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  1. Fasting blood glucose level and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.

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    Luo, Juhua; Chen, Yea-Jyh; Chang, Li-Jung

    2012-05-01

    Diabetes has been consistently linked to many forms of cancers, such as liver, colorectal, pancreatic, and breast cancer, however, the role of diabetes in outcome among cancer patients remains unclear. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed electronic medical records of 342 inpatients newly diagnosed with NSCLC referred by a teaching hospital cancer center in southern Taiwan between 2005 and 2007 to examine the effects of fasting glucose levels at time of cancer diagnosis on overall survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). All patients were followed up until the end of 2010. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival curves for patients with and without diabetes. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios for the association between diabetes, other prognostic factors and patient survival. We observed that significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival in patients with NSCLC included older age, smoking, poor performance status, advanced stage (stage IIIB or IV), and no cancer-directed surgery treatment. Particularly, we identified that diabetic state defined by fasting blood glucose level ≥126 mg/dl was another independent prognostic factor for these patients. Compared with those who had normal range of fasting glucose level (70-99 mg/dl), patients with high fasting glucose level (≥126 mg/dl) had 69% excess risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC. Diabetes as indicated by elevated fasting blood glucose was independently associated with a significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality in patients with NSCLC, indicating that diabetes or hyperglycemia effectively controlled may present an opportunity for improving prognosis in NSCLS patients with abnormal glucose level. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase II trial of second-line erlotinib and digoxin for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC

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    Fadi Kayali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Fadi Kayali, Muhamad A Janjua, Damian A Laber, Donald Miller, Goetz H KloeckerUniversity of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, KY, USABackground: In vitro digoxin sensitizes cancer cells to the induction of apoptosis by chemotherapy. Inhibition of the Na/K-ATPase enzyme by ouabain disturbs the intracellular ion composition of cancer cells, altering cellular homeostasis. This suggests that inhibition of the Na/K pump results in cellular sensitization of malignant but not benign cells to the induction of apoptosis. Epidemiologic studies have also shown beneficial effects of digitalis in breast cancer incidence. At ASCO (American Society of Clinical Oncology 2007 our group presented a Phase II study showing encouraging results by adding digoxin to biochemotherapy for melanoma. Erlotinib is one of the standard second-line treatments for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, with a response rate (RR of 10%. This study's hypothesis was that adding digoxin to erlotinib will improve the RR and time to progression (TTP in NSCLC.Methods: Patients with progressive disease (PD after chemotherapy were enrolled if they had an ECOG (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score from 0 to 2 and good organ function. Daily erlotinib 150 mg and digoxin 0.25 mg were taken by mouth. The digoxin dose was adjusted to keep levels between 1 and 2 ng/mL. Computed tomography scans were done every 6 weeks. Treatment continued until PD or significant toxicity occurred.Results: Patient accrual lasted from March 2006 until August 2008 and was stopped early at the time of interim analysis. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled, and 24 who completed at least 6 weeks of therapy are presented here. All patients had unresectable NSCLC stage III/IV at diagnosis. Median age was 61 (34–78, 14 were female, 17 had prior radiation (not involving the target lesions, 23 had one prior chemotherapy, and one subject had two. Only one patient was a never-smoker. Histologies were

  3. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

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    Glaysher, Sharon; Modi, Paul; Rahamim, Joe; Smith, Mark E; Amer, Khalid; Addis, Bruce; Poole, Matthew; Narayanan, Ajit; Gulliford, Tim J; Andreotti, Peter E; Cree, Ian A; Yiannakis, Dennis; Gabriel, Francis G; Johnson, Penny; Polak, Marta E; Knight, Louise A; Goldthorpe, Zoe; Peregrin, Katharine; Gyi, Mya

    2009-01-01

    NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA) and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer

  4. Resistance gene expression determines the in vitro chemosensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

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    Amer Khalid

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NSCLC exhibits considerable heterogeneity in its sensitivity to chemotherapy and similar heterogeneity is noted in vitro in a variety of model systems. This study has tested the hypothesis that the molecular basis of the observed in vitro chemosensitivity of NSCLC lies within the known resistance mechanisms inherent to these patients' tumors. Methods The chemosensitivity of a series of 49 NSCLC tumors was assessed using the ATP-based tumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA and compared with quantitative expression of resistance genes measured by RT-PCR in a Taqman Array™ following extraction of RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue. Results There was considerable heterogeneity between tumors within the ATP-TCA, and while this showed no direct correlation with individual gene expression, there was strong correlation of multi-gene signatures for many of the single agents and combinations tested. For instance, docetaxel activity showed some dependence on the expression of drug pumps, while cisplatin activity showed some dependence on DNA repair enzyme expression. Activity of both drugs was influenced more strongly still by the expression of anti- and pro-apoptotic genes by the tumor for both docetaxel and cisplatin. The doublet combinations of cisplatin with gemcitabine and cisplatin with docetaxel showed gene expression signatures incorporating resistance mechanisms for both agents. Conclusion Genes predicted to be involved in known mechanisms drug sensitivity and resistance correlate well with in vitro chemosensitivity and may allow the definition of predictive signatures to guide individualized chemotherapy in lung cancer.

  5. Metastatic squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC: disrupting the drug treatment paradigm with immunotherapies

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    Sarah L Scarpace

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Unlike non-squamous NSCLC, squamous NSCLC rarely harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK mutations for which there are directed therapies, and until the recent approval of immunotherapies for squamous NSCLC, a limited number of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs have been FDA-approved for use in the treatment of advanced and metastatic squamous NSCLC. Immunotherapies directed at the programmed cell death-1 receptor (PD-1 or its ligand (PD-L1 (nivolumab and pembrolizumab have demonstrated efficacy in both nonsquamous and squamous cell NSCLC. Because of their similar mechanism of action against the PD-L1/PD-1 pathway, both drugs have similar toxicity profiles related to immune-mediated adverse reactions that can generally be monitored and managed with oral corticosteroids. This paper provides an overview of drug therapy options for squamous cell NSCLC with a focus on the evidence and clinical application of the anti-PD1 therapies. A comparison of the dosing, administration, indications, and differences in the measurement of PD-L1 expression in the clinical trials of nivolumab and pembrolizumab is also provided.

  6. Highly frequent promoter methylation and PIK3CA amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

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    Ji, Meiju; Guan, Haixia; Gao, Cuixia; Shi, Bingyin; Hou, Peng

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Genetic and epigenetic alterations have been identified frequently in lung cancer, such as promoter methylation, gene mutations and genomic amplification. However, the interaction between genetic and epigenetic events and their significance in lung tumorigenesis remains poorly understood. We determined the promoter methylation of 6 genes and PIK3CA amplification using quantitative methylation-specific PCR (Q-MSP) and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively, and explore the association of promoter methylation with PIK3CA amplification in a large cohort of clinically well-characterized non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Highly frequent promoter methylation was observed in NSCLC. With 100% diagnostic specificity, excellent sensitivity, ranging from 45.8 to 84.1%, was found for each of the 6 genes. The promoter methylation was associated with histologic type. Methylation of CALCA, CDH1, DAPK1, and EVX2 was more common in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) compared to adenocarcinomas (ADC). Conversely, there was a trend toward a higher frequency of RASSF1A methylation in ADC than SCC. In addition, PIK3CA amplification was frequently found in NSCLC, and was associated with certain clinicopathologic features, such as smoking history, histologic type and pleural indentation. Importantly, aberrant promoter methylation of certain genes was significantly associated with PIK3CA amplification. Our data showed highly frequent promoter methylation and PIK3CA amplification in Chinese NSCLC population, and first demonstrated the associations of gene methylation with PIK3CA amplification, suggesting that these epigenetic events may be a consequence of overactivation of PI3K/Akt pathway

  7. Promoter methylation of APC and RAR-β genes as prognostic markers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

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    Feng, Hongxiang; Zhang, Zhenrong; Qing, Xin; Wang, Xiaowei; Liang, Chaoyang; Liu, Deruo

    2016-02-01

    Aberrant promoter hypermethylations of tumor suppressor genes are promising markers for lung cancer diagnosis and prognosis. The purpose of this study was to determine methylation status at APC and RAR-β promoters in primary NSCLC, and whether they have any relationship with survival. APC and RAR-β promoter methylation status were determined in 41 NSCLC patients using methylation specific PCR. APC promoter methylation was detectable in 9 (22.0%) tumor samples and 6 (14.6%) corresponding non-tumor samples (P=0.391). RAR-β promoter methylation was detectable in 13 (31.7%) tumor samples and 4 (9.8%) corresponding non-tumor samples (P=0.049) in the NSCLC patients. APC promoter methylation was found to be associated with T stage (P=0.046) and nodal status (P=0.019) in non-tumor samples, and with smoking (P=0.004) in tumor samples. RAR-β promoter methylation was found associated with age (P=0.031) in non-tumor samples and with primary tumor site in tumor samples. Patients with APC promoter methylation in tumor samples showed significantly longer survival than patients without it (Log-rank P=0.014). In a multivariate analysis of prognostic factors, APC methylation in tumor samples was an independent prognostic factor (P=0.012), as were N1 positive lymph node number (P=0.025) and N2 positive lymph node number (P=0.06). Our study shows that RAR-β methylation detected in lung tissue may be used as a predictive marker for NSCLC diagnosis and that APC methylation in tumor sample may be a useful marker for superior survival in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Treatment paradigms for patients with metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, squamous lung cancer: first, second and third-line

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    Abdulaziz eAl Farsi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the treatment algorithm applied to non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC was the same for all histologic subtypes. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular profiles of squamous and non-squamous NSCLC have changed this perspective. Histologic subtype and the presence of specific molecular abnormalities have predictive value for response to and toxicity from therapy, as well as overall survival. For patients with squamous NSCLC, a platinum agent plus gemcitabine, or paclitaxel is recommended as first-line therapy. The role of EGFR monoclonal antibodies is uncertain. Maintenance therapy is not widely recommended, although data exist for the use of erlotinib. The standard recommendation for second-line therapy is docetaxel and erlotinib should be considered as second or third-line therapy. There is ongoing research identifying molecular targets in squamous NSCLC and many agents are in early phase clinical trials. Immunotherapeutic approaches targeting programmed death 1 receptor (PD-1 and its ligand (PD-L1 appear promising.

  9. Preoperative Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs) and Outcomes from Resected Early Stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC).

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    Almquist, Daniel; Khanal, Nabin; Smith, Lynette; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2018-05-01

    Preoperative pulmonary function tests (PFTs) predict operative morbidity and mortality after resection in lung cancer. However, the impact of preoperative PFTs on overall outcomes in surgically-resected stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been well studied. This is a retrospective study of 149 patients who underwent surgical resection as first-line treatment for stage I and II NSCLC at a single center between 2003 and 2014. PFTs [forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), Diffusing Capacity (DLCO)], both absolute values and percent predicted values were categorized into quartiles. The Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to determine whether PFTs predicted for overall survival (OS). Logistic regression was used to estimate the risk of postoperative complications and length of stay (LOS) greater than 10 days based on the results of PFTs. The median age of the cohort was 68 years. The cohort was predominantly males (98.6%), current or ex-smokers (98%), with stage I NSCLC (82.76%). The majority of patients underwent a lobectomy (n=121, 81.21%). The predominant tumor histology was adenocarcinoma (n=70, 47%) followed by squamous cell carcinoma (n=61, 41%). The median follow-up of surviving patients was 53.2 months. DLCO was found to be a significant predictor of OS (HR=0.93, 95% CI=0.87-0.99; p=0.03) on univariate analysis. Although PFTs did not predict for postoperative complications, worse PFTs were significant predictors of length of stay >10 days. Preoperative PFTs did not predict for survival from resected early-stage NSCLC, but did predict for prolonged hospital stay following surgery. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Mortality in asymptomatic vs. symptomatic patients surgically treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

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    Madsen, Kirsten Riis; Bødtger, Uffe

    , tobacco pack years, or FEV1. Former malignancy was significantly more prevalent among asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (33 % vs. 11%), with insignificant differences in prevalence of other co-morbidities or in post-surgical TNM (82% vs 85% in stages IA-IIB). 12-months mortality was insignificantly...... higher in asymptomatic than symptomatic subjects (23% vs. 12%), and in patients with former malignancy compared to patients with no former cancer (17% vs. 16%). Discussion: Symptoms at diagnosis per se appear unrelated to mortality in patients with NSCLC referred for surgery. Asymptomatic patients were...

  11. Meta-Analysis on Pharmacogenetics of Platinum-Based Chemotherapy in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Patients

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    Yin, Ji-Ye; Huang, Qiong; Zhao, Ying-Chun; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Aim To determine the pharmacogenetics of platinum-based chemotherapy in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Publications were selected from PubMed, Cochrane Library and ISI Web of Knowledge. A meta-analysis was conducted to determine the association between genetic polymorphisms and platinum-based chemotherapy by checking odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Data were extracted from 24 publications, which included 11 polymorphisms in 8 genes for meta-analysis. MDR1 C3435T (OR = 1.97, 95% CI: 1.11–3.50, P = 0.02), G2677A/T (OR = 2.61, 95% CI: 1.44–4.74, P = 0.002) and GSTP1 A313G (OR = 0.32, 95% CI: 0.17–0.58, P = 0.0002) were significantly correlated with platinum-based chemotherapy in Asian NSCLC patients. Conclusion Attention should be paid to MDR1 C3435T, G2677A/T and GSTP1 A313G for personalized chemotherapy treatment for NSCLC patients in Asian population in the future. PMID:22761669

  12. Improved progression free survival for patients with diabetes and locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using metformin during concurrent chemoradiotherapy

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    Wink, Krista C. J.; Belderbos, José S. A.; Dieleman, Edith M. T.; Rossi, Maddalena; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Damhuis, Ronald A. M.; Houben, Ruud M. A.; Troost, Esther G. C.

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate whether the use of metformin during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) improved treatment outcome. A total of 682 patients were included in this retrospective cohort study (59 metformin users, 623 control patients).

  13. [Optimization of radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using 18FDG-PET].

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    Schmidt, S; Nestle, U; Walter, K; Licht, N; Ukena, D; Schnabel, K; Kirsch, C M

    2002-10-01

    In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most causes (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm2, after redefinition using PET 166 cm2. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectasis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation.

  14. Percutaneous microwave ablation for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the elderly: a promising outlook

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    Acksteiner, Christian; Steinke, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a relatively new minimally invasive treatment option for lung cancer with substantially lower morbidity and mortality than surgery. This retrospective study was performed to evaluate the safety, effectiveness and follow-up imaging of MWA in the elderly aged 75 years and above. Eleven percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided MWA of early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were performed in 10 patients aged 75 years and older. All but one patient were treated with a high-powered MWA system delivering maximally 140 W. Follow-up with CT and fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) was carried out over a maximum period of 30 months and a median period of 12 months. There were no peri-procedural deaths or major complications. Seven patients were disease free at the time of manuscript submission. Three patients showed growth of the treated lesions, one patient aged 90 years deceased due to unknown cause after approximately 18 months. One patient presented with local progression and disseminated metastatic disease at 12 months; he is still alive. One patient showed increasing soft tissue at the ablation site 15 months post-treatment. Three consecutive core biopsies over 2 months failed to confirm tumour recurrence. MWA therapy is a promising option of treating early-stage NSCLC in the elderly with good treatment outcome and negligible morbidity. Determining successful treatment outcome may be challenging at times as local tissue increase and PET-CT positivity do not seem to necessarily correlate with recurrence of malignancy.

  15. Efficacy of sorafenib in BRAF-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and no response in synchronous BRAF wild type-hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Chiadini, Elisa; Faloppi, Luca; Marisi, Giorgia; Delmonte, Angelo; Scartozzi, Mario; Loretelli, Cristian; Lucchesi, Alessandro; Oboldi, Devil; Dubini, Alessandra; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca; Ulivi, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor with a demonstrated activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and it is currently used for the treatment of these pathologies. Ongoing clinical trials are studying its activity in other malignancies, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, no biological marker is known to define either the sensitivity or resistance to the drug. Here we report a case of a patient with two synchronous tumors, HCC and NSCLC, with metastases in the contralateral lung and bone. The patient was treated with gemcitabine as first line, with a resulting progressive disease after two months, and then with sorafenib at standard dosage in the second line setting. After 6 months of treatment CT scan showed a partial response in the primary lesion of the lung, complete response of the metastasis in the contralateral lung, and stability of HCC. The patient had progression in the lung, liver and bone after 13 months of therapy. A molecular characterization of NSCLC and HCC lesions was performed, revealing a BRAF exon 11 mutation (G469V) only in NSCLC. We hypothesize that the response observed in NSCLC lesions could be due to the presence of BRAF mutation, and that this alteration could be responsible in determining sorafenib sensitivity. Results observed in this case encourage further research on the activity of sorafenib in both HCC and NSCLC, based on the presence of BRAF mutation. This could lead to a selection of HCC patients to be treated with this drug, and could help identify a novel treatment strategy for BRAF-mutated NSCLC patients

  16. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC

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    Nikaedo Sueli M

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT, its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. Methods In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m2, on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years, younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m2 or 90 mg/m2, and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m2 or 70 mg/m2. We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Results Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4 was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP and overall survival (OS were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7 weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8 weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%, with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Conclusion Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions.

  17. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for elderly patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, José Rodrigues; Martins, Sandro J; Nikaedo, Sueli M; Ikari, Flora K

    2004-01-01

    Although modest improvements in the survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be achieved with cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT), its value is disputed in the geriatric setting. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of vinorelbine/cisplatin CT for elderly NSCLC patients. In this pilot phase I/II trial, all patients received CT with vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 , on day 1 and 8, and cisplatin on day 1, in 28 days-cycles. After stratification for age (up to 75 years), younger patients were sequentially allocated to moderate cisplatin doses (80 mg/m 2 or 90 mg/m 2 ), and older patients were allocated to lower cisplatin doses (60 mg/m 2 or 70 mg/m 2 ). We recruited patients aged over 70 years with newly diagnosed NSCLC, clinical stage III or IV, Karnofsky performance status ≥ 70%, normal serum creatinine, peripheral neuropathy ≤ grade 1, and no prior cancer therapy. Analysis was by intention to treat. Main toxicities (grade 3–4) was as follows: neutropenia, 20%; anemia, 11%; and thrombocytopenia, 2%; alopecia, 55%; fatigue, 11%; and peripheral neurotoxicity, 2%. No grade 3–4 emesis or renal toxicity occurred. Global median time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 27.0 (95% CI: 10.1 to 43.7) weeks and 30.1 (95% CI: 24.4 to 35.8) weeks; 1- and 2-year survival rates were 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Overall response rate was 50.0% (95% CI: 35.4% to 64.5%), with 1 complete response; no difference on response rate was noticed according to cisplatin dose. Median overall survival was 30.1 weeks, with 1- and 2-year survival rates of 36.3% and 13.2%, respectively. Age does not preclude assessment on the role of cisplatin-vinorelbine CT for elderly NSCLC patients with good performance status and adequate bodily functions

  18. An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Predictive Biomarkers in the Treatment of Non- Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinton, Cindy; Ellis, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have led to improvements in patient survival and quality of life. It is unclear whether molecular abnormalities associated with NSCLC cell survival, growth and proliferation are useful in predicting treatment benefit. We conducted a systematic review to establish which biomarkers contribute meaningfully to the management of NSCLC. A team of researchers searched PubMed and conference proceedings (ASCO, ESMO, IASLC, USCAP) using MESH terms for NSCLC and randomized trials (RCT), plus keywords for variables of interest. Evidence from multiple RCTs confirmed that histologic subtype is prognostic for survival and predictive of treatment efficacy and/or toxicity in NSCLC. Likewise, activating mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are associated with benefit from EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC and should be assessed routinely. No biomarkers to date reliably predict response to anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapies. There are inconsistent data on the role of ERCC1, BRCA, Beta tubulin III, RRM1, K-RAS, or TP-53 in treatment decisions. These tests should not be routinely used in selecting treatment at this time, whereas EML4/ALK translocations predict responses to specific targeted agents, the optimal assessment of this molecular abnormality has yet to be established. Personalized care of patients with NSCLC based on biomarkers is increasingly important to both clinical practice and research

  19. Role of Radiotherapy in Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC

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    Sergio L. Faria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy has had important role in the palliation of NSCLC. Randomized trials tend to suggest that, in general, short regimens give similar palliation and toxicity compared to longer regimens. The benefit of combining chemotherapy to radiosensitize the palliative radiation treatment is an open question, but so far it has not been proved to be very useful in NSCLC. The addition of molecular targeted drugs to radiotherapy outside of approved regimens or clinical trials warrants careful consideration for every single case and probably should not be used as a routine management.Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT are modern techniques being used each time more frequently in the treatment of single or oligometastases. In general, they offer good tumour control with little toxicity (with a more expensive cost compared to the traditionally fractionated radiotherapy regimens.

  20. EGFR testing and clinical management of advanced NSCLC: a Galician Lung Cancer Group study (GGCP 048-10

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    Vázquez S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sergio Vázquez,1 Joaquín Casal,2 Francisco Javier Afonso Afonso,3 José Luis Fírvida,4 Lucía Santomé,5 Francisco Barón,6 Martín Lázaro,7 Carolina Pena,7 Margarita Amenedo,8 Ihab Abdulkader,9 Carmen González-Arenas,10 Laura Fachal,11 Ana Vega11 On behalf of the Galician Lung Cancer Group (GGCP1Medical Oncology Department, Lucus Augusti University Hospital, Lugo, 2Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Vigo, Pontevedra, 3Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ferrol, Ferrol, 4Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Ourense, Ourense, 5Medical Oncology Department Povisa Hospital, Vigo, 6Medical Oncology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 7Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Complex of Pontevedra, Pontevedra, 8Medical Oncology Department, Oncology Center of Galicia, A Coruña, 9Anatomical Pathology Department, University Hospital Complex of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, 10AstraZeneca, Madrid, 11Galician Public Foundation of Genomic Medicine-SERGAS, Santiago de Compostela Clinic Hospital, Santiago de Compostela, Spain Purpose: This study aimed to assess the incidence of mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR gene in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in the Galician region of Spain and the clinical management and outcome of patients carrying EGFR mutations. Patients and methods: All newly diagnosed advanced or metastatic NSCLC patients were screened for EGFR mutations in matched tumor samples (tissue or cytology specimens and serum samples. Results: Of 198 patients screened for EGFR mutations in tumor samples, 184 had evaluable data and, of these, 25 (13.6% had EGFR mutations (84% sensitizing mutations. EGFR mutation was found in serum in 14 (8.1% patients (of 174 evaluable. Compared to matched tumor tissue, serum EGFR mutation testing specificity and sensitivity were 99% and 52

  1. Favorable prognosis of operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring an increased expression of tumor endothelial markers (TEMs).

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    Pircher, Andreas; Fiegl, Michael; Untergasser, Gerold; Heidegger, Isabel; Medinger, Michael; Kern, Johann; Hilbe, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Genome analyses of endothelial cells identified genes specifically expressed by tumor endothelial cells, called tumor endothelial markers (TEMs). Currently there are no data available concerning the role of TEMs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of TEMs in NSCLC in vitro and in vivo. First we evaluated the expression of various TEMs (Robo4, Clec14 and ECSCR) by qRT-PCR and Western blot analyses in three NSCLC cell lines (A549, Calu1, Colo699) and compared them to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) and human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEpCs). Next the expression of TEMs was measured in resected tumor tissue of NSCLC patients (n = 63) by qRT-PCR and compared to adjacent non-cancerous lung tissue (n = 52). Further, immunohistochemical analysis of Robo4 expression in tumor tissue (n = 33) and adjacent non-cancerous tissue (n = 27) was performed. We found that NSCLC cell lines and HBEpC did not express TEMs on the mRNA level compared to HUVECs (p = 0.001). In the contrary, a significant up-regulation of Robo4 and Clec14 was found in tumor samples (Robo4 p = 0.03, Clec14 p = 0.002). Both facts clearly indicate that these proteins are allocated to the tumor stromal department. Correlation with clinical data showed that increased TEM expression correlated with prolonged overall survival of operated NSCLC patients (Robo4 high 120.5 vs. Robo4 low 47.6 months, Clec14 high 108.1 vs. Clec14 low 54.5 months and ECSCR high 120.5 vs. ECSCR low 42.2 months). In summary, we found that TEMs are overexpressed in NSCLC stromal tissue and that an increased TEM expression correlated with an increased overall survival in early stage NSCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Final toxicity results of a radiation-dose escalation study in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Predictors for radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, F.-M.; Hayman, James A.; Griffith, Kent A.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Arenberg, Douglas; Lyons, Susan; Turrisi, Andrew; Lichter, Allen; Fraass, Benedick; Eisbruch, Avraham; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Haken, Randall K. ten

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to report the final toxicity results on a radiation-dose escalation trial designed to test a hypothesis that very high doses of radiation could be safely administered to patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by quantifying the dose-volume toxicity relationship of the lung. Methods and Materials: A total of 109 patients with unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC were enrolled and treated with radiation-dose escalation (on the basis of predicted normal-lung toxicity) either alone or with neoadjuvant chemotherapy by use of 3D conformal techniques. Eighty-four patients (77%) received more than 69 Gy, the trial was stopped after the dose reached 103 Gy. Estimated median follow-up was 110 months. Results: There were 17 (14.6%) Grade 2 to 3 pneumonitis and 15 (13.8%) Grade 2 to 3 fibrosis and no Grade 4 to 5 lung toxicity. Multivariate analyses showed them to be (1) not associated with the dose prescribed to the tumor, and (2) significantly (p < 0.001) associated with lung-dosimetric parameters such as the mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung that received at least 20 Gy (V20), and the normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) of the lung. If cutoffs are 30% for V20, 20 Gy for MLD, and 10% for NTCP, these factors have positive predictive values of 50% to 71% and negative predictive value of 85% to 89%. Conclusions: With long-term follow-up for toxicity, we have demonstrated that much higher doses of radiation than are traditionally administered can be safely delivered to a majority of patients with NSCLC. Quantitative lung dose-volume toxicity-based dose escalation can form the basis for individualized high-dose radiation treatment to maximize the therapeutic ratio in these patients

  3. Multidisciplinary management of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in stage III: clinical case description. Recommendations and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carnio

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in industrialized countries with progressive increase of its mortality rate. Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is approximately 80-85% of all lung cancers, being adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma the most common histologies. The majority of the patients with stage III clinical stage, presents a mediastinal lymph node involvement described with computed tomography (TC and/or positron emission tomography (PET. The current approach to patients with NSCLC is multidisciplinary, especially for those staged as potentially operable, both for staging and for a correct definition of best treatment strategy. Updated international and national Guidelines and recommendations can provide valuable support to the clinician.The case described concerns the accidental detection of a tumour in the lung in a 58-year-old man with arterial hypertension controlled with ACE inhibitors. The treatments agreed after a multidisciplinary approach are cisplatin and docetaxel, the surgical resection, and the radiotherapy. After three months the patient has neither metastasis nor relapse.

  4. Examination of 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Mechanisms controlling survival and induction of apoptosis following selective inhibition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cathcart, Mary Clare

    2011-06-01

    Background: Platelet-type 12-LOX is an arachidonic acid metabolising enzyme resulting in the formation of 12(S)-HETE, which stimulates tumour cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. This study aimed to examine the expression profile and role of this enzyme in NSCLC, and determine if it is a potential target for intervention. Methods: A panel of retrospective resected lung tumours was stained for 12-LOX expression by IHC. Levels of the 12-LOX metabolite, 12(S)-HETE, were examined in 50 NSCLC serum samples, and correlated with serum VEGF. A panel of NSCLC cell lines were treated with baicalein (10 uM), a selective inhibitor of 12-LOX, or 12(S)-HETE (100 ng\\/ml) and cell survival\\/proliferation examined by BrdU. Apoptosis following 12-LOX inhibition was examined by HCS and validated by FACS and DNA laddering. The effect of 12-LOX inhibition on NSCLC tumour growth and survival was examined in-vivo using an athymic nude mouse model. Gene alterations following 12-LOX inhibition in NSCLC cell lines were assessed by qPCR arrays and validated by RT-PCR. Transient transfection methods were used to examine the effects of 12-LOX overexpression in NSCLC cells. Results: 12-LOX expression was observed to a varying degree in human lung cancers of varying histological subtypes. 12(S)-HETE levels were correlated (p<0.05) with those of VEGF. Baicalein inhibited proliferation\\/survival in all cell lines, while 12(S)-HETE increased proliferation. 12-LOX inhibition increased apoptosis, indicated by a reduction in f-actin content and mitochondrial mass potential. Treatment with baicalein significantly reduced the growth of NSCLC tumours and increased overall survival in athymic nude mice. qPCR array data implicated a number of apoptosis\\/angiogenesis genes regulating these effects, including bcl-2, VEGF, integrin A2 and A4. 12-LOX overexpression resulted in an increase in VEGF secretion, confirming qPCR observations. Conclusions: 12-LOX is a survival factor\\/potential target in

  5. Time and dose-related changes in lung perfusion after definitive radiotherapy for NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Khalil, Azza A; Møller, Ditte S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To examine radiation-induced changes in regional lung perfusion per dose level in 58 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients receiving chemo-radiotherapy (RT) of minimum 60 Gy we...

  6. Effective avoidance of a functional spect-perfused lung using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): An update of a planning study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavrenkov, Konstantin; Singh, Shalini; Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2009-01-01

    IMRT and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3-DCRT) plans of 25 patients with non-small cell lung (NSCLC) were compared in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and sparing of functional lung (FL) defined by a SPECT perfusion scan. IMRT resulted in significant reduction of functional V 20 and mean lung dose in stage III patients with inhomogeneous hypoperfusion. If the dose to FL is shown to be the determinant of lung toxicity, IMRT would allow for effective dose escalation by specific avoidance of functional lung.

  7. Discovery of 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone as a Hsp90 inhibitor and its effect on iressa-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Ho

    2015-10-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a ATP dependent molecular chaperone and has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target in the war on cancer due to its role in regulating maturation and stabilization of numerous oncogenic proteins. In this study, we discovered that 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone (1b) disrupted Hsp90 chaperoning function and inhibited the growth of iressa-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, H1975). The result suggested that 2',4'-dimethoxychalcone (1b) could serve as a potential therapeutic lead to circumvent the drug resistance acquired by EGFR mutation and Met amplification.

  8. Detection of EGFR somatic mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a novel mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Huiyi; Zhao, Yanwei; Liu, Wenchao; Wu, Shiyang; He, Jiaying; Luo, Xiaodi; Zhu, Zeyao; Xu, Jiasen; Zhou, Qinghua; Ren-Heidenreich, Lifen

    2012-09-01

    We have developed and standardized a novel technology, mutant-enriched liquidchip (MEL), for clinical detection of EGFR mutations. The MEL integrates a mutant-enriched PCR procedure with liquidchip technology for detections of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R mutation on both formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) slides and plasma samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The detection sensitivity was 0.1% of mutant DNA in the presence of its wild-type DNA. The cross-reaction rate was lower than 5%. To evaluate the MEL platform, the EGFR mutation status of 59 patients with advanced NSCLC treated with EGFRTKIs (Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors) were tested on their FFPE samples. EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected in 21 patients (21/59) and 76.2% (16/21) of them had partial response to the EGFR-TKIs, while by sequencing method, only 4 (4/59) mutations were detected. Plasma samples from 627 patients with various stages of NSCLC were examined with the MEL and 22% of EGFR exon 19 deletions and L858R were detected. Furthermore, in patients with advanced disease there are more mutations detected in plasma samples than in patients with less advanced disease. In conclusion, the MEL is a sensitive, stable, and robust technology for detecting EGFR DNA mutations from both FFPE and plasma samples from patients with NSCLC and is now routinely used for clinical diagnosis.

  9. Clinical features and treatment outcome of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with uncommon or complex epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassan, Matteo; Indraccolo, Stefano; Calabrese, Fiorella; Favaretto, Adolfo; Bonanno, Laura; Polo, Valentina; Zago, Giulia; Lunardi, Francesca; Attili, Ilaria; Pavan, Alberto; Rugge, Massimo; Guarneri, Valentina; Conte, PierFranco; Pasello, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs) represent the best treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with common exon 19 deletion or exon 21 epidermal growth factor receptor mutation (EGFRm). This is an observational study investigating epidemiology, clinical features and treatment outcome of NSCLC cases harbouring rare/complex EGFRm. Results Among 764 non-squamous NSCLC cases with known EGFRm status, 26(3.4%) harboured rare/complex EGFRm. Patients receiving first-line TKIs (N = 17) achieved median Progression Free Survival (PFS) and Overall Survival (OS) of 53 (IC 95%, 2–105) and 84 (CI 95%, 27–141) weeks respectively, without significant covariate impact. Response Rate and Disease Control Rate (DCR) were 47% and 65%, respectively. Uncommon exon 19 mutations achieved longer OS and PFS and higher DCR compared with exon 18 and 20 mutations. No additional gene mutation was discovered by MassARRAY analysis. TKIs were globally well tolerated. Materials and methods A retrospective review of advanced non-squamous NSCLC harbouring rare/complex EGFRm referred to our Center between 2010 and 2015 was performed. Additional molecular pathways disregulation was explored in selected cases, through MassARRAY analysis. Conclusions Peculiar clinical features and lower TKIs sensitivity of uncommon/complex compared with common EGFRm were shown. Exon 19 EGFRm achieved the best TKIs treatment outcome, while the optimal treatment of exon 18 and 20 mutations should be further clarified. PMID:28427238

  10. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Methods: Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using F-18-FDG PET/CT ...

  11. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH)2D3 in NSCLC Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne; Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song; Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR high ) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR low and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 -mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients

  12. A single-arm, multicenter, safety-monitoring, phase IV study of icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingsheng; Han, Baohui; Gu, Aiqin; Zhang, Yiping; Jiao, Shun Chang; Wang, Chang-Li; He, Jintao; Jia, Xueke; Zhang, Li; Peng, Jiewen; Wu, Meina; Ying, Kejing; Wang, Junye; Ma, Kewei; Zhang, Shucai; You, Changxuan; Tan, Fenlai; Wang, Yinxiang; Ding, Lieming; Sun, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The phase 3 ICOGEN trial established the non-inferiority of icotinib to gefitinib in terms of progression-free survival (PFS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and this led to the approval of icotinib for NSCLC by the China Food and Drug Administration. A phase 4 study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of icotinib in a broad range of patients with advanced NSCLC across China. This study retrospectively analyzed data from unresectable, recurrent, and/or advanced NSCLC patients who received oral icotinib 125 mg three times per day. The primary endpoint was safety. The secondary endpoints included objective response rate (ORR) and disease control rate (DCR), which were investigated overall and in subgroups such as patients with an EGFR mutation and elderly patients. Between August, 2011 and August, 2012, a total of 6087 advanced NSCLC patients were registered in this study, of which 5549 were evaluable for safety and tumor response. The median age was 63 years (range 21-95 years), and 1571 (28.3%) patients were over the age of 70. The majority of patients were non-smokers, and had adenocarcinoma and stage IV disease. The overall incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) of any grade was 31.5%. The most common ADRs included rash (17.4%) and diarrhea (8.5%), and three patients experienced interstitial lung disease (ILD). The ORR and DCR were 30.0% and 80.6%, respectively, for the overall population, and 33.4% and 81.2%, 30.3% and 80.3%, and 30.4% and 89.3%, for first-line, second-line, and third-line or multiple line subsets, respectively. In 665 EGFR-mutated patients who were evaluable for tumor response, the ORR and DCR were 49.2% (327/665) and 92.3% (614/665), respectively. The data from over 6000 patients was consistent with the results of the ICOGEN study. Icotinib demonstrated a favorable toxicity profile and efficacy in the routine clinical setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Texture analysis of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography: prediction of the response to the first-line chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Davide; Morassi, Mauro; Maroldi, Roberto; Roca, Elisa; Tassi, Gianfranco; Cavalleri, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether tumour heterogeneity, quantified by texture analysis (TA) on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT), can predict response to chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty-three CECT studies of patients with advanced NSCLC who had undergone first-line chemotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Response to chemotherapy was evaluated according to RECIST1.1. Tumour uniformity was assessed by a TA method based on Laplacian of Gaussian filtering. The resulting parameters were correlated with treatment response and overall survival by multivariate analysis. Thirty-one out of 53 patients were non-responders and 22 were responders. Average overall survival was 13 months (4-35), minimum follow-up was 12 months. In the adenocarcinoma group (n = 31), the product of tumour uniformity and grey level (GL*U) was the unique independent variable correlating with treatment response. Dividing the GL*U (range 8.5-46.6) into tertiles, lesions belonging to the second and the third tertiles had an 8.3-fold higher probability of treatment response compared with those in the first tertile. No association between texture features and response to treatment was observed in the non-adenocarcinoma group (n = 22). GL*U did not correlate with overall survival. TA on CECT images in advanced lung adenocarcinoma provides an independent predictive indicator of response to first-line chemotherapy. (orig.)

  14. Molecular prediction of adjuvant cisplatin efficacy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)—validation in two independent cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Ida Kappel; Santoni Rugiu, Eric; Ravn, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Effective predictive biomarkers for selection of patients benefiting from adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are needed. Based on a previously validated methodology, molecular profiles of predicted sensitivity in two patient cohorts are presented....... Methods The profiles are correlations between in vitro sensitivity to cisplatin and vinorelbine and baseline mRNA expression of the 60 cell lines in the National Cancer Institute panel. An applied clinical samples filter focused the profiles to clinically relevant genes. The profiles were tested on 1......) univariate HR of 0.37 (95% CI:0.12–1.15, p = 0.09) in the ACV cohort and 2) univariate HR of 0.14 (95% CI:0.03–0.59, p = 0.0076) to three years. Functional analysis on the cisplatin profile revealed a group of upregulated genes related to RNA splicing as a part of DNA damage repair and apoptosis. Conclusions...

  15. Stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy in stage I (T1-2 N0 M0) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Frank B.; Geinitz, Hans; Schill, Sabine; Thamm, Reinhard; Nieder, Carsten; Schratzenstaller, Ulrich; Molls, Michael [Technical Univ., Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2006-09-15

    Stereotactic Radiotherapy has the potential to produce high local control rates with low risk of severe lung toxicity. From December 2000 to January 2006, 68 inoperable patients (median age 76 years) with stage I NSCLC received definitive hSRT. A mean total dose of 37.5 Gy (24-40 Gy; 60%-isodose) in 3-5 fractions was applied. Immobilisation was carried out by means of a vacuum couch and low pressure foil (Medical Intelligence, Schwab Muenchen, Germany). Staging procedures were thoracic and abdominal CT-scan, FDG-PET and CT or MRI of the brain in all patients. Clinical target volume was the tumor as seen in lung windowing of CT and in FDG-PET. Organ movements (6-22 mm) and patient positioning in the couch (3-12 mm) were added as safety margin for the definition of the planning target volume (PTV), that was enclosed by the 60%-isodose. We observed four (6%) local tumor recurrences, resulting in an actuarial local tumor control rate of 96%, 88% and 88% after 1, 2 and 3 year follow-up. Nineteen patients died, with eight patients due to cancer (12%), two to local tumor progression alone. Cancer-specific survival is 96%, 82% and 73% at 1, 2 and 3 years. Eleven patients died from comorbidities, making a 53% overall 3-year survival. Fifty five percent of the patients were affected by mild acute and subacute side effects, with only 3% experiencing pneumonitis III. Late effects were pneumonitis III in 1%, rib fractures in 3%, and benign pleural effusion in 2 patients. Hypofractionated SRT is safe even in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC and significantly reduced lung capacity. It leads to high local control rates and should be offered to patients not amenable for curative resection.

  16. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  17. Combination of paclitaxel and bevacizumab in heavily pre-treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients: a case series study on 15 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Hadoux, Julien; Gontier, Eric; Chargari, Cyrus; Helissey, Carole; Lamand, Virginie; Tanz, Rachid; Farace, Françoise; Vedrine, Lionel; Bonardel, Gérald; Soria, Jean-Charles; Besse, Benjamin

    2013-12-01

    The combination of paclitaxel and bevacizumab was EMA-approved as first-line therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Moreover, in vitro studies showed a potential antiangiogenic synergistic effect of paclitaxel and bevacizumab. Between November 2008 and March 2010, this case series study included 15 patients with metastatic non squamous-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Those were bevacizumab eligible and received the same regimen used in metastatic breast cancer with weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m(2), days 1, 8 and 15) and bevacizumab (10 mg/kg at days 1 and 15) after at least one prior line of chemotherapy. Efficacy was evaluated by CT-scan and PET-FDG every two months. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEP) and circulating endothelial cells (CEC) levels were explored in a subset of patients. Median age 56 (36-75), female: 47%, never smokers: 27%, adenocarcinoma: 100%, PS 0-1: 87% and PS 3: 13%. All patients were treated with a first-line platinum-based doublet with or without bevacizumab and 70% of them with erlotinib in the second-line. No major toxicity was observed. Partial response (PR) rate was 44% (31-63%) using RECIST criteria on CT-scan, and 65% (29-88%) with PET FDG. PS improved in 33% of the cases. Median progression free survival was 4.6 months. An increase of CEC and CEP was observed in patients with NSCLC treated with paclitaxel and bevacizumab. In this retrospective series, our results suggest efficacy signal in pre-treated metastatic NSCLC and warrant further assessment in a randomized clinical trial.

  18. Optimization of radiotherapy planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) by {sup 18}FDG-PET; Optimierung der Bestrahlungsplanung beim nicht-kleinzelligen bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) mit Hilfe von {sup 18}FDG-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Nestle, U.; Kirsch, C.M. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Walter, K. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Marienkrankenhaus Amberg (Germany); Licht, N.; Schnabel, K. [Abt. fuer Strahlentherapie, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Ukena, D. [Innere Medizin V, Universitaetskliniken des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2002-10-01

    Aim: In recent years, FDG-PET examinations have become more important for problems in oncology, especially in staging of bronchogenic carcinoma. In the retrospective study presented here, the influence of PET on the planning of radiotherapy for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was investigated. Methods: The study involved 39 patients with NSCLC who had been examined by PET for staging. They received radiotherapy on the basis of the anterior/posterior portals including the primary tumour and the mediastinum planned according to CT- and bronchoscopic findings. The results of the PET examination were not considered in initial radiotherapy planning. The portals were retrospectively redefined on the basis of FDG uptake considering the size and localization of the primary tumour; and FDG activities outside the mediastinal part of the portals. Results: In 15 out of 39 patients, the CT/PET-planned portals differed from the CT-planned ones. In most cases (n = 12) the CT/PET field was smaller than the CT field. The median geometric field size of the portals was 179 cm{sup 2}, after redefinition using PET 166 cm{sup 2}. In 20 patients with disturbed ventilation caused by the tumour (atelectosis, dystelectosis), a correction of the portal was suggested significantly more frequently than in the other patients (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrate the synergism of topographical (CT) and metabolic (FDG-PET) information, which could be helpful in planning radiotherapy of bronchial carcinoma, especially for patients with disturbed ventilation. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die FDG-PET-Untersuchung hat in den vergangenen Jahren bei onkologischen Fragestellungen insbesondere beim Staging des Bronchialkarzinoms wachsende Bedeutung erlangt. In der vorliegenden retrospektiven Untersuchung wurde der Einfluss der PET auf die Strahlentherapieplanung bei Patienten mit non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) untersucht. Methoden: Die Untersuchung umfasste 39 Patienten mit

  19. Investigations of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate as a SPECT radiotracer for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and potential tumor uptake mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lanfang; Xiu, Yan; Li, Yanli; Xu, Xiaobo; Li, Shanqun; Li, Xiao; Pak, Koon Y; Shi, Hongcheng; Cheng, Dengfeng

    2015-07-01

    This study attempted to evaluate the feasibility of (99m)Tc-labeled glucarate ((99m)Tc-GLA) imaging in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the potential tumor uptake mechanism. Cell lysates from two NSCLC cell lines, H292 and H1975, were immunoblotted with anti-glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5) antibody for Western blotting. Thereafter, the two cell lines were used to examine cellular uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA with or without fructose. SPECT/CT imaging studies were performed on small animals bearing H292 and H1975 tumors. Biodistribution studies were also conducted to achieve accurate tissue uptake of this tracer in two tumor models. Hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining and GLUT5, Ki67 and cytokeratin-7 (CK-7) immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis were further investigated on tumor tissues. In Western blotting, H292 cells showed higher levels of GLUT5 compared to the H1975 cells. Meanwhile, the in vitro cell assays indicated GLUT5-dependent uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in H292 and H1975 cells. The fructose competition assays showed a significant decrease in (99m)Tc-GLA uptake by H292 and H1975 cells when fructose was added. The (99m)Tc-GLA accumulation was as much as two-fold higher in H292 implanted tumors than in H1975 implanted tumors. (99m)Tc-GLA exhibited rapid clearance pharmacokinetics and reasonable uptake in human NSCLC H292 (1.69±0.37 ID%/g) and H1975 (0.89±0.06 ID%/g) implanted tumors at 30min post injection. Finally, the expression of GLUT5, Ki67 and CK-7 on tumor tissues also exhibited positive correlation with the in vitro cell test results and in vivo SPECT/CT imaging results in xenograft tumors. Both in vitro and ex vivo studies demonstrated that the uptake of (99m)Tc-GLA in NSCLC is highly related to GLUT5 expression. Imaging and further IHC results support that (99m)Tc-GLA could be a promising SPECT imaging agent for NSCLC diagnosis and prognosis evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal F-18-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerner, Gerald S. M. A.; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel J. B.; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image

  1. Fluorine F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) for restaging of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): analysis of management change and survival in 63 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, R.J.; Binns, D.J.; Kalff, V.; Ware, R.E.; Hogg, A.; MacManus, M.P.; Ball, D.L.; Suter, M.E.; Matthews, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Following treatment with curative intent for non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), assessment of disease status using conventional techniques is often difficult. We evaluated management impact and prognostic value of FDG PET in 63 consecutive patients undergoing restaging of NSCLC between 11/96 and 12/98. All patients were >6 months from primary treatment with curative intent. Salvage therapy with curative intent was being contemplated in 18 patients. Conventional imaging was abnormal 61/63 patients, two others had recurrent symptoms only. Compared to conventional restaging, 33% of patients were down-staged, and 35% were upstaged by PET. PET led to more aggressive treatment than planned in 7 patients (11%), a change from planned curative to palliative treatment in 8 patients (13%) and 17 patients (27%) thought to have recurrent disease had no further investigation or treatment after negative PET studies. Cox proportional hazards analysis indicated that a positive PET scan had a hazard ratio of 2.95 (95% CI 1.038.50, p = 0.012) compared to negative PET. Extent of active disease on PET was also prognostically significant with each incremental extent category (no disease, local recurrence, limited locoregional, extensive locoregional and systemic) having an estimated 60% increase in the rate of death (95% Cl 24% to 107%, p<0.0001). Stage of disease at initial diagnosis, primary treatment used and disease extent on conventional restaging were not predictive of survival. Thus, PET provided a high impact on management for NSCLC patients with suspected recurrence and more accurate prognostic stratification than conventional staging. Copyright (2000) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  2. LATE-BREAKING ABSTRACT: Early relapse of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) found after CNS-symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Jeppesen, Stefan S.

    2016-01-01

    whether the introduction in 2010 of follow-up by CT of thorax and upper abdomen every three months has reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms.Results: All 827 NSCLC patients from Funen completing curative treatment from 2005 to 2013 were included. The total number of relapses found...... or III were found.Conclusion: CT-based follow-up has not reduced the incidence of relapse suspected from CNS-symptoms in stage II-IV, and therefore we suggest routine MR of the brain before curative treatment for this group of patients.Number, fractions(%), and [95%CI]Jan. 2005 - June 2010July 2010 - Dec...... after symptoms within 24 months decreased in the 3½ years after the introduction of CT-based follow-up, p < 0,001 (table), but the total fraction presenting with CNS-symptoms did not change, p = 0.296. Relapses after stage I cancer decreased (p = 0.025), while no differences or changes for stages II...

  3. Vinorelbine and gemcitabine vs vinorelbine and carboplatin as first-line treatment of advanced NSCLC. A phase III randomised controlled trial by the Norwegian Lung Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløtten, Ø; Grønberg, B H; Bremnes, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard first-line treatment for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but earlier studies have suggested that non-platinum combinations are equally effective and better tolerated. We conducted a national, randomised study to compare...... a non-platinum with a platinum combination. METHODS: Eligible patients had stage IIIB/IV NSCLC and performance status (PS) 0-2. Patients received up to three cycles of vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o.+gemcitabine 1000 mg m(-2) i.v. day 1 and 8 (VG) or vinorelbine 60 mg m(-2) p.o. day 1 and 8+carboplatin...... was 65 years, 58% were men and 25% had PS 2. Median survival was VG: 6.3 months; VC: 7.0 months, P=0.802. Vinorelbine plus carboplatin patients had more grade III/IV nausea/vomiting (VG: 4%, VC: 12%, P=0.008) and grade IV neutropenia (VG: 7%, VC: 19%, P

  4. Radiotherapeutic management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An overview based on the clinical trials of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical trials clarified the role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The evolution of this research is illustrated by a systemic succession of studies conducted during the last twenty years by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). This article reviews past and present RTOG research efforts in NSCLC. For unresectable NSCLS, major research themes have included radiation dose intensification using both standard and altered fractionation (hyperfractionation or accelerated fraction RT), treatment intensification using combined modality RT and chemotherapy (CT), as well as noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT. These trials have shown that treatment intensification can yield improved survival with acceptable toxicity. Local control and survival was improved with induction CT followed by standard RT to 60 Gy. Current studies will evaluate the timing and sequencing of CT and RT and the combination of CT with altered fractionation RT. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and nonspecific immune stimulants, two noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT, have shown no survival benefit. Biologic response modifiers, including recombinant interferon-beta, will also be evaluated as adjuvants to standard RT, based on interferon-beta radiosensitization observed in the laboratory and clinical investigations suggesting improved survival. Overall, RTOG studies have demonstrated small, but definite, incremental improvements in treatment outcome in NSCLS and provide a solid foundation on which to develop future investigations. (N.K.) 51 refs

  5. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) Signaling Capacity and the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Implications for Use of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} in NSCLC Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Verone, Alissa; Shoemaker, Suzanne [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Qin, Maochun; Liu, Song [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States); Campbell, Moray; Hershberger, Pamela A., E-mail: pamela.hershberger@roswellpark.org [Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Elm and Carlton Streets, Buffalo, NY 14263 (United States)

    2013-11-08

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) exerts anti-proliferative activity by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and regulating gene expression. We previously reported that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells which harbor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations display elevated VDR expression (VDR{sup high}) and are vitamin D-sensitive. Conversely, those with K-ras mutations are VDR{sup low} and vitamin D-refractory. Because EGFR mutations are found predominately in NSCLC cells with an epithelial phenotype and K-ras mutations are more common in cells with a mesenchymal phenotype, we investigated the relationship between vitamin D signaling capacity and the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using NSCLC cell lines and publically available lung cancer cell line microarray data, we identified a relationship between VDR expression, 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} sensitivity, and EMT phenotype. Further, we discovered that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} induces E-cadherin and decreases EMT-related molecules SNAIL, ZEB1, and vimentin in NSCLC cells. 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}-mediated changes in gene expression are associated with a significant decrease in cell migration and maintenance of epithelial morphology. These data indicate that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} opposes EMT in NSCLC cells. Because EMT is associated with increased migration, invasion, and chemoresistance, our data imply that 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} may prevent lung cancer progression in a molecularly defined subset of NSCLC patients.

  6. Factors which influence quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A radiation therapy oncology group study (RTOG 89-01)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.B.; Sause, W.T.; Johnson, D.; Dar, A.R.; Wasserman, T.H.; Rubin, P.; Khandekar, J.; Byhardt, R.B.; Taylor, S.; McDonald, A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Prospectively evaluate the quality of life (QOL) of patients with NSCLC participating in a randomized phase III study conducted by the RTOG and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. Determine the factors which influence QOL during and post therapy. Materials and Methods: From (4(90)) to (4(94)) to 75 patients (pts) were randomized on RTOG 89-01 between a regimen containing radiation therapy (RT) versus a regimen containing surgery (S). All pts received induction vinblastine and cisplatin, followed by either S or RT and consolidation chemotherapy (CT). Pts were given the self-assessment QOL forms prior to the start of therapy, post induction CT, post RT or S, and periodically during follow-up. Two questionnaires were used: Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy for lung cancer patients (FACT-L) and Functional Living Index-Cancer (FLIC). The FACT-L consists of 44 questions covering 6 domains (physical, social, and emotional well-being, relationship with physician, fulfilment, and lung cancer specific concerns), FLIC contains 22 questions summing to one total score. Results: 51 pts participated in the QOL endpoint, 24 were excluded: 3 pts refused, institution did not administer QOL questionnaires in 9 pts, 3 completed QOL after start of therapy, 1 institution refused to participate, 5 questionnaires were incomplete/unusable, 1 pt could not read English, and 2 were ineligible for treatment. Participation in QOL was not predicted by any pretreatment characteristic. Women had worse pretreatment QOL (p<0.005, by FLIC) and more problems with disease-related symptoms (p<0.005, by FACT) than men. Pts with KPS 90-100 had better pretreatment QOL than pts with KPS 60-80 (p<0.025, FLIC). Neither race, marital status, education level, age, prior weight loss, nor disease symptoms statistically significantly influenced pretreatment QOL. Initial QOL did not predict overall survival. FACT-L was reported on 25 pts post induction CT. Follow-up FACT-L was available on 12 pts

  7. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. Methods: We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Results: Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Conclusions: Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients.

  8. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-05-01

    Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Protocol for the isotoxic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslett, Kate; Franks, Kevin; Hanna, Gerard G; Harden, Susan; Hatton, Matthew; Harrow, Stephen; McDonald, Fiona; Ashcroft, Linda; Falk, Sally; Groom, Nicki; Harris, Catherine; McCloskey, Paula; Whitehurst, Philip; Bayman, Neil; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2016-04-15

    The majority of stage III patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy, the non-surgical gold standard of care. As the alternative treatment options of sequential chemoradiotherapy and radiotherapy alone are associated with high local failure rates, various intensification strategies have been employed. There is evidence to suggest that altered fractionation using hyperfractionation, acceleration, dose escalation, and individualisation may be of benefit. The MAASTRO group have pioneered the concept of 'isotoxic' radiotherapy allowing for individualised dose escalation using hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy based on predefined normal tissue constraints. This study aims to evaluate whether delivering isotoxic radiotherapy using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is achievable. Isotoxic IMRT is a multicentre feasibility study. From June 2014, a total of 35 patients from 7 UK centres, with a proven histological or cytological diagnosis of inoperable NSCLC, unsuitable for concurrent chemoradiotherapy will be recruited. A minimum of 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy is mandated before starting isotoxic radiotherapy. The dose of radiation will be increased until one or more of the organs at risk tolerance or the maximum dose of 79.2 Gy is reached. The primary end point is feasibility, with accrual rates, local control and overall survival our secondary end points. Patients will be followed up for 5 years. The study has received ethical approval (REC reference: 13/NW/0480) from the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) Committee North West-Greater Manchester South. The trial is conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The trial results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented internationally. NCT01836692; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  10. Effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy for patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and borderline prognostic factors without distant metastasis: a retrospective review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Linh N.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Allen, Pamela; Schea, Randi A.; Milas, Luka

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The standard treatment for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and good prognostic factors (e.g., weight loss [WL] ≤5% and Karnofsky performance status [KPS] ≥70) is induction chemotherapy followed by definitive radiotherapy to the primary site at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a total dose of 60-63 Gy to the target volume. Patients with poor prognostic factors usually receive radiotherapy alone, but the fractionation schedule and total dose have not been standardized. To attempt to optimize irradiation doses and schedule, we compared the effectiveness of accelerated radiotherapy (ACRT) alone to 45 Gy at 3 Gy per fraction with standard radiation therapy (STRT) of 60-66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in regard to tumor response, local control, distant metastasis, toxicity, and survival. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients treated with radiation for NSCLC at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1990 and 1994 were identified. All 55 patients had node-positive, and no distant metastasis (N+, M0) of NSCLC. Two cohorts were identified. One cohort (26 patients) had borderline poor prognostic factors (KPS less than 70 but higher than 50, and/or WL of more than 5%) and was treated with radiotherapy alone to 45 Gy over 3 weeks at 3 Gy/fraction (ACRT). The second cohort (29 patients) had significantly better prognostic factors (KPS ≥70 and WL ≤5%) and was treated to 60-66 Gy over 6 to 6((1)/(2)) weeks at 2 Gy per fraction (STRT) during the same period. Results: In the first cohort treated by ACRT, the distribution of patients by AJCC stage was IIB 8%, IIIA 19%, and IIIB 73%. Sixty-two percent had KPS 5%. The maximum response rate as determined by chest X-ray was 60% among 45 of 55 patients who were evaluable for response: combined complete responses (20%) and partial responses (40%). Overall survival in these patients was 13% at 2 and 5 years, with a locoregional control rate of 42% and a

  11. Radiological differential diagnosis between fibrosis and recurrence after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frakulli, Rezarta; Salvi, Fabrizio; Balestrini, Damiano; Palombarini, Marcella; Akshija, Ilir; Cammelli, Silvia; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Zompatori, Maurizio; Frezza, Giovanni

    2017-12-01

    Parenchymal changes after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) make differential diagnosis between treatment outcomes and disease recurrence often difficult. The purpose of our study was to identify the radiographic features detectable at computed tomography (CT) scan [high-risk features (HRFs)] that allow enough specificity and sensitivity for early detection of recurrence. We retrospectively evaluated patients who underwent SBRT for inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The median delivered dose performed was 50 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to 80% isodose. All patients underwent chest CT scan before SBRT and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 months after, and then annually. Each CT scan was evaluated and benign and HRFs were recorded. 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-CT was not used routinely. Forty-five patients were included (34 males, 11 females; median age: 77 years; stage IA: 77.8%, stage IB: 22.2%; median follow-up: 21.7 months). Two year and actuarial local control was 77%. HRFs were identified in 20 patients. The most significant predictor of relapse was an enlarging opacity at 12 months (P2 HRFs.

  12. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrera, Francesco; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Bessone, Luca; Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted.

  13. Hybrid [{sup 18}F]-FDG PET/MRI including non-Gaussian diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI): Preliminary results in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusch, Philipp [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Köhler, Jens [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Wittsack, Hans-Joerg [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Heusner, Till A., E-mail: Heusner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Buchbender, Christian [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany); Poeppel, Thorsten D. [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Nensa, Felix; Wetter, Axel [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Gauler, Thomas [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Medical Oncology, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Hartung, Verena [Univ Duisburg-Essen, Medical Faculty, Department of Nuclear Medicine, D-45147 Essen (Germany); Lanzman, Rotem S. [Univ Dusseldorf, Medical Faculty, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, D-40225 Dusseldorf (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of non-Gaussian DWI as part of a FDG-PET/MRI protocol in patients with histologically proven non-small cell lung cancer. Material and methods: 15 consecutive patients with histologically proven NSCLC (mean age 61 ± 11 years) were included in this study and underwent whole-body FDG-PET/MRI following whole-body FDG-PET/CT. As part of the whole-body FDG-PET/MRI protocol, an EPI-sequence with 5 b-values (0, 100, 500, 1000 and 2000 s/mm{sup 2}) was acquired for DWI of the thorax during free-breathing. Volume of interest (VOI) measurements were performed to determine the maximum and mean standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}). A region of interest (ROI) was manually drawn around the tumor on b = 0 images and then transferred to the corresponding parameter maps to assess ADC{sub mono}, D{sub app} and K{sub app}. To assess the goodness of the mathematical fit R{sup 2} was calculated for monoexponential and non-Gaussian analysis. Spearman's correlation coefficients were calculated to compare SUV values and diffusion coefficients. A Student's t-test was performed to compare the monoexponential and non-Gaussian diffusion fitting (R{sup 2}). Results: T staging was equal between FDG-PET/CT and FDG-PET/MRI in 12 of 15 patients. For NSCLC, mean ADC{sub mono} was 2.11 ± 1.24 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s, D{sub app} was 2.46 ± 1.29 × 10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s and mean K{sub app} was 0.70 ± 0.21. The non-Gaussian diffusion analysis (R{sup 2} = 0.98) provided a significantly better mathematical fitting to the DWI signal decay than the monoexponetial analysis (R{sup 2} = 0.96) (p < 0.001). SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} of NSCLC was 13.5 ± 7.6 and 7.9 ± 4.3 for FDG-PET/MRI. ADC{sub mono} as well as D{sub app} exhibited a significant inverse correlation with the SUV{sub max} (ADC{sub mono}: R = −0.67; p < 0.01; D{sub app}: R = −0.69; p < 0.01) as well as with SUV{sub mean} assessed by FDG-PET/MRI (ADC{sub mono}: R

  14. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer

  15. Time evolution of regional CT density changes in normal lung after IMRT for NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Schytte, Tine; Bertelsen, Anders; Bentzen, Søren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Brink, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the clinical radiobiology of radiation induced lung disease in terms of regional computed tomography (CT) density changes following intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: A total of 387 follow-up CT scans in 131 NSCLC patients receiving IMRT to a prescribed dose of 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. The dose-dependent temporal evolution of the density change was analyzed using a two-component model, a superposition of an early, transient component and a late, persistent component. Results: The CT density of healthy lung tissue was observed to increase significantly (p 12 months. Conclusions: The radiobiology of lung injury may be analyzed in terms of CT density change. The initial transient change in density is consistent with radiation pneumonitis, while the subsequent stabilization of the density is consistent with pulmonary fibrosis

  16. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  17. Targeting apoptosis pathways in lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pore, Milind M.; Hiltermann, T. Jeroen N.; Kruyt, Frank A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is a devastating disease with a poor prognosis. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represent different forms of lung cancer that are associated with distinct genetic causes and display different responses to therapy in the clinic. Whereas SCLC is often

  18. Combined Targeted DNA Sequencing in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC Using UNCseq and NGScopy, and RNA Sequencing Using UNCqeR for the Detection of Genetic Aberrations in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobei Zhao

    Full Text Available The recent FDA approval of the MiSeqDx platform provides a unique opportunity to develop targeted next generation sequencing (NGS panels for human disease, including cancer. We have developed a scalable, targeted panel-based assay termed UNCseq, which involves a NGS panel of over 200 cancer-associated genes and a standardized downstream bioinformatics pipeline for detection of single nucleotide variations (SNV as well as small insertions and deletions (indel. In addition, we developed a novel algorithm, NGScopy, designed for samples with sparse sequencing coverage to detect large-scale copy number variations (CNV, similar to human SNP Array 6.0 as well as small-scale intragenic CNV. Overall, we applied this assay to 100 snap-frozen lung cancer specimens lacking same-patient germline DNA (07-0120 tissue cohort and validated our results against Sanger sequencing, SNP Array, and our recently published integrated DNA-seq/RNA-seq assay, UNCqeR, where RNA-seq of same-patient tumor specimens confirmed SNV detected by DNA-seq, if RNA-seq coverage depth was adequate. In addition, we applied the UNCseq assay on an independent lung cancer tumor tissue collection with available same-patient germline DNA (11-1115 tissue cohort and confirmed mutations using assays performed in a CLIA-certified laboratory. We conclude that UNCseq can identify SNV, indel, and CNV in tumor specimens lacking germline DNA in a cost-efficient fashion.

  19. Improved radiotherapy for locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann

    to comply with the DIBH technique. For DIBH, the patients are guided to hold their breath almost at their maximum inspiration level during imaging and treatment. This leads to reduction of the breathing motion which decreases the movement of the tumor and OARs. It also expands the lung tissue which...... be reduced by the DIBH method for the lung cancer patients. The overall aim of the clinical part of this thesis was to clarify the potential benefit of offering DIBH gating, compared to free-breathing (FB), for lung cancer patients. Particularly, the benefits for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) patients were explored. For the dosimetric part of the thesis, the dosimetric aspects of correct dose calculations in heterogeneous patient-like geometries were studied. The clinical aspects of DIBH were evaluated in three different studies, where planning and setup verification images acquired...

  20. Role of interim {sup 18}F-FDG-PET/CT for the early prediction of clinical outcomes of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) during radiotherapy or chemo-radiotherapy. A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Garibaldi, Cristina [European Institute of Oncology, Radiation Research Unit, Milano (Italy); Gilardi, Laura; Travaini, Laura Lavinia; Grana, Chiara Maria [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milano (Italy); Ferrari, Mahila Esmeralda; Botta, Francesca [Medical Physics Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milano (Italy); Piperno, Gaia; Ronchi, Sara; Ciardo, Delia [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); Timmerman, Robert [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dallas, TX (United States); Baroni, Guido [Politecnico di Milano University, Department of Electronics, Information and Bioengineering, Milano (Italy); Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Milano (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); Orecchia, Roberto [University of Milan, Department of Oncology and Hemato-Oncology, Milano (Italy); European Institute of Oncology, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Milano (Italy)

    2017-10-15

    Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) is characterized by aggressiveness and includes the majority of thorax malignancies. The possibility of early stratification of patients as responsive and non-responsive to radiotherapy with a non-invasive method is extremely appealing. The distribution of the Fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) in tumours, provided by Positron-Emission-Tomography (PET) images, has been proved to be useful to assess the initial staging of the disease, recurrence, and response to chemotherapy and chemo-radiotherapy (CRT). In the last years, particular efforts have been focused on the possibility of using ad interim {sup 18}F-FDG PET (FDG{sub int}) to evaluate response already in the course of radiotherapy. However, controversial findings have been reported for various malignancies, although several results would support the use of FDG{sub int} for individual therapeutic decisions, at least in some pathologies. The objective of the present review is to assemble comprehensively the literature concerning NSCLC, to evaluate where and whether FDG{sub int} may offer predictive potential. Several searches were completed on Medline and the Embase database, combining different keywords. Original papers published in the English language from 2005 to 2016 with studies involving FDG{sub int} in patients affected by NSCLC and treated with radiation therapy or chemo-radiotherapy only were chosen. Twenty-one studies out of 970 in Pubmed and 1256 in Embase were selected, reporting on 627 patients. Certainly, the lack of univocal PET parameters was identified as a major drawback, while standardization would be required for best practice. In any case, all these papers denoted FDG{sub int} as promising and a challenging examination for early assessment of outcomes during CRT, sustaining its predictivity in lung cancer. (orig.)

  1. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  2. WE-AB-207B-02: A Bayesian Network Approach for Joint Prediction of Tumor Control and Radiation Pneumonitis (RP) in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Y; McShan, D; Matuszak, M; Hobson, S; Jolly, S; Ten Haken, R; El Naqa, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: NSCLC radiotherapy treatment is a trade-off between controlling the tumor while limiting radiation-induced toxicities. Here we identify hierarchical biophysical relationships that could simultaneously influence both local control (LC) and RP by using an integrated Bayesian Networks (BN) approach. Methods: We studied 79 NSCLC patients treated on prospective protocol with 56 cases of LC and 21 events of RP. Beyond dosimetric information, each patient had 193 features including 12 clinical factors, 60 circulating blood cytokines before and during radiotherapy, 62 microRNAs, and 59 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The most relevant biophysical predictors for both LC and RP were identified using a Markov blanket local discovery algorithm and the corresponding BN was constructed using a score-learning algorithm. The area under the free-response receiver operating characteristics (AU-FROC) was used for performance evaluation. Cross-validation was employed to guard against overfitting pitfalls. Results: A BN revealing the biophysical interrelationships jointly in terms of LC and RP was developed and evaluated. The integrated BN included two SNPs, one microRNA, one clinical factor, three pre-treatment cytokines, relative changes of two cytokines between pre and during-treatment, and gEUDs of the GTV (a=-20) and lung (a=1). On cross-validation, the AUC prediction of independent LC was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.75–0.95) and RP was 0.83 (0.73–0.92). The AU-FROC of the integrated BN to predict both LC/RP was 0.81 (0.71–0.90) based on 2000 stratified bootstrap, indicating minimal loss in joint prediction power. Conclusions: We developed a new approach for multiple outcome utility application in radiotherapy based on integrated BN techniques. The BN developed from large-scale retrospective data is able to simultaneously predict LC and RP in NSCLC treatments based on individual patient characteristics. The joint prediction is only slightly compromised compared to

  3. Feasibility of accelerated radiotherapy (AR) using a concomitant boost for the treatment of unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): a phase II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Parvesh; Wan, Jim; Paig, Camilo U.; Kun, Larry E.; Niell, H. Barry

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The feasibility of AR using a concomitant boost in the treatment of unresectable NSCLC was prospectively tested in a phase II study. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients were enrolled to the protocol between 11/90 and 5/93. Stage distribution was as follows: Medically inoperable stage I = 5 (T 1 = 1, T 2 = 4), stage IIIA = 1, and stage IIIA(N 2 ) = 14. Planned AR delivered a total dose of 65 Gy in 45 fractions over five weeks using a 'field within a field technique'. The large field (day 1, a.m.) encompassed the primary lesion and adjacent lymph nodes to 45 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction (fx). A CT planned small field (day 8, >6 hours apart in p.m.) included only the primary lesion and overt nodal disease to 20 Gy at 1.0 Gy/fx. Doses were not corrected for lung inhomogeneity. Results: Median age of the 20 male enrolled patients was 68 years (range = 42-80 years). Eighteen (90%) of 20 patients completed the planned AR without any interruptions in therapy. One patient experienced a 4 day interruption due to tumor related obstructive pneumonia while the other patient missed 2 days secondary to non-treatment related small bowel obstruction. No incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis was observed. One patient experienced pneumonitis within the radiation portal 1 month post-RT which response d to corticosteroid therapy; otherwise, no late sequelae were observed. The median total delivered dose was 65 Gy (range 64.0-65.4). At a minimum follow-up interval of 30 months, the 2-year Kaplan-Meier and median survival are 15% and 13.4 months, respectively for all 20 patients. Conclusion: AR using a concomitant boost to 65 Gy in 5 weeks for unresectable NSCLC is feasible with minimal acute or long term toxicity. Median survival in our study was similar to the chemo radiation arms of CALGB 8433 and RTOG 8808 protocols. Protocols which combine AR with chemotherapy should be explored for unresectable NSCLC

  4. Mathematical modeling for Phase I cancer trials: A study of metronomic vinorelbine for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlesi, Fabrice; Imbs, Diane-Charlotte; Tomasini, Pascale; Greillier, Laurent; Galloux, Melissa; Testot-Ferry, Albane; Garcia, Mélanie; Elharrar, Xavier; Pelletier, Annick; André, Nicolas; Mascaux, Céline; Lacarelle, Bruno; Cheikh, Raouf El; Serre, Raphaël; Ciccolini, Joseph; Barbolosi, Dominique

    2017-07-18

    Using mathematical modelling allows to select a treatment's regimen across infinite possibilities. Here, we report the phase I assessment of a new schedule for metronomic vinorelbine in treating refractory advanced NSCLC and mesothelioma patients. Overall, 13 patients were screened and 12 were treated (50% male, median age: 68yrs), including 9 NSCLC patients. All patients received at least one week (3 doses) of treatment. At data cut-off, the median length of treatment was 6.5 weeks (1-32+). All the patients presented with at least one adverse event (AE) and six patients with a severe AE (SAE). One partial response and 5 stable diseases were observed. The median OS was 6.4 months (95% CI, 4.8 to 12 months). The median and mean vinorelbine's AUC were 122 ng/ml*h and 159 ng/ml*h, respectively, with the higher plasmatic vinorelbine exposure associated with the best ORR (difference of AUC comparison between responders and non-responders, p-value 0.017). The mathematical modelling determined the administration of vinorelbine, 60 mg on Day 1, 30 mg on Day 2 and 60 mg on Day 4 weekly until progression, as the best schedule. Advanced NSCLC or mesothelioma patients progressing after standard treatment were eligible for the trial. NCT02555007. Responses with acceptable safety profile were observed in heavily pretreated NSCLC and mesothelioma patients using oral vinorelbine at this metronomic dosage based on a mathematic modeling. This study demonstrates the feasibility of this new type of approach, as mathematical modeling may help to rationally decide the better regimen to be clinically tested across infinite possibilities.

  5. small cell lung cancer in a Chinese population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical significance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Hubei province ... diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, progression .... Table 4: Association between EGFR mutation, gender and histologic type in 138 NSCLC patients.

  6. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  7. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference......, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  8. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Become An Advocate Volunteer Ways To Give Lung Cancer www.lung.org > Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > ... Cancer Learn About Lung Cancer What Is Lung Cancer Lung Cancer Basics Causes & Risk Factors Lung Cancer Staging ...

  9. Open-label, randomized study of individualized, pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided dosing of paclitaxel combined with carboplatin or cisplatin in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joerger, M; von Pawel, J; Kraff, S; Fischer, J R; Eberhardt, W; Gauler, T C; Mueller, L; Reinmuth, N; Reck, M; Kimmich, M; Mayer, F; Kopp, H-G; Behringer, D M; Ko, Y-D; Hilger, R A; Roessler, M; Kloft, C; Henrich, A; Moritz, B; Miller, M C; Salamone, S J; Jaehde, U

    2016-10-01

    Variable chemotherapy exposure may cause toxicity or lack of efficacy. This study was initiated to validate pharmacokinetically (PK)-guided paclitaxel dosing in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to avoid supra- or subtherapeutic exposure. Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to receive up to 6 cycles of 3-weekly carboplatin AUC 6 or cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) either with standard paclitaxel at 200 mg/m(2) (arm A) or PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel (arm B). In arm B, initial paclitaxel dose was adjusted to body surface area, age, sex, and subsequent doses were guided by neutropenia and previous-cycle paclitaxel exposure [time above a plasma concentration of 0.05 µM (Tc>0.05)] determined from a single blood sample on day 2. The primary end point was grade 4 neutropenia; secondary end points included neuropathy, radiological response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Among 365 patients randomly assigned, grade 4 neutropenia was similar in both arms (19% versus 16%; P = 0.10). Neuropathy grade ≥2 (38% versus 23%, P PK-guided dosing of paclitaxel does not improve severe neutropenia, but reduces paclitaxel-associated neuropathy and thereby improves the benefit-risk profile in patients with advanced NSCLC. NCT01326767 (https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01326767). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Influence of the number and interval of treatment cycles on cytokine-induced killer cells and their adjuvant therapeutic effects in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuanlong; Lv, Huimin; Zhao, Juan; Li, Qi; Mu, Guannan; Li, Jiade; Wuyang, Jiazi; Lou, Ge; Wang, Ruitao; Zhang, Yanqiao; Huang, Xiaoyi

    2017-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells have important therapeutic effects in adoptive cell transfer (ACT) for the treatment of various malignancies. In this study, we focused on in vitro expansion of CIK cells and their clinical efficacy in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 64 patients with NSCLC (enrolled from 2011 to 2012), including 32 patients who received chemotherapy alone or with sequential radiotherapy (conventional treatment, control group) and 32 patients who received conventional treatment and sequential CIK infusion (study group), were retrospectively analyzed. The time to progression (TTP), overall survival (OS) and adverse effects were analyzed and the phenotype of lymphocytes in CIK population was also determined by flow cytometry. After in vitro expansion, the average percentage of CIK cells was 26.35%. During the 54-month follow up, the median OS and TTP were significantly longer in the study group than in the control group (P=0.0189 and P=0.0129, respectively). The median OS of the ACT≥4cycles subgroup was significantly longer than that of the ACTcells in patients who received ≥4cycles of ACT was higher than that in patients treated with cells were difficult to expand in vitro in some patients after the first ACT cycle but became much easier as the treatment cycles increased monthly. Longer treatment interval negatively impacted the expansion of CIK cells. Systematic immune levels can be increasingly boosted by reinfusion of ACT. Conventional treatment plus CIK cells is an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent progression and prolong survival of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. ROMANA 3: a phase 3 safety extension study of anamorelin in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currow, D; Temel, J S; Abernethy, A; Milanowski, J; Friend, J; Fearon, K C

    2017-08-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia is a debilitating condition frequently observed in NSCLC patients, characterized by decreased body weight, reduced food intake, and impaired quality of life. Anamorelin, a novel selective ghrelin receptor agonist, has anabolic and appetite-enhancing activities. ROMANA 3 was a safety extension study of two phase 3, double-blind studies that assessed safety and efficacy of anamorelin in advanced NSCLC patients with cachexia. Patients with preserved Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group ≤2 after completing 12 weeks (w) on the ROMANA 1 or ROMANA 2 trials (0-12 weeks) could enroll in ROMANA 3 and continue to receive anamorelin 100 mg or placebo once daily for an additional 12w (12-24 weeks). The primary endpoint of ROMANA 3 was anamorelin safety/tolerability (12-24 weeks). Secondary endpoints included changes in body weight, handgrip strength (HGS), and symptom burden (0-24 weeks). Of the 703 patients who completed ROMANA 1 and ROMANA 2, 513 patients entered ROMANA 3 (anamorelin, N = 345, mean age 62.0 years; placebo, N = 168; mean age 62.2 years). During ROMANA 3, anamorelin and placebo groups had similar incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs; 52.2% versus 55.7%), grade ≥3 TEAEs (22.4% versus 21.6%), and serious TEAEs (12.8% versus 12.6%). There were 36 (10.5%) and 23 (13.8%) deaths in the anamorelin and placebo groups, respectively; none were drug-related. Improvements in body weight and anorexia-cachexia symptoms observed in the original trials were consistently maintained over 12-24 weeks. Anamorelin, versus placebo, significantly increased body weight from baseline of original trials at all time points (P cachexia symptoms at weeks 3, 6, 9, 12, and 16 (P < 0.05). No significant improvement in HGS was seen in either group. During the 12-24 weeks ROMANA 3 trial, anamorelin continued to be well tolerated. Over the entire 0-24w treatment period, body weight and symptom burden were improved

  12. SU-F-J-64: Comparison of Dosimetric Robustness Between Proton Therapy and IMRT Plans Following Tumor Regression for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, C; Ainsley, C; Teo, B; Burgdorf, B; Berman, A; Levin, W; Xiao, Y; Lin, L; Simone, C; Solberg, T [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Janssens, G [IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In the light of tumor regression and normal tissue changes, dose distributions can deviate undesirably from what was planned. As a consequence, replanning is sometimes necessary during treatment to ensure continued tumor coverage or to avoid overdosing organs at risk (OARs). Proton plans are generally thought to be less robust than photon plans because of the proton beam’s higher sensitivity to changes in tissue composition, suggesting also a higher likely replanning rate due to tumor regression. The purpose of this study is to compare dosimetric deviations between forward-calculated double scattering (DS) proton plans with IMRT plans upon tumor regression, and assesses their impact on clinical replanning decisions. Methods: Ten consecutive locally advanced NSCLC patients whose tumors shrank > 50% in volume and who received four or more CT scans during radiotherapy were analyzed. All the patients received proton radiotherapy (6660 cGy, 180 cGy/fx). Dosimetric robustness during therapy was characterized by changes in the planning objective metrics as well as by point-by-point root-mean-squared differences for the entire PTV, ITV, and OARs (heart, cord, esophagus, brachial plexus and lungs) DVHs. Results: Sixty-four pairs of DVHs were reviewed by three clinicians, who requested a replanning rate of 16.7% and 18.6% for DS and IMRT plans, respectively, with a high agreement between providers. Robustness of clinical indicators was found to depend on the beam orientation and dose level on the DVH curve. Proton dose increased most in OARs distal to the PTV along the beam path, but these changes were primarily in the mid to low dose levels. In contrast, the variation in IMRT plans occurred primarily in the high dose region. Conclusion: Robustness of clinical indicators depends where on the DVH curves comparisons are made. Similar replanning rates were observed for DS and IMRT plans upon large tumor regression.

  13. Correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC with the standardized uptake value (SUV in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients using hybrid 18F-FDG PET/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Michael Schaarschmidt

    Full Text Available To compare the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC in lymph node metastases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with standardized uptake values (SUV derived from combined 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (18F-FDG PET/MRI.38 patients with histopathologically proven NSCLC (mean age 60.1 ± 9.5 y received whole-body PET/CT (Siemens mCT™ 60 min after injection of a mean dose of 280 ± 50 MBq 18F-FDG and subsequent PET/MRI (mean time after tracer injection: 139 ± 26 min, Siemens Biograph mMR. During PET acquisition, simultaneous diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, b values: 0, 500, 1000 s/mm² was performed. A maximum of 10 lymph nodes per patient suspicious for malignancy were analyzed. Regions of interest (ROI were drawn covering the entire lymph node on the attenuation-corrected PET-image and the monoexponential ADC-map. According to histopathology or radiological follow-up, lymph nodes were classified as benign or malignant. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for all lymph node metastases correlating SUVmax and SUVmean with ADCmean.A total of 146 suspicious lymph nodes were found in 25 patients. One hundred lymph nodes were eligible for final analysis. Ninety-one lymph nodes were classified as malignant and 9 as benign according to the reference standard. In malignant lesions, mean SUVmax was 9.1 ± 3.8 and mean SUVmean was 6.0 ± 2.5 while mean ADCmean was 877.0 ± 128.6 x10(-5 mm²/s in PET/MRI. For all malignant lymph nodes, a weak, inverse correlation between SUVmax and ADCmean as well as SUVmean and ADCmean (r = -0.30, p<0.05 and r = -0.36, p<0.05 existed.The present data show a weak inverse correlation between increased glucose-metabolism and cellularity in lymph node metastases of NSCLC patients. 18F-FDG-PET and DWI thus may offer complementary information for the evaluation of treatment response in lymph node metastases of NSCLC.

  14. Diffusion weighted MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): Does the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) correlate with tracer uptake (SUV)?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regier, M.; Derlin, T.; Schwarz, D.; Laqmani, A.; Henes, F.O.; Groth, M.; Buhk, J.-H.; Kooijman, H.; Adam, G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To investigate the potential correlation of the apparent diffusion coefficient assessed by diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) and glucose metabolism determined by the standardized uptake value (SUV) at 18F-FDG PET/CT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: 18F-FDG PET/CT and DWI (TR/TE, 2000/66 ms; b-values, 0 and 500 s/mm 2 ) were performed in 41 consecutive patients with histologically verified NSCLC. Analysing the PET-CT data calculation of the mean (SUV mean ) and maximum (SUV max ) SUV was performed. By placing a region-of-interest (ROI) encovering the entire tumor mean (ADC mean ) and minimum ADC (ADC min ) were determined by two independent radiologists. Results of 18F-FDG PET-CT and DWI were compared on a per-patient basis. For statistical analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient, Bland–Altman and regression analysis were assessed. Results: Data analysis revealed a significant inverse correlation of the ADC min and SUV max (r = −0.46; p = 0.032). Testing the correlation of the ADC min and SUV max for each histological subtype separately revealed that the inverse correlation was good for both adenocarcinomas (r = −0.47; p = 0.03) and squamouscell carcinomas (r = −0.71; p = 0.002), respectively. No significant correlation was found for the comparison of ADC min and SUV mean (r = −0.29; p = 0.27), ADC mean vs. SUV mean (r = −0.28; p = 0.31) or ADC mean vs. SUV max (r = −0.33; p = 0.23). The κ-value of 0.88 indicated a good agreement between both observers. Conclusion: This preliminary study is the first to verify the relation between the SUV and the ADC in NSCLC. The significant inverse correlation of these two quantitative imaging approaches points out the association of metabolic activity and tumor cellularity. Therefore, DWI with ADC measurement might represent a new prognostic marker in NSCLC

  15. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Screening Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  16. Chemotherapy followed by a combination of daily irradiation and carboplatine (CBDCA) in stage IIIB non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) : first interim analysis of a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardet, E.; Douillard, J.Y.; Riviere, A.; Quoix, E.; Spaeth, D.; Ducolone, A.; Coudert, B.; Lagrange, J.L.; Chomy, P.; Tuchais, C.; Pellae-Cosset, B.; Henry-Amar, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate feasibility and efficacy of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant daily irradiation and carboplatine in the treatment of stage IIIB NSCLC patients. Materials and Methods : Were eligible previously untreated patients with histological y proven stage IIIB NSCLC, aged ≤ 75 years, WHO performance status (PS) ≤ 2, neutrophil count ≥ 2000 and platelets ≥ 150,000, and with no renal or hepatic insufficiency. Patients with large tumor volume which could not be irradiated, were excluded from this phase II study. Induction chemotherapy (CT) consisted of navelbine (NVB) and cisplatin (CDDP) administered over a 8 week period. NVB 30 mg/m 2 was given on weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9; NVB 15 mg/m 2 on weeks 3 and 7; CDDP 120 mg/m 2 was given on weeks 1, 5 and 9. Patients free of distant progression after induction CT received megavoltage radiation (66 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) along with daily CBDCA (15 mg/m 2 ) given 2 to 4 hours before irradiation. Adjuvant NVB-CDDP chemotherapy (2 cycles) was administered in patients still progression-free. Evaluation was performed at the end of induction CT (week 10) and 3 months after the end of irradiation. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival rate with time at risk starting the first day of induction CT. Results : From February 1994 to January 1996, 111 patients were enrolled in 8 centers of whom 76 were eligible for analysis at March 1, 1996. Initial characteristics were : male/female ratio (68(8)), mean age 59 (39 to 76), PS 0 : 40%, PS 1 : 49%, PS 2 : 11%, squamous carcinoma 67%. Observed to theoretical dose ratios of NVB and CDDP as induction CT were 83% and 86%, respectively. Hematological grade 3-4 toxicity was observed in 79% of patients; other grade 3-4 toxicities were nausea in 21%, diarrhea in 3%, alopecia in 2% and sepsis in 5% of patients. Seven (9%) patients died before first evaluation. After induction CT, 3 patients were in complete remission (CR), 35 in partial

  17. Chemotherapy followed by a combination of daily irradiation and carboplatine (CBDCA) in stage IIIB non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) : first interim analysis of a phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, E; Douillard, J Y; Riviere, A; Quoix, E; Spaeth, D; Ducolone, A; Coudert, B; Lagrange, J L; Chomy, P; Tuchais, C; Pellae-Cosset, B; Henry-Amar, M

    1996-09-01

    Purpose/Objective: To demonstrate feasibility and efficacy of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant daily irradiation and carboplatine in the treatment of stage IIIB NSCLC patients. Materials and Methods : Were eligible previously untreated patients with histological y proven stage IIIB NSCLC, aged {<=} 75 years, WHO performance status (PS) {<=} 2, neutrophil count {>=} 2000 and platelets {>=} 150,000, and with no renal or hepatic insufficiency. Patients with large tumor volume which could not be irradiated, were excluded from this phase II study. Induction chemotherapy (CT) consisted of navelbine (NVB) and cisplatin (CDDP) administered over a 8 week period. NVB 30 mg/m{sup 2} was given on weeks 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 9; NVB 15 mg/m{sup 2} on weeks 3 and 7; CDDP 120 mg/m{sup 2} was given on weeks 1, 5 and 9. Patients free of distant progression after induction CT received megavoltage radiation (66 Gy, 2 Gy/fraction) along with daily CBDCA (15 mg/m{sup 2}) given 2 to 4 hours before irradiation. Adjuvant NVB-CDDP chemotherapy (2 cycles) was administered in patients still progression-free. Evaluation was performed at the end of induction CT (week 10) and 3 months after the end of irradiation. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival rate with time at risk starting the first day of induction CT. Results : From February 1994 to January 1996, 111 patients were enrolled in 8 centers of whom 76 were eligible for analysis at March 1, 1996. Initial characteristics were : male/female ratio (68(8)), mean age 59 (39 to 76), PS 0 : 40%, PS 1 : 49%, PS 2 : 11%, squamous carcinoma 67%. Observed to theoretical dose ratios of NVB and CDDP as induction CT were 83% and 86%, respectively. Hematological grade 3-4 toxicity was observed in 79% of patients; other grade 3-4 toxicities were nausea in 21%, diarrhea in 3%, alopecia in 2% and sepsis in 5% of patients. Seven (9%) patients died before first evaluation. After induction CT, 3 patients were in complete remission

  18. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  19. Correlation of FDG-PET measurements with morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Niesen, A.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Docetaxel (D) and carboplatin (C) combination chemotherapy (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced NSCLC. Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined modality induction is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction chemotherapy with etoposide, ifosfamide and cisplatin (VIP) has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. Finally, erythropoietin (EPO) may prevent the decrease in hemoglobin levels that was seen in a previous study of DC (median drop 2.7 g/dl) and thus may enhance treatment efficacy. The aim of the present study was to correlate FDG-PET studies with histomorphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Epo. 33 patients (pts) with NSCLC stage IIIA (7 pts) or IIIB (24 pts) were enrolled and received treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 dl and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles. Epo was given at 10,000 IU s.c. three times a week. All pts received adjuvant radiotherapy. Of 33 enrolled patients, 22 were evaluable for response by CT imaging. 14/22 pts (64 %) achieved PR. Of the 22 responders, 20 were evaluable for repeated FDG-PET studies. 13/20 pts had a decrease of standardized uptake values (SUV) and of the metabolic tumor index (MTI) by >50 %, 9/20 had SUV <2.5 (CR). Seven of these 9 pts underwent tumor resection, and specimens were subjected to morphometric analysis. In 7/7 cases, no vital tumor cells were detected in the specimens. In contrast to our previous study, hemoglobin levels increased by a median of 0.3 g/dl. Morphometric tumor response after induction chemotherapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. FDG-PET appears to be a useful non-invasive diagnostic tool to predict pathologic response and potentially long-term outcome in stage III NSCLC. (author)

  20. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Rahal, Daoud [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Alloisio, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Thoracic Surgery, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Roncalli, Massimo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Pathology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Santoro, Armando [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Oncology, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Marchesi, Federica [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Department of Immunology and Inflammation, Rozzano, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Medical Biotechnologies and Translational Medicine, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Humanitas University, Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2016-10-15

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  1. Correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune markers in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who are candidates for upfront surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopci, Egesta; Olivari, Laura; Toschi, Luca; Marchetti, Silvia; Pistillo, Daniela; Grizzi, Fabio; Castino, Giovanni Francesco; Cortese, Nina; Qehajaj, Dorina; Rahal, Daoud; Alloisio, Marco; Roncalli, Massimo; Allavena, Paola; Santoro, Armando; Marchesi, Federica; Chiti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Eliciting antitumor T-cell response by targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis with checkpoint inhibitors has emerged as a novel therapeutic strategy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The identification of predictors for sensitivity or resistance to these agents is, therefore, needed. Herein, we investigate the correlation of metabolic information on FDG-PET with tissue expression of immune-checkpoints and other markers of tumor-related immunity in resected NSCLC patients. All patients referred to our institution for upfront surgical resection of NSCLC, who were investigated with FDG-PET prior to surgery, were consecutively included in the study. From January 2010 to May 2014, 55 patients (stage IA-IIIB; M:F = 42:13; mean age 68.9 years) were investigated. Sampled surgical tumor specimens were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68-TAMs (tumor-associated macrophages), CD8-TILs (tumor infiltrating lymphocytes), PD-1-TILs, and PD-L1 tumor expression. Immunoreactivity was evaluated, and scores were compared with imaging findings. FDG-PET images were analyzed to define semi-quantitative parameters: SUVmax and SUVmean. Metabolic information on FDG-PET was correlated with tissue markers expression and disease-free survival (DFS) considering a median follow-up of 16.2 months. Thirty-six adenocarcinomas (ADC), 18 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and one sarcomatoid carcinoma were analyzed. All tumors resulted positive at FDG-PET: median SUVmax 11.3 (range: 2.3-32.5) and SUVmean 6.4 (range: 1.5-13) both resulted significantly higher in SCC compared to other NSCLC histotypes (p = 0.007 and 0.048, respectively). IHC demonstrated a median immunoreactive surface covered by CD68-TAMs of 5.41 % (range: 0.84-14.01 %), CD8-TILs of 2.9 % (range: 0.11-11.92 %), PD-1 of 0.65 % (range: 0.02-5.87 %), and PD-L1 of 0.7 % (range: 0.03-10.29 %). We found a statistically significant correlation between SUVmax and SUVmean with the expression of CD8 TILs (rho = 0.31; p = 0.027) and PD-1

  2. Loss of lung function after chemo-radiotherapy for NSCLC measured by perfusion SPECT/CT: Correlation with radiation dose and clinical morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farr, Katherina P; Møller, Ditte S; Khalil, Azza A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of the study was to assess dose and time dependence of radiotherapy (RT)-induced changes in regional lung function measured with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the lung and relate these changes to the symptomatic endpoint of radiation pneumonitis (RP......) in patients treated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: NSCLC patients scheduled to receive curative RT of minimum 60 Gy were included prospectively in the study. Lung perfusion SPECT/CT was performed before and three months after RT. Reconstructed SPECT/CT data were registered...

  3. Second-line Treatment of Stage III/IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC with pemetrexed in routine clinical practice: Evaluation of performance status and health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuette Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC improves overall survival. There is a lack of data regarding the impact on patients' overall health condition. This prospective, non-interventional study evaluated performance status (PS and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL during second-line pemetrexed treatment in routine clinical practice. Methods Stage III/IV NSCLC patients who initiated second-line pemetrexed (standard vitamin and dexamethasone supplementation were observed for a maximum of 9 treatment cycles. The primary objective was to evaluate the proportion of patients achieving improvement of Karnofsky Index (KI of ≥ 10% (absolute or maintaining KI ≥ 80% after the second treatment cycle ("KI benefit response". HR-QoL was self-rated using the EuroQoL-5D questionnaire (EQ-5D. Factors potentially associated with KI benefit response were evaluated using logistic regression models. Results Of 521 eligible patients (73.5% Stage IV, median age 66.3 yrs, 36.1% ≥ 70 yrs, 62.0% with KI ≥ 80%, 471 (90.4% completed at least 2 treatment cycles. 58.0% (95%CI 53.6%;62.2% achieved KI benefit response after the second cycle. Patients with baseline KI ≥ 80%, no Grade 3/4 toxicities during the first 2 cycles, or combination regimen as prior first-line therapy were more likely to achieve a KI benefit response. EQ-5D scores improved over time. Grade 3/4 toxicities were reported in 23.8% of patients (mainly fatigue/asthenia 15.9%, neutropenia 8.7%. Conclusions In this large prospective, non-interventional study of second-line pemetrexed treatment in patients with advanced NSCLC, including 36% elderly patients ( ≥ 70 years, physician-rated PS and self-rated HR-QoL were maintained or improved in the majority of patients. Trial registration Registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00540241 on October 4, 2007

  4. Evaluation of elastix-based propagated align algorithm for VOI- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal (18)F-FDG PET/CT data from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Gerald Sma; Fischer, Alexander; Koole, Michel Jb; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry Jm

    2015-01-01

    Deformable image registration allows volume of interest (VOI)- and voxel-based analysis of longitudinal changes in fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tumor uptake in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study evaluates the performance of the elastix toolbox deformable image registration algorithm for VOI and voxel-wise assessment of longitudinal variations in FDG tumor uptake in NSCLC patients. Evaluation of the elastix toolbox was performed using (18)F-FDG PET/CT at baseline and after 2 cycles of therapy (follow-up) data in advanced NSCLC patients. The elastix toolbox, an integrated part of the IMALYTICS workstation, was used to apply a CT-based non-linear image registration of follow-up PET/CT data using the baseline PET/CT data as reference. Lesion statistics were compared to assess the impact on therapy response assessment. Next, CT-based deformable image registration was performed anew on the deformed follow-up PET/CT data using the original follow-up PET/CT data as reference, yielding a realigned follow-up PET dataset. Performance was evaluated by determining the correlation coefficient between original and realigned follow-up PET datasets. The intra- and extra-thoracic tumors were automatically delineated on the original PET using a 41% of maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) adaptive threshold. Equivalence between reference and realigned images was tested (determining 95% range of the difference) and estimating the percentage of voxel values that fell within that range. Thirty-nine patients with 191 tumor lesions were included. In 37/39 and 12/39 patients, respectively, thoracic and non-thoracic lesions were evaluable for response assessment. Using the EORTC/SUVmax-based criteria, 5/37 patients had a discordant response of thoracic, and 2/12 a discordant response of non-thoracic lesions between the reference and the realigned image. FDG uptake values of corresponding tumor voxels in the original and realigned reference PET correlated well (R

  5. An exploratory study of volumetric analysis for assessing tumor response with (18)F-FAZA PET/CT in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, Gerald S M A; Bollineni, Vikram R; Hiltermann, Thijo J N; Sijtsema, Nanna M; Fischer, Alexander; Bongaerts, Alphons H H; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M

    2016-12-01

    Hypoxia is associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy and is randomly distributed within malignancies. Characterization of changes in intratumoral hypoxic regions is possible with specially developed PET tracers such as (18)F-fluoroazomycin arabinoside ((18)F-FAZA) while tumor metabolism can be measured with 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG). The purpose of this study was to study the effects of chemotherapy on (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG uptake simultaneously in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients At baseline and after the second chemotherapy cycle, both PET/CT with (18)F-FDG and (18)F-FAZA was performed in seven patients with metastasized NSCLC. (18)F-FAZA and (18)F-FDG scans were aligned with deformable image registration using Mirada DBx. The primary tumors were contoured, and on the (18)F-FDG scan, volumes of interest (VOI) were drawn using a 41 % adaptive threshold technique. Subsequently, the resulting VOI was transferred to the (18)F-FAZA scan. (18)F-FAZA maximum tumor-to-background (T/Bgmax) ratio and the fractional hypoxic volume (FHV) were assessed. Measurements were corrected for partial volume effects. Finally, a voxel-by-voxel analysis of the primary tumor was performed to assess regional uptake differences. In the primary tumor of all seven patients, median (18)F-FDG standard uptake value (SUVmax) decreased significantly (p = 0.03). There was no significant decrease in (18)F-FAZA uptake as measured with T/Bgmax (p = 0.24) or the FHV (p = 0.35). Additionally, volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis showed that low hypoxic tumors did not significantly change in hypoxic status between baseline and two cycles of chemotherapy, whereas highly hypoxic tumors did. Individualized volumetric voxel-by-voxel analysis revealed that hypoxia and metabolism were not associated before and after 2 cycles of chemotherapy. Tumor hypoxia and metabolism are independent dynamic events as measured by (18)F-FAZA PET and (18)F

  6. Serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA-125 are associated with worse prognosis in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrés, Susana; Nuñez, Isaac; Longo, Marina; Martinez, Pablo; Checa, Eva; Torrejón, Davis; Felip, Enriqueta

    2011-05-01

    Serum tumor markers are considered a negative prognostic factor in early-stages NSCLC but its role in advanced disease is controversial. The aim of this study is to analyze the prognostic value of tumor markers in advanced NSCLC. Two hundred and seventy seven patients diagnosed in our institution were retrospectively reviewed. Baseline prognostic factors analyzed were gender, histology and brain metastases. Baseline patients characteristics: median age 63 years (30-81 years); males 84.4%, stage IV: 61.7%; adenocarcinoma 38.6%, squamous carcinoma 22.4%. High levels of CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 levels were detected in 179 (55.9%), 119 (65%), and 129 (46.6%) patients respectively. Significant higher levels of CEA and CA125 at baseline were present in adenocarcinoma (P CEA, CYFRA21-1, and CA125 was 5.3 months (m), 3.5 m and 4.6 m versus 7.4 m, 6.2 m and 7.5 m in patients with normal levels (P tumor markers was 10.0 m vs 14.0 m (P = 0.085) for CEA; 5.6 vs 12.1 m for CYFRA21-1 (P = .002), and 8.7 vs 14.0 (P = .03) for CA125. In the multivariate analysis high levels of tumor markers, histology and clinical stage were significant correlated with worse prognostic. Patients with all the tumor markers elevated presented the worst prognosis (3.6 m for PFS and 7.1 m for OS, P tumor markers at baseline are correlated with worse survival in stage III-IV NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of EGFR mutation testing in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Anaya, Pablo; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Polanco, Ana C

    2016-09-01

    Assess the cost-effectiveness of an EGFR-mutation testing strategy for advanced NSCLC in first-line therapy with either gefitinib or carboplatin-paclitaxel in Mexican institutions. Cost-effectiveness analysis using a discrete event simulation (DES) model to simulate two therapeutic strategies in patients with advanced NSCLC. Strategy one included patients tested for EGFR-mutation and therapy given accordingly. Strategy two included chemotherapy for all patients without testing. All results are presented in 2014 US dollars. The analysis was made with data from the Mexican frequency of EGFR-mutation. A univariate sensitivity analysis was conducted on EGFR prevalence. Progression-free survival (PFS) transition probabilities were estimated on data from the IPASS and simulated with a Weibull distribution, run with parallel trials to calculate a probabilistic sensitivity analysis. PFS of patients in the testing strategy was 6.76 months (95 % CI 6.10-7.44) vs 5.85 months (95 % CI 5.43-6.29) in the non-testing group. The one-way sensitivity analysis showed that PFS has a direct relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence, while the ICER and testing cost have an inverse relationship with EGFR-mutation prevalence. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that all iterations had incremental costs and incremental PFS for strategy 1 in comparison with strategy 2. There is a direct relationship between the ICER and the cost of EGFR testing, with an inverse relationship with the prevalence of EGFR-mutation. When prevalence is >10 % ICER remains constant. This study could impact Mexican and Latin American health policies regarding mutation detection testing and treatment for advanced NSCLC.

  8. Radiolabeled cetuximab plus whole-brain irradiation (WBI) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Nadrowitz, Roger; Buchmann, Inga; Meller, Birgit; Hunold, Peter; Noack, Frank; Schild, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The addition of systemic drugs to whole-brain irradiation has not improved the survival of patients with multiple brain metastases, most likely because the agents did not readily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Radiolabeling of cetuximab was performed to investigate whether this antibody crosses the BBB. Case Report: A patient with multiple brain lesions from non-small cell lung cancer was investigated. The largest metastasis (40 x 33 x 27 mm) was selected the reference lesion. On day 1, 200 mg/m 2 cetuximab (0.25% hot and 99.75% cold antibody) were given. On day 3, 200 mg/m 2 cetuximab (cold antibody) were given. Weekly doses of 250 mg/m 2 cetuximab were administered for 3 months. Results: The reference lesion showed enhancement of radiolabeled cetuximab ( 123 I-Erbi) on scintigraphy; 123 I-Erbi crossed the BBB and accumulated in the lesion. The reference lesion measured 31 x 22 x 21 mm at 4 months. Enhancement of contrast medium was less pronounced. Conclusion: This is the first demonstration of cetuximab crossing the BBB and accumulating in brain metastasis. (orig.)

  9. Radiolabeled cetuximab plus whole-brain irradiation (WBI) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk; Nadrowitz, Roger [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Buchmann, Inga; Meller, Birgit [Section of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Hunold, Peter [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Noack, Frank [Inst. of Pathology, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Background and Purpose: The addition of systemic drugs to whole-brain irradiation has not improved the survival of patients with multiple brain metastases, most likely because the agents did not readily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Radiolabeling of cetuximab was performed to investigate whether this antibody crosses the BBB. Case Report: A patient with multiple brain lesions from non-small cell lung cancer was investigated. The largest metastasis (40 x 33 x 27 mm) was selected the reference lesion. On day 1, 200 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab (0.25% hot and 99.75% cold antibody) were given. On day 3, 200 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab (cold antibody) were given. Weekly doses of 250 mg/m{sup 2} cetuximab were administered for 3 months. Results: The reference lesion showed enhancement of radiolabeled cetuximab ({sup 123}I-Erbi) on scintigraphy; {sup 123}I-Erbi crossed the BBB and accumulated in the lesion. The reference lesion measured 31 x 22 x 21 mm at 4 months. Enhancement of contrast medium was less pronounced. Conclusion: This is the first demonstration of cetuximab crossing the BBB and accumulating in brain metastasis. (orig.)

  10. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  11. Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghfoor, Irfan; Perry, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Since tobacco smoking is the cause in vast majority of cases, the incidence of lung cancer is expected to rise in those countries with high or rising incidence of tobacco smoking. Even though population at a risk of developing lung cancer are easily identified, mass screening for lung cancer is not supported by currently available evidence. In case of non-small cell lung cancer, a cure may be possible with surgical resection followed by post-operative chemotherapy in those diagnosed at an early stage. A small minority of patients who present with locally advanced disease may also benefit from preoperative chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to down stage the tumor to render it potentially operable. In a vast majority of patients, however, lung cancer presents at an advanced stage and a cure is not possible with currently available therapeutic strategies. Similarly small cell lung cancer confined to one hemi-thorax may be curable with a combination of chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation, if complete remission is achieved at the primary site. Small cell lung cancer that is spread beyond the confines of one hemi-thorax is however, considered incurable. In this era of molecular targeted therapies, new agents are constantly undergoing pre-clinical and clinical testing with the aim of targeting the molecular pathways thought to involved in etiology and pathogenesis of lung cancer. (author)

  12. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Lung cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) ... following PDQ summaries for more information about lung cancer: Lung Cancer Prevention Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment ...

  13. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA) from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, James L.; Corcoran, Claire; Brown, Helen; Sharpe, Alan D.; Musilova, Milena; Kohlmann, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options. Materials & Methods Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits. Results 2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g) reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA). Reduced “contamination” and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT) (Streck), after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield. Conclusion This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous. PMID:26918901

  14. Optimised Pre-Analytical Methods Improve KRAS Mutation Detection in Circulating Tumour DNA (ctDNA from Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Sherwood

    Full Text Available Non-invasive mutation testing using circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA is an attractive premise. This could enable patients without available tumour sample to access more treatment options.Peripheral blood and matched tumours were analysed from 45 NSCLC patients. We investigated the impact of pre-analytical variables on DNA yield and/or KRAS mutation detection: sample collection tube type, incubation time, centrifugation steps, plasma input volume and DNA extraction kits.2 hr incubation time and double plasma centrifugation (2000 x g reduced overall DNA yield resulting in lowered levels of contaminating genomic DNA (gDNA. Reduced "contamination" and increased KRAS mutation detection was observed using cell-free DNA Blood Collection Tubes (cfDNA BCT (Streck, after 72 hrs following blood draw compared to EDTA tubes. Plasma input volume and use of different DNA extraction kits impacted DNA yield.This study demonstrated that successful ctDNA recovery for mutation detection in NSCLC is dependent on pre-analytical steps. Development of standardised methods for the detection of KRAS mutations from ctDNA specimens is recommended to minimise the impact of pre-analytical steps on mutation detection rates. Where rapid sample processing is not possible the use of cfDNA BCT tubes would be advantageous.

  15. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  16. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shareable Graphics Infographics “African-American Men and Lung Cancer” “Lung Cancer Is the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both ... starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may spread ...

  17. Epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status and the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A population based quality assurance analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels-Chr. G.; Laursen, Christian B.; Hansen, Karin H.

    2015-01-01

    of adenocarcinoma or NSCLC not otherwise specified - diagnosed from July 2010 to June 2014. Chart review was updated in February 2015. The median age was 68 years (range 31 – 96 years), 6.4% were never-smokers and 37.5% ex-smokers. EGFR-mutation status has been determined for 683 patients (73.6%), but has not been...... possible from the available samples in 89 cases. For 156 patients the analysis has not been requested. The prevalence of EGFR-mutation has been 10.4% in women, 5.4% in men, and 39.2% in never-smokers (no gender difference). The EGFR mutations were proven in cytology samples in 75% of the 56 positive cases...

  18. Correlation of F-18 FDG PET with morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation in locally advanced (stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Bonnet, R.; Presselt, N.; Przetak, C.; Junker, K.; Schneider, C.P.; Hoeffken, K.; Wendt, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: To determine the role of 2-[(18)F] fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation, findings in 32 patients were analyzed prospectively in an ongoing multicenter trial (LUCAS-MD, Germany). Material and Methods: Inclusion criteria was histologically confirmed NSCLC stage IIIA/IIIB. For staging all patients received a PET scan in addition to a spiral CT and/or MRI before therapy. Neoadjuvant treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of chemotherapy with paclitaxel (225 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC 6), each d1 q22 and a block of chemoradiation (45Gy, 1.5Gy b.i.d., concomitant with paclitaxel (50 mg/m 2 ) and carboplatin (AUC = 2), each d1, d8, d15) followed by surgery. All patients received a second PET after completion of neoadjuvant therapy prior to surgery. Whole-body PET (ECAT Exact 47) studies (attenuation corrected, iteratively reconstructed) were obtained 60 min. after injection of 6 MBq/kg body weight F-18 FDG. For semi-quantitative analysis, the tumor standardized uptake values (SUV), the tumor to background SUV ratio (T/B ratio), the metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and the metabolic tumor index (MTI = SUV x MTD) were assessed in all primary tumors and in metastatic lymph nodes. Additionally, image fusion of PET with CT data was applied (using a HERMES Computer, Nuclear Diagnostics, Sweden). Results: So far, all patients (7/32) with complete metabolic response in lymph node metastases detected by PET, had no vital tumor cells (morphometric regression grade III). In primary tumors showing complete metabolic response, the regression grade was IIB (less than 10% vital tumor cells) or III. Conclusion: Morphometric tumor response after neoadjuvant therapy correlates strongly with metabolic remission by FDG-PET. PET precedes the tumor response as measured by CT after neoadjuvant treatment and may predict the long term therapeutic outcome in stage III NSCLC

  19. SU-E-J-172: A Quantitative Assessment of Lung Tumor Motion Using 4DCT Imaging Under Conditions of Controlled Breathing in the Management of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohatt, D; Gomez, J; Singh, A; Malhotra, H [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study breathing related tumor motion amplitudes by lung lobe location under controlled breathing conditions used in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for NSCLC. Methods: Sixty-five NSCLC SBRT patients since 2009 were investigated. Patients were categorized based on tumor anatomic location (RUL-17, RML-7, RLL-18, LUL-14, LLL-9). A 16-slice CT scanner [GE RT16 Pro] along with Varian Realtime Position Management (RPM) software was used to acquire the 4DCT data set using 1.25 mm slice width. Images were binned in 10 phases, T00 being at maximum inspiration ' T50 at maximum expiration phase. Tumor volume was segmented in T50 using the CT-lung window and its displacement were measured from phase to phase in all three axes; superiorinferior, anterior-posterior ' medial-lateral at the centroid level of the tumor. Results: The median tumor movement in each lobe was as follows: RUL= 3.8±2.0 mm (mean ITV: 9.5 cm{sup 3}), RML= 4.7±2.8 mm (mean ITV: 9.2 cm{sup 3}), RLL=6.6±2.6 mm (mean ITV: 12.3 cm{sup 3}), LUL=3.8±2.4 mm (mean ITV: 18.5 cm{sup 3}), ' LLL=4.7±2.5 mm (mean ITV: 11.9 cm{sup 3}). The median respiratory cycle for all patients was found to be 3.81 ± 1.08 seconds [minimum 2.50 seconds, maximum 7.07 seconds]. The tumor mobility incorporating breathing cycle was RUL = 0.95±0.49 mm/s, RML = 1.35±0.62 mm/s, RLL = 1.83±0.71 mm/s, LUL = 0.98 ±0.50 mm/s, and LLL = 1.15 ±0.53 mm/s. Conclusion: Our results show that tumor displacement is location dependent. The range of motion and mobility increases as the location of the tumor nears the diaphragm. Under abdominal compression, the magnitude of tumor motion is reduced by as much as a factor of 2 in comparison to reported tumor magnitudes under conventional free breathing conditions. This study demonstrates the utility of abdominal compression in reducing the tumor motion leading to reduced ITV and planning tumor volumes (PTV)

  20. Peptide hormones and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, T W

    2006-03-01

    Several peptide hormones have been identified which alter the proliferation of lung cancer. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is a neuroendocrine cancer, produces and secretes gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), neurotensin (NT) and adrenomedullin (AM) as autocrine growth factors. GRP, NT and AM bind to G-protein coupled receptors causing phosphatidylinositol turnover or elevated cAMP in SCLC cells. Addition of GRP, NT or AM to SCLC cells causes altered expression of nuclear oncogenes, such as c-fos, and stimulation of growth. Antagonists have been developed for GRP, NT and AM receptors which function as cytostatic agents and inhibit SCLC growth. Growth factor antagonists, such as the NT1 receptor antagonist SR48692, facilitate the ability of chemotherapeutic drugs to kill lung cancer cells. It remains to be determined if GRP, NT and AM receptors will served as molecular targets, for development of new therapies for the treatment of SCLC patients. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells also have a high density of GRP, NT, AM and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors. Several NSCLC patients with EGF receptor mutations respond to gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Gefitinib relieves NSCLC symptoms, maintaining stable disease in patients who are not eligible for systemic chemotherapy. It is important to develop new therapeutic approaches using translational research techniques for the treatment of lung cancer patients.

  1. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scolaro, T; Ardizzoni, A; Giudici, S; Grossi, F; Cosso, M; Pennucci, M C; Bacigalupo, A; Rosso, R; Vitale, V

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m{sup 2} i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m{sup 2} daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12

  2. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy combined with daily cisplatin in stage III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scolaro, T.; Ardizzoni, A.; Giudici, S.; Grossi, F.; Cosso, M.; Pennucci, M.C.; Bacigalupo, A.; Rosso, R.; Vitale, V.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Results of radical radiotherapy in the treatment of inoperable NSCLC can be improved by either concurrent daily low-dose Cisplatin as radiosensitizer (Shaake-Koning, N Engl J Med, 1992; 326: 524) or by using neoadiuvant chemotherapy (Dillman, N Engl J Med, 1990; 323: 940). The aim of present study was to evaluate the activity and feasibility of a new chemo-radiotherapy (CT-RT) regimen in which both strategies of RT improvement will be used. Methods: Thirty consecutive patients (pts) were treated with induction CT (Cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,22 + Vinblastine 5 mg/m 2 i.v. day 1,8,15,22,29) followed by RT (60 Gy/30 fractions in 6 wks) combined with Cisplatin 5 mg/m 2 daily before RT. Patients' characteristics were: 29 pts were male and 1 female; median age 60.5 yrs (range 44-69); median PS 1 (range 0-1); 21 squamous cell carcinoma and 9 adenocarcinoma; stage III A in 9 pts and stage IIIB in 21 pts. Results: Twenty-three pts were evaluable for RT plus daily Cisplatin toxicity and 29 for CT toxicity (according to WHO). For RT plus daily cisplatin hematological toxicity consisted of grade III leukopenia in 22%, grade III anemia 9% and grade III thrombocytopenia in 9% of pts. Only 2 patients developed severe esophagitis. Only one case of radiation pneumonitis was reported. For induction CT hematological toxicity consisted of grade III-IV leukopenia in 31%, grade II anemia 10% and grade IV thrombocitopenia in 14% of cases. Non-hematological toxicity consisted mainly of grade I peripheral neuropaty and occured in 17% of pts. One case of minor hearing loss and 4 cases of tinnitus were observed at the end of treatment. Twenty-seven pts were evaluable for response. Response rate was 59% with 7 CRs (26%) and 9 PRs (33%); 1 patient had SD (4%), 5 pts PD (20%) and 5 pts (19%) died early (3 for early progression, 1 for toxicity and 1 for cardiac failure). All pts with CR are still alive with a median event-free survival of 23.9 months (range 12.3-41.9). Actuarial

  3. Predicting death from surgery for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dowd, Emma L; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Baldwin, David R

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Current British guidelines advocate the use of risk prediction scores such as Thoracoscore to estimate mortality prior to radical surgery for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A recent publication used the National Lung Cancer Audit (NLCA) to produce a score to predict 90day mortali...

  4. Clinical decision-making and health-related quality of life during first-line and maintenance therapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): findings from a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztankay, Monika; Giesinger, Johannes Maria; Zabernigg, August; Krempler, Elisabeth; Pall, Georg; Hilbe, Wolfgang; Burghuber, Otto; Hochmair, Maximilian; Rumpold, Gerhard; Doering, Stephan; Holzner, Bernhard

    2017-08-23

    Maintenance therapy (MT) with pemetrexed has been shown to improve overall and progression-free survival of patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), without impairing patients' health-related quality of life (HRQOL) substantially. Comprehensive data on HRQOL under real-life conditions are necessary to enable informed decision-making. This study aims to (1) assess HRQOL during first-line chemotherapy and subsequent MT and (2) record patients' and physicians' reasons leading to clinical decisions on MT. Patients treated for NSCLC at three Austrian medical centres were included. HRQOL was assessed at every chemotherapy cycle using the EORTC QLQ-C30/+LC13 questionnaire. Semi-structured interviews were conducted before MT initiation and at the time of discontinuation to evaluate patients' and physicians' reasons for treatment decisions. Longitudinal QOL analysis was based on linear mixed models. Sixty-one (73%) out of 84 patients were considered for MT. Thirty-six patients (43%) received MT and 29 (35%) discontinued therapy. Decisions on MT initiation (in 20 cases by the physician vs 4 by the patient) and discontinuation (19 vs 10) were mainly voiced by the physician. Treatment toxicity of first-line chemotherapy was the main reason for rejection of MT in patients with stable disease and was more often indicated by patients than clinicians. HRQOL data were collected from 83 patients at 422 assessment time points and indicated significantly lower symptom severity during MT compared with first-line therapy for nausea and vomiting (p = 0.006), sleep disturbances (p loss (p = 0.043), constipation (p = 0.017) and chest pain (p = 0.022), and a deterioration in emotional functioning (p = 0.023) and cognitive functioning (p = 0.044) during MT. Our results indicate that HRQOL and symptom burden improve between first-line treatment to MT in some respects, although some late toxicity persists. Discrepancies between patients' and physicians

  5. Revisiting the prognostic value of preoperative 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in early-stage (I and II) non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Mohit; Brahmanday, Govinda; Bajaj, Sunil K.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Ravikrishnan, K.P.

    2010-01-01

    The aims were to determine if the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV max ) of the primary tumor as determined by preoperative 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is an independent predictor of overall survival and to assess its prognostic value after stratification according to pathological staging. A retrospective clinicopathologic review of 363 patients who had a preoperative 18 F-FDG PET done before undergoing attempted curative resection for early-stage (I and II) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was performed. Patients who had received any adjuvant or neoadjuvant chemotherapy or radiation therapy were excluded. The primary outcome measure was duration of overall survival. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were plotted to find out the optimal cutoff values of SUV max yielding the maximal sensitivity plus specificity for predicting the overall survival. Survival curves stratified by median SUV max and optimal cutoff SUV max were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and statistical differences were assessed using the log-rank test. Multivariate proportional hazards (Cox) regression analyses were applied to test the SUV max 's independency of other prognostic factors for the prediction of overall survival. The median duration of follow-up was 981 days (2.7 years). The median SUV max was 5.9 for all subjects, 4.5 for stage IA, 8.4 for stage IB, and 10.9 for stage IIB. The optimal cutoff SUV max was 8.2 for all subjects. No optimal cutoff could be established for specific stages. In univariate analyses, each doubling of SUV max [i.e., each log (base 2) unit increase in SUV max ] was associated with a 1.28-fold [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03-1.59, p = 0.029] increase in hazard of death. Univariate analyses did not show any significant difference in survival by SUV max when data were stratified according to pathological stage (p = 0.119, p = 0.818, and p = 0.882 for stages IA, IB, and IIB, respectively

  6. Lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causing chemicals such as uranium, beryllium, vinyl chloride, nickel chromates, coal products, mustard gas, chloromethyl ethers, gasoline, and diesel exhaust Exposure to radon gas Family history of lung cancer ...

  7. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  8. Targeted Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    Targeted therapies have become standard therapies for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A phase III trial of carboplatin and paclitaxel with and without bevacizumab in patients with advanced NSCLC with non-squamous histology demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in efficacy. In patients with NSCLC with an activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation (defined as exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R point mutation), phase III trials of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) compared to platinum-based chemotherapy have demonstrated superior efficacy in the first-line setting. In patients with NSCLC with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangements, phase III trials of crizotinib have demonstrated superior efficacy compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting and standard chemotherapy in the second-line setting. A second-generation ALK inhibitor, ceritinib, is available for patients who have progressed after or were intolerant of crizotinib. Crizotinib has also demonstrated activity on patients with ROS1 rearrangements, and BRAF inhibitors (dabrafenib, vemurafenib) have demonstrated activity in patients with NSCLC with BRAF V600E mutation. The oncogenic mutations that are susceptible to targeted therapy are mainly found in non-squamous NSCLC. The development of targeted therapy in patients with squamous NSCLC has been more challenging due to the genomic complexity observed in the squamous histology and the low prevalence of EGFR, ALK, and ROS1 molecular alterations. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine with and without necitumumab in patients with advanced NSCLC with squamous histology demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in progression-free and overall survival.

  9. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  10. Lung Cancer: Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professional support team today. Learn More . Find more lung cancer resources. Learn More Donate Today! What is Lung ... to Give How Your Support Helps Events Lung Cancer Awareness © Lung Cancer Alliance. The information presented in this website ...

  11. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: High-Throughput siRNA Screening of a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Cell Line Panel | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use siRNA screens to identify NSCLC-selective siRNAs from two genome-wide libraries that will allow us to functionally define genetic dependencies of subtypes of NSCLC. Using bioinformatics tools, the CTD2 center at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are discovering associations between this functional data (siRNAs) and NSCLC mutational status, methylation arrays, gene expression arrays, and copy number variation data that will help us identify new targets and enrollment biomarkers. 

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three ...

  13. Perioperative Rehabilitation in Operable Lung Cancer Patients (PROLUCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Maja S; Trier, Karen; Vibe-Petersen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical resection in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be associated with significant morbidity, functional limitations, and decreased quality of life. Objectives: The safety and feasibility of a preoperative and early postoperative rehabilitation program...

  14. Approach for oligometastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidemi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring a limited number of distant metastases, referred to as the oligometastatic state, has been indicated for surgery for the past several decades. However, whether the strategy of surgical treatment results in a survival benefit for such patients remains controversial. Experientially, however, thoracic surgeons often encounter long-term survivors among surgically resected oligometastatic NSCLC patients. In this article, the current situation of surgical approach and potential future perspective for oligometastatic NSCLC are reviewed.

  15. Lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Toshio

    1982-01-01

    Based on the own experience and world literatures, contribution of radiation in the treatment of lung cancer was reviewed and discussed. Although the patients with advanced cancer were referred to radiation usually, the results of radiotherapy were superior to those by chemotherapy. Of course the radiotherapy was a local one, radiation combined with chemotherapy was highly recommended, besides systemic administration of chemotherapeutics, special methods such as bronchial arterial infusion (BAI) and chemoembolization would be more favourable in selected patients. Treatment of undifferentiated small cell carcinoma was becoming more dependent on chemotherapy, radiation showed as excellent local control as ever. To treat locally extended cancer patients with involvement of the thoracic wall and Pancoast's syndrome, external radiation alone were not successful, interstitial radiation or a single exposure with a large dose during the thoracotomy would be promising. Finally, data indicated that aged and poor risk patients in early stage of cancer might be treated by radiation instead of unjustifiable operation. (author)

  16. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  17. Radiation pneumonitis in non‑small‑cell lung cancer patients treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. Results: We found that ... lung cancer (NSCLC) patients who underwent radiotherapy with HT in our ..... might have a different effect on lung toxicity in the subject undergoing the ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Lung cancer Lung cancer Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... cancer, childhood Additional NIH Resources (3 links) National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Overview National Cancer Institute: Lung Cancer Prevention ...

  19. New modalities of cancer treatment for NSCLC: focus on immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Marianne Davies Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Recent advances in the understanding of immunology and antitumor immune responses have led to the development of new immunotherapies, including vaccination approaches and monoclonal antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoint pathways. These strategies have shown activity in melanoma and are now being tested in lung cancer. The antibody drugs targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein-1 immune checkpoint pathways work by restoring immune responses against cancer cells, and are associated with unconventional response patterns and immune-related adverse events as a result of their mechanism of action. As these new agents enter the clinic, nurses and other health care providers will require an understanding of the unique efficacy and safety profiles with immunotherapy to optimize potential patient benefits. This paper provides a review of the new immunotherapeutic agents in development for lung cancer, and strategies for managing patients on immunotherapy. Keywords: immunotherapy, lung cancer, vaccination, nivolumab, ipilimumab, nursing

  20. New modalities of cancer treatment for NSCLC: focus on immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of immunology and antitumor immune responses have led to the development of new immunotherapies, including vaccination approaches and monoclonal antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoint pathways. These strategies have shown activity in melanoma and are now being tested in lung cancer. The antibody drugs targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein-1 immune checkpoint pathways work by restoring immune responses against cancer cells, and are associated with unconventional response patterns and immune-related adverse events as a result of their mechanism of action. As these new agents enter the clinic, nurses and other health care providers will require an understanding of the unique efficacy and safety profiles with immunotherapy to optimize potential patient benefits. This paper provides a review of the new immunotherapeutic agents in development for lung cancer, and strategies for managing patients on immunotherapy

  1. Analysis of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing; Wei Xiong; Liu, Helen H.; Tucker, Susan L.; Hu Chaosu; Mohan, Rodhe; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate factors associated with treatment-related pneumonitis in non-small-cell lung cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Patients and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from 223 patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Treatment-related pneumonitis was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictive factors. Results: Median follow-up was 10.5 months (range, 1.4-58 months). The actuarial incidence of Grade ≥3 pneumonitis was 22% at 6 months and 32% at 1 year. By univariate analyses, lung volume, gross tumor volume, mean lung dose, and relative V5 through V65, in increments of 5 Gy, were all found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. The mean lung dose and rV5-rV65 were highly correlated (p 42% were 3% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.001). Conclusions: In this study, a number of clinical and dosimetric factors were found to be significantly associated with treatment-related pneumonitis. However, rV5 was the only significant factor associated with this toxicity. Until it is better understood which dose range is most relevant, multiple clinical and dosimetric factors should be considered in treatment planning for non-small-cell lung cancer patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

  2. MHC class II expression in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yayi; Rozeboom, Leslie; Rivard, Christopher J; Ellison, Kim; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Yu, Hui; Zhou, Caicun; Hirsch, Fred R

    2017-10-01

    Immunotherapy is an exciting development in lung cancer research. In this study we described major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II protein expression in lung cancer cell lines and patient tissues. We studied MHC Class II (DP, DQ, DR) (CR3/43, Abcam) protein expression in 55 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, 42 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines and 278 lung cancer patient tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Seven (12.7%) NSCLC cell lines were positive for MHC Class II. No SCLC cell lines were found to be MHC Class II positive. We assessed 139 lung cancer samples available in the Hirsch Lab for MHC Class II. There was no positive MHC Class II staining on SCLC tumor cells. MHC Class II expression on TILs in SCLC was significantly lower than that on TILs in NSCLC (P<0.001). MHC Class II was also assessed in an additional 139 NSCLC tumor tissues from Medical University of Gdansk, Poland. Patients with positive staining of MHC Class II on TILs had longer regression-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those whose TILs were MHC Class II negative (2.980 years, 95% CI 1.628-4.332 vs. 1.050 years, 95% CI 0.556-1.554, P=0.028) (3.230 years, 95% CI 2.617-3.843 vs. 1.390 years, 95% CI 0.629-2.151, P=0.014). MHC Class II was expressed both in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. However, MHC Class II was not detected in SCLC cell lines or tissue tumor cells. MHC Class II expression was lower on SCLC TILs than on NSCLC TILs. Loss of expression of MHC Class II on SCLC tumor cells and reduced expression on SCLC TILs may be a means of escaping anti-cancer immunity. Higher MHC Class II expression on TILs was correlated with better prognosis in patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Protein signature of lung cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R Mehan

    Full Text Available Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related mortality. We applied a highly multiplexed proteomic technology (SOMAscan to compare protein expression signatures of non small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC tissues with healthy adjacent and distant tissues from surgical resections. In this first report of SOMAscan applied to tissues, we highlight 36 proteins that exhibit the largest expression differences between matched tumor and non-tumor tissues. The concentrations of twenty proteins increased and sixteen decreased in tumor tissue, thirteen of which are novel for NSCLC. NSCLC tissue biomarkers identified here overlap with a core set identified in a large serum-based NSCLC study with SOMAscan. We show that large-scale comparative analysis of protein expression can be used to develop novel histochemical probes. As expected, relative differences in protein expression are greater in tissues than in serum. The combined results from tissue and serum present the most extensive view to date of the complex changes in NSCLC protein expression and provide important implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is almost always due to smoking. TREATING LUNG CANCER Lung cancer treatment depends on several factors, including the ... org TARGETING CANCER CARE Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Lung cancer is the second most common cancer in ...

  5. TP53 Mutations in Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Mogi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is frequently mutated in human cancers. Abnormality of the TP53 gene is one of the most significant events in lung cancers and plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of lung epithelial cells. Human lung cancers are classified into two major types, small cell lung cancer (SCLC and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The latter accounts for approximately 80% of all primary lung cancers, and the incidence of NSCLC is increasing yearly. Most clinical studies suggest that NSCLC with TP53 alterations carries a worse prognosis and may be relatively more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation. A deep understanding of the role of TP53 in lung carcinogenesis may lead to a more reasonably targeted clinical approach, which should be exploited to enhance the survival rates of patients with lung cancer. This paper will focus on the role of TP53 in the molecular pathogenesis, epidemiology, and therapeutic strategies of TP53 mutation in NSCLC.

  6. Staging of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LUNG CANCER MINI-SERIES #2 Staging of Lung Cancer Once your lung cancer is diagnosed, staging tells you and your health care provider about ... at it under a microscope. The stages of lung cancer are listed as I, II, III, and IV ...

  7. Does the quality of radiation therapy (RT) impact upon outcome in the tri-modality treatment of stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)?: Analysis of cancer and leukemia group B (CALGB) protocol 8935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P.; Herndon, J.; Glicksman, A.; Eaton, W.; Langer, M.; Kass, F.C.; Seagren, S.; Green, M.; Sugarbaker, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The impact of the adequacy of portal fields and the total dose of RT upon pattern of local failure and survival was analyzed. Materials and Methods: Seventy-four patients with pathological stage IIIA(N 2 ) NSCLC were enrolled to a sequential tri-modality protocol consisting of induction chemotherapy [cisplatin(P) at 100 mg/m 2 on days 1,29 and vinblastine(V) 5 mg/m 2 weekly x 5] followed by thoracotomy. Patients with resected disease received an additional two cycles of the same PV followed by thoracic RT. Patients with completely resected disease were treated to 54 Gy while those with incompletely resected disease (i.e., positive margins and/or positive highest sampled mediastinal lymph node) received 59.4 Gy at 1.8 Gy/fraction (fx) once daily. Following protocol therapy, the adequacy of portal fields and total dose of RT was independently peer reviewed by a committee of CALGB Radiation Oncologists under the auspices of the Quality Assurance Review Center (QARC) in Providence, RI. A major deviation was scored if the radiation portal 'cut through' the required target volume and/or if the total radiation dose was greater than +/-10% from the protocol. Results: Thirty-three of 74 patients completed the full adjuvant protocol treatment including post-operative RT. Among patients undergoing complete vs. incomplete resection, no significant difference in 2-year post-RT failure-free survival (FFS) [48% vs. 17%, respectively, p .13] or overall survival (OS) [43% vs. 50%, respectively, p = .27] was evident between the two resection groups. Pattern of first failure among these 33 patients was as follows: Local (L) only = 1(5%), L/Distant (D) 6(28%), D only = 14(67%), p .99). Conclusion: In our study, thoracic RT delivered according to protocol requirements did not affect either pattern of local failure or survival in the tri-modality treatment of pathological stage IIIA(N 2 ) NSCLC. However, these findings could also reflect the sample size of our

  8. In Silico Oncology: Quantification of the In Vivo Antitumor Efficacy of Cisplatin-Based Doublet Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) through a Multiscale Mechanistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokotroni, Eleni; Dionysiou, Dimitra; Veith, Christian; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Franz, Astrid; Grgic, Aleksandar; Bohle, Rainer M.; Stamatakos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    The 5-year survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients can be as low as 1% in advanced stages. For patients with resectable disease, the successful choice of preoperative chemotherapy is critical to eliminate micrometastasis and improve operability. In silico experimentations can suggest the optimal treatment protocol for each patient based on their own multiscale data. A determinant for reliable predictions is the a priori estimation of the drugs’ cytotoxic efficacy on cancer cells for a given treatment. In the present work a mechanistic model of cancer response to treatment is applied for the estimation of a plausible value range of the cell killing efficacy of various cisplatin-based doublet regimens. Among others, the model incorporates the cancer related mechanism of uncontrolled proliferation, population heterogeneity, hypoxia and treatment resistance. The methodology is based on the provision of tumor volumetric data at two time points, before and after or during treatment. It takes into account the effect of tumor microenvironment and cell repopulation on treatment outcome. A thorough sensitivity analysis based on one-factor-at-a-time and latin hypercube sampling/partial rank correlation coefficient approaches has established the volume growth rate and the growth fraction at diagnosis as key features for more accurate estimates. The methodology is applied on the retrospective data of thirteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine or docetaxel in the neoadjuvant context. The selection of model input values has been guided by a comprehensive literature survey on cancer-specific proliferation kinetics. The latin hypercube sampling has been recruited to compensate for patient-specific uncertainties. Concluding, the present work provides a quantitative framework for the estimation of the in-vivo cell-killing ability of various chemotherapies. Correlation studies of such estimates with

  9. In Silico Oncology: Quantification of the In Vivo Antitumor Efficacy of Cisplatin-Based Doublet Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC through a Multiscale Mechanistic Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Kolokotroni

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The 5-year survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients can be as low as 1% in advanced stages. For patients with resectable disease, the successful choice of preoperative chemotherapy is critical to eliminate micrometastasis and improve operability. In silico experimentations can suggest the optimal treatment protocol for each patient based on their own multiscale data. A determinant for reliable predictions is the a priori estimation of the drugs' cytotoxic efficacy on cancer cells for a given treatment. In the present work a mechanistic model of cancer response to treatment is applied for the estimation of a plausible value range of the cell killing efficacy of various cisplatin-based doublet regimens. Among others, the model incorporates the cancer related mechanism of uncontrolled proliferation, population heterogeneity, hypoxia and treatment resistance. The methodology is based on the provision of tumor volumetric data at two time points, before and after or during treatment. It takes into account the effect of tumor microenvironment and cell repopulation on treatment outcome. A thorough sensitivity analysis based on one-factor-at-a-time and latin hypercube sampling/partial rank correlation coefficient approaches has established the volume growth rate and the growth fraction at diagnosis as key features for more accurate estimates. The methodology is applied on the retrospective data of thirteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer who received cisplatin in combination with gemcitabine, vinorelbine or docetaxel in the neoadjuvant context. The selection of model input values has been guided by a comprehensive literature survey on cancer-specific proliferation kinetics. The latin hypercube sampling has been recruited to compensate for patient-specific uncertainties. Concluding, the present work provides a quantitative framework for the estimation of the in-vivo cell-killing ability of various chemotherapies. Correlation studies of

  10. Tracking the Evolution of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; McGranahan, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), data on intratumor heterogeneity and cancer genome evolution have been limited to small retrospective cohorts. We wanted to prospectively investigate intratumor heterogeneity in relation to clinical outcome and to determine...... as a prognostic predictor. (Funded by Cancer Research UK and others; TRACERx ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01888601 .)....

  11. Role of Autophagy and Apoptosis in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangbo; Pei, Fen; Yang, Fengqing; Li, Lingxiao; Amin, Amit Dipak; Liu, Songnian; Buchan, J. Ross; Cho, William C.

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes 85% of all lung cancers, and is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The poor prognosis and resistance to both radiation and chemotherapy warrant further investigation into the molecular mechanisms of NSCLC and the development of new, more efficacious therapeutics. The processes of autophagy and apoptosis, which induce degradation of proteins and organelles or cell death upon cellular stress, are crucial in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The close interplay between autophagy and apoptosis through shared signaling pathways complicates our understanding of how NSCLC pathophysiology is regulated. The apoptotic effect of autophagy is controversial as both inhibitory and stimulatory effects have been reported in NSCLC. In addition, crosstalk of proteins regulating both autophagy and apoptosis exists. Here, we review the recent advances of the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in NSCLC, aiming to provide few insights into the discovery of novel pathogenic factors and the development of new cancer therapeutics. PMID:28208579

  12. Outcomes in Lung Cancer: 9-Year Experience From a Tertiary Cancer Center in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Navile Murali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. There are limited studies on survival outcomes of lung cancer in developing countries such as India. This study analyzed the outcomes of patients with lung cancer who underwent treatment at Cancer Institute (WIA, Chennai, India, between 2006 and 2015 to determine survival outcomes and identify prognostic factors. Patients and Methods: In all, 678 patients with lung cancer underwent treatment. Median age was 58 years, and 91% of patients had non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Testing for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation was performed in 132 of 347 patients and 61 (46% were positive. Results: Median progression-free survival was 6.9 months and overall survival (OS was 7.6 months for patients with NSCLC. Median progression-free survival was 6 months and OS was 7.2 months for patients with small-cell lung cancer. On multivariable analysis, the factors found to be significantly associated with inferior OS in NSCLC included nonadenocarcinoma histology, performance status more than 2, and stage. In small-cell lung cancer, younger age and earlier stage at presentation showed significantly better survival. Conclusion: Our study highlights the challenges faced in treating lung cancer in India. Although median survival in advanced-stage lung cancer is still poor, strategies such as personalized medicine and use of second-line and maintenance chemotherapy may significantly improve the survival in patients with advanced-stage lung cancer in developing countries.

  13. Outcomes in Lung Cancer: 9-Year Experience From a Tertiary Cancer Center in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Aditya Navile; Ganesan, Trivadi S.; Rajendranath, Rejiv; Ganesan, Prasanth; Selvaluxmy, Ganesarajah; Swaminathan, Rajaraman; Sundersingh, Shirley; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Sagar, Tenali Gnana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in the world. There are limited studies on survival outcomes of lung cancer in developing countries such as India. This study analyzed the outcomes of patients with lung cancer who underwent treatment at Cancer Institute (WIA), Chennai, India, between 2006 and 2015 to determine survival outcomes and identify prognostic factors. Patients and Methods In all, 678 patients with lung cancer underwent treatment. Median age was 58 years, and 91% of patients had non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Testing for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation was performed in 132 of 347 patients and 61 (46%) were positive. Results Median progression-free survival was 6.9 months and overall survival (OS) was 7.6 months for patients with NSCLC. Median progression-free survival was 6 months and OS was 7.2 months for patients with small-cell lung cancer. On multivariable analysis, the factors found to be significantly associated with inferior OS in NSCLC included nonadenocarcinoma histology, performance status more than 2, and stage. In small-cell lung cancer, younger age and earlier stage at presentation showed significantly better survival. Conclusion Our study highlights the challenges faced in treating lung cancer in India. Although median survival in advanced-stage lung cancer is still poor, strategies such as personalized medicine and use of second-line and maintenance chemotherapy may significantly improve the survival in patients with advanced-stage lung cancer in developing countries. PMID:29094084

  14. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mie Grunnet; Sorensen, J B

    2012-01-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic...... significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those...... relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA...

  15. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  16. Phase III study by the Norwegian lung cancer study group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønberg, Bjørn H; Bremnes, Roy M; Fløtten, Oystein

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare pemetrexed/carboplatin with a standard regimen as first-line therapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer NSCLC. PATIENTS AND METHODS Patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC and performance status of 0 to 2 were randomly assigned to receive pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) plus carboplatin......, and fatigue reported on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the lung cancer-specific module LC13 during the first 20 weeks. Secondary end points were overall survival and toxicity. Results Four hundred thirty-six eligible patients were enrolled...

  17. TUSC3 induces autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer cells through Wnt/?-catenin signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yun; Cao, Jun; Yao, Xiao-Yi; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhong, Mei-Zuo; Gan, Ping-Ping; Li, Jian-Huang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the effects of tumor suppressor candidate 3 (TUSC3) on autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. A total of 118 NSCLC patients (88 males and 30 females) who underwent surgery at our institute were enrolled in the study. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TUSC3 protein expression was lower in NSCLC specimens than adjacent normal tissue. Correspondingly, there was greater methylation of TUSC3 in NSCLC than adjacent normal tissue. After transient transf...

  18. Radiation sensitivity of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, J.; Degraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, G.; Mitchell, J.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Minna, J.D.; Levitt, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    X-Ray survival curves were determined using a panel of 17 human lung cancer cell lines, with emphasis on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In contrast to classic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, NSCLC cell lines were generally less sensitive to radiation as evidenced by higher radiation survival curve extrapolation numbers, surviving fraction values following a 2Gy dose (SF2) and the mean inactivation dose values (D) values. The spectrum of in vitro radiation responses observed was similar to that expected in clinical practice, although mesothelioma was unexpectedly sensitive in vitro. Differences in radiosensitivity were best distinguished by comparison of SF2 values. Some NSCLC lines were relatively sensitive, and in view of this demonstrable variability in radiation sensitivity, the SF2 value may be useful for in vitro predictive assay testing of clinical specimens. (author)

  19. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  20. Lung Cancer Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Trends for Other Kinds of Cancer Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) Ovarian Prostate Skin Cancer Home Lung Cancer Trends Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ...

  1. Drug Resistance to EGFR Inhibitors in Lung Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The discovery of mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has dramatically changed the treatment of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. EGFR-targeted therapies show considerable promise, but drug resistance has become a substantial issue. We reviewed the literature to provide an overview of the drug resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC. The mechanisms causing primary, acquired and persistent drug resistance to TKIs vary.

  2. High procedure volume is strongly associated with improved survival after lung cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüchtenborg, Margreet; Riaz, Sharma P; Coupland, Victoria H

    2013-01-01

    Studies have reported an association between hospital volume and survival for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We explored this association in England, accounting for case mix and propensity to resect....

  3. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  4. A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Jeffrey; Bae, Kyounghwa; Choi, Noah; Forster, Ken; Siegel, Barry A.; Brunetti, Jacqueline; Purdy, James; Faria, Sergio; Vu, Toni; Thorstad, Wade; Choy, Hak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non–small-cell lung cancer (≥60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7–22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

  5. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  6. Lung cancer in elderly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagnerova, M.

    2007-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in Europe and USA. The median age of diagnosis is currently 69 years, however this is gradually increasing with the aging population. Patients over age of 70 represent 40 % of all patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Age alone has not been found to be a significant prognostic factor in many malignancies, including lung cancer with performance status and stage being of greater importance. In lung cancer it is also evident that older patients gain equivalent benefit from cancer therapies as their younger counterparts. Elderly patients are under-treated in all aspects of their disease course from histological diagnosis to active therapy with surgical resection, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, irrespective of performance status or co-morbidities. Elderly patients are also underrepresented in lung cancer clinical trials. In this review is presented knowledge about lung cancer in elderly. (author)

  7. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells ...

  8. Customising chemotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer: daily practice and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, A C; Sorensen, J B

    2011-01-01

    Treating patients with advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a daunting task but during recent years new options have emerged. By tailoring treatment using either information on histological subtypes of NSCLC or biomarkers it is now possible to improve outcome and maintain stable quality...

  9. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chansky, Kari; Detterbeck, Frank C; Nicholson, Andrew G

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Revisions to the TNM stage classifications for lung cancer, informed by the international database (N = 94,708) of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee, need external validation. The objective was to externally...... demonstrated consistent ability to discriminate TNM categories and stage groups for clinical and pathologic stage. CONCLUSIONS: The IASLC revisions made for the eighth edition of lung cancer staging are validated by this analysis of the NCDB database by the ordering, statistical differences, and homogeneity...... validate the revisions by using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) of the American College of Surgeons. METHODS: Cases presenting from 2000 through 2012 were drawn from the NCDB and reclassified according to the eighth edition stage classification. Clinically and pathologically staged subsets of NSCLC...

  10. A prospective randomized study of postoperative adjuvant chemo-radiotherapy (CT+RT) vs. radiotherapy(RT) alone in resected stage II and IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Geol Lee; Joo, Hang Kim; Kyung, Young Chung; Doo, Yun Lee; Kil, Dong Kim; Won, Young Lee; Sung, Kyu Kim; Sei, Kyu Kim; Gwi, Eon Kim

    1995-01-01

    Objective: A prospective randomized study has been conducted to compare the results of treatment between CT+RT and RT alone as an adjuvant setting in completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC. Materials and Methods: Patients who had completely resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC were randomized into a CT+RT arm(arm A) and a RT alone arm(arm B) as an adjuvant setting after stratification according to cell type(squamous vs. non-squamous) and stage(II vs. IIIA). CT(Etoposide 100mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-3, Cisplatin 20mg/m2 I.V. infusion d1-5, total 6cycles) was started in postop. 3 weeks with a 4 weeks interval. RT(5040cGy/5-6wks, 180cGy/fr) was started in postoperative 5 weeks after the first cycle of CT for group A and in postoperative 4 weeks for group B. A total of 69 patients were registered from Sep. 1990 to Jun. 1993. Sixty five of these patients were evaluable because 4 patients were ineligible due to distant metastasis before adjuvant treatment. Two patients who refused adjuvant treatment were included in this study to avoid selection bias. Results: Sixteen patients (48%) have received CT of more than 3 cycles and 51 patients(78%) have received RT of more than 50Gy. Four patients died due to treatment-related complications [broncho-pleural fistula 3(arm A:B=2:1), pneumonia 1(arm A)]. Survival and the patterns of failure are as follows: Conclusion: There is no statistical significance in either the overall survival or the patterns of failure between the CT+RT arm and RT alone arm as an adjuvant setting in resected stage II and IIIA NSCLC

  11. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat (SAHA) and erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations after erlotinib progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguart, Noemi; Rosell, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Cardona, Andres F; Isla, Dolores; Palmero, Ramon; Moran, Teresa; Rolfo, Christian; Pallarès, M Cinta; Insa, Amelia; Carcereny, Enric; Majem, Margarita; De Castro, Javier; Queralt, Cristina; Molina, Miguel A; Taron, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    Vorinostat or suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with demonstrated antiproliferative effects due to drug-induced accumulation of acetylated proteins, including the heat shock protein 90. We prospectively studied the activity of vorinostat plus erlotinib in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients with progression to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We conducted this prospective, non-randomized, multicenter, phase I/II trial to evaluate the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile and efficacy of erlotinib and vorinostat. Patients with advanced NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations and progressive disease after a minimum of 12 weeks on erlotinib were included. The maximum tolerated dose of vorinostat plus erlotinib was used as recommended dose for the phase II (RDP2) to assess the efficacy of the combination. The primary end point was progression-free-survival rate at 12 weeks (PFSR12w). Pre-treatment plasma samples were required to assess T790M resistant mutation. A total of 33 patients were enrolled in the phase I-II trial. The maximum tolerated dose was erlotinib 150 mg p.o., QD, and 400mg p.o., QD, on days 1-7 and 15-21 in a 28-day cycle. Among the 25 patients treated at the RDP2, the most common toxicities included anemia, fatigue and diarrhea. No responses were observed. PFSR12w was 28% (IC 95%: 18.0-37.2); median progression-free survival (PFS) was 8 weeks (IC 95%: 7.43-8.45) and overall survival (OS) 10.3 months (95% CI: 2.4-18.1). Full dose of continuous erlotinib with vorinostat 400mg p.o., QD on alternative weeks can be safely administered. Still, the combination has no meaningful activity in EGFR-mutated NSCLC patients after TKI progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular biology of the lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, S.Z.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases and leading cause of cancer death worldwide. The advances in molecular biology and genetics, including the modern microarray technology and rapid sequencing techniques, have enabled a remarkable progress into elucidating the lung cancer ethiopathogenesis. Numerous studies suggest that more than 20 different genetic and epigenetic alterations are accumulating during the pathogenesis of clinically evident pulmonary cancers as a clonal, multistep process. Thus far, the most investigated alterations are the inactivational mutations and losses of tumour suppressor genes and the overexpression of growth-promoting oncogenes. More recently, the acquired epigenetic inactivation of tumour suppressor genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized. The early clonal genetic abnormalities that occur in preneoplastic bronchial epithelium damaged by smoking or other carcinogenes are being identified. The molecular distinctions between small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as between tumors with different clinical outcomes have been described. These investigations lead to the h allmarks of lung cancer . Conclusions. It is realistic to expect that the molecular and cell culture-based investigations will lead to discoveries of new clinical applications with the potential to provide new avenues for early diagnosis, risk assessment, prevention, and most important, new more effective treatment approaches for the lung cancer patients. (author)

  13. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  14. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  15. Exosomes derived from mesenchymal non-small cell lung cancer cells promote chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobb, Richard J; van Amerongen, Rosa; Wiegmans, Adrian; Ham, Sunyoung; Larsen, Jill E; Möller, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common lung cancer type and the most common cause of mortality in lung cancer patients. NSCLC is often associated with resistance to chemotherapeutics and together with rapid metastatic spread, results in limited treatment options and poor patient survival. NSCLCs are heterogeneous, and consist of epithelial and mesenchymal NSCLC cells. Mesenchymal NSCLC cells are thought to be responsible for the chemoresistance phenotype, but if and how this phenotype can be transferred to other NSCLC cells is currently not known. We hypothesised that small extracellular vesicles, exosomes, secreted by mesenchymal NSCLC cells could potentially transfer the chemoresistance phenotype to surrounding epithelial NSCLC cells. To explore this possibility, we used a unique human bronchial epithelial cell (HBEC) model in which the parental cells were transformed from an epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype by introducing oncogenic alterations common in NSCLC. We found that exosomes derived from the oncogenically transformed, mesenchymal HBECs could transfer chemoresistance to the parental, epithelial HBECs and increase ZEB1 mRNA, a master EMT transcription factor, in the recipient cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that exosomes from mesenchymal, but not epithelial HBECs contain the ZEB1 mRNA, thereby providing a potential mechanism for the induction of a mesenchymal phenotype in recipient cells. Together, this work demonstrates for the first time that exosomes derived from mesenchymal, oncogenically transformed lung cells can transfer chemoresistance and mesenchymal phenotypes to recipient cells, likely via the transfer of ZEB1 mRNA in exosomes. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines.

  17. FOCUS ON NIVOLUMAB IN NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Luigi Cortinovis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is changing the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab has demonstrated meaningful results in terms of efficacy with a good safety profile. The novel approach of treating NSCLC using immunotherapy has still unsolved questions and challenging issues in regard to the optimal selection of the patient, its role in first line of treatment, the individualization of the correct methodology of radiologic assessment and efficacy analysis, the best management of immunomediated adverse events, and how to overcome the immunoresistance.

  18. Failure patterns by prognostic group as determined by recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of 1547 on four radiation therapy oncology group studies in operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Scott, Charles B.; Byhardt, Roger W.; Emami, Bahman; Asbell, Sucha O.; Russell, Anthony H.; Roach, Mack; Urtasun, Raul C.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To identify groups of patients who might benefit from more aggressive systemic or local treatment based on failure patterns when unresectable NSCLC was treated by radiation therapy alone. Methods: 1547 patients from 4 RTOG trials treated by RT alone were analyzed for the patterns of first failure by PRA class which was defined by prognostic factors, e.g., stage, KPS, weight loss, pleural effusion, age. All patients were AJCC stage II, IIIA or IIIB with KPS of at least 50 and n previous radiotherapy or chemotherapy for their NSCLC. Progressions in the primary (within irradiated fields), thorax (outside irradiated area), brain and distant metastasis other than brain were compared (two-sided) for each failure category by RPA. Results: The RPA classes are four distinct subgroups that had significantly different median survivals of 12.6, 8.3, 6.2 and 3.3 months for classes I, II, III and IV respectively (all groups p=0.0002). Pair comparison showed that RPA I vs IV p<0.0001, I vs III p=0.006, II vs IV p<0.0001, and III vs IV p=0.06. Conclusions: These results suggest the burden of disease and physiologic compromise in class IV patients are sufficient to cause death before specific sites of failure can be discerned. Site specific treatment strategies (intensive local therapy, combination chemotherapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation) may lead to improved outcome in class I and II, but are unlikely to alter outcome in class III and IV

  19. Anamorelin hydrochloride for the treatment of cancer-anorexia-cachexia in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjie; Garcia, Jose M

    2015-06-01

    Cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome (CACS) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Anamorelin is a novel, orally active ghrelin receptor agonist in clinical development for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC. The aim of this review is to summarize preclinical and clinical studies evaluating anamorelin as a potential promising treatment for CACS in NSCLC. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and metabolism, clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of anamorelin for the treatment of CACS in NSCLC were reviewed. Anamorelin administration may lead to increases in food intake, body weight and lean body mass, and a stimulatory effect on growth hormone secretion in NSCLC patients. Anamorelin is well tolerated with no dose-limiting toxicities identified to date. Targeting ghrelin receptors presents the advantage of potentially addressing multiple mechanisms of CACS simultaneously including appetite, muscle protein balance, adipose tissue metabolism, energy expenditure and inflammation. Clinical data suggest that anamorelin is well tolerated and it effectively increases appetite, body weight and lean mass in patients with advanced NSCLC. Long-term safety remains unknown at this time. The potential synergistic effects of anamorelin with nutritional support or exercise as well as its efficacy/safety in other tumor types are also unknown.

  20. Result of radiation therapy for non-resectable lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Kawamura, Masashi; Kimura, Makoto; Mogami, Hiroshi; Kimura, Yoshiko; Hamamoto, Ken

    1988-01-01

    A total of 122 patients with non-resectable lung cancer, comprising 98 with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 24 with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), who were treated from November 1976 through December 1985 with definitive radiation therapy (RT), were retrospectively analyzed for the outcome of RT. Overall, the 5-year survival rate was 6 %: it was 8 % for SCLC and 4 % for NSCLC. For NSCLC, survival was significantly better in stages I-III patients than stage IV patients (p < 0.01), although it was independent of histology, the combination of chemotherapy, and fractionation schedule. Local recurrence and distant metastasis were found to be the cause of death in 42 % and 13 %, respectively, in the stages I-II NSCLC group; and in 19 % and 52 %, respectively, in the SCLC group. The SCLC patients tended to have better survival when given chemotherapy before RT. Ten patients surviving for three years or more were characterized by having early stage of NSCLC, less than 100 cm of irradiated field, and a total dose of 60 Gy or more. Twelve patients (10 %) had severe radiation pneumonitis that resulted in death. Acute and fetal pneumonitis tended to be frequent when chemotherapy was combined with RT. (Namekawa, K.)

  1. Preoperative staging of lung cancer with combined PET-CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara; Lassen, Ulrik; Mortensen, Jann

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fast and accurate staging is essential for choosing treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this randomized study was to evaluate the clinical effect of combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) on preoperative staging of NSCLC...... one of the following: a thoracotomy with the finding of pathologically confirmed mediastinal lymph-node involvement (stage IIIA [N2]), stage IIIB or stage IV disease, or a benign lung lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy; or a thoracotomy in a patient who had recurrent disease or death from any cause...

  2. Microarray data re-annotation reveals specific lncRNAs and their potential functions in non-small cell lung cancer subtypes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dongbo; Xie, Mingxuan; He, Baimei; Gao, Ying; Yu, Qiao; He, Bixiu; Chen, Qiong

    2017-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The most common subtypes of NSCLC are adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). However, the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to AC and SCC are still largely unknown, especially the roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The present study identified differentially expressed lncRNAs between lung AC and SCC by re-annotation of NSCLC microarray data analysis profiling. The potential func...

  3. Radiofrequency Ablation for Early-Stage Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hiraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review examines studies of radiofrequency ablation (RFA of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC and discusses the role of RFA in treatment of early-stage NSCLC. RFA is usually performed under local anesthesia with computed tomography guidance. RFA-associated mortality, while being rare, can result from pulmonary events. RFA causes pneumothorax in up to 63% of cases, although pneumothorax requiring chest drainage occurs in less than 15% of procedures. Other severe complications are rare. After RFA of stage I NSCLC, 31–42% of patients show local progression. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival rates after RFA of stage I NSCLC were 78% to 100%, 53% to 86%, 36% to 88%, and 25% to 61%, respectively. The median survival time ranged from 29 to 67 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rates after RFA of stage I NSCLC were 89% to 100%, 92% to 93%, and 59% to 88%, respectively. RFA has a higher local failure rate than sublobar resection and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. Therefore, RFA may currently be reserved for early-stage NSCLC patients who are unfit for sublobar resection or SBRT. Various technologies are being developed to improve clinical outcomes of RFA for early-stage NSCLC.

  4. Tracking Genomic Cancer Evolution for Precision Medicine: The Lung TRACERx Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Hackshaw, Alan; Ngai, Yenting

    2014-01-01

    . TRACERx (TRAcking non-small cell lung Cancer Evolution through therapy [Rx]), a prospective study of patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aims to define the evolutionary trajectories of lung cancer in both space and time through multiregion and longitudinal tumour sampling and genetic...... analysis. By following cancers from diagnosis to relapse, tracking the evolutionary trajectories of tumours in relation to therapeutic interventions, and determining the impact of clonal heterogeneity on clinical outcomes, TRACERx may help to identify novel therapeutic targets for NSCLC and may also serve...

  5. Smoking and Lung Cancer: A Geo-Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Zahraa; El Nemr, Shaza; Sinjab, Ansam; Chami, Hassan; Tfayli, Arafat; Kadara, Humam

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents the most frequently diagnosed subtype of this morbid malignancy. NSCLC is causally linked to tobacco consumption with more than 500 million smokers worldwide at high risk for this fatal malignancy. We are currently lagging in our knowledge of the early molecular (e.g., genomic) effects of smoking in NSCLC pathogenesis that would constitute ideal markers for early detection. This limitation is further amplified when considering the variable etiologic factors in NSCLC pathogenesis among different regions around the globe. In this review, we present our current knowledge of genomic alterations arising during early stages of smoking-induced lung cancer initiation and progression, including discussing the premalignant airway field of injury induced by smoking. The review also underscores the wider spectra and higher age-adjusted rates of tobacco (e.g., water-pipe smoke) consumption, along with elevated environmental carcinogenic exposures and relatively poorer socioeconomic status, in low-middle income countries (LMICs), with Lebanon as an exemplar. This "cocktail" of carcinogenic exposures warrants the pressing need to understand the complex etiology of lung malignancies developing in LMICs such as Lebanon.

  6. Smoking and Lung Cancer: A Geo-Regional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahraa Rahal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents the most frequently diagnosed subtype of this morbid malignancy. NSCLC is causally linked to tobacco consumption with more than 500 million smokers worldwide at high risk for this fatal malignancy. We are currently lagging in our knowledge of the early molecular (e.g., genomic effects of smoking in NSCLC pathogenesis that would constitute ideal markers for early detection. This limitation is further amplified when considering the variable etiologic factors in NSCLC pathogenesis among different regions around the globe. In this review, we present our current knowledge of genomic alterations arising during early stages of smoking-induced lung cancer initiation and progression, including discussing the premalignant airway field of injury induced by smoking. The review also underscores the wider spectra and higher age-adjusted rates of tobacco (e.g., water-pipe smoke consumption, along with elevated environmental carcinogenic exposures and relatively poorer socioeconomic status, in low-middle income countries (LMICs, with Lebanon as an exemplar. This “cocktail” of carcinogenic exposures warrants the pressing need to understand the complex etiology of lung malignancies developing in LMICs such as Lebanon.

  7. Mediastinal staging for lung cancer: the influence of biopsy volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Elof; Pape, Christian; Jørgensen, Ole Dan

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance prior to surgery for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify patients with N2-disease. Mediastinoscopy remains the gold standard, and sampling from at least three lymph node stations is generally recommended. It is unknown whether...

  8. Minimally invasive diagnostics and immunotherapy of lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talebian-Yazdi, M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with aspects of diagnostics and immunotherapy of lung cancer. The first aim of this thesis is to investigate how the implementation of minimally invasive endoscopic ultrasound techniques (EUS and EBUS) in the staging algorithm of NSCLC can be optimized. The second aim of this

  9. Exosomal Proteins as a Diagnostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandfeld-Paulsen, B; Jakobsen, K R; Bæk, R

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Exosomes have been suggested as promising biomarkers in NSCLC because they contain proteins from their originating cells and are readily available in plasma. In this study, we explored the potential of exosome protein profiling in diagnosing lung cancers of all stages and various...

  10. WE-FG-206-08: Pulmonary Functional Imaging Biomarkers of NSCLC to Guide and Optimize Functional Lung Avoidance Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheikh, Khadija; Capaldi, Dante PI; Parraga, Grace [Robarts Research Institute (Canada); Hoover, Douglas A; Palma, David A [Department of Medical Biophysics, Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada); Yaremko, Brian P [Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Functional lung avoidance radiotherapy promises optimized therapy planning by minimizing dose to well-functioning lung and maximizing dose to the rest of the lung. Patients with NSCLC commonly present with co-morbid COPD and heterogeneously distributed ventilation abnormalities stemming from emphysema, airways disease, and tumour burden. We hypothesized that pulmonary functional imaging methods may be used to optimize radiotherapy plans to avoid regions of well-functioning lung and significantly improve outcomes like quality-of-life and survival. To ascertain the utility of functional lung avoidance therapy in clinical practice, we measured COPD phenotypes in NSCLC patients enrolled in a randomized-controlled-clinical-trial prior to curative intent therapy. Methods: Thirty stage IIIA/IIIB NSCLC patients provided written informed consent to a randomized-controlled-clinical-trial ( http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02002052 ) comparing outcomes in patients randomized to standard or image-guided radiotherapy. Hyperpolarized noble gas MRI ventilation-defect-percent (VDP) (Kirby et al, Acad Radiol, 2012) as well as CT-emphysema measurements were determined. Patients were stratified based on quantitative imaging evidence of ventilation-defects and emphysema into two subgroups: 1) tumour-specific ventilation defects only (TSD), and, 2) tumour-specific and other ventilation defects with and without emphysema (TSD{sub VE}). Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves were used to characterize the performance of clinical measures as predictors of the presence of non-tumour specific ventilation defects. Results: Twenty-one out of thirty subjects (70%) had non-tumour specific ventilation defects (TSD{sub VE}) and nine subjects had ONLY tumour-specific defects (TSD). Subjects in the TSD{sub VE} group had significantly greater smoking-history (p=.006) and airflow obstruction (FEV{sub 1}/FVC) (p=.001). ROC analysis demonstrated an 87% classification rate for

  11. Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytte, Tine; Hansen, Olfred; Stohlberg-Rohr, Thomine

    2010-01-01

        Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity   Backgro......    Cardiac Toxicity after definitive Radiotherapy of locally advanced NSCLC Tine Schytte, Olfred Hansen, Thomine Stolberg-Rohr* and Carsten Brink*. Dept. Oncology and Radiophysic Lab.* Odense University Hospital, Denmark   Keyword: Radiotherapy, Locally advanced NSCLC, Cardiac toxicity......   Background: Lung and oesophageal toxicity have been regarded as main toxicity in definitive radiotherapy (RT) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), whereas cardiac toxicity has not been offered much concern. This is probably due to the poor prognosis for patients with unresectable NSCLC. In this study we...

  12. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  13. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  14. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Materials/methods. One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n=124) and limited (n=61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. Results. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p=0.001). Conclusions. INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status

  15. Risk of isolated nodal failure for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) techniques--a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepka, Lucyna; Bujko, Krzysztof; Zolciak-Siwinska, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    To estimate retrospectively the rate of isolated nodal failures (INF) in NSCLC patients treated with the elective nodal irradiation (ENI) using 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). One hundred and eighty-five patients with I-IIIB stage treated with 3D-CRT in consecutive clinical trials differing in an extent of the ENI were analyzed. According to the extent of the ENI, two groups were distinguished: extended (n = 124) and limited (n = 61) ENI. INF was defined as regional nodal failure occurring without local progression. Cumulative Incidence of INF (CIINF) was evaluated by univariate and multivariate analysis with regard to prognostic factors. With a median follow up of 30 months, the two-year actuarial overall survival was 35%. The two-year CIINF rate was 12%. There were 16 (9%) INF, eight (6%) for extended and eight (13%) for limited ENI. In the univariate analysis bulky mediastinal disease (BMD), left side, higher N stage, and partial response to RT had a significant negative impact on the CIINF. BMD was the only independent predictor of the risk of incidence of the INF (p = 0.001). INF is more likely to occur in case of more advanced nodal status.

  16. Using positron emission tomography (PET) response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST) 1.0 for evaluation of 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose-PET/CT scans to predict survival early during treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fledelius, Joan; Khalil, Azza Ahmed; Hjorthaug, Karin; Frøkiaer, Jørgen

    2016-04-01

    The demand for early-response evaluation with 2'-deoxy-2'-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (F-18-FDG) positron emission tomography combined with whole body CT (PET/CT) is rapidly growing. This study was initiated to evaluate the applicability of the PET response criteria in solid tumours (PERCIST 1.0) for response evaluation. We performed a retrospective study of 21 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who had undergone both a baseline and a follow-up F-18-FDG-PET/CT scan during their treatments. The scans were performed at our institution in the period September 2009 and March 2011 and were analysed visually and according to PERCIST 1.0 by one board-certified nuclear medicine physician. The response was compared with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). The variation in key parameters affecting the F-18-FDG uptake was assessed. A kappa of 0.94 corresponding to an almost perfect agreement was found for the comparison of the visual evaluation with PERCIST. Patients with partial metabolic response and stable metabolic disease (as evaluated by PERCIST 1.0) had statistically significant longer median time to progression: 8.4 months (confidence interval (CI) 5.1-11.8 months) as compared with 2.7 months (CI 0-5.6 months) in patients classified with progression. The variation in uptake time between baseline and follow-up scans was more than the recommended 15 min in 48% of patients. PERCIST 1.0 is readily implementable and highly comparable with visual evaluation of response using early F-18-FDG-PET/CT scanning for locally advanced NSCLC patients. In spite of variations in parameters affecting F-18-FDG uptake, evaluation of F-18-FDG-PET/CT during treatment with PERCIST 1.0 is shown to separate non-responders from responders, each with statistically significant differences in both OS and PFS. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  17. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  18. Proportion and clinical features of never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Jaeyoung; Choi, Sun Mi; Lee, Jinwoo; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Dong-Wan; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Young Tae; Yoo, Chul-Gyu; Kim, Young Whan; Han, Sung Koo; Park, Young Sik

    2017-01-01

    Background The proportion of never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is increasing, but that in Korea has not been well addressed in a large population. We aimed to evaluate the proportion and clinical features of never-smokers with NSCLC in a large single institution. Methods We analyzed clinical data of 1860 consecutive patients who were newly diagnosed with NSCLC between June 2011 and December 2014. Results Of the 1860 NSCLC patients, 707 (38.0%) were never-smokers. The propo...

  19. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui, E-mail: baohuihan1@163.com

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of β-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC.

  20. Lung cancer-derived Dickkopf1 is associated with bone metastasis and the mechanism involves the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Tianqing; Teng, Jiajun; Jiang, Liyan; Zhong, Hua; Han, Baohui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •DKK1 level was associated with NSCLC bone metastases. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 inhibited osteoblast differentiation. •Lung tumor cells derived DKK1 modulates β-catenin and RUNX2. -- Abstract: Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferably metastasizes to skeleton. But the role of them in bone dissemination is poorly understood. This study aims to define the role of DKK1 in lung cancer bone metastases and investigate the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that DKK1 over-expression was a frequent event in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) blood samples, and serous DKK1 level was much higher in bone metastatic NSCLC compared to non-bone metastatic NSCLC. We also found that conditioned medium from DKK1 over-expressing lung cancer cells inhibited the differentiation of osteoblast, determined by alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin secretion, whereas the conditioned medium from DKK1 silencing lung cancer cells exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, DKK1 reduced the level of β-catenin and RUNX2, as well as inhibiting the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Taken together, these results suggested that lung cancer-produced DKK1 may be an important mechanistic link between NSCLC and bone metastases, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to treat bone metastase of NSCLC

  1. PPARGC1A is upregulated and facilitates lung cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Dong; Feng, Qing-Chuan; Qi, Yu; Cui, Guanghui; Zhao, Song

    2017-10-15

    Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality, with metastatic progression remaining the single largest cause of lung cancer mortality. Hence it is imperative to determine reliable biomarkers for lung cancer prognosis. We performed quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis to explore epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) inducers that regulate EMT process in three patients with advanced lung cancer disease. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARGC1A) was uniformly the topmost overexpressed gene in all three human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient samples. Further evaluation in human normal lung and metastatic lung cancer cell lines revealed that the expression of PPARGC1A was upregulated in metastatic lung cancer cell lines. Metagenomic analysis revealed direct correlation among PPARGC1A, zinc-finger transcription factor snail homolog 1 (SNAI1), and metastatic lung disease. Upregulation of PPARGC1A transcript expression was independent of a differential upregulation of the upstream AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) activation or steady state expression of the silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (SIRT1). Xenograft tail vein colonization assays proved that the high expression of PPARGC1A was a prerequisite for metastatic progression of lung cancer to brain. Our results indicate that PPARGC1A might be a potential biomarker for lung cancer prognosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews and l...... are only ameliorated to a minor degree by a healthy diet.......Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...

  3. Metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: consensus on pathology and molecular tests, first-line, second-line, and third-line therapy: 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in Lung Cancer; Lugano 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felip, E; Gridelli, C; Baas, P

    2011-01-01

    the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer to be addressed through discussion......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21 and 22 May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics, medical oncology, surgical oncology and radiation oncology. Before...... at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement on three of these areas: NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, the treatment of first-line...

  4. Lung cancer in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Rodriguez R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Raúl Barrera-Rodriguez,1 Jorge Morales-Fuentes2 1Biochemistry and Environmental Medicine Laboratory, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, 2Lung Cancer Medical Service, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, Tlalpan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, women, genetic susceptibility, genetic differences, tobacco

  5. The challenge of NSCLC diagnosis and predictive analysis on small samples. Practical approach of a working group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunnissen, Erik; Kerr, Keith M; Herth, Felix J F

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the division of pulmonary carcinomas into small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was adequate for therapy selection. Due to the emergence of new treatment options subtyping of NSCLC and predictive testing have become mandatory. A practical approach to...

  6. Subtyping of nonsmall cell lung cancer on cytology specimens: Reproducibility of cytopathologic diagnoses on sparse material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haukali, O. S.; Henrik, H.; Olsen, Karen Ege

    2014-01-01

    Cytologic examination of fine-needle aspiration (material is increasingly used in diagnosing lung cancer. High interobserver agreement in distinguishing small-cell lung cancer from nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) on cytologic material has been demonstrated. Because of new treatment......, cytoscrape (CS) can convert cytologic material into tissue fragments useful for IHC. The purpose of this study was to test the reproducibility of pulmonary malignant diagnoses, in particular distinction between subgroups of NSCLC, based on smeared material and IHC on CS. A consecutive series of May...

  7. Evaluation of pentavalent Tc-99m DMSA scintigraphy in small cell and nonsmall cell lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atasever, T.; Guendogdu, C.; Vural, G.; Kapucu, L.Oe.; Karalezli, A.; Uenlue, M.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of Tc-99m (V) DMSA in patients suspected of lung cancer and determine whether this agent may have value in differentiation between small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell (NSCLC) lung carcinoma. Methods: Thirty-six patients with clinical and radiological suspicion of primary lung carcinoma were injected 450-600 MBq of Tc-99m (V) DMSA intravenously. Whole body and planar anterior, posterior thorax images were obtained 4-5 h after injection of the radioactive complex. Results: Histopathological results confirmed 23 NSCLC, 10 SCLC and 1 metastatic lung carcinoma and 2 lung abscess. Nineteen of the 23 (82%) NSCLC and all of the 10 (100%) SCLC cases showed Tc-99m (V) DMSA uptake. Single metastatic lung cancer also accumulated radiotracer. Lung abscess did not show uptake. Lesion/Nonlesion (L/N) ratio of SCLC (1.59±0.32) and NSCLC (1.43±0.19) tumour types did not show statistical difference (p>0.05). Tc-99m (V) DMSA whole body imaging also showed bone metastases. Conclusion: Tc-99m (V) DMSA is a noninvasive and cheap imaging method to detect malignant lung cancers and their bone metastases but, differentiation of SCLC and NSCLC is not possible. (orig.) [de

  8. Clinical importance and significance of early evaluation of therapy response in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesinger, F.; Baum, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    In solid tumors, especially in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the TNM staging is the only well defined pretherapeutic risk factor. TNM-staging has a significant impact on prognosis and survival and is used to determine therapeutic stratification. Although numerous molecular and immunologic pretherapeutic risk factors have been described in NSCLC, none of them has been translated into therapeutic stratification. Therefore, the identification of posttherapeutic risk factors in NSCLC is essential. Locally advanced NSCLC are currently treated with preoperative (neoadjuvant) induction regimens. It has been shown that systemic tumor control and long-term disease free survival is correlated with histologic tumor regression. First results are presented in this paper that PET may be highly predictive for histologic tumor regression and long term outcome in NSCLC stage III. These results may establish PET as the first noninvasive posttherapeutic risk factor in locally advanced NSCLC. (orig.) [de

  9. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  10. Long-Term Excess Mortality for Survivors of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.; van Steenbergen, Liza N.; Steyerberg, Ewout; Visser, Otto; De Ruysscher, Dirk K.; Groen, Harry J.

    Introduction: Most patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years after diagnosis. However, only little is known about those who have survived these first years. We aimed to study conditional 5-year relative survival rates for NSCLC patients during

  11. Cytokine single-nucleotide polymorphisms and risk of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ramírez, Cristina; Alnatsha, Ahmed; Cañadas-Garre, Marisa; Villar, Eduardo; Valdivia-Bautista, Javier; Faus-Dáder, María J; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Á

    2017-12-01

    Lung cancer, particularly the non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype, is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Several functional polymorphisms in inflammatory cytokine genes, such as IL1B, IL6, IL12A, IL13 and IL16, have been associated with the risk of NSCLC. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between ILs gene polymorphisms and the risk of developing NSCLC. A retrospective case-control study was carried out, including 174 NSCLC cases and 298 controls of Spanish origin. IL1B (rs1143634), IL1B (rs12621220), IL1B (rs1143623), IL1B (rs16944), IL1B (rs1143627), IL12A (rs662959), IL13 (rs1881457), IL6 (rs1800795) and IL16 (rs7170924) gene polymorphisms were analysed by TaqMan. The genotypic logistic regression model adjusted by smoking status showed that the IL1B rs1143634-TT genotype was associated with a lower risk of NSCLC (P=0.04312; odds ratio=0.226; 95% confidence interval=0.044-0.840). No other gene polymorphisms showed an association with NSCLC in any of the models tested. In conclusion, IL1B rs1143634 was significantly associated with a higher risk of NSCLC. No influence of IL1B rs12621220, rs1143623, rs16944, rs1143627, IL12A rs662959, IL13 rs1881457 and IL16 rs7170924 on the risk of developing NSCLC was found in our study.

  12. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detected on a lung CT scan. If your doctor finds another health problem, you may undergo further testing and, possibly, invasive treatments that wouldn't have been pursued if you hadn't had lung cancer ... need to: Inform your doctor if you have a respiratory tract infection. If ...

  13. Lung cancer imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Ravenel, James G

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a guide to the diagnosis, staging and overview of the management of lung cancer relevant to practicing radiologists so that they can better understand the decision making issues and provide more useful communication to treating physicians.

  14. Choice of Surgical Procedure for Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer ≤ 1 cm or > 1 to 2 cm Among Lobectomy, Segmentectomy, and Wedge Resection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Chenyang; Shen, Jianfei; Ren, Yijiu

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: According to the lung cancer staging project, T1a (≤ 2 cm) non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) should be additionally classified into ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm groups. This study aimed to investigate the surgical procedure for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. METHODS: We identified 15...... multiple prognostic factors. RESULTS: OS and LCSS favored lobectomy compared with segmentectomy or wedge resection in patients with NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. Multivariable analysis showed that segmentectomy and wedge resection were independently associated with poorer OS and LCSS than lobectomy...... for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm and > 1 to 2 cm. With sublobar resection, lower OS and LCSS emerged for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm after wedge resection, whereas similar survivals were observed for NSCLC ≤ 1 cm. Multivariable analyses showed that wedge resection is an independent risk factor of survival for NSCLC > 1 to 2 cm...

  15. Can Lung Nodules Be Cancerous?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung nodules be cancerous? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Yes, lung nodules can be cancerous, ... to determine if it's cancerous. With Eric J. Olson, M.D. AskMayoExpert. Pulmonary nodules. Rochester, Minn.: Mayo ...

  16. Radio(chemotherapy in locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Glatzer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitive radiochemotherapy is the standard treatment for many patients with locally advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Treatment outcomes have improved over the last decades. Several treatment regimens have been shown effective and safe. This review summarises the results of significant studies between 1996 and 2015 on concomitant and sequential radiochemotherapy regimens and radiation dose per fraction. Beside therapy regimens, optimised radiotherapy planning is indispensable to improve outcome and minimise radiation-induced toxicity. An insight into the rationale of radiotherapy planning for stage III NSCLC is also provided.

  17. Rare lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzinec, P.

    2013-01-01

    The RARECARE Project (Rare Cancers in the Europe) supported by the European Union defined the rare cancers by the incidence rate of less than 6/100 000. There are several variants of lung cancer which are rare according to this definition. From the clinical point of view the most interesting are the rare adenocarcinomas and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. There are important differences in the diagnostic probability of EGFR and ALK mutations in the mutinous and non-mucin ous adenocarcinomas, in the signet ring cell adenocarcinomas, and large cell carcinomas. The optimal chemotherapy for neuroendocrine large cell carcinomas remains undefined. There is only very limited number of clinical trials aimed on the rare lung cancers and actually none phase III trial. Rare lung cancers continue to be a challenge both for the laboratory and the clinical research. (author)

  18. Molecular imaging of hypoxia in non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yip, Connie; Blower, Philip J.; Goh, Vicky; Landau, David B.; Cook, Gary J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the commonest cancer worldwide but survival remains poor with a high risk of relapse, particularly after nonsurgical treatment. Hypoxia is present in a variety of solid tumours, including NSCLC. It is associated with treatment resistance and a poor prognosis, although when recognised may be amenable to different treatment strategies. Thus, noninvasive assessment of intratumoral hypoxia could be used to stratify patients for modification of subsequent treatment to improve tumour control. Molecular imaging approaches targeting hypoxic cells have shown some early success in the clinical setting. This review evaluates the evidence for hypoxia imaging using PET in NSCLC and explores its potential clinical utility. (orig.)

  19. Molecular imaging of hypoxia in non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Connie [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); National Cancer Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Singapore (Singapore); St Thomas' Hospital, Imaging 2, London (United Kingdom); Blower, Philip J. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Imaging Chemistry and Biology, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Goh, Vicky [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Radiology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Landau, David B. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Clinical Oncology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Cook, Gary J.R. [King' s College London, St Thomas' Hospital, Department of Cancer Imaging, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); St Thomas' Hospital, Clinical PET Imaging Centre, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the commonest cancer worldwide but survival remains poor with a high risk of relapse, particularly after nonsurgical treatment. Hypoxia is present in a variety of solid tumours, including NSCLC. It is associated with treatment resistance and a poor prognosis, although when recognised may be amenable to different treatment strategies. Thus, noninvasive assessment of intratumoral hypoxia could be used to stratify patients for modification of subsequent treatment to improve tumour control. Molecular imaging approaches targeting hypoxic cells have shown some early success in the clinical setting. This review evaluates the evidence for hypoxia imaging using PET in NSCLC and explores its potential clinical utility. (orig.)

  20. The Role of Epigenetics in Resistance to Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Byrne, Kenneth J.; Barr, Martin P.; Gray, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer related death in the world. Cisplatin and carboplatin are the most commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents to treat the disease. These agents, usually combined with drugs such as gemcitabine or pemetrexed, induce objective tumor responses in only 20–30% of patients. Aberrant epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a frequent event in NSCLC. In this article we review the emerging evidence that epigenetics and the cellular machinery involved with this type of regulation may be key elements in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC

  1. The Role of Epigenetics in Resistance to Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Byrne, Kenneth J.; Barr, Martin P.; Gray, Steven G., E-mail: sgray@stjames.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James Hospital, James Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-03-17

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer related death in the world. Cisplatin and carboplatin are the most commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents to treat the disease. These agents, usually combined with drugs such as gemcitabine or pemetrexed, induce objective tumor responses in only 20–30% of patients. Aberrant epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a frequent event in NSCLC. In this article we review the emerging evidence that epigenetics and the cellular machinery involved with this type of regulation may be key elements in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC.

  2. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as tumor marker in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunnet, M; Sorensen, J B

    2012-05-01

    The use of CEA as a prognostic and predictive marker in patients with lung cancer is widely debated. The aim of this review was to evaluate the results from studies made on this subject. Using the search words "CEA", "tumor markers in lung cancer", "prognostic significance", "diagnostic significance" and "predictive significance", a search was carried out on PubMed. Exclusion criteria was articles never published in English, articles before 1981 and articles evaluating tumor markers in lung cancer not involving CEA. Initially 217 articles were found, and 34 were left after selecting those relevant for the present study. Four of these included both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) patients, and 31 dealt solely with NSCLC patients. Regarding SCLC no studies showed that serum level of CEA was a prognostic marker for overall survival (OS). The use of CEA serum level as a prognostic marker in NSCLC was investigated in 23 studies and the use of CEA plasma level in two. In 18 (17 serum, 1 plasma) of these studies CEA was found to be a useful prognostic marker for either OS, recurrence after surgery or/and progression free survival (PFS) in NSCLC patients. Interestingly, an overweight of low stage (stage I-II) disease and adenocarcinoma (AC) patients were observed in this group. The remaining 7 studies (6 serum, 1 plasma) contained an overweight of patients with squamous carcinoma (SQ). One study found evidence for that a tumor marker index (TMI), based on preoperative CEA and CYFRA21-1 serum levels, is useful as a prognostic marker for OS in NSCLC. Six studies evaluated the use of CEA as a predictive marker for risk of recurrence and risk of death in NSCLC patients. Four of these studies found, that CEA was useful as a predictive marker for risk of recurrence and risk of death measured over time. No studies found CEA levels useful as a diagnostic marker for lung cancer. With regard to NSCLC the level of CEA measured in tumor tissue in

  3. The next generation of immunotherapy: keeping lung cancer in check

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Somasundaram

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung cancer is the deadliest malignancy with more cancer deaths per year than the next three cancers combined. Despite remarkable advances in targeted therapy, advanced lung cancer patients have not experienced a significant improvement in mortality. Lung cancer has been shown to be immunogenic and responsive to checkpoint blockade therapy. Checkpoint signals such as CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 dampen T cell activation and allow tumors to escape the adaptive immune response. Response rates in patients with pretreated, advanced NSCLC were much higher and more durable with PD-1 blockade therapy compared to standard-of-care, cytotoxic chemotherapy. Therefore, PD-1 inhibitors such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab were rapidly approved for both squamous and nonsquamous lung cancer in the pretreated population. The advent of these new therapies have revolutionized the treatment of lung cancer; however, the majority of NSCLC patients still do not respond to PD-1/PD-L1 inhibition leaving an unmet need for a large and growing population. Immunotherapy combinations with chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or novel immunomodulatory agents are currently being examined with the hope of achieving higher response rates and improving overall survival rate. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy has been theorized to increase the release of tumor antigen leading to increased responses with immunotherapy. However, cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation therapy may also destroy actively proliferating T cells. The correct combination and order of therapy is under investigation. The majority of patients who do respond to immunotherapy have a durable response attributed to the effect of adaptive immune system’s memory. Unfortunately, some patients’ tumors do progress afterward and investigation of checkpoint blockade resistance is still nascent. This review will summarize the latest efficacy and safety data for early and advanced NSCLC in both the treatment-naïve and

  4. Bmi-1 expression modulates non-small cell lung cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Dan; Ye, Yunlin; Fu, Yujie; Wang, Jinglong; Kuang, Bohua; Wang, Hongbo; Wang, Xiumin; Zu, Lidong; Xiao, Gang; Hao, Mingang; Wang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the role of B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1) is responsible for multiple cancer progression. However, Bmi-1 in controlling gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) development is not well explored. Here we report that the Bmi-1 level is highly increased in primary NSCLC tissues compared to matched adjacent non-cancerous tissues and required for lung tumor growth in xenograft model. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that Bmi-1 level is lower in matched involved lymph node cancerous tissues than the respective primary NSCLC tissues. We find that Bmi-1 does not affect cell cycle and apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines as it does not affect the expression of p16/p19, Pten, AKT and P-AKT. Mechanistic analyses note that reduction of Bmi-1 expression inversely regulates invasion and metastasis of NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo, followed by induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Using genome microarray assays, we find that RNAi-mediated silence of Bmi-1 modulates some important molecular genetics or signaling pathways, potentially associated with NSCLC development. Taken together, our findings disclose for the first time that Bmi-1 level accumulates strongly in early stage and then declines in late stage, which is potentially important for NSCLC cell invasion and metastasis during progression. PMID:25880371

  5. Lung Cancer Survivorship

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-20

    A lung cancer survivor shares her story about diagnosis, treatment, and community support. She also gives advice for other cancer survivors.  Created: 10/20/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/20/2016.

  6. 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) as a molecular marker of hypoxia in non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathmaraj, K.; Foo, S.; Sachinidis, J.; Scott, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: FMISO is a hypoxic marker with the potential ability to predict tumour resistance to chemoradiation. We present preliminary findings from pilot studies to determine the significance of FMISO Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in NSCLC. We are currently studying 2 cohorts of patients with NSCLC and a case study will be presented from each cohort. Patients in the first cohort have surgically resectable tumours: we aim to evaluate the extent of intratumoural hypoxia preoperatively and then validate and correlate this at a molecular level. Patients in the second cohort have locally advanced disease being treated with radiotherapy and will have pretreatment and sequential FMISO-PET scans. Mr GH, a 51 year old man presented with a suspicious lesion in the right upper lobe of the lung. Biopsy was non diagnostic and a FDG-PET scan showed a hypermetabolic focus in the right upper lobe highly indicative of malignancy. The FMISO-PET scan showed a small hypoxic area in the right upper lobe of the lung. The FDG-PET and FMISO-PET images were coregistered and the hypoxic focus correlated well with the hypermetabolic FDG focus. Wedge resection demonstrated moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Mr JS was a 61-year-old male with stage III inoperable NSCLC. CT scan showed extensive disease around the left lung hilum with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. The FDG-PET scan showed metabolic findings consistent with a large necrotic malignancy in the left lung with left hilar and mediastinal nodal involvement. FMISO uptake was observed in the left lung hilum corresponding to the areas of FDG uptake. A subsequent FMISO-PET study midway through his radiotherapy showed decreased tracer concentration in the left hilar region with a suggestion of cystic changes inferiorly to the hilum. To our knowledge, there has been no correlation of FMISO-PET studies with molecular markers of hypoxia. This pilot study will be important in confirming FMISO-PET studies as a feasible non invasive

  7. Staging of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Betancourt Cuellar, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J

    2015-06-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. Thorough clinical staging of patients with lung cancer is important, because therapeutic options and management are to a considerable degree dependent on stage at presentation. Radiologic imaging is an essential component of clinical staging, including chest radiography in some cases, computed tomography, MRI, and PET. Multiplanar imaging modalities allow assessment of features that are important for surgical, oncologic, and radiation therapy planning, including size of the primary tumor, location and relationship to normal anatomic structures in the thorax, and existence of nodal and/or metastatic disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b Is Involved in Icotinib (BPI-2009H)-Induced Apoptosis and G1 Phase Arrest of EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mu, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ye; Qu, Xiujuan; Hou, Kezuo; Kang, Jian; Hu, Xuejun; Liu, Yunpeng

    2013-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is one of the most promising targets for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Icotinib, a highly selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI), has shown promising clinical efficacy and safety in patients with NSCLC. The exact molecular mechanism of icotinib remains unclear. In this study, we first investigated the antiproliferative effect of icotinib on NSCLC cells. Icotinib significantly inhibited proliferation of the EGFR-mutated lung cancer HCC...

  9. Incidence and survival from lung cancer in Greenland is comparable to survival in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelvan, Allan; Risum, Signe; Langer, Seppo W

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Oncological treatment of lung cancer has been available in Greenland since 2004. We evaluated patient characteristics and survival rates for the first six years of local lung cancer treatment. METHODS: From September 2004 to August 2010, a total of 173 patients with lung cancer were...... referred to treatment at Queen Ingrid's Hospital. On 1 February 2014, treatment results, survival, and prognostic variables were analysed. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 63 years. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was diagnosed in 145 patients (84%); 56% had squamous cell carcinoma, 34% had...... adenocarcinoma, 2% had large cell carcinoma and 8% had NSCLC not otherwise specified (NOS). In all, 28 (16%) had small cell lung cancer. A total of 142 patients (82%) received treatment; 20 underwent surgery (ten stage Ib, one stage IIa, five stage IIb, four stage IIIa); palliative chemotherapy was given to 122...

  10. Enhanced Heme Function and Mitochondrial Respiration Promote the Progression of Lung Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M.; Sullivan, Laura A.; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  11. The miR-599 promotes non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion via SATB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Wenjun; Wang, Guanghai; Liu, Yiqing; Huang, Zhenglan; Zhang, Caiqing; Ning, Kang; Yu, Cuixiang; Shen, Yajuan; Wang, Minghui; Li, Yuantang; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Bingchang; Zhao, Yaoran

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. Here, we identified that miR-599 is up-regulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It promoted NSCLC cell proliferation by negatively regulating SATB2. In NSCLC cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation is promoted by miR-599 mimics. Transwell assay showed that miR-599 mimics promoted the invasion and migration of NSCLC cells. Luciferase assays confirmed that miR-599 directly binds to the 3'untranslated region of SATB2, and western blotting showed that miR-599 suppresses the expression of SATB2 at the protein level. This study indicates that miR-599 promotes proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cell lines via SATB2. The miR-599 may represent a potential therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment. - Highlights: • miR-599 is up-regulated in NSCLC. • miR-599 promotes the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-599 inhibitors inhibits the proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cells. • miR-599 targets 3′ UTR of SATB2 in NSCLC cells. • miR-599 inhibits SATB2 in NSCLC cells.

  12. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. © 2015 UICC.

  13. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  14. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  15. Studies on mRNA expression of the somatostatin receptor family in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Deng Jinglan; Wu Shengxi; Qiao Hongqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the characteristics of expression and distribution of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR1∼5) in lung cancer. Methods: With [α- 35 S]dATP labelled oligonucleotides of the 5 SSTR subtypes as probes, using in situ hybridization, patterns of mRNA expression were detected in lung cancer tissue sections of 21 cases which fell in varied pathologic types. Additionally, Leica Q-500 image analyzing device was employed to semi-quantitatively analyze density of the expression. Results: Patterns of SSTR1∼5 expression in lung cancer were as follows: SSTR2 expression was dominant in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) while in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) such as adenous and squamous, SSTR1 expression was stronger than that of the other 4 subtypes, In density of SSTR1∼5 expression in lung cancer, NSCLC was higher than SCLC (P<0.01). Conclusions: even though patterns and density of expression of SSTR subtypes in the lung cancer showed heterogeneity in different histopathologic types, as in SCLC and in NSCLC. Therefore, it has positive prospects for somatostatin analog-oriented agents to be used in treatment of both types of the lung cancers

  16. Identification of Reprogrammed Myeloid Cell Transcriptomes in NSCLC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Durrans

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as the most prevalent form. Despite advances in treatment options including minimally invasive surgery, CT-guided radiation, novel chemotherapeutic regimens, and targeted therapeutics, prognosis remains dismal. Therefore, further molecular analysis of NSCLC is necessary to identify novel molecular targets that impact prognosis and the design of new-targeted therapies. In recent years, tumor "activated/reprogrammed" stromal cells that promote carcinogenesis have emerged as potential therapeutic targets. However, the contribution of stromal cells to NSCLC is poorly understood. Here, we show increased numbers of bone marrow (BM-derived hematopoietic cells in the tumor parenchyma of NSCLC patients compared with matched adjacent non-neoplastic lung tissue. By sorting specific cellular fractions from lung cancer patients, we compared the transcriptomes of intratumoral myeloid compartments within the tumor bed with their counterparts within adjacent non-neoplastic tissue from NSCLC patients. The RNA sequencing of specific myeloid compartments (immature monocytic myeloid cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils identified differentially regulated genes and mRNA isoforms, which were inconspicuous in whole tumor analysis. Genes encoding secreted factors, including osteopontin (OPN, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 7 (CCL7 and thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 were identified, which enhanced tumorigenic properties of lung cancer cells indicative of their potential as targets for therapy. This study demonstrates that analysis of homogeneous stromal populations isolated directly from fresh clinical specimens can detect important stromal genes of therapeutic value.

  17. Lung cancer screening: Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyea Young [Dept. of Radiology, Center for Lung Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers.

  18. Lung cancer screening: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyea Young

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide as well as in Korea. A recent National Lung Screening Trial in U.S. revealed that low-dose CT (LDCT) screening reduced lung cancer specific mortality by 20% in high risk individuals as compared to chest radiograph screening. Based on this evidence, several expert societies in U.S. and Korean multisociety collaborative committee developed guidelines for recommendation of lung cancer screening using annual LDCT in high risk populations. In most of the societies high risk groups are defined as persons aged 55 to 74 years, who are current smokers with history of smoking of more than 30 packs per year or ex-smokers, who quit smoking up to 15 or more years ago. The benefits of LDCT screening are modestly higher than the harms in high risk individuals. The harms included a high rate of false-positive findings, over-diagnosis and radiation-related deaths. Invasive diagnostic procedure due to false positive findings may lead to complications. LDCT should be performed in qualified hospitals and interpreted by expert radiologists. Recently, the American College of Radiology released the current version of Lung cancer CT screening Reporting and Data Systems. Education and actions to stop smoking must be offered to current smokers

  19. Downregulated TIPE2 is associated with poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yuexia; Li, Xiaohui; Liu, Gang; Sun, Rongqing; Wang, Lirui; Wang, Jing; Wang, Hongmin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • TIPE2 is down-regulated in NSCLC tissues. • TIPE2 inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • TIPE2 reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. - Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the expression pattern of TIPE2 protein and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated the expression levels of TIPE2 in 96 NSCLC tumor samples by immunohistochemistry and then analyzed its clinical significance. Furthermore, the role of TIPE2 on the biological properties of the NSCLC cell line H1299 and A549 was experimentally tested in vitro and in vivo. We found that the expression level of TIPE2 was significantly higher in normal lung tissues compared with NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), and TIPE2 downregulation was significantly correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006). TIPE2 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TIPE2 plasmid was performed in H1299 and A549 cells. TIPE2 overexpression inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasive in vitro, and prevented lung tumor growth in vivo. In addition, TIPE2 transfection reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TIPE2 might serve as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC progression

  20. Downregulated TIPE2 is associated with poor prognosis and promotes cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yuexia [Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Li, Xiaohui [Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Henan Provincial People’s Hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan 450003 (China); Liu, Gang; Sun, Rongqing; Wang, Lirui [Intensive Care Unit, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Wang, Jing, E-mail: jing_wang1980@163.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China); Wang, Hongmin, E-mail: hmwangzz@126.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan 450052 (China)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • TIPE2 is down-regulated in NSCLC tissues. • TIPE2 inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion. • TIPE2 reduces the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. - Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the expression pattern of TIPE2 protein and its clinical significance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated the expression levels of TIPE2 in 96 NSCLC tumor samples by immunohistochemistry and then analyzed its clinical significance. Furthermore, the role of TIPE2 on the biological properties of the NSCLC cell line H1299 and A549 was experimentally tested in vitro and in vivo. We found that the expression level of TIPE2 was significantly higher in normal lung tissues compared with NSCLC tissues (P < 0.001), and TIPE2 downregulation was significantly correlated with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.006). TIPE2 expression was lower in lung cancer cell lines than normal bronchial cell line HBE. Transfection of TIPE2 plasmid was performed in H1299 and A549 cells. TIPE2 overexpression inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation, colony formation and cell invasive in vitro, and prevented lung tumor growth in vivo. In addition, TIPE2 transfection reduced the anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL protein and mesenchymal marker N-cadherin expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that TIPE2 might serve as a tumor suppressor in NSCLC progression.

  1. Preanalytics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Arne; Muley, Thomas; Meister, Michael; Weichert, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    Preanalytic sampling techniques and preparation of tissue specimens strongly influence analytical results in lung tissue diagnostics both on the morphological but also on the molecular level. However, in contrast to analytics where tremendous achievements in the last decade have led to a whole new portfolio of test methods, developments in preanalytics have been minimal. This is specifically unfortunate in lung cancer, where usually only small amounts of tissue are at hand and optimization in all processing steps is mandatory in order to increase the diagnostic yield. In the following, we provide a comprehensive overview on some aspects of preanalytics in lung cancer from the method of sampling over tissue processing to its impact on analytical test results. We specifically discuss the role of preanalytics in novel technologies like next-generation sequencing and in the state-of the-art cytology preparations. In addition, we point out specific problems in preanalytics which hamper further developments in the field of lung tissue diagnostics.

  2. Expression of the somatostatin receptor family mRNAs in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jing; Wang Liangang; Deng Jinglan; Wu Shengxi

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of expression and distribution of 5 subtypes of somatostatin receptors (SSTR1-5) in lung cancer, in situ hybridization was used to examine the expression patterns of SSTR mRNAs in 21 cases of different pathologic types of lung cancer tissues with [α- 35 S]dATP labelled oligonucleotides of the 5 SSTR subtypes as probes. Additionally, Leica Q-500 image analysis processing system was employed for the semi-quantitatively analysis of the hybridization signals. Patterns of SSTR1-5 expression in lung cancer tissues were found as follows. SSTR2 was prominent in small cell lung cancer (SCLC), whereas in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) including the adenous cancer (Ad) and the squamous cancer (Sq), the expression of SSTR1 mRNA was stronger than that of the other 4 types. the expression density of SSTR1-5 in the NSCLC was higher that the SCLC (p < 0.01). The expression patterns and densities of the SSTR subtypes showed heterogeneity in different pathologic types of lung cancer. The expressions of the SSTR mRNAs in both SCLC and NSCLC indicated the positive prospects for somatostatin analog (SSA)-oriented agents in the treatment of both types of the lung cancer

  3. A Case Study in Advanced Lung Cancer Patients with Vimentin Over Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Nagla A; Eldessouki, Ihab; Yellu, Mahendar; Namad, Tariq; Wang, Jiang; Gaber, Ola

    2017-10-01

    Vimentin belongs to an intermediate filament (IF) family of proteins, mainly present in mesenchymal cells and has a crucial role in maintaining cellular integrity. Vimentin can induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition, and thus increase migration and invasion capacity of the cells. It has been shown to be a useful and reliable diagnostic and prognostic marker in several cancers including colon cancers, breast and hepatocellular cancers. Recent studies suggest that it may have a role in distant metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounting for poor survival [1]. The aim of the study is to assess the impact of vimentin testing as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in NSCLC. This is a case study of 12 NSCLC patients who had vimentin testing as a part of their work up over the past five years at the University of Cincinnati. A total of 12 patients with advanced lung cancer were included in this case study as they were found to have strong vimentin expression. This was correlated with overall survival of this group of patients. Median survival of the patients was 4.66 months. This is 7.34 months less compared to the median survival of patients with stage IV NSCLC which is reported to be 12 months. More studies are warranted into the use of vimentin as an emerging useful marker for early diagnosis, aggressive transformation relapse, and prognostication of NSCLC. It may have therapeutic value in NSCLC as observed in other cancers.

  4. Impact of Neuro-Psychological Factors on Smoking-Associated Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuller, Hildegard M. [Experimental Oncology Laboratory, Department of Biomedical and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, 2407 River Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    Smoking has been extensively documented as a risk factor for all histological types of lung cancer and tobacco-specific nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons reproducibly cause lung cancer in laboratory rodents. However, the most common lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), frequently develops in never smokers and is particularly common in women and African Americans, suggesting that factors unrelated to smoking significantly impact this cancer. Recent experimental investigations in vitro and in animal models have shown that chronic psychological stress and the associated hyperactive signaling of stress neurotransmitters via β-adrenergic receptors significantly promote the growth and metastatic potential of NSCLC. These responses were caused by modulation in the expression and sensitization state of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that regulate the production of stress neurotransmitters and the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Similar changes in nAChR-mediated neurotransmitter production were identified as the cause of NSCLC stimulation in vitro and in xenograft models by chronic nicotine. Collectively, these data suggest that hyperactivity of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system caused by chronic psychological stress or chronic exposure to nicotinic agonists in cigarette smoke significantly contribute to the development and progression of NSCLC. A recent clinical study that reported improved survival outcomes with the incidental use of β-blockers among patients with NSCLC supports this interpretation.

  5. Distribution and mRNA Expression of BAMBI in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen MIAO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective BAMBI structure is similar with that of the receptor Ⅰof TGF-β, it broadly participates in the control of TGF-β signaling. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression and its significance of BAMBI in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and explore the relation between BAMBI and clinical and pathological factors of NSCLC. Methods Sixty-three cases with NSCLC and adjacent normal tissue specimens were used for immunohistochemical assay. Thirty-one fresh lung cancer tissue specimens and surrounding normal lung tissue specimens was preserved for RT-PCR in -70 ℃ after quick-frozen in liquid nitrogen immediately. Results The level of BAMBI mRNA in cancer tissues was higher than that in the corresponding adjacent tissues (0.358±0.135 vs 0.249±0.129, with the difference being statistically significant (P =0.003. BAMBI protein expressed mainly in the membrane and the cytoplasm close to the membrane, its expression in the cancer tissue was higher than that in the adjacent tissues, the difference was significant (P <0.01. Expression of BAMBI in the cancer tissue was higher than that in the adjacent tissues, and the expression of BAMBI in adenocarcinoma of lung is higher than that in squamous carcinoma. Conclusion The expressions of BAMBI significantly increase in NSCLC. It might be a common affair in carcinogenesis of NSCLC.

  6. Impact of Neuro-Psychological Factors on Smoking-Associated Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, Hildegard M.

    2014-01-01

    Smoking has been extensively documented as a risk factor for all histological types of lung cancer and tobacco-specific nitrosamines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons reproducibly cause lung cancer in laboratory rodents. However, the most common lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), frequently develops in never smokers and is particularly common in women and African Americans, suggesting that factors unrelated to smoking significantly impact this cancer. Recent experimental investigations in vitro and in animal models have shown that chronic psychological stress and the associated hyperactive signaling of stress neurotransmitters via β-adrenergic receptors significantly promote the growth and metastatic potential of NSCLC. These responses were caused by modulation in the expression and sensitization state of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) that regulate the production of stress neurotransmitters and the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Similar changes in nAChR-mediated neurotransmitter production were identified as the cause of NSCLC stimulation in vitro and in xenograft models by chronic nicotine. Collectively, these data suggest that hyperactivity of the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system caused by chronic psychological stress or chronic exposure to nicotinic agonists in cigarette smoke significantly contribute to the development and progression of NSCLC. A recent clinical study that reported improved survival outcomes with the incidental use of β-blockers among patients with NSCLC supports this interpretation

  7. MiR-122 Induces Radiosensitization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debin Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available MiR-122 is a novel tumor suppresser and its expression induces cell cycle arrest, or apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation in multiple cancer cells, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cells. Radioresistance of cancer cell leads to the major drawback of radiotherapy for NSCLC and the induction of radiosensitization could be a useful strategy to fix this problem. The present work investigates the function of miR-122 in inducing radiosensitization in A549 cell, a type of NSCLC cells. MiR-122 induces the radiosensitization of A549 cells. MiR-122 also boosts the inhibitory activity of ionizing radiation (IR on cancer cell anchor-independent growth and invasion. Moreover, miR-122 reduced the expression of its targeted genes related to tumor-survival or cellular stress response. These results indicate that miR-122 would be a novel strategy for NSCLC radiation-therapy.

  8. Lung Cancer Precision Medicine Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients with lung cancer are benefiting from the boom in targeted and immune-based therapies. With a series of precision medicine trials, NCI is keeping pace with the rapidly changing treatment landscape for lung cancer.

  9. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in women. Different factors increase or decrease the risk of lung cancer. Anything that increases your chance ... been studied to see if they decrease the risk of dying from lung cancer. The following screening ...

  10. Exercise and relaxation intervention for patients with advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Stage, M; Laursen, J

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer patients experience loss of physical capacity, dyspnea, pain, reduced energy and psychological distress. The aim of this study was to explore feasibility, health benefits and barriers of exercise in former sedentary patients with advanced stage lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer...... (NSCLC) (III-IV) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) (ED), undergoing chemotherapy. The intervention consisted of a hospital-based, supervised, group exercise and relaxation program comprising resistance-, cardiovascular- and relaxation training 4 h weekly, 6 weeks, and a concurrent unsupervised home......-based exercise program. An explorative study using individual semi-structured interviews (n=15) and one focus group interview (n=8) was conducted among the participants. Throughout the intervention the patients experienced increased muscle strength, improvement in wellbeing, breathlessness and energy. The group...

  11. National Working Group Meeting on ALK diagnostics in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wendy; Fox, Stephen; O'Toole, Sandra; Morey, Adrienne; Frances, Glenn; Pavlakis, Nick; O'Byrne, Kenneth; Dettrick, Andrew; Leong, Trishe; Rathi, Vivek; Spagnolo, Dominic; Hemmings, Chris; Singh, Mahendra; Moffat, David; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Wilner, Keith; Buller, Richard; Pitman Lowenthal, Susan; Arifeen, Shams; Binko, Justin; Alam, Mahmood

    2014-04-01

    The global landscape of molecular testing is rapidly changing, with the recent publication of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC)/College of American Pathologists (CAP) guidelines and the ALK Atlas. The IASLC/CAP guidelines recommend that tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) be tested for ALK rearrangements in addition to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. The spur for this recommendation is the availability of novel therapies that target these rearrangements. This article is based on coverage of a Pfizer-sponsored National Working Group Meeting on ALK Diagnostics in Lung Cancer, held around the 15th World Lung Cancer Conference, in Sydney on October 31, 2013. It is based on the presentations given by the authors at the meeting and the discussion that ensued. The content for this article was discussed and agreed on by the authors. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  13. [Expression and clinical significance of Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhihong; Wang, Shengfa; Zhang, Tiewa

    2007-12-20

    Proto-oncogene Pokemon is the special transcription inhibitor of ARF,which can regulate cell growth and differentiation by ARF-P53 path.It may be the important monitoring target of tumor because of being upstream region of many tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes.The aim of this study is to explore the clinical significance of Pokemon gene in non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). Immunohistochemistry was applied to detect the expression of Pokemon protein in 92 cases of NSCLC and 20 cases of paracancerous lung tissues.Correlation between abnormal expression of Pokemon with pathologic characteristics and prognosis of NSCLC was analyzed. Pokemon was not expressed in paracancerous lung tissues and was found in 66 of 92(71.7%) cases of lung cancer tissues.Expression of Pokemon was closely related to TNM stages(P=0.011).Survival rate of patients with negative Pokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression(P=0.0015).Pokemon expression was demonstrated as independent prognostic factor of NSCLC. Pokemon is expressed in NSCLC and it may be identified as a new diagnostic marker.High expression of Pokemon may indicate poor prognosis of patients with NSCLC.

  14. P38 pathway as a key downstream signal of connective tissue growth factor to regulate metastatic potential in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Satoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Li, Luhui; Iwakami, Yusuke; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Saiki, Ikuo

    2016-10-01

    Although the secretory matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported to be related to lung cancer metastasis, the precise mechanism by which CTGF regulates lung cancer metastasis has not been elucidated. In the present study, we show the molecular link between CTGF secretion and the p38 pathway in the invasive and metastatic potential of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among three different human NSCLC cell lines (PC-14, A549, and PC-9), their in vitro invasiveness was inversely correlated with the level of CTGF secretion. By supplementing or reducing CTGF secretion in NSCLC culture, dysregulation of the invasive and metastatic potential of NSCLC cell lines was largely compensated. By focusing on the protein kinases that are known to be regulated by CTGF, we found that the p38 pathway is a key downstream signal of CTGF to regulate the metastatic potential of NSCLC. Importantly, a negative correlation between CTGF and phosphorylation status of p38 was identified in The Cancer Genome Atlas lung adenocarcinoma dataset. In the context of the clinical importance of our findings, we showed that p38 inhibitor, SB203580, reduced the metastatic potential of NSCLC secreting low levels of CTGF. Collectively, our present findings indicate that the CTGF/p38 axis is a novel therapeutic target of NSCLC metastasis, particularly NSCLC secreting low levels of CTGF. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Factors affecting 30-month survival in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahesh, P A; Archana, S; Jayaraj, B S; Patil, Shekar; Chaya, S K; Shashidhar, H P; Sunitha, B S; Prabhakar, A K

    2012-10-01

    Age adjusted incidence rate of lung cancer in India ranges from 7.4 to 13.1 per 100,000 among males and 3.9 to 5.8 per 100,000 among females. The factors affecting survival in lung cancer patients in India are not fully understood. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the factors affecting survival in patients diagnosed with lung cancer attending a tertiary care cancer institute in Bangalore, Karnataka, India. Consecutive patients with primary lung cancer attending Bangalore Institute of Oncology, a tertiary care centre at Bangalore, between 2006 and 2009 were included. Demographic, clinical, radiological data were collected retrospectively from the medical records. A total of 170 consecutive subjects (128 males, 42 females) diagnosed to have lung cancer; 151 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 19 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) were included. A higher proportion of never-smokers (54.1%) were observed, mostly presenting below the age of 60 yr. Most subjects were in stage IV and III at the time of diagnosis. More than 50 per cent of patients presented with late stage lung cancer even though the duration of symptoms is less than 2 months. The 30-month overall survival rates for smokers and never-smokers were 32 and 49 per cent, respectively. No significant differences were observed in 30 month survival based on age at presentation, gender and type of lung cancer. Cox proportional hazards model identified never-smokers and duration of symptoms less than 1 month as factors adversely affecting survival. Our results showed that lung cancer in Indians involved younger subjects and associated with poorer survival as compared to other ethnic population. Studies on large sample need to be done to evaluate risk factors in lung cancer patients.

  16. Quality-of-care indicators for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanvetyanon, Tawee

    2009-10-01

    Quality-of-care indicators are measurable elements of practice performance that can be used to assess the quality or change in quality of the care provided. To date, the literature on quality-of-care indicators for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not been reviewed. A search was performed to identify articles reporting on quality-of-care indicators specific for NSCLC published from January 2003 to May 2009 (using MEDLINE and American Society of Clinical Oncology abstract databases). Web sites of major quality care organizations were also searched. The identified indicators were then classified by their aspect of care provision (structure-of-care, process-of-care, or outcome-of-care indicator). For structure-of-care quality indicators, the most cited indicators were related to the quality of lung surgery. These included being National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers or high-volume hospitals. For process-of-care quality indicators, the most common indicators were the receipt of surgery for early-stage NSCLC and the administration of chemotherapy for advanced-stage NSCLC. For outcome-of-care quality indicators, the most cited indicators were related to postoperative morbidity or mortality after lung surgery. Several quality-of-care indicators for NSCLC are available. Process-of-care indicators are the most studied. The use of these indicators to measure practice performance holds the promise of improving outcomes of patients with NSCLC.

  17. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Lung Cancer Oncogenotype-Selective Drug Target Discovery (Natural Products Focus) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use small molecules and RNAi to functionally define subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a panel of cell lines prepared and molecularly annotated by Drs. John Minna and Adi Gazdar. Experimental Approaches Lung Cancer Natural Products Screening/Chemical Library Screening

  18. Postoperative radiotherapy for lung cancer: Is it worth the controversy?

    OpenAIRE

    Billiet, Charlotte; Peeters, Stephanie; Decaluwe, Herbert; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Mebis, Jeroen; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pathologically involved mediastinal lymph nodes (N2) remains unclear. Despite a reduction of local recurrence (LR), its effect on overall survival (OS) remains unproven. Therefore we conducted a review of the current literature. Methods: To investigate the benefit and safety of modern PORT, we identified published phase III trials for PORT. We investiga...

  19. Decision support systems for incurable non-small cell lung cancer : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Révész, D; Engelhardt, E G; Tamminga, J J; Schramel, Franz M N H; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; van de Garde, E M W; Steyerberg, E.W.; Jansma, E P; de Vet, Henrica C W; Coupé, V.M.H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individually tailored cancer treatment is essential to ensure optimal treatment and resource use. Treatments for incurable metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving rapidly, and decision support systems (DSS) for this patient population have been developed to balance

  20. Decision support systems for incurable non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Révész, D. (D.); Engelhardt, E.G. (E. G.); Tamminga, J.J. (J. J.); F.M.N.H. Schramel (Franz); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); E.M.W. van de Garde (Ewoudt); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Jansma, E.P. (E. P.); H.C. de Vet (Henrica C); V.M.H. Coupé (Veerle)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Individually tailored cancer treatment is essential to ensure optimal treatment and resource use. Treatments for incurable metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving rapidly, and decision support systems (DSS) for this patient population have been developed to

  1. Clinical Application of 18F-FDG PET in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Joon Young

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on the clinical use of 18 F-FDG PET to evaluate solitary pulmonary nodule (SPN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). When SPN or mass without calcification is found on chest X-ray or CT, 18 F-FDG PET is an effective modality to differentiate benign from malignant lesions. For initial staging of NSCLC, 18 F-FDG PET is useful, and proved to be cost-effective in several countries. 18 F-FDG PET is useful for detecting recurrence, restaging and evaluating residual tumor after curative therapy in NSCLC. For therapy response assessment, 18 F-FDG PET may be effective after chemotherapy or radiation therapy. 18 F-FDG PET is useful to predict pathological response after neoadjuvant therapy in NSCLC. For radiation therapy planning, 18 F-FDG PET may be helpful, but requires further investigations. PET/CT is better for evaluating NSCLC than conventional PET

  2. An active treatment of lung adenocarcinoma cancer with brain metastases: icotinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang, Huaping Tang, Jun Li, Meng Li Department of Respiration Medicine, Municipal Hospital, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers world­wide. A total of 70%–75% of all lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with two-thirds presenting with locally advanced or metastatic disease at diagnosis. Brain metastasis is one of the most common problems in the management of NSCLC, worsening the prognosis and quality of life of NSCLC patients. The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs gefitinib and erlotinib have been tested in patients with NSCLC and brain metastasis. Icotinib is a new type of oral EGFR-TKI. In this report, we describe a patient with lung adenocarcinoma cancer with brain metastases who received icotinib treatment and kept satisfactory health-related quality of life for 1 year. Keywords: EGFR, non-small cell lung cancer, tyrosine kinase inhibitor

  3. Genomic profiling toward precision medicine in non-small cell lung cancer: getting beyond EGFR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richer AL

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Amanda L Richer,1 Jacqueline M Friel,1 Vashti M Carson,2 Landon J Inge,1 Timothy G Whitsett2 1Norton Thoracic Institute, St Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, 2Cancer and Cell Biology Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The application of next-generation genomic technologies has offered a more comprehensive look at the mutational landscape across the different subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. A number of recurrent mutations such as TP53, KRAS, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR have been identified in NSCLC. While targeted therapeutic successes have been demonstrated in the therapeutic targeting of EGFR and ALK, the majority of NSCLC tumors do not harbor these genomic events. This review looks at the current treatment paradigms for lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas, examining genomic aberrations that dictate therapy selection, as well as novel therapeutic strategies for tumors harboring mutations in KRAS, TP53, and LKB1 which, to date, have been considered “undruggable”. A more thorough understanding of the molecular alterations that govern NSCLC tumorigenesis, aided by next-generation sequencing, will lead to targeted therapeutic options expected to dramatically reduce the high mortality rate observed in lung cancer. Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, precision medicine, epidermal growth factor receptor, Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog, serine/threonine kinase 11, tumor protein p53

  4. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... that the plasminogen activation system could play a role in this type of cancer during invasion. In addition a difference in the levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in NSCLC and SCLC is found, which could contribute to the differences in biology....

  5. Loss of Bad expression confers poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi; Liu, Dan; Chen, Bojiang; Zeng, Jing; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shangfu; Mo, Xianming; Li, Weimin

    2012-09-01

    Proapoptotic BH-3-only protein Bad (Bcl-Xl/Bcl-2-associated death promoter homolog, Bad) initiates apoptosis in human cells, and contributes to tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistant in malignancies. This study explored association between the Bad expression level and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, a cohort of 88 resected primary NSCLC cases were collected and analyzed. Bad expression level was determined via immunohistochemical staining assay. The prognostic significances of Bad expression were evaluated with univariate and multivariate survival analysis. The results showed that compared with normal lung tissues, Bad expression level significantly decreased in NSCLC (P Bad expression was associated with adjuvant therapy status. Loss of Bad independently predicted poor prognosis in whole NSCLC cohort and early stage subjects (T1 + T2 and N0 + N1) (all P Bad negative phenotype in NSCLC patients with smoking history, especially lung squamous cell carcinoma (all P Bad is an independent and powerful predictor of adverse prognosis in NSCLC. Bad protein could be a new biomarker for selecting individual therapy strategies and predicting therapeutic response in subjects with NSCLC.

  6. Disparities in the treatment and outcomes of lung cancer among HIV-infected individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suneja, Gita; Shiels, Meredith S.; Melville, Sharon K.; Williams, Melanie A.; Rengan, Ramesh; Engels, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives HIV-infected people have elevated risk for lung cancer and higher mortality following cancer diagnosis than HIV-uninfected individuals. It is unclear whether HIV-infected individuals with lung cancer receive similar cancer treatment as HIV-uninfected individuals. Design/methods We studied adults more than 18 years of age with lung cancer reported to the Texas Cancer Registry (N = 156 930) from 1995 to 2009. HIV status was determined by linkage with the Texas enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System. For nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases, we identified predictors of cancer treatment using logistic regression. We used Cox regression to evaluate effects of HIV and cancer treatment on mortality. Results Compared with HIV-uninfected lung cancer patients (N = 156 593), HIV-infected lung cancer patients (N = 337) were more frequently young, black, men, and with non-Hispanic distant stage disease. HIV-infected NSCLC patients less frequently received cancer treatment than HIV-uninfected patients [60.3 vs. 77.5%; odds ratio 0.39, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.30–0.52, after adjustment for diagnosis year, age, sex, race, stage, and histologic subtype]. HIV infection was associated with higher lung cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio 1.34, 95% CI 1.15–1.56, adjusted for demographics and tumor characteristics). Inclusion of cancer treatment in adjusted models slightly attenuated the effect of HIV on lung cancer-specific mortality (hazard ratio 1.25; 95% CI 1.06–1.47). Also, there was a suggestion that HIV was more strongly associated with mortality among untreated than among treated patients (adjusted hazard ratio 1.32 vs. 1.16, P-interaction = 0.34). Conclusion HIV-infected NSCLC patients were less frequently treated for lung cancer than HIV-uninfected patients, which may have affected survival. PMID:23079809

  7. Advances of Drug Resistance Marker of Gemcitabine for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baorui LIU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available With the development of pharmacogenomics and pharmacogenetics, personal therapy based on genes has become one of the most effective ways to enhance chemotherapeutic effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Much attention has been paid to validate the predictive biomarkers of chemotherapy in order to guide chemotherapy and enhance effect in general. Gemcitabine is one of the common agents treating NSCLC recently. This review is mainly about the recent reports on potential biomarkers of Gemcitabine in tailored therapy of NSCLC.

  8. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  9. Relationship between radiation dose and lung function in patients with lung cancer receiving radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsaker, V.; Dale, E.; Bruland, O.S.; Olsen, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    In patients with inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), radical radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. The dose is limited by consequential pneumonitis and lung fibrosis. Hence, a better understanding of the relationship between the dose-volume distributions and normal tissue side effects is needed. CT is a non-invasive method to monitor the development of fibrosis and pneumonitis, and spirometry is an established tool to measure lung function. NSCLC patients were included in a multicenter trial and treated with megavoltage conformal radiotherapy. In a subgroup comprising 16 patients, a total dose of 59-63 Gy with 1.8-1.9 Gy per fraction was given. Dose-volume histograms were calculated and corrected according to the linear-quadratic formula using alpha/beta=3 Gy. The patients underwent repetitive CT examinations (mean follow-up, 133 days) following radiotherapy, and pre and post treatment spirometry (mean follow-up, 240 days). A significant correlation was demonstrated between local lung dose and changes in CT numbers >30 days after treatment (p 40 Gy Gy there was a sudden increase in CT numbers at 70-90 days. Somewhat unexpectedly, the highest mean lung doses were found in patients with the least reductions in lung function (peak expiratory flow; p<0.001). The correlation between CT numbers, radiation dose and time after treatment show that CT may be used to monitor development of lung fibrosis/pneumonitis after radiotherapy for lung cancer. Paradoxically, the patients with the highest mean lung doses experienced the minimum deterioration of lung function. This may be explained by reduction in the volume of existing tumour masses obstructing the airways, leading to relief of symptoms. This finding stresses the role of radiotherapy for lung cancer, especially where the treatment aim is palliative

  10. Impact of HIV Infection on Medicare Beneficiaries with Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. Y.; Moore, P. C.; Lensing, S. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancer among individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is elevated compared to that among the general population. This study examines the prevalence of HIV and its impact on outcomes among Medicare beneficiaries who are 65 years of age or older and were diagnosed with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) between 1997 and 2008. Prevalence of HIV was estimated using the Poisson point estimate and its 95% confidence interval. Relative risks for potential risk factors were estimated using the log-binomial model. A total of 111,219 Medicare beneficiaries met the study criteria. The prevalence of HIV was 156.4 per 100,000 (95% CI: 140.8 to 173.8) and has increased with time. Stage at NSCLC diagnosis did not vary by HIV status. Mortality rates due to all causes were 44%, 76%, and 88% for patients with stage I/II, III, and IV NSCLC, respectively. Across stages of disease, there was no difference between those who were HIV-infected and those who were not with respect to overall mortality. HIV patients, however, were more likely to die of causes other than lung cancer than their immunocompetent counterparts.

  11. Socioeconomic position and surgery for early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kærgaard Starr, Laila; Osler, Merete; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Register 2001-2008 (date of diagnosis, histology, stage, and treatment), the Central Population Register (vital status), the Integrated Database for Labour Market Research (socioeconomic position), and the Danish Hospital Discharge Register (comorbidity). Logistic regression analyses were performed overall......AIM: To examine possible associations between socioeconomic position and surgical treatment of patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS: In a register-based clinical cohort study, patients with early-stage (stages I-IIIa) NSCLC were identified in the Danish Lung Cancer...

  12. Benefits of home-based multidisciplinary exercise and supportive care in inoperable non-small cell lung cancer – protocol for a phase II randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Edbrooke, Lara; Aranda, Sanchia; Granger, Catherine L.; McDonald, Christine F.; Krishnasamy, Mei; Mileshkin, Linda; Irving, Louis; Braat, Sabine; Clark, Ross A.; Gordon, Ian; Denehy, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers, and is a leading cause of cancer mortality world-wide. Due to lack of early specific symptoms, the majority of patients present with advanced, inoperable disease and five-year relative survival across all stages of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is 14%. People with lung cancer also report higher levels of symptom distress than those with other forms of cancer. Several benefits for survival and patient reported outcomes ...

  13. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Baek, Hee Jong; Jung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Du Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Hae Young

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage I, II, IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemo-therapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study. Some important results of this study were as follows. 1. The new therapeutic method (surgery + MVP chemotherapy) was superior to the standard therapeutic one in stage I Non-small cell lung cancer patients. So, we have to change the standard method of treatment in stage I NSCLC. 2. Also, this new therapeutic method made a good result in stage II NSCLC patients. And this result was reported in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 3. However, this new therapeutic method was not superior to the standard treatment method (surgery only) in stage IIIA NSCLC patients. So, we must develop new chemo-therapeutic agents in the future for advanced NSCLC patients. 4. In the results of the randomized phase II studies about small cell lung cancer, there was no difference in survival between Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin group and Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin + Tamoxifen group in both the limited and extended types of small cell lung cancer patients

  14. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Carla F

    2017-06-30

    The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  15. Intersections of lung progenitor cells, lung disease and lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla F. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cell biology approaches to study adult lung progenitor cells and lung cancer has brought a variety of new techniques to the field of lung biology and has elucidated new pathways that may be therapeutic targets in lung cancer. Recent results have begun to identify the ways in which different cell populations interact to regulate progenitor activity, and this has implications for the interventions that are possible in cancer and in a variety of lung diseases. Today's better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lung progenitor cell self-renewal and differentiation, including understanding how multiple epigenetic factors affect lung injury repair, holds the promise for future better treatments for lung cancer and for optimising the response to therapy in lung cancer. Working between platforms in sophisticated organoid culture techniques, genetically engineered mouse models of injury and cancer, and human cell lines and specimens, lung progenitor cell studies can begin with basic biology, progress to translational research and finally lead to the beginnings of clinical trials.

  16. SSX2-4 expression in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, K B V; Pøhl, M; Olsen, K E

    2014-01-01

    The expression of cancer/testis antigens SSX2, SSX3, and SSX4 in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) was examined, since they are considered promising targets for cancer immunotherapy due to their immunogenicity and testis-restricted normal tissue expression. We characterized three SSX antibodies...... was only detected in 5 of 143 early-stage NSCLCs, which is rare compared to other cancer/testis antigens (e.g. MAGE-A and GAGE). However, further studies are needed to determine whether SSX can be used as a prognostic or predictive biomarker in NSCLC....

  17. An overview of mortality & predictors of small-cell and non-small cell lung cancer among Saudi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim I. Alghamdi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer ranks as the top cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and constitutes a major health problem. About 90% of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at advance stage where treatment is not available. Despite evidence that lung cancer screening improves survival, guidelines for lung cancer screening are still a subject for debate. In Saudi Arabia, only 14% of lung cancers are diagnosed at early stage and researches on survival and its predictors are lacking. This overview analysis was conducted on predictors of lung cancer mortality according to the two major cancer types, small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs in Saudi Arabia. A secondary data analysis was performed on small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs and Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs registered in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR for the period 2009–2013 to estimate predictors of mortality for both lung cancer types. A total of 404 cases (197 SCLC and 207 NSCLC were included in the analysis, all Saudi nationals. A total of 213 (52.75% deaths occurred among lung cancer patients, 108 (54.82% among SCLCs and 105 (50.72% among NCSLCs. Three quarter of patients are diagnosis with advance stage for both SCLC & NSCLC. Univariate analysis revealed higher mean age at diagnosis in dead patients compared to alive patients for SCLCs (p = 0.04; but not NSCLCs, a lower mortality for NSCLCs diagnosed in 2013 (p = 0.025 and a significant difference in stage of tumor (p = 0.006 and (p = 0.035 for both SCLC and NSCLC respectively. In multiple logistic regression, stage of tumor was a strong predictor of mortality, where distant metastasis increased morality by 6-fold (OR = 5.87, 95% CI: 2.01 – 17.19 in SCLC and by 3-fold (OR = 3.29, 95% CI: 1.22 – 8.85 in NSCLC, compared to localized tumors. Those with NSCLC who were diagnosed in 2013 were less likely to die by 64% compared to NSCLC diagnosed in 2009 (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.93. Age, sex, topography

  18. An overview of mortality & predictors of small-cell and non-small cell lung cancer among Saudi patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Hatim I; Alshehri, Ali F; Farhat, Ghada N

    2018-03-01

    Lung cancer ranks as the top cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and constitutes a major health problem. About 90% of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at advance stage where treatment is not available. Despite evidence that lung cancer screening improves survival, guidelines for lung cancer screening are still a subject for debate. In Saudi Arabia, only 14% of lung cancers are diagnosed at early stage and researches on survival and its predictors are lacking. This overview analysis was conducted on predictors of lung cancer mortality according to the two major cancer types, small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in Saudi Arabia. A secondary data analysis was performed on small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) registered in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) for the period 2009-2013 to estimate predictors of mortality for both lung cancer types. A total of 404 cases (197 SCLC and 207 NSCLC) were included in the analysis, all Saudi nationals. A total of 213 (52.75%) deaths occurred among lung cancer patients, 108 (54.82%) among SCLCs and 105 (50.72%) among NCSLCs. Three quarter of patients are diagnosis with advance stage for both SCLC & NSCLC. Univariate analysis revealed higher mean age at diagnosis in dead patients compared to alive patients for SCLCs (p=0.04); but not NSCLCs, a lower mortality for NSCLCs diagnosed in 2013 (p=0.025) and a significant difference in stage of tumor (p=0.006) and (p=0.035) for both SCLC and NSCLC respectively. In multiple logistic regression, stage of tumor was a strong predictor of mortality, where distant metastasis increased morality by 6-fold (OR=5.87, 95% CI: 2.01 - 17.19) in SCLC and by 3-fold (OR=3.29, 95% CI: 1.22 - 8.85) in NSCLC, compared to localized tumors. Those with NSCLC who were diagnosed in 2013 were less likely to die by 64% compared to NSCLC diagnosed in 2009 (OR=0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 - 0.93). Age, sex, topography and laterality were not associated with

  19. Effect of informing the diagnosis on depressive state in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ

    OpenAIRE

    Wei WANG; Ping CHEN; Xianglin PI; Anlan WANG; Xiaoping WEN; Dong HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Background and objective As other tumors, unresectabe lung cancer can cause many psychological problems to the patients, such as depression and anxiety. The present paper aims to evaluate the status of depression before and after knowing the state of illness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ. Methods 43 casesof newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stage Ⅲ were enrolled in the study. All the patients were distributed into three groups and given different...

  20. Lipidomic Profiling of Lung Pleural Effusion Identifies Unique Metabotype for EGFR Mutants in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Swan Ho; Lian Yee Yip; Nurhidayah Basri; Vivian Su Hui Chong; Chin Chye Teo; Eddy Tan; Kah Ling Lim; Gek San Tan; Xulei Yang; Si Yong Yeo; Mariko Si Yue Koh; Anantham Devanand; Angela Takano; Eng Huat Tan; Daniel Shao Weng Tan

    2016-01-01

    Cytology and histology forms the cornerstone for the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but obtaining sufficient tumour cells or tissue biopsies for these tests remains a challenge. We investigate the lipidome of lung pleural effusion (PE) for unique metabolic signatures to discriminate benign versus malignant PE and EGFR versus non-EGFR malignant subgroups to identify novel diagnostic markers that is independent of tumour cell availability. Using liquid chromatography mass spect...

  1. Randomize Trial of Cisplatin plus Gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or Placebo as First-line Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yan WANG; Lin WANG; Yutao LIU; Shufei YU; Xiangru ZHANG; Yuankai SHI; Yan SUN

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective Platinum-based chemotherapy doublets reached an efficacy plateau in nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This randomized controlled study prospectively assessed the efficacy and safety of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with either Sorafenib or placebo as first-line therapy for NSCLC. Methods Thirty patients, which were confirmed advanced NSCLC histologically or cytologically, were randomly assigned to receive up to six cycles of cisplatin plus gemcitabine with sorafenib or ...

  2. Temozolomide in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer with and without brain metastases. a phase II study of the EORTC Lung Cancer Group (08965).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dziadziuszko, R; Ardizzoni, A.; Postmus, P.E.; Smit, E.F.; Price, A; Debruyne, C.; Legrand, C; Giaccone, G.

    2003-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the activity of single-agent temozolomide in two groups of chemotherapy-naive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, with (12 patients) and without (13 patients) brain metastases (BM). Patients in both groups were treated with temozolomide 200 mg/m(2)/day,

  3. Tumour cell expression of C4.4A, a structural homologue of the urokinase receptor, correlates with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Line V.; Skov, Birgit G; Ploug, Michael

    2007-01-01

    expression. In the present study, we therefore explored the possible association between C4.4A expression and prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Tissue sections from 108 NSCLC patients were subjected to immunohistochemical staining using a polyclonal antibody...

  4. Variation in causes of death in patients with non-small cell lung cancer according to stage and time since diagnosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen-Heijnen, M. L. G.; van Erning, F. N.; De Ruysscher, D. K.; Coebergh, J. W. W.; Groen, H. J. M.

    Background: Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) die within the first few years of diagnosis, and considerable excess mortality remains even after 5 years. We investigated the death rate and the distribution of causes of death for NSCLC patients by age and stage at diagnosis during

  5. Integration of gene dosage and gene expression in non-small cell lung cancer, identification of HSP90 as potential target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariëlle I Gallegos Ruiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer causes approximately 1.2 million deaths per year worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC represents 85% of all lung cancers. Understanding the molecular events in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is essential to improve early diagnosis and treatment for this disease. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In an attempt to identify novel NSCLC related genes, we performed a genome-wide screening of chromosomal copy number changes affecting gene expression using microarray based comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression arrays on 32 radically resected tumor samples from stage I and II NSCLC patients. An integrative analysis tool was applied to determine whether chromosomal copy number affects gene expression. We identified a deletion on 14q32.2-33 as a common alteration in NSCLC (44%, which significantly influenced gene expression for HSP90, residing on 14q32. This deletion was correlated with better overall survival (P = 0.008, survival was also longer in patients whose tumors had low expression levels of HSP90. We extended the analysis to three independent validation sets of NSCLC patients, and confirmed low HSP90 expression to be related with longer overall survival (P = 0.003, P = 0.07 and P = 0.04. Furthermore, in vitro treatment with an HSP90 inhibitor had potent antiproliferative activity in NSCLC cell lines. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that targeting HSP90 will have clinical impact for NSCLC patients.

  6. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy versus lobectomy for operable stage I non-small-cell lung cancer : a pooled analysis of two randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Joe Y.; Senan, Suresh; Paul, Marinus A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Louie, Alexander V.; Balter, Peter; Groen, Harry; McRae, Stephen E.; Widder, Joachim; Feng, Lei; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Munsell, Mark F.; Hurkmans, Coen; Berry, Donald A.; van Werkhoven, Erik; Kresl, John J.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Dawood, Omar; Haasbeek, Cornelis J. A.; Carpenter, Larry S.; De Jaeger, Katrien; Komaki, Ritsuko; Slotman, Ben J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Roth, Jack A.

    Background The standard of care for operable, stage I, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is lobectomy with mediastinal lymph node dissection or sampling. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for inoperable stage I NSCLC has shown promising results, but two independent, randomised, phase 3

  7. Feasibility of Pencil Beam Scanned Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy in Breath-hold for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgisyan, Jenny; Munck Af Rosenschold, Per; Perrin, Rosalind

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We evaluated the feasibility of treating patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with pencil beam scanned intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in breath-hold. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen NSCLC patients who had previously received 66 Gy in 33 fractions wi...

  8. Comparison of clinical outcome after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy in different types of KRAS mutated advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellema, Wouter W.; Masen-Poos, Lucie; Smit, Egbert F.; Hendriks, Lizza E. L.; Aerts, Joachim G.; Termeer, Arien; Goosens, Martijn J.; Smit, Hans J. M.; van den Heuvel, Michel M.; Wekken, van der Anthonie J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Krouwels, Frans H.; Stigt, Jos A.; van den Borne, Ben E. E. M.; Haitjema, Tjeerd J.; Staal-Van den Brekel, Agnes J.; van Heemst, Robbert C.; Pouw, Ellen; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: As suggested by in-vitro data, we hypothesize that subtypes of ICRAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) respond differently to chemotherapy regimens. Methods: Patients with advanced NSCLC and known KRAS mutation, treated with first-line platinumbased chemotherapy, were retrieved

  9. Phase III trial comparing vinflunine with docetaxel in second-line advanced non-small-cell lung cancer previously treated with platinum-containing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzakowski, Maciej; Ramlau, Rodryg; Jassem, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy.......To compare vinflunine (VFL) to docetaxel in patients with stage IIIB/IV non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have experienced treatment failure with first-line platinum-based chemotherapy....

  10. A novel imidazopyridine PI3K inhibitor with anticancer activity in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunseung; Kim, Soo Jung; Jung, Kyung Hee; Son, Mi Kwon; Yan, Hong Hua; Hong, Sungwoo; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2013-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 85% of all cases. Since more than 60% of NSCLC cases express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used to treat NSCLC. However, due to the acquired resistance associated with EGFR-targeted therapy, other strategies for the treatment of NSCLC are urgently needed. Therefore, we investigated the anticancer effects of a novel phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase α (PI3Kα) inhibitor, HS-173, in human NSCLC cell lines. HS-173 demonstrated anti-proliferative effects in NSCLC cells and effectively inhibited the PI3K signaling pathway in a dose‑dependent manner. In addition, it induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase as well as apoptosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate that HS-173 exhibits anticancer activities, including the induction of apoptosis, by blocking the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in human NSCLC cell lines. We, therefore, suggest that this novel drug could potentially be used for targeted NSCLC therapy.

  11. MicroRNA-429 induces tumorigenesis of human non-small cell lung cancer cells and targets multiple tumor suppressor genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Yaoguo; Xu, Shidong; Ma, Jianqun; Wu, Jun [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Jin, Shi; Cao, Shoubo [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China); Yu, Yan, E-mail: yuyan@hrbmu.edu.cn [Department of Medical Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, 150 Haping Road, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150081 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • MiR-429 expression is upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). • MiR-429 inhibits PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression. • MiR-429 promotes metastasis and proliferation. • We report important regulatory mechanisms involved in NSCLC progression. • MiR-429 is a potential therapeutic target and diagnostic marker. - Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death globally. MicroRNAs are evolutionally conserved small noncoding RNAs that are critical for the regulation of gene expression. Aberrant expression of microRNA (miRNA) has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of miR-429 are often upregulated in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with normal lung tissues, and its expression level is also increased in NSCLC cell lines compared with normal lung cells. Overexpression of miR-429 in A549 NSCLC cells significantly promoted cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas inhibition of miR-429 inhibits these effects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that miR-429 down-regulates PTEN, RASSF8 and TIMP2 expression by directly targeting the 3′-untranslated region of these target genes. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-429 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and metastasis of NSCLC cells and is a potential target for NSCLC therapy.

  12. The Danish Lung Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik; Rasmussen, Torben Riis

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Lung Cancer Registry (DLCR) was established by the Danish Lung Cancer Group. The primary and first goal of the DLCR was to improve survival and the overall clinical management of Danish lung cancer patients. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish primary lung cancer patients since...... 2000 are included into the registry and the database today contains information on more than 50,000 cases of lung cancer. MAIN VARIABLES: The database contains information on patient characteristics such as age, sex, diagnostic procedures, histology, tumor stage, lung function, performance...... the results are commented for local, regional, and national audits. Indicator results are supported by descriptive reports with details on diagnostics and treatment. CONCLUSION: DLCR has since its creation been used to improve the quality of treatment of lung cancer in Denmark and it is increasingly used...

  13. Management of non-small cell lung cancer with oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Kubicek, Gregory J; Socinski, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) present a potential opportunity for curative therapy; however, the challenge remains the definitive treatment of their localized disease and ablation of their limited overt metastatic sites of disease. In selecting patients with oligometastatic NSCLC for definitive therapy, proper staging through radiographic studies, including PET and brain MRI, and the pathologic staging of the mediastinal lymph nodes and potential sites of metastatic disease, are critical. With that in mind, the available literature suggests that in highly selected patients with solitary metastases to the brain, adrenals and other organs, long term survival may be achieved with combined definitive therapy of both the primary lung tumor and the solitary metastatic site.

  14. Lung cancer stage at diagnosis: Individual associations in the prospective VITamins and lifestyle (VITAL cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Au David H

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Identifying factors associated with stage of diagnosis can improve our understanding of biologic and behavioral pathways of lung cancer development and detection. We used data from a prospective cohort study to evaluate associations of demographic, health history, and health behaviors with early versus late stage at diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Methods We calculated odds ratios (ORs for the association of patient-level characteristics with advanced stage of diagnosis for NSCLC. The OR's were then adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, smoking status, income, education, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and a comorbidity index. Results We identified 612 cases of NSCLC among 77,719 adults, aged 50 to 76 years from Washington State recruited in 2000-2002, with followup through December 2007. In univariate analyses, subjects who quit smoking Conclusions Smoking status, education, and a screening activity were associated with stage at diagnosis of NSCLC. These results may guide future studies of the underlying mechanisms that influence how NSCLC is detected and diagnosed.

  15. Diagnostic Imaging of Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Kara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in men and women. It is frequently seen among men than in women and male-female ratio is 1.5:1. Common epidemiological factors that increase risk of lung cancer is smoking. Early age to start smoking, high number of smoking cigarettes per a day and depth of inhalation increase risk of lung cancer. 25% of patients with lung cancer are nonsmokers that passively exposed to cigarette smoke. Occupational exposure to substances such as asbestos, arsenic, nickel, beryllium, mustard gas increases the risk of lung cancer. The well defined risk factor is exposure to asbestos. In addition advanced age, diffuse pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and genetic predisposition are the risk factors that increases lung cancer. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 749-756

  16. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, Abigail T.; James, Sara St.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning

  17. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail T. Berman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT, through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning.

  18. Research Progress of the Resistance Mechanism of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
to EGFR-TKIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui LIU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, lung cancer is the malignant tumor of the highest morbidity and mortality over the world, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC makes up about 80%. There is a great many NSCLC patients have been in advanced stage when diagnosed. As a result, people pay more attention to curing advanced NSCLC. The standard treatment to advanced NSCLC is platinum-based combined chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy drugs usually have limited effects on improving the survival of the patients. Then exploring new therapies is extremely urgent to us. Now, molecular targeted therapy has been the most promising research area for the treatment of NSCLC with researches going deep into pathogenesis and biological behavior of lung cancer. Epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have achieved a great success in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Their representatives are erlotinib and gefitinib. The two drugs have been widely used to treat advanced NSCLCs worldwide, especially for the patients with EGFR activating mutations. However, after a period of treatment (median time is 6 to 12 months, most patients will develop drug resistance to EGFR-TKIs. Intense research in these NSCLCs has identified two major mechanisms of resistance to TKIs: primary and acquired resistances. The research about resistance mechanism of NSCLC to EGFR-TKIs is a hot one because of their excellent effects on improving overall and progression-free survival. The aim of this article was to summarize the development of the resistance mechanisms.

  19. Subcarinal Lymph Nodes Should be Dissected in All Lobectomies for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckardt, Jens; Jakobsen, Erik; Licht, Peter B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mediastinal staging is of paramount importance for planning of treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Single institution reports recently claimed that subcarinal lymph node dissection during resection of upper lobe NSCLC could be spared. We used a complete national lung cancer...... registry to investigate patterns of unsuspected mediastinal lymph node involvement after lobectomy. METHODS: During an 11-year period (2004 to 2014) 5,577 consecutive patients who underwent operations for NSCLC were investigated for unsuspected mediastinal lymph node involvement (N2 disease) discovered......: Mediastinal lymph node dissection was performed in 5,577 patients during the operation, and unsuspected N2 disease was discovered in 612 (11.0%), and 193 (3.5%) had subcarinal metastasis. Subcarinal N2 disease was significantly more common in patients with lower-lobe or middle-lobe cancers compared with upper...

  20. Melatonin as a potential anticarcinogen for non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Wang, Dongjin; Di, Shouyin; Hu, Wei; Liu, Dong; Li, Xiaofei; Reiter, Russel J.; Yan, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of death from cancer worldwide. Melatonin, an indoleamine discovered in the pineal gland, exerts pleiotropic anticancer effects against a variety of cancer types. In particular, melatonin may be an important anticancer drug in the treatment of NSCLC. Herein, we review the correlation between the disruption of the melatonin rhythm and NSCLC incidence; we also evaluate the evidence related to the effects of melatonin in inhibiting lung carcinogenesis. Special focus is placed on the oncostatic effects of melatonin, including anti-proliferation, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of invasion and metastasis, and enhancement of immunomodulation. We suggest the drug synergy of melatonin with radio- or chemotherapy for NSCLC could prove to be useful. Taken together, the information complied herein may serve as a comprehensive reference for the anticancer mechanisms of melatonin against NSCLC, and may be helpful for the design of future experimental research and for advancing melatonin as a therapeutic agent for NSCLC. PMID:27102150

  1. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer - role of nivolumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, Giulia; Muller, Mirte; van den Heuvel, Michel; Baas, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017) and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057). In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively). Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors.

  2. Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0243 TITLE: Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Development of a Prognostic Marker for Lung Cancer Using Analysis of Tumor Evolution 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...derive a prognostic classifier. 15. SUBJECT TERMS NSCLC; tumor evolution ; whole exome sequencing 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  3. Prediction of lung density changes after radiotherapy by cone beam computed tomography response markers and pre-treatment factors for non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernchou, Uffe; Hansen, Olfred; Schytte, Tine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study investigates the ability of pre-treatment factors and response markers extracted from standard cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images to predict the lung density changes induced by radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. METHODS...... AND MATERIALS: Density changes in follow-up computed tomography scans were evaluated for 135 NSCLC patients treated with radiotherapy. Early response markers were obtained by analysing changes in lung density in CBCT images acquired during the treatment course. The ability of pre-treatment factors and CBCT...

  4. Telomerase in lung cancer diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovkarova, E.; Stefanovski, T.; Dimov, A.; Naumovski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that looks after the telomeric cap of the linear chromosomes maintaining its length. It is over expressed in tumour tissues, but not in normal somatic cells. Therefore the aim of this study was to determine the telomerase activity in lung cancer patients as novel marker for lung cancer detection evaluating the influence of tissue/cell obtaining technique. Material and methods. Using the TRAP (telomeric repeat amplification protocol), telomerase activity was determined in material obtained from bronchobiopsy (60 lung cancer patients compared with 20 controls) and washings from transthoracic fine needle aspiration biopsy performed in 10 patients with peripheral lung tumours. Results. Telomerase activity was detected in 75% of the lung cancer bronchobyopsies, and in 100% in transthoracic needle washings. Conclusions. Measurement of telomerase activity can contribute in fulfilling the diagnosis of lung masses and nodules suspected for lung cancer. (author)

  5. Effects of Src on Proliferation and Invasion of Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui ZHENG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that Src played pivotal roles in carcinogenesis, cancer progression and metastasis. The aim of this study is to explore the roles of Src phosphorylation on lung cancer cells. Methods Western blot and immunoprecipitation was used to detect the expression and phosphorylation of Src in lung cancer cells. MTT and Boyden chamber assay was used to examine the effects of inhibition of Src phosphorylation on proliferation and invasion of lung cancer cells in vitro, respectively. Results pp60src was expressed in all lung cancer cell lines in this study. All 5 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines had increased autophosphorylated tyrosine-418, while nearly no phosphorylated Src in small cell lung cancer SBC5 cell line was detected. The effect of inhibition of Src tyrosine kinase on cell proliferation varied among the lung cancer cell lines. Submicromolar Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor (≤1 μM remarkably suppressed the proliferation of PC-9 and A549 cells in a dose dependent manner (P < 0.05, while the same concentration of Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor had no significant effect on proliferation of H226, PC14PE6 and RERFLCOK cells. Invasiveness of lung cancer cells was significantly suppressed by Src tyrosine kinase in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05. Conclusion Phosphorylation of Src, but not over-expression, plays a pivotal role in proliferation and invasion of NSCLC cell lines in vitro.

  6. Bricklayers and lung cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The article ‘Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case–control studies’ in the International Journal of Cancer publishes findings of an epidemiological study (in the frame of a SYNERGY-project) dedicated to the lung cancer risk among bricklayers. The authors conclude that a

  7. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for centrally located early-stage non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases from the RSSearch® patient registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Joanne N.; Medbery, Clinton; Sharma, Sanjeev; Pablo, John; Kimsey, Frank; Perry, David; Muacevic, Alexander; Mahadevan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns and outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for centrally located primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or lung metastases from the RSSearch ® Patient Registry, an international, multi-center patient registry dedicated to radiosurgery and SBRT. Eligible patients included those with centrally located lung tumors clinically staged T1-T2 N0, M0, biopsy-confirmed NSCLC or lung metastases treated with SBRT between November 2004 and January 2014. Descriptive analysis was used to report patient demographics and treatment patterns. Overall survival (OS) and local control (LC) were determined using Kaplan-Meier method. Toxicity was reported using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. In total, 111 patients with 114 centrally located lung tumors (48 T1-T2,N0,M0 NSCLC and 66 lung metastases) were treated with SBRT at 19 academic and community-based radiotherapy centers in the US and Germany. Median follow-up was 17 months (range, 1–72). Median age was 74 years for primary NSCLC patients and 65 years for lung metastases patients (p < 0.001). SBRT dose varied from 16 – 60 Gy (median 48 Gy) delivered in 1–5 fractions (median 4 fractions). Median dose to centrally located primary NSCLC was 48 Gy compared to 37.5 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0001) and median BED 10 was 105.6 Gy for primary NSCLC and 93.6 Gy for lung metastases (p = 0.0005). Two-year OS for T1N0M0 and T2N0M0 NSCLC was 79 and 32.1 %, respectively (p = 0.009) and 2-year OS for lung metastases was 49.6 %. Two-year LC was 76.4 and 69.8 % for primary NSCLC and lung metastases, respectively. Toxicity was low with no Grade 3 or higher acute or late toxicities. Overall, patients with centrally located primary NSCLC were older and received higher doses of SBRT than those with lung metastases. Despite these differences, LC and OS was favorable for patients with central lung tumors treated with SBRT. Reported toxicity

  8. Bag3 promotes resistance to apoptosis through Bcl-2 family members in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jian-Hua; Lu, Qiang; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2012-01-01

    In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) certain molecular characteristics, which are related to molecular alterations have been investigated. These are responsible for both the initiation and maintenance of the malignancy in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of Bag3 (Bcl-2 associated athanogene 3) in the regulation of apoptosis on NSCLC. Bag3 and Hsp70 expression were examined by immunohistochemistry to confirm their potential roles in the prevalence of NSCLC. We also established human normal bronchial epithelial cells and HOP-62 cell line as the model to analyze cell apoptosis and the expression of Hsp70, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, which were affected by Bag3. In this study, we found that Bag3 and Hsp70 are highly expressed in few tissues and cell lines of NSCLC. Bag3 inhibits apoptosis in human normal bronchial epithelial cell lines and sustain the survival of NSCLC cells. Bag3, Hsp70, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 are up-regulated in NSCLC cell lines. At the same time, the silencing of Bag3 results in diminishing protein levels of Bcl-XL and Bcl-2. The results of immunoprecipitation identified that Bag3 could interact with Hsp70, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 NSCLC cells directly or indirectly. We conclude that NSCLC cells were protected from apoptosis through increasing Bag3 expression and consequently promoted the expression of Bcl-XL and Bcl-2.

  9. Pain management in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Not only burdened by the limited overall survival, lung cancer patient also suffer from various symptoms, such as pain, that implicated in the quality of life. Cancer pain is a complicated and transiently dynamic symptom that results from multiple mechanisms. This review will describe the pathophysiology of cancer pain and general approach in managing a patient with lung cancer pain. The use of opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and adjuvant analgesia, as part of the pharmacology therapy along with interventional strategy, will also be discussed.

  10. Advances in immunotherapy for treatment of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustamante Alvarez, Jean G.; González-Cao, María; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Viteri, Santiago; Teixidó, Cristina; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Different approaches for treating lung cancer have been developed over time, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted therapies against activating mutations. Lately, better understanding of the role of the immunological system in tumor control has opened multiple doors to implement different strategies to enhance immune response against cancer cells. It is known that tumor cells elude immune response by several mechanisms. The development of monoclonal antibodies against the checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), on T cells, has led to high activity in cancer patients with long lasting responses. Nivolumab, an anti PD-1 inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancer patients, given the survival advantage demonstrated in a phase III trial. Pembrolizumab, another anti PD-1 antibody, has received FDA breakthrough therapy designation for treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), supported by data from a phase I trial. Clinical trials with anti PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in NSCLC have demonstrated very good tolerability and activity, with response rates around 20% and a median duration of response of 18 months

  11. [Prognostic factors of advanced stage non-small-cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwas, H; Guermazi, E; Khattab, A; Hrizi, C; Zendah, I; Ghédira, H

    2017-09-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men in the world. Although the introduction of new drugs, new therapeutic strategies and despite therapeutic advances, the prognosis is relatively improved during the last years. To evaluate the prognosis of patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to identify prognostic factors at these stages. A retrospective study, including 140 cases of locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC diagnosed in our department between 2003 and 2013. The average age was 61±10 years (35 to 90 years). Sex ratio was 18. The delays management were 80±25 days for presentation, 45±20 days for the diagnostic, while the treatment delay was 8±2.33 days. The cancer was at stage IIIA in 14%, IIIB in 27% and IV in 59%. Six months and one-year survival was between 50 and 74% and between 9 and 25%, respectively. Better survival was observed in patients with NSCLC on stage III, having better performance status, having comorbid conditions, with prolonged delays management, a short therapeutic delay and patients who received specific antitumor treatment. The prognostic factors in locally advanced and metastatic NSCLC in our patients were: stage of cancer, performance status, comorbid conditions, delay of management and specific antitumoral treatment. These factors should be considered in the management of patients with advanced NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Lung cancer: principles and practice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pass, Harvey I

    2005-01-01

    "A comprehensive review of lung cancer, from screening, early detection, and prevention, to management strategies including surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and multimodality therapy, as well...

  13. Causes of death and competing risk analysis of the associated factors for non-small cell lung cancer using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shenhai; Tian, Jintao; Song, Xiaoping; Wu, Bingqun; Liu, Limin

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the probability of death (POD) from any causes by time after diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the factors associated with survival for NSCLC patients. A total of 202,914 patients with NSCLC from 2004 to 2013 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The overall survival (OS) and lung cancer-specific survival (LCSS) were calculated and POD from any causes at different time periods after diagnosis was explored. The predictive factors for OS, LCSS and survival from non-lung cancer deaths were investigated using multivariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk regression analysis. The 5- and 10-year OS were 20.4% and 11.5%, accordingly that for LCSS were 25.5% and 18.4%, respectively. Lung cancer contributed 88.3% (n = 128,402) of the deaths. The POD from lung cancer decreased with time after diagnosis. In multivariate analysis, advanced age and advanced stage of NSCLC were associated with decreased OS and LCSS. Comparing to no surgery, any kind of resection conferred lower risk of death from lung cancer and higher risk of dying from non-lung cancer conditions except lobectomy or bilobectomy, which was associated with lower risk of death from both lung cancer and non-lung cancer conditions. Most of the patients with NSCLC died from lung cancer. Rational surveillance and treatment policies should be made for them. Early stage and lobectomy or bilobectomy were associated with improved OS and LCSS. It is reasonable to focus on early detection and optimal surgical treatment for NSCLC.

  14. Lung cancer in younger patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasowa, Leda; Madsen, Poul Henning

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death. The incidence increases with age and the occurrence in young patients is relatively low. The clinicopathological features of lung cancer in younger patients have not been fully explored previously. METHODS: To assess the age...... differences in the clinical characteristics of lung cancer, we conducted a retrospective analysis comparing young patients ≤ 65 years of age with an elderly group > 65 years of age. Among 1,232 patients evaluated due to suspicion of lung cancer in our fast-track setting from January-December 2013, 312 newly...... diagnosed lung cancer patients were included. RESULTS: Patients ≤ 65 years had a significantly higher representation of females (p = 0.0021), more frequent familial cancer aggregation (p = 0.028) and a lower incidence of squamous cell carcinoma (p = 0.0133). When excluding pure carcinoid tumours...

  15. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC. PMID:27081229

  16. Radiofrequency ablation in primary non-small cell lung cancer: What a radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Shivank; Pereira, Keith; Mohan, Prasoon; Narayanan, Govindarajan; Wangpaichitr, Medhi; Savaraj, Niramol

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. In advanced cases of lung cancer, a multimodality approach is often applied, however with poor local control rates. In early non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery is the standard of care. Only 15-30% of patients are eligible for surgical resection. Improvements in imaging and treatment delivery systems have provided new tools to better target these tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has evolved as the next best option. The role of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is also growing. Currently, it is a third-line option in stage 1 NSCLC, when SBRT cannot be performed. More recent studies have demonstrated usefulness in recurrent tumors and some authors have also suggested combination of RFA with other modalities in larger tumors. Following the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), screening by low-dose computed tomography (CT) has demonstrated high rates of early-stage lung cancer detection in high-risk populations. Hence, even considering the current role of RFA as a third-line option, in view of increasing numbers of occurrences detected, the number of potential RFA candidates may see a steep uptrend. In view of all this, it is imperative that interventional radiologists be familiar with the techniques of lung ablation. The aim of this article is to discuss the procedural technique of RFA in the lung and review the current evidence regarding RFA for NSCLC

  17. Cost and effectiveness studies in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Yalcin-Balcik

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer disease diagnosis and treatment is costly. As the numbers of inflicted rise so does the economic burden assumed for this cancer type. When the treatment expenditures are considered for all types of cancer, the lung cancer is thought to occupy a 20% share. The disease examined in two basic groups as small-cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most frequently encountered type of its kind nationally and in the World. This study considers the cost, effectiveness and cost effectiveness of platinum based chemotherapy medications with active ingredients pemetrexed and gemcitabine used for NSCLC. A review of studies relevant to the advanced stage NSCLC where majority of patients are positioned is foreseen to be useful to the decision makers since policy makers, regulating authorities and physicians require more information due to increased overall finance and costs, as well as treatment cost effectiveness. Furthermore, due to the entry attempt of pemetrexed active ingredient to the list of reimbursed medications for the first stage lung cancer treatment, it is assumed that a review of studies containing pemetrexed and gemcitabine will draw the attention of decision makers at the Social Security Instutition. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(1.000: 55-64

  18. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Ding, Lan-Bao; Zhou, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  19. FOXD3 suppresses tumor growth and angiogenesis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jun-Hai; Zhao, Chun-Liu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China); Ding, Lan-Bao [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai 10th People' s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhou, Xi, E-mail: modelmap@139.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Luwan Branch of Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 20020 (China)

    2015-10-09

    The transcription factor forkhead box D3 (FOXD3), widely studied as a transcriptional repressor in embryogenesis, participates in the carcinogenesis of many cancers. However, the expression pattern and role of FOXD3 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been well characterized. We report that FOXD3 is significantly downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and clinical tissues. FOXD3 overexpression significantly inhibits cell growth and results in G1 cell cycle arrest in NSCLC A549 and H1299 cells. In a xenograft tumor model, FOXD3 overexpression inhibits tumor growth and angiogenesis. Remarkably, expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was reduced in FOXD3 overexpression models both in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FOXD3 plays a potential tumor suppressor role in NSCLC progression and represents a promising clinical prognostic marker and therapeutic target for this disease. - Highlights: • FOXD3 is downregulated in NSCLC cell lines and tissues. • FOXD3 overexpression inhibited cell proliferation in NSCLC cells. • FOXD3 overexpression led to decreased angiogenesis in NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo.

  20. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  1. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Biggest Cancer Killer in Both Men and Women” Stay Informed Rates by State for Other Kinds of Cancer All Cancers Combined Breast Cervical Colorectal (Colon) HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English (US) ...

  2. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease.

  3. Overexpression of Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and foreshowing tumor biological behavior as well as clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Sheng-Fa; Yu, Liang; Wang, Ju; Chang, Hao; Yan, Wei-Li; Zhang, Jian; Fu, Kai

    2008-10-01

    Transcription factor Pokemon, a central regulation gene of the important tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF), exerted its activity by acting upstream of many tumor-suppressing genes and proto-oncogenes. Its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and to explore its correlation with the clinical pathological characteristics and its influence on patients' prognosis. Observe the expression of Pokemon in NSCLC and investigate its mechanism and clinical significance. Determine the expression of Pokemon in human NSCLC cell lines as well as 55 cases of NSCLC tumor tissues, tumor adjacent tissues and surrounding tissues by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot, and analyze the relationship between Pokemon expression in NSCLC tumor tissues and clinicopathological features. Determine 62 NSCLC tumor tissues (5 years ago) and p14(ARF) expression with immunohistochemical technique, discuss the correlation between them and assess the effect of Pokemon on prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Pokemon mRNA and protein took on high expression in lung cancer cell lines, and the expression difference between cancer tissues, tumor adjacent tissues and surrounding tissues had statistical significance (PPokemon expression and p14(ARF) expression were negatively correlated (r=-0.287). The expression of Pokemon was determined not to be associated with the patient's sex, age, smoking condition, tumor differentiation degree, histology and lymph node metastasis condition. However, its relationship with TNM staging was established (PPokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression (P=0.004), therefore, the expression of Pokemon is believed to be an independent factor affecting prognosis (P=0.034). There was high expression of Pokemon in NSCLC

  4. Predictive role of computer simulation in assessing signaling pathways of crizotinib-treated A549 lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Pu; Mou, Fei-Fei; Wang, Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Crizotinib has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. However, understanding of mechanisms of action is still limited. In our studies, we confirmed crizotinib-induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells. In order to assess mechanisms, small molecular docking technology was used as a preliminary simulation of signaling pathways. Interesting, our results of experiments were consistent with the results of computer simulation. This indicates that small molecular docking technology should find wide use for its reliability and convenience.

  5. Positron emission tomography in the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Højgaard, L

    2001-01-01

    positron emission tomography (PET) and gamma-camera PET in the diagnostic investigation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A systematic literature search was carried out in the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. We identified 55 original works on the diagnostic...

  6. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  7. PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer : Correlations with genetic alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheel, Andreas H.; Ansen, Sascha; Schultheis, Anne M.; Scheffler, Matthias; Fischer, Rieke N.; Michels, Sebastian; Hellmich, Martin; George, Julie; Zander, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Stoelben, Erich; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Perner, Sven; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may induce anticancer immune responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays have been approved as companion diagnostic tests for therapeutic anti-PD-1 antibodies. However, many aspects of PD-L1 prevalence and

  8. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D.P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; Heuvel, M. van den; Ciuleanu, T.E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Nair, S.; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J.M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; umenschein GR, J.r. Bl; Villaruz, L.C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; rral Jaime, J. Co; Chang, H.; Geese, W.J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, A.C.; Socinski, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  9. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D. P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; van den Heuvel, M. M.; Ciuleanu, T. -E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T. J. N.; Nair, S; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J. M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; Blumenschein, G. R.; Villaruz, L. C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; Corral Jaime, J.; Chang, C. -H.; Geese, W. J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, Alexander C.; Socinski, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  10. Changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression during chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as cetuximab, may potentially improve outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with high EGFR expression. The EGFR expression may be heterogeneously distributed within tumors, and small biopsies may thus...

  11. Enhanced expression of G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) in lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jala, Venkatakrishna Rao; Radde, Brandie N; Haribabu, Bodduluri; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2012-01-01

    G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER/GPR30) was reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E 2 ), tamoxifen, and ICI 182,780 (fulvestrant) and promotes activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling in breast, endometrial and thyroid cancer cells. Although lung adenocarcinomas express estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ), the expression of GPER in lung cancer has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of GPER in lung cancer. The expression patterns of GPER in various lung cancer lines and lung tumors were investigated using standard quantitative real time PCR (at mRNA levels), Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) methods (at protein levels). The expression of GPER was scored and the pairwise comparisons (cancer vs adjacent tissues as well as cancer vs normal lung tissues) were performed. Analysis by real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed a significantly higher expression of GPER at both mRNA and protein levels in human non small cell lung cancer cell (NSCLC) lines relative to immortalized normal lung bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs). The virally immortalized human small airway epithelial cell line HPL1D showed higher expression than HBECs and similar expression to NSCLC cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue sections of murine lung adenomas as well as human lung adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and non-small cell lung carcinomas showed consistently higher expression of GPER in the tumor relative to the surrounding non-tumor tissue. The results from this study demonstrate increased GPER expression in lung cancer cells and tumors compared to normal lung. Further evaluation of the function and regulation of GPER will be necessary to determine if GPER is a marker of lung cancer progression

  12. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  13. Present trends in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parvez, T.; Iskandrani, A.

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths all over the world. As most patients present with advanced disease, major efforts have been made in the treatment of such disease with systemic chemotherapy. Several new agents and new combinations of chemotherapy have been developed recently. This article reviews the randomized clinical trials investigating chemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in relapse or progressive disease while being treated and in elderly patients. Therapies that incorporate new biological agents to target specific defects in lung cancer are also discussed. Several clinical trials have demonstrated improvement in overall survival as well as quality of life with presently available chemotherapy treatment of advanced NSCLC. Better options are available for the elderly as well as those having relapse after first line chemotherapy. Despite all this progress the 5-year survival rate still remains at a dismal 14%. New therapies with good results are still desired. (author)

  14. Lung cancer in never-smokers - what are the differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Margarida; Linhas, Rita; Campainha, Sérgio; Conde, Sara; Barroso, Ana

    2017-07-01

    Characteristics of never-smokers with lung cancer are still not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to compare never-smokers and ever-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regarding patient and tumor characteristics. All consecutive newly NSCLC patients with known smoking status diagnosed between 2011 and 2015 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Clinical, histological, and molecular characteristics were compared between ever-smokers and never-smokers. Of the 558 included patients, 125 (22.4%) were never-smokers. These patients were more likely to be female (74% vs. 7%, p Never-smokers took longer to seek medical care after the symptoms onset (3 vs. 2 months, p never-smokers: pleural metastases were more frequent (OR: 2.1 [1.1-4.0]), regardless of the histological type and gender. Never-smokers had a higher prevalence of ALK translocations (26% vs. 4%, p Never-smokers with NSCLC present distinct demographic and clinical characteristics. The characteristics of tumor also differ between never-smokers and ever-smokers, which may suggest different carcinogenic pathways.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B. [Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-09-05

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer: preclinical and clinical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorge, S.E.D.C.; Kobayashi, S.S.; Costa, D.B.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer leads cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most prevalent subtype of this recalcitrant cancer, is usually diagnosed at advanced stages, and available systemic therapies are mostly palliative. The probing of the NSCLC kinome has identified numerous nonoverlapping driver genomic events, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations. This review provides a synopsis of preclinical and clinical data on EGFR mutated NSCLC and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Classic somatic EGFR kinase domain mutations (such as L858R and exon 19 deletions) make tumors addicted to their signaling cascades and generate a therapeutic window for the use of ATP-mimetic EGFR TKIs. The latter inhibit these kinases and their downstream effectors, and induce apoptosis in preclinical models. The aforementioned EGFR mutations are stout predictors of response and augmentation of progression-free survival when gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib are used for patients with advanced NSCLC. The benefits associated with these EGFR TKIs are limited by the mechanisms of tumor resistance, such as the gatekeeper EGFR-T790M mutation, and bypass activation of signaling cascades. Ongoing preclinical efforts for treating resistance have started to translate into patient care (including clinical trials of the covalent EGFR-T790M TKIs AZD9291 and CO-1686) and hold promise to further boost the median survival of patients with EGFR mutated NSCLC

  17. ERCC1, toxicity and quality of life in advanced NSCLC patients randomized in a large multicentre phase III trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmar, Adam Christian; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2010-01-01

    Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited.......Excision repair cross complementation group 1 (ERCC1) is a promising biomarker in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, current evidence regarding the impact of ERCC1 on toxicity and quality of life (QOL) is limited....

  18. Diagnostic utility of LunX mRNA in peripheral blood and pleural fluid in patients with primary non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Zhigang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progress in lung cancer is hampered by the lack of clinically useful diagnostic markers. The goal of this study was to provide a detailed evaluation of lung cancer tumor markers indicative of molecular abnormalities and to assess their diagnostic utility in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. Methods Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to determine LunX, CK19, CEA, VEGF-C and hnRNP A2/B1 mRNA levels in peripheral blood and pleural fluid from NSCLC patients, compared with those from patients with other epithelial cancer (esophagus cancer and breast cancer, benign lung disease (pneumonia and tuberculo pleurisy and from healthy volunteers. Results In peripheral blood LunX mRNA was detectable in 75.0% (33/44 of patients with NSCLC, but not in patients with other epithelial cancer (0/28, benign lung disease (0/10 or in healthy volunteers (0/15. In contrast, all other genetic markers were detected in patients with either NSCLC, other epithelia cancer or benign lung disease, and in healthy volunteers. The expression level and positive rate of LunX mRNA in peripheral blood correlated with the pathologic stage of NSCLC (P LunX mRNA was detected in 92.9% (13/14 of malignant pleural fluid samples and was the only marker whose expression level was significantly different between malignant and benign pleural fluid (P LunX mRNA in the peripheral blood of NSCLC patients decreased shortly after clinical treatment (P = 0.005. Conclusion Of several commonly used genetic markers, LunX mRNA is the most specific gene marker for lung cancer and has potential diagnostic utility when measured in the peripheral blood and pleural fluid of NSCLC patients.

  19. Chlorella vulgaris Induces Apoptosis of Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Dong; Liang, Kai; Li, Kun; Wang, Guo-Quan; Zhang, Ke-Wei; Cai, Lei; Zhai, Shui-Ting; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris), a unicellular green microalga, has been widely used as a food supplement and reported to have antioxidant and anticancer properties. The current study was designed to assess the cytotoxic, apoptotic, and DNA-damaging effects of C. vulgaris growth factor (CGF), hot water C. vulgaris extracts, inlung tumor A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines. A549 cells, NCI-H460 cells, and normal human fibroblasts were treated with CGF at various concentrations (0-300 μg/ml) for 24 hr. The comet assay and γH2AX assay showed DNA damage in A549 and NCI-H460 cells upon CGF exposure. Evaluation of apoptosis by the TUNEL assay and DNA fragmentation analysis by agarose gel electrophoresis showed that CGF induced apoptosis in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Chlorella vulgaris hot water extract induced apoptosis and DNA damage in human lung carcinoma cells. CGF can thus be considered a potential cytotoxic or genotoxic drug for treatment of lung carcinoma. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Genetic variants in regulatory regions of microRNAs are associated with lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Yang, Jianshui; Zhu, Meng; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-07-26

    Genetic variants in regulatory regions of some miRNAs might be associated with lung cancer risk and survival. We performed a case-control study including 1341 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and 1982 controls to evaluate the associations of 7 potentially functional polymorphisms in several differently expressed miRNAs with NSCLC risk. Each SNP was also tested for the association with overall survival of 1001 NSCLC patients. We identified that rs9660710 in miR-200b/200a/429 cluster and rs763354 in miR-30a were significantly associated with NSCLC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.30, P = 0.002; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.98, P = 0.017; respectively]. However, no significant association between variants and NSCLC death risk was observed in survival analysis. Functional annotation showed that both rs9660710 and rs763354 were located in regulatory elements in lung cancer cells. Compared to normal tissues, miR-200a-3p, miR-200a-5p, miR-200b-3p, miR-200b-5p and miR-429 were significantly increased in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) tumors, whereas miR-30a-3p and miR-30a-5p were significantly decreased in tumors (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, we observed that rs9660710 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) or methylation eQTL for miR-429 expression in TCGA normal tissues. Our results indicated that rs9660710 in miR-200b/200a/429 cluster and rs763354 in miR-30a might modify the susceptibility to NSCLC.

  1. Epigenetic Therapy in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen V Liu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic dysregulation of gene function has been strongly implicated in carcinogenesis and is one of the mechanisms contributing to the development of lung cancer. The inherent reversibility of epigenetic alterations makes them viable therapeutic targets. Here, we review the therapeutic implications of epigenetic changes in lung cancer, and recent advances in therapeutic strategies targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation.

  2. High glucose contributes to the proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAS5-TRIB3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cheng-Zhi; Guo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Guo-Lei; Wang, Hong-Tao; Xu, Guang-Hui; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Zhen-Jiang; Chen, Yu-Hang; Wang, Jiao; Wang, Wen-Guang

    2018-01-24

    Despite the growing number of studies exhibited an association of diabetes mellitus (DM) and lung cancer progression, the concrete mechanism of DM aggravating lung cancer has not been elucidated. This study was to investigate whether and how high glucose (HG) contribute to the proliferation and migration of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in vitro. In the present study, we confirmed that HG promoted the proliferation and migration of NSCLC cells, and also induced an anti-apoptosis effect on NSCLC cells. Moreover, HG inhibited the expression of GAS5 in NSCLC cells but elevated the protein level of TRIB3. GAS5 overexpression promoted the degradation of TRIB3 protein by ubiquitination and inhibited the HG induced-proliferation, anti-apoptosis and migration of NSCLC cells. Importantly, TRIB3 overexpression reversed the effects of GAS5 on the HG-treated NSCLC cells. Taken together, down-regulated GAS5 by HG significantly enhanced the proliferation, anti-apoptosis and migration in NSCLC cells through TRIB3, thus promoting the carcinogenesis of NSCLC. ©2018 The Author(s).

  3. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Lung Cancer This booklet is about lung cancer. Learning about ...

  4. Construction of a T7 Human Lung Cancer cDNA Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wentao YUE

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Currently, only a limited numbers of tumor markers for non small lung cancer (NSCLC diagnosis, new biomarker, such as serum autoantibody may improve the early detection of lung cancer. Our objective is construction human lung squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma T7 phage display cDNA library from the tissues of NSCLC patients. Methods mRNA was isolated from a pool of total RNA extract from NSCLC tissues obtained from 5 adenocarcinomas and 5 squamous carcinomas, and then mRNA was reverse transcribed into double stranded cDNA. After digestion, the cDNA was inserted into T7Select 10-3 vector. The phage display cDNA library was constructed by package reaction in vitro and plate proliferation. Plaque assay and PCR were used to evaluate the library.Results Two T7 phage display cDNA library were established. Plaque assay show the titer of lung squamas carcinoma library was 1.8×106 pfu, and the adenocarcinoma library was 5×106 pfu. The phage titer of the amplified library were 3.2×1010 pfu/mL and 2.5×1010 pfu/mL. PCR amplification of random plaque show insert ratio were 100% (24/24 in adenocarcinoma library and 95.8% in human lung squamas carcinoma library (23/24. Insert range from 300 bp to 1 500 bp. Conclusion Two phage display cDNA library from NSCLC were constructed.

  5. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kylie H. [School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Okoye, Christian C.; Patel, Ravi B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Siva, Shankar [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002 (Australia); Biswas, Tithi; Ellis, Rodney J.; Yao, Min; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S., E-mail: Simon.Lo@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta), lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis), and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve). We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  6. Complications from Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kylie H. Kang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT has become a standard treatment option for early stage, node negative non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in patients who are either medically inoperable or refuse surgical resection. SBRT has high local control rates and a favorable toxicity profile relative to other surgical and non-surgical approaches. Given the excellent tumor control rates and increasing utilization of SBRT, recent efforts have focused on limiting toxicity while expanding treatment to increasingly complex patients. We review toxicities from SBRT for lung cancer, including central airway, esophageal, vascular (e.g., aorta, lung parenchyma (e.g., radiation pneumonitis, and chest wall toxicities, as well as radiation-induced neuropathies (e.g., brachial plexus, vagus nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. We summarize patient-related, tumor-related, dosimetric characteristics of these toxicities, review published dose constraints, and propose strategies to reduce such complications.

  7. Radon exposure and lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planinic, J.; Vukovic, B.; Faj, Z.; Radolic, V.; Suveljak, B.

    2003-01-01

    Although studies of radon exposure have established that Rn decay products are a cause of lung cancer among miners, the lung cancer risk to the general population from indoor radon remains unclear and controversial. Our epidemiological investigation of indoor radon influence on lung cancer incidence was carried out for 201 patients from the Osijek town. Ecological method was applied by using the town map with square fields of 1 km 2 and the town was divided into 24 fields. Multiple regression study for the lung cancer rate on field, average indoor radon exposure and smoking showed a positive linear double regression for the mentioned variables. Case-control study showed that patients, diseased of lung cancer, dwelt in homes with significantly higher radon concentrations, by comparison to the average indoor radon level of control sample. (author)

  8. Emerging treatments and combinations in the management of NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Martin; Mellemgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    There remains an unmet need for effective, well-tolerated treatment options in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to alleviate the disease burden for a broad selection of patients. Nintedanib is a potent, oral, triple angiokinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast...

  9. Cytoplasmic RAP1 mediates cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Lan, Xiaoying; Shi, Xianping; Zhao, Kai; Wang, Dongrui; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Faqian; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-05-18

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (e.g., cisplatin) are the first-line drugs to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but NSCLC develops resistance to the agent, limiting therapeutic efficacy. Despite many approaches to identifying the underlying mechanism for cisplatin resistance, there remains a lack of effective targets in the population that resist cisplatin treatment. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of cytoplasmic RAP1, a previously identified positive regulator of NF-κB signaling, in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. We found that the expression of cytoplasmic RAP1 was significantly higher in high-grade NSCLC tissues than in low-grade NSCLC; compared with a normal pulmonary epithelial cell line, the A549 NSCLC cells exhibited more cytoplasmic RAP1 expression as well as increased NF-κB activity; cisplatin treatment resulted in a further increase of cytoplasmic RAP1 in A549 cells; overexpression of RAP1 desensitized the A549 cells to cisplatin, and conversely, RAP1 depletion in the NSCLC cells reduced their proliferation and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin, indicating that RAP1 is required for cell growth and has a key mediating role in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. The RAP1-mediated cisplatin resistance was associated with the activation of NF-κB signaling and the upregulation of the antiapoptosis factor BCL-2. Intriguingly, in the small portion of RAP1-depleted cells that survived cisplatin treatment, no induction of NF-κB activity and BCL-2 expression was observed. Furthermore, in established cisplatin-resistant A549 cells, RAP1 depletion caused BCL2 depletion, caspase activation and dramatic lethality to the cells. Hence, our results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic RAP1-NF-κB-BCL2 axis represents a key pathway to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells, identifying RAP1 as a marker and a potential therapeutic target for cisplatin resistance of NSCLC.

  10. Association of microRNA-33a Molecular Signature with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Prognosis after Chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Kun Hou

    Full Text Available This study aims to explore the expression pattern and prognostic significance of miR-33a in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with adjuvant chemotherapy.MiR-33aexpression in NSCLC was analyzed in silico using the GEO database and was subsequently confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR in 147 NSCLC biopsies. Among these, 32 of these biopsies were paired with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues. The survival analysis of NSCLC by Kaplan-Meier estimates was stratified based on miR-33a expression. In addition, multivariate survival analysis in corresponding groups of NSCLC patients was conducted by Cox proportional hazards regression model.The in silico analysis of miR-33a expression in NSCLC resulted to its down-regulation in different tumor types. The expression level of miR-33a was lower in each grade of NSCLC tumor biopsies than in normal lung tissues. Univariate and multivariate survival analysis further established that low miR-33a expression was an important risk factor for overall survival and disease free survival in NSCLC patients.Our study implied that miR-33a expression levels may have an essential role in NSCLC progression, and could act as a specific and sensitive biomarker for NSCLC patients who have undergone adjuvant chemotherapy.

  11. Clinical value of 99Tcm-octreotide SPECT/CT in diagnostics of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaofang; Li Mei; Liu Yong; Li Ran; Xu Jie; Sun yongchang; Dai Haojie

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of 99 Tc m -Octreotide SPECT-CT in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods: Sixty-five consecutive patients with suspected lung cancer received intravenous injection of 740 MBq 99 Tc m -Octreotide and additional SPECT images of the chest were performed at 4h post injection. The SPECT/CT images were interpreted separately. The tumor uptake of 99 Tc m -Octreotide was visually determined and then measured and expressed as the activity ratio of tumor to normal tissues (T/N). The differences between lung cancer and benign lung lesion and between SCLC and NSCLC, and between adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma were studied by statistical analysis. Moreover, the receiver operating characteristic ROC curves were plotted and the predicted probabilities and areas under the curve were calculated. Results: Fifty-one patients and fourteen patients in 65 cases were diagnosed as lung cancer and benign lung lesion by histopathological analysis, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 99 Tc m -Octreotide SPECT/CT in diagnosis of lung cancer were 92.2%, 85.7%, 95.9% and 75%, respectively. The area under ROC curve was 0.889 (P 99 Tc m -Octreotide SPECT/CT could play an important role in the diagnosis of lung cancer, and it may be useful for identifying SCLC and NSCLC. (authors)

  12. CXCR4/CXCL12 in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Metastasis to the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiano Cavallaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related mortality throughout the world. Patients die of local progression, disseminated disease, or both. At least one third of the people with lung cancer develop brain metastases at some point during their disease, even often before the diagnosis of lung cancer is made. The high rate of brain metastasis makes lung cancer the most common type of tumor to spread to the brain. It is critical to understand the biologic basis of brain metastases to develop novel diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. This review will focus on the emerging data supporting the involvement of the chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 in the brain metastatic evolution of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC and the pharmacological tools that may be used to interfere with this signaling axis.

  13. New targeted treatments for non-small-cell lung cancer – role of nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zago G

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Giulia Zago,1,2,* Mirte Muller,1,* Michel van den Heuvel,1 Paul Baas1 1Department of Thoracic Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek (NKI-AvL, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; 2Medical Oncology 2, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV, Padova, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is often diagnosed at an advanced stage of disease, where it is no longer amenable to curative treatment. During the last decades, the survival has only improved significantly for lung cancer patients who have tumors harboring a driver mutation. Therefore, there is a clear unmet need for effective therapies for patients with no mutation. Immunotherapy has emerged as an effective treatment for different cancer types. Nivolumab, a monoclonal inhibitory antibody against PD-1 receptor, can prolong survival of NSCLC patients, with a manageable toxicity profile. In two Phase III trials, nivolumab was compared to docetaxel in patients with, respectively, squamous (CheckMate 017 and non-squamous NSCLC (CheckMate 057. In both trials, nivolumab significantly reduced the risk of death compared to docetaxel (41% and 27% lower risk of death for squamous and non-squamous NSCLC, respectively. Therefore, nivolumab has been approved in the US and in Europe as second-line treatment for advanced NSCLC. Unfortunately, accurate predictive factors for patient selection are lacking, making it difficult to decide who will benefit and who will not. Currently, there are many ongoing trials that evaluate the efficacy of nivolumab in different settings and in combination with other agents. This paper reviews the present literature about the role of nivolumab in the treatment of NSCLC. Particular attention has been given to efficacy studies, toxicity profile, and current and emerging predictive factors. Keywords: nivolumab, advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, immunotherapy, anti-PD-1

  14. Targeted therapy for localized non-small-cell lung cancer: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paleiron N

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Paleiron,1 Olivier Bylicki,2 Michel André,1 Emilie Rivière,1 Frederic Grassin,1 Gilles Robinet,3 Christos Chouaïd4 On behalf of the GFPC Group 1Chest Department, HIA Clermont Tonnerre, Brest, 2Chest Department, HIA Percy, Clamart, 3Chest Department, CHU de Brest, Brest, 4GRC OncoEst, Université Paris XII, Paris, France Abstract: Targeted therapies have markedly improved the management of patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, but their efficacy in localized NSCLC is less well established. The aim of this review is to analyze trials of targeted therapies in localized NSCLC. In patients with wild-type EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have shown no efficacy in Phase III trials. Few data are available for EGFR-mutated localized NSCLC, as routine biological profiling is not recommended. Available studies are small, often retrospectives, and/or conducted in a single-center making it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Ongoing prospective Phase III trials are comparing adjuvant tyrosine kinase inhibitor administration versus adjuvant chemotherapy. By analogy with the indication of bevacizumab in advanced NSCLC, use of antiangiogenic agents in the perioperative setting is currently restricted to nonsquamous NSCLC. Several trials of adjuvant or neoadjuvant bevacizumab are planned or ongoing, but for the moment there is no evidence of efficacy. Data on perioperative use of biomarkers in early-stage NSCLC come mainly from small, retrospective, uncontrolled studies. Assessment of customized adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy in localized NSCLC (with or without oncogenic driver mutations is a major challenge. Keywords: targeted therapy, non-small-cell lung cancer, adjuvant, neo-adjuvant, surgery 

  15. The Combination of the Tumor Markers Suggests the Histological Diagnosis of Lung Cancer

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    Linjie Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor markers are beneficial for the diagnosis and therapy monitoring of lung cancer. However, the value of tumor markers in lung cancer histological diagnosis is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the serum levels of six tumor markers (CEA, CYFRA21-1, SCC, NSE, ProGRP, and CA125 in 2097 suspected patients with lung cancer and determined whether the combination of the tumor markers was useful for histological diagnosis of lung cancer. We found that CYFRA21-1 was the most sensitive marker in NSCLC. ProGRP showed a better clinical performance than that of NSE in discriminating between SCLC and NSCLC. The serum level of CYFRA21-1 or SCC was significantly higher in squamous carcinoma (p<0.05, and the levels of ProGRP and NSE were significantly higher in SCLC (p<0.05. According to the criteria established, SCLC and NSCLC were discriminated with sensitivity of 87.12 and 62.63% and specificity of 64.61 and 99.5%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity in the differentiation of adenocarcinoma and squamous carcinoma were 68.1 and 81.63% and 70.73 and 65.93%, with NPV of 46.03 and 68.97% and PPV of 85.82 and 79.47%, respectively. Our results suggested the combination of six tumor markers could discriminate the histological types of lung cancer.

  16. Correlation between Pre-treatment Anemia and Prognosis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhua DENG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC might contract anemia, however, whether anemia is one of the independent prognostic factors to the patients with NSCLC is still controversial. So the aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between anemia and overall survival (OS in patients with NSCLC. Methods 1 018 patients with operable NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed in our hospital from January 2000 to December 2008. Results The occurrence of anemia before operation was 252/1 018 (24.1%. The OS in NSCLC patients without anemia was (2 425.98±50.03 days, and the OS in patients with anemia was (2 107.15±93.86 days. There was significant difference in the OS between them (P=0.001. The patients with anemia in stage I had shorter survival time than those without anemia (P < 0.001. But there was no difference in other stage patients. TNM stage, gender, tumor size and lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with OS using Cox regression analysis. Conclusion Anemia is correlated with survival in operable NSCLC patients. Moreover, it is an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC patients with stage I.

  17. High NOTCH activity induces radiation resistance in non small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theys, Jan; Yahyanejad, Sanaz; Habets, Roger; Span, Paul; Dubois, Ludwig; Paesmans, Kim; Kattenbeld, Bo; Cleutjens, Jack; Groot, Arjan J.; Schuurbiers, Olga C.J.; Lambin, Philippe; Bussink, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with advanced NSCLC have survival rates <15%. The NOTCH pathway plays an important role during lung development and physiology but is often deregulated in lung cancer, making it a potential therapeutic target. We investigated NOTCH signaling in NSCLC and hypothesized that high NOTCH activity contributes to radiation resistance. Materials and methods: NOTCH signaling in NSCLC patient samples was investigated using quantitative RT-PCR. H460 NSCLC cells with either high or blocked NOTCH activity were generated and their radiation sensitivity monitored using clonogenic assays. In vivo, xenograft tumors were irradiated and response assessed using growth delay. Microenvironmental parameters were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results: Patients with high NOTCH activity in tumors showed significantly worse disease-free survival. In vitro, NOTCH activity did not affect the proliferation or intrinsic radiosensitivity of NSCLC cells. In contrast, xenografts with blocked NOTCH activity grew slower than wild type tumors. Tumors with high NOTCH activity grew significantly faster, were more hypoxic and showed a radioresistant phenotype. Conclusions: We demonstrate an important role for NOTCH in tumor growth and correlate high NOTCH activity with poor prognosis and radioresistance. Blocking NOTCH activity in NSCLC might be a promising intervention to improve outcome after radiotherapy

  18. High Expression of PHGDH Predicts Poor Prognosis in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Zhu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumors have exceptionally high demands for energy and anabolism because of their rapid growth. The de novo serine synthesis pathway initiated by phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase (PHGDH has been recognized as a hallmark of metabolic adaption in carcinogenesis. The oncogenic role and prognostic value of PHGDH have been investigated in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, melanoma, cervical cancer, and colon cancer. Due to the importance of PHGDH in cancer, we attempted to determine the clinical significance of PHGDH in 319 patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. We evaluated the mRNA and protein expression levels of PHGDH gene, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and tissue array–based immunohistochemistry, respectively. Significantly increased PHGDH expression in mRNA and protein levels was identified in tumor tissues versus matched adjacent nontumor tissues. More interestingly, immunohistochemical expression of PHGDH was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = .021 and TNM stage (P = .016. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that NSCLC patients with low levels of PHGDH outperformed patients with high levels of PHGDH regarding 5-year overall survival. Significantly longer survival in the former suggested the prognostic implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. Multivariate survival analysis using Cox regression model demonstrated that high PHGDH levels and advanced TNM stage (III + IV were independent predictors of prognosis in NSCLC. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis confirmed the increase in PHGDH transcripts (data from The Cancer Genome Atlas and its prognostic value (Kaplan-Meier plotter in NSCLC. In conclusion, this study suggested the clinical implication of PHGDH in NSCLC. PHGDH may be a promising therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  19. Lung cancer-A global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Amanda; Ganti, Apar Kishor

    2017-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. While tobacco exposure is responsible for the majority of lung cancers, the incidence of lung cancer in never smokers, especially Asian women, is increasing. There is a global variation in lung cancer biology with EGFR mutations being more common in Asian patients, while Kras mutation is more common in Caucasians. This review will focus on the global variations in lung cancer and its treatment. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Prognostic impact of vitamin B6 metabolism in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Olaussen, Ken André; Pinna, Guillaume; Eisenberg, Tobias; Goubar, Aïcha; Martins, Isabelle; Michels, Judith; Kratassiouk, Gueorgui; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Scoazec, Marie; Vacchelli, Erika; Schlemmer, Frederic; Kepp, Oliver; Shen, Shensi; Tailler, Maximilien; Niso-Santano, Mireia; Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Adjemian, Sandy; Jemaà, Mohamed; Chaba, Kariman; Pailleret, Claire; Michaud, Mickaël; Pietrocola, Federico; Tajeddine, Nicolas; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Araujo, Natalia; Morozova, Nadya; Robert, Thomas; Ripoche, Hugues; Commo, Frederic; Besse, Benjamin; Validire, Pierre; Fouret, Pierre; Robin, Angélique; Dorvault, Nicolas; Girard, Philippe; Gouy, Sébastien; Pautier, Patricia; Jägemann, Nora; Nickel, Ann-Christin; Marsili, Sabrina; Paccard, Caroline; Servant, Nicolas; Hupé, Philippe; Behrens, Carmen; Behnam-Motlagh, Parviz; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Cremer, Isabelle; Damotte, Diane; Alifano, Marco; Midttun, Oivind; Ueland, Per Magne; Lazar, Vladimir; Dessen, Philippe; Zischka, Hans; Chatelut, Etienne; Castedo, Maria; Madeo, Frank; Barillot, Emmanuel; Thomale, Juergen; Wistuba, Ignacio Ivan; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Zitvogel, Laurence; Soria, Jean-Charles; Harel-Bellan, Annick; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-08-30

    Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are routinely treated with cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin. Through a genome-wide siRNA-based screen, we identified vitamin B6 metabolism as a central regulator of cisplatin responses in vitro and in vivo. By aggravating a bioenergetic catastrophe that involves the depletion of intracellular glutathione, vitamin B6 exacerbates cisplatin-mediated DNA damage, thus sensitizing a large panel of cancer cell lines to apoptosis. Moreover, vitamin B6 sensitizes cancer cells to apoptosis induction by distinct types of physical and chemical stress, including multiple chemotherapeutics. This effect requires pyridoxal kinase (PDXK), the enzyme that generates the bioactive form of vitamin B6. In line with a general role of vitamin B6 in stress responses, low PDXK expression levels were found to be associated with poor disease outcome in two independent cohorts of patients with NSCLC. These results indicate that PDXK expression levels constitute a biomarker for risk stratification among patients with NSCLC. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cetuximab for treating non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Luca; Guida, Alessandro; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent signaling plays a crucial role in epithelial cancer biology, and dictated the development of several targeting agents. The mouse-human chimeric antibody Cetuximab was among the first to be developed. After about two decades of clinical research it has gained a significant place in the management of advanced colorectal and head and neck cancers, whereas its development in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not led to a place in routine clinical practice, because of marginal clinical benefit despite statistically significant Phase III trials. Recent data from ongoing trials suggest that more careful selection based on molecular markers may identify good responders. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review the literature concerning basic science studies identifying EGFR as a therapeutic target, pharmacological development of Cetuximab, its pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and clinical trials on Cetuximab in NSCLC, focusing on recent findings on putative predictive biomarkers. Expert opinion: Cetuximab currently has no role in NSCLC treatment outside of research settings. We argue that failure to identify a predictive biomarker early on has hampered its chances to enter routine practice. Although recent research suggests benefit in highly selected patient subsets, its potential impact is severely dampened by lack of regulatory body approval and the emergence of competitors for the same niches.

  2. miR-151a induces partial EMT by regulating E-cadherin in NSCLC cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Iben; Sanders, K J; Idica, A

    2017-01-01

    mortality. Here, we demonstrate that miR-151a is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient specimens, as compared to healthy lung. In addition, miR-151a overexpression promotes proliferation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces tumor cell migration and invasion of NSCLC......-cadherin in miR-151a NSCLC cell lines potently repressed miR-151a-induced partial EMT and cell migration of NSCLC cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that miR-151a functions as an oncomiR in NSCLC by targeting E-cadherin mRNA and inducing proliferation, migration and partial EMT....

  3. Cost-effective analysis of PET application in NSCLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Aichun; Liu Jianjun; Sun Xiaoguang; Shi Yiping; Huang Gang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of PET and CT application for diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in China. Methods: Using decision analysis method the diagnostic efficiency of PET and CT for diagnosis of NSCLC in china was analysed. And also the value of cost for accurate diagnosis (CAD), cost for accurate staging (CAS) and cost for effective therapy (CAT) was calculated. Results: (1) For the accurate diagnosis, CT was much more cost-effective than PET. (2) For the accurate staging, CT was still more cost-effective than PET. (3) For the all over diagnostic and therapeutic cost, PET was more cost-effective than CT. (4) The priority of PET to CT was for the diagnosis of stage I NSCLC. Conclusion: For the management of NSCLC patient in China, CT is more cost-effective for screening, whereas PET for clinical staging and monitoring therapeutic effect. (authors)

  4. Gefitinib: a pharmacoeconomic profile of its use in patients with Non Small Cell Lung Cancer EGFR+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Sacchi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common form of cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. The mortality rates are highest in males and second highest in females, after breast cancer. The genetic predisposition to Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC is still under investigation, however, studies have shown that the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR, a receptor tyrosine kinase is frequently over-expressed and activated to a phosphorylated state in NSCLC. The activity of EGFR in cancer cells results in the phosphorylation of downstream proteins that promote cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis, and inhibition of apoptosis. Targeting the EGFR pathway therefore constitutes a relevant strategy for cancer therapy. Gefitinib is a selective inhibitor of the EGFR tyrosine kinase and is indicated for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC with activating mutations of EGFR-TK. From the pharmacoeconomic point of view gefitinib is dominant (more effective and less expensive compared to the alternatives. In conclusion, gefitinib is a treatment option for NSCLC tumors with a high clinical and economic value in the Italian setting.

  5. Optical and Functional Imaging in Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.H. van der Leest (Cor)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the second most common cancer in men and women, and is the leading cause of cancer related death. In industrialized countries the mortality rate of lung cancer is higher than the mortality rate of breast, colorectal and prostate cancer combined 1. When lung cancer is

  6. [Principles of radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esik, Olga; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Hideghéty, Katalin; Agócs, László; Pikó, Béla; Lengyel, Zsolt; Petrányi, Agota; Pisch, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The long-term survival probability for Hungarian lung cancer patients is 10% worse than the best results published in the most highly developed countries (the mean 5-year survival probability in Hungary is 5%, in contrast with the 15% survival probability in the USA). On the basis of the international recommendations and personal experience, an attempt was made to formulate the guidelines for radiotherapy as one of the fundamental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment modalities for national use. An expert panel was set up comprising physicians from 6 radiotherapeutic centers (the National Institute of Oncology / Semmelweis University, Budapest; the Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; the University of Kaposvár; the University of Essen; the University of Debrecen; and the County Hospital of Gyula). Experts in two important medical fields closely related to radiotherapy (surgery and diagnostic imaging) were also engaged in the elaboration of the manuscript. Discussion of the most important principles of the radiotherapy and an overview of the prognostic factors was followed by a critical analysis of the protocols applied in the radiotherapy of Hungarian NSCLC patients during recent decades. The new guidelines suggested for the radiotherapy of NSCLC are presented separately for the postoperative period, marginally resectable tumors, and the aggressive or non-aggressive radiotherapy of inoperable tumors. Detailed accounts are given of the techniques of external irradiation and brachytherapy, and of the acute and late radiation-induced damage of normal tissues. The authors believe that this document may be instrumental in improving the survival index of Hungarian NSCLC patients in the near future.

  7. Treatment of Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A.; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Results: The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Conclusions: Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the

  8. Summary of presentations from the 46th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology: focus on non-small cell lung cancer (2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Baggstrom, Maria Q; Somaiah, Neeta; Simon, George R; Govindan, Ramaswamy

    2011-01-01

    The promising results of crizotinib in molecularly selected patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumor cells had a novel fusion protein involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase presented at the 2010 American Society of Clinical Oncology reinforce once again the importance of understanding molecular heterogeneity of lung cancer and careful patient selection. Several other important issues were the subject of presentations related to lung cancer at the recently concluded American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting. The articles covered a wide variety of topics including optimal staging techniques to detect mediastinal nodal involvement, the role of platinum-based doublet chemotherapy in the management of elderly patients with advanced NSCLC, use of maintenance therapy with gemcitabine, and the impact of early introduction of organized palliative care in improving the quality of life of patients with advanced NSCLC. This report provides a brief overview of the presentations related to lung cancer that are relevant to clinical practice and future research.

  9. Staging Lung Cancer: Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Girish S; Viswanathan, Chitra; Carter, Brett W; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Truong, Mylene T; Sabloff, Bradley S

    2018-05-01

    The updated eighth edition of the tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) classification for lung cancer includes revisions to T and M descriptors. In terms of the M descriptor, the classification of intrathoracic metastatic disease as M1a is unchanged from TNM-7. Extrathoracic metastatic disease, which was classified as M1b in TNM-7, is now subdivided into M1b (single metastasis, single organ) and M1c (multiple metastases in one or multiple organs) descriptors. In this article, the rationale for changes in the M descriptors, the utility of preoperative staging with PET/computed tomography, and the treatment options available for patients with oligometastatic disease are discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dilemmas in Lung Cancer Staging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Ioannis

    2018-05-01

    The advent of the 8th edition of the lung cancer staging system reflects a further meticulous evidence-based advance in the stratification of the survival of patients with lung cancer. Although addressing many limitations of earlier staging systems, several limitations in staging remain. This article reviews from a radiological perspective the limitations of the current staging system, highlighting the process of TNM restructuring, the residual issues with regards to the assignment of T, N, M descriptors, and their associated stage groupings and how these dilemmas impact guidance of multidisciplinary teams taking care of patients with lung cancer. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Non-small cell lung cancer in young adults: presentation and survival in the English National Lung Cancer Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, A L; Khakwani, A; Free, C M; Tata, L J; Stanley, R A; Peake, M D; Hubbard, R B; Baldwin, D R

    2015-11-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in young adults is a rare but devastating illness with significant socioeconomic implications, and studies of this patient subgroup are limited. This study employed the National Lung Cancer Audit to compare the clinical features and survival of young adults with NSCLC with the older age groups. A retrospective cohort review using a validated national audit dataset. Data were analysed for the period between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2011. Young adults were defined as between 18 and 39 years, and all others were divided into decade age groups, up to the 80 years and above group. We performed logistic and Cox regression analyses to assess clinical outcomes. Of a total of 1 46 422 patients, 651 (0.5%) were young adults, of whom a higher proportion had adenocarcinoma (48%) than in any other age group. Stage distribution of NSCLC was similar across the age groups and 71% of young patients had stage IIIb/IV. Performance status (PS) was 0-1 for 85%. Young adults were more likely to have surgery and chemotherapy compared with the older age groups and had better overall and post-operative survival. The proportion with adenocarcinoma, better PS and that receiving surgery or chemotherapy diminished progressively with advancing decade age groups. In our cohort of young adults with NSCLC, the majority had good PS despite the same late-stage disease as older patients. They were more likely to have treatment and survive longer than older patients. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Anti-tumor activity of high-dose EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor and sequential docetaxel in wild type EGFR non-small cell lung cancer cell nude mouse xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Ning; Zhang, Qianqian; Fang, Shu; Han, Xiao; Wang, Zhehai

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with wild-type epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is still a challenge. This study explored antitumor activity of high-dose icotinib (an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) plus sequential docetaxel against wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells-generated nude mouse xenografts. Nude mice were subcutaneously injected with wild-type EGFR NSCLC A549 cells and divided into different groups for 3-week treatment. Tumor xenograft volumes were monitored and record...

  13. Lung Cancer in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Chundi; Fan Jixiong; Wang Liuhu; Huang Yiehan; Nie Guanghua

    1987-01-01

    This paper analyese the clinical data of 39 uranium miners with lung cancer and of 20 patients with lung cancer who have not been exposed to uranium as control. The age of uranium miners with lung cancer was 36∼61 with an average of 48.8, nine years earlier than that of the control group (57.3). In the uranium miner patients the right lung was more susceptible to cancer than the left, the ratio being 2.5:1. However, in the control group the right lung had an equal incidence of cancer as the left lung. The relative frequency of small cell anaplastic carcinoma in uranium miner was higher than that in the control group. In the miner patients the mean occupation history was 11.1 ± 5.2 years; the exposure dose to radon and its daughters in 50% patients was 0.504J(120 WLM). The etiologic factor of lung cancer in uranium miners is strongly attributed, in addition to smoking, to the exposure to radon and its daughters in uranium mines

  14. Pretreatment advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) for predicting early progression in nivolumab-treated patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroyama, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Tamiya, Motohiro; Tamiya, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayako; Okamoto, Norio; Nakahama, Kenji; Taniguchi, Yoshihiko; Isa, Shun-Ichi; Inoue, Takako; Imamura, Fumio; Atagi, Shinji; Hirashima, Tomonori

    2018-01-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression status is inadequate for indicating nivolumab in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because the baseline advanced lung cancer inflammation index (ALI) is reportedly associated with patient outcomes, we investigated whether the pretreatment ALI is prognostic in NSCLC patients treated with nivolumab. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients treated with nivolumab for advanced NSCLC between December 2015 and May 2016 at three Japanese institutes. Multivariate logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the impact of the pretreatment ALI (and other inflammation-related parameters) on progression-free survival (PFS) and early progression (i.e., within 8 weeks after starting nivolumab). A total of 201 patients were analyzed; their median age was 68 years (range, 27-87 years), 67% were men, and 24% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or higher. An ECOG performance status ≥2, serum albumin ALI ALI ALI was found to be a significant independent predictor of early progression in patients with advanced NSCLC receiving nivolumab, and may help identify patients likely to benefit from continued nivolumab treatment in routine clinical practice. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cytology-based treatment decision in primary lung cancer: is it accurate enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Lama; Roll, Patrice; Payan, Marie-José; Liprandi, Agnès; Dutau, Hervé; Astoul, Philippe; Robaglia-Schlupp, Andrée; Loundou, Anderson; Barlesi, Fabrice

    2012-03-01

    Accurate distinction of lung cancer types has become increasingly important as recent trials have shown differential response to chemotherapy among non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) subtypes. Cytological procedures are frequently used but their diagnostic accuracy has been previously questioned. However, new endoscopic and cytological techniques might have improved cytological accuracy in comparison with prior findings. The aim of this study was to reassess cytological accuracy for diagnosis of lung cancer subtypes. A retrospective chart review of subjects who underwent fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) for suspicion of lung cancer in 2007-2008, was undertaken. Reports of bronchoscopically derived cytological specimens were compared to those of histological material. Endoscopic findings and specific investigational techniques were taken into account. A total of 467 FOB with both cytological and histological diagnostic techniques were performed in 449 subjects. Patients consisted of 345 men and 104 women (median age, 65 yrs). Cytology proved malignancy in 157 patients. Cytologically diagnosed carcinomas were classified into squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) in 56, adenocarcinoma (ADC) in 6, small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) in 12, non-small cell lung carcinoma not otherwise specified (NSCLC-NOS) in 71, and unclassified carcinoma in 12. Cytology correlated fairly with biopsy specimens, as agreement was observed in 83% of SCLC, 100% of ADC, 74% of SqCC and 8% of NSCLC-NOS. Interestingly, 61% of cytologically identified NSCLC-NOS were classified as ADC by histology. Cytological accuracy improved in case of an endobronchial lesion, mainly for SqCC. These results indicate that cytological accuracy remains fair with regard to diagnosis of squamous and non-squamous lung cancer subtypes. Improvement of cytological accuracy is expected however with novel diagnostic strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Hans; Kleijnen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy. Patients with NSCLC are therefore tested for EGFR-TK tumour gene mutations to inform treatment decisions. There are a variety of tests available to detect these mutations. T...

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Tumor Markers for Diagnosis in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Xie, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ma, Ling-Yun; Wen, Zhong-Guang

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1), and carbohydrateantigen 125 (CA125) for the clinical diagnosis of non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Serum CEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 were assessed in 140 patients with NSCLC, 90 patients with benign lung disease and 90 normal control subjects, and differences of expression were compared in each group, and joint effects of these tumor markers in the diagnosis of NSCLC were analyzed. Serum CEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 in patients with NSCLC were significantly higher than those with benign lung disease and normal controls (PCEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 were 49.45%, 59.67%, and 44.87% respectively. As expected, combinations of these tumor markers improved their sensitivity for NSCLC. The combined detection of CEA+CYFRA21-1 was the most cost-effective combination which had higher sensitivity and specificity in NSCLC. Elevation of serum CEA and CYFRA21-1 was significantly associated with pathological types (PCEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 was significantly associated with TNM staging (PCEA, CYFRA21-1 and CA125 is of diagnostic value in the diagnosis of lung cancer, and a joint detection of these three tumor markers, could greatly improve the sensitivity of diagnosis on NSCLC. Combined detection of CEA+CYFRA21-1 proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of NSCLC, which can be used to screen the high-risk group.

  18. EGFR targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer: potential role of cetuximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad A Reade

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Chad A Reade1, Apar Kishor Ganti1,21Department of Internal Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA; 2Section of Oncology-Hematology, Department of internal Medicine, VA Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USAAbstract: Chemotherapy alone has limited ability to significantly improve survival in non-small lung cancer (NSCLC beyond what has already been achieved. The epidermal growth factor (EGF pathway plays a vital role in the pathogenesis and progression of NSCLC. Two classes of drugs inhibit the EGF receptor (EGFR pathway: small molecules that inhibit the intracellular tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor, and monoclonal antibodies that target the extracellular domain in the ligand-binding region. Cetuximab is a human – mouse chimeric immunoglobulin G1 class monoclonal antibody directed against EGFR. Preclinical studies with cetuximab suggested that there was inhibition of growth of human NSCLC cell lines. Cetuximab is currently the focus of intense investigation in various patient populations with NSCLC. This review focuses on clinical trials of cetuximab in NSCLC and identifies future directions with this agent.Keywords: non-small cell lung cancer, EGFR, cetuximab, monoclonal antibodies

  19. Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy for Octogenarians With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Eriguchi, Takahisa [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kaneko, Takeshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Department of Respirology, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Morita, Satoshi [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Kanagawa (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi [Respiratory Disease Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, Kanagawa (Japan); Division of Respiratory and Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Aoki, Yousuke; Oku, Yohei [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively investigate treatment outcomes of stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy (SABR) for octogenarians with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2012, 109 patients aged ≥80 years with T1-2N0M0 NSCLC were treated with SABR: 47 patients had histology-unproven lung cancer; 62 patients had pathologically proven NSCLC. The prescribed doses were either 50 Gy/5 fractions for peripheral tumors or 40 Gy/5 fractions for centrally located tumors. The treatment outcomes, toxicities, and the correlating factors for overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Results: The median follow-up duration after SABR was 24.2 (range, 3.0-64.6) months. Only limited toxicities were observed, except for 1 grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. The 3-year local, regional, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 82.3%, 90.1%, and 76.8%, respectively. The OS and lung cancer-specific survival rates were 53.7% and 70.8%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that medically inoperable, low body mass index, high T stage, and high C-reactive protein were the predictors for short OS. The OS for the operable octogenarians was significantly better than that for inoperable (P<.01). Conclusions: Stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy for octogenarians was feasible, with excellent OS. Multivariate analysis revealed that operability was one of the predictors for OS. For medically operable octogenarians with early-stage NSCLC, SABR should be prospectively compared with resection.

  20. Role of artificial intelligence in the care of patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Mohamad; Kanevsky, Jonathan; Kafi, Kamran; Chandelier, Florent; Giles, Francis J

    2018-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In up to 57% of patients, it is diagnosed at an advanced stage and the 5-year survival rate ranges between 10%-16%. There has been a significant amount of research using machine learning to generate tools using patient data to improve outcomes. This narrative review is based on research material obtained from PubMed up to Nov 2017. The search terms include "artificial intelligence," "machine learning," "lung cancer," "Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)," "diagnosis" and "treatment." Recent studies support the use of computer-aided systems and the use of radiomic features to help diagnose lung cancer earlier. Other studies have looked at machine learning (ML) methods that offer prognostic tools to doctors and help them in choosing personalized treatment options for their patients based on molecular, genetics and histological features. Combining artificial intelligence approaches into health care may serve as a beneficial tool for patients with NSCLC, and this review outlines these benefits and current shortcomings throughout the continuum of care. We present a review of the various applications of ML methods in NSCLC as it relates to improving diagnosis, treatment and outcomes. © 2018 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. A Comparison of Endoscopic Ultrasound Guided Biopsy and Positron Emission Tomography with Integrated Computed Tomography in Lung Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Vilmann, P; Krasnik, K

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Exact staging of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is important to improve selection of resectable and curable patients for surgery. Positron emission tomography with integrated computed tomography (PET/CT) and endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle...... aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) are new and promising methods, but indications in lung cancer staging are controversial. Only few studies have compared the 2 methods. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the diagnostic values of PET/CT and EUS-FNA for diagnosing advanced lung cancer in patients, who...... had both procedures performed. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 27 patients considered to be potential candidates for resection of NSCLC underwent PET/CT and EUS-FNA. Diagnoses were confirmed either by open thoracotomy, mediastinoscopy or clinical follow-up. Advanced lung cancer was defined as tumour...

  2. SU-F-T-112: Long-Term Follow-Up of NSCLC Patients Treated with Lung SBRT Using the Modified Conformal Arc (MDCA) Planning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku, E; Desai, A [Frank H Netter, MD, School of Medicine, North Haven, CT (United States); Fang, D; Lawrence, C; Iannuzzi, C; Shi, C [St. Vincent’s Medical Center, Bridgeport, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To assess long-term toxicity and primary tumor changes for Stage I/II non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients after treatment with lung SBRT using the modified dynamic conformal arc (MDCA) planning technique. Methods: Clinical and radiograph data from electronic health records of 15 NSCLC patients treated with lung SBRT utilizing the MDCA technique between October 2011 and July 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. MDCA uses a coplanar beam arrangement, patient body center for the beam isocenter, and six partial rotation conformal arcs to target the tumor. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) guidelines for treatment parameters were followed. Most patients received 5 radiation fractions (Range: 3 to 7 fractions) with 48 hours between each fraction. Median total dose was 60 Gy (range: 45 to 70 Gy). Results: Median follow-up was 18 months (range: 6–51 months). Median age was 72.5 years (range: 48–90 years). Post-treatment findings included fatigue (n = 5) and chronic chest wall pain (n=1). Seven patients reported respiratory symptoms, which included: cough (n = 4), dyspnea (n = 5), and hemoptysis (n = 1). No patients deaths or grade ≥4 toxicity were recorded. Radiographic scarring was seen on computed tomography (CT) imaging in 6 patients. Local control rate was 93.3% (n = 14) and 1 patient had local recurrence. Conclusion: Our results were very similar to RTOG 0236 findings reported by Timmerman et al. – our local control rate was 93.3% compared to their 3-year primary tumor control rate of 97.6%. Toxicity rates were also similar – RTOG 0236 constitutional symptoms and pulmonary/upper respiratory symptoms rates were 36.4% and 60.0%, respectively, while ours were 33.3% and 46.7%, respectively. We were limited by a small sample size and relatively short follow-up but our findings support the use of the MDCA technique for lung SBRT treatment of Stage I/II NSCLC.

  3. Krüppel-like factor 4 promotes c-Met amplification-mediated gefitinib resistance in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wei; Xie, Qianyi; Liu, Suo; Ji, Ying; Li, Chunyun; Wang, Chunle; Jin, Longyu

    2018-06-01

    Gefitinib has been widely used in the first-line treatment of advanced EGFR-mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, many NSCLC patients will acquire resistance to gefitinib after 9-14 months of treatment. This study revealed that Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) contributes to the formation of gefitinib resistance in c-Met-overexpressing NSCLC cells. We observed that KLF4 was overexpressed in c-Met-overexpressing NSCLC cells and tissues. Knockdown of KLF4 increased tumorigenic properties in gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cell lines without c-Met overexpression, but it reduced tumorigenic properties and increased gefitinib sensitivity in gefitinib-resistant NSCLC cells with c-Met overexpression, whereas overexpression of KLF4 reduced gefitinib sensitivity in gefitinib-sensitive NSCLC cells. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that KLF4 contributed to the formation of gefitinib resistance in c-Met-overexpressing NSCLC cells by inhibiting the expression of apoptosis-related proteins under gefitinib treatment and activating the c-Met/Akt signaling pathway by decreasing the inhibition of β-catenin on phosphorylation of c-Met to prevent blockade by gefitinib. In summary, this study's results suggest that KLF4 is a promising candidate molecular target for both prevention and therapy of NSCLC with c-Met overexpression. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  4. Lung Cancer Serum Biomarker Discovery Using Label Free LC-MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xuemei; Hood, Brian L.; Zhao, Ting; Conrads, Thomas P.; Sun, Mai; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Grover, Himanshu; Day, Roger S.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Wilson, David O.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Bigbee, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death with poor survival due to the late stage at which lung cancer is typically diagnosed. Given the clinical burden from lung cancer, and the relatively favorable survival associated with early stage lung cancer, biomarkers for early detection of lung cancer are of important potential clinical benefit. Methods We performed a global lung cancer serum biomarker discovery study using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in a set of pooled non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) case sera and matched controls. Immunoaffinity subtraction was used to deplete the top most abundant serum proteins; the remaining serum proteins were subjected to trypsin digestion and analyzed in triplicate by LC-MS/MS. The tandem mass spectrum data were searched against the human proteome database and the resultant spectral counting data were used to estimate the relative abundance of proteins across the case/control serum pools. The spectral counting derived abundances of some candidate biomarker proteins were confirmed with multiple reaction monitoring MS assays. Results A list of 49 differentially abundant candidate proteins was compiled by applying a negative binomial regression model to the spectral counting data (pbiomarkers with statistically significant differential abundance across the lung cancer case/control pools which, when validated, could improve lung cancer early detection. PMID:21304412

  5. Bidi smoking and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Singhal, Sanjay; Garg, Rajiv

    2009-04-01

    This article discusses the role of bidi smoking as a risk factor for lung cancer. A review of the documented evidence is presented. The literature from Pubmed has been searched using the key words 'beedi smoking', 'bidi smoking' and 'lung cancer'. The bibliographies of all papers found were further searched for additional relevant articles. After this thorough search, eight studies were found. The evidence suggests that bidi smoking poses a higher risk for lung cancer than cigarette smoking and risk further increases with both the length of time and amount of bidi smoking. The focus of tobacco control programs should be expanded to all types of tobacco use, including bidis, to reduce the increasing problem of lung cancer.

  6. The incorporation of SPECT functional lung imaging into inverse radiotherapy planning for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian, Judith A.; Partridge, Mike; Nioutsikou, Elena; Cook, Gary; McNair, Helen A.; Cronin, Bernadette; Courbon, Frederic; Bedford, James L.; Brada, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often have inhomogeneous lung perfusion. Radiotherapy planning computed tomography (CT) scans have been accurately co-registered with lung perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans to design radiotherapy treatments which limit dose to healthy 'perfused' lung. Patients and methods: Patients with localised NSCLC had CT and SPECT scans accurately co-registered in the planning system. The SPECT images were used to define a volume of perfused 'functioning' lung (FL). Inverse planning software was used to create 3D-conformal plans, the planning objective being either to minimise the dose to whole lungs (WL) or to minimise the dose to FL. Results: Four plans were created for each of six patients. The mean difference in volume between WL and FL was 1011.7 cm 3 (range 596.2-1581.1 cm 3 ). One patient with bilateral upper lobe perfusion deficits had a 16% reduction in FLV 2 (the percentage volume of functioning lung receiving ≥20 Gy). The remaining patients had inhomogeneous perfusion deficits such that inverse planning was not able to sufficiently optimise beam angles to avoid functioning lung. Conclusion: SPECT perfusion images can be accurately co-registered with radiotherapy planning CT scans and may be helpful in creating treatment plans for patients with large perfusion deficits

  7. Validation of an elastic registration technique to estimate anatomical lung modification in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Tomotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggiano, Elena; Cattaneo, Giovanni M; Ciavarro, Cristina; Dell'Oca, Italo; Persano, Diego; Calandrino, Riccardo; Rizzo, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    The study of lung parenchyma anatomical modification is useful to estimate dose discrepancies during the radiation treatment of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) patients. We propose and validate a method, based on free-form deformation and mutual information, to elastically register planning kVCT with daily MVCT images, to estimate lung parenchyma modification during Tomotherapy. We analyzed 15 registrations between the planning kVCT and 3 MVCT images for each of the 5 NSCLC patients. Image registration accuracy was evaluated by visual inspection and, quantitatively, by Correlation Coefficients (CC) and Target Registration Errors (TRE). Finally, a lung volume correspondence analysis was performed to specifically evaluate registration accuracy in lungs. Results showed that elastic registration was always satisfactory, both qualitatively and quantitatively: TRE after elastic registration (average value of 3.6 mm) remained comparable and often smaller than voxel resolution. Lung volume variations were well estimated by elastic registration (average volume and centroid errors of 1.78% and 0.87 mm, respectively). Our results demonstrate that this method is able to estimate lung deformations in thorax MVCT, with an accuracy within 3.6 mm comparable or smaller than the voxel dimension of the kVCT and MVCT images. It could be used to estimate lung parenchyma dose variations in thoracic Tomotherapy

  8. Induction chemotherapy for locoregional lung cancer using paclitaxel combination. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takita, H.; Pitoniak, R.F.

    2000-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy has been reported to be effective in treatment of locally advanced, borderline resectable, (Stage III), non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A logical extension of the indication for the induction chemotherapy may be to treat earlier stage resectable lung cancers (stages I and II) because the cure rate of the resectable lung cancers still remains poor and is below 60% except for stage I A. Thirty eight patients with a diagnosis of loco-regional NSCLC were treated with paclitaxel combination chemotherapy. Following two courses of induction chemotherapy, patients underwent surgical therapy whenever possible. There ten patients with stage I disease, four patients with stage II, 13 with stage IIIA, nine had stage IIIB, and two with stage IV. An overall response rate of 74% was observed. The response rate for 14 resectable patients (stage I and II) was 86%. The chemotherapy regimen was well tolerated and apart from one instance of anaphylaxis, no serious side effects were observed

  9. Expressions and Significances of CRABPII and E-FABP 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian LIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The cellular retinoic acid-binding protein II (CRABPII and epidermal fatty acid-binding protein (E-FABP both serving as the transport protein of retinoic acid (RA, through RA signal transduction pathway, commit the cell to opposite fate, apoptosis or survival. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of CRABPII and E-FABP and significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and their lymph node metastases with tissue microarray technique. Methods CRABPII and E-FABP proteins were detected in 54 normal lung tissues, 287 primary NSCLC tissues and 112 lymph node metastatic tissues by SP method of immunohistochemical staining. Results The expression level of CRABPII in the primary lesions was relevant to the gender of NSCLC patients, the metastasis and TNM staging of NSCLC (P<0.05, while the expression level of E-FABP was related to the grading and metastasis of NSCLC (P<0.05. The positive expression rate of E-FABP in NSCLC primary lesion was remarkably higher than that in adjacent normal lung tissues and lymph node metastases, respectively (P<0.05. The expression level of E-FABP had a recognizable advantage over that of CRABPII in NSCLC primary lesions (P<0.05. The differential expressions between CRABPII and E-FABP was correlated with the tumor size, grading, metastasis, TNM staging of NSCLC (P<0.05. The larger the tumor was and the later the TNM staging was, along with cancer metastasis, the more likely the expression of E-FABP would dominate. The expression of CRABPII and difference expression between CRABPII and E-FABP were closely related to the prognosis of NSCLC patients based on Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Conclusion E-FABP showed high exp ression in NSCLC, and the increased E-FABP expression may involved in the occurrence and development of NSCLC. CRABPII might have a negative effect in NSCLC progression, and its expression was negatively related to the prognosis of NSCLC patients.

  10. Contemporary review on the inequities in the management of lung cancer among the African-American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Anthony W; Liptay, Michael J; Higgins, Robert S D

    2008-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) constitutes approximately 80% of all the lung cancers observed. Despite the aggressive nature of this disease, totally adequate and fully comprehensive treatment yielding outstanding outcomes and survival has yet to be discovered. A uniform means by which to manage NSCLC is only in evolution. Without a universally accepted algorithm upon which clinical decisions can be referenced or compared, differences in the treatment of this disease process can and will exist. Racial bias in the management of NSCLC is being realized as a cause of a substandard delivery of adequate care. Whether this is a newly emerging phenomenon or simply one that is being exposed is unclear. Nevertheless, this inequity in management ranges from the early-to-late stages of NSCLC. The purpose of this manuscript is to explore the reasons behind the differences in the receipt of care for NSCLC that exists between the African-American and Caucasian population.

  11. Clinical potential of nintedanib for the second-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothschild SI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sacha I Rothschild Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland Abstract: The therapeutic landscape in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is changing. The description of molecular alterations leading to NSCLC carcinogenesis and progression (so-called oncogenic driver mutations and the development of targeted agents interfering with the tumor-promoting intracellular signaling pathways have improved the outcome for many patients with advanced/metastatic NSCLC. However, many patients with stage IV NSCLC do not have one of the targetable predictive biomarkers, and are therefore in need of classical chemotherapy. This especially applies to squamous cell cancer. A platinum-based doublet chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with stage IV NSCLC. As second-line therapies, docetaxel, pemetrexed, and the EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib have demonstrated benefit in Phase III randomized trials. Recently, the addition of the angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib to docetaxel has proven efficacious, and is a new treatment option in the second-line setting. Preclinical and clinical data of nintedanib for the treatment of lung cancer patients are reviewed here. Keywords: nintedanib, lung cancer, angiokinase inhibitor, VEGFR, PDGF, FGFR

  12. Metagenes Associated with Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urgard, Egon; Vooder, Tõnu; Võsa, Urmo; Välk, Kristjan; Liu, Mingming; Luo, Cheng; Hoti, Fabian; Roosipuu, Retlav; Annilo, Tarmo; Laine, Jukka; Frenz, Christopher M.; Zhang, Liqing; Metspalu, Andres

    2011-01-01

    NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) comprises about 80% of all lung cancer cases worldwide. Surgery is most effective treatment for patients with early-stage disease. However, 30%–55% of these patients develop recurrence within 5 years. Therefore, markers that can be used to accurately classify early-stage NSCLC patients into different prognostic groups may be helpful in selecting patients who should receive specific therapies. A previously published dataset was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of different NSCLC subtypes. A moderated two-sample t-test was used to identify differentially expressed genes between all tumor samples and cancer-free control tissue, between SCC samples and AC/BC samples and between stage I tumor samples and all other tumor samples. Gene expression microarray measurements were validated using qRT-PCR. Bayesian regression analysis and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were performed to determine metagenes associated with survival. We identified 599 genes which were down-regulated and 402 genes which were up-regulated in NSCLC compared to the normal lung tissue and 112 genes which were up-regulated and 101 genes which were down-regulated in AC/BC compared to the SCC. Further, for stage Ib patients the metagenes potentially associated with survival were identified. Genes that expressed differently between normal lung tissue and cancer showed enrichment in gene ontology terms which were associated with mitosis and proliferation. Bayesian regression and Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that gene-expression patterns and metagene profiles can be applied to predict the probability of different survival outcomes in NSCLC patients. PMID:21695068

  13. Serum long non coding RNA MALAT-1 protected by exosomes is up-regulated and promotes cell proliferation and migration in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Xia, Yuhong; Wang, Zhixin; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Yafei; Li, Xiaoli; Wang, Yu; Ming, Huaikun

    2017-08-19

    Circulating lncRNAs have been defined as a novel biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), MALAT-1 was first identified lncRNA that was related to lung cancer metastasis. However, the relationship between exosomal lncRNAs and the diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC was poorly understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of serum exosomal MALAT-1 as a biomarker in the metastasis of NSCLC. In this study, we firstly isolated the exosomes from healthy subjects and NSCLC patients. Then we measured the expression levels of MALAT-1 contained in exosomes, and found that exosomal MALAT-1 was highly expressed in NSCLC patients, more importantly, the levels of exosomal MALAT-1 were positively associated with tumor stage and lymphatic metastasis. In addition, we decreased MALAT-1 expression by short hairpin RNA and conducted a series of assays including MTT, cell cycle, colony formation, wound-healing scratch and Annexin/V PI by flow cytometry in human lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro studies demonstrated that serum exosome-derived long noncoding RNA MALAT-1 promoted the tumor growth and migration, and prevented tumor cells from apoptosis in lung cancer cell lines. Taken together, this study shed a light on utilizing MALAT-1 in exosomes as a non-invasive serum-based tumor biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of the new international association for the study of lung cancer staging system in non-small cell lung cancer: With comparison to the union for international cancer control 6th tumor, node, metastasis edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Jae; Lee, So Won; Shim, Sung Shine; Ryu, Yon Ju; Kim, Yoo Kyung

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the impact of the proposed International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) tumor, node, metastasis (TNM) system on staging and outcome of non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With a total of 501 NSCLC patients with staging according to Union for International Cancer Control (UICC), 6th TNM (TNM-6) were reclassified according to the IASLC proposed TNM staging (TNM-7). The impact of TNM-7 in comparison with TNM-6 was evaluated at three levels: change in substage, staging, and outcome. The outcome measure was to compare the stage-specific overall survival of NSCLC between the two groups of patients. A total of 214 (42.7%) patients had changed TNM staging, and 101 (20.2%) patients had changed stage groupings in TNM-7 compared to TNM-6. Among 100 patients showing changed stage grouping, 72 (14.4%) showed upstage and 29 (5.8%) demonstrated downstage. The TNM-7 system resulted in better separation of survival curves among stage-specific NSCLC than TNM-6 system, especially in separation of stage IIA vs. IIB (p 0.023) and stage IIIB vs. IV (p < 0.001). TNM-7 for lung cancer appears to be superior in defining stage-specific survival groups than TNM-6, especially between stage IIA vs. stage IIB and stage IIIB vs. stage IV.

  15. Placenta-specific protein 1 promotes cell proliferation and invasion in non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zha, Tian-Qi; He, Xiang; Chen, Liang; Zhu, Quan; Wu, Wei-Bing; Nie, Feng-Qi; Wang, Qian; Zang, Chong-Shuang; Zhang, Mei-Ling; He, Jing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Wen; Lu, Kai-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary carcinoma-associated proteins have emerged as crucial players in governing fundamental biological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis and metastasis in human cancers. Placenta-specific protein 1 (PLAC1) is a cancer-related protein, which is activated and upregulated in a variety of malignant tissues, including prostate cancer, gastric adenocarcinoma, colorectal, epithelial ovarian and breast cancer. However, its biological role and clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) development and progression are still unknown. In the present study, we found that PLAC1 was significantly upregulated in NSCLC tissues, and its expression level was associated with advanced pathological stage and it was also correlated with shorter progression-free survival of lung cancer patients. Furthermore, knockdown of PLAC1 expression by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and impaired invasive ability in NSCLC cells partly via regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related protein expression. Our findings present that increased PLAC1 could be identified as a negative prognostic biomarker in NSCLC and regulate cell proliferation and invasion. Thus, we conclusively demonstrated that PLAC1 plays a key role in NSCLC development and progression, which may provide novel insights on the function of tumor-related gene-driven tumorigenesis. PMID:29138842

  16. Cyclopamine tartrate, an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, strongly interferes with mitochondrial function and suppresses aerobic respiration in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Md Maksudul; Sohoni, Sagar; Kalainayakan, Sarada Preeta; Garrossian, Massoud; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is associated with the development of many cancers including prostate cancer, gastrointestinal cancer, lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, ovarian cancer, and basal cell carcinoma. The Hh signaling pathway has been one of the most intensely investigated targets for cancer therapy, and a number of compounds inhibiting Hh signaling are being tested clinically for treating many cancers. Lung cancer causes more deaths than the next three most common cancers (colon, breast, and prostate) combined. Cyclopamine was the first compound found to inhibit Hh signaling and has been invaluable for understanding the function of Hh signaling in development and cancer. To find novel strategies for combating lung cancer, we decided to characterize the effect of cyclopamine tartrate (CycT), an improved analogue of cyclopamine, on lung cancer cells and its mechanism of action. The effect of CycT on oxygen consumption and proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines was quantified by using an Oxygraph system and live cell counting, respectively. Apoptosis was detected by using Annexin V and Propidium Iodide staining. CycT’s impact on ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial morphology in NSCLC cells was monitored by using fluorometry and fluorescent microscopy. Western blotting and fluorescent microscopy were used to detect the levels and localization of Hh signaling targets, mitochondrial fission protein Drp1, and heme-related proteins in various NSCLC cells. Our findings identified a novel function of CycT, as well as another Hh inhibitor SANT1, to disrupt mitochondrial function and aerobic respiration. Our results showed that CycT, like glutamine depletion, caused a substantial decrease in oxygen consumption in a number of NSCLC cell lines, suppressed NSCLC cell proliferation, and induced apoptosis. Further, we found that CycT increased ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization, and

  17. Icotinib, a selective EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Fenlai; Shi, Yuankai; Wang, Yinxiang; Ding, Lieming; Yuan, Xiaobin; Sun, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the main cause for cancer-related mortality. Treatments for advanced NSCLC are largely palliative and a benefit plateau appears to have reached with the platinum-based chemotherapy regimens. EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib came up with prolonged progression-free survival and improved quality of life, especially in EGFR-mutated patients. Icotinib is an oral selective EGFR tyrosine kinase, which was approved by China Food and Drug administration in June 2011 for treating advanced NSCLC. Its approval was based on the registered Phase III trial (ICOGEN), which showed icotinib is noninferior to gefitinib. This review will discuss the role of icotinib in NSCLC, and its potential application and ongoing investigations.

  18. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minxia Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfection were used to investigate interaction between the miRNA and target gene. miR-944 was significantly down-regulated in NSCLC and had many putative targets. Moreover, the forced expression of miR-944 significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. By integrating mRNA expression data and miR-944-target prediction, we disclosed that EPHA7 was a potential target of miR-944, which was further verified by luciferase reporter assay and microRNA transfection. Our data indicated that miR-944 targets EPHA7 in NSCLC and regulates NSCLC cell proliferation, which may offer a new mechanism underlying the development and progression of NSCLC.

  19. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minxia; Zhou, Kecheng; Cao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D) and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfection were used to investigate interaction between the miRNA and target gene. miR-944 was significantly down-regulated in NSCLC and had many putative targets. Moreover, the forced expression of miR-944 significantly inhibited the proliferation of NSCLC cells in vitro. By integrating mRNA expression data and miR-944-target prediction, we disclosed that EPHA7 was a potential target of miR-944, which was further verified by luciferase reporter assay and microRNA transfection. Our data indicated that miR-944 targets EPHA7 in NSCLC and regulates NSCLC cell proliferation, which may offer a new mechanism underlying the development and progression of NSCLC.

  20. Vorinostat increases carboplatin and paclitaxel activity in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Ramalingam, Suresh S.; Kanterewicz, Beatriz; Balius, Trent; Belani, Chandra P.; Hershberger, Pamela A.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a 53% response rate in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with vorinostat plus paclitaxel/carboplatin in a Phase I trial. Studies were undertaken to investigate the mechanism (s) underlying this activity. Growth inhibition was assessed in NSCLC cells by MTT assay after 72 h of continuous drug exposure. Vorinostat (1 µM) inhibited growth by: 17±7% in A549, 28±6% in 128-88T, 39±8% in Calu1, and 41±7% in 201T cells. Vorinostat addition to carboplatin or paclitaxel le...

  1. TUCAN/CARDINAL/CARD8 and apoptosis resistance in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Checinska, Agnieszka; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Hoogeland, Bas SJ; Ferreira, Carlos G; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kruyt, Frank AE

    2006-01-01

    Activation of caspase-9 in response to treatment with cytotoxic drugs is inhibited in NSCLC cells, which may contribute to the clinical resistance to chemotherapy shown in this type of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of caspase-9 inhibition, with a focus on a possible role of TUCAN as caspase-9 inhibitor and a determinant of chemosensitivity in NSCLC cells. Caspase-9 processing and activation were investigated by Western blot and by measuring the cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate LEHD-AFC. Proteins interaction assays, and RNA interference in combination with cell viability and apoptosis assays were used to investigate the involvement of TUCAN in inhibition of caspase-9 and chemosensitivity NSCLC. Analysis of the components of the caspase-9 activation pathway in a panel of NSCLC and SCLC cells revealed no intrinsic defects. In fact, exogenously added cytochrome c and dATP triggered procaspase-9 cleavage and activation in lung cancer cell lysates, suggesting the presence of an inhibitor. The reported inhibitor of caspase-9, TUCAN, was exclusively expressed in NSCLC cells. However, interactions between TUCAN and procaspase-9 could not be demonstrated by any of the assays used. Furthermore, RNA interference-mediated down-regulation of TUCAN did not restore cisplatin-induced caspase-9 activation or affect cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC cells. These results indicate that procaspase-9 is functional and can undergo activation and full processing in lung cancer cell extracts in the presence of additional cytochrome c/dATP. However, the inhibitory protein TUCAN does not play a role in inhibition of procaspase-9 and in determining the sensitivity to cisplatin in NSCLC

  2. XCR1 promotes cell growth and migration and is correlated with bone metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ting; Han, Shuai; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Zhitao; Yan, Wangjun; Liu, Tielong; Wei, Haifeng; Song, Dianwen; Zhou, Wang, E-mail: brilliant212@163.com; Yang, Xinghai, E-mail: cnspineyang@163.com; Xiao, Jianru, E-mail: jianruxiao83@163.com

    2015-08-21

    Bone metastasis occurs in approximately 30–40% patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), but the mechanism underlying this bone metastasis remains poorly understood. The chemokine super family is believed to play an important role in tumor metastasis in lung cancer. The chemokine receptor XCR1 has been identified to promote cell proliferation and migration in oral cancer and ovarian carcinoma, but the role of XCR1 in lung cancer has not been reported. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that XCR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer bone metastasis as compared with that in patients with primary lung cancer. In addition, the XCR1 ligand XCL1 promoted the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells markedly, and knockdown of XCR1 by siRNA abolished the effect of XCL1 in cell proliferation and migration. Furthermore, we identified JAK2/STAT3 as a novel downstream pathway of XCR1, while XCL1/XCR1 increased the mRNA level of the downstream of JAK2/STAT3 including PIM1, JunB, TTP, MMP2 and MMP9. These results indicate that XCR1 is a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of lung cancer bone metastasis. - Highlights: • XCR1 is overexpressed in bone metastasis compared with primary NSCLC. • XCR1 activation by XCL1 promotes lung cancer cell proliferation and migration. • JAK2/STAT3 is a novel potential downstream pathway of XCR1.

  3. Radioimmunoscintigraphy in lung cancer diagnosing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadjikostova, H.

    1999-01-01

    As the lung cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer at males, the exact staging is essential. Monoclonal antibodies marked with radionuclides like 131 I, 111 In, 99m Tc, etc., allow detecting and staging the small cell lung cancer with sensibility 90%, specificity 45% and accuracy 85%. It is suggested this method to be applied simultaneously with computerized tomography. The diagnostic possibility of radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) in earlier detection, recurrence or metastasis as well as follow up the effect of therapy performed at patients with lung cancer are reviewed. RIS is performed with IODOMAB-R-2 (Sorin Biomedica) 131 I antiCEA Mob F(ab') 2 , dose 92.5-185 MBq. Planar images were performed 72 hours after i.v. injection. Four patients with epidermoid squamous cell cancer were examined. Positive results were obtained at 3 patients and one false negative. In general sensitivity of radioimmunoscintigraphy of lung cancer is 75-90%. However there are difficulties at its application linked with necessity of permanent availability of radiolabelled antibodies with high specific activity at the moment of their injection. Despite all radioimmunoscintigraphy is developing as an useful diagnostic method for evaluation and follow up of lung cancer patients

  4. Co-culture with NK-92MI cells enhanced the anti-cancer effect of bee venom on NSCLC cells by inactivation of NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollipara, Pushpa Saranya; Kim, Jung Hyun; Won, Dohee; Lee, Sang Min; Sung, Ha Chang; Chang, Hyun Sok; Lee, Kang Tae; Lee, Kang Sik; Park, Mi Hee; Song, Min Jong; Song, Ho Sueb; Hong, Jin Tae

    2014-03-01

    In the present study we experimented on a multimodal therapeutic approach, such as combining chemotherapy agent (Bee venom) with cellular (NK-92MI) immunotherapy. Previously bee venom has been found to show anti-cancer effect in various cancer cell lines. In lung cancer cells bee venom showed an IC(50) value of 3 μg/ml in both cell lines. The co-culture of NK-92MI cell lines with lung cancer cells also show a decrease in viability upto 50 % at 48 h time point. Hence we used bee venom treated NK-92MI cells to co-culture with NSCLC cells and found that there is a further decrease in cell viability upto 70 and 75 % in A549 and NCI-H460 cell lines respectively. We further investigated the expression of various apoptotic and anti-apoptotic proteins and found that Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and -8 were increasing where as Bcl-2 and cIAP-2 was decreasing. The expression of various death receptor proteins like DR3, DR6 and Fas was also increasing. Concomitantly the expression of various death receptor ligands (TNFalpha, Apo3L and FasL) was also increasing of NK-92MI cells after co-culture. Further the DNA binding activity and luciferase activity of NF-κB was also inhibited after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cell lines. The knock down of death receptors with si-RNA has reversed the decrease in cell viability and NF-κB activity after co-culture with bee venom treated NK-92MI cells. Thus this new approach can enhance the anti-cancer effect of bee venom at a much lower concentration.

  5. TNF-driven adaptive response mediates resistance to EGFR inhibition in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ke; Guo, Gao; Gerber, David E; Gao, Boning; Peyton, Michael; Huang, Chun; Minna, John D; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Kernstine, Kemp; Cai, Ling; Xie, Yang; Zhu, Hong; Fattah, Farjana J; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Burma, Sandeep; Dowell, Jonathan; Dao, Kathryn; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A; Olivas, Victor; Bivona, Trever G; Zhao, Dawen; Habib, Amyn A

    2018-06-01

    Although aberrant EGFR signaling is widespread in cancer, EGFR inhibition is effective only in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR activating mutations. A majority of NSCLCs express EGFR wild type (EGFRwt) and do not respond to EGFR inhibition. TNF is a major mediator of inflammation-induced cancer. We find that a rapid increase in TNF level is a universal adaptive response to EGFR inhibition in NSCLC, regardless of EGFR status. EGFR signaling actively suppresses TNF mRNA levels by inducing expression of miR-21, resulting in decreased TNF mRNA stability. Conversely, EGFR inhibition results in loss of miR-21 and increased TNF mRNA stability. In addition, TNF-induced NF-κB activation leads to increased TNF transcription in a feed-forward loop. Inhibition of TNF signaling renders EGFRwt-expressing NSCLC cell lines and an EGFRwt patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model highly sensitive to EGFR inhibition. In EGFR-mutant oncogene-addicted cells, blocking TNF enhances the effectiveness of EGFR inhibition. EGFR plus TNF inhibition is also effective in NSCLC with acquired resistance to EGFR inhibition. We suggest concomitant EGFR and TNF inhibition as a potentially new treatment approach that could be beneficial for a majority of lung cancer patients.

  6. Decreased expression of connective tissue growth factor in non-small cell lung cancer is associated with clinicopathological variables and can be restored by epigenetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiecka, Hanna; Gałęcki, Bartłomiej; Jarmołowska-Jurczyszyn, Donata; Kluk, Andrzej; Dyszkiewicz, Wojciech; Jagodziński, Paweł P

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies indicated undisputed contribution of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the development of many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the functional role and regulation of CTGF expression during tumorigenesis remain elusive. Our goal was to determine CTGF transcript and protein levels in tumoral and matched control tissues from 98 NSCLC patients, to correlate the results with clinicopathological features and to investigate whether the CTGF expression can be epigenetically regulated in NSCLC. We used quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry to evaluate CTGF expression in lung cancerous and histopathologically unchanged tissues. We tested the impact of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-dAzaC) and trichostatin A (TSA) on CTGF transcript and protein levels in NSCLC cells (A549, Calu-1). DNA methylation status of the CTGF regulatory region was evaluated by bisulfite sequencing. The influence of 5-dAzaC and TSA on NSCLC cells viability and proliferation was monitored by the trypan blue assay. We found significantly decreased levels of CTGF mRNA and protein (both p cancerous tissues of NSCLC patients. Down-regulation of CTGF occurred regardless of gender in all histological subtypes of NSCLC. Moreover, we showed that 5-dAzaC and TSA were able to restore CTGF mRNA and protein contents in NSCLC cells. However, no methylation within CTGF regulatory region was detected. Both compounds significantly reduced NSCLC cells proliferation. Decreased expression of CTGF is a common feature in NSCLC; however, it can be restored by the chromatin-modifying agents such as 5-dAzaC or TSA and consequently restrain cancer development.

  7. Spine Metastases in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Stolyarova

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose and the objectives of the study were to determine the incidence of metastatic lesions to various parts of the spine, the assessment of the association with other clinical signs of lung cancer (localization, form, histology, degree of differentiation, staging, nature of extraosseous metastasis, to investigate the effect of these parameters on the survi­val of the patients. Material and methods. The study included 1071 patients with lung cancer aged 24 to 86 years. None of the examined patients has been operated previously for lung cancer, and after arriving at a diagnosis, all patients received radiation therapy, 73 % of them — combined radiochemothe­rapy. Results. Metastasis in the vertebral bodies and vertebral joints occurs in 13 % of patients with lung cancer and in 61 % of patients with bone form of the disease, the ratio of the defeat of thoracic, sacral, lumbar and cervical spine was 6 : 4 : 2 : 1. The development of metastases in the spine is mostly associa­ted with the localization of the tumor in the upper lobe of the lung, the peripheral form of the disease, with non-small cell histologic variants (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The number of metastases in the spinal column directly correlates with the degree of metastatic involvement of the inguinal lymph nodes, abdominal wall and the liver, has an impact on the invasion of lung tumor into the esophagus and the trachea. The life expectancy of the deceased persons with spine metastases is less than that of other patients with the lung cancer, but the overall survival rate in these groups of patients is not very different. Conclusions. Clinical features of lung cancer with metastases in the spine necessitate the development of medical technology of rational radiochemotherapy in such patients.

  8. A comparison of tumor motion characteristics between early stage and locally advanced stage lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z. Henry; Lin, Steven H.; Balter, Peter; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: With the increasing use of conformal radiation therapy methods for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), it is necessary to accurately determine respiratory-induced tumor motion. The purpose of this study is to analyze and compare the motion characteristics of early and locally advanced stage NSCLC tumors in a large population and correlate tumor motion with position, volume, and diaphragm motion. Methods and materials: A total of 191 (94 early stage, 97 locally advanced) non-small cell lung tumors were analyzed for this study. Each patient received a four-dimensional CT scan prior to receiving radiation treatment. A soft-tissue-based rigid registration algorithm was used to track the tumor motion. Tumor volumes were determined based on the gross tumor volume delineated by physicians in the end of expiration phase. Tumor motion characteristics were correlated with their standardized tumor locations, lobe location, and clinical staging. Diaphragm motion was calculated by subtracting the diaphragm location between the expiration and the inspiration phases. Results: Median, max, and 95th percentile of tumor motion for early stage tumors were 5.9 mm, 31.0 mm, and 20.0 mm, which were 1.2 mm, 12 mm, and 7 mm more than those in locally advanced NSCLC, respectively. The range of motion at 95th percentile is more than 50% larger in early stage lung cancer group than in the locally advanced lung cancer group. Early stage tumors in the lower lobe showed the largest motion with a median motion of 9.2 mm, while upper/mid-lobe tumors exhibited a median motion of 3.3 mm. Tumor volumes were not correlated with motion. Conclusion: The range of tumor motion differs depending on tumor location and staging of NSCLC. Early stage tumors are more mobile than locally advanced stage NSCLC. These factors should be considered for general motion management strategies when 4D simulation is not performed on individual basis.

  9. Performance monitoring in lung cancer patients pre- and post-chemotherapy using fine-grained electrophysiological measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Simó

    Full Text Available No previous event-related potentials (ERPs study has explored the error-related negativity (ERN - an ERP component indexing performance monitoring - associated to cancer and chemotherapy-induced cognitive impairment in a lung cancer population. The aim of this study was to examine differences in performance monitoring in a small-cell lung cancer group (SCLC, C+ 1-month following chemotherapy and two control groups: a non-small cell lung cancer patient group (NSCLC, C− prior to chemotherapy and a healthy control group (HC.Seventeen SCLC (C+ underwent a neuropsychological assessment and an ERP study using a flanker and a stop-signal paradigm. This group was compared to fifteen age-, gender- and education-matched NSCLC (C− and eighteen HC.Between 20 and 30% of patients in both lung cancer groups (C+ and C− met criteria for cognitive impairment. Concerning ERPs, lung cancer patients showed lower overall hit rate and a severe ERN amplitude reduction compared to HC.Lung cancer patients exhibited an abnormal pattern of performance monitoring thus suggesting that chemotherapy and especially cancer itself, may contribute to cognitive deterioration. ERN appeared as an objective laboratory tool sensitive to cognitive dysfunction in cancer population. Keywords: Event-related potentials-ERP, Error-related negativity (ERN, Performance monitoring, Lung cancer, Cognitive impairment, Chemobrain

  10. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  11. TC-1 Overexpression Promotes Cell Proliferation in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer that Can Be Inhibited by PD173074

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Bai, Guangzhen; Zhong, Daixing; Su, Kai; Liu, Boya; Li, Xiaofei; Wang, Yunjie; Wang, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid cancer-1 (TC-1), a natively disordered protein, is widely expressed in vertebrates and overexpressed in many kinds of tumors. However, its exact role and regulation mechanism in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are still unclear. In the present study, we found that TC-1 is highly expressed in NSCLC and that its aberrant expression is strongly associated with NSCLC cell proliferation. Exogenous TC-1 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, accelerates the cell G1-to-S-phase transition, and reduces apoptosis in NSCLC. The knockdown of TC-1, however, inhibits NSCLC cell proliferation, cycle transition, and apoptosis resistance. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that PD173074, which functions as an inhibitor of the TC-1 in NSCLC, decreases the expression of TC-1 and inhibits TC-1 overexpression mediated cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, the inhibition function of PD173074 on NSCLC cell proliferation was eliminated in cells with TC-1 knockdown. These results suggest that PD173074 plays a significant role in TC-1 overexpression mediated NSCLC cell proliferation and may be a potential intervention target for the prevention of cell proliferation in NSCLC. PMID:24941347

  12. MicroRNA-944 Affects Cell Growth by Targeting EPHA7 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Minxia Liu; Kecheng Zhou; Yi Cao

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical roles in lung tumorigenesis and development. To determine aberrantly expressed miRNAs involved in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and investigate pathophysiological functions and mechanisms, we firstly carried out small RNA deep sequencing in NSCLC cell lines (EPLC-32M1, A549 and 801D) and a human immortalized cell line 16HBE, we then studied miRNA function by cell proliferation and apoptosis. cDNA microarray, luciferase reporter assay and miRNA transfectio...

  13. Single nucleotide polymorphisms as susceptibility, prognostic, and therapeutic markers of nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zienolddiny S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Shanbeh Zienolddiny, Vidar SkaugSection for Toxicology and Biological Work Environment, National Institute of Occupational Health, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: Lung cancer is a major public health problem throughout the world. Among the most frequent cancer types (prostate, breast, colorectal, stomach, lung, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Among the two major subtypes of small cell lung cancer and nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC, 85% of tumors belong to the NSCLC histological types. Small cell lung cancer is associated with the shortest survival time. Although tobacco smoking has been recognized as the major risk factor for lung cancer, there is a great interindividual and interethnic difference in risk of developing lung cancer given exposure to similar environmental and lifestyle factors. This may indicate that in addition to chemical and environmental factors, genetic variations in the genome may contribute to risk modification. A common type of genetic variation in the genome, known as single nucleotide polymorphism, has been found to be associated with susceptibility to lung cancer. Interestingly, many of these polymorphisms are found in the genes that regulate major pathways of carcinogen metabolism (cytochrome P450 genes, detoxification (glutathione S-transferases, adduct removal (DNA repair genes, cell growth/apoptosis (TP53/MDM2, the immune system (cytokines/chemokines, and membrane receptors (nicotinic acetylcholine and dopaminergic receptors. Some of these polymorphisms have been shown to alter the level of mRNA, and protein structure and function. In addition to being susceptibility markers, several of these polymorphisms are emerging to be important for response to chemotherapy/radiotherapy and survival of patients. Therefore, it is hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms will be valuable genetic markers in individual-based prognosis and therapy in future. Here we will review some of the most

  14. European position statement on lung cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudkerk, Matthijs; Devaraj, Anand; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer screening with low-dose CT can save lives. This European Union (EU) position statement presents the available evidence and the major issues that need to be addressed to ensure the successful implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening in Europe. This statement identified...... specific actions required by the European lung cancer screening community to adopt before the implementation of low-dose CT lung cancer screening. This position statement recommends the following actions: a risk stratification approach should be used for future lung cancer low-dose CT programmes...... need to set a timeline for implementing lung cancer screening....

  15. Reducing dose to the lungs through loosing target dose homogeneity requirement for radiotherapy of non small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Junjie; Yan, Hui; Tian, Yuan; Ma, Pan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Minghui; Ren, Wenting; Chen, Jiayun; Zhang, Ye; Dai, Jianrong

    2017-11-01

    It is important to minimize lung dose during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, an approach was proposed to reduce lung dose by relaxing the constraint of target dose homogeneity during treatment planning of IMRT. Ten NSCLC patients with lung tumor on the right side were selected. The total dose for planning target volume (PTV) was 60 Gy (2 Gy/fraction). For each patient, two IMRT plans with six beams were created in Pinnacle treatment planning system. The dose homogeneity of target was controlled by constraints on the maximum and uniform doses of target volume. One IMRT plan was made with homogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was within 95%-107% of the prescribed dose), while another IMRT plan was made with inhomogeneous target dose (the resulting target dose was more than 95% of the prescribed dose). During plan optimization, the dose of cord and heart in two types of IMRT plans were kept nearly the same. The doses of lungs, PTV and organs at risk (OARs) between two types of IMRT plans were compared and analyzed quantitatively. For all patients, the lung dose was decreased in the IMRT plans with inhomogeneous target dose. On average, the mean dose, V5, V20, and V30 of lung were reduced by 1.4 Gy, 4.8%, 3.7%, and 1.7%, respectively, and the dose to normal tissue was also reduced. These reductions in DVH values were all statistically significant (P target dose could protect lungs better and may be considered as a choice for treating NSCLC. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007 is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel. A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.Keywords: ABI-007, Abraxane, nab

  17. Nucleomedical diagnosis of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yasuhiko [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan)

    1982-06-01

    /sup 67/Ga citrate is most often used in the diagnosis of lung cancer. As judged from reported cases, the accuracy rate was 90%, with a false negative rate being about 5%. Lung ventilation and blood flow scintigraphy are valuable in assessing the degree of damage to lung function and the therapeutic effect rather than in finding lung cancer. In aerosol scintigraphy, sup(99m)Tc labelled aerosols with different particle size depending on the purpose of diagnosis are used; the large particles deposit at the center of the trachea and small size aerosols on the periphery. Aerosol-inhaled scintigraphy is highly valuable for the diagnosis of hilus lung cancer. sup(99m)Tc methylene diphosphate is used in bone scintigraphy to detect bone metastasis. But it sometimes gives false positive results such as in the case of senile bone changes. Another valuable method of diagnosis is emission CT by which various substances having affinity for the tumor can be detected by labelling them with a proton emitting nuclear species such as 11 C, /sup 13/N, /sup 15/O and /sup 18/F. Some cases of lung cancer, and the radionuclide methods used in the diagnosis are shown.

  18. GTV and CTV in radiation therapy: lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Chapet, O.; Sentenac, I.; Loubeyre, P.; Giraud, P.; Van Houtte, P.; Bonnette, P.

    2001-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role as a curative treatment of various stages non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC): as an exclusive treatment in curative attempt for patients with unresectable stages I and II; as a preoperative treatment, which is often associated with chemotherapy, for patients with surgically stage IIIA NSCLC in clinical trials; in association with chemotherapy for unresectable stages IIIA and IIIB patients. Currently, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy allows for some dose escalation, increasing radiation quality. However, the high inherent conformality of this radiotherapy technique requires a rigorous approach and an optimal quality of the preparation throughout the treatment procedure and specifically of the accurate definition of the safety margins (GTV, CTV...). Different questions remain specific to lung cancers: 1) Despite the absence of randomized trials, the irradiated lymph nodes volume should be only, for the majority of the authors, the visible macroscopically involved lymph nodal regions. However, local control remains low and solid arguments suggest the poor local control is due to an insufficient delivered dose. Therefore the goal of radiotherapy, in this particular location, is to improve local control by increasing the dose until the maximum normal tissue tolerance is achieved, which essentially depends on the dose to the organs at risk (OAR) and specifically for the lung, the esophagus and the spinal cord. For this reason, the irradiated volume should be as tiny as possible, leading to not including the macroscopically uninvolved lymph nodes regions in prophylactic view in the target volume; 2) The lung is one of the rare organs with extensive motion within the body, making lung tumors difficult to treat. This particular point is not specifically considered in the GTV and CTV definitions but it is important enough to be noted; 3) When radiation therapy starts after a good response to chemotherapy, the residual tumoral volume

  19. Drug repositioning for non-small cell lung cancer by using machine learning algorithms and topological graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Hung; Chang, Peter Mu-Hsin; Hsu, Chia-Wei; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2016-01-11

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of death globally, and research into NSCLC has been accumulating steadily over several years. Drug repositioning is the current trend in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development process of drugs, as well as reducing side effects. This work integrates two approaches--machine learning algorithms and topological parameter-based classification--to develop a novel pipeline of drug repositioning to analyze four lung cancer microarray datasets, enriched biological processes, potential therapeutic drugs and targeted genes for NSCLC treatments. A total of 7 (8) and 11 (12) promising drugs (targeted genes) were discovered for treating early- and late-stage NSCLC, respectively. The effectiveness of these drugs is supported by the literature, experimentally determined in-vitro IC50 and clinical trials. This work provides better drug prediction accuracy than competitive research according to IC50 measurements. With the novel pipeline of drug repositioning, the discovery of enriched pathways and potential drugs related to NSCLC can provide insight into the key regulators of tumorigenesis and the treatment of NSCLC. Based on the verified effectiveness of the targeted drugs predicted by this pipeline, we suggest that our drug-finding pipeline is effective for repositioning drugs.

  20. Blood group antigen A type 3 expression is a favorable prognostic factor in advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, L H; Kuemmel, A; Schliemann, C; Schulze, A; Humberg, J; Mohr, M; Görlich, D; Hartmann, W; Bröckling, S; Marra, A; Hillejan, L; Goletz, S; Karsten, U; Berdel, W E; Spieker, T; Wiewrodt, R

    2016-02-01

    Several blood group-related carbohydrate antigens are prognosis-relevant markers of tumor tissues. A type 3 (repetitive A) is a blood group antigen specific for A1 erythrocytes. Its potential expression in tumor tissues has so far not been examined. We have evaluated its expression in normal lung and in lung cancer using a novel antibody (A69-A/E8). For comparison an anti-A antibody specific to A types 1 and 2 was used, because its expression on lung cancer tissue has been previously reported to be of prognostic relevance. Resected tissue samples of 398 NSCLC patients were analyzed in immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Expression of A type 3 was not observed in non-malignant lung tissues. A type 3 was expressed on tumor cells of around half of NSCLC patients of blood group A1 (ptype 1/2 antigen was observed (p=0.562), the expression of A type 3 by tumor cells indicated a highly significant favorable prognosis among advanced NSCLC patients (p=0.011) and in NSCLC patients with lymphatic spread (p=0.014). Univariate prognostic results were confirmed in a Cox proportional hazards model. In this study we present for the first time prognostic data for A type 3 antigen expression in lung cancer patients. Prospective studies should be performed to confirm the prognostic value of A type 3 expression for an improved risk stratification in NSCLC patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. MEK inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Johnson, Gary L

    2014-11-01

    KRAS mutations are the most common mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with adenocarcinoma histology. KRAS mutations result in the activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, and agents that target RAF-MEK-ERK pathways have been investigated in KRAS mutant NSCLC. The two agents furthest in development are selumetinib and trametinib. Trametinib has greater binding for the MEK1/2 allosteric site, and generally has superior pharmacokinetics. A randomized phase II trial of docetaxel with and without selumetinib revealed that the combination resulted numerically superior overall survival, and a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate. However, a concerning rate of hospital admission, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia was observed with the combination. Trials have investigated MEK inhibitors as single agents and in combination with erlotinib, and the data do not support the further development. The activity of MEK inhibitors appears to be similar in patients with KRAS mutant and wild-type NSCLC suggesting KRAS mutation status is not a reliable biomarker for efficacy. It is possible that mutations of genes in addition to KRAS mutations impact the activity of MEK inhibitors, or specific subsets of KRAS mutations may be resistant or susceptible to MEK inhibition. Other potential explanations are gene amplifications, alternative RNA splicing of genes resulting in activation of their protein products, and deregulation of noncoding RNAs and consequent altered protein expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phase I dose escalation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of naptumomab estafenatox alone in patients with advanced cancer and with docetaxel in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghaei, Hossein; Alpaugh, Katherine; Hedlund, Gunnar

    2009-01-01

    recognizing the tumor-associated antigen 5T4. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), pancreatic cancer (PC), and renal cell cancer (RCC) received 5 daily boluses of ABR-217620 (3-month cycles) in escalating doses to determine the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD; ABR-217620 dose...

  3. Intratumor heterogeneity and chemotherapy-induced changes in EGFR status in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker expression is increasingly being used to customize treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The choice of systemic treatment usually depends on biomarker expression in the initial diagnostic biopsy taken before initiation of first-line treatment. Chemotherapy induces DNA damages...

  4. Consensus for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer: results from a European workshop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirker, Robert; Herth, Felix J F; Kerr, Keith M

    2010-01-01

    Activating somatic mutations of the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have recently been characterized in a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients harboring these mutations in their tumors show excellent response to EGFR tyros...

  5. Prognostic significance of tissue polypeptidespecific antigen (TPS) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van der Gaast (Ate); C.H.H. Schoenmakers (Christian); T.C. Kok (Tjebbe); B.G. Blijenberg (Bert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn this study, we evaluated the prognostic value of the tumour marker, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS), in 203 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and related this to several other known prognostic factors. TPS was significantly correlated with lactate

  6. Feasibility of escalating daily doses of cisplatin in combination with accelerated radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuster-Uitterhoeve, A. L.; van de Vaart, P. J.; Schaake-Koning, C. C.; Benraadt, J.; Koolen, M. G.; González González, D.; Bartelink, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether it is feasible to reduce the overall treatment time from 7 to 4 weeks in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving radiotherapy with cisplatin. This follows an EORTC phase III randomised trial (08844) in which cisplatin given before

  7. A patient perspective on shared decision making in stage I non-small cell lung cancer: a mixed methods study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopmans, W.; Damman, O.C.; Senan, S.; Hartemink, K.J.; Smit, E.F.; Timmermans, D.R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgery and stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) are both curative treatment options for patients with a stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Consequently, there is growing interest in studying the role of patients in treatment decision making. We studied how patients with

  8. Thymidylate synthase protein expression levels remain stable during paclitaxel and carboplatin treatment in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thymidylate synthase (TS) is a potential predictive marker for efficacy of treatment with pemetrexed. The current study aimed at investigating whether TS expression changes during non-pemetrexed chemotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), thus making rebiopsy necessary for dec...

  9. Non-small cell lung cancer therapy: safety and efficacy in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glotzer OS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Owen S Glotzer,1 Thomas Fabian,1 Anurag Chandra,2 Charles T Bakhos21Division of Thoracic Surgery, Albany Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Albany Medical Center, Albany Medical College, Albany, New York, USABackground: Our objective was to evaluate and review the current literature on the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in the elderly.Methods: We selected recent peer-reviewed articles addressing ageing, cancer treatment in the elderly, and lung cancer treatment in the elderly. We defined elderly as over the age of 70.Results: The population is ageing dramatically throughout most of the world. Given that situation, clinicians are seeing and being asked to treat more elderly patients that have NSCLC. Elderly patients are less likely to participate or be allowed to participate in prospective or retrospective studies of treatments for NSCLC. Elderly patients are also less likely to be staged appropriately for their advanced tumors, and are less likely to be referred for surgery or adjuvant therapy after surgery. When treatment is tailored to patient comorbidities but not to age, the data support survival and outcomes comparable to those of younger patients.Conclusions: Data are limited on the treatment of elderly patients with NSCLC. No data exist to support limiting recommendations for treatment based on age alone. Treatments should be determined on an individual basis.Keywords: thoracic surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, pulmonary, physiology, ageing, SBRT

  10. Successful Chemotherapy with Nab-Paclitaxel in a Heavily Treated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patient: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikiko Ishihara

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for the majority of all lung cancers. A 69-year-old female with postoperatively recurrent NSCLC was treated weekly with nanoparticle-albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel monotherapy every 4 weeks as a tenth line chemotherapy, and stable disease was achieved by seven cycles of this regimen. The patient developed grade 4 neutropenia and grade 3 leukopenia, but none of the other toxicities, including febrile neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy, were severe, and thus she was able to tolerate this salvage chemotherapy. To our knowledge this is the first report of the efficacy of nab-paclitaxel monotherapy in a heavily treated NSCLC patient.

  11. The Significance of the PD-L1 Expression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Trenchant Double Swords as Predictive and Prognostic Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Kazuki; Toyokawa, Gouji; Shoji, Fumihiro; Okamoto, Tatsuro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2018-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer worldwide. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have been the standard treatment for lung cancer, and targeted molecular therapy has greatly improved the clinical course of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring driver mutations, such as in epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase genes. Despite advances in such therapies, the prognosis of patients with NSCLC without driver oncogene mutations remains poor. Immunotherapy targeting programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) has recently been shown to improve the survival in advanced NSCLC. The PD-L1 expression on the surface of tumor cells has emerged as a potential biomarker for predicting responses to immunotherapy and prognosis after surgery in NSCLC. However, the utility of PD-L1 expression as a predictive and prognostic biomarker remains controversial because of the existence of various PD-L1 antibodies, scoring systems, and positivity cutoffs. In this review, we summarize the data from representative clinical trials of PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint inhibitors in NSCLC and previous reports on the association between PD-L1 expression and clinical outcomes in patients with NSCLC. Furthermore, we discuss the future perspectives of immunotherapy and immune checkpoint factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. HOXA9 inhibits migration of lung cancer cells and its hypermethylation is associated with recurrence in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jung-Ah; Lee, Bo Bin; Kim, Yujin; Hong, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Young-Ho; Han, Joungho; Shim, Young Mog; Yoon, Chae-Yeong; Lee, Yeon-Su; Kim, Duk-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the clinicopathological significance of HOXA9 hypermethylation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). HOXA9 hypermethylation was characterized in six lung cancer cell lines, and its clinicopathological significance was analyzed using methylation-specific PCR in 271 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues and 27 fresh-frozen tumor and matched normal tissues from 298 NSCLC patients, and Ki-67 expression was analyzed using immunohistochemistry. The promoter region of HOXA9 was highly methylated in six lung cancer cell lines, but not in normal bronchial epithelial cells. The loss of expression was restored by treatment of the cells with a demethylating agent, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC). Transient transfection of HOXA9 into H23 lung cancer cells resulted in the inhibition of cell migration but not proliferation. Conversely, sequence-specific siRNA-mediated knockdown of HOXA9 enhanced cell migration. The mRNA levels of HOXA9 in 27 fresh-frozen tumor tissues were significantly lower than in matched normal tissues (Precurrence-free survival (hazard ratio=3.98, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-17.09, P=0.01) in never-smokers, after adjusting for age, sex, tumor size, adjuvant therapy, pathologic stage, and histology. In conclusion, the present study suggests that HOXA9 inhibits migration of lung cancer cells and its hypermethylation is an independent prognostic factor for recurrence-free survival in never-smokers with NSCLC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lack of any association between blood groups and lung cancer, independent of histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguz, Arzu; Unal, Dilek; Tasdemir, Arzu; Karahan, Samet; Aykas, Fatma; Mutlu, Hasan; Cihan, Yasemin Benderli; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer deaths, is divided into 2 main classes based on its biology, therapy and prognosis: non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Many cases are at an advanced stage at diagnosis, which is a major obstacle to improving outcomes. It is important to define the high risk group patients for early diagnosis and chance of cure. Blood group antigens are chemical components on erythrocyte membranes but they are also expressed on a variety of epithelial cells. Links between ABO blood groups with benign or malignant diseases, such as gastric and pancreas cancers, have been observed for a long time. In this study, we aimed to investigate any possible relationship between lung cancer histological subtypes and ABO-Rh blood groups. The files of 307 pathologically confirmed lung cancer patients were were reviewed retrospectively. Cases with a serologically determined blood group and Rh factor were included and those with a history of another primary cancer were excluded, leaving a total of 221. The distribution of blood groups of the lung cancer patients were compared with the distribution of blood groups of healthy donors admitted to the Turkish Red Crescent Blood Service in our city in the year 2012. There was no significant difference between patients with lung cancer of either type and the control group in terms of distribution of ABO blood groups and Rh factor (p: 0.073). There was also no relationship with non small cell cancer histological subtypes. In this study, we found no relationship between the ABO-Rhesus blood groups and NSCLC and SCLC groups. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of ABO blood groups in SCLC patients.

  14. Clinical, pathologic, and biologic features associated with BRAF mutations in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarella, Stephanie; Ogino, Atsuko; Nishino, Mizuki; Butaney, Mohit; Shen, Jeanne; Lydon, Christine; Yeap, Beow Y; Sholl, Lynette M; Johnson, Bruce E; Jänne, Pasi A

    2013-08-15

    BRAF mutations are found in a subset of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). We examined the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with NSCLC harboring BRAF mutations. Using DNA sequencing, we successfully screened 883 patients with NSCLC for BRAF mutations between July 1, 2009 and July 16, 2012. Baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes were compared between patients with and without BRAF mutations. Wild-type controls consisted of patients with NSCLC without a somatic alteration in BRAF, KRAS, EGFR, and ALK. In vitro studies assessed the biologic properties of selected non-V600E BRAF mutations identified from patients with NSCLC. Of 883 tumors screened, 36 (4%) harbored BRAF mutations (V600E, 18; non-V600E, 18) and 257 were wild-type for BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and ALK negative. Twenty-nine of 36 patients with BRAF mutations were smokers. There were no distinguishing clinical features between BRAF-mutant and wild-type patients. Patients with advanced NSCLC with BRAF mutations and wild-type tumors showed similar response rates and progression-free survival (PFS) to platinum-based combination chemotherapy and no difference in overall survival. Within the BRAF cohort, patients with V600E-mutated tumors had a shorter PFS to platinum-based chemotherapy compared with those with non-V600E mutations, although this did not reach statistical significance (4.1 vs. 8.9 months; P = 0.297). We identified five BRAF mutations not previously reported in NSCLC; two of five were associated with increased BRAF kinase activity. BRAF mutations occur in 4% of NSCLCs and half are non-V600E. Prospective trials are ongoing to validate BRAF as a therapeutic target in NSCLC. ©2013 AACR.

  15. Cytoplasmic Kaiso is associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shun-Dong; Wang, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Zhang, Peng-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, En-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Kaiso has been identified as a new member of the POZ-zinc finger family of transcription factors that are implicated in development and cancer. Although controversy still exists, Kaiso is supposed to be involved in human cancer. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of cytoplasmic/nuclear Kaiso in human lung cancer. In this study, immunohistochemical studies were performed on 20 cases of normal lung tissues and 294 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including 50 cases of paired lymph node metastases and 88 cases with complete follow-up records. Three lung cancer cell lines showing primarily nuclear localization of Kaiso were selected to examine whether roles of Kaiso in cytoplasm and in nucleus are identical. Nuclear Kaiso was down-regulated by shRNA technology or addition a specific Kaiso antibody in these cell lines. The proliferative and invasive abilities were evaluated by MTT and Matrigel invasive assay, transcription of Kaiso's target gene matrilysin was detected by RT-PCR. Kaiso was primarily expressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer tissues. Overall positive cytoplasmic expression rate was 63.61% (187/294). The positive cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was higher in advanced TNM stages (III+IV) of NSCLC, compared to lower stages (I+II) (p = 0.019). A correlation between cytoplasmic Kaiso expression and lymph node metastasis was found (p = 0.003). In 50 paired cases, cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was 78.0% (41/50) in primary sites and 90.0% (45/50) in lymph node metastases (p = 0.001). The lung cancer-related 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients who were cytoplasmic Kaiso-positive (22.22%), compared to those with cytoplasmic Kaiso-negative tumors (64.00%) (p = 0.005). Nuclear Kaiso staining was seen in occasional cases with only a 5.10% (15/294) positive rate and was not associated with any clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Furthermore, after the down-regulation of the nuclear

  16. The relationship between glasgow prognostic score and serum tumor markers in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Ai-Gui; Chen, Hong-Lin; Lu, Hui-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) has been reported as a powerful prognostic tool for patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between GPS and prognosis related tumor markers in patients with advanced NSCLC. We included 138 advanced NSCLC patients and twenty healthy controls in the study. GPS was calculated by combined serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and albumin. Three serum tumor markers, which included cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21–1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and tissue polypeptide specific antigen (TPS), were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). GPS and tumor markers were all assessed before chemotherapy. All patients received at least 2 courses of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. After that, 2 to 5 years follow-up was conducted. Median levels of CYFRA21–1 were 1.5 ng/ml (0.1–3.1 ng/ml) in healthy controls, and 4.6 ng/ml (0.7–35.2 ng/ml) in GPS 0 advanced NSCLC, 11.2 ng/ml (0.4–89.2) ng/ml in GPS 1 advanced NSCLC, and 15.7 ng/ml (2.9–134.6 ng/ml) in GPS 2 advanced NSCLC, respectively. Median levels of CYFRA21-1 were higher in NSCLC patients than in healthy controls, and CYFRA21-1 increased gradually according to GPS category in NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). Similar results were found for median levels of CEA and TPS in healthy controls and NSCLC patients (P < 0.05). In NSCLC patients, positive correlations were found between CYFRA21-1 and GPS, CEA and GPS, TPS and GPS. The Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient were 0.67 (P < 0.05), 0.61 (P < 0.05) and 0.55 (P < 0.05), respectively. Survival analyses showed GPS was an independent prognostic factor for advanced NSCLC. CYFRA21-1(>3.3 ng/ml) and TPS (>80 U/l) were related with the prognosis of advanced NSCLC by univariate analyses, but multivariate analyses showed CYFRA21-1, TPS and CEA were not the independent prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Our results showed GPS were positive correlated

  17. Impact of low skeletal muscle mass on non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Mitsuyoshi, Takamasa; Shintani, Takashi; Iizuka, Yusuke; Mizowaki, Takashi

    2018-05-17

    The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate impact of pre-treatment skeletal muscle mass (SMM) on overall survival and non-lung cancer mortality after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). One-hundred and eighty-six patients whose abdominal CT before the treatment was available were enrolled into this study. The patients were divided into two groups of SMM according to gender-specific thresholds for unilateral psoas area. Operability was judged by the treating physician or thoracic surgeon after discussion in a multi-disciplinary tumor board. Patients with low SMM tended to be elderly and underweight in body mass index compared with the high SMM. Overall survival in patients with the low SMM tended to be worse than that in the high SMM (41.1% and 55.9% at 5 years, P = 0.115). Cumulative incidence of non-lung cancer death was significantly worse in the low SMM (31.3% at 5 years compared with 9.7% in the high SMM, P = 0.006). Multivariate analysis identified SMM and operability as significant factors for non-lung cancer mortality. Impact of SMM on lung cancer death was not significant. No difference in rate of severe treatment-related toxicity was observed between the SMM groups. Low SMM is a significant risk factor for non-lung cancer death, which might lead to worse overall survival, after SBRT for stage I NSCLC. However, the low SMM does not increase lung cancer death or severe treatment-related toxicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The option value of innovative treatments for non-small cell lung cancer and renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton Snider, Julia; Batt, Katharine; Wu, Yanyu; Tebeka, Mahlet Gizaw; Seabury, Seth

    2017-10-01

    To develop a model of the option value a therapy provides by enabling patients to live to see subsequent innovations and to apply the model to the case of nivolumab in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A model of the option value of nivolumab in RCC and NSCLC was developed and estimated. Data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registry and published clinical trial results were used to estimate survival curves for metastatic cancer patients with RCC, squamous NSCLC, or nonsquamous NSCLC. To estimate the conventional value of nivolumab, survival with the pre-nivolumab standard of care was compared with survival with nivolumab assuming no future innovation. To estimate the option value of nivolumab, long-term survival trends in RCC and squamous and nonsquamous NSCLC were measured in SEER to forecast mortality improvements that nivolumab patients may live to see. Compared with the previous standard of care, nivolumab extended life expectancy by 6.3 months in RCC, 7.5 months in squamous NSCLC, and 4.5 months in nonsquamous NSCLC, according to conventional methods. Accounting for expected future mortality trends, nivolumab patients are likely to gain an additional 1.2 months in RCC, 0.4 months in squamous NSCLC, and 0.5 months in nonsquamous NSCLC. These option values correspond to 18%, 5%, and 10% of the conventional value of nivolumab, respectively. Option value is important when valuing therapies like nivolumab that extend life in a rapidly evolving area of care.

  19. NSCLC and HER2: between lights and shadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Giuseppina Rosaria Rita; Russo, Alessandro; Franchina, Tindara; Ferraro, Giuseppa; Zanghì, Mariangela; Picone, Antonio; Scimone, Antonino; Adamo, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    The therapeutic landscape of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has dramatically changed in the last few years with the introduction of molecularly targeted agents, leading to unprecedented results in lung tumors with a paradigmatic shift from a "one size fits all" approach to an histologic and molecular-based approach. The discovery of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in NSCLC in 2004 and the marked response to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib, in a small subset of patients harboring these genetic abnormalities, stimulated the study of other kinase mutants involvement in NSCLC. The incredible story of ALK rearranged tumors, with the rapid Food and Drug Administration approval of Crizotinib after only 4 years from the discovery of EML4-ALK translocation in NSCLC, has profoundly influenced the concept of drug development in NSCLC, paving the way to a novel series of molecularly selected studies with specific inhibitors. The identification of these oncogenic drivers has dramatically changed the genetic landscape of NSCLC moving away from the old concept of a large indistinct histological entity to a combination of rare clinically relevant molecular subsets. Recently, a renewed interest has been emerging on the human epidermal growth factor-2 (HER2) pathway. Genetic aberrations of this signaling pathway have been reported over time to be associated in NSCLC with different sensitivity to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to have a possible prognostic role and more recently HER2 amplification has been emerged as a possible mechanism in EGFR-mutated tumors of acquired resistance to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In addition, dysregulation of the HER2 pathway, in particular HER2 mutations (mostly, in-frame exon 20 insertions), may represent a possible novel therapeutic target in NSCLC, paving the way for a new generation of targeted agents in NSCLC. Since anecdotal case reports of clinical activity of anti-HER2 agents in NSCLC

  20. Prognostic significance of CDH13 hypermethylation and mRNA in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue R

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ruilin Xue,1 Cuili Yang,1 Fang Zhao,2 Dejia Li1 1Global Health Institute, School of Public Health, 2Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Aberrant methylation of CpG dinucleotides is a commonly observed epigenetic modification in human cancer. Thus, detection of aberrant gene promoter methylation as a tool for diagnosis of tumors or as a prognostic marker has been widely described for many types of cancers, including nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Emerging evidence indicates that CDH13 is a candidate tumor suppressor in several types of human tumors, including NSCLC. However, the correlation between CDH13 hypermethylation and clinicopathological characteristics of NSCLC remains unclear. In the current study, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the effects of CDH13 hypermethylation on the incidence of NSCLC and clinicopathological characteristics. Final analysis of 803 NSCLC patients from eleven eligible studies was performed. CDH13 hypermethylation was observed to be significantly higher in NSCLC than in normal lung tissue, with the pooled odds ratio (OR from seven studies including 448 NSCLC and 345 normal lung tissue (OR, 7.85; 95% confidence interval, 5.12–12.03; P<0.00001. CDH13 hypermethylation was also associated with pathological types. The pooled OR was obtained from four studies, including 111 squamous cell carcinoma and 106 adenocarcinoma (OR, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.66; P=0.001, which indicated that CDH13 hypermethylation plays a more important role in the pathogenesis of adenocarcinoma. NSCLC with CDH13 hypermethylation was found more frequently in poorly differentiated NSCLC patients. NSCLC patients with CDH13 hypermethylation had a lower survival rate than those without CDH13 hypermethylation. In addition, CDH13 mRNA high expression was found to correlate with better overall survival for all NSCLC patients followed for 20 years

  1. GrB TWEAK: A Potential Novel Biologic for NSCLC Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    granzyme B, lung cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT...cost extension period we were able to test whether our therapeutic construct GrB-Fc-IT4 could inhibit NSCLC tumor growth in vivo using the NSCLC patient ...derived Fn14-positive cell line M2010-1005. The M2010-1005 line was established from a NSCLC patient with a tumor harboring the EGFRdel747-752

  2. Lung cancer in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Deepthi; Haigentz, Missak; Aboulafia, David M

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most prevalent non-AIDS-defining malignancy in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era. Smoking plays a significant role in the development of HIV-associated lung cancer, but the cancer risk is two to four times greater in HIV-infected persons than in the general population, even after adjusting for smoking intensity and duration. Lung cancer is typically diagnosed a decade or more earlier among HIV-infected persons (mean age, 46 years) compared to those without HIV infection. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological subtype, and the majority of patients are diagnosed with locally advanced or metastatic carcinoma. Because pulmonary infections are common among HIV-infected individuals, clinicians may not suspect lung cancer in this younger patient population. Surgery with curative intent remains the treatment of choice for early-stage disease. Although there is increasing experience in using radiation and chemotherapy for HIV-infected patients who do not have surgical options, there is a need for prospective studies because this population is frequently excluded from participating in cancer trials. Evidence-based treatments for smoking-cessation with demonstrated efficacy in the general population must be routinely incorporated into the care of HIV-positive smokers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ablative dose proton beam therapy for stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinomas. Ablative dose PBT for NSCLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Joo Young; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Suh, Yang-Gun; Kim, Yeon-Joo [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Sung Ho [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Center for Lung Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Proton Therapy Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Hong Ryull [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of ablative dose hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT) for patients with stage I and recurrent non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). A total of 55 patients with stage I (n = 42) and recurrent (n = 13) NSCLC underwent hypofractionated PBT and were retrospectively reviewed. A total dose of 50-72 CGE (cobalt gray equivalent) in 5-12 fractions was delivered. The median follow-up duration was 29 months (range 4-95 months). There were 24 deaths (43.6%) during the follow-up period: 11 died of disease progression and 13 from other causes. Kaplan-Meier overall survival rate (OS) at 3 years was 54.9% and the median OS was 48.6 months (range 4-95 months). Local progression was observed in 7 patients and the median time to local progression was 9.3 months (range 5-14 months). Cumulative actuarial local control rate (LCR), lymph node metastasis-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival rates at 3 years were 85.4, 78.4, and 76.5%, respectively. Larger tumor diameter was significantly associated with poorer LCR (3-year: 94% for ≤3 cm vs. 65% for >3 cm, p = 0.006) on univariate analysis and also an independent prognostic factor for LCR (HR 6.9, 95% CI = 1.3-37.8, p = 0.026) on multivariate analysis. No grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicities developed. One grade 5 treatment-related adverse event occurred in a patient with symptomatic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ablative dose hypofractionated PBT was safe and promising for stage I and recurrent NSCLC. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Sicherheit hypofraktionierter Protonentherapie (PBT) mit ablativen Dosen fuer nichtkleinzellige Lungenkarzinome (NSCLC) im Stadium I und rekurrierende NSCLC. Retrospektiv wurden insgesamt 55 NSCLC-Patienten (Stadium I: n = 42; rekurrierender Tumor: n = 13), analysiert. Sie waren mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50-72 CGE (''cobalt gray equivalent'') in 5-12 Fraktionen behandelt worden. Der Median der Follow

  4. Expression and Bioinformatic Analysis of Ornithine Aminotransferase 
in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danfei ZHOU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that ornithine aminotransferase (OAT might play an important role in the oncogenesis and progression of numerous malignant tumors. The aim of this study is to detect the mRNA and protein expression of OAT in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as well as to analyze the bioinformatic features and binary interactions. Methods OAT mRNA expression was detected in A549 and 16HBE cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. OAT protein expression was determined in 55 cases of NSCLC and 17 cases of adjacent non-tumor lung tissues by immunohistochemical staining. The bioinformatic features and binary interactions of OAT were analyzed. Gene ontology annotation and signal pathway analysis were performed. Results OAT mRNA expression in A549 cells was 2.85-fold lower than that in 16HBE cells. OAT protein expression was significantly higher in NSCLC tissues than that in adjacent non-tumor lung tissues. A significant difference of OAT protein expression was existed between squamous cell lung cancer and adenocarcinoma (P<0.05, but was not correlated with the gender, age, lymph node metastasis, tumor size, and TNM stages. Bioinformatic analysis suggested that OAT was a highly homologous and stable protein located in the mitochondria. An aminotran-3 domain and several sites of phosphorylation, which may function in signal transduction, gene transcription, and molecular transit, were found. In the 54 selected binary interactions of OAT, TNF and TRAF6 play roles in the NF-κB pathway. Conclusion OAT may play an important role in the oncogenesis and progression of NSCLC. Thus, OAT may be a novel biomarker for the diagnosis of NSCLC or a new target for its treatment.

  5. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  6. Improving chemotherapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Lung cancer is the third most common mortal disease in industrialised countries and the prognosis has been slow to improve. The largest subgroup has locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Unfortunately, these patients can usually not be cured and the main...... project. The description of the experiences can serve as an example for the improvement of microsystems in settings with similar problems. Finally, in the registry study of Norwegian patients with lung cancer, we found significant geographical and temporal variations of the utilisation of chemotherapy...... that were related to survival. Potential areas of improvement in the system of care for lung cancer are recruitment of patients in clinical studies, standardisation of the processes of care in outpatient clinics, definition of strategic aims of quality, development of balanced quality indicators, as well...

  7. Triple SILAC quantitative proteomic analysis reveals differential abundance of cell signaling proteins between normal and lung cancer-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J; Fondrie, William E; Yang, Austin; Mao, Li

    2016-02-05

    Exosomes are 30-100 nm sized membrane vesicles released by cells into the extracellular space that mediate intercellular communication via transfer of proteins and other biological molecules. To better understand the role of these microvesicles in lung carcinogenesis, we employed a Triple SILAC quantitative proteomic strategy to examine the differential protein abundance between exosomes derived from an immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cell line and two non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines harboring distinct activating mutations in the cell signaling molecules: Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In total, we were able to quantify 721 exosomal proteins derived from the three cell lines. Proteins associated with signal transduction, including EGFR, GRB2 and SRC, were enriched in NSCLC exosomes, and could actively regulate cell proliferation in recipient cells. This study's investigation of the NSCLC exosomal proteome has identified enriched protein cargo that can contribute to lung cancer progression, which may have potential clinical implications in biomarker development for patients with NSCLC. The high mortality associated with lung cancer is a result of late-stage diagnosis of the disease. Current screening techniques used for early detection of lung cancer lack the specificity for accurate diagnosis. Exosomes are nano-sized extracellular vesicles, and the increased abundance of select protein cargo in exosomes derived from cancer cells may be used for diagnostic purposes. In this paper, we applied quantitative proteomic analysis to elucidate abundance differences in exosomal protein cargo between two NSCLC cell lines with distinctive oncogene mutations and an immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cell line. This study revealed proteins associated with cell adhesion, the extracellular matrix, and a variety of signaling molecules were enriched in NSCLC exosomes. The present data reveals

  8. Prevalence and natural history of ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer and the clinical impact of targeted therapy with ALK inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia PL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Puey Ling Chia,1 Paul Mitchell,1 Alexander Dobrovic,2–4 Thomas John1,2,4 1Department of Medical Oncology, Olivia-Newton John Cancer and Wellness Centre, Victoria, Australia; 2Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Austin Health, Victoria, Australia; 3Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 4School of Cancer Medicine, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia Abstract: Improved understanding of molecular drivers of carcinogenesis has led to significant progress in the management of lung cancer. Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC with anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene rearrangements constitute about 4%–5% of all NSCLC patients. ALK+ NSCLC cells respond well to small molecule ALK inhibitors such as crizotinib; however, resistance invariably develops after several months of treatment. There are now several newer ALK inhibitors, with the next generation of agents targeting resistance mutations. In this review, we will discuss the prevalence and clinical characteristics of ALK+ lung cancer, current treatment options, and future directions in the management of this subset of NSCLC patients. Keywords: anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK, gene rearrangements, lung cancer, kinase inhibitors, lung adenocarcinoma

  9. Expression and Its Clinical Significance of SLC22A18 in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming LEI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that multidrug resistance (MDR is the main cause of chemotherapy failure in lung cancer. Research on emergence mechanisms of MDR has great clinical significance in improving the curative efficiency of lung cancer chemotherapy. Proteins encoded by the SLC22A18 gene, which is similar to the transmembrane transporter, may influence the sensitivity of chemotherapeutics as well as the metabolism and growth of cells. In addition, these proteins probably have some effect on the development of lung cancer MDR. The aim of the present study is to investigate the expression of SLC22A18 protein in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as well as in corresponding normal lung tissue. Furthermore, the relationship between SLC22A18 expression and pathological grade and TNM stage is analyzed. Methods The expression of SLC22A18 was detected by EnVinsion in 96 cases with NSCLC and in corresponding normal lung tissue. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results SLC22A18 was mainly located in cell membrane and cytoplasm. The expression level of SLC22A18 in NSCLC was significantly higher than that in normal tissue (P<0.01. The positive rates in squamous cell lung cancer and lung adenocarcinoma were 68% and 78.2%, respectively (P<0.05. Moreover, the higher expression of SLC22A18 was associated with lower histological grade and later TNM stage (P<0.05. Conclusion SLC22A18 protein is overexpressed in NSCLC, and its expression is correlated with pathological grade and TNM stage. These findings provide the experimental basis for investigating the role of tumor and chemoresistance.

  10. Application of detecting cerebrospinal fluid circulating tumor cells in the diagnosis of meningeal metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rong JIANG; Chun-hua MA; Zi-long ZHU; Jin-duo LI; Bin WANG; Li-wei SUN; Yuan LÜ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe a new technology for the detection and enumeration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with meningeal metastasis (MM).  Methods Five cases of NSCLC with MM that were diagnosed by CSF cytology were selected, and 20 ml CSF samples were obtained by lumbar puncture for every patient. The tumor marker immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH) technology was adapted to detect...

  11. Overexpression of EMMPRIN is associated with lymph node metastasis and advanced stage of non-small cell lung cancer: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bing; Wan, Zhaohui; Sheng, Baowei; Lin, Yong; Fu, Tian; Zeng, Qingdi; Qi, Congcong

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies show that overexpression of EMMPRIN involved in the malignant biological behavior of tumors. This investigation was to disclose the expression status of EMMPRIN in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical value for the diagnosis of NSCLC. Methods The expression of EMMPRIN was examined using immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The clinical value of EMMPRIN was evaluated by drawing a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Re...

  12. Reliable and valid assessment of competence in endoscopic ultrasonography and fine-needle aspiration for mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Vilmann, P; Clementsen, P

    2012-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is important in mediastinal staging of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Training standards and implementation strategies of this technique are currently under discussion. The aim of this study was to explore the reliabilit...... and validity of a newly developed EUS Assessment Tool (EUSAT) designed to measure competence in EUS - FNA for mediastinal staging of NSCLC....

  13. Efficacy and safety evaluation of icotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Aiqin; Shi, Chunlei; Xiong, Liwen; Chu, Tianqing; Pei, Jun; Han, Baohui

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of icotinib hydrochloride in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A total of 89 patients with stage IIIB or IV NSCLC received icotinib at a dose of 125 mg administered 3 times a day. Icotinib treatment was continued until disease progression or development of unacceptable toxicity. A total of 89 patients were assessable. In patients treated with icotinib, the overall response rate (RR) was 36.0% (32/89), and the disease control rate (DCR) was 69.7% (62/89). RR and DCR were significantly improved in patients with adenocarcinoma versus non-adenocarcinoma (Picotinib hydrochloride in the treatment of advanced NSCLC is efficacious and safe, and its toxic effects are tolerable.

  14. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Centrally Located Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuming WAN

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A few study has proven that about 90% of local control rates might be benefit from stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, it is reported SBRT associated overall survival and tumor specific survival is comparable with those treated with surgery. SBRT has been accepted as the first line treatment for inoperable patients with peripheral located stage I NSCLC. However, the role of SBRT in centrally located lesions is controversial for potential toxic effects from the adjacent anatomical structure. This paper will review the definition, indication, dose regimens, dose-volume constraints for organs at risk, radiation technology, treatment side effect of centrally located NSCLC treated with SBRT and stereotactic body proton therapy.

  15. Redox-responsive manganese dioxide nanoparticles for enhanced MR imaging and radiotherapy of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi Hyeon; Choi, Eun-Seok; Kim, Sehee; Goh, Sung-Ho; Choi, Yongdoo

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we synthesized manganese dioxide nanoparticles (MnO2 NPs) stabilized with biocompatible polymers (polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyacrylic acid) and analyzed their effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells with or without gefitinib resistance in vitro. MnO2 NPs showed glutathione (GSH)-responsive dissolution and subsequent enhancement in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Of note, treatment with MnO2 NPs induced significant cytotoxic effects on NSCLC cells, and additional dose-dependent therapeutic effects were obtained upon X-ray irradiation. Normal cells treated with MnO2 NPs were viable at the tested concentrations. In addition, increased therapeutic efficacy could be achieved when the cells were treated with MnO2 NPs in hypoxic conditions. Therefore, we conclude that the use of MnO2 NPs in MR imaging and combination radiotherapy may be an efficient strategy for the imaging and therapy of NSCLC.

  16. Longitudinal assessment of TUBB3 expression in non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Class-III-beta-tubulin (TUBB3) expression may be a potential predictive factor for treatment with microtubule interfering cytotoxic drugs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Potential changes in TUBB3 expression during chemotherapy may be of interest if future choice...... NSCLC patients stage T1-4N0-1 was treated with surgery alone without preceding chemotherapy (OP-group). Paired repeated samples were compared in order to evaluate for changes in TUBB3 expression. RESULTS: No statistically significant change in TUBB3 expression was observed between initial diagnostic...... during chemotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: TUBB3 expression was investigated by immunohistochemistry performed on diagnostic biopsies and on available subsequent resection specimens in 65 NSCLC patients stage T1-3N0-2 who received neoadjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel (NAC-group). Another group of 53...

  17. The potential diagnostic power of circulating tumor cell analysis for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kirsty; Pailler, Emma; Faugeroux, Vincent; Taylor, Melissa; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Planchard, David; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lindsay, Colin R; Besse, Benjamin; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), genotyping tumor biopsies for targetable somatic alterations has become routine practice. However, serial biopsies have limitations: they may be technically difficult or impossible and could incur serious risks to patients. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) offer an alternative source for tumor analysis that is easily accessible and presents the potential to identify predictive biomarkers to tailor therapies on a personalized basis. Examined here is our current knowledge of CTC detection and characterization in NSCLC and their potential role in EGFR-mutant, ALK-rearranged and ROS1-rearranged patients. This is followed by discussion of the ongoing issues such as the question of CTC partnership as diagnostic tools in NSCLC.

  18. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers by accelerating EGFR turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Boas; Rho, Jin Kyung; Shin, Dong-Myung; Son, Jaekyoung

    2016-10-01

    Gallic acid is a common botanic phenolic compound, which is present in plants and foods worldwide. Gallic acid is implicated in various biological processes such as cell growth and apoptosis. Indeed, gallic acid has been shown to induce apoptosis in many cancer types. However, the molecular mechanisms of gallic acid-induced apoptosis in cancer, particularly lung cancer, are still unclear. Here, we report that gallic acid induces apoptosis in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, but not in EGFR-WT NSCLC cells. Treatment with gallic acid resulted in a significant reduction in proliferation and induction of apoptosis, only in EGFR-mutant NSCLC cells. Interestingly, treatment with gallic acid led to a robust decrease in EGFR levels, which is critical for NSCLC survival. Treatment with gallic acid had no significant effect on transcription, but induced EGFR turnover. Indeed, treatment with a proteasome inhibitor dramatically reversed gallic acid-induced EGFR downregulation. Moreover, treatment with gallic acid induced EGFR turnover leading to apoptosis in EGFR-TKI (tyrosine kinase inhibitor)-resistant cell lines, which are dependent on EGFR signaling for survival. Thus, these studies suggest that gallic acid can induce apoptosis in EGFR-dependent lung cancers that are dependent on EGFR for growth and survival via acceleration of EGFR turnover. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nationwide quality improvement in lung cancer care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Erik Winther; Green, Anders; Oesterlind, Kell

    2013-01-01

    To improve prognosis and quality of lung cancer care the Danish Lung Cancer Group has developed a strategy consisting of national clinical guidelines and a clinical quality and research database. The first edition of our guidelines was published in 1998 and our national lung cancer registry...... was opened for registrations in 2000. This article describes methods and results obtained by multidisciplinary collaboration and illustrates how quality of lung cancer care can be improved by establishing and monitoring result and process indicators....

  20. PD-L1 Expression and Survival among Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Steffen Filskov; Zhou, Wei; Dolled-Filhart, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with chemotherapy are inconsistent. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between PD-L1 expression and overall survival (OS) among 204 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark, from 2007 to 2012. PD......-positive tumors, and 50% had PD-L1 weak-positive tumors. No statistically significant association was found between PD-L1 expression and survival; adjusted hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 0.88-2.03; median OS, 9.0 months) for the PD-L1 strong-positive group and 1.07 (0.74-1.55; median OS, 9...... by immunohistochemistry to be frequently expressed in patients with advanced NSCLC. However, PD-L1 expression is not a strong prognostic marker in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with chemotherapy....

  1. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherrer, M.

    1982-01-01

    Unanimity does not exist about the utility and organisation of screening procedures for early diagnosis of lung cancer. We describe a low cost structue of screening, requiring only a minimum of compliance from the elderly smoker and ex-smoker. At 4 months interval, radiographs, sputum cytologies and eventual fiberbronchoscopies are realized in all that elderly smokers and ex-smokers which begin to present one of the first early lung cancer signs or symptoms (loss of weight, hemoptoe, thoracic pain and others). (orig.) [de

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer : a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westwood, Marie; Joore, Manuela; Whiting, Penny; van Asselt, Thea; Ramaekers, Bram; Armstrong, Nigel; Misso, Kate; Severens, Johan; Kleijnen, Jos

    BACKGROUND: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment with standard chemotherapy.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutation testing in adults with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Westwood (Marie); M.A. Joore (Manuela); P. Whiting (Penny); T. van Asselt (Thea); B.L.T. Ramaekers (Bram); N. Armstrong (Nigel); K. Misso (Kate); J.L. Severens (Hans); J. Kleijnen (Jos)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common form of lung cancer. Some epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR-TK) mutations make tumours responsive to treatment with EGFR-TK inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) but less responsive to treatment

  4. The prognostic value of KRAS mutated plasma DNA in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Anneli Dowler; Garm Spindler, Karen-Lise; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide and associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. New agents targeting the epidermal growth factor system are emerging, but only a subgroup of the patients will benefit from the therapy. Cell free DNA (cf......DNA) in the blood allows for tumour specific analyses, including KRAS-mutations, and the aim of the study was to investigate the possible prognostic value of plasma mutated KRAS (pmKRAS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC eligible....... RESULTS: The study included 246 patients receiving a minimum of 1 treatment cycle, and all but four were evaluable for response according to RECIST. Forty-three patients (17.5%) presented with a KRAS mutation. OS was 8.9 months and PFS by intention to treat 5.4 months. Patients with a detectable plasma...

  5. [Construction of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-kang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Jian-hua; Fu, Chun-yan; Li, Bo

    2008-08-01

    To construct a technological platform of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TAMP) expression. Thirty samples of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were collected after surgery. The corresponding sections of tumor tissue specimens to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected. Immunohistochemical staining,Gomori methenamine silver stain, and electron microscope observation were performed to build a technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression by detecting the morphology and the integrity of basement membrane of microvasculature, microvascular density, various microvascular subtype, the degree of the maturity and lumenization of microvasculature, and the characteristics of immunogenetics of microvasculature. The technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression was constructed successfully. There was heterogeneity in 2D-TMAP expression of non-small cell lung cancer. The microvascular of NSCLC had certain characteristics. 2D-TMAP is a key technology that can be used to observe the overall state of micro-environment in tumor growth.

  6. Apatinib plus icotinib in treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer after icotinib treatment failure: a retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jianping; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiangru; Shi, Yuankai

    2017-01-01

    Jianping Xu, Xiaoyan Liu, Sheng Yang, Xiangru Zhang, Yuankai Shi Department of Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center/Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing Key Laboratory of Clinical Study on Anticancer Molecular Targeted Drugs, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: Treatment failure frequently occurs in patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who resp...

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound guided biopsy performed routinely in lung cancer staging spares futile thoracotomies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Soeren S; Vilmann, Peter; Krasnik, Mark

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to 45% of operations with curative intent for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be regarded as futile, apparently because the stage of the disease is more advanced than expected preoperatively. During the past decade several studies have evaluated the usefulness of endoscopic...... ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy (EUS-FNA) in lung cancer staging with promising results. However, no randomised trials have been performed, in which a staging strategy with EUS-FNA performed in all patients is compared with a conventional workup. METHODS: Before surgery (i.e. mediastinoscopy...

  8. A Case of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with Possible “Disease Flare” on Nivolumab Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Chubachi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent clinical trials proven the clinically significant efficacy and tolerability of nivolumab, a programmed death 1 (PD-1 inhibitor, in previously treated patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Case Presentation. Here, we describe the case of a patient who experienced possible “disease flare” immediately after initiation of nivolumab treatment. A 54-year-old man was diagnosed with Stage IIB (T2N1M0 lung adenocarcinoma. After 7 years from recurrence, 10th line chemotherapy, nivolumab, was initiated. Six weeks later, after 3 cycles of nivolumab treatment, rapid lung cancer progression was observed with an increase in the size of the primary lesion, multiple novel nodules on both lungs, and multiple novel brain metastases. Conclusion. We believe that physicians should be made aware that, in a subset of NSCLC patients, disease flare might occur on nivolumab treatment.

  9. Understanding the function and dysfunction of the immune system in lung cancer: the role of immune checkpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Cao, Maria Gonzalez; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-06-01

    Survival rates for metastatic lung cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), are poor with 5-year survivals of less than 5%. The immune system has an intricate and complex relationship with tumorigenesis; a groundswell of research on the immune system is leading to greater understanding of how cancer progresses and presenting new ways to halt disease progress. Due to the extraordinary power of the immune system-with its capacity for memory, exquisite specificity and central and universal role in human biology-immunotherapy has the potential to achieve complete, long-lasting remissions and cures, with few side effects for any cancer patient, regardless of cancer type. As a result, a range of cancer therapies are under development that work by turning our own immune cells against tumors. However deeper understanding of the complexity of immunomodulation by tumors is key to the development of effective immunotherapies, especially in lung cancer.

  10. Understanding the function and dysfunction of the immune system in lung cancer: the role of immune checkpoints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karachaliou, Niki; Cao, Maria Gonzalez; Teixidó, Cristina; Viteri, Santiago; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Survival rates for metastatic lung cancer, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC), are poor with 5-year survivals of less than 5%. The immune system has an intricate and complex relationship with tumorigenesis; a groundswell of research on the immune system is leading to greater understanding of how cancer progresses and presenting new ways to halt disease progress. Due to the extraordinary power of the immune system—with its capacity for memory, exquisite specificity and central and universal role in human biology—immunotherapy has the potential to achieve complete, long-lasting remissions and cures, with few side effects for any cancer patient, regardless of cancer type. As a result, a range of cancer therapies are under development that work by turning our own immune cells against tumors. However deeper understanding of the complexity of immunomodulation by tumors is key to the development of effective immunotherapies, especially in lung cancer

  11. A willingness-to-pay study of oral epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighl, Natasha B; Tsao, W Stephen; Zawisza, Dianne L; Nematollahi, Mahsan; Shepherd, Frances A

    2006-01-01

    Oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR TKIs) are new agents in the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II studies demonstrate objective tumor responses and symptom improvement, combined with minimal toxicity and the convenience of an oral agent. We evaluated patient utility through willingness-to-pay (WTP) for these agents in the treatment of advanced NSCLC in Canada. Advanced NSCLC patients and healthy subjects participated in a structured interview and bidding exercise, reviewing current evidence supporting EGFR TKI therapy in advanced NSCLC and patient willingness-to-pay for treatment. Fifty-seven patients and 54 healthy subjects participated. The median amount both groups were willing to pay for a month of oral EGFR TKI therapy was $100 CAD (range $0-5000 per month). A minority of NSCLC patients received employment income, the majority relying on disability, pension income, and social assistance for financial support. Affordability of these agents was a key concern for both advanced NSCLC patients and healthy subjects. Univariate predictors of WTP included marital status, prior chemotherapy treatment, receiving pension income or financial social assistance. In multivariate analysis, only prior chemotherapy remained a significant predictor of WTP (p=0.049). Both advanced NSCLC patients and healthy subjects feel oral EGFR TKIs are worth paying for in the treatment of advanced NSCLC, but are willing to pay only a fraction of the market price. As many advanced NSCLC patients are financially disadvantaged, the potential for restricted access to newer therapies is of concern.

  12. The In Vitro Anti-Tumor Activity of Phycocyanin against Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Hao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Phycocyanin, a type of functional food colorant, is shown to have a potent anti-cancer property. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the most aggressive form of cancers with few effective therapeutic options. Previous studies have demonstrated that phycocyanin exerts a growth inhibitory effect on NSCLC A549 cells. However, its biological function and underlying regulatory mechanism on other cells still remain unknown. Here, we investigated the in vitro function of phycocyanin on three typical NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H1299, NCI-H460, and LTEP-A2, for the first time. The results showed that phycocyanin could significantly induce apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, as well as suppress cell migration, proliferation, and the colony formation ability of NSCLC cells through regulating multiple key genes. Strikingly, phycocyanin was discovered to affect the cell phenotype through regulating the NF-κB signaling of NSCLC cells. Our findings demonstrated the anti-neoplastic function of phycocyanin and provided valuable information for the regulation of phycocyanin in NSCLC cells.

  13. Physical activity measured using global positioning system tracking in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, Catherine L; Denehy, Linda; McDonald, Christine F; Irving, Louis; Clark, Ross A

    2014-11-01

    Increasingly physical activity (PA) is being recognized as an important outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated PA using novel global positioning system (GPS) tracking individuals with NSCLC and a group of similar-aged healthy individuals. A prospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Fifty individuals with NSCLC from 3 Australian tertiary hospitals and 35 similar-aged healthy individuals without cancer were included. Individuals with NSCLC were assessed pretreatment. Primary measures were triaxial accelerometery (steps/day) and GPS tracking (outdoor PA behavior). Secondary measures were questionnaires assessing depression, motivation to exercise, and environmental barriers to PA. Between-group comparisons were analyzed using analysis of covariance. Individuals with NSCLC engaged in significantly less PA than similar-aged healthy individuals (mean difference 2363 steps/day, P = .007) and had higher levels of depression (P = .027) and lower motivation to exercise (P = .001). Daily outdoor walking time (P = .874) and distance travelled away from home (P = .883) were not different between groups. Individuals with NSCLC spent less time outdoors in their local neighborhood area (P system tracking appears to be a feasible methodology for adult cancer patients and holds promise for use in future studies investigating PA and or lifestyle behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Lung cancer mimicking lung abscess formation on CT images

    OpenAIRE

    Taira, Naohiro; Kawabata, Tsutomu; Gabe, Atsushi; Ichi, Takaharu; Kushi, Kazuaki; Yohena, Tomofumi; Kawasaki, Hidenori; Yamashiro, Toshimitsu; Ishikawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Patient: Male, 64 Final Diagnosis: Lung pleomorphic carcinoma Symptoms: Cough • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The diagnosis of lung cancer is often made based on computed tomography (CT) image findings if it cannot be confirmed on pathological examinations, such as bronchoscopy. However, the CT image findings of cancerous lesions are similar to those of abscesses.We herein report a case of lung cancer that resemble...

  15. Expression of transcription factor Pokemon in non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-hong; Wang, Sheng-fa; Yu, Liang; Wang, Ju; Chang, Hao; Yan, Wei-li; Fu, Kai; Zhang, Jian

    2008-03-05

    Transcription factor Pokemon, a central regulation gene of the important tumor suppressor ARF gene, exerted its activity by acting upstream of many tumor-suppressing genes and proto-oncogenes. Its expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of Pokemon in NSCLC and to explore its correlation with the clinical pathological characteristics and its influence on patients' prognosis. Fifty-five cases of NSCLC were involved in this study. The expression of Pokemon in the tumor tissue, the corresponding tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue was detected via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, with the aim of investigating the correlation between the expression of Pokemon in tumor tissue of NSCLC and its clinical pathological characteristics. Moreover, a prognostic analysis was carried out based upon the immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of the expression of Pokemon gene in archival tumor specimens (5 years ago) of 62 cases of NSCLC. Statistical significance of the expression of Pokemon mRNA and protein was determined in the tumor tissue, the tumor adjacent tissue and the surrounding tissue (PPokemon was determined not to be associated with the patients' sex, age, smoking condition, tumor differentiation degree, histology and lymph node metastasis condition. However, its relationship with TNM staging was established (PPokemon expression was significantly higher than that of those with positive Pokemon expression (P=0.004), therefore, the expression of Pokemon is believed to be an independent factor affecting prognosis (P=0.034). Pokemon was over-expressed in NSCLC tissue and the expression of Pokemon might be of clinical significance in non-small cell lung cancer prognostic evaluation.

  16. Tumourigenic non-small-cell lung cancer mesenchymal circulating tumour cells: a clinical case study

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, C. J.; Trapani, F.; Metcalf, R. L.; Bertolini, G.; Hodgkinson, C. L.; Khandelwal, G.; Kelly, P.; Galvin, M.; Carter, L.; Simpson, K. L.; Williamson, S.; Wirth, C.; Simms, N.; Frankliln, L.; Frese, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, numerous reports describe the generation and increasing utility of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient-derived xenografts (PDX) from tissue biopsies. While PDX have proven useful for genetic profiling and preclinical drug testing, the requirement of a tissue biopsy limits the available patient population, particularly those with advanced oligometastatic disease. Conversely, ?liquid biopsies? such as circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are minimally invasive...

  17. A retrospective analysis of serum tumor markers found in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Hu

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Although the positive CEA, CYFRA 21-1, NSE, and TSGF rates were observed at low values during the NSLCLC serum diagnosis, they still played an important role in diagnosing lung cancer. Significant levels of CEA, CYFRA 21-1, NSE, and TSGF were detected in the serum. The amounts found were useful for diagnosing NSCLC patients who depended on the currently limited biomarker development.

  18. The role of maintenance pemetrexed in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rafii, S

    2010-01-01

    Saeed Rafii, Michael H CullenDepartment of Medical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TH, United KingdomAbstract: Until recently, the weight of evidence has supported the discontinuation of ­chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after 4–6 cycles of induction therapy. This allows patients with limited life expectancy a “treatment holiday.” A minority of cases then go on to r...

  19. TUSC3 induces autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer cells through Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yun; Cao, Jun; Yao, Xiao-Yi; Wang, Jian-Xin; Zhong, Mei-Zuo; Gan, Ping-Ping; Li, Jian-Huang

    2017-08-08

    We investigated the effects of tumor suppressor candidate 3 ( TUSC3 ) on autophagy in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. A total of 118 NSCLC patients (88 males and 30 females) who underwent surgery at our institute were enrolled in the study. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TUSC3 protein expression was lower in NSCLC specimens than adjacent normal tissue. Correspondingly, there was greater methylation of TUSC3 in NSCLC than adjacent normal tissue. After transient transfection of A549 NSCLC cells with constructs designed to up-regulate or down-regulate TUSC3 expression, we analyzed the effects of inhibiting the Wnt pathway (XAV939) and autophagy (chloroquine, CQ) on the behavior of NSCLC cells. We also performed TOP/FOP-Flash reporter assays, MTT assays, Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide staining, and acridine orange staining to evaluate Wnt/β-catenin signaling, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and autophagy, respectively. Expression of Wnt/β-catenin pathway components and autophagy-related proteins was analyzed using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. We found that TUSC3 inhibited cell proliferation and promoted both apoptosis and autophagy in A549 cells. In addition, TUSC3 increased expression of autophagy-related proteins. It also increased expression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway components and promoted nuclear transfer of β-catenin, resulting in activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TUSC3 thus induces autophagy in human NSCLC cells through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  20. TRAIL-coated lipid-nanoparticles overcome resistance to soluble recombinant TRAIL in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Miguel, Diego; Gallego-Lleyda, Ana; Erviti-Ardanaz, Sandra; Anel, Alberto; Martinez-Lostao, Luis; Ayuso, José María; Fernández, Luis José; Ochoa, Ignacio; Pazo-Cid, Roberto; Del Agua, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one the types of cancer with higher prevalence and mortality. Apo2-Ligand/TRAIL is a TNF family member able to induce apoptosis in tumor cells but not in normal cells. It has been tested in clinical trials against different types of human cancer including NSCLC. However, results of clinical trials have shown a limited efficacy of TRAIL-based therapies. Recently we have demonstrated that artificial lipid nanoparticles coated with bioactive Apo2L/TRAIL (LUV-TRAIL) greatly improved TRAIL cytotoxic ability being capable of killing chemoresistant hematological cancer cells. In the present work we have extended the study to NSCLC. Methods/patients. LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity was assessed on different NSCLC cell lines with different sensitivity to soluble TRAIL and on primary human tumor cells from three patients suffering from NSCLC cancer. We also tested LUV-TRAIL-cytotoxic ability in combination with several anti-tumor agents. Results. LUV-TRAIL exhibited a greater cytotoxic effect compared to soluble TRAIL both in A549 cells and primary human NSCLC cells. LUV-TRAIL-induced cell death was dependent on caspase-8 and caspase-3 activation. Moreover, combination of LUV-TRAIL with other anti-tumor agents such as flavopiridol, and SNS-032 clearly enhanced LUV-TRAIL-induced cytotoxicity against NSCLC cancer cells. Conclusion. The novel formulation of TRAIL based on displaying it on the surface of lipid nanoparticles greatly increases its anti-tumor activity and has clinical potential in cancer treatment. (paper)

  1. Long-term results of a randomized controlled trial evaluating preoperative chemotherapy in resectable non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhiwei; Luo, Qingquan; Jian, Hong; Zhou, Zhen; Cheng, Baijun; Lu, Shun; Liao, Meilin

    2013-01-01

    Zhiwei Chen,* Qingquan Luo,* Hong Jian, Zhen Zhou, Baijun Cheng, Shun Lu, Meilin LiaoShanghai Lung Tumor Clinical Medical Center, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equallyObjective: We aimed to evaluate whether preoperative chemotherapy provides benefits in the survival and prognosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in resectable stages I to IIIA, except T1N0. Methods: In this ra...

  2. KDM6B Elicits Cell Apoptosis by Promoting Nuclear Translocation of FOXO1 in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer and the cause of most cancer-related deaths. The molecular mechanisms that are involved in NSCLC development are currently not well understood. Accumulating evidence shows that histone demethylases play important roles in the regulation of pathological developmental processes in many diseases, including various types of cancers. Methods: Mitochondrial membrane potential assays, migration and invasion assays, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity assays and western blot analysis were used in this research. Results: We found that overexpression of KDM6B, a demethylase that acts on histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27, inhibited cell growth by initiating mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and by attenuating the invasion-metastasis cascade in NSCLC cells. Moreover, our results showed that KDM6B directly interacted with FOXO1 and that overexpression of KDM6B promoted nuclear accumulation of FOXO1. The effects of KDM6B on cell apoptosis and metastasis were weakened by knockdown of FOXO1 expression. On the contrary, knocking down expression of KDM6B inhibited cell apoptosis and promoted cell growth by mitigating the nuclear translocation of FOXO1 in NSCLC cells. Conclusions: These findings suggest that KDM6B may act in a pro-apoptotic role in NSCLC by causing the nuclear translocation of FOXO1.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor expression in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and its impact on overall survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humar Mojca

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R expression has been addressed as a potential prognostic marker in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC in various studies; however, the associations between IGF1R expression and prognosis of advanced NSCLC patients is still controversial. The aim of our observational, cohort study was to evaluate the expression of IGF1R in advanced NSCLC and its prognostic role. A subgroup analysis was performed to address the influence of pre-existing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM status on IGF1R expression and overall survival (OS.

  4. Increased mean lung density: Another independent predictor of lung cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sverzellati, Nicola, E-mail: nicola.sverzellati@unipr.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Randi, Giorgia, E-mail: giorgia.randi@marionegri.it [Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute, Via La Masa 19, 20156 Milan (Italy); Spagnolo, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.spagnolo@unimore.it [Respiratory Disease Unit, Center for Rare Lung Disease, Department of Oncology, Hematology and Respiratory Disease, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, 44124 Modena (Italy); Marchianò, Alfonso, E-mail: alfonso.marchiano@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Radiology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Silva, Mario, E-mail: mac.mario@hotmail.it [Department of Department of Surgical Sciences, Section of Diagnostic Imaging, University of Parma, Padiglione Barbieri, University Hospital of Parma, V. Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin, E-mail: Jan-Martin.Kuhnigk@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); La Vecchia, Carlo, E-mail: carlo.lavecchia@marionegri.it [Department of Occupational Health, University of Milan, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.zompatori@unibo.it [Department of Radiology, Cardio-Thoracic Section, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Via Albertoni 15, 40138 Bologna (Italy); Pastorino, Ugo, E-mail: ugo.pastorino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Department of Surgery, Section of Thoracic Surgery, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between emphysema phenotype, mean lung density (MLD), lung function and lung cancer by using an automated multiple feature analysis tool on thin-section computed tomography (CT) data. Methods: Both emphysema phenotype and MLD evaluated by automated quantitative CT analysis were compared between outpatients and screening participants with lung cancer (n = 119) and controls (n = 989). Emphysema phenotype was defined by assessing features such as extent, distribution on core/peel of the lung and hole size. Adjusted multiple logistic regression models were used to evaluate independent associations of CT densitometric measurements and pulmonary function test (PFT) with lung cancer risk. Results: No emphysema feature was associated with lung cancer. Lung cancer risk increased with decreasing values of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}) independently of MLD (OR 5.37, 95% CI: 2.63–10.97 for FEV{sub 1} < 60% vs. FEV{sub 1} ≥ 90%), and with increasing MLD independently of FEV{sub 1} (OR 3.00, 95% CI: 1.60–5.63 for MLD > −823 vs. MLD < −857 Hounsfield units). Conclusion: Emphysema per se was not associated with lung cancer whereas decreased FEV{sub 1} was confirmed as being a strong and independent risk factor. The cross-sectional association between increased MLD and lung cancer requires future validations.

  5. Interplay between the lung microbiome and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Qixing; Jiang, Feng; Yin, Rong; Wang, Jie; Xia, Wenjie; Dong, Gaochao; Ma, Weidong; Yang, Yao; Xu, Lin; Hu, Jianzhong

    2018-02-28

    The human microbiome confers benefits or disease susceptibility to the human body through multiple pathways. Disruption of the symbiotic balance of the human microbiome is commonly found in systematic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and chronic gastric diseases. Emerging evidence has suggested that dysbiosis of the microbiota may also play vital roles in carcinogenesis at multiple levels, e.g., by affecting metabolic, inflammatory, or immune pathways. Although the impact of the gut microbiome on the digestive cancer has been widely explored, few studies have investigated the interplay between the microbiome and lung cancer. Some recent studies have shown that certain microbes and microbiota dysbiosis are correlated with development of lung cancer. In this mini-review, we briefly summarize current research findings describing the relationship between the lung microbiome and lung cancer. We further discuss the potential mechanisms through which the lung microbiome may play a role in lung carcinogenesis and impact lung cancer treatment. A better knowledge of the interplay between the lung microbiome and lung cancer may promote the development of innovative strategies for early prevention and personalized treatment in lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinical and prognostic significance of plasma fibrinogen in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hyperfibrinogenemia is a common problem associated with various carcinomas. The recent studies have shown that high plasma fibrinogen concentration is associated with invasion, growth and metastases of cancer. Furthermore, the recent studies focus on the prognostic significance of fibrinogen in the patients with advanced NSCLC (stage IIIB -IV. However, the prognostic significance of the plasma fibrinogen levels in early stage NSCLC patients (stage I -IIIA still remains unclear. In addition, it remains unclear whether or not chemotherapy-induced changes in fibrinogen level relate to the prognosis. The aims of this study were to 1 further explore the relationship between the plasma fibrinogen concentration and the stage and metastases of lung cancer 2 evaluate the prognostic significance of the basal plasma fibrinogen level in patients with lung cancer 3 explore the prognostic value of the change in fibrinogen levels between pre and post-chemotherapy. Methods: In this retrospective study, the data from 370 patients with lung cancer were enrolled into this study. The plasma fibrinogen levels were compared with the clinical and prognostic significance of