (p = .0.010), also tumor stage IIIA (p < 0.001), tumor stage IIIB (p = 0.003), gender (p = 0.042) and fatigue (p < 0.001) appeared to be significant predictors of QoL. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy or concurrent chemo-radiation in the treatment of lung cancer seems to be a well-tolerated treatment option with preservation of QoL.

  16. Steep Dose-Response Relationship for Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation by Real-Time Tumor-Tracking Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Yamazaki, Koichi; Onodera, Yuya; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Katoh, Norio; Hommura, Fumihiro; Oizumi, Satoshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical outcomes of patients with pathologically proven, peripherally located, Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer who had undergone stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy during the developmental period. Methods and Materials: A total of 41 patients (25 with Stage T1 and 16 with Stage T2) were admitted to the study between February 2000 and June 2005. A 5-mm planning target volume margin was added to the clinical target volume determined with computed tomography at the end of the expiratory phase. The gating window ranged from ±2 to 3 mm. The dose fractionation schedule was 40 or 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week. The dose was prescribed at the center of the planning target volume, giving more than an 80% dose at the planning target volume periphery. Results: For 28 patients treated with 48 Gy in four fractions, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 82% for those with Stage IA and 32% for those with Stage IB. For patients treated with 40 Gy in four fractions within 1 week, the overall actuarial survival rate at 3 years was 50% for those with Stage IA and 0% for those with Stage IB. A significant difference was found in local control between those with Stage IB who received 40 Gy vs. 48 Gy (p = 0.0015) but not in those with Stage IA (p = 0.5811). No serious radiation morbidity was observed with either dose schedule. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that 48 Gy in four fractions within 1 week is a safe and effective treatment for peripherally located, Stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer. A steep dose-response curve between 40 and 48 Gy using a daily dose of 12 Gy delivered within 1 week was identified for Stage IB non-small-cell lung cancer in stereotactic body radiotherapy using real-time tumor tracking radiotherapy

  17. A study to 3D dose measurement and evaluation for respiratory motion in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byeong Geol; Choi, Chang Heon; Yun, Il Gyu; Yang, Jin Seong; Lee, Dong Myeong; Park, Ju Mi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, VHS Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    This study aims to evaluate 3D dosimetric impact for MIP image and each phase image in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For each of 5 patients with non-small-cell pulmonary tumors, a respiration-correlated four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) study was performed . We obtain ten 3D CT images corresponding to phases of a breathing cycle. Treatment plans were generated using MIP CT image and each phases 3D CT. We performed the dose verification of the TPS with use of the Ion chamber and COMPASS. The dose distribution that were 3D reconstructed using MIP CT image compared with dose distribution on the corresponding phase of the 4D CT data. Gamma evaluation was performed to evaluate the accuracy of dose delivery for MIP CT data and 4D CT data of 5 patients. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 2 mm/2% about 99%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each 3D data of patient dose was 0.03∼0.04. The average difference between PTV maximum dose was 3.30 cGy, The average different Spinal Coad dose was 3.30 cGy, The average of difference with V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung was -0.04%∼2.32%. The average Homogeneity Index difference between MIP and each phase 3D data of all patient was -0.03∼0.03. The average PTV maximum dose difference was minimum for 10% phase and maximum for 70% phase. The average Spain cord maximum dose difference was minimum for 0% phase and maximum for 50% phase. The average difference of V{sub 20}, V{sub 10}, V{sub 5} of Lung show bo certain trend. There is no tendency of dose difference between MIP with 3D CT data of each phase. But there are appreciable difference for specific phase. It is need to study about patient group which has similar tumor location and breathing motion. Then we compare with dose distribution for each phase 3D image data or MIP image data. we will determine appropriate image data for treatment plan.

  18. Development of radiation pneumopathy and generalised radiological changes after radiotherapy are independent negative prognostic factors for survival in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farr, Katherina P.; Khalil, Azza A.; Knap, Marianne M.; Møller, Ditte S.; Grau, Cai

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the risk factors for radiation pneumopathy (RP) and survival rate of non-small cell lung cancer patients with RP and generalised interstitial lung changes (gen-ILC). Material and methods: A total of 147 consecutive patients receiving curative radiotherapy were analysed. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v. 3. Computed tomography images were assessed for the presence of gen-ILC after radiotherapy. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify significant factors. Results: Median follow-up was 16.2 months (range 1.4–58.6). Radiological changes after radiotherapy were confined to high dose irradiation volume in 111 patients, while 31 patients developed gen-ILC. Dosimetric parameters and level of C-reactive protein before radiotherapy were significantly associated with severe RP. Development of gen-ILC (p = 0.008), as well as severe RP (p = 0.03) had significant negative impact on patients’ survival. These two factors remained significant in the multivariate analysis. Conclusions: Severe radiation pneumopathy and generalised radiographic changes were significant independent prognostic factors for survival. More studies on pathophysiology of radiation induced damage are necessary to fully understand the mechanisms behind it

  19. Respiration-correlated image guidance is the most important radiotherapy motion management strategy for most lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine; Persson, Gitte; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT), 4D image guidance (4D-IG), and beam gating on calculated treatment field margins in a lung cancer patient population....

  20. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  1. Adjuvant radiotherapy and its role in the treatment of stage II lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzgerald, T.J.; Greenberger, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Lung carcinoma remains an enormous clinical challenge for all health care personnel involved in the care of these patients. Those patients with unresected primary lung carcinoma are ultimately referred for radiation therapy in order to control local regional disease. It is important to recognize the great gains in longevity have not materialized with the addition of adjuvant therapy. However, a very real benefit in the quality of life for most patients with carcinoma of the lung can be achieved with the judicious and thoughtful application of sophisticated radiation therapy, for a small but significant portion of the population, a cure will result from this treatment. This chapter reviews the role of radiation therapy as an adjuvant to definitive surgical treatment

  2. Dose verification of radiotherapy for lung cancer by using plastic scintillator dosimetry and a heterogeneous phantom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann; Behrens, C. F.; Andersen, Claus E.

    2015-01-01

    Bone, air passages, cavities, and lung are elements present in patients, but challenging to properly correct for in treatment planning dose calculations. Plastic scintillator detectors (PSDs) have proven to be well suited for dosimetry in non-reference conditions such as small fields. The objective...... of this study was to investigate the performance of a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) using a PSD and a specially designed thorax phantom with lung tumor inserts. 10 treatment plans of different complexity and phantom configurations were evaluated. Although the TPS agreed well with the measurements...

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshy, Matthew; Malik, Renuka; Mahmood, Usama; Husain, Zain; Sher, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  4. Stereotactic radiotherapy in oligometastatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Thomas A C; Corkum, Mark T; Louie, Alexander V

    2017-09-01

    Oligometastatic cancer describes a disease state somewhere between localized and metastatic cancer. Proposed definitions of oligometastatic disease have typically used a cut-off of five or fewer sites of disease. Treatment of oligometastatic disease should have the goal of long-term local control, and in selected cases, disease remission. While several retrospective cohorts argue for surgical excision of limited metastases (metastasectomy) as the preferred treatment option for several clinical indications, limited randomized data exists for treating oligometastases. Alternatively, stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) is a radiotherapy technique that combines high radiation doses per fraction with precision targeting with the goal of achieving long-term local control of treated sites. Published cohort studies of SABR have demonstrated excellent local control rates of 70-90% in oligometastatic disease, with long-term survival in some series approaching 20-40%. A recent randomized phase 2 clinical trial by Gomez et al. demonstrated significantly improved progression free survival with aggressive consolidative therapy (surgery, radiotherapy ± chemotherapy or SABR) in oli-gometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). As additional randomized controlled trials are ongoing to determine the efficacy of SABR in oligometastatic disease, SABR is increasingly being used within routine clinical practice. This review article aims to sum-marize the history and current paradigm of the oligometastatic state, review recently pub-lished literature of SABR in oligometastatic cancer and discuss ongoing trials and future directions in this context.

  5. Influence of rotational setup error on tumor shift in bony anatomy matching measured with pulmonary point registration in stereotactic body radiotherapy for early lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Osamu; Nishiyama, Kinji; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Miyazaki, Masayoshi; Tsujii, Katsutomo

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the correlation between the patient rotational error measured with pulmonary point registration and tumor shift after bony anatomy matching in stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer. Twenty-six patients with lung cancer who underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy were the subjects. On 104 cone-beam computed tomography measurements performed prior to radiation delivery, rotational setup errors were measured with point registration using pulmonary structures. Translational registration using bony anatomy matching was done and the three-dimensional vector of tumor displacement was measured retrospectively. Correlation among the three-dimensional vector and rotational error and vertebra-tumor distance was investigated quantitatively. The median and maximum rotational errors of the roll, pitch and yaw were 0.8, 0.9 and 0.5, and 6.0, 4.5 and 2.5, respectively. Bony anatomy matching resulted in a 0.2-1.6 cm three-dimensional vector of tumor shift. The shift became larger as the vertebra-tumor distance increased. Multiple regression analysis for the three-dimensional vector indicated that in the case of bony anatomy matching, tumor shifts of 5 and 10 mm were expected for vertebra-tumor distances of 4.46 and 14.1 cm, respectively. Using pulmonary point registration, it was found that the rotational setup error influences the tumor shift. Bony anatomy matching is not appropriate for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy with a tight margin. (author)

  6. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  7. Combined electron/photon (E/P) postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for early breast cancer based on central lung distance (CLD) values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiko; Takahashi, Satoshi; Nakamura, Michiko

    2008-01-01

    Combined electron/photon (E/P) method has been introduced since 1999 in the postoperative radiotherapy (RT) for 27 early breast cancer patients out of 491, whose central lung disease (CLD) exceeded over 2.5 cm. Several parameters were analyzed between the conventional method and E/P method. Remarkable improvement was established as follows, CLD 2.64 vs. 1.26 cm, maximum lung distance (MLD) 2.75 vs. 1.40 cm and maximum heart distance (MHD) 1.81 vs. 0.58 cm, respectively (p<0.0001). Combined E/P method would be valid to avoid lung complications and long-term cardiac mortality. (author)

  8. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  9. Efficient approach for determining four-dimensional computed tomography-based internal target volume in stereotactic radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung Gu; Kim, Eun Seog

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate efficient approaches for determining internal target volume (ITV) from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) images used in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). 4D CT images were analyzed for 15 patients who received SBRT for stage I NSCLC. Three different ITVs were determined as follows: combining clinical target volume (CTV) from all 10 respiratory phases (ITV 10Phases ); combining CTV from four respiratory phases, including two extreme phases (0% and 50%) plus two intermediate phases (20% and 70%) (ITV 4Phases ); and combining CTV from two extreme phases (ITV 2Phases ). The matching index (MI) of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases was defined as the ratio of ITV 4Phases and ITV 2Phases , respectively, to the ITV 10Phases . The tumor motion index (TMI) was defined as the ratio of ITV 10Phases to CTV mean , which was the mean of 10 CTVs delineated on 10 respiratory phases. The ITVs were significantly different in the order of ITV 10Phases , ITV 4Phases , and ITV 2Phases (all p 4Phases was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p 4Phases was inversely related to TMI (r = -0.569, p = 0.034). In a subgroup with low TMI (n = 7), ITV 4Phases was not statistically different from ITV 10Phases (p = 0.192) and its MI was significantly higher than that of ITV 2Phases (p = 0.016). The ITV 4Phases may be an efficient approach alternative to optimal ITV 10Phases in SBRT for early-stage NSCLC with less tumor motion.

  10. Effect of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy for stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To explore the influence of interfraction interval in hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFX RT) with or without concurrent chemotherapy for Stage III nonsmall cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-nine patients treated in a randomized study were retrospectively analyzed. Group I patients were treated by HFX RT with 1.2 Gy twice daily with a total dose of 64.8 Gy in 27 treatment days, while Groups II and III patients were treated by the same HFX RT and concurrent chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide (every week in Group II and every other week in Group III). Interfraction intervals of either 4.5-5 h or 5.5-6 h were used for each patient. Results: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) had a better prognosis than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h) (median survival: 22 vs. 7 months; 5-year survival rate: 27% vs. 0%, p = 0.00000). This phenomenon was observed in all treatment groups. Patients ≥ 60 years of age, with Stage IIIA disease, or with previous weight loss ≤ 5% were treated more often with the shorter intervals than those 5%, respectively, but in all of these subgroups of patients, the shorter intervals were associated with a better prognosis. Multivariate analysis showed that the interfraction interval was an independent prognostic factor, together with sex, age, performance status, and stage. The shorter intervals were associated with an increased incidence of acute high grade toxicity, but not with an increase in late toxicity. Conclusion: Patients treated with shorter interfraction intervals (4.5-5 h) appeared to have a better survival than those treated with longer intervals (5.5-6 h). Prospective randomized studies are warranted to further investigate the influence of interfraction interval in HFX RT

  11. A review of clinical trials of cetuximab combined with radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieder, Carsten; Pawinski, Adam; Dalhaug, Astrid; Andratschke, Nicolaus

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is challenging in many ways. One of the problems is disappointing local control rates in larger volume disease. Moreover, the likelihood of both nodal and distant spread increases with primary tumour (T-) stage. Many patients are elderly and have considerable comorbidity. Therefore, aggressive combined modality treatment might be contraindicated or poorly tolerated. In many cases with larger tumour volume, sufficiently high radiation doses can not be administered because the tolerance of surrounding normal tissues must be respected. Under such circumstances, simultaneous administration of radiosensitizing agents, which increase tumour cell kill, might improve the therapeutic ratio. If such agents have a favourable toxicity profile, even elderly patients might tolerate concomitant treatment. Based on sound preclinical evidence, several relatively small studies have examined radiotherapy (RT) with cetuximab in stage III NSCLC. Three different strategies were pursued: 1) RT plus cetuximab (2 studies), 2) induction chemotherapy followed by RT plus cetuximab (2 studies) and 3) concomitant RT and chemotherapy plus cetuximab (2 studies). Radiation doses were limited to 60-70 Gy. As a result of study design, in particular lack of randomised comparison between cetuximab and no cetuximab, the efficacy results are difficult to interpret. However, strategy 1) and 3) appear more promising than induction chemotherapy followed by RT and cetuximab. Toxicity and adverse events were more common when concomitant chemotherapy was given. Nevertheless, combined treatment appears feasible. The role of consolidation cetuximab after RT is uncertain. A large randomised phase III study of combined RT, chemotherapy and cetuximab has been initiated

  12. Quality of life assessment in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients undergoing an accelerated radiotherapy regimen: report of ECOG study 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchter, Richard M.; Scholtens, Denise; Adak, Sudeshna; Wagner, Henry; Cella, David F.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) before, at completion, and after therapy for patients receiving an accelerated fractionation schedule of radiotherapy for advanced, unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer in a Phase II multi-institutional trial. Methods and Materials: The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) patient questionnaire was used to score the QOL in patients enrolled in the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Phase II trial (ECOG 4593) of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer. Radiotherapy (total dose 57.6 Gy in 36 fractions) was delivered during 15 days, with three radiation fractions given each treatment day. The protocol was activated in 1993, and 30 patients had accrued by November 1995. The FACT-L questionnaire was administered at study entry (baseline), on the last day of radiotherapy (assessment 2), and 4 weeks after therapy (assessment 3). The FACT-L includes scores for physical, functional, emotional, and social well-being (33 items), and a subscale of lung cancer symptoms (10 additional items). The summation of the physical, functional, and lung cancer symptom subscales (21 items) constitutes the Trial Outcome Index (TOI), considered the most clinically relevant outcome measure in lung cancer treatment trials. Results: The FACT-L completion rates at the designated study time points were as follows: baseline, 30 of 30 (100%); assessment 2, 29 (97%) of 30; and assessment 3, 24 (80%) of 30. At treatment completion, statistically significant declines in QOL scores were noted, compared with baseline for physical and functional well-being. Emotional well-being scores improved at both assessment 2 and assessment 3. The physical and functional scores returned approximately to baseline values at assessment 3. The change in TOI score was evaluated as a function of the clinical response to treatment, toxicity grade, and survival; no clear association was noted. A trend for the

  13. Impact of thoracic radiotherapy timing in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: usefulness of the individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruysscher, D; Lueza, B; Le Péchoux, C; Johnson, D H; O'Brien, M; Murray, N; Spiro, S; Wang, X; Takada, M; Lebeau, B; Blackstock, W; Skarlos, D; Baas, P; Choy, H; Price, A; Seymour, L; Arriagada, R; Pignon, J-P

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy (CT) combined with radiotherapy is the standard treatment of 'limited-stage' small-cell lung cancer. However, controversy persists over the optimal timing of thoracic radiotherapy and CT. We carried out a meta-analysis of individual patient data in randomized trials comparing earlier versus later radiotherapy, or shorter versus longer radiotherapy duration, as defined in each trial. We combined the results from trials using the stratified log-rank test to calculate pooled hazard ratios (HRs). The primary outcome was overall survival. Twelve trials with 2668 patients were eligible. Data from nine trials comprising 2305 patients were available for analysis. The median follow-up was 10 years. When all trials were analysed together, 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy did not affect overall survival. However, the HR for overall survival was significantly in favour of 'earlier or shorter' radiotherapy among trials with a similar proportion of patients who were compliant with CT (defined as having received 100% or more of the planned CT cycles) in both arms (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69-0.91), and in favour of 'later or longer' radiotherapy among trials with different rates of CT compliance (HR 1.19, 1.05-1.34, interaction test, P < 0.0001). The absolute gain between 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy in 5-year overall survival for similar and for different CT compliance trials was 7.7% (95% CI 2.6-12.8%) and -2.2% (-5.8% to 1.4%), respectively. However, 'earlier or shorter' thoracic radiotherapy was associated with a higher incidence of severe acute oesophagitis than 'later or longer' radiotherapy. 'Earlier or shorter' delivery of thoracic radiotherapy with planned CT significantly improves 5-year overall survival at the expense of more acute toxicity, especially oesophagitis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  14. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy Following Induction Chemotherapy for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-Random iced for Adjuvant Chemotherapy vs. Observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Eun Kyung; Chang, Hye Sook; Ahn, Seung Do

    1993-01-01

    Since Jan. 1991 a prospective randomized study for Stage III unresectable non small cell lung cancer(NSCLC) has been conducted to evaluate the response rate and tolerance of induction chemotherapy with MVP followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy and evaluate the efficacy of maintenance chemotherapy in Asan Medical Center. All patients in this study were treated with hypefractionated radiotherapy (120 cGy/fx BID, 0480 cGy/54 fx) following 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy, MVP (Mitomycin C 6 mg/m2, Vinblastin B mg/ m2, Cisplatin 60 Mg/ m2) and then the partial and complete responders from induction chemotherapy were randomized to 3 cycles of adjuvant MVP chemotherapy group and observation group. 48 patients were registered to this study until December 1992; among 48 patients 3 refused further treatment after induction chemotherapy and 6 received incomplete radiation therapy because of patient refusal, 39 completed planned therapy. Twenty-three(58%) patients including 2 complete responders showed response from induction chemotherapy. Among the 21 patients who achieved a partial response after induction chemotherapy, 1 patient rendered complete clearance of disease and 10 patients showed further regression of tumor following hypefractionated radiotherapy. Remaining 10 patients showed stable disease or progression after radiotherapy. Of the sixteen patients judged to have stable disease or progression after induction chemotherapy, seven showed more than partial remission after radiotherapy but nine showed no response in spite of radiotherapy. Of the 35 patients who completed induction chemotherapy and radiotherapy, 25 patients(64%) including 3 complete responders showed more than partial remission. Nineteen patients were randomized after radiotherapy. Nine patients were allocated to adjuvant chemotherapy group and 4/9 shewed further regression of tumor after adjuvant chemotherapy. For the time being, there is no suggestion of a difference between the adjuvant

  15. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... for the craniocaudal direction in FB, where it was >3 mm. On the 31st fraction, the intraobserver uncertainty increased compared with the second fraction. This increase was more pronounced in FB. Image quality scores improved in DIBH compared with FB for all parameters in all patients. Simulated tumour baseline shifts...... ≤2 mm did not affect the CBCT image quality considerably. CONCLUSION: DIBH CBCT improved image quality and reduced registration uncertainty in the craniocaudal direction in image-guided RT of locally advanced lung cancer. Baseline shifts ≤2 mm in DIBH during CBCT acquisition did not affect image...

  16. Role of comorbidity on survival after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for nonsurgically treated lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellemgaard, Anders; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Iachina, Maria

    2015-01-01

    and chemoradiation. In contrast, age remained a strong negative prognosticator after multivariate adjustment as did stage and performance status. CONCLUSION: Comorbidity has a limited effect on survival and only for patients treated with chemotherapy. It is rather the performance of the patient at diagnosis than...... treatment was categorized as chemotherapy, chemoradiation, radiotherapy, or no therapy. Data on Charlson comorbidity index, performance status, age, sex, stage, pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second), histology, and type of initial treatment (if any) were included in univariable...... and multivariable Cox proportional hazard analyses. RESULTS: Treatment rates for chemotherapy and chemoradiation declined with increasing comorbidity and in particular increasing age. Women received treatment more often than men. In a univariable analysis of all patients combined, stage, performance status, age...

  17. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V 20 values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  18. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S 2 in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S 2 and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S 2 for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S 2 reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S 2 can be reconstructed from the tumor volume variation curves measured

  19. Predictive and prognostic value of tumor volume and its changes during radical radiotherapy of stage III non-small cell lung cancer. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaesmann, Lukas [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Niyazi, Maximilian; Fleischmann, Daniel [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), partner site Munich, Munich (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Blanck, Oliver; Baumann, Rene [University Medical Center Schleswig-Holstein, Department of Radiation Oncology, Kiel (Germany); Baues, Christian; Klook, Lisa; Rosenbrock, Johannes; Trommer-Nestler, Maike [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiotherapy, Cologne (Germany); Dobiasch, Sophie [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Eze, Chukwuka [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gauer, Tobias; Goy, Yvonne [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Giordano, Frank A.; Sautter, Lisa [University Medical Center Mannheim, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mannheim (Germany); Hausmann, Jan [University Medical Center Duesseldorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Henkenberens, Christoph [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiation and Special Oncology, Hannover (Germany); Kaul, David; Thieme, Alexander H. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Krug, David; Schmitt, Daniela [University Hospital Heidelberg and National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO) and Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Maeurer, Matthias [University Medical Center Jena, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jena (Germany); Panje, Cedric M. [Kantonsspital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Suess, Christoph [University Medical Center Regensburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Regensburg (Germany); Ziegler, Sonia [University Medical Center Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Ebert, Nadja [University Medical Center Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dresden (Germany); OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany); Medenwald, Daniel [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Ostheimer, Christian [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Halle (Germany); Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Halle (Saale) (Germany); Collaboration: Young DEGRO Trial Group

    2018-02-15

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes heterogeneous presentation of the disease including lymph node involvement and large tumour volumes with infiltration of the mediastinum, heart or spine. In the treatment of stage III NSCLC an interdisciplinary approach including radiotherapy is considered standard of care with acceptable toxicity and improved clinical outcome concerning local control. Furthermore, gross tumour volume (GTV) changes during definitive radiotherapy would allow for adaptive replanning which offers normal tissue sparing and dose escalation. A literature review was conducted to describe the predictive value of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy especially focussing on overall survival. The literature search was conducted in a two-step review process using PubMed registered /Medline registered with the key words ''stage III non-small cell lung cancer'' and ''radiotherapy'' and ''tumour volume'' and ''prognostic factors''. After final consideration 17, 14 and 9 studies with a total of 2516, 784 and 639 patients on predictive impact of GTV, GTV changes and its impact on overall survival, respectively, for definitive radiotherapy for stage III NSCLC were included in this review. Initial GTV is an important prognostic factor for overall survival in several studies, but the time of evaluation and the value of histology need to be further investigated. GTV changes during RT differ widely, optimal timing for re-evaluation of GTV and their predictive value for prognosis needs to be clarified. The prognostic value of GTV changes is unclear due to varying study qualities, re-evaluation time and conflicting results. The main findings were that the clinical impact of GTV changes during definitive radiotherapy is still unclear due to heterogeneous study designs with varying quality

  20. Involved-Field Radiotherapy versus Elective Nodal Irradiation in Combination with Concurrent Chemotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Randomized Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Bao, Yong; Ma, Hong-Lian; Wang, Jin; Wang, Yan; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qi-Chao; Xie, Cong-Hua

    2013-01-01

    This prospective randomized study is to evaluate the locoregional failure and its impact on survival by comparing involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) with elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in combination with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. It appears that higher dose could be delivered in IFRT arm than that in ENI arm, and IFRT did not increase the risk of initially uninvolved or isolated nodal failures. Both a tendency of improved locoregional progression-free survival and a significant increased overall survival rate are in favor of IFRT arm in this study. PMID:23762840

  1. Potential for enhancing external beam radiotherapy for lung cancer using high-Z nanoparticles administered via inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yao; Altundal, Yucel; Moreau, Michele; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy is emerging as a promising modality to enhance radiotherapy via the radiosensitizing action of high atomic number (Z) nanoparticles. However, the delivery of sufficiently potent concentrations of such nanoparticles to the tumor remain a challenge. This study investigates the dose enhancement to lung tumors due to high-Z nanoparticles (NPs) administered via inhalation during external beam radiotherapy. Here NPs investigated include: cisplatin nanoparticles (CNPs), carboplatin nanoparticles (CBNPs), and gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Using Monte Carlo-generated megavoltage energy spectra, a previously employed analytic method was used to estimate dose enhancement to lung tumors due to radiation-induced photoelectrons from the NPs administered via inhalation route (IR) in comparison to intravenous (IV) administration. Previous studies have indicated about 5% of FDA-approved cisplatin concentrations reach the lung via IV. Meanwhile recent experimental studies indicate that 3.5-14.6 times higher concentrations of NPs can reach the lung by IR compared to IV. Taking these into account, the dose enhancement factor (DEF) defined as the ratio of the radiotherapy dose with and without nanoparticles was calculated for a range of NPs concentrations and tumor sizes. The DEF for IR was then compared with that for IV. For IR with 3.5 times higher concentrations than IV, and 2 cm diameter tumor, clinically significant DEF values of up to 1.19, 1.26, and 1.51 were obtained for CNPs, CBNPs and GNPs. In comparison values of 1.06, 1.08, and 1.15 were obtained via IV administration. For IR with 14.6 times higher concentrations, even higher DEF values were obtained e.g. 1.81 for CNPs. Results also showed that the DEF increased with increasing field size or decreasing tumor volume, as expected. The results of this work indicate that IR administration of targeted high-Z CNPs/CBNPs/GNPs could enable clinically significant DEF to lung tumors compared to IV

  2. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  3. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for Stage I lung cancer with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Special reference to survival and radiation-induced pneumonitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toshihiko; Shiomi, Hiroya; Oh, Ryoong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study aimed to evaluate radiation-induced pneumonitis (RIP) and a related condition that we define in this report — prolonged minimal RIP (pmRIP) — after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for Stage I primary lung cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We assessed 136 Stage I lung cancer patients with COPD who underwent SBRT. Airflow limitation on spirometry was classified into four Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades, with minor modifications: GOLD 1 (mild), GOLD 2 (moderate), GOLD 3 (severe) and GOLD 4 (very severe). On this basis, we defined two subgroups: COPD-free (COPD -) and COPD-positive (COPD +). There was no significant difference in overall survival or cause-specific–survival between these groups. Of the 136 patients, 44 (32%) had pmRIP. Multivariate analysis showed that COPD and the Brinkman index were statistically significant risk factors for the development of pmRIP. COPD and the Brinkman index were predictive factors for pmRIP, although our findings also indicate that SBRT can be tolerated in early lung cancer patients with COPD. (author)

  4. Results of a multicentric in silico clinical trial (ROCOCO): comparing radiotherapy with photons and protons for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Erik; Engelsman, Martijn; Rasch, Coen; Persoon, Lucas; Qamhiyeh, Sima; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Verhaegen, Frank; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon; Lambin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    This multicentric in silico trial compares photon and proton radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer patients. The hypothesis is that proton radiotherapy decreases the dose and the volume of irradiated normal tissues even when escalating to the maximum tolerable dose of one or more of the organs at risk (OAR). Twenty-five patients, stage IA-IIIB, were prospectively included. On 4D F18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans, the gross tumor, clinical and planning target volumes, and OAR were delineated. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) photon and passive scattered conformal proton therapy (PSPT) plans were created to give 70 Gy to the tumor in 35 fractions. Dose (de-)escalation was performed by rescaling to the maximum tolerable dose. Protons resulted in the lowest dose to the OAR, while keeping the dose to the target at 70 Gy. The integral dose (ID) was higher for 3DCRT (59%) and IMRT (43%) than for PSPT. The mean lung dose reduced from 18.9 Gy for 3DCRT and 16.4 Gy for IMRT to 13.5 Gy for PSPT. For 10 patients, escalation to 87 Gy was possible for all 3 modalities. The mean lung dose and ID were 40 and 65% higher for photons than for protons, respectively. The treatment planning results of the Radiation Oncology Collaborative Comparison trial show a reduction of ID and the dose to the OAR when treating with protons instead of photons, even with dose escalation. This shows that PSPT is able to give a high tumor dose, while keeping the OAR dose lower than with the photon modalities.

  5. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  6. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Sergio L.; Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible

  7. Sci-Fri PM: Radiation Therapy, Planning, Imaging, and Special Techniques - 03: The Potential Benefit Of Esophageal Sparing During Palliative Radiotherapy For Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granton, Patrick V.; Palma, David A.; Louie, Alexander V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, London Health Sciences Centre (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    Puropose: Palliative radiotherapy is an effective technique to alleviate systems of disease burden in late-stage lung cancer patients. Previous randomized controlled studies demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with good performance status at radiation doses of 35Gy10 or greater but with an increased incidence of esophagitis. The objective of this planning study was to assess the potential impact of esophageal-sparing IMRT (ES-IMRT) compared to the current standard of care using parallel-opposed pair beams (POP). Methods: In this study, 15 patients with lung cancer treated to a dose of 30Gy in 10 fractions between August 2015 and January 2016 were identified. Radiation treatment plans were optimized using ES-IMRT by limiting the max esophagus point dose to 24Gy. Using published Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probabilities (LKB-NTCP) models, both plans were evaluated for the likelihood of esophagitis (≥ grade 2) and pneumonitis (≥ grade 2). Results: Using ES-IMRT, the median esophageal and lung mean doses reduced from 16 and 8Gy to 7 and 7Gy, respectively. Using the LKB models, the theoretical probability of symptomatic esophagitis and pneumonitis reduced from 13 to 1%, and from 5 to 3%, respectively. The median NTD mean for the GTV and PTV of the clinically approved POP plans compared to the ES-IMRT plans were similar. Conclusions: Advanced radiotherapy techniques such as ES-IMRT may have clinical utility in reducing treatment-related toxicity in advanced lung cancer patients. Our data suggests that the rate of esophagitis can be reduced without compromising tumour control.

  8. Time and dose-related changes in lung perfusion after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Khalil, Azza A; Møller, Ditte S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine radiation-induced changes in regional lung perfusion per dose level in 58 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients receiving chemo-radiotherapy (RT) of minimum 60 Gy we...

  9. Analysis of the impact of chest wall constraints on eligibility for a randomized trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Shaw, Mark; Gill, Suki; David, Ball; Chesson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Chest wall toxicities are recognized complications of stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer. To minimize toxicity, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 09.02 ‘CHISEL’ study protocol excluded patients with tumours within 1cm of the chest wall. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the implication of chest wall proximity constraints on patient eligibility, toxicity and potential accrual. Exclusion zones of 1cm beyond the mediastinum and 2cm beyond the bifurcation of the lobar bronchi were incorporated into the CHISEL credentialing CT dataset. Volumes of lung within which tumours varying from 1cm to 5cm in diameter may occupy and remain eligible for the CHISEL study were calculated. These volumes were compared to a hypothetical model in which the 1cm chest wall proximity restriction was removed. The percentage of lung area in which a tumour mass can occupy and be suitable for CHISEL in the left and right lung were 54% and 60% respectively. Removing the constraint increased the percentage of available lung to 83% and 87% respectively. Considering a 2cm spherical tumour, only 21% and 31% of tumours in the left and right lung would be eligible with the chest wall constraint, whilst 39% and 50% respectively would be eligible without the constraint. The exclusion of tumours less than 1cm to chest wall significantly reduces the proportion of patients eligible for the CHISEL protocol. A review of the literature pertaining to chest wall toxicity after stereotactic radiotherapy supports a change in chest wall exclusion criteria for the CHISEL study.

  10. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  11. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Hanna, Gerard G; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; Harrow, Stephen; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2016-04-15

    The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of 'isotoxic' radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West-Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. NCT01836692; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  12. The role of accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer: a controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Kowalska, T.; Glinski, C.

    2000-01-01

    Radiotherapy remains the basic form of treatment in cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but there still exist controversies concerning optimal radiotherapy regimen and in particular, the total dose and fractionation schedules. To prove whether the question: if using an unconventional dose fractionation regimen (accelerated hyperfractionation) could improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy patients with NSCLC. Between 1997 and 2000 in the Cancer Centre in Cracow (COOK) a controlled clinical trial was conducted in a group of 150 patients with locally advanced (III Deg) inoperable and unsuitable for radical radiotherapy NSCLC, with no major symptoms of the disease. In 76 patients conventionally fractionated radiotherapy was performed - 50 Gy in 25 fractions during 5 weeks (CF). 74 patients were irradiated twice a day (AHF); the dose per fraction was 1.25 Gy and the minimum interval between fractions - 6 hours. The total dose was 50 Gy in 40 fractions during 26 days. The probability of 12 months survival was 47.4% in the CF arm and 45.9% in the AHF arm; the probability of 24 months survival was 16.2% and 15.8%, respectively. In all 76 patients in CF arm the treatment was carried out in prescribed time without breaks. Out of 74 patients in the A HF group 8 (10,8%) did not complete the treatment and 2 of then died in 3rd and 4th week of treatment. The use of accelerated hyperfractionation does not improve the results of palliative teleradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced NSCLC without severe symptoms related to intrathoracic tumor. The treatment of choice in this group of patients os conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in 5 week of treatment. (author)

  13. Designing Targets for Elective Nodal Irradiation in Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: A Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Tatro, Daniel; Moran, Jean M.; Quint, Leslie E.; Hayman, James A.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong Fengming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess doses received by mediastinal and hilar lymph node stations (LNS) delineated according to published recommendations when 'standard' two-dimensional (2D) elective fields are applied and to assess doses to critical structures when fields are designed using 2D and three-dimensional (3D) treatment planning for elective irradiation. Methods and Materials: LNS were delineated on axial CT scans according to existing recommendations. For each case and tumor location, 2D anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) elective fields were applied using the AP-PA CT topograms. From the 2D portal fields, 3D dose distributions were then calculated to particular LNS. Next, 3D plans were prepared for elective nodal irradiation for tumors of different lobes. Doses for critical structures were compared for 2D and 3D plans. Results: LNS 1/2R, 1/2L, 3A, 3P, 5, 6, and 8 were not adequately covered in a substantial part of plans by standard 2D portals when guidelines for delineation were strictly followed. The magnitude of the lack of coverage increased with margin application. There was a trend for a higher yet probably still safe dose delivered to lung for 3D plans compared with 2D plans with a prescription dose of 45 Gy. Conclusions: 2D fields did not entirely cover LNS delineated according to the recommendations for 3D techniques. A strict adherence to these guidelines may lead to larger portals than traditionally constructed using 2D methods. Some modifications for clinical implementation are discussed.

  14. Effects of Respiration-Induced Density Variations on Dose Distributions in Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexner, Vanessa; Wolthaus, Jochem W.H.; Herk, Marcel van; Damen, Eugene M.F.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of respiration-induced density variations on the estimated dose delivered to moving structures and, consequently, to evaluate the necessity of using full four-dimensional (4D) treatment plan optimization. Methods and Materials: In 10 patients with large tumor motion (median, 1.9 cm; range, 1.1-3.6 cm), the clinical treatment plan, designed using the mid-ventilation ([MidV]; i.e., the 4D-CT frame closest to the time-averaged mean position) CT scan, was recalculated on all 4D-CT frames. The cumulative dose was determined by transforming the doses in all breathing phases to the MidV geometry using deformable registration and then averaging the results. To determine the effect of density variations, this cumulative dose was compared with the accumulated dose after similarly deforming the planned (3D) MidV-dose in each respiratory phase using the same transformation (i.e., 'blurring the dose'). Results: The accumulated tumor doses, including and excluding density variations, were almost identical. Relative differences in the minimum gross tumor volume (GTV) dose were less than 2% for all patients. The relative differences were even smaller in the mean lung dose and the V20 (<0.5% and 1%, respectively). Conclusions: The effect of respiration-induced density variations on the dose accumulated over the respiratory cycle was very small, even in the presence of considerable respiratory motion. A full 4D-dose calculation for treatment planning that takes into account such density variations is therefore not required. Planning using the MidV-CT derived from 4D-CT with an appropriate margin for geometric uncertainties is an accurate and safe method to account for respiration-induced anatomy variations.

  15. Acute exacerbation of subclinical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis triggered by hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in a patient with primary lung cancer and slightly focal honeycombing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Enomoto, Tatsuji; Takeda, Toshiaki; Kunieda, Etsuo; Nakajima, Takeshi; Sayama, Koichi

    2008-01-01

    Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for pulmonary lesions provides a high local control rate, allows completely painless ambulatory treatment, and is not associated with adverse reactions in most cases. Here we report a 70-year-old lung cancer patient with slight focal pulmonary honeycombing in whom subclinical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was exacerbated by SBRT. This experience has important implications for the development of selection criteria prior to SBRT for pulmonary lesions. For SBRT candidates with lung tumors, attention must be paid to the presence of co-morbid interstitial pneumonia even if findings are minimal. Such patients must be informed of potential risks, and careful decision-making must take place when SBRT is being considered. (author)

  16. Early prediction of tumor recurrence based on CT texture changes after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattonen, Sarah A.; Palma, David A.; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Senan, Suresh; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Benign computed tomography (CT) changes due to radiation induced lung injury (RILI) are common following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and can be difficult to differentiate from tumor recurrence. The authors measured the ability of CT image texture analysis, compared to more traditional measures of response, to predict eventual cancer recurrence based on CT images acquired within 5 months of treatment. Methods: A total of 24 lesions from 22 patients treated with SABR were selected for this study: 13 with moderate to severe benign RILI, and 11 with recurrence. Three-dimensional (3D) consolidative and ground-glass opacity (GGO) changes were manually delineated on all follow-up CT scans. Two size measures of the consolidation regions (longest axial diameter and 3D volume) and nine appearance features of the GGO were calculated: 2 first-order features [mean density and standard deviation of density (first-order texture)], and 7 second-order texture features [energy, entropy, correlation, inverse difference moment (IDM), inertia, cluster shade, and cluster prominence]. For comparison, the corresponding response evaluation criteria in solid tumors measures were also taken for the consolidation regions. Prediction accuracy was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and two-fold cross validation (CV). Results: For this analysis, 46 diagnostic CT scans scheduled for approximately 3 and 6 months post-treatment were binned based on their recorded scan dates into 2–5 month and 5–8 month follow-up time ranges. At 2–5 months post-treatment, first-order texture, energy, and entropy provided AUCs of 0.79–0.81 using a linear classifier. On two-fold CV, first-order texture yielded 73% accuracy versus 76%–77% with the second-order features. The size measures of the consolidative region, longest axial diameter and 3D volume, gave two-fold CV accuracies of 60% and 57%, and AUCs of 0.72 and 0.65, respectively

  17. Difference in target definition using three different methods to include respiratory motion in radiotherapy of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloth Møller, Ditte; Knap, Marianne Marquard; Nyeng, Tine Bisballe; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Holt, Marianne Ingerslev; Kandi, Maria; Hoffmann, Lone

    2017-11-01

    Minimizing the planning target volume (PTV) while ensuring sufficient target coverage during the entire respiratory cycle is essential for free-breathing radiotherapy of lung cancer. Different methods are used to incorporate the respiratory motion into the PTV. Fifteen patients were analyzed. Respiration can be included in the target delineation process creating a respiratory GTV, denoted iGTV. Alternatively, the respiratory amplitude (A) can be measured based on the 4D-CT and A can be incorporated in the margin expansion. The GTV expanded by A yielded GTV + resp, which was compared to iGTV in terms of overlap. Three methods for PTV generation were compared. PTV del (delineated iGTV expanded to CTV plus PTV margin), PTV σ (GTV expanded to CTV and A was included as a random uncertainty in the CTV to PTV margin) and PTV ∑ (GTV expanded to CTV, succeeded by CTV linear expansion by A to CTV + resp, which was finally expanded to PTV ∑ ). Deformation of tumor and lymph nodes during respiration resulted in volume changes between the respiratory phases. The overlap between iGTV and GTV + resp showed that on average 7% of iGTV was outside the GTV + resp implying that GTV + resp did not capture the tumor during the full deformable respiration cycle. A comparison of the PTV volumes showed that PTV σ was smallest and PTV Σ largest for all patients. PTV σ was in mean 14% (31 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV del , while PTV del was 7% (20 cm 3 ) smaller than PTV Σ . PTV σ yields the smallest volumes but does not ensure coverage of tumor during the full respiratory motion due to tumor deformation. Incorporating the respiratory motion in the delineation (PTV del ) takes into account the entire respiratory cycle including deformation, but at the cost, however, of larger treatment volumes. PTV Σ should not be used, since it incorporates the disadvantages of both PTV del and PTV σ .

  18. Pilot study of alternating radiotherapy and three-drug combined chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, cisplatin and vindesine in localized inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rikimaru, Toru; Tanaka, Yasuyuki; Ichikawa, Yoichiro; Oizumi, Kotaro; Fukurono, Kazuyoshi; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    1993-01-01

    During the period from February 1991 through October 1992, we conducted a pilot phase II trial of an 'Alternating Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy' for 15 patients with localized inoperable non-small cell lung cancer. The combined regimen, consisting of ifosfamide 1.5 g/m 2 on days 1 through 3, cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 and vindesine 3 mg/m 2 on day 1, was given repeatedly every 4 weeks. Patients were treated in a split course fashion with combination chemotherapy sandwiched between radiation therapy (total dose 60 Gy). Of 15 evaluable patients, complete remission, partial remission and no change were obtained in 1, 13 and 1 patients, respectively, with an overall response rate of 93.3%. The median survival for all patients was 62 weeks. Hematologic toxicity was severe and was judged to be dose limiting. It was, however, clinically manageable with colony stimulating factor. These results indicate that this alternating radiotherapy and chemotherapy is feasible for localized non-small cell lung cancer and warrants further clinical trials. (author)

  19. Predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Jun; Li, Guang; Ma, Lianghua; Han, Chong; Zhang, Shuo; Yao, Lei [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)], e-mail: gl1963516@yahoo.cn; Diao, Rao [Dept. of Experimental Technology Center, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China); Zang, Shuang [Dept. of Nursing, China Medical Univ., Shenyang (China)

    2013-08-15

    Grade {>=}3 radiation pneumonitis (RP) is generally severe and life-threatening. Predictors of grade {>=}2 are usually used for grade {>=}3 RP prediction, but it is unclear whether these predictors are appropriate. In this study, predictors of grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP were investigated separately. The increased risk of severe RP in elderly patients compared with younger patients was also evaluated. Material and methods: A total of 176 consecutive patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were followed up prospectively after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. RP was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Mean lung dose (MLD), mean heart dose, ratio of planning target volume to total lung volume (PTV/Lung), and dose-volume histogram comprehensive value of both heart and lung were associated with both grade {>=}2 and grade {>=}3 RP in univariate analysis. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, age and MLD were predictors of both grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP; receipt of chemotherapy predicted grade {>=}3 RP only; and sex and PTV/Lung predicted grade {>=}2 RP only. Among patients who developed high-grade RP, MLD and PTV/Lung were significantly lower in patients aged {>=}70 years than in younger patients (p<0.05 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The predictors were not completely consistent between grade {>=}2 RP and grade {>=}3 RP. Elderly patients had a higher risk of severe RP than younger patients did, possibly due to lower tolerance of radiation to the lung.

  20. Superiority of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy over helical tomotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A comparative plan analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Pyo, H.; Kim, J. [Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Lim, Y.K.; Kim, D.W.; Cho, K.H. [National Cancer Center, Research Institute and Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of). Proton Therapy Center; Kim, W.C. [Inha Univ. School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kim, H.J. [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To compare helical tomotherapy (HT) and conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using a variety of dosimetric and radiobiologic indexes in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Patients and methods: A total of 20 patients with LA-NSCLC were enrolled. IMRT plans with 4-6 coplanar beams and HT plans were generated for each patient. Dose distributions and dosimetric indexes for the tumors and critical structures were computed for both plans and compared. Results: Both modalities created highly conformal plans. They did not differ in the volumes of lung exposed to > 20 Gy of radiation. The average mean lung dose, volume receiving {>=} 30 Gy, and volume receiving {>=} 10 Gy in HT planning were 18.3 Gy, 18.5%, and 57.1%, respectively, compared to 19.4 Gy, 25.4%, and 48.9%, respectively, with IMRT (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, and p < 0.001). The differences between HT and IMRT in lung volume receiving {>=} 10-20 Gy increased significantly as the planning target volume (PTV) increased. For 6 patients who had PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT for 5 patients in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. The integral dose to the entire thorax in HT plans was significantly higher than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: HT gave significantly better control of mean lung dose and volume receiving {>=} 30-40 Gy, whereas IMRT provided better control of the lung volume receiving {>=} 5-15 Gy and the integral dose to entire thorax. In most patients with PTV greater than 700 cm{sup 3}, IMRT was superior to HT in terms of lung volume receiving {>=} 5-20 Gy. It is therefore advised that caution should be exercised when planning LA-NSCLC using HT. (orig.)

  1. Consequences of Anatomic Changes and Respiratory Motion on Radiation Dose Distributions in Conformal Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Keith R.; Starkschall, George; Liu, Helen; Chang, Joe Y.; Bilton, Stephen; Ezhil, Muthuveni; John-Baptiste, Sandra C.; Kantor, Michael; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Mohan, Radhe

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of interfractional changes in anatomy on the target and normal tissue dose distributions during course of radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Weekly respiration-correlated four-dimensional computed tomography scans were acquired for 10 patients. Original beam arrangements from conventional and inverse treatment plans were transferred into each of the weekly four-dimensional computed tomography data sets, and the dose distributions were recalculated. Dosimetric changes to the target volumes and relevant normal structures relative to the baseline treatment plans were analyzed by dose-volume histograms. Results: The overall difference in the mean ± standard deviation of the doses to 95% of the planning target volume and internal target volume between the initial and weekly treatment plans was -11.9% ± 12.1% and -2.5% ± 3.9%, respectively. The mean ± standard deviation change in the internal target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was -2.3% ± 4.1%. The overall differences in the mean ± standard deviation between the initial and weekly treatment plans was 3.1% ± 6.8% for the total lung volume exceeding 20 Gy, 2.2% ± 4.8% for mean total lung dose, and 34.3% ± 43.0% for the spinal cord maximal dose. Conclusion: Serial four-dimensional computed tomography scans provided useful anatomic information and dosimetric changes during radiotherapy. Although the observed dosimetric variations were small, on average, the interfractional changes in tumor volume, mobility, and patient setup was sometimes associated with dramatic dosimetric consequences. Therefore, for locally advanced lung cancer patients, efforts to include image-guided treatment and to perform repeated imaging during the treatment course are recommended

  2. Influence of conformal radiotherapy technique on survival after chemoradiotherapy for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer in the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, David J; Koshy, Matthew; Liptay, Michael J; Fidler, Mary Jo

    2014-07-01

    Definitive chemoradiotherapy is a core treatment modality for patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although radiotherapy (RT) technologies have advanced dramatically, to the authors' knowledge relatively little is known regarding the importance of irradiation technique on outcome, particularly given the competing risk of distant metastasis. The National Cancer Data Base was used to determine predictors of overall survival (OS) in patients with AJCC stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy, focusing on the importance of conformal RT (CRT). Patients with stage III NSCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy between 2003 and 2005 in the National Cancer Data Base were included. RT technique was defined as conventional, 3-dimensional-conformal, or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), the latter 2 combined as CRT. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed for univariable and multivariable analyses of OS. The median, 3-year, and 5-year survival outcomes for the 13,292 patients were 12.9 months, 19%, and 11%, respectively. The 3-year and 5-year survival probabilities of patients receiving CRT versus no CRT were 22% versus 19% and 14% versus 11%, respectively (P < .0001). On multivariable analysis, CRT was found to be significantly associated with improved OS (hazards ratio, 0.89). This effect was confirmed on sensitivity analyses, including restricting the cohort to minimum 6-month survivors, young patients with stage IIIA disease, and propensity score-matching. Institutional academic status and patient volume were not found to be associated with OS. CRT was found to be independently associated with a survival advantage. These results reflect the importance of optimal locoregional therapy in patients with stage III NSCLC and provide motivation for further study of advanced RT technologies in patients with NSCLC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Role of interim {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the early prediction of clinical outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Garibaldi, Cristina [European Institute of Oncology, Radiation Research Unit, Milano (Italy); Gilardi, Laura; Travaini, Laura Lavinia; Grana, Chiara Maria [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila Esmeralda; Botta, Francesca [Medical Physics Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Piperno, Gaia; Ronchi, Sara; Ciardo, Delia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Baroni, Guido [Politecnico di Milano University, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Milano (Italy); Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Milano (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by aggressiveness and includes the majority of thorax malignancies. The possibility of early stratification of patients as responsive and non-responsive to radiotherapy with a non-invasive method is extremely appealing. The distribution of the Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in tumours, provided by Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET) images, has been proved to be useful to assess the initial staging of the disease, recurrence, and response to chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy (CRT). In the last years, particular efforts have been focused on the possibility of using ad interim {sup 18}F-FDG PET (FDG{sub int}) to evaluate response already in the course of radiotherapy. However, controversial findings have been reported for various malignancies, although several results would support the use of FDG{sub int} for individual therapeutic decisions, at least in some pathologies. The objective of the present review is to assemble comprehensively the literature concerning NSCLC, to evaluate where and whether FDG{sub int} may offer predictive potential. Several searches were completed on Medline and the Embase database, combining different keywords. Original papers published in the English language from 2005 to 2016 with studies involving FDG{sub int} in patients affected by NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy or chemo-radiotherapy only were chosen. Twenty-one studies out of 970 in Pubmed and 1256 in Embase were selected, reporting on 627 patients. Certainly, the lack of univocal PET parameters was identified as a major drawback, while standardization would be required for best practice. In any case, all these papers denoted FDG{sub int} as promising and a challenging examination for early assessment of outcomes during CRT, sustaining its predictivity in lung cancer. (orig.)

  4. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuenzler, Thomas [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Grezdo, Jozef [Department of Radiotherapy, St Elisabeth Institute of Oncology, Bratislava (Slovakia); Bogner, Joachim [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Birkfellner, Wolfgang [Center for Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiobiology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2007-04-21

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm{sup 3} tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm{sup 3} were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical

  5. Registration of DRRs and portal images for verification of stereotactic body radiotherapy: a feasibility study in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzler, Thomas; Grezdo, Jozef; Bogner, Joachim; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Georg, Dietmar

    2007-01-01

    Image guidance has become a pre-requisite for hypofractionated radiotherapy where the applied dose per fraction is increased. Particularly in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung tumours, one has to account for set-up errors and intrafraction tumour motion. In our feasibility study, we compared digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) of lung lesions with MV portal images (PIs) to obtain the displacement of the tumour before irradiation. The verification of the tumour position was performed by rigid intensity based registration and three different merit functions such as the sum of squared pixel intensity differences, normalized cross correlation and normalized mutual information. The registration process then provided a translation vector that defines the displacement of the target in order to align the tumour with the isocentre. To evaluate the registration algorithms, 163 test images were created and subsequently, a lung phantom containing an 8 cm 3 tumour was built. In a further step, the registration process was applied on patient data, containing 38 tumours in 113 fractions. To potentially improve registration outcome, two filter types (histogram equalization and display equalization) were applied and their impact on the registration process was evaluated. Generated test images showed an increase in successful registrations when applying a histogram equalization filter whereas the lung phantom study proved the accuracy of the selected algorithms, i.e. deviations of the calculated translation vector for all test algorithms were below 1 mm. For clinical patient data, successful registrations occurred in about 59% of anterior-posterior (AP) and 46% of lateral projections, respectively. When patients with a clinical target volume smaller than 10 cm 3 were excluded, successful registrations go up to 90% in AP and 50% in lateral projection. In addition, a reliable identification of the tumour position was found to be difficult for clinical target

  6. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  7. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  8. High-resolution pulmonary ventilation and perfusion PET/CT allows for functionally adapted intensity modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Thomas, Roshini; Callahan, Jason; Hardcastle, Nicholas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Hicks, Rodney J.; MacManus, Michael P.; Ball, David L.; Hofman, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the utility of functional lung avoidance using IMRT informed by four-dimensional (4D) ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) PET/CT. Materials and methods: In a prospective clinical trial, patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) underwent 4D-V/Q PET/CT scanning before 60 Gy of definitive chemoradiation. Both “highly perfused” (HPLung) and “highly ventilated” (HVLung) lung volumes were delineated using a 70th centile SUV threshold, and a “ventilated lung volume” (VLung) was created using a 50th centile SUV threshold. For each patient four IMRT plans were created, optimised to the anatomical lung, HPLung, HVLung and VLung volumes, respectively. Improvements in functional dose volumetrics when optimising to functional volumes were assessed using mean lung dose (MLD), V5, V10, V20, V30, V40, V50 and V60 parameters. Results: The study cohort consisted of 20 patients with 80 IMRT plans. Plans optimised to HPLung resulted in a significant reduction of functional MLD by a mean of 13.0% (1.7 Gy), p = 0.02. Functional V5, V10 and V20 were improved by 13.2%, 7.3% and 3.8% respectively (p-values < 0.04). There was no significant sparing of dose to functional lung when adapting to VLung or HVLung. Plan quality was highly consistent with a mean PTV D95 and D5 ranging from 60.8 Gy to 61.0 Gy and 63.4 Gy to 64.5 Gy, respectively, and mean conformity and heterogeneity index ranging from 1.11 to 1.17 and 0.94 to 0.95, respectively. Conclusion: IMRT plans adapted to perfused but not ventilated lung on 4D-V/Q PET/CT allowed for reduced dose to functional lung whilst maintaining consistent plan quality

  9. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes for two different radiotherapy fractionation schedules given in the same overall time for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettington, Catherine S.; Bryant, Guy; Hickey, Brigid; Tripcony, Lee; Pratt, Gary; Fay, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To compare survival outcomes for two fractionation schedules of thoracic radiotherapy, both given over 3 weeks, in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). At Radiation Oncology Mater Centre (ROMC) and the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), patients with LS-SCLC treated with curative intent are given radiotherapy (with concurrent chemotherapy) to a dose of either 40Gy in 15 fractions ('the 40Gy/15⧣group') or 45Gy in 30 fractions ('the 45Gy/30⧣group'). The choice largely depends on institutional preference. Both these schedules are given over 3 weeks, using daily and twice-daily fractionation respectively. The records of all such patients treated from January 2000 to July 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and survival outcomes between the two groups compared. Of 118 eligible patients, there were 38 patients in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 41 patients in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The median relapse-free survival time was 12 months in both groups. Median overall survival was 21 months (95% CI 2–37 months) in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 26 months (95% CI 1–48 months) in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The 5-year overall survival rates were 20% and 25%, respectively (P=0.24). On multivariate analysis, factors influencing overall survival were: whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was given (P=0.01) and whether salvage chemotherapy was given at the time of relapse (P=0.057). Given the small sample size, the potential for selection bias and the retrospective nature of our study it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy compared with hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy however hypofractionated radiotherapy may result in equivalent relapse-free survival.

  10. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindsay, WD; Berlind, CG; Gee, JC; Simone, CB

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  11. SU-E-T-630: Predictive Modeling of Mortality, Tumor Control, and Normal Tissue Complications After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, WD [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Oncora Medical, LLC, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Berlind, CG [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Oncora Medical, LLC, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Gee, JC; Simone, CB [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: While rates of local control have been well characterized after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), less data are available characterizing survival and normal tissue toxicities, and no validated models exist assessing these parameters after SBRT. We evaluate the reliability of various machine learning techniques when applied to radiation oncology datasets to create predictive models of mortality, tumor control, and normal tissue complications. Methods: A dataset of 204 consecutive patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) at the University of Pennsylvania between 2009 and 2013 was used to create predictive models of tumor control, normal tissue complications, and mortality in this IRB-approved study. Nearly 200 data fields of detailed patient- and tumor-specific information, radiotherapy dosimetric measurements, and clinical outcomes data were collected. Predictive models were created for local tumor control, 1- and 3-year overall survival, and nodal failure using 60% of the data (leaving the remainder as a test set). After applying feature selection and dimensionality reduction, nonlinear support vector classification was applied to the resulting features. Models were evaluated for accuracy and area under ROC curve on the 81-patient test set. Results: Models for common events in the dataset (such as mortality at one year) had the highest predictive power (AUC = .67, p < 0.05). For rare occurrences such as radiation pneumonitis and local failure (each occurring in less than 10% of patients), too few events were present to create reliable models. Conclusion: Although this study demonstrates the validity of predictive analytics using information extracted from patient medical records and can most reliably predict for survival after SBRT, larger sample sizes are needed to develop predictive models for normal tissue toxicities and more advanced

  12. Radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, S.; Herfarth, K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of modern radiation techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), a dose escalation in the definitive radiotherapy of prostate cancer and a consecutive improvement in biochemical recurrence-free survival (BFS) could be achieved. Among others, investigators at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) saw 5-year BFS rates of up to 98%. A further gain in effectiveness and safety is expected of hypofractionation schedules, as suggested by data published by Kupelian et al., who saw a low 5-year rate of grade ≥2 rectal side-effects of 4.5%. However, randomized studies are just beginning to mature. Patients with intermediate or high-risk tumors should receive neoadjuvant (NHT) and adjuvant (AHT) androgen deprivation. Bolla et al. could show an increase in 5-year overall survival from 62-78%. The inclusion of the whole pelvis in the treatment field (WPRT) is still controversial. The RTOG 94-13 study showed a significant advantage in disease-free survival after 60 months but long-term data did not yield significant differences between WPRT and irradiation of the prostate alone. The German Society of Urology strongly recommends adjuvant radiotherapy of the prostate bed for pT3 N0 tumors with positive margins. In a pT3 N0 R0 or pT2 N0 R+ situation, adjuvant radiotherapy should at least be considered. So far, no randomized data on NHT and AHT have been published, so androgen deprivation remains an individual decision in the postoperative setting. In a retrospective analysis Spiotto et al. reported a positive effect for adjuvant WPRT and biochemical control. This article summarizes the essential publications on definitive and adjuvant radiotherapy and discusses the additional use of androgen deprivation and WPRT. (orig.) [de

  13. Prolonged survival after resection and radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chee, R. J.; Bydder, S.; Cameron, F.

    2007-01-01

    Selected patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer benefit from aggressive treatment. This report describes three patients who developed solitary brain metastases after previous resection of primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. Each underwent surgical resection of their brain metastasis followed by cranial irradiation and remain disease free 10 or more years later. Two patients developed cognitive impairment approximately 8 years after treatment of their brain metastasis, which was felt to be due to their previous brain irradiation. Here we discuss the treatment of solitary brain metastasis, particularly the value of combined method approaches in selected patients and dose-volume considerations

  14. Dosimetry analysis on radiation-induced acute esophagitis after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZZhu Shuchai; Cui Yanli; Li Juan; Liu Zhikun; Shen Wenbin; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the related factors with radiation-induced esophagitis after threedimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in order to explore the predictors for optimizing the treatment planning of NSCLC. Methods: From Aug 2000 to Dec 2004, 104 NSCLC patients received radiotherapy and were eligible for this study, 45 cases squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases adenocarcinoma, 33 cases carrying with cancer cells by test and 6 case with no definitive pathologic feature.46 patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), the other 58 patients conventional radiotherapy (CRT) before later-course 3DCRT. All the patients received the prescribed dose between 60-78 Gy and the median dose 66 Gy. The correlation of the variables were evaluated by Spearman relationship analysis. The morbidity of radiation-induced esophagitis was analyzed by X 2 test. The multivariate effect on radiation-induced esophagitis was statistically processed by Logistic regression model. Results: In 104 patients, the morbidity of radiation- induced esophagitis was 46.2%, including 32 cases at grade 1, 15 cases at grade 2, 1 case at grade 3. Univariate analysis showed the maximal and mean dose of esophagus, the volume of esophagus irradiated, the values of V 40 , V 45 , V 50 , V 55 , V 60 , LETT 45 , LETT 50 , LETT 55 , LETT 60 for the esophagus were correlated with radiation-induced esophagitis. Logistic regression model showed that the maximum dose received by the esophagus was the independent factor of ≥ 2 grade radiation-induced esophagitis. Conclusions: The maxmal dose of esophagus received might be the important factor of radiation-induced esophagitis. (authors)

  15. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Factors Predicting a Need for Treatment Replanning with Proton Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Janssens, G; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Valdes, G; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Gabriel, P; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Proton dose distribution is sensitive to tumor regression and tissue and normal anatomy changes. Replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continue tumor coverage or avoid overtreatment of organs at risk (OARs). We investigated action thresholds for replanning and identified both dosimetric and non-dosimetric metrics that would predict a need for replan. Methods: All consecutive lung cancer patients (n = 188) who received definitive proton radiotherapy and had more than two evaluation CT scans at the Roberts Proton Therapy Center (Philadelphia, USA) from 2011 to 2015 were included in this study. The cohort included a variety of tumor sizes, locations, histology, beam angles, as well as radiation-induced tumor and lung change. Dosimetric changes during therapy were characterized by changes in the dose volume distribution of PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs). Tumor and lung change were characterized by changes in sizes, and in the distribution of Hounsfield numbers and water equivalent thickness (WET) along the beam path. We applied machine learning tools to identify both dosimetric and non-dosimetric metrics that predicted a replan. Results: Preliminary data showed that clinical indicators (n = 54) were highly correlated; thus, a simple indicator may be derived to guide the action threshold for replanning. Additionally, tumor regression alone could not predict dosimetric changes in OARs; it required further information about beam angles and tumor locations. Conclusion: Both dosimetric and non-dosimetric factors are predictive of the need for replanning during proton treatment.

  16. Comparison of CT and positron emission tomography/CT coregistered images in planning radical radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacManus, M.; D'Costa, I.; Ball, D.; Everitt, S.; Andrews, J.; Ackerly, T.; Binns, D.; Lau, E.; Hicks, R.J.; Weih, L.

    2007-01-01

    Imaging with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) significantly improves lung cancer staging, especially when PET and CT information are combined. We describe a method for obtaining CT and PET images at separate acquisitions, which allows coregistration and incorporation of PET information into the radiotherapy (RT) planning process for non-small-cell lung cancer. The influence of PET information on RT planning was analysed for 10 consecutive patients. Computed tomography and PET images were acquired with the patient in an immobilization device, in the treatment position. Using specially written software, PET and CT data were coregistered using fiducial markers and imported into our RT planning system (Cadplan version 6). Treatment plans were prepared with and without access to PET/CT coregistered images and then compared. PET influenced the treatment plan in all cases. In three cases, geographic misses (gross tumour outside planning target volume) would have occurred had PET not been used. In a further three cases, better planning target volume marginal coverage was achieved with PET. In four patients, three with atelectasis, there were significant reductions in V20 (percentage of the total lung volume receiving 20 Gy or more). Use of coregistered PET/CT images significantly altered treatment plans in a majority of cases. This method could be used in routine practice at centres without access to a combined PET/CT scanner

  17. Phase I Study of Concurrent Whole Brain Radiotherapy and Erlotinib for Multiple Brain Metastases From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Joline S.W.; Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Senan, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib has shown activity in patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. The present dose-escalation Phase I trial evaluated the toxicity of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) with concurrent and maintenance erlotinib in this patient group. Methods and Materials: Erlotinib (Cohort 1, 100 mg/d; Cohort 2, 150 mg/d) was started 1 week before, and continued during, WBRT (30 Gy in 10 fractions). Maintenance erlotinib (150 mg/d) was continued until unacceptable toxicity or disease progression. Results: A total of 11 patients completed WBRT, 4 in Cohort 1 and 7 in Cohort 2. The median duration of erlotinib treatment was 83 days. No treatment-related neurotoxicity was observed. No treatment-related Grade 3 or greater toxicity occurred in Cohort 1. In Cohort 2, 1 patient developed a Grade 3 acneiform rash and 1 patient had Grade 3 fatigue. Two patients in Cohort 2 developed erlotinib-related interstitial lung disease, contributing to death during maintenance therapy. The median overall survival and interval to progression was 133 and 141 days, respectively. Six patients developed extracranial progression; only 1 patient had intracranial progression. In 7 patients with follow-up neuroimaging at 3 months, 5 had a partial response and 2 had stable disease. Conclusion: WBRT with concurrent erlotinib is well tolerated in patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. The suggestion of a high intracranial disease control rate warrants additional study.

  18. Surrogate endpoints for overall survival in chemotherapy and radiotherapy trials in operable and locally advanced lung cancer: a re-analysis of meta-analyses of individual patients' data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauguen, Audrey; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Burdett, Sarah; Domerg, Caroline; Fisher, David; Paulus, Rebecca; Mandrekar, Samithra J.; Belani, Chandra P.; Shepherd, Frances A.; Eisen, Tim; Pang, Herbert; Collette, Laurence; Sause, William T.; Dahlberg, Suzanne E.; Crawford, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Mary; Schild, Steven E.; Parmar, Mahesh; Tierney, Jayne F.; Le Pechoux, Cécile; Michiels, Stefan; Burdett, S.; Fisher, D.; Le Péchoux, C.; Mauguen, A.; Michiels, S.; Pignon, J. P.; Tierney, J. F.; Belani, C. P.; Collette, L.; Dahlberg, S.; Eisen, T.; Mandrekar, S.; O'Brien, M.; Parmar, M.; Pang, H.; Paulus, R.; Crawford, J.; Sause, W.; Schild, S. E.; Shepherd, F.; Arriagada, R.; Atagi, S.; Auperin, A.; Ball, D.; Baumann, M.; Behrendt, K.; Belderbos, J.; Koning, C. C. E.; Uitterhoeve, A.

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard endpoint in clinical trials of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for lung cancer is overall survival. Although reliable and simple to measure, this endpoint takes years to observe. Surrogate endpoints that would enable earlier assessments of treatment effects would be useful. We

  19. Phase II study of radiotherapy with three-dimensional conformal boost concurrent with paclitaxel and cisplatin for Stage IIIB non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Seok; Yoon, Sang Min; Choi, Eun Kyung; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Lee, Sang-wook; Shin, Seong Soo; Lee, Jung Shin; Suh, Cheolwon; Kim, Sang-We; Kim, Dong Soon; Kim, Woo Sung; Park, Heon Joo; Park, Charn Il

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with paclitaxel/cisplatin for Stage IIIB locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Radiotherapy was administered to a total dose of 70.2 Gy (daily fraction of 1.8 Gy, 5 days/wk), over an 8-week period, combined with chemotherapy. The chemotherapy consisted of weekly 40 mg/m 2 of paclitaxel plus 20 mg/m 2 of cisplatin for 8 consecutive weeks. All patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), based on computed tomography simulated planning after 41.4 Gy. The median follow-up period of survivors was 24 months. Results: Between January 2000 and October 2002, 135 patients with a median age of 60 years were enrolled and analyzed in this prospective trial. The overall response rate was 75% including 2 cases of complete response. The major patterns of failure were local failure and distant metastasis. The 2-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 37% and 18%, respectively. The median overall and progression-free survival times were 17 months and 9 months, respectively. Hematologic toxicity >Grade 2 was observed in 19% of patients and severe non-hematologic toxicity was infrequent. Conclusions: Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, combined with paclitaxel and cisplatin chemotherapy, was associated with a satisfactory outcome with manageable toxicity. Further investigations are needed to improve the local control

  20. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  1. Regional hyperthermia combined with radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. A multi-institutional prospective randomized trial of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsumori, Michihide; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Zeng Zhifan; Oliynychenko, P.; Park, Jeong-Ho; Choi, Ihl-Bohng; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Tanaka, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)-sponsored, multi-institutional prospective randomized trial was conducted to clarify whether the combination of hyperthermia and radiotherapy improves the local response rate of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with that obtained by radiotherapy alone. Between October 1998 and April 2002, 80 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were randomized to receive either standard radiation therapy alone (RT) or radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia (RT+HT). The primary endpoint was the local response rate. The secondary endpoints were local progression-free survival and overall survival. The median follow-up period was 204 days for all patients and 450 days for surviving patients. There were no significant differences between the two arms with regard to local response rate (P=0.49) or overall survival rate (P=0.868). However, local progression-free survival was significantly better in the RT+HT arm (P=0.036). Toxicity was generally mild and no grade 3 late toxicity was observed in either arm. Although improvement of local progression-free survival was observed in the RT+HT arm, this prospective randomized study failed to show any substantial benefit from the addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced NSCLC. (author)

  2. SU-E-J-267: Weekly Volumetric and Dosimetric Changes in Adaptive Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell-Lung Cancer Using 4D CT and Gating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Z; Shang, Q; Xiong, F; Zhang, X; Zhang, Q; Fu, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study was to evaluate the significance of weekly imageguided patient setup and to assess the volumetric and dosimetric changes in no-small-cell-lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with adaptive conformal radiotherapy (CRT). Methods: 9 NSCLC patients treated with 3D CRT underwent 4D CT-on-rail every five fractions. ITV was generated from three phases of the 4DCT (the end of exhalation, 25% before and after the end of exhalation). The margin of ITV to PTV is 5mm. 6 weekly CTs were acquired for each patient. The weekly CTs were fused with the planning CT by vertebrae. The couch shift was recorded for each weekly CT to evaluate the setup error. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on weekly CT images by a physician. Beams from the original plans were applied to weekly CTs to calculate the delivered doses. All patients underwent replanning after 20 fractions. Results: Among the total 54 CTs, the average setup error was 2.0± 1.7, 2.6± 2.1, 2.7± 2.2 mm in X, Y, and Z direction, respectively. The average volume of the primary GTV was reduced from 42.45 cc to 22.78 cc (47.04%) after 6 weeks. The maximal volume regression occurred between 15 and 20 fractions. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) reduced the V20 and V5 of the lung by 33.5% and 16.89%, respectively. ART also reduced Dmean and D1/3 of the heart by 31.7% and 32.32%, respectively. Dmax of the spinal cord did not vary much during the treatment course. Conclusion: 5 mm margin is sufficient for 4D weekly CTguided radiotherapy in lung cancer. Tumor regression was observed in the majority of patients. ART significantly reduced the OARs dose. Our preliminary results indicated that an off-line ART approach is appropriate in clinical practice

  3. Study of efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 gray in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, S.; Rasul, S.; Haider, N.; Mahmood, A.; Syed, A.S.; Nadeem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 Gray (Gy) in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Study design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and duration of study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 4th July 2008 to 4th Nov 2009. Material and Methods: Fifty four patients with histologically and/or cytologically confirmed unresectable stages III and IV non small cell lung cancer, with performance status 2 or 3 and expected survival > 2 months were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy 17 Gy in 2 fractions one week apart, with symptoms due to intrathoracic disease (cough, dyspnea and hemoptysis) and toxicity due to radiation therapy (dysphagia secondary to esophagitis) assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 3.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 30 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea showed significant improvement after treatment (p<0.001). A total of 42.68% patients showed an improvement in grade of cough (23 out of 54 patients), 85.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of hemoptysis (36 out of 42 patients) and 55.65% patients showed improvement in grade of dyspnea (30 out of 54 patients). Twenty two point two percent patients (12 out of 54) showed increase in grade of dysphagia. Although, there was a statistically significant increase in grade of dysphagia after treatment but it was limited to grade 1 and 2 only. Considering that no patient had grade 3 or 4 dysphagia, this toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion: Based on our results hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy, 17 Gy in 2 fractions, is effective with acceptable toxicity in palliation in advanced non small cell lung cancer and is recommended as it will result in shorter duration of hospital stay and low hospital stay charges. (author)

  4. Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Proton Beam-Based Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Dosimetric Comparison With Photon Plans Highlights Importance of Range Uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seco, Joao, E-mail: jseco@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Panahandeh, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Westover, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; Willers, Henning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Proton beam radiotherapy has been proposed for use in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer. In the present study, we sought to analyze how the range uncertainties for protons might affect its therapeutic utility for SBRT. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer received SBRT with two to three proton beams. The patients underwent repeat planning for photon SBRT, and the dose distributions to the normal and tumor tissues were compared with the proton plans. The dosimetric comparisons were performed within an operational definition of high- and low-dose regions representing volumes receiving >50% and <50% of the prescription dose, respectively. Results: In high-dose regions, the average volume receiving {>=}95% of the prescription dose was larger for proton than for photon SBRT (i.e., 46.5 cm{sup 3} vs. 33.5 cm{sup 3}; p = .009, respectively). The corresponding conformity indexes were 2.46 and 1.56. For tumors in close proximity to the chest wall, the chest wall volume receiving {>=}30 Gy was 7 cm{sup 3} larger for protons than for photons (p = .06). In low-dose regions, the lung volume receiving {>=}5 Gy and maximum esophagus dose were smaller for protons than for photons (p = .019 and p < .001, respectively). Conclusions: Protons generate larger high-dose regions than photons because of range uncertainties. This can result in nearby healthy organs (e.g., chest wall) receiving close to the prescription dose, at least when two to three beams are used, such as in our study. Therefore, future research should explore the benefit of using more than three beams to reduce the dose to nearby organs. Additionally, clinical subgroups should be identified that will benefit from proton SBRT.

  5. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  6. Radiotherapy in Cancer Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy has been used for curative or palliative treatment of cancer, either alone or increasingly as part of a multimodality approach in conjunction with chemotherapy, immunotherapy or surgery. Radiation must be delivered in the safest and most effective way. The use of radiologic and nuclear medicine diagnostic techniques, e.g., the use of CT (Computerized Tomography) and PET/CT allow better detection and staging of diseases by displaying both morphological and functional abnormalities within the affected organs and are essential in the process of radiotherapy planning. Technical advances in radiotherapy have allowed better targeting of tumors, sparing of normal tissue and, in the case of radiosurgery, a decrease in the number of treatments. The IAEA Programme in Human Health aims to enhance the capabilities in Member States to address needs related to the treatment of diseases, including cancer, through the application of nuclear techniques. The Programme supports quality assurance in radiation medicine; DIRAC, the only radiation oncology-specific resource database world-wide; significant, innovative education and training programmes through telemedicine and e-learning accessible via the human health campus website. Technical expertise for country– and region–specific technical cooperation radiation-medicine projects is provided to establish or enhance radiation medicine worldwide. (author)

  7. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  8. Postoperative radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: Is a reassessment necessary in modern times?

    OpenAIRE

    Billiet, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Background: The role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2) remains unclear. Despite a reduction of local recurrence (LR), its effect on overall survival (OS) remains unproven. Therefore we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: To investigate the benefit and safety of modern PORT, we identified published phase III trials for PORT. We inves...

  9. Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent radiotherapy and chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillet, T.; MOrere, J.F.; Piperno-Neuman, S.; Boaziz, C.; Breau, J.L.; Mazeron, J.J.; Haddad, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the efficacy and safety of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and whether the response to induction chemotherapy can predict the response to subsequent chemoradiotherapy and survival. In conclusion, there is a statistically significant relationship not only between the response to ICT and the response to CCrt, but also between the response to ICT and the local outcome and survival. (authors)

  10. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

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    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Yartsev, S [London Health Sciences Centre, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  11. Patient reported outcomes following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy or surgery for stage IA non-small-cell lung cancer : Results from the ROSEL multicenter randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louie, Alexander V.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Chen, Hanbo; Smit, Egbert F.; Paul, Marinus A.; Widder, Joachim; Groen, Harry J. M.; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Slotman, Ben J.; Senan, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    We report quality of life and indirect costs from patient reported outcomes from the ROSEL randomized control trial comparing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR, also known as stereotactic body radiotherapy or SBRT) versus surgical resection for medically operable stage IA non-small cell lung

  12. Postoperative Radiotherapy for Pathologic N2 Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Adjuvant Chemotherapy: A Review of the National Cancer Data Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Cliff G.; Patel, Aalok P.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; DeWees, Todd; Waqar, Saiama N.; Morgensztern, Daniel; Baggstrom, Maria Q.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Bell, Jennifer M.; Guthrie, Tracey J.; Colditz, Graham A.; Crabtree, Traves D.; Kreisel, Daniel; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Patterson, G. Alexander; Meyers, Bryan F.; Puri, Varun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the impact of modern postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) on overall survival (OS) for patients with N2 non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated nationally with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with pathologic N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy from 2006 to 2010 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base and stratified by use of PORT (≥ 45 Gy). A total of 4,483 patients were identified (PORT, n = 1,850; no PORT, n = 2,633). The impact of patient and treatment variables on OS was explored using Cox regression. Results Median follow-up time was 22 months. On univariable analysis, improved OS correlated with younger age, treatment at an academic facility, female sex, urban population, higher income, lower Charlson comorbidity score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT. On multivariable analysis, improved OS remained independently predicted by younger age, female sex, urban population, lower Charlson score, smaller tumor size, multiagent chemotherapy, resection with at least a lobectomy, and PORT (hazard ratio, 0.886; 95% CI, 0.798 to 0.988). Use of PORT was associated with an increase in median and 5-year OS compared with no PORT (median OS, 45.2 v 40.7 months, respectively; 5-year OS, 39.3% [95% CI, 35.4% to 43.5%] v 34.8% [95% CI, 31.6% to 38.3%], respectively; P = .014). Conclusion For patients with N2 NSCLC after complete resection and adjuvant chemotherapy, modern PORT seems to confer an additional OS advantage beyond that achieved with adjuvant chemotherapy alone. PMID:25667283

  13. The complex relationship between lung tumor volume and survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated by definitive radiotherapy: A prospective, observational prognostic factor study of the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 99.05)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, David L.; Fisher, Richard J.; Burmeister, Bryan H.; Poulsen, Michael G.; Graham, Peter H.; Penniment, Michael G.; Vinod, Shalini K.; Krawitz, Hedley E.; Joseph, David J.; Wheeler, Greg C.; McClure, Bev E.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the hypothesis that primary tumor volume is prognostic independent of T and N stages in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by definitive radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Multicenter prospective observational study. Patient eligibility: pathologically proven stage I–III non-small cell lung cancer planned for definitive radiotherapy (minimum 50 Gy in 20 fractions) using CT-based contouring. Volumes of the primary tumor and enlarged nodes were measured according to a standardized protocol. Survival was adjusted for the effect of T and N stage. Results: There were 509 eligible patients. Five-year survival rates for tumor volume grouped by quartiles were, for increasing tumor volume, 22%, 14%, 15% and 21%. Larger primary tumor volume was associated with shorter survival (HR = 1.060 (per doubling); 95% CI 1.01–1.12; P = 0.029). However, after adjusting for the effects of T and N stage, there was no evidence for an association (HR = 1.029, 95% CI, 0.96–1.10, P = 0.39). There was evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume was associated with an increased risk of dying, independently of T and N stage, in the first 18 months but not beyond. Conclusions: In patients treated by non-surgical means we were unable to show that lung tumor volume, overall, provides additional prognostic information beyond the T and N stage (TNM, 6th edition). There is evidence, however, that larger primary tumor volume adversely affects outcome only within the first 18 months. Larger tumor size alone should not by itself exclude patients from curative (chemo)radiotherapy

  14. The Comparison 2D and 3D Treatment Planning in Breast Cancer Radiotherapy with Emphasis on Dose Homogeneity and Lung Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Falahatpour

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Breast conserving radiotherapy is one of the most common procedures performed in any radiation oncology department. A tangential parallel-opposed pair is usually used for this purpose. This technique is performed using 2D or 3D treatment planning systems. The aim of this study was to compare 2D treatment planning with 3D treatment planning in tangential irradiation in breast conserving radiotherapy. In this comparison, homogeneity of isodoses in the breast volume and lung dose were considered. Material and Methods: Twenty patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery were included in this study. The patients were CT scanned. Two-dimensional treatment planning with the Alfard 2D TPS was performed for each patient using a single central CT slice. The data used on the Alfard 2D TPS was imported into the Eclipse 3D TPS, on which 3D treatment planning was performed. Cobalt-60 beams were used in all plans. Results: Comparing 2D and 3D treatment planning, homogeneity of isodoses was improved in 3D treatment planning (p30Gy was increased in 3D treatment planning (p< 0.01. Discussion and Conclusion: 3D treatment planning is a more suitable option for patients with breast cancer treated with conservative surgery because of improved dose homogeneity in 3D treatment planning. The results of the treatment can be improved with reduced recurrence probability and skin problems.

  15. Lung Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Trends for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Lung Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  16. Conservative surgery and radiotherapy for stage I/II breast cancer using lung density correction: 10-year and 15-year results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, Lori J.; Griffith, Kent A.; Hayman, James A.; Douglas, Kathye R.; Lichter, Allen S.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) planning for breast cancer using lung density correction improves dose homogeneity. Its use obviates the need for a medial wedge, thus reducing scatter to the opposite breast. Although lung density correction is used at many centers in planning for early-stage breast cancer, long-term results of local control and survival have not been reported. Since 1984, we have used lung density correction for dose calculations at the University of Michigan. We now present our 10-year and 15-year results. Methods and Materials: The records of 867 patients with Stage I/II breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery and RT with or without systemic therapy were reviewed. Tangential fields delivering 45-50 Gy to the whole breast calculated using lung density correction were used. A boost was added in 96.8% of patients for a total median dose of 61.8 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up of 6.6 years (range, 0.2-18.9 years), 5-, 10-, and 15-year actuarial rates of in-breast tumor recurrence as only first failure were 2.2%, 3.6%, and 5.4%, respectively. With surgical salvage, the 15-year cumulative rate of local control was 99.7%. Factors that significantly predicted for increased rate of local recurrence in multivariate analysis were age ≤ 35 years, hazard ratio 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-13.9) p = 0.004; negative progesterone receptor status, hazard ratio 6.8 (95% CI, 2.3-20.3) p = < 0.001; negative estrogen receptor status, hazard ratio 4.0 (95% CI, 1.5-11.1) p = 0.007; and lack of adjuvant tamoxifen therapy, hazard ratio 7.7 (95% CI, 1.7-33.3) p = 0.008. Relapse-free survival rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 84.6%, 70.8%, and 55.9%, respectively; breast cancer-specific survival rates were 94.4%, 90.5%, and 86.9%, respectively; and corresponding estimates for overall survival were 89.7%, 75.7%, and 61.3%. Conclusions: Use of lung density correction was associated with high rates of local control, relapse-free survival, breast

  17. Association of TGF-β1 and XPD polymorphisms with severe acute radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Yang Ming; Bi Nan; Ji Wei; Wu Chen; Tan Wen; Zhao Lujun; Yu Dianke; Lin Dongxin; Wang Luhua

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) is a dose-limiting toxicity in lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Accumulating evidence indicates that DNA repair and the cytokine pathways play essential roles in radiation-induced diseases. Genetic polymorphisms of genes in these pathways may affect gene function and/or gene expression and lead to different treatment-related esophageal toxicity. Materials and methods: This study investigated the association of 21 polymorphisms in 14 genes, with the occurrence of ≥grade 2 acute RIET. Genotypes were analyzed among 213 stage III lung cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. Results: We used Cox proportional hazard model to examine the effects of genotypes on ≥grade 2 acute RIET risk and Kaplan-Meier estimator to compare effects of different genotypes on such risk. Multivariate analysis showed that CT or TT genotype of TGF-β1-509C/T polymorphism was associated with a significantly higher RIET risk (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 2.47; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.17-5.24; P = 0.018, or HR = 3.86; 95% CI = 1.50-9.92; P = 0.005), respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Moreover, Lys/Gln+Gln/Gln genotypes of XPD Lys751Gln polymorphism were also associated with a significantly decreased RIET risk (adjusted HR = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.32-0.96; P = 0.030). Conclusions: This report, for the first time, examined the influence of inherited variation in the DNA repair and the cytokine pathways on RIET.

  18. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  19. Radiotherapy in stage 3, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer. Final results of a prospective randomized study of 240 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinfuss, M.; Glinski, B.; Kowalska, T.; Kulpa, J.; Zawila, K.; Reinfuss, K.; Dymek, P.; Herman, K.; Skolyszewski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: to report the results of a prospective randomized study concerning the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of stage III, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer. Material and methods: between 1992 and 1996, 240 patients with stage III, unresectable, asymptomatic non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study, and sequentially randomized to one of the three treatment arms: conventional irradiation, hypo-fractionated irradiation and control group. In the conventional irradiation arm (79 patients), a dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions in five weeks was delivered to the primary tumor and the mediastinum. In the hypo-fractionated irradiation arm (81 patients), there were two courses of irradiation separated by an interval of four weeks. In each series, patients received 20 Gy in five fractions in five days, in the same treatment volume as the conventional irradiation group. in the control group arm, 80 patients initially did not receive radiotherapy and were only observed. Delayed palliative hypo-fractionated irradiation (20-25 Gy in four to five fractions in four to five days) was given to the primary tumor when major symptoms developed. Results: the two-year actuarial survival rates for patients in the conventional irradiation, hypo-fractionated irradiation and control group arms were 18%, 6% and 0%, with a median survival time of 12 months, nine months and six months respectively. The differences between survival rates were statistically significant at the 0.05 level. Conclusion: although irradiation provides good palliation the results are disappointing. The comparison of conventional and hypo-fractionated irradiation shows an advantage for conventional schedules. (author)

  20. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  1. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  2. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saika, Kazumi

    2001-01-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  3. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, Nicholas O.; Shepherd, Wes; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior–posterior), and z (superior–inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy–based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  4. Interfractional Positional Variability of Fiducial Markers and Primary Tumors in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer During Audiovisual Biofeedback Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman, Nicholas O., E-mail: nroman@mcvh-vcu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Shepherd, Wes [Department of Pulmonology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Mukhopadhyay, Nitai [Department of Biostatistics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate implanted markers as a surrogate for tumor-based setup during image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy with audiovisual biofeedback. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were implanted bronchoscopically with gold coils. Markers, tumor, and a reference bony structure (vertebra) were contoured for all 10 phases of the four-dimensional respiration-correlated fan-beam computed tomography and weekly four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography. Results: The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-tumor centroid displacements were 2/3, 2/2, and 3/3 mm in the x (lateral), y (anterior-posterior), and z (superior-inferior) directions, respectively. The systematic/random interfractional marker-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/3, and 2/3 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. The systematic/random tumor-to-bone displacements were 2/3, 2/4, and 4/4 mm in the x, y, and z directions, respectively. All displacements changed significantly over time (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Although marker-based image guidance may decrease the risk for geometric miss compared with bony anatomy-based positioning, the observed displacements between markers and tumor centroids indicate the need for repeated soft tissue imaging, particularly in situations with large tumor volume change and large initial marker-to-tumor centroid distance.

  5. Chemotherapy response as a prognosticator for survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.T.; Fleming, T.R.; Lee, R.E.; Ingle, J.N.; Frytak, S.; Creagan, E.T.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-two patients with limited unresectable squamous cell lung cancer were treated with 6 courses of combination chemotherapy consisting of cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, cisplatin, and bleomycin (CAP-Bleo) and short-course thoracic irradiation started after the first 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Of 20 patients with visible tumor who were treated with 4 weeks of chemotherapy alone, 10 (50%) had a tumor regression in that 4 week period and 10 did not. Those patients with tumor regression had significantly better progression free and overall survivals than did patients with no chemotherapy regressions (medians of 258 days vs. 136 days and 356 days vs. 150 days respectively). The original bleomycin dose had to be reduced by 50% primarily because of excessive radiation esophagitis that has not been reported with use of either the CAP regimen or bleomycin along in conjunction with thoracic irradiation. An initial chemotherapy regression seems to be a good prognosticator for progression-free and overall survival in patients with limited squamous cell lung cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy

  6. Comparative Analysis of Local Control Prediction Using Different Biophysical Models for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Tian Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The consistency for predicting local control (LC data using biophysical models for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT treatment of lung cancer is unclear. This study aims to compare the results calculated from different models using the treatment planning data. Materials and Methods. Treatment plans were designed for 17 patients diagnosed with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using 5 different fraction schemes. The Martel model, Ohri model, and the Tai model were used to predict the 2-year LC value. The Gucken model, Santiago model, and the Tai model were employed to estimate the 3-year LC data. Results. We found that the employed models resulted in completely different LC prediction except for the Gucken and the Santiago models which exhibited quite similar 3-year LC data. The predicted 2-year and 3-year LC values in different models were not only associated with the dose normalization but also associated with the employed fraction schemes. The greatest difference predicted by different models was up to 15.0%. Conclusions. Our results show that different biophysical models influence the LC prediction and the difference is not only correlated to the dose normalization but also correlated to the employed fraction schemes.

  7. Recommendations for implementing stereotactic radiotherapy in peripheral stage IA non-small cell lung cancer: report from the Quality Assurance Working Party of the randomised phase III ROSEL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurkmans, Coen W; Cuijpers, Johan P; Lagerwaard, Frank J; Widder, Joachim; Heide, Uulke A van der; Schuring, Danny; Senan, Suresh

    2009-01-01

    A phase III multi-centre randomised trial (ROSEL) has been initiated to establish the role of stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with operable stage IA lung cancer. Due to rapid changes in radiotherapy technology and evolving techniques for image-guided delivery, guidelines had to be developed in order to ensure uniformity in implementation of stereotactic radiotherapy in this multi-centre study. A Quality Assurance Working Party was formed by radiation oncologists and clinical physicists from both academic as well as non-academic hospitals that had already implemented stereotactic radiotherapy for lung cancer. A literature survey was conducted and consensus meetings were held in which both the knowledge from the literature and clinical experience were pooled. In addition, a planning study was performed in 26 stage I patients, of which 22 were stage 1A, in order to develop and evaluate the planning guidelines. Plans were optimised according to parameters adopted from RTOG trials using both an algorithm with a simple homogeneity correction (Type A) and a more advanced algorithm (Type B). Dose conformity requirements were then formulated based on these results. Based on current literature and expert experience, guidelines were formulated for this phase III study of stereotactic radiotherapy versus surgery. These guidelines can serve to facilitate the design of future multi-centre clinical trials of stereotactic radiotherapy in other patient groups and aid a more uniform implementation of this technique outside clinical trials

  8. Feasibility and efficacy of helical intensity-modulated radiotherapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer in comparison with conventionally fractionated 3D-CRT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Huang, Yan; Chen, Yixing; Shi, Shiming; Ye, Luxi; Hu, Yong; Zhang, Jianying; Zeng, Zhaochong

    2016-05-01

    The standard treatment for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is still 60 Gy in conventional fractions combined with concurrent chemotherapy; however, the resulting local controls are disappointing. The aim of this study was to compare and assess the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated chemoradiotherapy using helical tomotherapy (HT) with conventional fractionation as opposed to using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for stage III NSCLC. Sixty-nine patients with stage III (AJCC 7th edition) NSCLC who underwent definitive radiation treatment at our institution between July 2011 and November 2013 were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. A dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions was delivered in the HT group (n=34), whereas 60 Gy in 30 fractions in the 3D-CRT group (n=35). Primary endpoints were toxicity, overall response rate, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The median follow-up period was 26.4 months. V20 (P=0.005), V30 (P=0.001), V40 (P=0.004), mean lung dose (P=0.000) and max dose of spinal cord (P=0.005) were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group. There was no significant difference in the incidences of acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) ≥ grade 2 between the two groups, whereas the incidences of acute radiation esophagitis ≥ grade 2 were significantly lower in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.027). Two-year overall response rate was significantly higher in the HT group than in the 3D-CRT group (P=0.015). One- and 2-year OS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (95.0% and 68.7%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (85.5% and 47.6%, respectively; P=0.0236). One- and 2-year PFS rates were significantly higher in the HT group (57.8% and 26.3%, respectively) than in the 3D-CRT group (32.7% and 11.4%, respectively; P=0.0351). Univariate analysis indicated that performance status (PS), T stage and radiotherapy technique were significant prognostic factors for both OS

  9. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael; Partridge, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% ± 10% to 73% ± 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared

  10. Icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment in patients with brain metastases from EGFR-mutant nonsmall cell lung cancer: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hai-Long; Gao, Feng; Lv, Yu-Feng

    2018-04-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect and toxicity of icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy (IWBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer (BMNSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant among Chinese Han population.A total of 55 patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC were included. They received orally icotinib (125 mg/tablet, 125 mg each time, 3 times daily) until disease progression. In addition, they also underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (3-Gy fractions once daily, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 30 Gy) in an attempt to extend their survival time. The outcomes consisted of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progress disease (PD), overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In addition, toxicity was also recorded in this study.The CR, PR, SD, PD, ORR, PFS, and OS were 38.2%, 52.8%, 5.4%, 3.6%, 90.1%, 12.5%, and 48.0% months, respectively. In addition, mild toxicity was observed in this study.This study demonstrated that IWBRT is efficacious with acceptable toxicity for patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC among Chinese Han population.

  11. Icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy for the treatment in patients with brain metastases from EGFR-mutant nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ai-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Luo, Hai-Long; Gao, Feng; Lv, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to explore the effect and toxicity of icotinib and whole-brain radiotherapy (IWBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from nonsmall cell lung cancer (BMNSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant among Chinese Han population. A total of 55 patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC were included. They received orally icotinib (125 mg/tablet, 125 mg each time, 3 times daily) until disease progression. In addition, they also underwent whole-brain radiotherapy (3-Gy fractions once daily, 5 days weekly for a total dose of 30 Gy) in an attempt to extend their survival time. The outcomes consisted of complete response (CR), partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progress disease (PD), overall response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In addition, toxicity was also recorded in this study. The CR, PR, SD, PD, ORR, PFS, and OS were 38.2%, 52.8%, 5.4%, 3.6%, 90.1%, 12.5%, and 48.0% months, respectively. In addition, mild toxicity was observed in this study. This study demonstrated that IWBRT is efficacious with acceptable toxicity for patients with EGFR-mutant BMNSCLC among Chinese Han population. PMID:29642161

  12. Surveillance after prostate cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supiot, S.; Rio, E.; Clement-Colmou, K.; Bouchot, O.; Rigaud, J.

    2011-01-01

    Follow-up after prostate cancer radiotherapy aims at detecting local or metastatic relapse, as well as long-term toxicity, requiring adapted treatments. Several scientific societies have published guidelines including clinical, biological and imaging recommendations. More data suggest a role for aggressive salvage therapy in case of local failure following radiotherapy. An adequate follow-up is required for the sake of patients' safety, i.e. to a posteriori validate dose constraints and radiation technique in each radiotherapy department. (authors)

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy of histologically proven inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer: Patterns of failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Zimmermann, Frank; Boehm, Eva; Schill, Sabine; Schoenknecht, Christine; Thamm, Reinhard; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten; Geinitz, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: To report patterns of failure of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in inoperable patients with histologically confirmed stage I NSCLC. Materials and methods: Ninety-two inoperable patients (median age: 75 years) with clinically staged, histologically proven T1 (n = 31) or T2 (n = 61), N0, M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were included in this study. Treatment consisted of 3–5 fractions with 7–15 Gy per fraction prescribed to the 60% isodose. Results: Freedom from local recurrence at 1, 3 and 5 years was 89%, 83% and 83%, respectively. All 10 local failures were observed in patients with T2 tumors. Isolated regional recurrence was observed in 7.6%. The crude rate of distant progression was 20.7%. Overall survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 79%, 38% and 17% with a median survival of 29 months. Disease specific survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 93%, 64% and 48%. Karnofsky performance status, T stage, gross tumor volume and tumor location had no significant impact on overall and disease specific survival. SBRT was generally well tolerated and all patients completed therapy as planned. Conclusion: SBRT for stage I lung cancer is very well tolerated in this patient cohort with significant cardiopulmonal comorbidity and results in excellent local control rates, although a considerable portion develops regional and distant metastases.

  14. Salvage stereotactic body radiotherapy for locally recurrent non-small cell lung cancer after sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beant Singh Gill

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Locally-recurrent non-small cell lung cancer (LR-NSCLC remains challenging treat, particularly in patients having received prior radiotherapy. Heterogeneous populations and varied treatment intent in existing literature result in significant limitations in evaluating efficacy of lung re-irradiation. In order to better establish the impact of re-irradiation in patients with LR-NSCLC following high-dose radiotherapy, we report outcomes for patients treated with prior sublobar resection and brachytherapy that subsequently underwent stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT.Methods: A retrospective review of patients initially treated with sublobar resection and I125 vicryl mesh brachytherapy, who later developed LR-NSCLC along the suture line, was performed. Patients received salvage SBRT with curative intent. Dose and fractionation was based on tumor location and size, with a median prescription dose of 48 Gy in 4 fractions (range 20-60 Gy in 1-4 fractions.Results: Thirteen consecutive patients were identified with median follow-up of 2.1 years (range 0.7-5.6 years. Two in-field local failures occurred at 7.5 and 11.1 months, resulting in 2-year local control of 83.9% (95% CI 63.5-100.0%. Two-year disease-free survival and overall survival estimates were 38.5% (95% CI 0.0-65.0% and 65.8% (95% CI, 38.2-93.4%. Four patients (31% remained disease-free at last follow-up. All but one patient who experienced disease recurrence developed isolated or synchronous distant metastases. Only one patient (7.7% developed grade ≥3 toxicity, consisting of grade 3 esophageal stricture following a centrally located recurrence previously treated with radiofrequency ablation.Conclusion: Despite high local radiation doses delivered to lung parenchyma previously with I125 brachytherapy, re-irradiation with SBRT for LR-NSCLC results in excellent local control with limited morbidity, allowing for potential disease cure in a subset of patients.

  15. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity

  16. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39–86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4–58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4–58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive

  17. Curative Treatment of Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Severe COPD: Stereotactic Radiotherapy Outcomes and Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma, David; Lagerwaard, Frank; Rodrigues, George; Haasbeek, Cornelis; Senan, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a high risk of lung cancer and of postsurgical complications. We studied outcomes after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in pa