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Sample records for lung application structure-function

  1. PEGylation affects cytotoxicity and cell-compatibility of poly(ethylene imine) for lung application: structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, Andrea; Merkel, Olivia; Stoeger, Tobias; Kissel, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) has widely been used as non-viral gene carrier due to its capability to form stable complexes by electrostatic interactions with nucleic acids. To reduce cytotoxicity of PEI, several studies have addressed modified PEIs such as block or graft copolymers containing cationic and hydrophilic non-ionic components. Copolymers of PEI and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) with various molecular weights and graft densities were shown to exhibit decreased cytotoxicity and potential for DNA and siRNA delivery. In this study, we evaluated the cytotoxicity and cell-compatibility of different PEGylated PEI polymers in two murine lung cell lines. We found that the degree of PEGylation correlated with both cytotoxicity and oxidative stress, but not with proinflammatory effects. AB type copolymers with long PEG blocks caused high membrane damage and significantly decreased the metabolic activity of lung cells. In addition, they significantly increased the release of two lipid mediators such as 8-isoprostanes (8-IP) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the cytokine profiles which indicated high levels of acute-phase cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-6, and G-CSF did not follow any clear structure-function relationship. In conclusion, we found that modification of PEI 25 kDa with high degree of PEGylation and low PEG chain length reduced cytotoxic and oxidative stress response in lung cells, while the proinflammatory potential remained unaffected. A degree of substitution in the range of 10 to 30 and PEG-chain lengths up to 2000 Da seem to be beneficial and merit further investigations.

  2. Investigation of Lung Structure-Function Relationships Using Hyperpolarized Noble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomen, Robert P.

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an application of the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) phenomenon to non-invasively generate 3D tomographic images. MRI is an emerging modality for the lung, but it suffers from low sensitivity due to inherent low tissue density and short T(*/2) . Hyperpolarization is a process by which the nuclear contribution to NMR signal is greatly enhanced to more than 100,000 times that of samples in thermal equilibrium. The noble gases 3He and 129Xe are most often hyperpolarized by transfer of light angular momentum through the electron of a vaporized alkali metal to the noble gas nucleus (called Spin Exchange Optical Pumping). The enhancement in NMR signal is so great that the gas itself can be imaged via MRI, and because noble gases are chemically inert, they can be safely inhaled by a subject, and the gas distribution within the interior of the lung can be imaged. The mechanics of respiration is an elegant physical process by which air is is brought into the distal airspaces of the lungs for oxygen/carbon dioxide gas exchange with blood. Therefore proper description of lung function is intricately related to its physical structure , and the basic mechanical operation of healthy lungs -- from pressure driven airflow, to alveolar airspace gas kinetics, to gas exchange by blood/gas concentration gradients, to elastic contraction of parenchymal tissue -- is a process decidedly governed by the laws of physics. This dissertation will describe experiments investigating the relationship of lung structure and function using hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. In particular HP gases will be applied to the study of several pulmonary diseases each of which demonstrates unique structure-function abnormalities: asthma, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Successful implementation of an HP gas acquisition protocol for pulmonary studies is an involved and stratified undertaking which requires a solid theoretical foundation in NMR

  3. Structural-functional lung imaging using a combined CT-EIT and a Discrete Cosine Transformation reconstruction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schullcke, Benjamin; Gong, Bo; Krueger-Ziolek, Sabine; Soleimani, Manuchehr; Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich; Moeller, Knut

    2016-05-01

    Lung EIT is a functional imaging method that utilizes electrical currents to reconstruct images of conductivity changes inside the thorax. This technique is radiation free and applicable at the bedside, but lacks of spatial resolution compared to morphological imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography (CT). In this article we describe an approach for EIT image reconstruction using morphologic information obtained from other structural imaging modalities. This leads to recon- structed images of lung ventilation that can easily be superimposed with structural CT or MRI images, which facilitates image interpretation. The approach is based on a Discrete Cosine Transformation (DCT) of an image of the considered transversal thorax slice. The use of DCT enables reduction of the dimensionality of the reconstruction and ensures that only conductivity changes of the lungs are reconstructed and displayed. The DCT based approach is well suited to fuse morphological image information with functional lung imaging at low computational costs. Results on simulated data indicate that this approach preserves the morphological structures of the lungs and avoids blurring of the solution. Images from patient measurements reveal the capabilities of the method and demonstrate benefits in possible applications.

  4. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  5. Structure, function and applications of carboxylesterases from insects for insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuaiguo; Cui, Feng; Qiao, Chuanling

    2009-01-01

    Carboxylesterases (EC 3.1.1.1) distribute broadly in insects, and play an important role in the metabolism with various functions. This paper reviews the insect carboxylesterases including the definitions and reaction mechanism, classification, structural context, functions especially on insecticide resistance, and its application.

  6. Structure, functionality and tuning up of laccases for lignocellulose and other industrial applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitarz, Anna K.; Mikkelsen, Jørn D.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2016-01-01

    Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) are copper-containing oxidoreductases that have a relatively high redox potential which enables them to catalyze oxidation of phenolic compounds, including lignin-derived phenolics. The laccase-catalyzed oxidation of phenolics is accompanied by concomitant reduction of diox...... but differences in loop conformations. We also evaluate the features and regions of laccases in relation to modification and evolution of laccases for various industrial applications including lignocellulosic biomass processing....

  7. Ribosomally synthesized peptides with antimicrobial properties: biosynthesis, structure, function, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagianni, Maria

    2003-09-01

    Ribosomally synthesized peptides with antimicrobial properties (antimicrobial peptides-AMPs) are produced by eukaryotes and prokaryotes and represent crucial components of their defense systems against microorganisms. Although they differ in structure, they are nearly all cationic and very often amphiphilic, which reflects the fact that many of them attack their target cells by permeabilizing the cell membrane. They can be roughly categorized into those that have a high content of a certain amino acid, most often proline, those that contain intramolecular disulfide bridges, and those with an amphiphilic region in their molecule if they assume an alpha-helical structure. Most of the known ribosomally synthesized peptides with antimicrobial functions have been identified and studied during the last 20 years. As a result of these studies, new knowledge has been acquired into biology and biochemistry. It has become evident that these peptides may be developed into useful antimicrobial additives and drugs. The use of two-peptide antimicrobial peptides as replacement for clinical antibiotics is promising, though their applications in preservation of foods (safe and effective for use in meat, vegetables, and dairy products), in veterinary medicine, and in dentistry are more immediate. This review focuses on the current status of some of the main types of ribosomally synthesized AMPs produced by eucaryotes and procaryotes and discusses the novel antimicrobial functions, new developments, e.g. heterologous production of bacteriocins by lactic acid bacteria, or construction of multibacteriocinogenic strains, novel applications related to these peptides, and future research paradigms.

  8. Lipid Transfer Proteins As Components of the Plant Innate Immune System: Structure, Functions, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkina, E I; Melnikova, D N; Bogdanov, I V; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2016-01-01

    Among a variety of molecular factors of the plant innate immune system, small proteins that transfer lipids and exhibit a broad spectrum of biological activities are of particular interest. These are lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are interesting to researchers for three main features. The first feature is the ability of plant LTPs to bind and transfer lipids, whereby these proteins got their name and were combined into one class. The second feature is that LTPs are defense proteins that are components of plant innate immunity. The third feature is that LTPs constitute one of the most clinically important classes of plant allergens. In this review, we summarize the available data on the plant LTP structure, biological properties, diversity of functions, mechanisms of action, and practical applications, emphasizing their role in plant physiology and their significance in human life.

  9. Biopolymeric Mucin and Synthetic Polymer Analogs: Their Structure, Function and Role in Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundar P. Authimoolam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucin networks are viscoelastic fibrillar aggregates formed through the complex self-association of biopolymeric glycoprotein chains. The networks form a lubricious, hydrated protective shield along epithelial regions within the human body. The critical role played by mucin networks in impacting the transport properties of biofunctional molecules (e.g., biogenic molecules, probes, nanoparticles, and its effect on bioavailability are well described in the literature. An alternate perspective is provided in this paper, presenting mucin’s complex network structure, and its interdependent functional characteristics in human physiology. We highlight the recent advances that were achieved through the use of mucin in diverse areas of bioengineering applications (e.g., drug delivery, biomedical devices and tissue engineering. Mucin network formation is a highly complex process, driven by wide variety of molecular interactions, and the network possess structural and chemical variations, posing a great challenge to understand mucin’s bulk behavior. Through this review, the prospective potential of polymer based analogs to serve as mucin mimic is suggested. These analog systems, apart from functioning as an artificial model, reducing the current dependency on animal models, can aid in furthering our fundamental understanding of such complex structures.

  10. The application of psoralens to the study of DNA structure, function and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spielmann, P.H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1991-04-01

    A series of six nitroxide spin-labeled psoralens were designed, synthesized and tested as probes for DNA dynamics. The synthesis of these spin-labeled psoralen derivatives and their photoreactivity with double-stranded DNA fragments is described. The spin labels (nitroxides) were demonstrated to survive the uv irradiation required to bind the probe to the target DNA. EPR spectra of the photobound spin-labels indicate that they do not wobble with respect to the DNA on the time-scales investigated. The author has used psoralen modified DNA as a model for the study of DNA repair enzyme systems in human cell free extracts. He has shown that damage-induced DNA synthesis is associated with removal of psoralen adducts and therefore is {open_quotes}repair synthesis{close_quotes} and not an aberrant DNA synthesis reaction potentiated by deformation of the DNA by adducts. He has found that all DNA synthesis induced by psoralen monoadducts is the consequence of removal of these adducts. By the same approach he has obtained evidence that this in vitro system is capable of removing psoralen cross-links as well. Reported here are synthetic methods that make use of high intensity lasers coupled with HPLC purification to make homogeneous and very pure micromole quantities of furan-side monoadducted, cross-linked, and pyrone-side monoadducted DNA oligonucleotide. These molecules are currently being studied by NMR and X-ray crystallography. The application of the site-specifically psoralen modified oligonucleotide synthesized by these methods to the construction of substrates for the investigation of DNA repair is also discussed.

  11. Structure-function relationships of bacterial and enzymatically produced reuterans and dextran in sourdough bread baking application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Yan; Levy, Clemens; Gänzle, Michael G

    2016-12-19

    Exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria may improve texture and shelf life of bread. The effect of exopolysaccharides on bread quality, however, depends on properties of the EPS and the EPS producing strain. This study investigated structure-function relationships of EPS in baking application. The dextransucrase DsrM and the reuteransucrase GtfA were cloned from Weissella cibaria 10M and Lactobacillus reuteri TMW1.656, respectively, and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis of GtfA was generates reuterans with different glycosidic bonds. NMR spectrum indicated reuteranPI, reuteranNS and reuteranPINS produced by GtfA-V1024P:V1027I, GtfA-S1135N:A1137S and GtfA-V1024P:V1027I:S1135N:A1137S, respectively, had a higher proportion of α-(1→4) linkages when compared to reuteran. ReuteranNS has the lowest molecular weight as measured by asymmetric flow-field-flow fractionation. The reuteransucrase negative mutant L. reuteri TMW1.656ΔgtfA was generated as EPS-negative derivative of L. reuteri TMW1.656. Cell counts, pH, and organic acid levels of sourdough fermented with L. reuteri TMW1.656 and TMW1.656ΔgtfA were comparable. Reuteran produced by L. reuteri TMW1.656 during growth in sourdough and reuteran produced ex situ by GtfA-ΔN had comparable effects on bread volume and crumb hardness. Enzymatically produced dextran improved volume and texture of wheat bread, and of bread containing 20% rye flour. ReuteranNS but not reuteranPI or reuteran was as efficient as dextran in enhancing wheat bread volume and texture. Overall, reuteran linkage type and molecular weight are determinants of EPS effects on bread quality. This study established a valuable method to elucidate structure-function relationships of glucans in baking applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and application of pulmonary structure-function registration methods: towards pulmonary image-guidance tools for improved airway targeted therapies and outcomes

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    Guo, Fumin; Pike, Damien; Svenningsen, Sarah; Coxson, Harvey O.; Drozd, John J.; Yuan, Jing; Fenster, Aaron; Parraga, Grace

    2014-03-01

    Objectives: We aimed to develop a way to rapidly generate multi-modality (MRI-CT) pulmonary imaging structurefunction maps using novel non-rigid image registration methods. This objective is part of our overarching goal to provide an image processing pipeline to generate pulmonary structure-function maps and guide airway-targeted therapies. Methods: Anatomical 1H and functional 3He MRI were acquired in 5 healthy asymptomatic ex-smokers and 7 ex-smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at inspiration breath-hold. Thoracic CT was performed within ten minutes of MRI using the same breath-hold volume. Landmark-based affine registration methods previously validated for imaging of COPD, was based on corresponding fiducial markers located in both CT and 1H MRI coronal slices and compared with shape-based CT-MRI non-rigid registration. Shape-based CT-MRI registration was developed by first identifying the shapes of the lung cavities manually, and then registering the two shapes using affine and thin-plate spline algorithms. We compared registration accuracy using the fiducial localization error (FLE) and target registration error (TRE). Results: For landmark-based registration, the TRE was 8.4±5.3 mm for whole lung and 7.8±4.6 mm for the R and L lungs registered independently (p=0.4). For shape-based registration, the TRE was 8.0±4.6 mm for whole lung as compared to 6.9±4.4 mm for the R and L lung registered independently and this difference was significant (p=0.01). The difference for shape-based (6.9±4.4 mm) and landmark-based R and L lung registration (7.8±4.6 mm) was also significant (p=.04) Conclusion: Shape-based registration TRE was significantly improved compared to landmark-based registration when considering L and R lungs independently.

  13. An extended structure-function model and its application to the analysis of solar wind intermittency properties

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    C.-Y. Tu

    Full Text Available An extended structure-function model is developed by including the new effect in the p-model of Meneveau and Sreenivasan which shows that the averaged energy cascade rate changes with scale, a situation which has been found to prevail in non-fully-developed turbulence in the inner solar wind. This model is useful for the small-scale fluctuations in the inner heliosphere, where the turbulence is not fully developed and cannot be explained quantitatively by any of the previous intermittency turbulence models. With two model parameters, the intrinsic index of the energy spectrum α, and the fragmentation fraction P1, the model can fit, for the first time, all the observed scaling exponents of the structure functions, which are calculated for time lags ranging from 81 s to 0.7 h from the Helios solar wind data. From the cases we studied we cannot establish for P1 either a clear radial evolution trend, or a solar-wind-speed or stream-structure dependence or a systematic anisotropy for both the flow velocity and magnetic field component fluctuations. Generally, P1 has values between 0.7 and 0.8. However, in some cases in low-speed wind P1 has somewhat higher values for the magnetic components, especially for the radial component. In high-speed wind, the inferred intrinsic spectral indices α of the velocity and magnetic field components are about equal, while the experimental spectral indices derived from the observed power spectra differ. The magnetic index is somewhat larger than the index of the velocity spectrum. For magnetic fluctuations in both high- and low-speed winds, the intrinsic exponent α has values which are near 1.5, while the observed spectral exponent has much higher values. In the solar wind with considerable density fluctuations near the interplanetary current sheet near 1 AU, it is found that P1 has a comparatively high value of 0

  14. Lung structure and function relation in systemic sclerosis: Application of lung densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninaber, Maarten K., E-mail: m.k.ninaber@lumc.nl [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Stolk, Jan; Smit, Jasper; Le Roy, Ernest J. [Department of Pulmonology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Kroft, Lucia J.M. [Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Els Bakker, M. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Vries Bouwstra, Jeska K. de; Schouffoer, Anne A. [Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands); Staring, Marius; Stoel, Berend C. [Division of Image Processing, Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333ZA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A quantitative CT parameter of lung parenchyma in systemic sclerosis is presented. • We examine the optimal percentage threshold for the percentile density. • The 85th percentile density threshold correlated significantly with lung function. • A lung structure–function relation is confirmed. • We report applicability of Perc85 in progression mapping of interstitial lung disease. - Abstract: Introduction: Interstitial lung disease occurs frequently in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Quantitative computed tomography (CT) densitometry using the percentile density method may provide a sensitive assessment of lung structure for monitoring parenchymal damage. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the optimal percentile density score in SSc by quantitative CT densitometry, against pulmonary function. Material and methods: We investigated 41 SSc patients by chest CT scan, spirometry and gas transfer tests. Lung volumes and the nth percentile density (between 1 and 99%) of the entire lungs were calculated from CT histograms. The nth percentile density is defined as the threshold value of densities expressed in Hounsfield units. A prerequisite for an optimal percentage was its correlation with baseline DLCO %predicted. Two patients showed distinct changes in lung function 2 years after baseline. We obtained CT scans from these patients and performed progression analysis. Results: Regression analysis for the relation between DLCO %predicted and the nth percentile density was optimal at 85% (Perc85). There was significant agreement between Perc85 and DLCO %predicted (R = −0.49, P = 0.001) and FVC %predicted (R = −0.64, P < 0.001). Two patients showed a marked change in Perc85 over a 2 year period, but the localization of change differed clearly. Conclusions: We identified Perc85 as optimal lung density parameter, which correlated significantly with DLCO and FVC, confirming a lung parenchymal structure–function relation in SSc. This provides

  15. Structure function monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, John T [Placitas, NM; Zimmer, Peter C [Albuquerque, NM; Ackermann, Mark R [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-01-24

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  16. Antimicrobial Peptides and Innate Lung Defenses: Role in Infectious and Noninfectious Lung Diseases and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Pieter S; Amatngalim, Gimano D; van der Does, Anne M; Taube, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory infections are a major clinical problem, and treatment is increasingly complicated by the emergence of microbial antibiotic resistance. Development of new antibiotics is notoriously costly and slow; therefore, alternative strategies are needed. Antimicrobial peptides, central effector molecules of the immune system, are being considered as alternatives to conventional antibiotics. These peptides display a range of activities, including not only direct antimicrobial activity, but also immunomodulation and wound repair. In the lung, airway epithelial cells and neutrophils in particular contribute to their synthesis. The relevance of antimicrobial peptides for host defense against infection has been demonstrated in animal models and is supported by observations in patient studies, showing altered expression and/or unfavorable circumstances for their action in a variety of lung diseases. Importantly, antimicrobial peptides are active against microorganisms that are resistant against conventional antibiotics, including multidrug-resistant bacteria. Several strategies have been proposed to use these peptides in the treatment of infections, including direct administration of antimicrobial peptides, enhancement of their local production, and creation of more favorable circumstances for their action. In this review, recent developments in antimicrobial peptides research in the lung and clinical applications for novel therapies of lung diseases are discussed.

  17. Next-order structure-function equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Reginald J.; Boratav, Olus N.

    2001-01-01

    Kolmogorov's equation [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 32, 16 (1941)] relates the two-point second- and third-order velocity structure functions and the energy dissipation rate. The analogous next higher-order two-point equation relates the third- and fourth-order velocity structure functions and the structure function of the product of pressure-gradient difference and two factors of velocity difference, denoted Tijk. The equation is simplified on the basis of local isotropy. Laboratory and numerical simulation data are used to evaluate and compare terms in the equation, examine the balance of the equation, and evaluate components of Tijk. Atmospheric surface-layer data are used to evaluate Tijk in the inertial range. Combined with the random sweeping hypothesis, the equation relates components of the fourth-order velocity structure function. Data show the resultant error of this application of random sweeping. The next-order equation constrains the relationships that have been suggested among components of the fourth-order velocity structure function. The pressure structure function, pressure-gradient correlation, and mean-squared pressure gradient are related to Tijk. Inertial range formulas are discussed.

  18. Research on Fast Track Surgery Application in Lung Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiyun YANG

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Fast track surgery (FTS is a systematical method to accelerate the recovery of surgical patients by reducing the physical and mental trauma stress of them. The research is to investigate the feasibility of FTS application in lung cancer surgery. Methods A total of 80 cases of lung cancer patients with single leaf lobotomy resection were randomized into two groups. While the experimental group was treated with the conception of FTS, and the control group was treated with the traditional methods. The incident rate of post-operation pain degrees, telecasts, pleural effusion, the post-operation time stay in hospital time and the total cost during hospitalization in two groups were compared respectively. Results In FTS group: the VAS score of post-operation pain at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h all significantly decreased compared to the traditional therapy group. The incidence rate of telecast was 10.53%. The incidence rate of pleural effusion was 26.31%. The length of stay after operation was (4±1 d and the total cost was RMB 15 600±7 600. In the control group, the above values were 77.78%, 33.33%, 22.22%, (9±1 d, RMB 23 600±5 400, respectively. The post operation pain (VAS method of FTS group was remarkablely below the control group. There has significant difference of the incident rate of telecasts, stay time in hospital and the total cast in two groups (P < 0.05. No significant difference was observed in the incident rate of pleural effusion. Conclusion The new methods of FTS can apparently accelerates recovery after lung cancer resection, reduces complications, shorten timestay in hospital and cut down the total cost.

  19. Marginal Shape Deep Learning: Applications to Pediatric Lung Field Segmentation.

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    Mansoor, Awais; Cerrolaza, Juan J; Perez, Geovanny; Biggs, Elijah; Nino, Gustavo; Linguraru, Marius George

    2017-02-11

    Representation learning through deep learning (DL) architecture has shown tremendous potential for identification, localization, and texture classification in various medical imaging modalities. However, DL applications to segmentation of objects especially to deformable objects are rather limited and mostly restricted to pixel classification. In this work, we propose marginal shape deep learning (MaShDL), a framework that extends the application of DL to deformable shape segmentation by using deep classifiers to estimate the shape parameters. MaShDL combines the strength of statistical shape models with the automated feature learning architecture of DL. Unlike the iterative shape parameters estimation approach of classical shape models that often leads to a local minima, the proposed framework is robust to local minima optimization and illumination changes. Furthermore, since the direct application of DL framework to a multi-parameter estimation problem results in a very high complexity, our framework provides an excellent run-time performance solution by independently learning shape parameter classifiers in marginal eigenspaces in the decreasing order of variation. We evaluated MaShDL for segmenting the lung field from 314 normal and abnormal pediatric chest radiographs and obtained a mean Dice similarity coefficient of 0.927 using only the four highest modes of variation (compared to 0.888 with classical ASM(1) (p-value=0.01) using same configuration). To the best of our knowledge this is the first demonstration of using DL framework for parametrized shape learning for the delineation of deformable objects.

  20. Computer-controlled mechanical lung model for application in pulmonary function studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); J.E.W. Beneken; J.M. Bogaard (Jan); A. Versprille (Adrian)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA computer controlled mechanical lung model has been developed for testing lung function equipment, validation of computer programs and simulation of impaired pulmonary mechanics. The construction, function and some applications are described. The physical model is constructed from two

  1. Proton structure functions at HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, Bruno

    2001-10-01

    The electron-proton collider HERA, like an electron-mycroscope, explores the structure of the proton down to 10-16 cm and up to the situation of very high parton densities. The proton energy was upgraded from 820 to 920 GeV in the Fall of '98 and the luminosity has also substantially improved, with another factor of 3 upgrade expected to follow this year. Inclusive proton structure functions have been studied with incident e+ and e- of 27 GeV in the neutral (NC) and charged (CC) current interactions as functions of the squared four-momentum transfer, Q2, and of the fractional proton momentum carried by partons, x. The structure function F2, as well as the γ-Z0 interference term xF3, have been measured in a range of Q2 and 1/x that extends by orders of magnitude that reached by fixed target experiments. The DGLAP evolution equations [1] allow for a perturbative NLO QCD fit of the measured non-perturbative structure functions in the available kinematic range: αS and the gluon density at low x are fitted at the same time with good precision. The longitudinal structure function, FL, can be determined within the DGLAP formalism. With CC, the electroweak unification has been tested; at high x, a first flavor decomposition of the light quarks is achieved. The contribution to F2 of the charm quark has been measured and results to be relevant. Bounds on the radius of quarks and on compositeness are derived from the data at the highest Q2, 100

  2. Structure functions and parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.D.; Stirling, W.J. [Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom); Roberts, R.G. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1995-07-01

    The MRS parton distribution analysis is described. The latest sets are shown to give an excellent description of a wide range of deep-inelastic and other hard scattering data. Two important theoretical issues-the behavior of the distributions at small x and the flavor structure of the quark sea-are discussed in detail. A comparison with the new structure function data from HERA is made, and the outlook for the future is discussed.

  3. Structure functions at large x

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2002-01-01

    Structure function data together with other measurements from fixed-target deep inelastic scattering and hadron-hadron collider experiments which contribute to our knowledge of the parton density functions are reviewed. The inclusive cross-section measurements of neutral and charged current interactions at HERA are presented and their impact on the parton density functions is discussed. Future prospects for an improved knowledge of the parton density functions at large x are briefly mentioned.

  4. Emerging applications of nanoparticles for lung cancer diagnosis and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, Uday Kumar; Bhushan, Bharat; Dubey, Poornima; Matai, Ishita; Sachdev, Abhay; Packirisamy, Gopinath

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is by far the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, most of them being active tobacco smokers. Non small cell lung cancer accounts for around 85% to 90% of deaths, whereas the rest is contributed by small cell lung cancer. The extreme lethality of lung cancer arises due to lack of suitable diagnostic procedures for early detection of lung cancer and ineffective conventional therapeutic strategies. In course with desperate attempts to address these issues independently, a multifunctional nanotherapeutic or diagnostic system is being sought as a favorable solution. The manifestation of physiochemical properties of such nanoscale systems is tuned favorably to come up with a versatile cancer cell targeted diagnostic and therapeutic system. Apart from this, the aspect of being at nanoscale by itself confers the system with an advantage of passive accumulation at the site of tumor. This review provides a broad perspective of three major subclasses of such nanoscale therapeutic and diagnostic systems which include polymeric nanoparticles-based approaches, metal nanoparticles-based approaches, and bio-nanoparticles-based approaches. This review work also serves the purpose of gaining an insight into the pros and cons of each of these approaches with a prospective improvement in lung cancer therapeutics and diagnostics.

  5. Variations in lung lymphatic drainage into the inferior tracheobronchial lymph nodes junction: Applications in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Assane; Dimarino, Vincent; Ndiaye, Aïnina; Gaye, Magaye; Ba, Papa Salmane; Nazarian, Serge

    2016-10-01

    The group of inferior tracheobronchial lymph nodes (ITB) is a lymphatic junction through which the lymph from both lungs is carried. Lymphatic activity in this area can be used to assess the lymphatic spreading of lung cancers. Our aim was to quantify lymph drainage from the lung segments towards the ITB group and to determine the direction of the lymph flow into other mediastinal and abdominal lymph nodes. We injected dye directly into the subpleural lymphatic vessels in 100 lung segments of 25 fresh cadaver subjects; the cadavers were then dissected. Thirty-eight segments (38%) drained into the ITB group in 18 subjects. The drainage into the ITB group involved 15.6% of the upper lobe segments, 87.5% of the middle lobe segments, and 70.6% of the lower lobe segments in the right lung. On the left, 6.9% of the upper lobe segments and 83.3% of the lower lobe segments were drained into the ITB group. For three subjects, the dye did not pass beyond the ITB group. The efferent vessels of the ITB group drained towards the right paratracheal and tracheoesophageal chains in 12 subjects and through the left ascending recurrent chain in five subjects. For six subjects, the efferent channels reached the abdominal lymph nodes. A contralateral drainage involved 14 segments (36%). The size and variety of the segments that drain into the ITB group, coupled with the efferent contralateral mediastinal and abdominal pathways, account for the severity of metastasis to this area. Clin. Anat. 29:955-962, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  7. Applicability of avidin protein coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as drug carriers in the lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijt, S. H.; Bölükbas, D. A.; Argyo, C.; Wipplinger, K.; Naureen, M.; Datz, S.; Eickelberg, O.; Meiners, S.; Bein, T.; Schmid, O.; Stoeger, T.

    2016-04-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up by lung epithelial cells, but induced a prolonged inflammatory response in the lung and macrophage cell death. In contrast, MSN-AVI co-localized with alveolar epithelial type 1 and type 2 cells in the lung in the absence of sustained inflammatory responses or cell death, and showed preferential epithelial cell uptake in in vitro co-cultures. Further, MSN-AVI particles demonstrated uniform particle distribution in mouse lungs and slow clearance rates. Thus, we provide evidence that avidin functionalized MSNs (MSN-AVI) have the potential to serve as versatile biocompatible drug carriers for lung-specific drug delivery.Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) exhibit unique drug delivery properties and are thus considered as promising candidates for next generation nano-medicines. In particular, inhalation into the lungs represents a direct, non-invasive delivery route for treating lung disease. To assess MSN biocompatibility in the lung, we investigated the bioresponse of avidin-coated MSNs (MSN-AVI), as well as aminated (uncoated) MSNs, after direct application into the lungs of mice. We quantified MSN distribution, clearance rate, cell-specific uptake, and inflammatory responses to MSNs within one week after instillation. We show that amine-functionalized (MSN-NH2) particles are not taken up

  8. Review of Structural Functionalism and Its Application in Higher Education Research%结构功能理论及其在高等教育研究中运用的综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昀

    2015-01-01

    结构功能主义于20世纪50-60年代在西方社会学界占据统治地位,是分析社会系统与功能的有效理论。通常认为,结构功能主义起源于欧洲功能主义理论流派,以孔德、斯宾塞、涂尔干等古典社会学家的思想为基础,以生物有机理论为前提,后经过帕森斯和默顿两位代表人物的发展,逐渐成熟。结构功能主义倾向于将社会看作是一个统一的整体,其中各个部分都发挥着应有的功能,从而达到整个社会的和谐发展。这一理论在其兴盛时期也被用作对于高等教育,尤其是比较教育的分析,并且在教育公平和教育的社会功能等方面也都有广泛的运用。文章主要对结构功能主义的理论进行阐述,同时概括这一理论在教育社会分析中的应用。%Structural Functionalism has played a leading role in western sociology from 1950 to 1960, because of its efficient methods of analyzing the social systems and their functions. It is generated from European traditional school of Functionalism and developed by Talcott Parsons and Robert Morten on the basis of the thoughts of classical sociologists such as Augusts Comte, Herbert Spencer and Emile Durkheim and Biological Organic Theory. Structural Functionalism regards the society as a whole system and every part of the society plays its special function so as to make the whole society develop harmoniously. The theory is also used in higher education, especially in the analysis of comparative education and widely applied in education fairness and the social functions of education in its prosperous times. The paper mainly reviews Structural Functionalism and summarizes the application of theory in social analysis of education.

  9. Structure Function Estimated From Histological Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Aiguo; O'Brien, William D

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasonic scattering is determined by not only the properties of individual scatterers but also the correlation among scatterer positions. The role of scatterer spatial correlation is significant for dense medium, but has not been fully understood. The effect of scatterer spatial correlation may be modeled by the structure function as a frequency-dependent factor in the backscatter coefficient (BSC) expression. The structure function has been previously estimated from the BSC data. The aim of this study is to estimate the structure function from histology to test if the acoustically estimated structure function is indeed caused by the scatterer spatial distribution. Hematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections from dense cell pellet biophantoms were digitized. The scatterer positions were determined manually from the histological images. The structure function was calculated from the extracted scatterer positions. The structure function obtained from histology showed reasonable agreement in the shape but not in the amplitude, compared with the structure function previously estimated from the backscattered data. Fitting a polydisperse structure function model to the histologically estimated structure function yielded relatively accurate cell radius estimates ([Formula: see text]). Furthermore, two types of mouse tumors that have similar cell size and shape but distinct cell spatial distributions were studied, where the backscattered data were shown to be related to the cell spatial distribution through the structure function estimated from histology. In conclusion, the agreement between acoustically estimated and histologically estimated structure functions suggests that the acoustically estimated structure function is related to the scatterer spatial distribution.

  10. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer: detection methods and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Na; Zhou, Jia; Cui, Fang; Tang, Xiaokui

    2015-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that have disseminated from primary and metastatic sites, and circulate in the bloodstream. Advanced immunological and molecular-based methods can be used to detect and analyze the cells with the characteristics of tumor cells, and can be detected and analyzed in the blood of cancer patients. The most commonly used methods in lung cancer combine the processes of immunomagnetic enrichment and immunocytochemical detection, morphology-based enrichment coupled with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and RT-PCR alone. CTC analysis is considered a liquid biopsy approach for early diagnosis, risk stratification, evaluation of curative efficacy, and early detection of lung cancer relapse. In this review, we discuss the present techniques for analyzing CTCs, and the restrictions of using these methods in lung cancer. We also review the clinical studies in lung cancer and discuss the underlying associations between these studies and their future applications to this disease.

  11. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  12. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  13. GH62 arabinofuranosidases: Structure, function and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Dumon, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by industrial demands and ongoing scientific discoveries continuous efforts are made to identify and create improved biocatalysts dedicated to plant biomass conversion. α-1,2 and α-1,3 arabinofuranosyl specific α-l-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are debranching enzymes catalyzing...... exclusively α-l-arabinofuranosidases and these are of fungal and bacterial origin. Twenty-two GH62 enzymes out of 223 entries in the CAZy database have been characterized and very recently new knowledge was acquired with regard to crystal structures, substrate specificities, and phylogenetics, which overall...

  14. Recruitment of lung diffusing capacity: update of concept and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Connie C W

    2002-11-01

    Lung diffusing capacity (DL) for carbon monoxide (DLCO), nitric oxide (DLNO) or oxygen (DLO2) increases from rest to peak exercise without reaching an upper limit; this recruitment results from interactions among alveolar volume (VA), and cardiac output (q), as well as changing physical properties and spatial distribution of capillary erythrocytes, and is critical for maintaining a normal arterial oxygen saturation. DLCO and DLNO can be used to interpret the effectiveness of diffusive oxygen transport and track structural alterations of the alveolar-capillary barrier, providing sensitive noninvasive indicators of microvascular integrity in health and disease. Clinical interpretation of DL should take into account Q in addition to VA and hemoglobin concentration.

  15. Current Situation of Research into the Structures Functions, and Applications of Collagen and Collagen Peptides%胶原与胶原多肽的结构、功能及其应用研究现状

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成晓瑜; 张顺亮; 戚彪; 陈文华

    2011-01-01

    Coming from the same source, collagen and collagen peptides are two substances that derive from different stages, but are often confused. This paper introduces the structural difference of between collagen and collagen peptides, and reviews the current situation of research into the structures, functions, and applications of collagen and collagen peptides. Also, we forecast future prospects of collagen and collagen peptides based on relevant domestic and foreign regulations.%胶原(胶原蛋白)和胶原多肽作为同一来源、不同阶段产生的两种物质,经常会造成混淆。本文介绍胶原蛋白和胶原多肽的结构差别,综述胶原蛋白和胶原多肽的制备、功能和应用的研究现状,并结合国内外的法规对其发展前景进行展望。

  16. Application of artificial neural network model combined with four biomarkers in auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xiaoran; Yang, Yongli; Tan, Shanjuan; Wang, Sihua; Feng, Xiaolei; Cui, Liuxin; Feng, Feifei; Yu, Songcheng; Wang, Wei; Wu, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the application of artificial neural network model in the auxiliary diagnosis of lung cancer and compare the effects of back-propagation (BP) neural network with Fisher discrimination model for lung cancer screening by the combined detections of four biomarkers of p16, RASSF1A and FHIT gene promoter methylation levels and the relative telomere length. Real-time quantitative methylation-specific PCR was used to detect the levels of three-gene promoter methylation, and real-time PCR method was applied to determine the relative telomere length. BP neural network and Fisher discrimination analysis were used to establish the discrimination diagnosis model. The levels of three-gene promoter methylation in patients with lung cancer were significantly higher than those of the normal controls. The values of Z(P) in two groups were 2.641 (0.008), 2.075 (0.038) and 3.044 (0.002), respectively. The relative telomere lengths of patients with lung cancer (0.93 ± 0.32) were significantly lower than those of the normal controls (1.16 ± 0.57), t = 4.072, P neural network were 0.670 (0.569-0.761) and 0.760 (0.664-0.840). The AUC of BP neural network was higher than that of Fisher discrimination analysis, and Z(P) was 0.76. Four biomarkers are associated with lung cancer. BP neural network model for the prediction of lung cancer is better than Fisher discrimination analysis, and it can provide an excellent and intelligent diagnosis tool for lung cancer.

  17. Extravascular lung water in critical care: recent advances and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jozwiak, Mathieu; Teboul, Jean-Louis; Monnet, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Extravascular lung water (EVLW) is the amount of fluid that is accumulated in the interstitial and alveolar spaces. In lung oedema, EVLW increases either because of increased lung permeability or because of increased hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries, or both. Increased EVLW is always potentially life-threatening, mainly because it impairs gas exchange and reduces lung compliance. The only technique that provides an easy measurement of EVLW at the bedside is transpulmonary thermodilution. The validation of EVLW measurements by thermodilution was based on studies showing reasonable correlations with gravimetry or thermo-dye dilution in experimental and clinical studies. EVLW should be indexed to predicted body weight. This indexation reduces the proportion of ARDS patients for whom EVLW is in the normal range. Compared to non-indexed EVLW, indexed EVLW (EVLWI) is better correlated with the lung injury score and the oxygenation and it is a better predictor of mortality of patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Transpulmonary thermodilution also provides the pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI), which is an indirect reflection of the integrity of the alveolocapillary barrier. As clinical applications, EVLWI and PVPI may be useful to guide fluid management of patients at risk of fluid overload, as during septic shock and ARDS. High EVLWI and PVPI values predict mortality in several categories of critically ill patients, especially during ARDS. Thus, fluid administration should be limited when EVLWI is already high. Whatever the value of EVLWI, PVPI may indicate that fluid administration is particularly at risk of aggravating lung oedema. In the acute phase of haemodynamic resuscitation during septic shock and ARDS, high EVLWI and PVPI values may warn of the risk of fluid overload and prevent excessive volume expansion. At the post-resuscitation phase, they may prompt initiation of fluid removal thereby

  18. Clinical application of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in pediatric lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Angelo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO is a non invasive method for assessing the inflammatory status of children with airway disease. Different ways to measure FeNO levels are currently available. The possibility of measuring FeNO levels in an office setting even in young children, and the commercial availability of portable devices, support the routine use of FeNO determination in the daily pediatric practice. Although many confounding factors may affect its measurement, FeNO is now widely used in the management of children with asthma, and seems to provide significantly higher diagnostic accuracy than lung function or bronchial challenge tests. The role of FeNO in airway infection (e.g. viral bronchiolitis and common acquired pneumonia, in bronchiectasis, or in cases with diffuse lung disease is less clear. This review focuses on the most recent advances and the current clinical applications of FeNO measurement in pediatric lung disease.

  19. Photon structure function in supersymmetric QCD revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahara, Ryo, E-mail: sahara@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Uematsu, Tsuneo, E-mail: uematsu@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kitadono, Yoshio, E-mail: kitadono@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2012-02-07

    We investigate the virtual photon structure function in the supersymmetric QCD (SQCD), where we have squarks and gluinos in addition to the quarks and gluons. Taking into account the heavy particle mass effects to the leading order in QCD and SQCD we evaluate the photon structure function and numerically study its behavior for the QCD and SQCD cases.

  20. Photon Structure Function in Supersymmetric QCD Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Sahara, Ryo; Kitadono, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the virtual photon structure function in the supersymmetric QCD (SQCD), where we have squarks and gluinos in addition to the quarks and gluons. Taking into account the heavy particle mass effects to the leading order in QCD and SQCD we evaluate the photon structure function and numerically study its behavior for the QCD and SQCD cases.

  1. Clinic application of tissue engineered bronchus for lung cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruijun; Chen, Xiaoke; Wu, Jingxiang; Pan, Yinggen; Lu, Shun; Weder, Walter; Luo, Qingquan

    2017-01-01

    Background Delayed revascularization process and substitute infection remain to be key challenges in tissue engineered (TE) airway reconstruction. We propose an “in-vivo bioreactor” design, defined as an implanted TE substitutes perfused with an intra-scaffold medium flow created by an extracorporeal portable pump system for in situ organ regeneration. The perfusate keeps pre-seeded cells alive before revascularization. Meanwhile the antibiotic inside the perfusate controls topical infection. Methods A stage IIIA squamous lung cancer patient received a 5-cm TE airway substitute, bridging left basal segment bronchus to carina, with the in-vivo bioreactor design to avoid left pneumonectomy. Continuous intra-scaffold Ringer’s-gentamicin perfusion lasted for 1 month, together with orthotopic peripheral total nucleated cells (TNCs) injection twice a week. Results The patient recovered uneventfully. Bronchoscopy follow-up confirmed complete revascularization and reepithelialization four months postoperatively. Perfusate waste test demonstrated various revascularization growth factors secreted by TNCs. The patient received two cycles of chemotherapy and 30 Gy radiotherapy thereafter without complications related to the TE substitute. Conclusions In-vivo bioreactor design combines the traditionally separated in vitro 3D cell-scaffold culture system and the in vivo regenerative processes associated with TE substitutes, while treating the recipients as bioreactors for their own TE prostheses. This design can be applied clinically. We also proved for the first time that TE airway substitute is able to tolerate chemo-radiotherapy and suitable to be used in cancer treatment.

  2. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U;

    2000-01-01

    fundamental structure/function relationships in the binding and catalytic mechanisms. In parallel, issues of relevance for application have been pursued using protein engineering to improve the industrial properties. The present review focuses on recent findings on the catalytic site, mechanism of action...

  3. Structured Functional Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, Haochang; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Greven, Sonja

    2015-01-01

    Summary Motivated by modern observational studies, we introduce a class of functional models that expand nested and crossed designs. These models account for the natural inheritance of the correlation structures from sampling designs in studies where the fundamental unit is a function or image. Inference is based on functional quadratics and their relationship with the underlying covariance structure of the latent processes. A computationally fast and scalable estimation procedure is developed for high-dimensional data. Methods are used in applications including high-frequency accelerometer data for daily activity, pitch linguistic data for phonetic analysis, and EEG data for studying electrical brain activity during sleep. PMID:25327216

  4. Extraction and Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Biological Matrices with Application to Rat Lung Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudrick, Kyle; Corson, Nancy; Oberdörster, Günter; Elder, Alison; Herckes, Pierre; Halden, Rolf U.; Westerhoff, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Extraction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from biological matrices such as rat lung tissue is integral to developing a quantification method for evaluating the environmental and human health exposure and toxicity of CNTs. The ability of various chemical treatment methods, including Solvable (2.5% sodium hydroxide/surfactant mixture), ammonium hydroxide, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and proteinase K, to extract CNTs from rat lung tissue was evaluated. CNTs were quantified using programmed thermal analysis (PTA). Two CNTs were used to represent the lower (500°C) and upper (800°C) PTA limit of CNT thermal stability. The recovery efficiency of each of the eight chemical reagents evaluated was found to depend on the ability to (1) minimize oxidation of CNTs, (2) remove interfering background carbon from the rat lung tissue, and (3) separate the solid-phase CNTs from the liquid-phase dissolved tissue via centrifugation. A two-step extraction method using Solvable and proteinase K emerged as the optimal approach, enabling a recovery of 98 ± 15% of a 2.9 ± 0.19 µg CNT loading that was spiked into whole rat lungs. Due to its high yield and applicability to low organ burdens of nanomaterials, this extraction method is particularly well suited for in vivo studies to quantify clearance rates and retained CNTs in lungs and other organs. PMID:23992048

  5. The structure function as a metric for roughness and figure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Robert E.; Tuell, Michael T.

    2016-09-01

    As optical designs become more sophisticated and incorporate aspheric and free form surfaces, the need to specify limits on mid-spatial frequency manufacturing errors becomes more critical, particularly as we better understand the effects of these errors on image quality. While there already exist methods based on Fourier analysis to specify these errors in most commercial interferometry software, the method of calculation and the power spectral density (PSD) results remain obscure to many in the optical design and manufacturing field. We suggest that the structure functions (SF) contains the same information as in the Fourier based PSD but in a way that is much more transparent to analysis, interpretation and application as a specification. The units of measure are more familiar and the concept behind the analysis is simpler to understand. Further, the information contained in the structure function (or PSD) allows a complete specification of an optical surface from the finest measurable detail of roughness to the overall figure. We discuss the origin of the structure function in the field of astronomy to describe the effects of air turbulence on image quality, the simple mathematical definition of the structure function and its easy means of calculation and how its results should be scaled depending on the location of the optical surface in a system from pupil to image plane. Finally, we give an example of how to write a specification of an optical surface using the structure function.

  6. Application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns in diagnosis of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bin

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, no satisfactory biomarkers are available to screen for lung cancer. Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/ionization Time-of- Flight Mass Spectrometry ProteinChip system (SELDI-TOF-MS is one of the currently used techniques to identify biomarkers for cancers. The aim of this study is to explore the application of serum SELDI proteomic patterns to distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. Methods A total of 208 serum samples, including 158 lung cancer patients and 50 healthy individuals, were randomly divided into a training set (including 11 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 63 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 20 from healthy controls and a blinded test set (including 43 sera from patients with stages I/II lung cancer, 41 from patients with stages III/IV lung cancer and 30 from healthy controls. All samples were analyzed by SELDI technology. The spectra were generated on weak cation exchange (WCX2 chips, and protein peaks clustering and classification analyses were made using Ciphergen Biomarker Wizard and Biomarker Pattern software, respectively. We additionally determined Cyfra21-1 and NSE in the 208 serum samples included in this study using an electrochemiluminescent immunoassay. Results Five protein peaks at 11493, 6429, 8245, 5335 and 2538 Da were automatically chosen as a biomarker pattern in the training set. When the SELDI marker pattern was tested with the blinded test set, it yielded a sensitivity of 86.9%, a specificity of 80.0% and a positive predictive value of 92.4%. The sensitivities provided by Cyfra21-1 and NSE used individually or in combination were significantly lower than that of the SELDI marker pattern (P P Conclusion These results suggest that serum SELDI protein profiling can distinguish lung cancer patients, especially NSCLC patients, from normal subjects with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, and the SELDI-TOF-MS is a potential tool

  7. Nuclear effects in the structure functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Marco; E Oset; S K Singh

    2003-11-01

    By using a relativistic framework and accurate nuclear spectral function the structure functions 2 and 3 of deep inelastic charged lepton and neutrino scattering are calculated in nuclei and results are presented.

  8. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kumano, S

    2016-01-01

    We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrino-oscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function $b_1$ is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact ...

  9. Recent Structure Function Results from CCFR

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, B T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    A new structure function analysis of CCFR deep inelastic nu-N and nubar-N scattering data is presented for previously unexplored kinematic regions down to Bjorken x=0.0045 and Q^2=0.3 GeV^2. Comparisons to charged lepton scattering data from NMC and E665 experiments are made and the behavior of the structure function F2_nu is studied in the limit Q^2 -> 0

  10. Polarized deuteron structure functions at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, J; Weise, W

    1997-01-01

    We investigate shadowing corrections to the polarized deuteron structure functions g_1^d and b_1. In the kinematic domain of current fixed target experiments we observe that shadowing effects in g_1^d are approximately twice as large as for the unpolarized structure function F_2^d. Furthermore, we find that b_1 is surprisingly large at x < 0.1 and receives dominant contributions from coherent double scattering.

  11. Next-Generation Sequencing and Applications to the Diagnosis and Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglyak, Kristina M; Lin, Erick; Ong, Frank S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease characterized by uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Over time, somatic mutations accumulate in the cells of an individual due to replication errors, chromosome segregation errors, or DNA damage. When not caught by traditional mechanisms, these somatic mutations can lead to cellular proliferation, the hallmark of cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the United States, accounting for approximately 160,000 deaths annually. Five year survival rates for lung cancer remain low (treatment can be based on his or her individual molecular profile, rather than on historical population-based medicine. Towards this end, NGS has already been used to identify new biomarker candidates for the early diagnosis of lung cancer and is increasingly used to guide personalized treatment decisions. In this review we will provide a high-level overview of NGS technology and summarize its application to the diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. We will also describe how NGS can drive advances that bring us closer to precision oncology and discuss some of the technical challenges that will need to be overcome in order to realize this ultimate goal.

  12. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-12-05

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Correspondingly, blocking of Notch signaling inhibits NSCLC migration and tumor growth by reversing EMT. Clinical trials have showed promising effect in some cancer patients received treatment with Notch1 inhibitor. This review attempts to provide an overview of the Notch signal in NSCLC: its biological significance and therapeutic application.

  13. A no extensive statistical model for the nucleon structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-03-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and two chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon.

  14. Clustering aspects in nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Hirai, M; Saito, K; Watanabe, T

    2010-01-01

    For understanding an anomalous nuclear effect experimentally observed for the beryllium-9 nucleus at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), clustering aspects are studied in structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering by using momentum distributions calculated in antisymmetrized (or fermionic) molecular dynamics (AMD) and also in a simple shell model for comparison. According to the AMD, the Be-9 nucleus consists of two alpha-like clusters with a surrounding neutron. The clustering produces high-momentum components in nuclear wave functions, which affects nuclear modifications of the structure functions. We investigated whether clustering features could appear in the structure function F_2 of Be-9 along with studies for other light nuclei. We found that nuclear modifications of F_2 are similar in both AMD and shell models within our simple convolution description although there are slight differences in Be-9. It indicates that the anomalous Be-9 result should be explain...

  15. Structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V.; Vento, V.

    1989-07-13

    We calculate the structure functions of an isoscalar nuclear target for the deep inelastic scattering by leptons in an extended version of the chiral bag model which incorporates the qanti q structure of the pions in the cloud. Bjorken scaling and Regge behavior are satisfied. The model calculation reproduces the low-x behavior of the data but fails to explain the medium- to large-x behavior. Evolution of the quark structure functions seem inevitable to attempt a connection between the low-energy models and the high-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics. (orig.).

  16. Deep Inelastic Structure Functions at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2006-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet structure functions g_1 in the small-x region are obtained. They include the total resummation of the double- and single- logarithms of x and account for the running QCD coupling effects. Both the non-singlet and singlet structure functions are Regge behavied asymptotically, with the intercepts predicted in agreement with experiments. A detailed comparison with the DGLAP evolution equations for different values of x and Q^2 is performed. Finally, the role played by singular terms in DGLAP fits is discussed and explicitly shown to mimic the resummation of leading logarithms at small x.

  17. Unlocking biomarker discovery: large scale application of aptamer proteomic technology for early detection of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M Ostroff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. New diagnostics are needed to detect early stage lung cancer because it may be cured with surgery. However, most cases are diagnosed too late for curative surgery. Here we present a comprehensive clinical biomarker study of lung cancer and the first large-scale clinical application of a new aptamer-based proteomic technology to discover blood protein biomarkers in disease. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a multi-center case-control study in archived serum samples from 1,326 subjects from four independent studies of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in long-term tobacco-exposed populations. Sera were collected and processed under uniform protocols. Case sera were collected from 291 patients within 8 weeks of the first biopsy-proven lung cancer and prior to tumor removal by surgery. Control sera were collected from 1,035 asymptomatic study participants with ≥ 10 pack-years of cigarette smoking. We measured 813 proteins in each sample with a new aptamer-based proteomic technology, identified 44 candidate biomarkers, and developed a 12-protein panel (cadherin-1, CD30 ligand, endostatin, HSP90α, LRIG3, MIP-4, pleiotrophin, PRKCI, RGM-C, SCF-sR, sL-selectin, and YES that discriminates NSCLC from controls with 91% sensitivity and 84% specificity in cross-validated training and 89% sensitivity and 83% specificity in a separate verification set, with similar performance for early and late stage NSCLC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is a significant advance in clinical proteomics in an area of high unmet clinical need. Our analysis exceeds the breadth and dynamic range of proteome interrogated of previously published clinical studies of broad serum proteome profiling platforms including mass spectrometry, antibody arrays, and autoantibody arrays. The sensitivity and specificity of our 12-biomarker panel improves upon published protein and gene expression panels

  18. 植物铁蛋白结构、性质及其在纳米材料制备中的应用%Structure, Function of Phytoferritin and its Application in Nano Material Science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵广华; 云少君

    2012-01-01

    Ferritins are a broad superfamily of iron storage proteins,present in all living organisms and play important roles in controlling cellar iron homeostasis. To date, relatively little information is available on structure and function of phytoferritin compared to animal ferritin. Phytoferritin is observed in amyloplast whereas animal ferritins are largely found in the cytoplasm of cell. In contrast to animal ferritin,phytofer-ritins exhibit two major distinctive features in structure: (1)phytoferritin contains a specific extension pep-tide (EP) at the N-terminal while animal ferritin lacks. The EP is located on the exterior surface of protein,which recently has been found to act as a second ferroxidase center for iron-binding and oxidation,and regulate iron release during the germination and early growth of seedlings. (2) only H-type subunit has been identified in phytoferritin which is usually a heteropolymer consisting of two different subunits, H-l and H-2,sharing ~80℅ amino acid sequence identity. These two subunits in phytoferritin play a positively cooperative role in iron oxidative deposition in protein. The obtained ferritin has attracted great interest among researchers in the field of nanodevices due to its specific structure. Biomineralization of ferritin core has been extended to the artificial synthesis of homo-geneousmetal complex nanoparticles and semiconductor nanoparticles. The inner cavity of apophytoferritin is an ideal spatially restricted chemical reaction chamber for nanoparticles synthesis. This review focuses on recent progresses in structure,function of phytoferritin and its application in nano material science.%铁蛋白具有储存铁及调节体内铁平衡的功能,它广泛存在于大多数生物体中.和动物铁蛋白相比,关于植物铁蛋白的研究至今很少.目前已知,植物铁蛋白主要存在于淀粉体中,而动物铁蛋白则主要存在于细胞质中.植物铁蛋白和动物铁蛋白相比,其在结

  19. Gene Editing and Genetic Lung Disease. Basic Research Meets Therapeutic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Deepthi; Morrisey, Edward E

    2017-03-01

    Although our understanding of the genetics and pathology of congenital lung diseases such as surfactant protein deficiency, cystic fibrosis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is extensive, treatment options are lacking. Because the lung is a barrier organ in direct communication with the external environment, targeted delivery of gene corrective technologies to the respiratory system via intratracheal or intranasal routes is an attractive option for therapy. CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology is a promising approach to repairing or inactivating disease-causing mutations. Recent reports have provided proof of concept by using CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully repair or inactivate mutations in animal models of monogenic human diseases. Potential pulmonary applications of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing include gene correction of monogenic diseases in pre- or postnatal lungs and ex vivo gene editing of patient-specific airway stem cells followed by autologous cell transplant. Strategies to enhance gene-editing efficiency and eliminate off-target effects by targeting pulmonary stem/progenitor cells and the assessment of short-term and long-term effects of gene editing are important considerations as the field advances. If methods continue to advance rapidly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing may provide a novel opportunity to correct monogenic diseases of the respiratory system.

  20. Polyethylenimine-mediated gene delivery to the lung and therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Di Gioia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sante Di Gioia, Massimo ConeseDepartment of Biomedical Sciences, University of Foggia, Foggia, ItalyAbstract: Nonviral gene delivery is now considered a promising alternative to viral vectors. Among nonviral gene delivery agents, polyethylenimine (PEI has emerged as a potent candidate for gene delivery to the lung. PEI has some advantages over other polycations in that it combines strong DNA compaction capacity with an intrinsic endosomolytic activity. However, intracellular (mainly the nuclear membrane and extracellular obstacles still hamper its efficiency in vitro and in vivo, depending on the route of administration and the type of PEI. Nuclear delivery has been increased by adding nuclear localization signals. To overcome nonspecific interactions with biological fluids, extracellular matrix components and nontarget cells, strategies have been developed to protect polyplexes from these interactions and to increase target specificity and gene expression. When gene delivery into airway epithelial cells of the conducting airways is necessary, aerosolization of complexes seems to be better suited to guarantee higher transgene expression in the airway epithelial cells with lower toxicity than observed with either intratracheal or intravenous administration. Aerosolization, indeed, is useful to target the alveolar epithelium and pulmonary endothelium. Proof-of-principle that PEI-mediated gene delivery has therapeutic application to some genetic and acquired lung disease is presented, using as genetic material either plasmidic DNA or small-interfering RNA, although optimization of formulation and delivery protocols and limitation of toxicity need further studies.Keywords: gene transfer, gene therapy, polyethylenimine, airway epithelial cells, lung, RNA interference

  1. Progress on nuclear modifications of structure functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumano S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report progress on nuclear structure functions, especially on their nuclear modifications and a new tensor structure function for the deuteron. To understand nuclear structure functions is an important step toward describing nuclei and QCD matters from low to high densities and from low to high energies in terms of fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom beyond conventional hadron and nuclear physics. It is also practically important for understanding new phenomena in high-energy heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. Furthermore, since systematic errors of current neutrinooscillation experiments are dominated by uncertainties of neutrino-nucleus interactions, such studies are valuable for finding new physics beyond current framework. Next, a new tensor-polarized structure function b1 is discussed for the deuteron. There was a measurement by HERMES; however, its data are inconsistent with the conventional convolution estimate based on the standard deuteron model with D-state admixture. This fact suggests that a new hadronic phenomenon should exist in the tensor-polarized deuteron at high energies, and it will be experimentally investigated at JLab from the end of 2010’s.

  2. Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilcott, John H.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that structural functionalism as a method for conducting fieldwork and as a format for the analysis of ethnographic data remains a powerful model, one that is easily understood by professional educators. As a heuristic device, functionalist theory can help in the solution of a problem that is otherwise incapable of theoretical…

  3. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  4. Development of LC-QTOF-MS method for human lung tissue fingerprinting. A preliminary application to nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciborowski, Michal; Kisluk, Joanna; Pietrowska, Karolina; Samczuk, Paulina; Parfieniuk, Ewa; Kowalczyk, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Kretowski, Adam; Niklinski, Jacek

    2017-09-01

    The major histologic subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include adenocarcinoma (ADC), squamous cell lung carcinoma (SCC), and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). Clinical trials of targeted agents and newer chemotherapy agents yielded differences in outcomes according to histologic subgroups providing a rationale for histology-based treatment in NSCLC. Currently, NSCLC subtyping is performed based on histopathological examinations and immunohistochemistry. However available methods leave about 10% of NSCLC cases as not otherwise specified. The purpose of this study was development of an LC-QTOF-MS method for human lung tissue metabolic fingerprinting that could discriminate NSCLC histological subtypes and propose biomarkers candidates that could support proper NSCLC diagnosis. Metabolites were extracted with acetonitrile or methanol/ethanol and different chromatographic conditions were tested. In the final method 10 mg of lung tissue was homogenized with 50% methanol and metabolites were extracted with acetonitrile. Metabolites were separated on C8-RP and HILIC columns. About 3500 and 2000 of metabolic features (in both ion modes) were detected with good repeatability (CV Lung tumor and control tissue samples obtained from NSCLC patients were analyzed with developed methodology. Acylcarnitines, fatty acids, phospholipids, and amino acids were found more abundant in tumor as compared to control tissue. Acylcarnitines, lysophospholipids, creatinine, creatine, and alanine were identified as potential targets enabling classification of NSCLC subtypes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. OLC1 protein levels in plasma of patients with non-small cell lung cancer and its clinical application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨龙海

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the plasma concentration of OLC1(overexpressed in lung cancer 1)protein as a potential cancer biomarker,and evaluating its clinical application value in the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).Methods We prepared OLC1 antibody with OLC1 full length protein,in 5-6-week old Bal B/c mice.Each mouse was immunized four times at a dose of

  6. Emergent structure-function relations in emphysema and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Tilo; Suki, Béla

    2011-01-01

    Structure-function relationships in the respiratory system are often a result of the emergence of self-organized patterns or behaviors that are characteristic of certain respiratory diseases. Proper description of such self-organized behavior requires network models that include nonlinear interactions among different parts of the system. This review focuses on 2 models that exhibit self-organized behavior: a network model of the lung parenchyma during the progression of emphysema that is driven by mechanical force-induced breakdown, and an integrative model of bronchoconstriction in asthma that describes interactions among airways within the bronchial tree. Both models suggest that the transition from normal to pathologic states is a nonlinear process that includes a tipping point beyond which interactions among the system components are reinforced by positive feedback, further promoting the progression of pathologic changes. In emphysema, the progressive destruction of tissue is irreversible, while in asthma, it is possible to recover from a severe bronchoconstriction. These concepts may have implications for pulmonary medicine. Specifically, we suggest that structure-function relationships emerging from network behavior across multiple scales should be taken into account when the efficacy of novel treatments or drug therapy is evaluated. Multiscale, computational, network models will play a major role in this endeavor.

  7. Longitudinal Structure Function FL from Charm Structure Function F2c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Rezaei; G.R.Boroun

    2013-01-01

    We predict the effect of the charm structure function on the longitudinal structure function at small x.In NLO analysis we find that the hard Pomeron behavior gives a good description of FL and Fkc (k =2,L) at small x values.We conclude that a direct relation between FL∝ F2c would provide useful information on how to measure longitudinal structure function at high Q2 values.Having checked that this model gives a good description of the data,when compared with other models.

  8. Truncated Moment Analysis of Nucleon Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Psaker; W. Melnitchouk; M. E. Christy; C. E. Keppel

    2007-11-16

    We employ a novel new approach using "truncated" moments, or integrals of structure functions over restricted regions of x, to study local quark-hadron duality, and the degree to which individual resonance regions are dominated by leading twists. Because truncated moments obey the same Q^2 evolution equations as the leading twist parton distributions, this approach makes possible for the first time a description of resonance region data and the phenomenon of quark-hadron duality directly from QCD.

  9. Application of a high throughput method of biomarker discovery to improvement of the EarlyCDT(®-Lung Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel K Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The National Lung Screening Trial showed that CT screening for lung cancer led to a 20% reduction in mortality. However, CT screening has a number of disadvantages including low specificity. A validated autoantibody assay is available commercially (EarlyCDT®-Lung to aid in the early detection of lung cancer and risk stratification in patients with pulmonary nodules detected by CT. Recent advances in high throughput (HTP cloning and expression methods have been developed into a discovery pipeline to identify biomarkers that detect autoantibodies. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the successful clinical application of this strategy to add to the EarlyCDT-Lung panel in order to improve its sensitivity and specificity (and hence positive predictive value, (PPV. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Serum from two matched independent cohorts of lung cancer patients were used (n = 100 and n = 165. Sixty nine proteins were initially screened on an abridged HTP version of the autoantibody ELISA using protein prepared on small scale by a HTP expression and purification screen. Promising leads were produced in shake flask culture and tested on the full assay. These results were analyzed in combination with those from the EarlyCDT-Lung panel in order to provide a set of re-optimized cut-offs. Five proteins that still displayed cancer/normal differentiation were tested for reproducibility and validation on a second batch of protein and a separate patient cohort. Addition of these proteins resulted in an improvement in the sensitivity and specificity of the test from 38% and 86% to 49% and 93% respectively (PPV improvement from 1 in 16 to 1 in 7. CONCLUSION: This is a practical example of the value of investing resources to develop a HTP technology. Such technology may lead to improvement in the clinical utility of the EarlyCDT--Lung test, and so further aid the early detection of lung cancer.

  10. Application of a high throughput method of biomarker discovery to improvement of the EarlyCDT(®)-Lung Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Isabel K; Murray, Andrea; Healey, Graham F; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B; Allen, Jared; McElveen, Jane; Robertson, Chris; Sewell, Herbert F; Chapman, Caroline J; Robertson, John F R

    2012-01-01

    The National Lung Screening Trial showed that CT screening for lung cancer led to a 20% reduction in mortality. However, CT screening has a number of disadvantages including low specificity. A validated autoantibody assay is available commercially (EarlyCDT®-Lung) to aid in the early detection of lung cancer and risk stratification in patients with pulmonary nodules detected by CT. Recent advances in high throughput (HTP) cloning and expression methods have been developed into a discovery pipeline to identify biomarkers that detect autoantibodies. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the successful clinical application of this strategy to add to the EarlyCDT-Lung panel in order to improve its sensitivity and specificity (and hence positive predictive value, (PPV)). Serum from two matched independent cohorts of lung cancer patients were used (n = 100 and n = 165). Sixty nine proteins were initially screened on an abridged HTP version of the autoantibody ELISA using protein prepared on small scale by a HTP expression and purification screen. Promising leads were produced in shake flask culture and tested on the full assay. These results were analyzed in combination with those from the EarlyCDT-Lung panel in order to provide a set of re-optimized cut-offs. Five proteins that still displayed cancer/normal differentiation were tested for reproducibility and validation on a second batch of protein and a separate patient cohort. Addition of these proteins resulted in an improvement in the sensitivity and specificity of the test from 38% and 86% to 49% and 93% respectively (PPV improvement from 1 in 16 to 1 in 7). This is a practical example of the value of investing resources to develop a HTP technology. Such technology may lead to improvement in the clinical utility of the EarlyCDT--Lung test, and so further aid the early detection of lung cancer.

  11. EXPERIENCE WITH APPLICATION OF EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBRANE OXYGENATION IN DOUBLE LUNG TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Kurilova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most reliable intraoperative mechanical extracorporeal support is conventional сardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. However, CPB increases a risk of intraoperative bleeding and primary graft dysfunction. ECMO is more benefi cial method of intraoperative cardiopulmonary support than CPB in LTx.Aim. 10 LTx were retrospectively analyzed in the period from 01.2012 till 01.2014.Methods. Indications for ECMO were acute grafts edema after reperfusion (n = 4, group I. In group II (n = 6 indications for ECMO were severe hypoxia (РаО2 and FiO2 ratio < 1,0 and/or acidosis (pH < 7,2 during one lung ventilation. We used central type of veno-arterial ECMO: right atrium to ascending aorta.Results. Intraoperative ECMO lasted 4,1 ± 1,0 hours in group I and 8,5 ± 0,7 hours in group II. ECMO was prolonged into postoperative period in all patients from group I due to primary graft dysfunction. Application of ECMO in group II enabled to stabilize gas exchange and circulation as well as to decrease pulmonary arterial pressure in the time of reperfusion. ECMO was fi nished just after transplantation in group II. The 1-year survival in group I and II was 75,0 and 83,3%, respectively.Conclusion. Central veno-arterial ECMO is an adequate method of intraoperative cardiopulmonary support in LTx. It prevents postreperfusion edema of the lung grafts.

  12. Nuclear Structure Functions from Constituent Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Arash, F; Arash, Firooz; Atashbar-Tehrani, Shahin

    1999-01-01

    We have used the notion of the constituent quark model of nucleon, where a constituent quark carries its own internal structure, and applied it to determine nuclear structure functions ratios. It is found that the description of experimental data require the inclusion of strong shadowing effect for $x<0.01$. Using the idea of vector meson dominance model and other ingredients this effect is calculated in the context of the constituent quark model. It is rather striking that the constituent quark model, used here, gives a good account of the data for a wide range of atomic mass number from A=4 to A=204.

  13. Liquid fiducial marker applicability in proton therapy of locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherman Rydhög, Jonas; Perrin, Rosalind; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2017-01-01

    .164 for the LFM. Phantom measurements revealed a maximum relative deviation in dose of 4.8% for the LFM in the spread-out Bragg Peak, compared to 12-67% for the solid markers. Using the experimentally determined RSP, the maximum proton range error introduced by the LFM is about 1. mm. If the marker was displaced......Background and purpose: We investigated the clinical applicability of a novel liquid fiducial marker (LFM) for image-guided pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton therapy (PBSPT) of locally advanced lung cancer (LALC). Materials and methods: The relative proton stopping power (RSP) of the LFM...... was calculated and measured. Dose perturbations of the LFM and three solid markers, in a phantom, were measured. PBSPT treatment planning on computer tomography scans of five patients with LALC with the LFM implanted was performed with 1-3 fields. Results: The RSP was experimentally determined to be 1...

  14. Perspective of clinical application of pumpless extracorporeal lung assist (ECMO in newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gandolfi José Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal lung assist (ECLA has been proposed as an invasive alternative to conventional treatment when oxygenation is not possible by rigorous mechanical ventilation alone. Usually, ECLA is carried out by establishing a venovenous or venoarterial shunt consisting of a roller or centrifugal pump, a membrane oxygenator, and a heat exchanger. However, the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO with circulatory support lead hemolysis, coagulation disorders, inflammatory response, and specific technical complications inherent to a procedure of high risk and cost. To reduce the drawbacks of mechanical blood trauma during prolonged ECLA, the patient´s arteriovenous pressure gradient as the driving force for the blood flow through for the extracorporeal circuit can be used. In this article are analysed the main contributions of pumpless ECMO, used experimentally and in children and adults with respiratory failure, with perspective of clinical application in newborn.

  15. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  16. Non-animal models of epithelial barriers (skin, intestine and lung) in research, industrial applications and regulatory toxicology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, S.; Daneshian, M.; Bouwstra, J.A.; Caloni, F.; Constant, S.; Davies, D.E.; Dandekar, G.; Guzman, C.A.; Fabian, E.; Haltner, E.; Hartung, T.; Hasiwa, N.; Hayden, P.; Kandarova, H.; Khare, S.; Krug, H.F.; Kneuer, C.; Leist, M.; Lian, G.; Marx, U.; Metzger, M.; Ott, K.; Prieto, P.; Roberts, M.S.; Roggen, E.L.; Tralau, T.; Braak, van den C.; Walles, H.; Lehr, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of the outer epithelia of the human body - namely the skin, the intestine and the lung - have found valid applications in both research and industrial settings as attractive alternatives to animal testing. A variety of approaches to model these barriers are currently employed in such fields,

  17. Application of Blocking Unilateral Main Pulmonary Artery in Pulmonary Lobectomy of Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Gao; Yunchao Huang; Lixia Liang; Anning Chen; Tierong Zhao

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the application of blocking the unilateral main pulmonary artery (MPA) in pulmonary lobectomy (PL) for patients with stage Ⅱand Ⅲ lung cancer, and to retrospectively analyze the methods of surgery for blocking the unilateral main pulmonary artery, perioperative indications, intraoperative concerns and postoperative cardio-pulmonary complications. METHODS During a period from January 2006 to January 2008, intra-pericardial, or extra-pericardial separation and blockade of the left or right MPA followed by completion of various PLs were conducted for 30 lung cancer patients in stage-Ⅱ to Ⅲ with ill- defined anatomic structure of the pulmonary hilum and difficult pulmonary angiodiastasis.RESULTS In the 30 patients, 5 were diagnosed as stage-Ⅱb, 11 stage-Ⅲa, and 14 stage-Ⅲb. During the surgery, giant tumors at the superior pulmonary lobe, with a diameter of over 10 cm, were seen in 13 cases, in which tumor invasion in the extra-pericardiac pulmonary artery was found in 5 cases. Hilar lymphadenectasis with severe tumor adhesion to pulmonary blood vessel could be seen in 20 cases and partial tumorous invasion in the pericardium in 7. In most of the cases, adhesions existed around the tumor, aorta, superior vena, and azygous vein. Invasion of the laryngeal and vagus nerves on the left side was found in 3 cases. Of the 30 patients, simple PL was conducted in 12, and sleeve lobectomy combined with a pulmonary arterioplasty in 18 cases. With a blockade of unilateral MPA, no intraoperative hemorrhea of pulmonary blood vessels occurred during surgery, when there was a clear surgical field of vision. Both PL and lymphadenectomy were smoothly completed in the 30 patients. The healthy pulmonary lobes with normal function were kept and total pneumonectomy was avoided. The time of blocking the pulmonary artery ranged from 10 to 30 min, and intraoperative blood loss was from 200 to 300 ml. Postoperative complicated acute pulmonary edema occurred in

  18. Optimal unified combination rule in application of Dempster-Shafer theory to lung cancer radiotherapy dose response outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yanyan; Hussaini, M Yousuff; Gong, Yutao U T; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-08

    Our previous study demonstrated the application of the Dempster-Shafer theory of evidence to dose/volume/outcome data analysis. Specifically, it provided Yager's rule to fuse data from different institutions pertaining to radiotherapy pneumonitis versus mean lung dose. The present work is a follow-on study that employs the optimal unified combination rule, which optimizes data similarity among independent sources. Specifically, we construct belief and plausibility functions on the lung cancer radiotherapy dose outcome datasets, and then apply the optimal unified combination rule to obtain combined belief and plausibility, which bound the probabilities of pneumonitis incidence. To estimate the incidence of pneumonitis at any value of mean lung dose, we use the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to fit the combined belief and plausibility curves. The results show that the optimal unified combination rule yields a narrower uncertainty range (as represented by the belief-plausibility range) than Yager's rule, which is also theoretically proven.

  19. Combining vibrational biomolecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques for the study of response and sensitivity of molecular structures/functional groups mainly related to lipid biopolymer to various processing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gloria Qingyu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to (1) combine vibrational spectroscopy with chemometric multivariate techniques to determine the effect of processing applications on molecular structural changes of lipid biopolymer that mainly related to functional groups in green- and yellow-type Crop Development Centre (CDC) pea varieties [CDC strike (green-type) vs. CDC meadow (yellow-type)] that occurred during various processing applications; (2) relatively quantify the effect of processing applications on the antisymmetric CH3 ("CH3as") and CH2 ("CH2as") (ca. 2960 and 2923 cm(-1), respectively), symmetric CH3 ("CH3s") and CH2 ("CH2s") (ca. 2873 and 2954 cm(-1), respectively) functional groups and carbonyl C=O ester (ca. 1745 cm(-1)) spectral intensities as well as their ratios of antisymmetric CH3 to antisymmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3as to CH2as), ratios of symmetric CH3 to symmetric CH2 (ratio of CH3s to CH2s), and ratios of carbonyl C=O ester peak area to total CH peak area (ratio of C=O ester to CH); and (3) illustrate non-invasive techniques to detect the sensitivity of individual molecular functional group to the various processing applications in the recently developed different types of pea varieties. The hypothesis of this research was that processing applications modified the molecular structure profiles in the processed products as opposed to original unprocessed pea seeds. The results showed that the different processing methods had different impacts on lipid molecular functional groups. Different lipid functional groups had different sensitivity to various heat processing applications. These changes were detected by advanced molecular spectroscopy with chemometric techniques which may be highly related to lipid utilization and availability. The multivariate molecular spectral analyses, cluster analysis, and principal component analysis of original spectra (without spectral parameterization) are unable to fully distinguish the structural differences in the

  20. Application of Glycoproteomics in the Discovery of Biomarkers for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing Kay; Gabrielson, Edward; Zhang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Approximately 40–60% of lung cancer patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. In order to improve the survival rate of lung cancer patients, the discovery of early diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is urgently needed. Lung cancer development and progression are a multistep process which is characterized by abnormal gene and protein expressions ultimately leading to phenotypic change. In lung cancer, the expression of cellular glycoproteins directly reflects the physiological and/or pathological status of the lung parenchyma. Glycoproteins have long been recognized to play fundamental roles in many physiological and pathological processes, particularly in cancer genesis and progression. Although numerous papers have already acknowledged the importance of the discovery of cancer biomarkers, the systemic study of glycoproteins in lung cancer using glycoproteomic approaches is still suboptimal. Herein, we review the recent technological development of glycoproteomics in highlighting their utility and limitations for the discovery of glycoprotein biomarkers in lung cancer. PMID:22641610

  1. Application and interpretation of histocompatibility data in thoracic (heart and lung) transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlendorf, Kelly H; Shah, Ashish S

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of the review is to update our current understanding and utilization of immunogenetic tools in heart and lung transplant. Increasingly, complex patients have been managed perioperatively for heart and lung transplant using a variety of tests and techniques. Recent treatment regimens and listing strategies have exploited recent laboratory advances. However, the better characterization has led to an even more complex description of sensitized heart and lung candidates. Several recent studies have examined antibody strengths and behavior to guide clinical decision-making and examine postoperative outcomes. Finally, non-human leukocyte antigen antibodies have emerged as possible determinants of allograft outcome in heart and lung transplant. Heart and lung transplant candidates with preformed and de-novo posttransplant antibodies continue to represent a challenging and high-risk group of patients. Modern immunogenetic techniques have broadened our understanding and have revealed an even more complex relationship between antibodies, allografts, and outcomes.

  2. Application of machine learning methodology for PET-based definition of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhet, A; Small, C; Quon, H; Riauka, T; Schrader, L; Greiner, R; Yee, D; McEwan, A; Roa, W

    2010-02-01

    We applied a learning methodology framework to assist in the threshold-based segmentation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumours in positron-emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) imaging for use in radiotherapy planning. Gated and standard free-breathing studies of two patients were independently analysed (four studies in total). Each study had a pet-ct and a treatment-planning ct image. The reference gross tumour volume (GTV) was identified by two experienced radiation oncologists who also determined reference standardized uptake value (SUV) thresholds that most closely approximated the GTV contour on each slice. A set of uptake distribution-related attributes was calculated for each PET slice. A machine learning algorithm was trained on a subset of the PET slices to cope with slice-to-slice variation in the optimal suv threshold: that is, to predict the most appropriate suv threshold from the calculated attributes for each slice. The algorithm's performance was evaluated using the remainder of the pet slices. A high degree of geometric similarity was achieved between the areas outlined by the predicted and the reference SUV thresholds (Jaccard index exceeding 0.82). No significant difference was found between the gated and the free-breathing results in the same patient. In this preliminary work, we demonstrated the potential applicability of a machine learning methodology as an auxiliary tool for radiation treatment planning in NSCLC.

  3. Application of machine learning methodology for pet-based definition of lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerhet, A.; Small, C.; Quon, H.; Riauka, T.; Schrader, L.; Greiner, R.; Yee, D.; McEwan, A.; Roa, W.

    2010-01-01

    We applied a learning methodology framework to assist in the threshold-based segmentation of non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc) tumours in positron-emission tomography–computed tomography (pet–ct) imaging for use in radiotherapy planning. Gated and standard free-breathing studies of two patients were independently analysed (four studies in total). Each study had a pet–ct and a treatment-planning ct image. The reference gross tumour volume (gtv) was identified by two experienced radiation oncologists who also determined reference standardized uptake value (suv) thresholds that most closely approximated the gtv contour on each slice. A set of uptake distribution-related attributes was calculated for each pet slice. A machine learning algorithm was trained on a subset of the pet slices to cope with slice-to-slice variation in the optimal suv threshold: that is, to predict the most appropriate suv threshold from the calculated attributes for each slice. The algorithm’s performance was evaluated using the remainder of the pet slices. A high degree of geometric similarity was achieved between the areas outlined by the predicted and the reference suv thresholds (Jaccard index exceeding 0.82). No significant difference was found between the gated and the free-breathing results in the same patient. In this preliminary work, we demonstrated the potential applicability of a machine learning methodology as an auxiliary tool for radiation treatment planning in nsclc. PMID:20179802

  4. Structure-function relationships in calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert L; Davies, Peter L

    2012-11-01

    Calpains are a family of complex multi-domain intracellular enzymes that share a calcium-dependent cysteine protease core. These are not degradative enzymes, but instead carry out limited cleavage of target proteins in response to calcium signalling. Selective cutting of cytoskeletal proteins to facilitate cell migration is one such function. The two most abundant and extensively studied members of this family in mammals, calpains 1 and 2, are heterodimers of an isoform-specific 80 kDa large subunit and a common 28 kDa small subunit. Structures of calpain-2, both Ca2+-free and bound to calpastatin in the activated Ca2+-bound state, have provided a wealth of information about the enzyme's structure-function relationships and activation. The main association between the subunits is the pairing of their C-terminal penta-EF-hand domains through extensive intimate hydrophobic contacts. A lesser contact is made between the N-terminal anchor helix of the large subunit and the penta-EF-hand domain of the small subunit. Up to ten Ca2+ ions are co-operatively bound during activation. The anchor helix is released and individual domains change their positions relative to each other to properly align the active site. Because calpains 1 and 2 require ~30 and ~350 μM Ca2+ ions for half-maximal activation respectively, it has long been argued that autoproteolysis, subunit dissociation, post-translational modifications or auxiliary proteins are needed to activate the enzymes in the cell, where Ca2+ levels are in the nanomolar range. In the absence of robust support for these mechanisms, it is possible that under normal conditions calpains are transiently activated by high Ca2+ concentrations in the microenvironment of a Ca2+ influx, and then return to an inactive state ready for reactivation.

  5. Increasing physical activity and exercise in lung cancer: reviewing safety, benefits, and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Brett C; Thomas, D David; Scott, JoAnn B; Silvestri, Gerard A

    2015-06-01

    Lung cancer continues to be a difficult disease frequently diagnosed in late stages with a high mortality and symptom burden. In part because of frequent lung comorbidity, even lung cancer survivors often remain symptomatic and functionally limited. Though targeted therapy continues to increase treatment options for advanced-stage disease, symptom burden remains high with few therapeutic options. In the last several decades, exercise and physical activity have arisen as therapeutic options for obstructive lung disease and lung cancer. To date, exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms, increase exercise tolerance, improve quality of life, and potentially reduce length of stay and postoperative complications. Multiple small trials have been performed in perioperative non-small-cell lung cancer patients, although fewer studies are available for patients with advanced-stage disease. Despite the increased interest in this subject over the last few years, a validated exercise regimen has not been established for perioperative or advanced-stage disease. Clinicians underutilize exercise and pulmonary rehabilitation as a therapy, in part because of the lack of evidence-based consensus as to how and when to implement increasing physical activity. This review summarizes the existing evidence on exercise in lung cancer patients.

  6. Patterns of lung cancer mortality in 23 countries: Application of the Age-Period-Cohort model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yi-Chia

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smoking habits do not seem to be the main explanation of the epidemiological characteristics of female lung cancer mortality in Asian countries. However, Asian countries are often excluded from studies of geographical differences in trends for lung cancer mortality. We thus examined lung cancer trends from 1971 to 1995 among men and women for 23 countries, including four in Asia. Methods International and national data were used to analyze lung cancer mortality from 1971 to 1995 in both sexes. Age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR were analyzed in five consecutive five-year periods and for each five-year age group in the age range 30 to 79. The age-period-cohort (APC model was used to estimate the period effect (adjusted for age and cohort effects for mortality from lung cancer. Results The sex ratio of the ASMR for lung cancer was lower in Asian countries, while the sex ratio of smoking prevalence was higher in Asian countries. The mean values of the sex ratio of the ASMR from lung cancer in Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Japan for the five 5-year period were 2.10, 2.39, 3.07, and 3.55, respectively. These values not only remained quite constant over each five-year period, but were also lower than seen in the western countries. The period effect, for lung cancer mortality as derived for the 23 countries from the APC model, could be classified into seven patterns. Conclusion Period effects for both men and women in 23 countries, as derived using the APC model, could be classified into seven patterns. Four Asian countries have a relatively low sex ratio in lung cancer mortality and a relatively high sex ratio in smoking prevalence. Factors other than smoking might be important, especially for women in Asian countries.

  7. Lung metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metastases to the lung; Metastatic cancer to the lung; Lung cancer - metastases ... Metastatic tumors in the lungs are cancers that developed at other places in the body (or other parts of the lungs). They then spread through ...

  8. Local respiratory motion correction for PET/CT imaging: Application to lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [INCIA, UMR 5287, University of Bordeaux, Talence F-33400, France and Nuclear Medicine Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux 33000 (France); Fayad, H.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest 29609 (France)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Despite multiple methodologies already proposed to correct respiratory motion in the whole PET imaging field of view (FOV), such approaches have not found wide acceptance in clinical routine. An alternative can be the local respiratory motion correction (LRMC) of data corresponding to a given volume of interest (VOI: organ or tumor). Advantages of LRMC include the use of a simple motion model, faster execution times, and organ specific motion correction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of LMRC using various motion models for oncology (lung lesion) applications. Methods: Both simulated (NURBS based 4D cardiac-torso phantom) and clinical studies (six patients) were used in the evaluation of the proposed LRMC approach. PET data were acquired in list-mode and synchronized with respiration. The implemented approach consists first in defining a VOI on the reconstructed motion average image. Gated PET images of the VOI are subsequently reconstructed using only lines of response passing through the selected VOI and are used in combination with a center of gravity or an affine/elastic registration algorithm to derive the transformation maps corresponding to the respiration effects. Those are finally integrated in the reconstruction process to produce a motion free image over the lesion regions. Results: Although the center of gravity or affine algorithm achieved similar performance for individual lesion motion correction, the elastic model, applied either locally or to the whole FOV, led to an overall superior performance. The spatial tumor location was altered by 89% and 81% for the elastic model applied locally or to the whole FOV, respectively (compared to 44% and 39% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). This resulted in similar associated overall tumor volume changes of 84% and 80%, respectively (compared to 75% and 71% for the center of gravity and affine models, respectively). The application of the nonrigid

  9. Clinical application of whole blood red cell distribution width in lung cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐阳飏

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical value of whole blood red cell distribution width(RDW)in discriminating lung cancer metastasis.Methods A retropective analysis was conducted on the patients who were initially diagnosed as primary lung cancer.A total of 525 patients were included for analysis between January 2012 and July2013,stratified by different stages and metastasis scenarios.RDW data was investigated.Kruskal-Wallis H tests

  10. Synthesis and surface activity of diether-linked phosphoglycerols: potential applications for exogenous lung surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notter, Robert H; Wang, Zhongyi; Wang, Zhengdong; Davy, Jason A; Schwan, Adrian L

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of three phosphoglycerols is described, one of which contains the previously unknown phosphonoglycerol headgroup. The surface tension-lowering capabilities of synthetic lung surfactant mixtures containing the PG analogs were measured on the pulsating bubble surfactometer and compared to known controls. The PG-containing mixtures exhibited superior surface tension-lowering properties indicating the significant potential of these analogs as components in synthetic exogenous lung surfactants.

  11. Survival ensembles by the sum of pairwise differences with application to lung cancer microarray studies

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Brent A.; Long, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is among the most common cancers in the United States, in terms of incidence and mortality. In 2009, it is estimated that more than 150,000 deaths will result from lung cancer alone. Genetic information is an extremely valuable data source in characterizing the personal nature of cancer. Over the past several years, investigators have conducted numerous association studies where intensive genetic data is collected on relatively few patients compared to the numbers of gene predicto...

  12. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung c...

  13. On the Stability of Lung Parenchymal Lesions with Applications to Early Pneumothorax Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhandarkar, Archis R.; Rohan Banerjee; Padmanabhan Seshaiyer

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax, a prevalent medical challenge in most trauma cases, is a form of sudden lung collapse closely associated with risk factors such as lung cancer and emphysema. Our work seeks to explore and quantify the currently unknown pathological factors underlying lesion rupture in pneumothorax through biomechanical modeling. We hypothesized that lesion instability is closely associated with elastodynamic strain of the pleural membrane from pulsatile air flow and collagen-elastin ...

  14. Adaptive Radiation: application in lung cancer; Radioterapia adaptativa: aplicacion en cancer de pulmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez Mazon, J.; Raba Diez, J. I.; Vazquez Rodriguez, J. a.; Pacheco Baldor, M. T.; Mendiguren Santiago, M. A.; Menendez Garcia, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The previous updates are a form of adaptive radiation that can be used to account for changes in the size, shape and location of both the tumor and healthy tissue. Are especially useful in the case of lung cancer which typically is associated with significant anatomical changes due to the response to treatment.In the present study, the variation in tumor volume and dosimetric effects from a new CT and replanning during the course of treatment in patients with lung cancer.

  15. Measurement of the Electron Structure Function at LEP energies

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, U; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W-D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Asman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, P; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K-H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A; Berat, C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Besancon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Bruckman, P; Brunet, J M; Buschbeck, B; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, Ph; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D; Cuevas, J; D'Hondt, J; da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; De Boer, W; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; de Paula, L; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Eigen, G; Ekelof, T; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Foeth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Gandelman, M; Garcia, C; Gavillet, Ph; Gazis, E; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S-O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kouznetsov, O; Krumstein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; Lopez, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Marechal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J-C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martinez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; Mc Nulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W; Mjoernmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Moenig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Mueller, U; Muenich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, F; Nawrocki, K; Nemecek, S; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Olshevski, A; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, Th D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdniakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P; Richard, F; Ridky, J; Rivero, M; Rodriguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovsky, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Sekulin, R; Siebel, M; Sisakian, A; Slominski, W; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassov, T; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Szwed, J; Tabarelli, T; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tome, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O; Zalewska, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2010-01-01

    The hadronic part of the Electron Structure Function (ESF) has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies sqrt(s) = 91.2-209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The ESF data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the quasi-real photon virtuality contribution is significant. The presented data can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function analyses and help in refining existing parametrizations.

  16. Small-x asymptotics of structure function $g_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I

    1997-01-01

    Nonsinglet structure function g_2(x) for deep inelastic scattering of a lepton on a constituent quark is calculated in the double logarithmic approximation at x<<1. Small-x asymptotics of g_2 is shown to have the same singular behaviour as asymptotics of the nonsinglet structure function g_1.

  17. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Rafiei, Ali; Mirjalili, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    In the context of noncommutative space-time, we investigate the nucleon structure functions which plays an important role to identify the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of noncommutative tensor \\theta_{\\mu\

  18. Exogenous surfactant application in a rat lung ischemia reperfusion injury model: effects on edema formation and alveolar type II cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richter Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prophylactic exogenous surfactant therapy is a promising way to attenuate the ischemia and reperfusion (I/R injury associated with lung transplantation and thereby to decrease the clinical occurrence of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. However, there is little information on the mode by which exogenous surfactant attenuates I/R injury of the lung. We hypothesized that exogenous surfactant may act by limiting pulmonary edema formation and by enhancing alveolar type II cell and lamellar body preservation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of exogenous surfactant therapy on the formation of pulmonary edema in different lung compartments and on the ultrastructure of the surfactant producing alveolar epithelial type II cells. Methods Rats were randomly assigned to a control, Celsior (CE or Celsior + surfactant (CE+S group (n = 5 each. In both Celsior groups, the lungs were flush-perfused with Celsior and subsequently exposed to 4 h of extracorporeal ischemia at 4°C and 50 min of reperfusion at 37°C. The CE+S group received an intratracheal bolus of a modified natural bovine surfactant at a dosage of 50 mg/kg body weight before flush perfusion. After reperfusion (Celsior groups or immediately after sacrifice (Control, the lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion and processed for light and electron microscopy. Stereology was used to quantify edematous changes as well as alterations of the alveolar epithelial type II cells. Results Surfactant treatment decreased the intraalveolar edema formation (mean (coefficient of variation: CE: 160 mm3 (0.61 vs. CE+S: 4 mm3 (0.75; p 3 (0.90 vs. CE+S: 0 mm3; p 3 (0.39 vs. CE+S: 268 mm3 (0.43; p 3(0.10 and CE+S (481 μm3(0.10 compared with controls (323 μm3(0.07; p Conclusion Intratracheal surfactant application before I/R significantly reduces the intraalveolar edema formation and development of atelectases but leads to an increased development of

  19. Bromodomains: Structure, function and pharmacology of inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Elena; Petosa, Carlo; McKenna, Charles E

    2016-04-15

    Bromodomains are epigenetic readers of histone acetylation involved in chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. The human proteome comprises 46 bromodomain-containing proteins with a total of 61 bromodomains, which, despite highly conserved structural features, recognize a wide array of natural peptide ligands. Over the past five years, bromodomains have attracted great interest as promising new epigenetic targets for diverse human diseases, including inflammation, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. The demonstration in 2010 that two small molecule compounds, JQ1 and I-BET762, potently inhibit proteins of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family with translational potential for cancer and inflammatory disease sparked intense efforts in academia and pharmaceutical industry to develop novel bromodomain antagonists for therapeutic applications. Several BET inhibitors are already in clinical trials for hematological malignancies, solid tumors and cardiovascular disease. Currently, the field faces the challenge of single-target selectivity, especially within the BET family, and of overcoming problems related to the development of drug resistance. At the same time, new trends in bromodomain inhibitor research are emerging, including an increased interest in non-BET bromodomains and a focus on drug synergy with established antitumor agents to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy. This review presents an updated view of the structure and function of bromodomains, traces the development of bromodomain inhibitors and their potential therapeutic applications, and surveys the current challenges and future directions of this vibrant new field in drug discovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Prostate cancer microenvironment: Its structure, functions and therapeutic applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorion, R; Bladou, F; Spatz, A; van Kempen, L; Irani, J

    2016-06-01

    In the field of prostate cancer there is a growing tendency for more and more studies to emphasise the predominant role of the zone situated between the tumour and the host: the tumour microenvironment. The aim of this article is to describe the structure and the functions of the prostate cancer microenvironment as well as the principal treatments that are being applied to it. PubMed and ScienceDirect databases have been interrogated using the association of keywords "tumour microenvironment" and "neoplasm therapy" along with "microenvironnement tumoral" and "traitements". Of the 593 articles initially found, 50 were finally included. The tumour microenvironment principally includes host elements that are diverted from their primary functions and encourage the development of the tumour. In it we find immunity cells, support tissue as well as vascular and lymphatic neovascularization. Highlighting the major role played by this microenvironment has led to the development of specific treatments, notably antiangiogenic therapy and immunotherapy. The tumour microenvironment, the tumour and the host influence themselves mutually and create a variable situation over time. Improvement of the knowledge of the prostate cancer microenvironment gradually enables us to pass from an approach centred on the tumour to a broader approach to the whole tumoral ecosystem. This enabled the emergence of new treatments whose place in the therapeutic arsenal still need to be found. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Antitumor Lipids--Structure, Functions, and Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinova, Aneliya; Topouzova-Hristova, Tanya; Momchilova, Albena; Tzoneva, Rumiana; Berger, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Cell proliferation and metastasis are considered hallmarks of tumor progression. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop novel anticancer drugs that inhibit both the proliferation and the motility of tumor cells. Synthetic antitumor lipids (ATLs), which are chemically divided into two main classes, comprise (i) alkylphospholipids (APLs) and (ii) alkylphosphocholines (APCs). They represent a new entity of drugs with distinct antiproliferative properties in tumor cells. These compounds do not interfere with the DNA or mitotic spindle apparatus of the cell, instead, they incorporate into cell membranes, where they accumulate and interfere with lipid metabolism and lipid-dependent signaling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that the most commonly studied APLs inhibit proliferation by inducing apoptosis in malignant cells while leaving normal cells unaffected and are potent sensitizers of conventional chemo- and radiotherapy, as well as of electrical field therapy. APLs resist catabolic degradation to a large extent, therefore accumulate in the cell and interfere with lipid-dependent survival signaling pathways, notably PI3K-Akt and Raf-Erk1/2, and de novo phospholipid biosynthesis. They are internalized in the cell membrane via raft domains and cause downstream reactions as inhibition of cell growth and migration, cell cycle arrest, actin stress fibers collapse, and apoptosis. This review summarizes the in vitro, in vivo, and clinical trials of most common ATLs and their mode of action at molecular and biochemical levels.

  2. Laser resection of lung tissue: heat accumulation from adjacent laser application and how to cool it down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschbaum, Andreas; Rexin, Peter; Pehl, Anika; Bartsch, Detlef; Quint, Karl

    2014-06-01

    Heat accumulation might induce thermal damage of the surrounding lung tissue, especially when multiple lesions are resected in one session. The present study aimed to investigate whether heat accumulates in the immediate vicinity of the resection surface and leads to thermal damage of the lung parenchyma, and what is the most effective cooling strategy in this situation. In normothermic perfused paracardial swine lobes (n = 6), four punctiform laser lesions forming a square were created. Each lesion was lasered at a power of 100 W for 5 seconds. Two test conditions with square sides of either 1.0 or 0.5 cm were compared. Temperatures were recorded immediately after completing the laser procedure in the square center and in the corners using a thermal camera and continued during the cooling process at 10-second intervals until normothermia (37°C). We examined two cooling methods: rinsing with ice-cold (4°C) Ringer solution during the laser procedure (group B, n = 6) or submerging the lung in ice-cold water for 5 seconds immediately after laser application (group C, n = 6). In the control group A (n = 6), there was no cooling. In the 0.5 cm squares, mean temperature in the center immediately after laser application was 103.17 ± 8.56°C, significantly higher than in the corners (76.39 ± 2.87°C, p Laser application to the lung parenchyma causes considerable heat accumulation in closely related lesions. To prevent such cell damage, a distance of at least 1.0 cm between laser targets should be maintained. If no topical cooling method applied, sufficient time for spontaneous tissue cooling before additional laser application should be provided. The most effective cooling strategy against heat accumulation is submerging in ice-cold water for at least 5 seconds. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Toward a clinical application of ex situ boron neutron capture therapy for lung tumors at the RA-3 reactor in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farías, R. O.; Trivillin, V. A.; Portu, A. M.; Schwint, A. E.; González, S. J., E-mail: srgonzal@cnea.gov.ar [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), San Martín 1650, Argentina and Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Garabalino, M. A.; Monti Hughes, A.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Thorp, S. I.; Curotto, P.; Miller, M. E.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Saint Martin, G. [Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA), San Martín 1650 (Argentina); Ferraris, S.; Santa María, J.; Rovati, O.; Lange, F. [CIDME, Universidad Maimónides, Buenos Aires 1405 (Argentina); Bortolussi, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia 27100 (Italy); Altieri, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pavia 27100, Italy and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pavia, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Many types of lung tumors have a very poor prognosis due to their spread in the whole organ volume. The fact that boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) would allow for selective targeting of all the nodules regardless of their position, prompted a preclinical feasibility study of ex situ BNCT at the thermal neutron facility of RA-3 reactor in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. (L)-4p-dihydroxy-borylphenylalanine fructose complex (BPA-F) biodistribution studies in an adult sheep model and computational dosimetry for a human explanted lung were performed to evaluate the feasibility and the therapeutic potential of ex situ BNCT. Methods: Two kinds of boron biodistribution studies were carried out in the healthy sheep: a set of pharmacokinetic studies without lung excision, and a set that consisted of evaluation of boron concentration in the explanted and perfused lung. In order to assess the feasibility of the clinical application of ex situ BNCT at RA-3, a case of multiple lung metastases was analyzed. A detailed computational representation of the geometry of the lung was built based on a real collapsed human lung. Dosimetric calculations and dose limiting considerations were based on the experimental results from the adult sheep, and on the most suitable information published in the literature. In addition, a workable treatment plan was considered to assess the clinical application in a realistic scenario. Results: Concentration-time profiles for the normal sheep showed that the boron kinetics in blood, lung, and skin would adequately represent the boron behavior and absolute uptake expected in human tissues. Results strongly suggest that the distribution of the boron compound is spatially homogeneous in the lung. A constant lung-to-blood ratio of 1.3 ± 0.1 was observed from 80 min after the end of BPA-F infusion. The fact that this ratio remains constant during time would allow the blood boron concentration to be used as a surrogate and indirect

  4. Toward a clinical application of ex situ boron neutron capture therapy for lung tumors at the RA-3 reactor in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías, R O; Garabalino, M A; Ferraris, S; Santa María, J; Rovati, O; Lange, F; Trivillin, V A; Monti Hughes, A; Pozzi, E C C; Thorp, S I; Curotto, P; Miller, M E; Santa Cruz, G A; Bortolussi, S; Altieri, S; Portu, A M; Saint Martin, G; Schwint, A E; González, S J

    2015-07-01

    Many types of lung tumors have a very poor prognosis due to their spread in the whole organ volume. The fact that boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) would allow for selective targeting of all the nodules regardless of their position, prompted a preclinical feasibility study of ex situ BNCT at the thermal neutron facility of RA-3 reactor in the province of Buenos Aires, Argentina. (l)-4p-dihydroxy-borylphenylalanine fructose complex (BPA-F) biodistribution studies in an adult sheep model and computational dosimetry for a human explanted lung were performed to evaluate the feasibility and the therapeutic potential of ex situ BNCT. Two kinds of boron biodistribution studies were carried out in the healthy sheep: a set of pharmacokinetic studies without lung excision, and a set that consisted of evaluation of boron concentration in the explanted and perfused lung. In order to assess the feasibility of the clinical application of ex situ BNCT at RA-3, a case of multiple lung metastases was analyzed. A detailed computational representation of the geometry of the lung was built based on a real collapsed human lung. Dosimetric calculations and dose limiting considerations were based on the experimental results from the adult sheep, and on the most suitable information published in the literature. In addition, a workable treatment plan was considered to assess the clinical application in a realistic scenario. Concentration-time profiles for the normal sheep showed that the boron kinetics in blood, lung, and skin would adequately represent the boron behavior and absolute uptake expected in human tissues. Results strongly suggest that the distribution of the boron compound is spatially homogeneous in the lung. A constant lung-to-blood ratio of 1.3 ± 0.1 was observed from 80 min after the end of BPA-F infusion. The fact that this ratio remains constant during time would allow the blood boron concentration to be used as a surrogate and indirect quantification of the

  5. Structure/function relationships in cellulolytic enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marc Claeyssens

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cellulose and hemicellulose (mostly xylan), together with lignin, are the major polymeric constituents of plant cell walls and from the largest reservoir of fixed carbon in nature. The enzymatic hydrolysis of polymeric substances by extracellular enzymes, such as cellulases, hemicellulases and laccases, is preferred to chemical depolymerisation to avoid the production of toxic by-products and waste that are expensive to treat. The monosaccharides released through enzymatic hydrolysis can subsequently be microbially converted to commercial commodities, such as bio-ethanol (fuel extender) or microbial protein as feed supplements. The individual depolymerisering enzymes used, such as cellulases,xylanases and laccases, also have industrial application in (i) biobleaching in the paper and pulp industry, (ii) improvement of animal feed (poultry and ruminants) digestibility in feed industries, and (iii) dough rheology and bread volume in the baking process, and beer viscosity and filtration velocity during brewing. The cloning of the genes, coding for several xylan degrading enzymes, and their expression in Baker' s yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and filamentous fungi (Aspergillus species)opened the possibility to study the pure enzymes, without contaminating activity.Trichoderma reesei produces several of these enzymes and detailed information on their specificity,synergies and structure/activity relationships is known. An overview will be presented.

  6. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergencies Cardiac Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at ... should be considered an emergency. Symptoms of sudden lung collapse (pneumothorax) Symptoms of a sudden lung collapse ...

  7. Structure-function relationship in novel polyphenolics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sukanta

    The synthesis, properties and applications of hydroxyaromatic polymers, synthesized enzymatically in AOT/Water/Isooctane water-in-oil microemulsion is the subject of this dissertation. The enzymatic polymerization in such microstructured media furnishes the final polymer product with the unusual morphology of interconnected microspheres. Fundamental characterization of the nature of interaction of a model polymer, poly(4-ethylphenol), with the surfactant AOT, as well as various solvents was carried out to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the morphology development. From an applied perspective, presynthesized poly(4-ethylphenol) was precipitated using AOT/Water/Isooctane water-in-oil microemulsion as the non-solvent to give spherical microparticles. Of specific interest was the encapsulation of macromolecules and nanoparticles initially solubilized in the water droplets by the precipitating polymer matrix. This technique was utilized to synthesize catalytically active and superparamagnetic microspheres, containing entrapped enzyme and nanoparticulate ferrites, respectively. The enzymatically synthesized polymers possess a fully aromatic backbone and hence are expected to have unique pi conjugated structure. On the basis of this hypothesis several conjugated luminescent polymers were synthesized using 2-naphthol and 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene as the starting monomer. Chemical tuning of the emission properties of these polymers were achieved by copolymerization with 4-ethylphenol which is not a luminescent molecule. Addition of 2,6-dihydroxynaphthalene in dry reversed micellar solutions of AOT induced a dramatic phase transition to a clear luminescent organogel. Hydrogen bonding interaction between the hydroxyl groups and the head group of AOT form the basis of such gels. The microstructure of the gel was probed using NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. Finally, thiol group containing polymers were synthesized to bind nanoparticulate CdS, forming novel photoresponsive

  8. Deep inelastic structure functions in the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjose, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Didactica de las Ciencias Experimentales); Vento, V. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Centro Mixto CSIC/Valencia Univ., Valencia (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular)

    1989-10-02

    We calculate the structure functions for deep inelastic scattering on baryons in the cavity approximation to the chiral bag model. The behavior of these structure functions is analyzed in the Bjorken limit. We conclude that scaling is satisfied, but not Regge behavior. A trivial extension as a parton model can be achieved by introducing the structure function for the pion in a convolution picture. In this extended version of the model not only scaling but also Regge behavior is satisfied. Conclusions are drawn from the comparison of our results with experimental data. (orig.).

  9. Extracting nucleon spin structure functions from nuclear data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.W.; Afnan, I.R.; Bissey, F. [CSSM, University of Adelaide (Australia)

    2000-05-01

    The determination of the spin-dependent structure functions of the nucleons from nuclear data requires a knowledge of the changes induced by the nuclear medium. This is especially important for the neutron because there are no free neutron targets. We present the results of a study of the accuracy with which one can extract the neutron spin structure function from data on polarized {sup 3}He. This study is based on a three-body calculation of the wave function of the A=3 system, which is then used to calculate the nuclear structure functions including binding and off-shell effects. (author)

  10. Structure/Function/Dynamics of Photosystem II Plastoquinone Binding Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambreva, Maya D.; Russo, Daniela; Polticelli, Fabio; Scognamiglio, Viviana; Antonacci, Amina; Zobnina, Veranika; Campi, Gaetano; Rea, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) continuously attracts the attention of researchers aiming to unravel the riddle of its functioning and efficiency fundamental for all life on Earth. Besides, an increasing number of biotechnological applications have been envisaged exploiting and mimicking the unique properties of this macromolecular pigment-protein complex. The PSII organization and working principles have inspired the design of electrochemical water splitting schemes and charge separating triads in energy storage systems as well as biochips and sensors for environmental, agricultural and industrial screening of toxic compounds. An intriguing opportunity is the development of sensor devices, exploiting native or manipulated PSII complexes or ad hoc synthesized polypeptides mimicking the PSII reaction centre proteins as bio-sensing elements. This review offers a concise overview of the recent improvements in the understanding of structure and function of PSII donor side, with focus on the interactions of the plastoquinone cofactors with the surrounding environment and operational features. Furthermore, studies focused on photosynthetic proteins structure/function/dynamics and computational analyses aimed at rational design of high-quality bio-recognition elements in biosensor devices are discussed. PMID:24678671

  11. Clinical applicability of staging small cell lung cancer according to the seventh edition of the TNM staging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil; Choi, Joon Young; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Joungho; Um, Sang-Won

    2013-07-01

    The two-stage system of limited and extensive disease has been widely employed for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). However, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer has proposed that the TNM classification should be incorporated into clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the applicability of the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC) 7th TNM staging system to SCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of consecutive patients with newly diagnosed histologically proven SCLC between March 2005 and January 2010. Patients who had other concurrent malignancies or had combined-type SCLC were excluded. We assessed overall survival (OS) according to the T descriptor, N descriptor, M descriptor, and TNM stage grouping. In total, 320 SCLC patients were included. Median age was 65 years and 286 patients (89.4%) were male. Median OS was 12.7 months. There were no significant differences in OS according to the T descriptor (P = 0.880). However, there were significant differences in OS according to the N (P TNM stage grouping (P TNM stage grouping, but not according to the T descriptors. The UICC 7th TNM staging system may contribute to a more precise prognosis in SCLC patients. Further studies are required to evaluate the applicability of the TNM staging system to SCLC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nanoparticles used in medical applications for the lung: hopes for nanomedicine and fears for nanotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boland, S; Guadagnini, R; Baeza-Squiban, A; Hussain, S; Marano, F, E-mail: boland@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Laboratory of Functional and Adaptative Biology, unit of Reponses Moleculaires et Cellulaires aux Xenobiotiques (RMCX), CNRS EAC 4413, University Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CC 7073, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-07-06

    Nanotechnology is a promising tool for the development of innovative treatment strategies allowing to overcome obstacles encountered by classical drug delivery. This has led to the development of nanomedicine. Indeed, nano-delivery systems (NDS) may allow the controlled release of therapeutics, protection of drugs against degradation, targeted drug delivery and facilitated transport across barriers. All these advantages of NDS are particularly interesting for treatments of the lung which is a challenging organ in respect to drug delivery. However, for the development of nanomaterials aimed to transport therapeutics, there is also a need to assess the potential health hazards of these new materials, especially as a variety of nanoparticles have been shown to induce toxicity related to their nanometer size leading to the new field of nanotoxicology. We will address both aspects of NDS, specifically in respect to lung treatments: their potential benefits and the possible adverse health effects of these materials.

  13. Application to Rat Lung of the Extended Rorschach-Hazlewood Model of Spin-Lattice Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Andreas; Ailion, David C.; Ganesan, Krishnamurthy; Goodrich, K. Craig; Chen, Songhua; Laicher, Gernot; Cutillo, Antonio G.

    1996-02-01

    The spin-lattice relaxation timeT1was measured in excised degassed (airless) rat lungs over the frequency range 6.7 to 80.5 MHz. The observed frequency dependence was fitted successfully to the water-biopolymer cross-relaxation theory proposed by H. E. Rorschach and C. F. Hazlewood (RH) [J. Magn. Reson.70,79 (1986)]. The rotating frame spin-lattice relaxation timeT1ρwas also measured in rat lung fragments over the frequency range 0.56 to 5.6 kHz, and the observed frequency dependence was explained with an extension of the RH model. The agreement between the theory and the experimental data in both cases is good.

  14. Adaptation and applications of a realistic digital phantom based on patient lung tumor trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Pankaj; St. James, Sara; Segars, W Paul; Berbeco, Ross I; Lewis, John H

    2012-01-01

    Digital phantoms continue to play a significant role in modeling and characterizing medical imaging. The currently available XCAT phantom incorporates both the flexibility of mathematical phantoms and the realistic nature of voxelized phantoms. This phantom generates images based on a regular breathing pattern and can include arbitrary lung tumor trajectories. In this work, we present an algorithm that modifies the current XCAT phantom to generate 4D imaging data based on irregular breathing. First, a parameter is added to the existing XCAT phantom to include any arbitrary tumor motion. This modification introduces the desired tumor motion but, comes at the cost of decoupled diaphragm, chest wall and lung motion. To remedy this problem diaphragm and chest wall motion is first modified based on initial tumor location and then input to the XCAT phantom. This generates a phantom with synchronized respiratory motion. Mapping of tumor motion trajectories to diaphragm and chest wall motion is done by adaptively calculating a scale factor based on tumor to lung contour distance. The distance is calculated by projecting the initial tumor location to lung edge contours characterized by quadratic polynomials. Data from 10 patients were used to evaluate the accuracy between actual independent tumor location and the location obtained from the modified XCAT phantom. The rmse and standard deviations for 10 patients in x, y, and z directions are: (0.29 ± 0.04, 0.54 ± 0.17, and 0.39 ± 0.06) mm. To demonstrate the utility of the phantom, we use the new phantom to simulate a 4DCT acquisition as well as a recently published method for phase sorting. The modified XCAT phantom can be used to generate more realistic imaging data for enhanced testing of algorithms for CT reconstruction, tumor tracking, and dose reconstruction. PMID:22595980

  15. A high-throughput and sensitive method to measure Global DNA Methylation: Application in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamaev Sergey

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide changes in DNA methylation are an epigenetic phenomenon that can lead to the development of disease. The study of global DNA methylation utilizes technology that requires both expensive equipment and highly specialized skill sets. Methods We have designed and developed an assay, CpGlobal, which is easy-to-use, does not utilize PCR, radioactivity and expensive equipment. CpGlobal utilizes methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes, HRP Neutravidin to detect the biotinylated nucleotides incorporated in an end-fill reaction and a luminometer to measure the chemiluminescence. The assay shows high accuracy and reproducibility in measuring global DNA methylation. Furthermore, CpGlobal correlates significantly with High Performance Capillary Electrophoresis (HPCE, a gold standard technology. We have applied the technology to understand the role of global DNA methylation in the natural history of lung cancer. World-wide, it is the leading cause of death attributed to any cancer. The survival rate is 15% over 5 years due to the lack of any clinical symptoms until the disease has progressed to a stage where cure is limited. Results Through the use of cell lines and paired normal/tumor samples from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC we show that global DNA hypomethylation is highly associated with the progression of the tumor. In addition, the results provide the first indication that the normal part of the lung from a cancer patient has already experienced a loss of methylation compared to a normal individual. Conclusion By detecting these changes in global DNA methylation, CpGlobal may have a role as a barometer for the onset and development of lung cancer.

  16. Squark Contributions to Photon Structure Functions and Positivity Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Kitadono, Yoshio; Uematsu, Tsuneo; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Photon structure functions in supersymmetric QCD are investigated in terms of the parton model where squark contributions are evaluated. We calculate the eight virtual photon structure functions by taking the discontinuity of the squark massive one-loop diagrams of the photon-photon forward amplitude. The model-independent positivity constraints derived from the Cauchy-Schwarz inequalities are satisfied by the squark parton model calculation and actually the two equality relations hold for the squark contribution. We also show that our polarized photon structure function $g_1^\\gamma$ for the real photon leads to the vanishing 1st moment sum rule, and the constraint $|g_1^\\gamma|\\leq F_1^\\gamma$ is satisfied by the real photon. We also discuss a squark signature in the structure function $W_{TT}^\\tau$.

  17. Neutron structure function and A=3 mirror nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; Bissey, F.; Gomez, J.; Katramatou, A.T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Petratos, G.G.; Thomas, A.W.

    2000-06-01

    The authors demonstrate that the free neutron structure function can be extracted in deep-inelastic scattering from A=3 mirror nuclei, with nuclear effects canceling to within 2% for x {approx_lt} 0.85.

  18. An inertial range length scale in structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kerr, R M; Gotoh, T; Kerr, Robert M.; Meneguzzi, Maurice; Gotoh, Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    It is shown using experimental and numerical data that within the traditional inertial subrange defined by where the third order structure function is linear that the higher order structure function scaling exponents for longitudinal and transverse structure functions converge only over larger scales, $r>r_S$, where $r_S$ has scaling intermediate between $\\eta$ and $\\lambda$ as a function of $R_\\lambda$. Below these scales, scaling exponents cannot be determined for any of the structure functions without resorting to procedures such as extended self-similarity (ESS). With ESS, different longitudinal and transverse higher order exponents are obtained that are consistent with earlier results. The relationship of these statistics to derivative and pressure statistics, to turbulent structures and to length scales is discussed.

  19. Structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-06-26

    The phenomenological expressions for the structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering are proposed and are shown to satisfy the experimental data as well as a number of sum rules.

  20. On the Stability of Lung Parenchymal Lesions with Applications to Early Pneumothorax Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archis R. Bhandarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous pneumothorax, a prevalent medical challenge in most trauma cases, is a form of sudden lung collapse closely associated with risk factors such as lung cancer and emphysema. Our work seeks to explore and quantify the currently unknown pathological factors underlying lesion rupture in pneumothorax through biomechanical modeling. We hypothesized that lesion instability is closely associated with elastodynamic strain of the pleural membrane from pulsatile air flow and collagen-elastin dynamics. Based on the principles of continuum mechanics and fluid-structure interaction, our proposed model coupled isotropic tissue deformation with pressure from pulsatile air motion and the pleural fluid. Next, we derived mathematical instability criteria for our ordinary differential equation system and then translated these mathematical instabilities to physically relevant structural instabilities via the incorporation of a finite energy limiter. The introduction of novel biomechanical descriptions for collagen-elastin dynamics allowed us to demonstrate that changes in the protein structure can lead to a transition from stable to unstable domains in the material parameter space for a general lesion. This result allowed us to create a novel streamlined algorithm for detecting material instabilities in transient lung CT scan data via analyzing deformations in a local tissue boundary.

  1. On the stability of lung parenchymal lesions with applications to early pneumothorax diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandarkar, Archis R; Banerjee, Rohan; Seshaiyer, Padmanabhan

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax, a prevalent medical challenge in most trauma cases, is a form of sudden lung collapse closely associated with risk factors such as lung cancer and emphysema. Our work seeks to explore and quantify the currently unknown pathological factors underlying lesion rupture in pneumothorax through biomechanical modeling. We hypothesized that lesion instability is closely associated with elastodynamic strain of the pleural membrane from pulsatile air flow and collagen-elastin dynamics. Based on the principles of continuum mechanics and fluid-structure interaction, our proposed model coupled isotropic tissue deformation with pressure from pulsatile air motion and the pleural fluid. Next, we derived mathematical instability criteria for our ordinary differential equation system and then translated these mathematical instabilities to physically relevant structural instabilities via the incorporation of a finite energy limiter. The introduction of novel biomechanical descriptions for collagen-elastin dynamics allowed us to demonstrate that changes in the protein structure can lead to a transition from stable to unstable domains in the material parameter space for a general lesion. This result allowed us to create a novel streamlined algorithm for detecting material instabilities in transient lung CT scan data via analyzing deformations in a local tissue boundary.

  2. The nonsinglet structure function evolution by Laplace method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroun, G. R., E-mail: grboroun@gmail.com, E-mail: boroun@razi.ac.ir; Zarrin, S. [Razi University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    We derive a general scheme for the evolution of the nonsinglet structure function at the leadingorder (LO) and next-to-leading-order (NLO) by using the Laplace-transform technique. Results for the nonsinglet structure function are compared with MSTW2008, GRV, and CKMT parameterizations and also EMC experimental data in the LO and NLO analysis. The results are in good agreement with the experimental data and other parameterizations in the low- and large-x regions.

  3. Neutron Structure Function and A=3 Mirror Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Bissey, F.; Gomez, J.; Katramatou, A. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Petratos, G. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2000-10-01

    We describe how to extract the free neutron structure function from measurements of deep-inelastic scattering from ^3He and ^3H nuclei. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of ^3He to ^3H structure functions, independent of the nuclear wave function. Such measurements will in addition determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A <= 3 nuclei. We also describe a proposed experiment to perform these measurements at Jefferson Lab.

  4. Improving Survival in Patients Treated for a Lung Cancer Using Self-Evaluated Symptoms Reported Through a Web Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Fabrice; Yossi, Senna; Septans, Anne-Lise; Charron, Alexandre; Voog, Eric; Dupuis, Olivier; Ganem, Gérard; Pointreau, Yoann; Letellier, Christophe

    2015-03-24

    We retrospectively compared survivals in patients with a lung cancer history and followed by the so-called sentinel Web-application that allows early detection of relapse and early palliative care initiation versus a conventional follow-up in our center. The survival in 98 consecutive patients with lung cancer was assessed. The first part of them (the control arm) was retrospectively recruited between March 2011 and August 2012. The second half of them (the experimental arm) was prospectively recruited between August 2012 and December 2013 to weekly fill a form of 11 self-assessed symptoms, then processed by the "sentinel" Web-application. Data were sent to this sentinel application in real-time between planned visits. An email alert was sent to the oncologist when self-scored symptoms matched some predefined criteria. Follow-up visit and imaging were then organized after a phone call for confirming the suspect symptoms. In the control arm (49 patients), a common follow-up was applied (visit and imaging every 2 to 6 mo according to stage of tumor and kind of treatment). Median follow-up duration was 12.3 months in the experimental arm and 16.7 months in the control arm (P=0.27). Survival was significantly better in the sentinel arm than in the control arm (P=0.0014). Median survival was 16.7 months in the control arm and 22.4 months in the experimental arm. One-year survival was 86.6% in the experimental arm and 59.1% in the control arm. Survival may be improved by early detection of relapse and early palliative care initiation by using sentinel-like Web-application.

  5. Studies on Lung Cancer Angiogenesis-Application of Interventional Therapy (A Report of 56 Cases)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Zhang; Jun Guo; Hailong Qian; Baoqi Shi; Jigang Zhang; Chunjing Li; Ailing Yang; Zhuang Tian

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the significance of angiogenesis of lung cancer,in order to provide a scientific basis for interventional therapy.METHODS Double.phase enhancement-scanning spiral CT and DSA were performed in 56 pathologically confirmed lung cancer cases,in order to evaluate angiogenesis of the tumors.The patients included 36 males and 20 females.with ages ranging from 33 to 76 years (average of 53).Assessments and indexes for SCT and DSA examinations were as follows:a) Peak value (PV)of the cancerous focus was the difference between the maximum CT value after enhancement and the CT value of a plain scan;b)The abnormally distorted and expanded new vessels of the cancerous focus which could be macroscopically discriminated;c) DSA staining of the focus of cancer was sparse,grid-like and dense.Chemotherapy and embolotherapy via the bronchial artery (interventional therapy) were conducted.Radiotherapy was added for some of the solid tumors with a diameter exceeding 4 cm.RESULTS a) There were 25 cases with a central-type lesion,among which 4 were small cell lung cancers (SCLC) and 21 non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC).The cases with a peripheral location accounted for 31 of the total.with a maximum diameter of 1.5 to 13.5 cm and a median of 4.2 cm,including 5 small cell lung cancers and 26 NSCLC cases.b) The reinforced PVs of the cancerous foci were as follows:The PV ranged from 45 to 70 Hu in 34 cases.25 to 45 Hu in 19,and 10 to 25 Hu in 3.Sparse DSA staining occurred in 3 cases,there was uneven grid-like staining in 22 and dense staining in 31:c) The interventional therapy via the bronchial artery was conducted twice in 5 cases with the SCLC.and three times in 4 SCLC cases.For 3 of the latter cases,a dose of 5,000 to 7,000 cGy radiation therapy was added during the interventional treatment.Complete remissions (CR) were seen in 88.9% of the cases (8/9) and partial remission (PR) in 11.1%(1/9).Interventional therapy was conducted twice in 8 cases with NSCLC and

  6. Application of the adductome approach to assess intertissue DNA damage variations in human lung and esophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaly, Robert A. [Department of Technology and Ecology, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Department of Environmental Biosciences, International Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Matsui, Saburo [Department of Technology and Ecology, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hanaoka, Tomoyuki [Epidemiology and Prevention Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Matsuda, Tomonari [Department of Technology and Ecology, Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: matsuda@z05.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-01

    Methods for determining the differential susceptibility of human organs to DNA damage have not yet been explored to any large extent due to technical constraints. The development of comprehensive analytical approaches by which to detect intertissue variations in DNA damage susceptibility may advance our understanding of the roles of DNA adducts in cancer etiology and as exposure biomarkers at least. A strategy designed for the detection and comparison of multiple DNA adducts from different tissue samples was applied to assess esophageal and peripherally- and centrally-located lung tissue DNA obtained from the same person. This adductome approach utilized LC/ESI-MS/MS analysis methods designed to detect the neutral loss of 2'-deoxyribose from positively ionized 2'-deoxynucleoside adducts transmitting the [M+H]{sup +} > [M+H-116]{sup +} transition over 374 transitions. In the final analyses, adductome maps were produced which facilitated the visualization of putative DNA adducts and their relative levels of occurrence and allowed for comprehensive comparisons between samples, including a calf thymus DNA negative control. The largest putative adducts were distributed similarly across the samples, however, differences in the relative amounts of putative adducts in lung and esophagus tissue were also revealed. The largest-occurring lung tissue DNA putative adducts were 90% similar (n = 50), while putative adducts in esophagus tissue DNA were shown to be 80 and 84% similar to central and peripheral lung tissue DNA respectively. Seven DNA adducts, N{sup 2}-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (N{sup 2}-ethyl-dG), 1,N{sup 6}-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine ({epsilon}dA), {alpha}-S- and {alpha}-R-methyl-{gamma}-hydroxy-1,N{sup 2}-propano-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N{sup 2}-PdG{sub 1}, 1,N{sup 2}-PdG{sub 2}), 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-8-hydroxy-pyrimido[1,2-a] purine-(3H)-one (8-OH-PdG) and the two stereoisomers of 3-(2'-deoxyribosyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro

  7. Small-cell lung cancer-associated autoantibodies: potential applications to cancer diagnosis, early detection, and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laird-Offringa Ite A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is the most aggressive lung cancer subtype and lacks effective early detection methods and therapies. A number of rare paraneoplastic neurologic autoimmune diseases are strongly associated with SCLC. Most patients with such paraneoplastic syndromes harbor high titers of antibodies against neuronal proteins that are abnormally expressed in SCLC tumors. These autoantibodies may cross-react with the nervous system, possibly contributing to autoimmune disease development. Importantly, similar antibodies are present in many SCLC patients without autoimmune disease, albeit at lower titers. The timing of autoantibody development relative to cancer and the nature of the immune trigger remain to be elucidated. Here we review what is currently known about SCLC-associated autoantibodies, and describe a recently developed mouse model system of SCLC that appears to lend itself well to the study of the SCLC-associated immune response. We also discuss potential clinical applications for these autoantibodies, such as SCLC diagnosis, early detection, and therapy.

  8. Application of Phase Congruency for Discriminating Some Lung Diseases Using Chest Radiograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Mohd Rijal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ and the probability of Type II Error (β. However, since 1 −  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF and β is the false positive fraction (FPF, an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor.

  9. Application of phase congruency for discriminating some lung diseases using chest radiograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijal, Omar Mohd; Ebrahimian, Hossein; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Hussin, Amran; Yunus, Ashari; Mahayiddin, Aziah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    A novel procedure using phase congruency is proposed for discriminating some lung disease using chest radiograph. Phase congruency provides information about transitions between adjacent pixels. Abrupt changes of phase congruency values between pixels may suggest a possible boundary or another feature that may be used for discrimination. This property of phase congruency may have potential for deciding between disease present and disease absent where the regions of infection on the images have no obvious shape, size, or configuration. Five texture measures calculated from phase congruency and Gabor were shown to be normally distributed. This gave good indicators of discrimination errors in the form of the probability of Type I Error (δ) and the probability of Type II Error (β). However, since 1 -  δ is the true positive fraction (TPF) and β is the false positive fraction (FPF), an ROC analysis was used to decide on the choice of texture measures. Given that features are normally distributed, for the discrimination between disease present and disease absent, energy, contrast, and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results compared to those using Gabor. Similarly, for the more difficult problem of discriminating lobar pneumonia and lung cancer, entropy and homogeneity from phase congruency gave better results relative to Gabor.

  10. Intercepts of the non-singlet structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2001-01-01

    Infrared evolution equations for small-$x$ behaviour of the non-singlet structure functions $f_1^{NS}$ and $g_1^{NS}$ are obtained and solved in the next-to-leading approximation, to all orders in $\\alpha_s$, and including running $\\alpha_s$ effects. The intercepts of these structure functions, i.e. the exponents of the power-like small-$x$ behaviour, are calculated. A detailed comparison with the leading logarithmic approximation (LLA) and DGLAP is made. We explain why the LLA predictions for the small-$x$ dependence of the structure functions may be more reliable than the prediction for the $Q^2$ dependence in the range of $Q^2$ explored at HERA.

  11. Three Kinds of Velocity Structure Function in Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wei; JIANG Nan

    2004-01-01

    Based on the local multi-scale eddy structures in turbulent flows, we elucidate the essential difference between the real turbulent field with a finite Reynolds number and the Kolmogorov fully developed random field. The motion of fluid particles in the real turbulent field is not fully random. There exist multi-scale structures due to the effect of viscosity. Actually the movements of fluid particles in the turbulent field are restricted by such eddy structures. Furthermore, concept of the locally averaged velocity structure function is put forward to describe the relative strain distortion of two adjacent turbulent eddy structures at a certain scale. The time sequence of the longitudinal velocity component at different vertical locations in turbulent boundary layer has been elaborately measured by the constant temperature anemometry of model IFA-300 in a wind tunnel. The experiment proves that the locally averaged velocity structure function is in agreement with the wavelet-coefficient structure function.

  12. Deuteron Spin Structure Functions at Small Bjorken-x

    CERN Document Server

    Edelmann, J; Weise, W

    1998-01-01

    We investigate polarized deuteron structure functions at small values of the Bjorken variable, x < 0.1. In this region contributions from the coherent interaction of diffractively excited hadronic states with both nucleons become important. A proper treatment of this process requires an extension of the Glauber-Gribov multiple scattering theory to include spin degrees of freedom. In the kinematic domain of current fixed target experiments we observe that shadowing effects in g_1^d are approximately a factor 2-3 larger than for the unpolarized structure function F_2^d. Furthermore the tensor structure function b_1 is found to be surprisingly large at x < 0.1 due to coherent double scattering contributions.

  13. Lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000066.htm Lung disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... fibrosis and sarcoidosis are examples of lung tissue disease. Lung circulation diseases -- These diseases affect the blood vessels ...

  14. Lung transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solid organ transplant - lung ... the chance that the body will reject the transplant . Lungs can also be given by living donors. ... the person who is receiving it. During lung transplant surgery, you are asleep and pain-free (under ...

  15. Collapsed Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collapsed lung happens when air enters the pleural space, the area between the lung and the chest wall. If it is a ... is called pneumothorax. If only part of the lung is affected, it is called atelectasis. Causes of ...

  16. A measurement of the photon structure function F sub 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Ishi, Y.; Miyano, K.; Miyata, H. (Niigata Univ. (Japan)); Yamagishi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Kojima, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Yasuda, T. (Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)); Kirk, P.; Lim, J.; McNeil, R.R.; Metcalf, W.; Myung, S.S. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge (USA)); Cheng, C.P.; Gu, P.; Ye, M.H.; Zhu, Y.C. (Academia Sinica, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics); Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Hu, K.P.; Lai, A.Z.; Low, E.H.; Mattson, M.E.; Piilonen, L.; Sterner, K.L. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA)); Li, Y.K.; Lusin, S.; Rosenfeld, C.; Wang, A.T.M.; Wilson, S. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia (USA)); Frautschi, M.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA)); Breedon, R.E.; Kim, G.N. (California Univ., Davis (USA) National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)); Ko, W.; Lander, R.L.; Maeshima, K.; Malchow, R.L.; Rowe, J.; Smith, J.R.; Stuart, D. (California Univ., Davis (USA)); Abe, K.; Fujii, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Kim, S.K.; AMY Collaboration

    1990-12-20

    The photon structure function F{sub 2} has been measured at average Q{sup 2} values of 73, 160 and 390 (GeV/c){sup 2}. We compare the x dependence of the Q{sup 2}=73(GeV/c){sup 2} data with thereotical expectations based on QCD. In addition we present results on the Q{sup 2} evolution of the structure function for the intermediate x range (0.3{le}x{le}0.8). The results are consistent with QCD. (orig.).

  17. Cognitive Adequacy in Structural-Functional Theories of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Christopher S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the role played by cognition in three linguistic theories which may be labelled as "structural-functional": Functional (Discourse) Grammar, Role and Reference Grammar and Systemic Functional Grammar. It argues that if we are to achieve true cognitive adequacy, we must go well beyond the grammar itself to include the processes…

  18. Twist decomposition of Drell-Yan structure functions: phenomenological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzemiński, Dawid; Motyka, Leszek; Sadzikowski, Mariusz; Stebel, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    The forward Drell-Yan process in pp scattering at the LHC at √{S} = 14 TeV is considered. We analyze the Drell-Yan structure functions assuming the dominance of a Compton-like emission of a virtual photon from a fast quark scattering off the small x gluons. The color dipole framework is applied to perform quantitatively the twist decomposition of all the Drell-Yan structure functions. Two models of the color dipole scattering are applied: the Golec-Biernat-Wüsthoff model and the dipole cross section obtained from the Balitsky-Fadin-Kuraev-Lipatov evolution equation. The two models have essentially different higher twist content and the gluon transverse momentum distribution and lead to different significant effects beyond the collinear leading twist description. It is found that the gluon transverse momentum effects are significant in the Drell-Yan structure functions for all Drell-Yan pair masses M, and the higher twist effects become important for M ≲ 10GeV. It is found that the structure function W TT related to the A 2 angular coefficient and the Lam-Tung observable A 0 - A 2 are particularly sensitive to the gluon k T effects and to the higher twist effects. A procedure is suggested how to disentangle the higher twist effects from the gluon transverse momentum effects.

  19. The Polarized Structure Function $g_{2} A Lattice Study Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Göckeler, M; Kürzinger, W; Oelrich, H; Rakow, P; Schierholz, G

    1999-01-01

    A recent lattice calculation of the spin-dependent structure function g_2 is revisited. It has been recognized that the twist-three operator, which gives rise to d_2, mixes non-perturbatively with operators of lower dimensions under renormalization. This changes the results substantially.

  20. Two-level convolution formula for nuclear structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Boqiang

    1990-05-01

    A two-level convolution formula for the nuclear structure function is derived in considering the nucleus as a composite system of baryon-mesons which are also composite systems of quark-gluons again. The results show that the European Muon Colaboration effect can not be explained by the nuclear effects as nucleon Fermi motion and nuclear binding contributions.

  1. Riparian ecosystems and buffers - multiscale structure, function, and management: introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; Richard R. Lowrance

    2006-01-01

    Given the importance of issues related to improved understanding and management of riparian ecosystems and buffers, the American Water Resources Association (AWRA) sponsored a Summer Specialty Conference in June 2004 at Olympic Valley, California, entitled 'Riparian Ecosystems and Buffers: Multiscale Structure, Function, and Management.' The primary objective...

  2. Regarding Chilcott's "Structural Functionalism as a Heuristic Device" Heuristically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blot, Richard K.

    1998-01-01

    The heuristic value of Chilcott's essay lies less in its support for structural functionalism and more in its concern to reexamine theory in the work of earlier educational anthropologists for what earlier theories and practices can add to current research. (SLD)

  3. Structure functions in rotating Rayleigh–Bénard convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunnen, R.P.J.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2011-01-01

    A combined numerical–experimental investigation on the scaling of velocity structure functions in turbulent rotating Rayleigh–B´enard convection is carried out. Direct numerical simulations in a cylindrical domain and a horizontally periodic domain are compared with experiments using a cylindrical t

  4. [Clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index for predicting survival in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W J; Kang, Y M; Zhou, L; Chen, F F; Song, Y H; Zhang, C Q

    2017-02-23

    Objective: To explore the clinical application value of prognostic nutritional index(PNI) for predicting overall survival(OS) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: 123 patients with histologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study, and their clinical and laboratory data were reviewed. The PNI was calculated as 10×serum albumin value+ 5×total lymphocyte countin peripheral blood.Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify the potential prognostic factors for advanced NSCLC. Results: PNI of the 123 NSCLC patients was 46.24±6.56. PNI was significantly associated with age, weight loss and pleural effusion (P0.05). The median OS of the 123 patients was 19.5 months. The median OS in the higher PNI group (PNI≥46.24) and lower PNI group(PNI<46.24) were 25.2 months and 16.4 months, respectively.The 1-year survival rates were 80.6% and 63.9%, and 2-year survival rates were 54.8% and 19.6%, respectively (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed that PNI, age, dyspnea, and weight loss were related to the OS of the advanced NSCLC patients (P<0.05). Multivariate analysis identified PNI as an independent prognostic factor for OS of advanced NSCLC (P<0.001). Conclusion: PNI can be easily calculated, and may be used as a relatively new prognostic indicator for advanced NSCLC in clinical practice.

  5. Application of a spring-dashpot system to clinical lung tumor motion data

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerley, E J; Wilson, P L; Berbeco, R I; Meyer, J

    2012-01-01

    A spring-dashpot system based on the Voigt model was developed to model the correlation between abdominal respiratory motion and tumor motion during lung radiotherapy. The model was applied to clinical data comprising 52 treatment beams from 10 patients, treated on the Mitsubishi Real-Time Radiation Therapy system, Sapporo, Japan. In Stage 1, model parameters were optimized for individual patients and beams to determine reference values and to investigate how well the model can describe the data. In Stage 2, for each patient the optimal parameters determined for a single beam were applied to data from other beams to investigate whether a beam-specific set of model parameters is sufficient to model tumor motion over a course of treatment. In Stage 1 the baseline root mean square (RMS) residual error for all individually-optimized beam data was 0.90 plus or minus 0.40 mm. In Stage 2, patient-specific model parameters based on a single beam were found to model the tumor position closely, even for irregular beam ...

  6. Deterministic and Stochastic Study for a Microscopic Angiogenesis Model: Applications to the Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Bodnar

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis modelling is an important tool to understand the underlying mechanisms yielding tumour growth. Nevertheless, there is usually a gap between models and experimental data. We propose a model based on the intrinsic microscopic reactions defining the angiogenesis process to link experimental data with previous macroscopic models. The microscopic characterisation can describe the macroscopic behaviour of the tumour, which stability analysis reveals a set of predicted tumour states involving different morphologies. Additionally, the microscopic description also gives a framework to study the intrinsic stochasticity of the reactive system through the resulting Langevin equation. To follow the goal of the paper, we use available experimental information on the Lewis lung carcinoma to infer meaningful parameters for the model that are able to describe the different stages of the tumour growth. Finally we explore the predictive capabilities of the fitted model by showing that fluctuations are determinant for the survival of the tumour during the first week and that available treatments can give raise to new stable tumour dormant states with a reduced vascular network.

  7. Application of Positron Emission Tomography to Aerosol Transport Research in a Model of Human Lungs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Positron Emission Tomography (PET is a convenient method for measurement of aerosol deposition in complex models of lungs. It allows not only the evaluation of regional deposition characteristics but also precisely detects deposition hot spots. The method is based on a detection of a pair of annihilation photons moving in opposite directions as a result of positron – electron interaction after the positron emission decay of a suitable radioisotope. Liquid di(2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DEHS particles tagged with fluorine-18 as a radioactive tracer were generated by condensation monodisperse aerosol generator. Aerosol deposition was measured for three different inhalation flowrates and for two sizes of particles. Combination of PET with Computed Tomography (CT in one device allowed precise localisation of particular segments of the model. The results proved correlation of deposition efficiency with Stokes number, which means that the main deposition mechanism is inertial impaction. As a next task the methodology for tagging the solid aerosol particles with radioactive tracer will be developed and deposition of porous and fiber aerosols will be measured.

  8. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenney, Joshua R. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Sato Gonzalez, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ji, Chueng-Ryong [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and the $\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $\\chi^2$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Based on the fit results, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments at Jefferson Lab on the deuteron with forward protons.

  9. Predictive Parameters of CyberKnife Fiducial-less (XSight Lung) Applicability for Treatment of Early Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahig, Houda; Campeau, Marie-Pierre; Vu, Toni; Doucet, Robert; Béliveau Nadeau, Dominic [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Fortin, Bernard [Radiation Oncology Department, Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Roberge, David; Lambert, Louise; Carrier, Jean-François [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Filion, Edith, E-mail: edith.filion.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Radiation Oncology Department, Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine which parameters allow for CyberKnife fiducial-less tumor tracking in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 133 lung SBRT patients were preselected for direct soft-tissue tracking based on manufacturer recommendations (peripherally located tumors ≥1.5 cm with a dense appearance) and staff experience. Patients underwent a tumor visualization test to verify adequate detection by the tracking system (orthogonal radiographs). An analysis of potential predictors of successful tumor tracking was conducted looking at: tumor stage, size, histology, tumor projection on the vertebral column or mediastinum, distance to the diaphragm, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, and patient body mass index. Results: Tumor visualization was satisfactory for 88 patients (66%) and unsatisfactory for 45 patients (34%). Median time to treatment start was 6 days in the success group (range, 2-18 days) and 15 days (range, 3-63 days) in the failure group. A stage T2 (P=.04), larger tumor size (volume of 15.3 cm{sup 3} vs 6.5 cm{sup 3} in success and failure group, respectively) (P<.0001), and higher tumor density (0.86 g/cm{sup 3} vs 0.79 g/cm{sup 3}) were predictive of adequate detection. There was a 63% decrease in failure risk with every 1-cm increase in maximum tumor dimension (relative risk for failure = 0.37, CI=0.23-0.60, P=.001). A diameter of 3.6 cm predicted a success probability of 80%. Histology, lung-to-soft tissue ratio, distance to diaphragm, patient's body mass index, and tumor projection on vertebral column and mediastinum were not found to be predictive of success. Conclusions: Tumor size, volume, and density were the most predictive factors of a successful XSight Lung tumor tracking. Tumors >3.5 cm have ≥80% chance of being adequately visualized and therefore should all be considered for direct tumor tracking.

  10. Application of ThinPrep Bronchial Brushing Cytology in the Early Diagnosis of Lung Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoying; Wen, Zhongmei; Li, Yang; Peng, Liping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of lung cancer patients are diagnosed at advanced stages of disease. This study evaluated the diagnostic value of ThinPrep (TP) bronchial brushing cytology in lung cancer. A total of 595 patients with suspicious lung cancer were enrolled in this study. The bronchial brushing samples were prepared by TP. The data were then compared to histology of lung tissue samples. Histologically, 479 of these 595 patients were diagnosed with lung cancer, including 223 cases of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 77 cases of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), and 152 cases of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). The TP cytology revealed a total of 460 cases of lung cancer (including 232 SCCs, 91 ADCs, and 108 SCLCs). The TP cytological technique had 87.06% sensitivity and 62.93% specificity in the diagnosis of lung cancer. Specifically, TP cytology confirmed 195 of 223 SCCs, 47 of 77 ADCs, and 94 of 152 SCLCs. The TP cytology showed 87.44% sensitivity and 90.05% specificity for the diagnosis of SCC, with a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.820; while the sensitivity was reduced to 61.04% and the specificity was 90.93% for the diagnosis of ADC, with a MCC of 0.464. For the diagnosis of SCLC, the sensitivity was 61.84% and the specificity was 96.84%, with a MCC of 0.648. Thus, this study demonstrated the usefulness of TP bronchial brushing cytology in the early diagnosis of lung cancer, especially the early stage of lung SCC. A prospective clinical trial will verify these data before being translated into the clinic. PMID:24759600

  11. Therapeutic experience of the application of anisodamine on acute lung injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Bin Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of anisodamine combining with conventional ther-apy on the degree of lung injury and inflammatory reaction of patients with acute pul-monary contusion. Methods: A total of 48 patients with acute pulmonary contusion treated in our hospital emergency department from April 2011 to October 2015 were enrolled as the research object and were divided into experimental group and control group by using a method of random number table. Experimental group received anisodamine combining with con-ventional therapy and control group received conventional therapy. In the process of the treatment, the mechanical ventilation time, hospital stays in intensive care unit and the number of cases developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes of patients in two groups were observed. Oxygenation indexes of patients were respectively calculated on Days 1, 2 and 3 after treatment. The contents of inflammatory mediators in serum were detected on Day 3 after treatment. Results: The mechanical ventilation time and hospital stays in intensive care unit [(9.52 ± 1.41) vs. (14.57 ± 2.51) days] of patients in experimental group were signifi-cantly shorter than those in control group, and the number of cases developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome [1 (4.17%) vs. 9 (37.50%)] and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome [1 (4.17%) vs. 7 (29.17%)] was significantly less than those in control group. Oxygenation indexes (294.52 ± 41.26 vs. 257.63 ± 38.52; 357.74 ± 47.74 vs. 279.87 ± 31.46; 396.71 ± 55.12 vs. 279.87 ± 31.46) of patients were respectively calculated on Days 1, 2 and 3 after treatment, which were significantly higher than those in the control group. On Day 3 after treatment, the contents of serum C-reactive protein [(7.94 ± 1.05) vs. (14.49 ± 2.97) mg/L], tumor necrosis factor a [(264.69 ± 41.58) vs. (417.87 ± 64.51) ng/L], interleukin-6 (IL-6) [(147.72 ± 21.36) vs. (257.68 ± 41.54) ng

  12. Therapeutic exper ience of the application of anisodamine on acute lung injur y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Bin Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of anisodamine combining with conventional therapy on the degree of lung injury and inflammatory reaction of patients with acute pulmonary contusion. Methods: A total of 48 patients with acute pulmonary contusion treated in our hospital emergency department from April 2011 to October 2015 were enrolled as the research object and were divided into experimental group and control group by using a method of random number table. Experimental group received anisodamine combining with conventional therapy and control group received conventional therapy. In the process of the treatment, the mechanical ventilation time, hospital stays in intensive care unit and the number of cases developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes of patients in two groups were observed. Oxygenation indexes of patients were respectively calculated on Days 1, 2 and 3 after treatment. The contents of inflammatory mediators in serum were detected on Day 3 after treatment. Results: The mechanical ventilation time and hospital stays in intensive care unit [(9.52 ± 1.41 vs. (14.57 ± 2.51 days] of patients in experimental group were signifi- cantly shorter than those in control group, and the number of cases developed into acute respiratory distress syndrome [1 (4.17% vs. 9 (37.50%] and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome [1 (4.17% vs. 7 (29.17%] was significantly less than those in control group. Oxygenation indexes (294.52 ± 41.26 vs. 257.63 ± 38.52; 357.74 ± 47.74 vs. 279.87 ± 31.46; 396.71 ± 55.12 vs. 279.87 ± 31.46 of patients were respectively calculated on Days 1, 2 and 3 after treatment, which were significantly higher than those in the control group. On Day 3 after treatment, the contents of serum C-reactive protein [(7.94 ± 1.05 vs. (14.49 ± 2.97 mg/L], tumor necrosis factor a [(264.69 ± 41.58 vs. (417.87 ± 64.51 ng/L], interleukin-6 (IL-6 [(147.72 ± 21.36 vs. (257.68 ± 41

  13. Transport and flow characteristics of an oscillating cylindrical fiber for total artificial lung application

    KAUST Repository

    Qamar, Adnan

    2017-06-28

    Mass transport and fluid dynamics characteristics in the vicinity of an oscillating cylindrical fiber with an imposed pulsatile inflow condition are computationally investigated in the present study. The work is motivated by a recently proposed design modification to the Total Artificial Lung (TAL) device, which is expected to provide better gas exchange. Navier–Stokes computations, coupled with convection–diffusion equation are performed to assess flow dynamics and mass transport behavior around the oscillating fiber. The oscillations and the pulsatile free stream velocity are represented by two sinusoidal functions. The resulting non-dimensional parameters are Keulegan–Carpenter number (KC), Schmidt number (Sc), Reynolds number (Re), pulsatile inflow amplitude (), and amplitude of cylinder oscillation (). Results are computed for , Sc = 1000, Re = 5 and 10, and 0.7 and 0.25 5.25. The pulsatile inflow parameters correspond to the flow velocities found in human pulmonary artery while matching the operating TAL Reynolds number. Mass transport from the surface of the cylinder to the bulk fluid is found to be primarily dependent on the size of surface vortices created by the movement of the cylinder. Time-averaged surface Sherwood number (Sh) is dependent on the amplitude and KC of cylinder oscillation. Compared to the fixed cylinder case, a significant gain up to 380% in Sh is achieved by oscillating the cylinder even at the small displacement amplitude (AD = 0.75D). Moreover, with decrease in KC the oscillating cylinder exhibits a lower drag amplitude compared with the fixed cylinder case. Inflow pulsation amplitude has minor effects on the mass transport characteristics. However, an increase in results in an increase in the amplitude of the periodic drag force on the cylinder. This rise in the drag amplitude is similar to that measured for the fixed cylinder case. Quantifications of shear stress distribution in the bulk fluid suggest that the physiological

  14. Applicability of rat precision-cut lung slices in evaluating nanomaterial cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, Ursula G. [Scientific Consultancy — Animal Welfare, Neubiberg (Germany); Vogel, Sandra [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Product Stewardship Water Solutions, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Aumann, Alexandra; Hess, Annemarie; Kolle, Susanne N.; Ma-Hock, Lan [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wohlleben, Wendel [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Material Physics, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Dammann, Martina; Strauss, Volker; Treumann, Silke; Gröters, Sibylle [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Wiench, Karin [Product Safety, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Ravenzwaay, Bennard van [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Landsiedel, Robert, E-mail: robert.landsiedel@basf.com [Experimental Toxicology and Ecology, BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    The applicability of rat precision-cut lung slices (PCLuS) in detecting nanomaterial (NM) toxicity to the respiratory tract was investigated evaluating sixteen OECD reference NMs (TiO{sub 2}, ZnO, CeO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, Ag, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)). Upon 24-hour test substance exposure, the PCLuS system was able to detect early events of NM toxicity: total protein, reduction in mitochondrial activity, caspase-3/-7 activation, glutathione depletion/increase, cytokine induction, and histopathological evaluation. Ion shedding NMS (ZnO and Ag) induced severe tissue destruction detected by the loss of total protein. Two anatase TiO{sub 2} NMs, CeO{sub 2} NMs, and two MWCNT caused significant (determined by trend analysis) cytotoxicity in the WST-1 assay. At non-cytotoxic concentrations, different TiO{sub 2} NMs and one MWCNT increased GSH levels, presumably a defense response to reactive oxygen species, and these substances further induced a variety of cytokines. One of the SiO{sub 2} NMs increased caspase-3/-7 activities at non-cytotoxic levels, and one rutile TiO{sub 2} only induced cytokines. Investigating these effects is, however, not sufficient to predict apical effects found in vivo. Reproducibility of test substance measurements was not fully satisfactory, especially in the GSH and cytokine assays. Effects were frequently observed in negative controls pointing to tissue slice vulnerability even though prepared and handled with utmost care. Comparisons of the effects observed in the PCLuS to in vivo effects reveal some concordances for the metal oxide NMs, but less so for the MWCNT. The highest effective dosages, however, exceeded those reported for rat short-term inhalation studies. To become applicable for NM testing, the PCLuS system requires test protocol optimization. - Highlights: • 16 OECD reference nanomaterials were tested in rat precision-cut lung slices. • Nanomaterial cytotoxicity, apoptose, oxidative stress, and inflammation were

  15. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D. [IRSN/DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Dudoignon, N. [IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPAT, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E. [CEA/DSV/DRR/SRCA/LRT BP no 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Bottlaender, M. [CEA/SHFJ, 4, place du General Leclerc F-91400 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  16. Structure functions for the three-nucleon system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissey, F.; Thomas, A. W.; Afnan, I. R.

    2001-08-01

    The spectral functions and light-cone momentum distributions of protons and neutrons in 3He and 3H are given in terms of the three-nucleon wave function for realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions. To reduce computational complexity, separable expansions are employed for the nucleon-nucleon potentials. The results for the light-cone momentum distributions suggest that they are not very sensitive to the details of the two-body interaction, as long as it has reasonable short-range repulsion. The unpolarized and polarized structure functions are examined for both 3He and 3H in order to test the usefulness of 3He as a neutron target. It is found that the measurement of the spin structure function of polarized 3H would provide a very clear test of the predicted change in the polarized parton distributions of a bound proton.

  17. Nuclear structure functions in carbon near x=1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, A.C.; Bollini, D.; Camporesi, T.; Monari, L.; Navarria, F.L. (Dipt. di Fisica, Univ. Bologna (Italy) INFN, Sezione di Bologna (Italy)); Argento, A.; Cvach, J.; Lohmann, W.; Piemontese, L. (CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)); Genchev, V.I.; Hladky, J.; Golutvin, I.A.; Kiryushin, Yu.T.; Kiselev, V.S.; Krivokhizhin, V.G.; Kukhtin, V.V.; Nemecek, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Reimer, P.; Savin, I.A.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sultanov, S.; Volodko, A.G.; Zacek, J. (Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)); Jamnik, D.; Kopp, R.; Meyer-Berkhout, U.; Staude, A.; Teichert, K.M.; Tirler, R.; Voss, R.; Zupancic, C. (Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen (Germany)); Feltesse, J.; Misztajn, A.; Ouraou, A.; Rich-Hennion, P.; Sacquin, Y.; Smadja, G.; Verrecchia, P.; Virchaux, M. (DAPNIA-SPP, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)); BCDMS Collaboration

    1994-07-01

    Data from deep inelastic scattering of 200 GeV muons on a carbon target with squared four-momentum transfer 52 GeV[sup 2][<=]Q[sup 2][<=]200 GeV[sup 2] were analysed in the region of the Bjorken variable close to x=1, which is the kinematic limit for scattering on a free nucleon. At this value of x, the carbon structure function is found to be F[sub 2][sup C][approx]1.2.10[sup -4]. The x dependence of the structure function for x>0.8 is well described by an exponential F[sub 2][sup C][proportional to]exp(-sx) with s=16.5[+-]0.6. (orig.)

  18. A-dependence of weak nuclear structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haider, H.; Athar, M. Sajjad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Simo, I. Ruiz [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá degli studi di Trento Via Sommarive 14, Povo (Trento) I-38123 (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Effect of nuclear medium on the weak structure functions F{sub 2}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}{sup A}(x, Q{sup 2}) have been studied using charged current (anti)neutrino deep inelastic scattering on various nuclear targets. Relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations are used for the calculations. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions calculated from a microscopic model for meson-nucleus self-energies. Using these structure functions, F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup proton} and F{sub i}{sup A}/F{sub i}{sup deuteron}(i=2,3, A={sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, CH and H{sub 2}O) are obtained.

  19. R-ratios and moments of nuclear structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Rinat, A S

    2000-01-01

    We study implications of a model, which links nuclear and nucleon structure functions. Computed Callen-Gross functions $\\kappa^A(x,Q^2)= 2xF_1^A(x,Q^2)/F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ appear for finite $Q^2$ to be close to their asymptotic value 1. Using those $\\kappa$, we compure $R$ ratios for $Q^2\\ge 5 GeV^2$. We review approximate methods in use for the extraction of $R$ from inclusive scattering and ENC data. Further we calcuate ratios of the moments of $F_k$ and find these to describe the data, in particular their $Q^2$ dependence. The above observables, as well as inclusive cross sections, are sensitive tests for the underlying relation between nucleonic and nuclear structure functions. In view of the overall agreement, we speculate that the above relation effectively circumvents a QCD calculation.

  20. Structure Function Sum rules for Systems with Large Scattering Lengths

    CERN Document Server

    Goldberger, Walter D

    2010-01-01

    We use a dispersion relation in conjunction with the operator product expansion (OPE) to derive model independent sum rules for the dynamic structure functions of systems with large scattering lengths. We present an explicit sum rule for the structure functions that control the density and spin response of the many-body ground state. Our methods are general, and apply to either fermions or bosons which interact through two-body contact interactions with large scattering lengths. By employing a Borel transform of the OPE, the relevant integrals are weighted towards infrared frequencies, thus allowing for greater overlap low energy data. Similar sum rules can be derived for other response functions. The sum rules can be used to extract the contact parameter introduced by Tan, including universality violating corrections at finite scattering lengths.

  1. Structure-function relations of carbohydrates by neoglycolipid arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gang-Liang; Huang, Hua-Liang; Zhang, Hou-Cheng; Wang, Peng-George

    2006-06-01

    The work presented herein is a new noncovalent glycoarray assembly method for microplates created by simply mixing together a carbohydrate and a tetradecylamine. alpha-D-Mannopyranoside, alpha-D-glucopyranoside, and alpha-D-galactopyranoside were utilized in model studies and product formations were detected by lectin binding. The method can be extended to study the steric hindrance effect of carbohydrate-protein interactions, namely the structure-function relations of carbohydrates.

  2. Determination of the pion and kaon structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aitkenhead, W.; Barton, D.S.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Busza, W.; Dobrowolski, T.; Friedman, J.I.; Kendall, H.W.; Lyons, T.; Nelson, B.; Rosenson, L.; Toy, W.; Verdier, R.; Votta, L.; Chiaradia, M.T.; DeMarzo, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Germinario, G.; Guerriero, L.; LaVopa, P.; Maggi, G.; Posa, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Spinelli, P.; Waldner, F.; Brenner, A.E.; Carey, D.C.; Elias, J.E.; Garbincius, P.H.; Mikenberg, G.; Polychronakos, V.A.; Meunier, R.; Cutts, D.; Dulude, R.S.; Lanou, R.E. Jr.; Massimo, J.T.

    1980-07-21

    Quark structure functions have been extracted from low-p/sub T/ inclusive hadron production data for the pion and kaon with use of the recombination model. n/sup ..pi../=1.0 +- 0.1 and n/sup K/=2.5 +- 0.6 is obtained, where n is the leading (1-x) power of the nonstrange--valence-quark distribution. Both the pion and kaon nonstrange--sea-quark functions have napprox. =3.5.

  3. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    The major body of this work investigates how the chemical structure of conjugated polymers relates to the fundamental operating mechanism of organic photovoltaic devices. New conjugated polymers were characterized and their optical and electronic properties tested and correlated with their power conversion efficiencies as the active layer in polymer solar cells. From these experiments general structure/function relationships are drawn with an eye toward developing universal guidelines for con...

  4. EM vs Weak Structure Functions in DIS processes

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Simo, I Ruiz; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We obatin the ratio $F_i^A/F_i^{D}$(i=2,3, A=Be, C, Fe, Pb; D=Deuteron) in the case of weak and electromagnetic nuclear structure functions. For this, relativistic nuclear spectral function which incorporate the effects of Fermi motion, binding and nucleon correlations is used. We also consider the pion and rho meson cloud contributions and shadowing and antishadowing effects.

  5. In Medium Nucleon Structure Functions, SRC, and the EMC effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hen, O; Gilad, S; Wood, S A

    2014-01-01

    A proposal approved by the Jefferson Lab PAC to study semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) off the deuteron, tagged with high momentum recoiling protons or neutrons emitted at large angle relative to the momentum transfer. This experiment aims at studying the virtuality dependence of the bound nucleon structure function as a possible cause to the EMC effect and the EMC-SRC correlations. The experiment was approved in 2011 for a total run time of 40 days.

  6. Neutron structure function and /A=3 mirror nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Bissey, F.; Gomez, J.; Katramatou, A. T.; Melnitchouk, W.; Petratos, G. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2000-11-01

    We investigate deep inelastic scattering from 3He and 3H within a conventional convolution treatment of binding and Fermi motion effects. Using realistic Faddeev wave functions together with a nucleon spectral function, we demonstrate that the free neutron structure function can be extracted in deep-inelastic scattering from /A=3 mirror nuclei, with nuclear effects canceling to within 2% for /x<~0.85.

  7. Proton Spin Structure Functions and Quark-Hadron Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing

    2006-01-01

    @@ Quark-hadron duality of three proton spin structure functions g1, g2 and gT are discussed simultaneously. It is found that the onsets of the quark-hadron dualities of g1p, g2p and g3p are similar and they are expected to be at about Q2 ~ 2 GeV2. In addition, our results show that the elastic peak remarkably breaks local quark-hadron duality.

  8. Spin Structure Functions in a Covariant Spectator Quark Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ramalho, Franz Gross and M. T. Peña

    2010-12-01

    We apply the covariant spectator quark–diquark model, already probed in the description of the nucleon elastic form factors, to the calculation of the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) spin-independent and spin-dependent structure functions of the nucleon. The nucleon wave function is given by a combination of quark–diquark orbital states, corresponding to S, D and P-waves. A simple form for the quark distribution function associated to the P and D waves is tested.

  9. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  10. Twist decomposition of Drell-Yan structure functions: phenomenological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Brzeminski, Dawid; Sadzikowski, Mariusz; Stebel, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The forward Drell--Yan process in $pp$ scattering at the LHC at $\\sqrt{S}=14$ TeV is considered. We analyze the Drell--Yan structure functions assuming the dominance of a Compton-like emission of a virtual photon from a fast quark scattering off the small $x$ gluons. The color dipole framework is applied to perform quantitatively the twist decomposition of all the Drell--Yan structure functions. Two models of the color dipole scattering are applied: the Golec-Biernat--W\\"{u}sthoff model and the dipole cross section obtained from the Balitsky--Fadin--Kuraev--Lipatov evolution equation. The two models have essentially different higher twist content and the gluon transverse momentum distribution and lead to different significant effects beyond the collinear leading twist description. It is found that the gluon transverse momentum effects are significant in the Drell--Yan structure functions for all Drell--Yan pair masses $M$, and the higher twist effects become important for $M \\lesssim 10$ GeV. It is found that...

  11. Nucleon structure functions in noncommutative space-time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, A.; Rezaei, Z.; Mirjalili, A. [Yazd University, Physics Department, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In the context of noncommutative space-time we investigate the nucleon structure functions which play an important role in identifying the internal structure of nucleons. We use the corrected vertices and employ new vertices that appear in two approaches of noncommutativity and calculate the proton structure functions in terms of the noncommutative tensor θ{sub μν}. To check our results we plot the nucleon structure function (NSF), F{sub 2}(x), and compare it with experimental data and the results from the GRV, GJR and CT10 parametrization models. We show that with the new vertex that arises the noncommutativity correction will lead to a better consistency between theoretical results and experimental data for the NSF. This consistency will be better for small values of the Bjorken variable x. To indicate and confirm the validity of our calculations we also act conversely. We obtain a lower bound for the numerical values of Λ{sub NC} scale which correspond to recent reports. (orig.)

  12. Detailed Measurements of Structure Functions from Nucleons and Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment will study deep inelastic muon nucleon scattering in a wide range of Q|2~(1-200 (GeV/c)|2) and x~(0.005-0.75). The main aims of the experiment are: \\item a)~~~~Detailed measurements of the nuclear dependence of the structure function F^2|A, of R~=~@s^L/@s^T and of the cross-section for J/@y production. They will provide a basis for the understanding of the EMC effect: the modification of quark and gluon distributions due to the nuclear environment. \\item b)~~~~A simultaneous high luminosity measurement of the structure function F^2 on hydrogen and deuterium. This will provide substantially improved accuracy in the knowledge of the neutron structure function F^2|n, of F^2|p-F^2|n and F^2|n/F^2|p and their Q|2 dependence. Furthermore, the data will allow a determination of the strong coupling constant @a^s(Q|2) with reduced experimental and theoretical uncertainties as well as of the ratio of the down to up quark distributions in the valence region. Due to the large x range covered by the experim...

  13. Structure-function clustering in multiplex brain networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofts, J. J.; Forrester, M.; O'Dea, R. D.

    2016-10-01

    A key question in neuroscience is to understand how a rich functional repertoire of brain activity arises within relatively static networks of structurally connected neural populations: elucidating the subtle interactions between evoked “functional connectivity” and the underlying “structural connectivity” has the potential to address this. These structural-functional networks (and neural networks more generally) are more naturally described using a multilayer or multiplex network approach, in favour of standard single-layer network analyses that are more typically applied to such systems. In this letter, we address such issues by exploring important structure-function relations in the Macaque cortical network by modelling it as a duplex network that comprises an anatomical layer, describing the known (macro-scale) network topology of the Macaque monkey, and a functional layer derived from simulated neural activity. We investigate and characterize correlations between structural and functional layers, as system parameters controlling simulated neural activity are varied, by employing recently described multiplex network measures. Moreover, we propose a novel measure of multiplex structure-function clustering which allows us to investigate the emergence of functional connections that are distinct from the underlying cortical structure, and to highlight the dependence of multiplex structure on the neural dynamical regime.

  14. Measurement of inclusive spin structure functions of the deuteron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, J.; Kuhn, S. E.; Dodge, G. E.; Forest, T. A.; Taiuti, M.; Adams, G. S.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anciant, E.; Anghinolfi, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Asryan, G.; Audit, G.; Auger, T.; Avakian, H.; Barrow, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beard, K.; Bektasoglu, M.; Bertozzi, W.; Bianchi, N.; Biselli, A. S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bosted, P.; Bouchigny, S.; Bradford, R.; Branford, D.; Brooks, W. K.; Bueltmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Butuceanu, C.; Calarco, J. R.; Carman, D. S.; Carnahan, B.; Cetina, C.; Ciciani, L.; Cole, P. L.; Coleman, A.; Connelly, J.; Cords, D.; Corvisiero, P.; Crabb, D.; Crannell, H.; Cummings, J.; Sanctis, E. De; Vita, R. De; Degtyarenko, P. V.; Demirchyan, R. A.; Denizli, H.; Dennis, L. C.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Djalali, C.; Domingo, J.; Doughty, D.; Dragovitsch, P.; Dugger, M.; Dytman, S.; Eckhause, M.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egiyan, H.; Egiyan, K. S.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Empl, A.; Farhi, L.; Fatemi, R.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Ficenec, J.; Fissum, K.; Freyberger, A.; Frolov, V.; Funsten, H.; Gaff, S. J.; Gai, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gavrilov, V. B.; Gilad, S.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girard, P.; Golovatch, E.; Gordon, C. I.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guillo, M.; Guo, L.; Gyurjyan, V.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hancock, D.; Hardie, J.; Heddle, D.; Heimberg, P.; Hersman, F. W.; Hicks, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holtrop, M.; Hu, J.; Hyde-Wright, C. E.; Ito, M. M.; Jenkins, D.; Joo, K.; Keith, C.; Kelley, J. H.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, K.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Klimenko, A. V.; Klusman, M.; Kossov, M.; Kramer, L. H.; Kuang, Y.; Kuhn, J.; Lachniet, J.; Laget, J. M.; Lawrence, D.; Leksin, G. A.; Loukachine, K.; Major, R. W.; Manak, J. J.; Marchand, C.; McAleer, S.; McNabb, J. W.; McCarthy, J.; Mecking, B. A.; Mestayer, M. D.; Meyer, C. A.; Minehart, R.; Mirazita, M.; Miskimen, R.; Mokeev, V.; Morrow, S.; Muccifora, V.; Mueller, J.; Murphy, L. Y.; Mutchler, G. S.; Napolitano, J.; Nelson, S. O.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niczyporuk, B.; Niyazov, R. A.; Nozar, M.; O'Rielly, G. V.; Ohandjanyan, M. S.; Opper, A.; Ossipenko, M.; Park, K.; Patois, Y.; Peterson, G. A.; Philips, S.; Pivnyuk, N.; Pocanic, D.; Pogorelko, O.; Polli, E.; Preedom, B. M.; Price, J. W.; Protopopescu, D.; Qin, L. M.; Raue, B. A.; Riccardi, G.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rock, S.; Ronchetti, F.; Rossi, P.; Rowntree, D.; Rubin, P. D.; Sabourov, K.; Salgado, C. W.; Sapunenko, V.; Sargsyan, M.; Schumacher, R. A.; Serov, V. S.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Shaw, J.; Shuvalov, S. M.; Simionatto, S.; Skabelin, A.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, L. C.; Smith, T.; Sober, D. I.; Sorrell, L.; Spraker, M.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Taylor, S.; Tedeschi, D.; Thoma, U.; Thompson, R.; Todor, L.; Tung, T. Y.; Tur, C.; Vineyard, M. F.; Vlassov, A.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weller, H.; Welsh, R.; Weygand, D. P.; Whisnant, S.; Witkowski, M.; Wolin, E.; Wood, M. H.; Yegneswaran, A.; Zhang, B.; Zhao, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2003-05-01

    We report the results of a new measurement of spin structure functions of the deuteron in the region of moderate momentum transfer [Q2=0.27 1.3 (GeV/c)2] and final hadronic state mass in the nucleon resonance region (W=1.08 2.0 GeV). We scattered a 2.5 GeV polarized continuous electron beam at Jefferson Lab off a dynamically polarized cryogenic solid state target (15ND3) and detected the scattered electrons with the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer. From our data, we extract the longitudinal double spin asymmetry A|| and the spin structure function gd1. Our data are generally in reasonable agreement with existing data from SLAC where they overlap, and they represent a substantial improvement in statistical precision. We compare our results with expectations for resonance asymmetries and extrapolated deep inelastic scaling results. Finally, we evaluate the first moment of the structure function gd1 and study its approach to both the deep inelastic limit at large Q2 and to the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule at the real photon limit (Q2→0). We find that the first moment varies rapidly in the Q2 range of our experiment and crosses zero at Q2 between 0.5 and 0.8 (GeV/c)2, indicating the importance of the Δ resonance at these momentum transfers.

  15. Application of Tumor Markers in the Diagnosis of Lung Cancer%肿瘤标志物在肺癌辅助诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩宾

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lung cancer tumor markers in lung cancer diagnosis and assessment of recurrence, surgery has a higher value,.This study of 5 kinds of serum tumor markers in diagnosis of lung cancer application, including the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) and cancer Antigen 125 (CA125) and Cytokeratin 19 fragment () and squamous cell carcinoma Antigen (SCC);Methods 120 cases of patients with lung cancer, 80 healthy and Sera of 98 patients with benign disease.Above 5 kinds of markers are made of Elisa experiments (ELISA) testing. Results 5 kinds of serum tumor markers in patients with lung cancer are significantly higher than the non-tumor group and healthy groups and benign disease group, a statistically significant difference ( <0.01). NSE in small cell lung cancer, CYFRA21-1 and squamous cell carcinoma Antigen (SCC) Squamous cell carcinomas were significantly higher than those in other types of lung cancer ( <0.01);Detection sensitivity of NSE for small cell lung cancer was significantly higher than other types of lung cancer ( <0.01);More than 5 kinds of serum tumor markers combination, sensitivity was significantly higher than any single cancer markers ( <0.01).Conclusion 5 kinds of serum tumor markers for lung cancer diagnosis has clinical significance. NSE can be used as a marker for detection of small cell lung cancer;CEA +CYFRA21-1+SCC can be used to inspect non-small cell lung cancer with combination of markers. CYFRA21-1+SCC can be used to inspect combinations of markers in lung squamous cell carcinoma.%目的:肺癌肿瘤标志物在肺癌诊断、复发、手术评估方面均有较高价值,本研究探讨5种血清肿瘤标志物神经原特异性烯醇化酶(NSE)、癌胚抗原(CEA)、癌抗原125(CA125)、细胞角蛋白19片段(CYFRA21-1)和鳞状细胞癌抗原(SCC)在肺癌辅助诊断中的应用价值,及敏感性和特异性最高的肿瘤标志物组合。方法收集120例肺癌患者,80例健康人和98例肺

  16. Co-creation of an ICT-supported cancer rehabilitation application for resected lung cancer survivors: design and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Josien G.; Tönis, Thijs M.; Dekker-van Weering, Marit G.H.; Stuiver, Martijn M.; Wouters, Michel W.J.M.; Harten, van Wim H.; Hermens, Hermie J.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer (LC) patients experience high symptom burden and significant decline of physical fitness and quality of life following lung resection. Good quality of survivorship care post-surgery is essential to optimize recovery and prevent unscheduled healthcare use. The use of Informati

  17. [Current status and new applications of sentinel lymph node mapping in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Jun-Ichi

    2009-03-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping has become a common procedure in the treatment of breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Its primary benefit is that it enables surgeons to avoid nontherapeutic lymph node dissection and the complications that may follow. All present evidence demonstrates the existence of SLNs in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, SLN mapping is not widely used in the treatment of NSCLC for several reasons: first, special precautions are required to minimize exposure to radioisotopes; second, it is difficult to detect a dye within anthoracotic thoracic lymph nodes; and third, major complications comparable to the arm edema seen in breast cancer or the lymphedema and nerve injury seen in melanoma are not seen with mediastinal lymph node dissection. However, if the SLN mapping procedure were simplified, it could be used to avoid nontherapeutic mediastinal lymph node dissection in NSCLC. Recently, new applications of SLN mapping have been reported, such as the detection of lymph node micrometastases and segmentectomy for NSCLC. We expect SLN mapping to become a common clinical practice in the treatment of NSCLC in the near future

  18. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  19. Establishment and application of a multiplex genetic mutation-detection method of lung cancer based on MassARRAY platform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Tian; Xu-Chao Zhang; Zhen Wang; Jian-Guang Chen; Shi-Liang Chen; Wei-Bang Guo; Yi-Long Wu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:This study aims to establish a method for highly parallel multiplexed detection of genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer samples through Agena iPLEX chemistry and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight analysis on MassARRAY mass spectrometry platform. Methods:We reviewed the related literature and data on lung cancer treatments. We also identified 99 mutation hot spots in 13 target genes closely related to the pathogenesis, drug resistance, and metastasis of lung cancer. A total of 297 primers, composed of 99 paired forward and reverse amplification primers and 99 matched extension primers, were designed using Assay Design software. The detection method was established by analyzing eight cell lines and six lung cancer specimens. The proposed method was then validated through comparisons by using a LungCartaTM kit. The sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method were evaluated by directly sequencingEGFR andKRAS genes in 100 lung cancer cases. Results:The proposed method was able to detect multiplex genetic mutations in lung cancer cell lines. This finding was consistent with the observations on previously reported mutations. The proposed method can also detect such mutations in clinical lung cancer specimens. This result was consistent with the observations with LungCartaTM kit. However, anFGFR2 mutation was detected only through the proposed method. The measured sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 96.3%, respectively. Conclusions:The proposed MassARRAY technology-based multiplex method can detect genetic mutations in Chinese lung cancer patients. Therefore, the proposed method can be applied to detect mutations in other cancer tissues.

  20. Computational modeling of the obstructive lung diseases asthma and COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrowes, Kelly Suzanne; Doel, Tom; Brightling, Chris

    2014-11-28

    -of-the-art in techniques developed for pulmonary image analysis, development of structural models of therespiratory system and predictions of function within these models. We discuss application of modeling techniques to obstructive lung diseases, namely asthma and emphysema and the use of models to predict response to therapy. Finally we introduce a large European project, AirPROM that is developing multiscale models toinvestigate structure-function relationships in asthma and COPD.

  1. Flooded Lung Generates a Suitable Acoustic Pathway for Transthoracic Application of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Thomas Günther; Boltze, Carsten; Schubert, Harald; Wolfram, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has gained increasing clinical interest as a non-invasive method for local therapy of liver malignancies. HIFU treatment of tumours and metastases in the liver dome is limited due to the adjacent ultrasound blocking lung. One-lung flooding (OLF) enables complete sonography of lung and adjoining organs including liver. HIFU liver ablation passing through the flooded lung could enable a direct intercostal beam path and thus improve dose deposition in liver. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of an ultrasound guided transthoracic, transpulmonary HIFU ablation of liver using OLF. Methods: After right-side lung flooding, ultrasound guided HIFU was applied transthoracic- transpulmonary into liver to create thermal lesions in three pigs. The HIFU beam was targeted five times into liver, two times at the liver surface and three times deeper into the tissue. During autopsy examinations of lung, diaphragm and liver located in the HIFU path were performed. The focal liver lesions and lung tissue out of the beam path were examined histologically. Results: Fifteen thermal liver lesions were generated by transpulmonary HIFU sonication in all targeted regions. The lesions appeared well-demarcated in grey color with a cigar-shaped configuration. The mean length and width of the superficial and deeper lesions were 15.8 mm (range: 13-18 mm) and 5.8 mm (range: 5-7 mm), and 10.9 mm (range: 9-13 mm) and 3.3 mm (range: 2-5 mm), respectively. Histopathological, all liver lesions revealed a homogeneous thermal necrosis lacking vitality. There were no signs of damage of the overlying diaphragm and lung tissue. Conclusions: Flooded lung is a suitable pathway for applying HIFU to the liver, thus enabling a transthoracic, transpulmonary approach. The enlarged acoustic window could enhance the ablation speed for targets in the hepatic dome. PMID:27766022

  2. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pneumonectomy; Lobectomy; Lung biopsy; Thoracoscopy; Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery; VATS ... You will have general anesthesia before surgery. You will be asleep and unable to feel pain. Two common ways to do surgery on your lungs are thoracotomy and video- ...

  3. The polarized structure function of the nucleons with a non-extensive statistical quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    We studied an application of nonextensive thermodynamics to describe the polarized structure function of nucleon, in a model where the usual Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein energy distribution, often used in the statistical models, were replaced by the equivalent functions of the q-statistical. The parameters of the model are given by an effective temperature T, the q parameter (from Tsallis statistics), and the chemical potentials given by the corresponding up (u) and down (d) quark normalization in the nucleon and by Δu and Δd of the polarized functions.

  4. A Determination of the Neutron Spin Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Emlyn W

    2003-08-18

    The authors report the results of the experiment E142 which measured the spin dependent structure function of the neutron, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, Q{sup 2}). The experiment was carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by measuring an asymmetry in the deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target, at electron energies from 19 to 26 GeV. The structure function was determined over the kinematic range 0.03 < BJorken x < 0.6 and 1.0 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. An evaluation of the integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x,Q{sup 2})dx at fixed Q{sup 2} = 2 (GeV/c){sup 2} yields the final result {Lambda}{sub 1}{sup n} = -0.032 {+-} 0.006 (stat.) {+-} 0.009 (syst.). This result, when combined with the integral of the proton spin structure function measured in other experiments, confirms the fundamental Bjorken sum rule with O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) corrections to within one standard deviation. This is a major success for perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. Some ancillary results include the findings that the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the neutron is violated at the 2 {sigma} level, and that the total contribution of the quarks to the helicity of the nucleon is 0.36 {+-} 0.10. The strange sea polarization is estimated to be small and negative, {Delta}s = -0.07 {+-} 0.04.

  5. Nucleon effective mass and the A dependence of structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Canal, C.A.; Santangelo, E.M.; Vucetich, H.

    1984-10-08

    The nucleon effective mass was successfully used, as the only free parameter, to adjust the ratio R(A) of structure functions measured in a nucleus of mass number A and in the deuteron, for each A value in the SLAC set of experimental data. The resulting A dependence of the effective mass, being linear in A/sup -1/3/, is consistent with the behavior expected from nuclear structure considerations. The extrapolated value of the effective mass for nuclear matter agrees with previous estimations.

  6. Proceedings Fourth Workshop on Mathematically Structured Functional Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, James; 10.4204/EPTCS.76

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the Fourth Workshop on Mathematically Structured Functional Programming (MSFP 2012), taking place on 25 March, 2012 in Tallinn, Estonia, as a satellite event of the European Joint Conferences on Theory and Practice of Software, ETAPS 2012. MSFP is devoted to the derivation of functionality from structure. It highlights concepts from algebra, semantics and type theory as they are increasingly reflected in programming practice, especially functional programming. The workshop consists of two invited presentations and eight contributed papers on a range of topics at that interface.

  7. The deuteron structure function F2 with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Osipenko; G. Ricco; S. Simula; M. Battaglieri; M. Ripani

    2005-07-01

    The inclusive, inelastic eD scattering cross section has been measured with the CLAS detector in Hall B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). Combining these data and previously measured world data we have extracted Nachtmann moments of the deuteron structure function F2 in the region 0.4 < Q2 < 100 GeV2/c2. These results are published in hep-ex/0506004. The purpose of the present CLAS-Note is to tabulate the CLAS deuteron F2 data. A description of the data analysis is reported in hep-ex/0506004.

  8. Experimental investigation of Lagrangian structure functions in turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Ott, Søren; Mann, Jakob

    2009-01-01

    Lagrangian properties obtained from a particle tracking velocimetry experiment in a turbulent flow at intermediate Reynolds number are presented. Accurate sampling of particle trajectories is essential in order to obtain the Lagrangian structure functions and to measure intermittency at small...... temporal scales. The finiteness of the measurement volume can bias the results significantly. We present a robust way to overcome this obstacle. Despite no fully developed inertial range, we observe strong intermittency at the scale of dissipation. The multifractal model is only partially able to reproduce...

  9. The deuteron structure function F2 with CLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Simula, S; Battaglieri, M; Ripani, M; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Asryan, G; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Beard, K; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Golovatch, E; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Huertas, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kühn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Lee, T; Li, J; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Müller, J; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nefedov, G; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Shaw, J; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Suleiman, R; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zana, L; Zhang, J

    2005-01-01

    The inclusive, inelastic eD scattering cross section has been measured with the CLAS detector in Hall B of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF). Combining these data and previously measured world data we have extracted Nachtmann moments of the deuteron structure function F2 in the region 0.4 < Q2 < 100 GeV2/c2. These results are published in hep-ex/0506004. The purpose of the present CLAS-Note is to tabulate the CLAS deuteron F2 data. A description of the data analysis is reported in hep-ex/0506004.

  10. Nuclear medium modification of the F2 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function $F_{2}(x, Q^2)$ in nuclei in the deep inelastic lepton nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. The ratios $R_{F2}^A(x,Q^2)=\\frac{2F_2^A(x,Q^2)}{AF_{2}^{Deut}(x,Q^2)}$ are obtained and compared with the recent JLAB results for light nuclei that show a non trivial A dependence.

  11. Nuclear effects in F_3 structure function of nucleon

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2007-01-01

    We study nuclear effects in the $F^A_3(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral functions in the nucleus. The results for the ratio $R(x,Q^2)=\\frac{F^A_3(x,Q^2)}{AF^N_3(x, Q^2)}$ and the Gross-Llewellyn Smith(GLS) integral $G(x,Q^2)=\\int_x^1 dx F^A_3(x,Q^2)$ in nuclei are discussed and compared with the recent results available in literature from theoretical and phenomenological analyses of experimental data.

  12. Structure-Function-Property-Design Interplay in Biopolymers: Spider Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures, and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. PMID:23962644

  13. Advances on statistical/thermodynamical models for unpolarized structure functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Luis A.; Mirez, Carlos; Tomio, Lauro

    2013-03-01

    During the eights and nineties many statistical/thermodynamical models were proposed to describe the nucleons' structure functions and distribution of the quarks in the hadrons. Most of these models describe the compound quarks and gluons inside the nucleon as a Fermi / Bose gas respectively, confined in a MIT bag[1] with continuous energy levels. Another models considers discrete spectrum. Some interesting features of the nucleons are obtained by these models, like the sea asymmetries ¯d/¯u and ¯d-¯u.

  14. Measurement of the longitudinal proton structure function at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-03-15

    The reduced cross sections for ep deep inelastic scattering have been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA at three different centre-of-mass energies, 318, 251 and 225 GeV. From the cross sections, measured double differentially in Bjorken x and the virtuality, Q{sup 2}, the proton structure functions F{sub L} and F{sub 2} have been extracted in the region 5 x 10{sup -4}

  15. Structure-function-property-design interplay in biopolymers: spider silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokareva, Olena; Jacobsen, Matthew; Buehler, Markus; Wong, Joyce; Kaplan, David L

    2014-04-01

    Spider silks have been a focus of research for almost two decades due to their outstanding mechanical and biophysical properties. Recent advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of recombinant spider silks, thus helping to unravel a fundamental understanding of structure-function-property relationships. The relationships between molecular composition, secondary structures and mechanical properties found in different types of spider silks are described, along with a discussion of artificial spinning of these proteins and their bioapplications, including the role of silks in biomineralization and fabrication of biomaterials with controlled properties. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The QCD gluon ladders and HERA structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, A I

    2002-01-01

    We report on the extension of the data fitting considering the QCD inspired model based on the summation of gluon ladders applied to the $ep$ scattering. In lines of a two Pomeron approach, the structure function $F_2$ has a hard piece given by the model and the remaining soft contribution: a soft Pomeron and non-singlet content. In this contribution, we carefully estimate the relative role of the hard and the soft pieces from a global fit in a large span of $x$ and $Q^2$.

  17. Structure, Function and Regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans Cellulosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Roy H

    2008-06-01

    Our major goal for this project (2004-2008) was to obtain an understanding ofthe structure, function, and regulation of the Clostridium cellulovorans cellulosomes. Our specific goals were to select genes for cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes and characterize their products, to study the synergistic action between cellulosomal and non-cellulosomal enzymes, to study the composition of cellulosomes when cells were grown with different carbon sources, continue our studies on the scaffolding protein and examine heterologous expression of cellulosomal genes in Bacillus subtilis. We fulfilled the specific goals of our proposal.

  18. Application of non-small cell lung cancer pleural effusion cell blocks in molecular pathological detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhang; Nan Jiang; Dongdong Qian; Xiangzhou Li; Yu Zhou; Jia Mei; Xiaohui Cao

    2014-01-01

    Objective:The tumor tissues used in molecular pathological detection were usual y obtained by surgery, which would cause trauma and may not be suitable for the terminal cancer patients. This paper evaluated the value of the non-smal celllung cancer (NSCLC) pleural ef usion cellblocks as tumor tissues replacement materials in the application of molecular pathological detection. Methods: Tumor cells were made into cellblocks through stratified centrifugal from 30 NSCLC pa-tients with the pleural ef usion. The immunohistochemistry, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and gene sequencing methods were employed in our experiments. Results:The tumor cells of cellblock section were rich and could keep part of histological structure. Immunohistochemistry staining could assist diagnosis and tumor parting. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) FISH-positive was found in 33.33%of the group, high polysomy in 6 cases, amplification in 4 cases. EGFR gene mutations were found in 8 cases of 30 samples, with an incidence of 26.67%, 6 cases were detected in the exon 19, and 2 cases were detected in the exon 21. Conclusion:The NSCLC pleural ef usion cellblocks are useful for the diagnosis and determining the primary source of tumor, instructed targeted therapy.

  19. Application of Target Peptide in siRNA Delivery 
for the Research of Lung Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglin GAO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is considered a kind of malignant tumors of the world highest incidence. As it is not sensitive to chemotherapy and easy to produce drug resistance, improving effect of anticancer drug becomes a research focus recent years. siRNA, small interfering RNA, can silence complemenary mRNA which is a kind of gene therapy. Target peptides are small molecular peptides which specifically bind to tumor surface materials. When used with siRNA, target peptides can increase accumulation of siRNA in tumor cells and enhance the silencing effect. As result, drug resistance of lung cancer reduced and the effect of therapy can be improved. This method provides new direction and strategy for targeted therapy of lung cancer. This article will make a brief overview of target peptides applying in siRNA dilivery for the research of lung cancer treatment.

  20. Application of CO2 waveform in the alveolar recruitment maneuvers of hypoxemic patients during one-lung ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunshan; Yu, Junma; Liu, Qi; Wu, Chao; Lu, Yao

    2016-06-01

    Deterioration of gas exchange during one-lung ventilation (OLV) is caused by both total collapse of the nondependent lung and partial collapse of the dependent lung. Alveolar recruitment maneuver improves lung function during general anesthesia. The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is an indirect relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment. To further improve the oxygenation and gas exchange, we compare adjust setting of ventilated parameters based on CO2 expirogram and a preset setting of ventilated parameters during OLV in patients undergoing right-side thoracic surgery.Thirty patients met the requirements criteria that were studied at 3 time points: during two-lung ventilation (TLV), during OLV with preset ventilation parameters (OLV-PP), and during OLV with adjustable ventilation parameters (OLV-AP) that are in accordance with CO2 expirogram. Adjustable ventilation parameters such as tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), and the ratio of inspiratory to expiratory were adjusted by utilizing the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram, which together with the relationship between the changes of CO2 expirogram and the selective lung recruitment.During OLV, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram in patients with pulse oxymetry (SpO2) decreased less than 93% after the OLV-PP, and were absolutely different from that during TLV. After OLV-AP, the phase III slopes of CO2 expirogram and SpO2 were similar to those during TLV. During OLV, however, parameters of ventilation setting in both OLV-PP and OLV-AP are obviously different.This study indicates that alveolar recruitment by utilizing CO2 expirogram probably improves SpO2 level during one-lung ventilation.

  1. A compilation of structure functions in deep inelastic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrmann, T; Whalley, M R

    1999-01-01

    A compilation of all the available data on the unpolarized structure functions F/sub 2/ and xF/sub 3/, R=( sigma /sub L// sigma /sub T/), the virtual photon asymmetries A/sub 1/ and A/sub 2/ and the polarized structure functions g/sub 1/ and g/sub 2/, from deep inelastic lepton scattering off protons, deuterium and nuclei is presented. The relevant experiments at CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC from 1991, the date of our earlier review, to the present day are covered. A brief general theoretical introduction is given followed by the data presented both in tabular and graphical form and, for the F/sub 2/ and XF/sub 3/ data, the predictions based on the MRST98 and CTEQ4 parton distribution functions are also displayed. All the data in this review, together with data on a wide variety of other reactions, can be found in and retrieved from the Durham-RAL HEP Databases on the World-Wide-Web (http://durpdg.dur.ac.uk/HEPDATA). (76 refs).

  2. Understanding structure, function, and mutations in the mitochondrial ATP synthase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial ATP synthase is a multimeric enzyme complex with an overall molecular weight of about 600,000 Da. The ATP synthase is a molecular motor composed of two separable parts: F1 and Fo. The F1 portion contains the catalytic sites for ATP synthesis and protrudes into the mitochondrial matrix. Fo forms a proton turbine that is embedded in the inner membrane and connected to the rotor of F1. The flux of protons flowing down a potential gradient powers the rotation of the rotor driving the synthesis of ATP. Thus, the flow of protons though Fo is coupled to the synthesis of ATP. This review will discuss the structure/function relationship in the ATP synthase as determined by biochemical, crystallographic, and genetic studies. An emphasis will be placed on linking the structure/function relationship with understanding how disease causing mutations or putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding the subunits of the ATP synthase, will affect the function of the enzyme and the health of the individual. The review will start by summarizing the current understanding of the subunit composition of the enzyme and the role of the subunits followed by a discussion on known mutations and their effect on the activity of the ATP synthase. The review will conclude with a summary of mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ATP synthase that are known to be responsible for human disease, and a brief discussion on SNPs.

  3. Process-Structure-Function Relations of Pectin in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, Stefanie; Van Buggenhout, Sandy; Houben, Ken; Jamsazzadeh Kermani, Zahra; Moelants, Katlijn R N; Ngouémazong, Eugénie D; Van Loey, Ann; Hendrickx, Marc E G

    2016-01-01

    Pectin, a complex polysaccharide rich in galacturonic acid, has been identified as a critical structural component of plant cell walls. The functionality of this intricate macromolecule in fruit- and vegetable-based-derived products and ingredients is strongly determined by the nanostructure of its most abundant polymer, homogalacturonan. During food processing, pectic homogalacturonan is susceptible to various enzymatic as well as nonenzymatic conversion reactions modifying its structural and, hence, its functional properties. Consequently, a profound understanding of the various process-structure-function relations of pectin aids food scientists to tailor the functional properties of plant-based derived products and ingredients. This review describes the current knowledge on process-structure-function relations of pectin in foods with special focus on pectin's functionality with regard to textural attributes of solid plant-based foods and rheological properties of particulated fruit- and vegetable-derived products. In this context, both pectin research performed via traditional, ex situ physicochemical analyses of fractionated walls and isolated polymers and pectin investigation through in situ pectin localization are considered.

  4. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Slater, Benjamin J.; McMahon, David P.; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J.; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M.; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I.; Day, Graeme M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  5. Mouse models for ROS1-fusion-positive lung cancers and their application to the analysis of multikinase inhibitor efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Maki; Toki, Hideaki; Matsui, Junko; Togashi, Yuki; Dobashi, Akito; Fukumura, Ryutaro; Gondo, Yoichi; Minowa, Osamu; Tanaka, Norio; Mori, Seiichi; Takeuchi, Kengo; Noda, Tetsuo

    2016-05-01

    ROS1-fusion genes, resulting from chromosomal rearrangement, have been reported in 1-2% of human non-small cell lung cancer cases. More than 10 distinct ROS1-fusion genes, including break-point variants, have been identified to date. In this study, to investigate the in vivo oncogenic activities of one of the most frequently detected fusions, CD74-ROS1, as well as another SDC4-ROS1 fusion that has also been reported in several studies, we generated transgenic (TG) mouse strains that express either of the two ROS1-fusion genes specifically in lung alveolar type II cells. Mice in all TG lines developed tumorigenic nodules in the lung, and a few strains of both TG mouse lines demonstrated early-onset nodule development (multiple tumor lesions present in the lung at 2-4 weeks after birth); therefore, these two strains were selected for further investigation. Tumors developed progressively in the untreated TG mice of both lines, whereas those receiving oral administration of an ALK/MET/ROS1 inhibitor, crizotinib, and an ALK/ROS1 inhibitor, ASP3026, showed marked reduction in the tumor burden. Collectively, these data suggest that each of these two ROS1-fusion genes acts as a driver for the pathogenesis of lung adenocarcinoma in vivo The TG mice developed in this study are expected to serve as valuable tools for exploring novel therapeutic agents against ROS1-fusion-positive lung cancer.

  6. Lung function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    2005200 The effect of body position changes on lung function, lung CT imaging and pathology in an oleic acid induced acute lung injury model. JI Xin-ping (戢新平), et al. Dept Emergency, 1st Affili Hosp, China Med Univ, Shenyang 110001. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis, 2005;28(1) :33-36. Objective: To study the effect of body position changes on lung mechanics, oxygenation, CT images and pathology in an oleic acid-induced acute lung injury (ALl) model. Methods: The study groups con-

  7. Hormonal regulation of alveolarization: structure-function correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godinez Marye H

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dexamethasone (Dex limits and all-trans-retinoic acid (RA promotes alveolarization. While structural changes resulting from such hormonal exposures are known, their functional consequences are unclear. Methods Neonatal rats were treated with Dex and/or RA during the first two weeks of life or were given RA after previous exposure to Dex. Morphology was assessed by light microscopy and radial alveolar counts. Function was evaluated by plethysmography at d13, pressure volume curves at d30, and exercise swim testing and arterial blood gases at both d15 and d30. Results Dex-treated animals had simplified lung architecture without secondary septation. Animals given RA alone had smaller, more numerous alveoli. Concomitant treatment with Dex + RA prevented the Dex-induced changes in septation. While the results of exposure to Dex + RA were sustained, the effects of RA alone were reversed two weeks after treatment was stopped. At d13, Dex-treated animals had increased lung volume, respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. On d15, both RA- and Dex-treated animals had hypercarbia and low arterial pH. By d30, the RA-treated animals resolved this respiratory acidosis, but Dex-treated animals continued to demonstrate blood gas and lung volume abnormalities. Concomitant RA treatment improved respiratory acidosis, but failed to normalize Dex-induced changes in pulmonary function and lung volumes. No differences in exercise tolerance were noted at either d15 or d30. RA treatment after the period of alveolarization also corrected the effects of earlier Dex exposure, but the structural changes due to RA alone were again lost two weeks after treatment. Conclusion We conclude that both RA- and corticosteroid-treatments are associated with respiratory acidosis at d15. While RA alone-induced changes in structure andrespiratory function are reversed, Dex-treated animals continue to demonstrate increased respiratory rate, minute

  8. Lung Organogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, David; El-Hashash, Ahmed; Carraro, Gianni; Tiozzo, Caterina; Sala, Frederic; Rogers, Orquidea; De Langhe, Stijn; Kemp, Paul J.; Riccardi, Daniela; Torday, John; Bellusci, Saverio; Shi, Wei; Lubkin, Sharon R; Jesudason, Edwin

    2011-01-01

    Developmental lung biology is a field that has the potential for significant human impact: lung disease at the extremes of age continues to cause major morbidity and mortality worldwide. Understanding how the lung develops holds the promise that investigators can use this knowledge to aid lung repair and regeneration. In the decade since the “molecular embryology” of the lung was first comprehensively reviewed, new challenges have emerged—and it is on these that we focus the current review. Firstly, there is a critical need to understand the progenitor cell biology of the lung in order to exploit the potential of stem cells for the treatment of lung disease. Secondly, the current familiar descriptions of lung morphogenesis governed by growth and transcription factors need to be elaborated upon with the reinclusion and reconsideration of other factors, such as mechanics, in lung growth. Thirdly, efforts to parse the finer detail of lung bud signaling may need to be combined with broader consideration of overarching mechanisms that may be therapeutically easier to target: in this arena, we advance the proposal that looking at the lung in general (and branching in particular) in terms of clocks may yield unexpected benefits. PMID:20691848

  9. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    The density of a defined volume of the human lung can be measured in vivo by a new noninvasive technique. A beam of gamma-rays is directed at the lung and, by measuring the scattered gamma-rays, lung density is calculated. The density in the lower lobe of the right lung in normal man during quiet...... breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...... but the lung density values were more sensitive indices. This was particularly evident in serial observations of individual patients....

  10. ELISA: Structure-Function Inferences based on statistically significant and evolutionarily inspired observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLisi Charles

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of functional annotation based on homology modeling is primary to current bioinformatics research. Researchers have noted regularities in sequence, structure and even chromosome organization that allow valid functional cross-annotation. However, these methods provide a lot of false negatives due to limited specificity inherent in the system. We want to create an evolutionarily inspired organization of data that would approach the issue of structure-function correlation from a new, probabilistic perspective. Such organization has possible applications in phylogeny, modeling of functional evolution and structural determination. ELISA (Evolutionary Lineage Inferred from Structural Analysis, http://romi.bu.edu/elisa is an online database that combines functional annotation with structure and sequence homology modeling to place proteins into sequence-structure-function "neighborhoods". The atomic unit of the database is a set of sequences and structural templates that those sequences encode. A graph that is built from the structural comparison of these templates is called PDUG (protein domain universe graph. We introduce a method of functional inference through a probabilistic calculation done on an arbitrary set of PDUG nodes. Further, all PDUG structures are mapped onto all fully sequenced proteomes allowing an easy interface for evolutionary analysis and research into comparative proteomics. ELISA is the first database with applicability to evolutionary structural genomics explicitly in mind. Availability: The database is available at http://romi.bu.edu/elisa.

  11. Open lung biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CT scan Disseminated tuberculosis Granulomatosis with polyangiitis Lung cancer - small cell Lung disease Lung needle biopsy Malignant mesothelioma Pulmonary tuberculosis Rheumatoid lung disease Sarcoidosis Simple pulmonary eosinophilia ...

  12. Structure, Function, and Biology of the Enterococcus faecalis Cytolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Van Tyne

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive commensal member of the gut microbiota of a wide range of organisms. With the advent of antibiotic therapy, it has emerged as a multidrug resistant, hospital-acquired pathogen. Highly virulent strains of E. faecalis express a pore-forming exotoxin, called cytolysin, which lyses both bacterial and eukaryotic cells in response to quorum signals. Originally described in the 1930s, the cytolysin is a member of a large class of lanthionine-containing bacteriocins produced by Gram-positive bacteria. While the cytolysin shares some core features with other lantibiotics, it possesses unique characteristics as well. The current understanding of cytolysin biosynthesis, structure/function relationships, and contribution to the biology of E. faecalis are reviewed, and opportunities for using emerging technologies to advance this understanding are discussed.

  13. SLC6 Neurotransmitter Transporters: Structure, Function, and Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Andersen, Jacob; Jørgensen, Trine N

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters for the monoa......The neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) belonging to the solute carrier 6 (SLC6) gene family (also referred to as the neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter family or Na(+)/Cl(-)-dependent transporters) comprise a group of nine sodium- and chloride-dependent plasma membrane transporters....... Furthermore, psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines have the SLC6 NTTs as primary targets. Beginning with the determination of a high-resolution structure of a prokaryotic homolog of the mammalian SLC6 transporters in 2005, the understanding of the molecular structure, function, and pharmacology...

  14. SLAC measurement of the neutron spin structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, E.

    1993-04-01

    A measurement of the nucleon spin asymmetries from deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons by polarized [sup 3]He has been performed. The neutron spin structure function g[sub 1][sup n] is extracted and used to test the Bjorken sum rule. The neutron integral assuming a simple Regge theory extrapolation at low x is [integral][sub 0][sup 1]g[sub 1][sup n](x)dx = [minus]0.022 [plus minus] 0.011. Combined with the EMC proton results, the Bjorken sum rule predicts a neutron integral of [integral][sub 0][sup 1]g[sub 1][sup n](x)dx = [minus]0.065 [plus minus] 0.018.

  15. Structure-Function Studies on the Prolactin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    the PRLR-ICD and the ICD of the related growth hormone receptor (GHR). We showed that both ICDs were intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths and that they associated with lipids characteristic of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs, implicating the membrane......Class 1 Cytokine receptors are involved in important biological functions mediated through complex networks of intracellular signaling. However, the molecular details of how signaling is regulated are poorly understood. One of the primary reasons for this limited knowledge is the lack of structural...... information on the intracellular domains (ICDs) of these receptors. The overall aim of this study was to obtain an improved understanding of cytokine receptor signaling through structure-function studies on the prolactin receptor (PRLR). The primary focus of this thesis was to structurally characterize...

  16. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  17. Structure-Function Studies on the Prolactin Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg

    Class 1 Cytokine receptors are involved in important biological functions mediated through complex networks of intracellular signaling. However, the molecular details of how signaling is regulated are poorly understood. One of the primary reasons for this limited knowledge is the lack of structural...... information on the intracellular domains (ICDs) of these receptors. The overall aim of this study was to obtain an improved understanding of cytokine receptor signaling through structure-function studies on the prolactin receptor (PRLR). The primary focus of this thesis was to structurally characterize...... the PRLR-ICD and the ICD of the related growth hormone receptor (GHR). We showed that both ICDs were intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths and that they associated with lipids characteristic of the inner plasma membrane leaflet through conserved motifs, implicating the membrane...

  18. Structural-functional integrated concrete with macro-encapsulated inorganic PCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Ehsan; Tang, Waiching; Wang, Zhiyu

    2017-09-01

    Over the last few years the application of thermal energy storage system incorporating phase change materials (PCMs) to foster productivity and efficiency of buildings energy has grown rapidly. In this study, a structural-functional integrated concrete was developed using macro-encapsulated PCM-lightweight aggregate (LWA) as partial replacement (25 and 50% by volume) of coarse aggregate in control concrete. The PCM-LWA was prepared by incorporation of an inorganic PCM into porous LWAs through vacuum impregnation. The mechanical and thermal performance of PCM-LWA concrete were studied. The test results revealed that though the compressive strength of concrete with PCM-LWA was lower than the control concrete, but ranged from 22.02 MPa to 42.88 MPa which above the minimum strength requirement for structural application. The thermal performance test indicated that macro-encapsulated PCM-LWA has underwent the phase change transition reducing the indoor temperature.

  19. Bridging the etiologic and prognostic outlooks in individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness: application in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Igor; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Leffondré, Karen; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2016-11-01

    Assessment of individual risk of illness is an important activity in preventive medicine. Development of risk-assessment models has heretofore relied predominantly on studies involving follow-up of cohort-type populations, while case-control studies have generally been considered unfit for this purpose. To present a method for individualized assessment of absolute risk of an illness (as illustrated by lung cancer) based on data from a 'non-nested' case-control study. We used data from a case-control study conducted in Montreal, Canada in 1996-2001. Individuals diagnosed with lung cancer (n = 920) and age- and sex-matched lung-cancer-free subjects (n = 1288) completed questionnaires documenting life-time cigarette-smoking history and occupational, medical, and family history. Unweighted and weighted logistic models were fitted. Model overfitting was assessed using bootstrap-based cross-validation and 'shrinkage.' The discriminating ability was assessed by the c-statistic, and the risk-stratifying performance was assessed by examination of the variability in risk estimates over hypothetical risk-profiles. In the logistic models, the logarithm of incidence-density of lung cancer was expressed as a function of age, sex, cigarette-smoking history, history of respiratory conditions and exposure to occupational carcinogens, and family history of lung cancer. The models entailed a minimal degree of overfitting ('shrinkage' factor: 0.97 for both unweighted and weighted models) and moderately high discriminating ability (c-statistic: 0.82 for the unweighted model and 0.66 for the weighted model). The method's risk-stratifying performance was quite high. The presented method allows for individualized assessment of risk of lung cancer and can be used for development of risk-assessment models for other illnesses.

  20. Application of radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in dorsal root ganglia for controlling refractory pain induced by rib metastasis of lung cancer (a STROBE-compliant article).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang-Lun; Guo, Da-Peng; Li, Zhi-Gang; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to observe the therapeutic effects and adverse reactions of radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in dorsal root ganglia on lung cancer rib metastasis-related refractory pain which has no response to conventional therapy.This study contained 27 patients with lung cancer rib metastasis-related moderate or severe pain which had no response to conventional therapy. Under computed tomography (CT)-guidance, radiofrequency puncture need reached the corresponding intervertebral foramens to ensure needle point near dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by sensory and motor stimulation tests, and then radiofrequency thermocoagulation was performed on each corresponding DRG followed by injection of 0.5 to 1 mL of adriamycin (0.5%). The conditions of pain and complications were observed before management and 3 days, 1 month, and 3 months after management, respectively.Numerical rating scale (NRS) scores and dosage of morphine were all significantly decreased after management as compared with those before management (all P management as compared with that before management (all P management in nausea and vomiting, and constipation.CT-guided radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in DRG can effectively control lung cancer rib metastasis-related pain which has no response to conventional therapy. This combinatory treatment regimen is featured by better therapeutic effects and a few complications, so it is worthy of being recommended in clinical application.

  1. Clinical application of dual-source CT in the evaluation of patients with lung cancer: correlation with perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraioli, F; Serra, G; Liberali, S; Fiorelli, A; Liparulo, V; Zaccagna, F; Ciccariello, G; Catalano, C; Passariello, R

    2011-09-01

    This study was done to assess the diagnostic potential of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) in the functional evaluation of lung cancer patients undergoing surgical resection. The CT data were compared with pulmonary perfusion scintigraphy and pulmonary function tests (PFTs). All patients were evaluated with DSCT, scintigraphy and PFTs. The DSCT scan protocol was as follows: two tubes (80 and 140 kV; Care Dose protocol); 70 cc of contrast material (5 cc/s); 5- to 6-s scan time; 0.6 mm collimation. After the automatic calculation of lung perfusion with DSCT and quantification of air volumes and emphysema with dedicated software applications, the perfusional CT studies were compared with scintigraphy using a visual score for perfusion defects; CT air volumes and emphysema were compared with PFTs. The values of accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of DSCT compared with perfusion scintigraphy as the reference standard were: 0.88, 0.84, 0.90, 0.93 and 0.88, respectively. The McNemar test did not identify significant differences either between the two imaging techniques (p=0.07) or between CT and PFTs (p=0.09). DSCT is a robust and promising technique that provides important and accurate information on lung function.

  2. Application of radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in dorsal root ganglia for controlling refractory pain induced by rib metastasis of lung cancer (a STROBE-compliant article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guang-lun; Guo, Da-peng; Li, Zhi-gang; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to observe the therapeutic effects and adverse reactions of radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in dorsal root ganglia on lung cancer rib metastasis-related refractory pain which has no response to conventional therapy. This study contained 27 patients with lung cancer rib metastasis-related moderate or severe pain which had no response to conventional therapy. Under computed tomography (CT)-guidance, radiofrequency puncture need reached the corresponding intervertebral foramens to ensure needle point near dorsal root ganglia (DRG) by sensory and motor stimulation tests, and then radiofrequency thermocoagulation was performed on each corresponding DRG followed by injection of 0.5 to 1 mL of adriamycin (0.5%). The conditions of pain and complications were observed before management and 3 days, 1 month, and 3 months after management, respectively. Numerical rating scale (NRS) scores and dosage of morphine were all significantly decreased after management as compared with those before management (all P management as compared with that before management (all P management in nausea and vomiting, and constipation. CT-guided radiofrequency thermocoagulation combined with adriamycin injection in DRG can effectively control lung cancer rib metastasis-related pain which has no response to conventional therapy. This combinatory treatment regimen is featured by better therapeutic effects and a few complications, so it is worthy of being recommended in clinical application. PMID:27749531

  3. Treatment of Superior Lobe Central Lung Cancer with Lung Replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulun YANG

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Patients suffering from lung cancer often have poor quality of life after pneumonectomy. It has clinical significances to preserve maximum lobes of the “healthy” lung. The aim of this study is to report the applications of lung replantation in treatment of superior lobe central lung cancer. Methods Three lung cancer cases were included and analysed. The bronchus and margin of lower lung lobe were encroached by cancer. Pulmonary artery was invaded and surrounded by metastatic lymph node. Complete pneumonectomy, antegrade perfusion and retroperfusion with low-potassium dextran (LPD solution in vitro were performed. The retainable lower pulmonary lobe was selected from the isolated lung and superior pulmonary vein was replaced with inferior pulmonary veins. The bronchus and pulmonary artery were inosculated by turns. Results The operative cumulative time ranged from 220 min to 250 min. The isolated time of lobus inferior pulmonary ranged from 120 min to 150 min. The chest tube was pulled out after chest X-ray confirmed the reimplant lung full re-expansion. The patients were followed up for 4 months to 8 months and accomplished adjuvant chemotherapy for 3 or 4 periodicities. The patients had a sound quality of life. Conclusion Lung replantation removing the extensive tumor tissue and retaining the maximum pulmonary normal tissue is an useful method for treatment of lung cancer.

  4. Advances in Liquid Biopsy and its Clinical Application in the Diagnosis 
and Treatment of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Difan ZHENG

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the advances of technology, great progresses have been made in liquid biopsy in recent years. Liquid biopsy is currently playing a more and more important role in early diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Compared with traditional tissue biopsy, liquid biopsy is more popular in clinical practice due to its non-invasiveness, convenience and high repeatability. It has huge potential in the future. This review introduces circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA as the most important objects in liquid biopsy, mainly focusing on their history, biological characteristics, detection technologies, limitations and applications in non-small cell lung cancer.

  5. Improvement of lung mechanics by exogenous surfactant: effect of prior application of high positive end-expiratory pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hartog (Anneke); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.J. Haitsma (Jack); B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe use of a ventilation strategy with high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that is intended to recruit collapsed alveoli and to prevent recurrent collapse can reduce alveolar protein influx in experimental acute lung injury (ALI). This could affect

  6. Application of CT-PSF-based computer-simulated lung nodules for evaluating the accuracy of computer-aided volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaki, Ayumu; Ohkubo, Masaki; Wada, Shinichi; Murao, Kohei; Matsumoto, Toru; Niizuma, Shinji

    2012-07-01

    With the wide dissemination of computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer, measuring the nodule volume accurately with computer-aided volumetry software is increasingly important. Many studies for determining the accuracy of volumetry software have been performed using a phantom with artificial nodules. These phantom studies are limited, however, in their ability to reproduce the nodules both accurately and in the variety of sizes and densities required. Therefore, we propose a new approach of using computer-simulated nodules based on the point spread function measured in a CT system. The validity of the proposed method was confirmed by the excellent agreement obtained between computer-simulated nodules and phantom nodules regarding the volume measurements. A practical clinical evaluation of the accuracy of volumetry software was achieved by adding simulated nodules onto clinical lung images, including noise and artifacts. The tested volumetry software was revealed to be accurate within an error of 20 % for nodules >5 mm and with the difference between nodule density and background (lung) (CT value) being 400-600 HU. Such a detailed analysis can provide clinically useful information on the use of volumetry software in CT screening for lung cancer. We concluded that the proposed method is effective for evaluating the performance of computer-aided volumetry software.

  7. Small molecule distribution in rat lung: a comparison of various cryoprotectants as inflation media and their applicability to MSI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baijnath, Sooraj; Shobo, Adeola; Bester, Linda A; Singh, Sanil D; Kruger, Gert; Naicker, Tricia; Govender, Thavendran

    2016-04-01

    Given the recent explosion of mass spectrometric imaging (MSI), it has become easier to assess drug tissue localisation without the use of radiolabeling and other more complex methods (such as PET and MRI). For MSI tissue preparation is of utmost importance, however, the lung in particular does pose some difficulties with imaging since it is made up of a number of air-filled alveoli. These organs are known to collapse when the thoracic cavity is pierced, losing its structural integrity and giving poor histological representation for drug distribution analysis. The use of cryoprotectants as a tissue inflation media will aid in the preservation of the lung's structural integrity during MSI experiments involving small molecule distribution. Various established cryoprotectants (DMSO, PvP, ethylene glycol, sucrose, DMEM, control serum, OCT) were selected as lung inflation media for MSI analysis of gatifloxacin (GAT). Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with GAT (10 mg/kg b.w) via i.p. injection. After 15 min the animals were terminated by halothane overdose, and each set of tissue inflated with a specific agent. Cryosections were made and MSI conducted to determine drug tissue distribution. During the early stages of the experimental procedure some crypreservatives were eliminated due to difficulties with sample preparation. While others displayed excellent preservation of the tissue structure and integrity. Following MSI analysis, some agents showed homogenous drug distribution while some displayed heterogeneous distribution favoring the basal periphery. Taking into account the physiology of the lung and previous MRI investigations of its perfusion, it is expected that a systemically administered drug would localize in the basal areas. DMSO and DMEM proved to display this distribution pattern while keeping structural integrity intact. However, the later was ruled out since it showed complete suppression of GAT in solution. From the cryoprotectants selected for this

  8. Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  9. Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to ... you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in ...

  10. Lung transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, José Eduardo; Werebe, Eduardo de Campos; Carraro, Rafael Medeiros; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga; Fernandes, Lucas Matos; Abdalla, Luis Gustavo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Pêgo-Fernandes, Paulo Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung transplantation is a globally accepted treatment for some advanced lung diseases, giving the recipients longer survival and better quality of life. Since the first transplant successfully performed in 1983, more than 40 thousand transplants have been performed worldwide. Of these, about seven hundred were in Brazil. However, survival of the transplant is less than desired, with a high mortality rate related to primary graft dysfunction, infection, and chronic graft dysfunction, particularly in the form of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. New technologies have been developed to improve the various stages of lung transplant. To increase the supply of lungs, ex vivo lung reconditioning has been used in some countries, including Brazil. For advanced life support in the perioperative period, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and hemodynamic support equipment have been used as a bridge to transplant in critically ill patients on the waiting list, and to keep patients alive until resolution of the primary dysfunction after graft transplant. There are patients requiring lung transplant in Brazil who do not even come to the point of being referred to a transplant center because there are only seven such centers active in the country. It is urgent to create new centers capable of performing lung transplantation to provide patients with some advanced forms of lung disease a chance to live longer and with better quality of life. PMID:26154550

  11. Revisiting Stochastic Variability of AGNs with Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-01-01

    Discrepancies between reported structure function (SF) slopes and their overall flatness as compared to expectations from the damped random walk (DRW) model, generally well-describing the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGN), has triggered us to study this problem in detail. We review common AGN variability observables and identify their most common problems. Equipped with this knowledge, we study ~9000 r-band AGN light curves from Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using SFs described by stochastic processes with the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal. We model the "sub-ensemble" SFs in the redshift-absolute magnitude bins with the full SF equation (including the turnover and the noise part) and a single power-law (SPL; in the "red noise regime" after subtracting the noise term). The distribution of full-equation SF (SPL) slopes peaks at gamma=0.55+/-0.08 (0.52+/-0.06) and is consistent with DRW. There is a hint of a weak correlation of gamma with the luminosity and a lack of co...

  12. Strong coupling constant from the photon structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albino, Simon; Klasen, Michael; Soeldner-Rembold, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    We extract the value of the strong coupling constant a, from a single-parameter pointlike fit to the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} at large {xi} and Q{sup 2} and from a first five-parameter full (pointlike and hadronic) fit to the complete F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} data set taken at PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. In next-to-leading order and the MS renormalization and factorization schemes, we obtain {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub z}) = 0.1183 {+-} 0.0050(exp.){sub -0.0028}{sup +0.0029}(theor.) [pointlike] and {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub z}) = 0.1198 {+-} 0.0028(exp.){sub -0.0046}{sup +0.0034}(theor.) [pointlike and hadronic]. We demonstrate that the data taken at LEP have reduced the experimental error by about a factor of two, so that a competitive determination of {alpha}{sub s} from F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} is now possible.

  13. Strong coupling constant from the photon structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albino, S.; Klasen, M. [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Soeldner-Rembold, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    2002-05-01

    We extract the value of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s} from a single-parameter pointlike fit to the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} at large x and Q{sup 2} and from a first five-parameter full (pointlike and hadronic) fit to the complete F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} data set taken at PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. In next-to-leading order and the MS renormalization and factorization schemes, we obtain {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z})=0.1183{+-}0.0050(exp.){sub -0.0028}{sup +0.0029}(theor.) [pointlike] and {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z})=0.1198{+-}0.0028(exp.){sub -0.0046}{sup +0.0034}(theor.) [pointlike and hadronic]. We demonstrate that the data taken at LEP have reduced the experimental error by about a factor of two, so that a competitive determination of {alpha}{sub s} from F{sub 2}{sup {gamma}} is now possible. (orig.)

  14. Neurolinguistics: Structure, Function, and Connectivity in the Bilingual Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becky Wong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in neuroimaging techniques and analytic methods have led to a proliferation of studies investigating the impact of bilingualism on the cognitive and brain systems in humans. Lately, these findings have attracted much interest and debate in the field, leading to a number of recent commentaries and reviews. Here, we contribute to the ongoing discussion by compiling and interpreting the plethora of findings that relate to the structural, functional, and connective changes in the brain that ensue from bilingualism. In doing so, we integrate theoretical models and empirical findings from linguistics, cognitive/developmental psychology, and neuroscience to examine the following issues: (1 whether the language neural network is different for first (dominant versus second (nondominant language processing; (2 the effects of bilinguals’ executive functioning on the structure and function of the “universal” language neural network; (3 the differential effects of bilingualism on phonological, lexical-semantic, and syntactic aspects of language processing on the brain; and (4 the effects of age of acquisition and proficiency of the user’s second language in the bilingual brain, and how these have implications for future research in neurolinguistics.

  15. Neurolinguistics: Structure, Function, and Connectivity in the Bilingual Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Becky; Yin, Bin; O'Brien, Beth

    2016-01-01

    Advances in neuroimaging techniques and analytic methods have led to a proliferation of studies investigating the impact of bilingualism on the cognitive and brain systems in humans. Lately, these findings have attracted much interest and debate in the field, leading to a number of recent commentaries and reviews. Here, we contribute to the ongoing discussion by compiling and interpreting the plethora of findings that relate to the structural, functional, and connective changes in the brain that ensue from bilingualism. In doing so, we integrate theoretical models and empirical findings from linguistics, cognitive/developmental psychology, and neuroscience to examine the following issues: (1) whether the language neural network is different for first (dominant) versus second (nondominant) language processing; (2) the effects of bilinguals' executive functioning on the structure and function of the "universal" language neural network; (3) the differential effects of bilingualism on phonological, lexical-semantic, and syntactic aspects of language processing on the brain; and (4) the effects of age of acquisition and proficiency of the user's second language in the bilingual brain, and how these have implications for future research in neurolinguistics.

  16. Structure-function investigations of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, M M; Fufina, T Yu; Vasilieva, L G; Shuvalov, V A

    2011-12-01

    During photosynthesis light energy is converted into energy of chemical bonds through a series of electron and proton transfer reactions. Over the first ultrafast steps of photosynthesis that take place in the reaction center (RC) the quantum efficiency of the light energy transduction is nearly 100%. Compared to the plant and cyanobacterial photosystems, bacterial RCs are well studied and have relatively simple structure. Therefore they represent a useful model system both for manipulating of the electron transfer parameters to study detailed mechanisms of its separate steps as well as to investigate the common principles of the photosynthetic RC structure, function, and evolution. This review is focused on the research papers devoted to chemical and genetic modifications of the RCs of purple bacteria in order to study principles and mechanisms of their functioning. Investigations of the last two decades show that the maximal rates of the electron transfer reactions in the RC depend on a number of parameters. Chemical structure of the cofactors, distances between them, their relative orientation, and interactions to each other are of great importance for this process. By means of genetic and spectral methods, it was demonstrated that RC protein is also an essential factor affecting the efficiency of the photochemical charge separation. Finally, some of conservative water molecules found in RC not only contribute to stability of the protein structure, but are directly involved in the functioning of the complex.

  17. Cytochrome P450 structure, function and clinical significance: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palrasu, Manikandan; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2017-01-25

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes are membrane-bound hemoproteins that play a pivotal role in the detoxification of xenobiotics, cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Induction or inhibition of CYP enzymes is a major mechanism that underlies drug-drug interactions. CYP enzymes can be transcriptionally activated by various xenobiotics and endogenous substrates through receptor-dependent mechanisms. CYP enzyme inhibition is a principal mechanism for metabolism-based drug-drug interactions. Many chemotherapeutic drugs can cause drug interactions due to their ability to either inhibit or induce the CYP enzyme system. Predictions based on in silico analyses followed by validation have identified several microRNAs that regulate CYPs. Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic changes in CYP genes may be responsible for inter-individual and inter-ethnic variations in disease susceptibility and the therapeutic efficacy of drugs. Knowledge about the substrates, inducers, inhibitors of CYP isoforms, and the polymorphisms of CYP enzymes may be used as an aid by clinicians to determine therapeutic strategy, and treatment doses for drugs that are metabolized by CYP gene products. The present review is a comprehensive compilation of cytochrome P450 structure, function, pharmacogenetics, and pharmacoepigenetics and clinical significance.

  18. Measurement of the hadronic structure function of the photon

    CERN Document Server

    Affholderbach, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    The hadronic structure function of the photon, Fγ 2 , is measured using a data sample of 52.9 pb−1, recorded with the ALEPH detector at the LEP storage ring in 1997. Approximately 2100 single-tag two-photon events at a centre-of-mass energy of √s ≈ 183GeV are selected from this data sample. The data are analysed in the two Q2 ranges from 7 to 24 and from 17 to 200 GeV2 with mean values of 13.7 and 56.5 GeV2 . The measured distributions of kinematic variables are compared to different model predictions, based on the HERWIG and PHOJET Monte Carlo generators. To determine Fγ 2(x,Q2), a two-dimensional unfolding method employing the principle of maximum entropy is used. In addition to the Bjorken variable x, the variable E17 is introduced, denoting the hadronic energy measured in the polar angle range below 17◦ and is also used in the unfolding. The two-dimensional unfolding method significantly reduces the systematic errors compared to one-dimensional methods which is shown by various unfolding tests. ...

  19. Application of Bergman Parameter in Diagnosis of Lung Cancer%Bergman指数在肺癌诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾波航; 黄慧; 于宪; 邬勇坚; 李丹; 吕嘉春

    2001-01-01

    Objective:This study was designed to evaluate the application of three markers in diagnosing lung cancer and calculate Bergman Parameter to raise the sensitivity and validity in detecting the lung cancer. Methods:Using immunoradiometric and chemiluminescence assay, we observed serum NSE (neuron-specific enolase), CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), and CA50(cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens 50) in 107 cases of lung cancer and 118 cases of benign pulmonary diseases. Bergman parameter was calculated with Bergman’s formula. Results:The sensitivity of NSE, CEA, CA50 for lung cancer were 51.4% , 54.2% , and 31.7% , respectively. The specificity was 85.7% , 89.8% , and 93.0% , respectively, while diagnostic accuracy rates were 64.3% , 72.9% , and 55.8% . The sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy rate of Bergman parameter (95.2% , 87.5% and 92.1% ) were higher than these three markers in lung cancer (P<0.05). We found that Bergman parameter could be used to moniter the prognosis of advanced lung cancer. Conclusion: Serum NSE, CEA, and CA50 are of value in detecting lung cancer. Bergman parameter, calculated with NSE, CEA, CA50, is able to increase specificity and accuracy in diagnosis of lung cancer.%目的:了解3种血清肿瘤标志物在肺癌诊断的应用价值;计算Bergman指数以提高临床检测肺癌敏感性、有效性。方法:应用免疫放射法和化学发光法测定107例肺癌患者血清中神经元特异性烯醇化酶(neuron-specific enolase,NSE)、癌胚抗原(carcinoembryomic antigen,CEA)及碳水化合物抗原(cancer-associated carbohydrate antigens50,CA50)。按Bergman公式计算Bergman指数。以118例肺部良性疾病为对照。结果:NSE、CEA、CA50诊断肺癌敏感性为51.4%、54.2%、31.7%,特异性为85.7%、89.8%、93.0%,有效性64.3%、72.9%、55.8%。Bergman指数对肺癌诊断敏感性、特异性和有效性为95.2%、87.5%、93

  20. Lung Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease ...

  1. Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  2. What Is Lung Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Graphics Infographic Stay Informed Cancer Home What Is Lung Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... cancer starts in the lungs, it is called lung cancer. Lung cancer begins in the lungs and may ...

  3. A novel mouse model of conditional IRAK-M deficiency in myeloid cells: application in lung Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Di; Matsuda, Jennifer; Berman, Reena; Schaefer, Niccolette; Stevenson, Connor; Gross, James; Zhang, Bicheng; Sanchez, Amelia; Li, Liwu; Chu, Hong Wei

    2017-02-01

    Myeloid cells such as macrophages are critical to innate defense against infection. IL-1 receptor-associated kinase M (IRAK-M) is a negative regulator of TLR signaling during bacterial infection, but the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M in bacterial infection is unclear. Our goal was to generate a novel conditional knockout mouse model to define the role of myeloid cell IRAK-M during bacterial infection. Myeloid cell-specific IRAK-M knockout mice were generated by crossing IRAK-M floxed mice with LysM-Cre knock-in mice. The resulting LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) and control (LysM-Cre(-)/IRAK-M(fl/wt)) mice were intranasally infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). IRAK-M deletion, inflammation, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and PA load were measured in leukocytes, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lungs. PA killing assay with BAL fluid was performed to determine mechanisms of IRAK-M-mediated host defense. IRAK-M mRNA and protein levels in alveolar and lung macrophages were significantly reduced in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice compared with control mice. Following PA infection, LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mice have enhanced lung neutrophilic inflammation, including MPO activity, but reduced PA load. The increased lung MPO activity in LysM-Cre(+)/IRAK-M(fl/wt) mouse BAL fluid reduced PA load. Generation of IRAK-M conditional knockout mice will enable investigators to determine precisely the function of IRAK-M in myeloid cells and other types of cells during infection and inflammation.

  4. The strength of EPR and ENDOR techniques in revealing structure-function relationships in metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorslaer, Sabine; Vinck, Evi

    2007-09-01

    Recent technological and methodological advances have strongly increased the potential of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) techniques to characterize the structure and dynamics of metalloproteins. These developments include the introduction of powerful pulsed EPR/ENDOR methodologies and the development of spectrometers operating at very high microwave frequencies and high magnetic fields. This overview focuses on how valuable information about metalloprotein structure-function relations can be obtained using a combination of EPR and ENDOR techniques. After an overview of the historical development and a limited theoretical description of some of the key EPR and ENDOR techniques, their potential will be highlighted using selected examples of applications to iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and copper-containing proteins. We will end with an outlook of future developments.

  5. A tunable closed form model for the structure function of tropospheric delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Mohr, Johan Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Several interferometric synthetic aperture radar applications could benefit from the availability of a closed-form model for the second-order statistics of atmospheric delay. Due to the variability of the latter, it would also be desirable for the model to be tunable to some acquisition......-specific information, describing the atmospheric state. In this letter, a closed-form expression for the zenith delay structure function of tropospheric propagation delay is derived from a two-regime power spectral density function reported in the literature. The power at a specific spatial frequency is used as a free...... model parameter, which may be tuned to available measurements or, in the absence of these, to atmospheric statistics. The latter approach is used to compare the derived model with previously published results....

  6. Next-to-Leading Order Description of Nucleon Structure Function In Valon Model

    CERN Document Server

    Arash, F; Arash, Firooz; Khorramia, Ali Naghi

    1999-01-01

    We have improved and examined the applicability of the valon model where the structure of any hadron is determined by the structure of its constituent quarks. Nucleon structure functions are calculated within this model in the Next-to-Leading order. The results compare well with the experimental data. The model handles the bound state problem and the calculations show a flat or almost flat behavior for $F_{2}$ which sets in at some region of $x\\leq 10^{-5}$at fixed $Q^{2}$. The emergence of this behavior is a consequence of the model and was not put in a priori as a theoretical guess. It seems that such a flatness can be inferred from HERA data, although, not completely confirmed yet. A set of parton distributions are given and their evolutions are tested. Some qualitative implications of the model for the spin structure of the proton is discussed.

  7. Revisiting Stochastic Variability of AGNs with Structure Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Szymon

    2016-08-01

    Discrepancies between reported structure function (SF) slopes and their overall flatness as compared to the expectations from the damped random walk (DRW) model, which generally well describes the variability of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), have triggered us to study this problem in detail. We review common AGN variability observables and identify their most common problems. Equipped with this knowledge, we study ˜9000 r-band AGN light curves from Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using SFs described by stochastic processes with the power exponential covariance matrix of the signal. We model the “subensemble” SFs in the redshift-absolute magnitude bins with the full SF equation (including the turnover and the noise part) and a single power law (SPL; in the “red noise regime” after subtracting the noise term). The distribution of full-equation SF (SPL) slopes peaks at γ =0.55+/- 0.08 (0.52 ± 0.06) and is consistent with the DRW model. There is a hint of a weak correlation of γ with the luminosity and a lack of correlation with the black hole mass. The typical decorrelation timescale in the optical is τ =0.97+/- 0.46 year. The SF amplitude at one year obtained from the SPL fitting is {{SF}}0=0.22+/- 0.06 mag and is overestimated because the SF is already at the turnover part, so the true value is {{SF}}0=0.20+/- 0.06 mag. The asymptotic variability is {{SF}}∞ =0.25+/- 0.06 mag. It is strongly anticorrelated with both the luminosity and the Eddington ratio and is correlated with the black hole mass. The reliability of these results is fortified with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. STRUCTURE FUNCTION ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM QUASAR VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, W; Becker, R; White, R; Loomis, C

    2004-11-15

    In our second paper on long-term quasar variability, we employ a much larger database of quasars than in de Vries, Becker & White. This expanded sample, containing 35,165 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 2, and 6,413 additional quasars in the same area of the sky taken from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey, allows us to significantly improve on our earlier conclusions. As before, all the historic quasar photometry has been calibrated onto the SDSS scale by using large numbers of calibration stars around each quasar position. We find the following: (1) the outbursts have an asymmetric light-curve profile, with a fast-rise, slow-decline shape; this argues against a scenario in which micro-lensing events along the line-of-sight to the quasars are dominating the long-term variations in quasars; (2) there is no turnover in the Structure Function of the quasars up to time-scales of {approx}40 years, and the increase in variability with increasing time-lags is monotonic and constant; and consequently, (3) there is not a single preferred characteristic outburst time-scale for the quasars, but most likely a continuum of outburst time-scales, (4) the magnitude of the quasar variability is a function of wavelength: variability increases toward the blue part of the spectrum, (5) high-luminosity quasars vary less than low-luminosity quasars, consistent with a scenario in which variations have limited absolute magnitude. Based on this, we conclude that quasar variability is intrinsic to the Active Galactic Nucleus, is caused by chromatic outbursts/flares with a limited luminosity range and varying time-scales, and which have an overall asymmetric light-curve shape. Currently the model that has the most promise of fitting the observations is based on accretion disk instabilities.

  9. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  10. Clinical application of immunocytochemical detection of ALK rearrangement on cytology slides for detection or screening of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hisashi; Tone, Kiyoshi; Hayashi, Akihito; Morimoto, Takeshi; Taima, Kageaki; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Nakagawa, Hideyuki; Takanashi, Shingo; Okumura, Ken; Kurose, Akira

    2013-06-01

    Immunohistochemical screening of Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) rearrangement has been regarded essential and routinely carried out to select treatment for lung adenocarcinoma. However, difficulty to approach a tumor by transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB), it often fails to obtain tumor tissues whereas tumor cells are contained in cytology specimens simultaneously obtained when the bronchoscopy is done. Therefore we evaluated the expression of ALK protein by using immunohistochemistry (IHC) on TBLB specimens and immunocytochemistry (ICC) on brushing smear cytology slides in the same cases, and compared the concordance rate of IHC and ICC results. ICC was carried out on routine Papanicolau-stained slides after cytology diagnosis and decolorization. Eighteen patients with adenocarcinoma were extracted in the Hirosaki University Hospital and the Hirosaki National Hospital. IHC and ICC results showed a very high concordance rate: sensitivity of ICC in comparison with IHC was 85.7% (6/7), specificity was 100% (11/11), positive predictive value was 100% (6/6), and negative predictive value was 91.6% (11/12). Detection of ALK rearrangement using ICC on routine Papanicolau cytology slides is considered to be advantageous for lung cancer treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Application of Cytidyl Guanosyl Oligodeoxynucleotide Can Affect the Antitumor Immune Response Induced by a Combined Protocol of Cryoablation and Dendritic Cells in Lewis Lung Cancer Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mi; Yin, Tianquan; Lu, Yuan; Feng, Huasong

    2016-04-19

    BACKGROUND Recently, several combined therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in lung cancer. The combined administration of dendritic cells (DCs) and immune-adjuvant cytidyl guanosyl oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) after cryosurgery has proven to be an effective strategy for treating lung cancer. However, whether the application of CpG-ODN could affect the therapeutic results remained to be further explored. MATERIAL AND METHODS The Lewis lung cancer (LLC)-bearing mice received cryoablation and injection of ex vivo-cultured DCs into the peritumoral zone. Subsequently, CpG-ODN was administered to experimental animals 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after DC injection. The mice in the control group received coadministration of DCs and CpG-ODN simultaneously. Therapeutic effects were evaluated by survival rates. The resistance to rechallenge of LLC cell was assessed by lung metastasis and in vitro cytotoxicity of splenocytes. Furthermore, T-cell subsets and multiple cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, -10, and-12; interferon [IFN]-γ; tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) in the blood were assessed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. RESULTS Higher ratios of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and higher levels of IL-12, IFN-γ, and TNF-α were found in the blood of the mice that received CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection. The cytotoxicity potency of the splenocytes of these mice was significantly higher compared with the mice in other groups. Moreover, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection showed significantly better resistance to rechallenge. Compared with the mice in other groups, the mice receiving CpG-ODN therapy 12 h after DC injection were superior in survival rates and antimetastatic effects. CONCLUSIONS Our study suggested that the therapeutic efficacy was closely associated with CpG-ODN administration in the combined therapeutic protocol of cryoablation, DCs, and immune adjuvant. In situ

  12. Monte Carlo validation of the TrueBeam 10XFFF phase–space files for applications in lung SABR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teke, Tony, E-mail: tteke2@bccancer.bc.ca [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency—Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 5L3 (Canada); Duzenli, Cheryl; Bergman, Alanah; Viel, Francis; Atwal, Parmveer; Gete, Ermias [Medical Physics, BC Cancer Agency—Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4E6 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To establish the clinical acceptability of universal Monte Carlo phase–space data for the 10XFFF (flattening filter free) photon beam on the Varian TrueBeam Linac, including previously unreported data for small fields, output factors, and inhomogeneous media. The study was particularly aimed at confirming the suitability for use in simulations of lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy treatment plans. Methods: Monte Carlo calculated percent depth doses (PDDs), transverse profiles, and output factors for the TrueBeam 10 MV FFF beam using generic phase–space data that have been released by the Varian MC research team were compared with in-house measurements and published data from multiple institutions (ten Linacs from eight different institutions). BEAMnrc was used to create field size specific phase–spaces located underneath the jaws. Doses were calculated with DOSXYZnrc in a water phantom for fields ranging from 1 × 1 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. Particular attention was paid to small fields (down to 1 × 1 cm{sup 2}) and dose per pulse effects on dosimeter response for high dose rate 10XFFF beams. Ion chamber measurements were corrected for changes in ion collection efficiency (P{sub ion}) with increasing dose per pulse. MC and ECLIPSE ANISOTROPIC ANALYTICAL ALGORITHM (AAA) calculated PDDs were compared to Gafchromic film measurement in inhomogeneous media (water, bone, lung). Results: Measured data from all machines agreed with Monte Carlo simulations within 1.0% and 1.5% for PDDs and in-field transverse profiles, respectively, for field sizes >1 × 1 cm{sup 2} in a homogeneous water phantom. Agreements in the 80%–20% penumbra widths were better than 2 mm for all the fields that were compared. For all the field sizes considered, the agreement between their measured and calculated output factors was within 1.1%. Monte Carlo results for dose to water at water/bone, bone/lung, and lung/water interfaces as well as within lung agree with film

  13. Lung Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will recover in the hospital’s intensive care unit (ICU) before moving to a hospital room for one to three weeks. Your doctor may recommend pulmonary rehabilitation after your lung transplant surgery to help you ...

  14. Topical application of phosphatidyl-inositol-3,5-bisphosphate for acute lung injury in neonatal swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuß, Stefanie; Omam, Friede D; Scheiermann, Julia; Stadelmann, Sabrina; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; von Bismarck, Philipp; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Knerlich-Lukoschus, Friederike; Lex, Dennis; Wesch, Daniela; Held-Feindt, Janka; Uhlig, Stefan; Schütze, Stefan; Krause, Martin F

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxemic respiratory failure of the neonatal organism involves increased acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) activity and production of ceramide, a second messenger of a pro-inflammatory pathway that promotes increased vascular permeability, surfactant alterations and alveolar epithelial apoptosis. We comparatively assessed the benefits of topical aSMase inhibition by either imipramine (Imi) or phosphatidylinositol-3,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) when administered into the airways together with surfactant (S) for fortification. In this translational study, a triple-hit acute lung injury model was used that entails repeated airway lavage, injurious ventilation and tracheal lipopolysaccharide instillation in newborn piglets subject to mechanical ventilation for 72 hrs. After randomization, we administered an air bolus (control), S, S+Imi, or S+PIP2. Only in the latter two groups we observed significantly improved oxygenation and ventilation, dynamic compliance and pulmonary oedema. S+Imi caused systemic aSMase suppression and ceramide reduction, whereas the S+PIP2 effect remained compartmentalized in the airways because of the molecule's bulky structure. The surfactant surface tensions improved by S+Imi and S+PIP2 interventions, but only to a minor extent by S alone. S+PIP2 inhibited the migration of monocyte-derived macrophages and granulocytes into airways by the reduction of CD14/CD18 expression on cell membranes and the expression of epidermal growth factors (amphiregulin and TGF-β1) and interleukin-6 as pro-fibrotic factors. Finally we observed reduced alveolar epithelial apoptosis, which was most apparent in S+PIP2 lungs. Exogenous surfactant “fortified” by PIP2, a naturally occurring surfactant component, improves lung function by topical suppression of aSMase, providing a potential treatment concept for neonates with hypoxemic respiratory failure. PMID:22882773

  15. Application of the homology method for quantification of low-attenuation lung region inpatients with and without COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Mizuho; Nakane, Kazuaki; Tanaka, Yutaka

    Homology is a mathematical concept that can be used to quantify degree of contact. Recently, image processing with the homology method has been proposed. In this study, we used the homology method and computed tomography images to quantify emphysema. This study included 112 patients who had undergone computed tomography and pulmonary function test. Low-attenuation lung regions were evaluated by the homology method, and homology-based emphysema quantification (b0, b1, nb0, nb1, and R) was performed. For comparison, the percentage of low-attenuation lung area (LAA%) was also obtained. Relationships between emphysema quantification and pulmonary function test results were evaluated by Pearson's correlation coefficients. In addition to the correlation, the patients were divided into the following three groups based on guidelines of the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease: Group A, nonsmokers; Group B, smokers without COPD, mild COPD, and moderate COPD; Group C, severe COPD and very severe COPD. The homology-based emphysema quantification and LAA% were compared among these groups. For forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity, the correlation coefficients were as follows: LAA%, -0.603; b0, -0.460; b1, -0.500; nb0, -0.449; nb1, -0.524; and R, -0.574. For forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the coefficients were as follows: LAA%, -0.461; b0, -0.173; b1, -0.314; nb0, -0.191; nb1, -0.329; and R, -0.409. Between Groups A and B, difference in nb0 was significant (P-value = 0.00858), and those in the other types of quantification were not significant. Feasibility of the homology-based emphysema quantification was validated. The homology-based emphysema quantification was useful for the assessment of emphysema severity.

  16. Calculation of the Gluon Distribution Function Using Alternative Method for the Proton Structure Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.Ghahramany; G.R.Boroun

    2003-01-01

    A calculation of the proton structure function F2(x,Q2) is reported with an approximation method that relates the reduced cross section derivative and the F2(x, Q2) scaling violation at low x by using quadratic form for the structure function. This quadratic form approximation method can be used to determine the structure function F2 (x, Q2) from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low x. This new approach can determine the structure functions F2(x,Q2) with reasonable precision even for low x values which have not been investigated. We observe that the Q2 dependence is quadratic over the full kinematic covered range. To test the validity of our new determined structure functions, we find the gluon distribution function in the leading order approximation with our new calculation for the structure functions and compare them with the QCD parton distribution functions.

  17. Calculation of the Gluon Distribution Function Using Alternative Method for the Proton Structure Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N. Ghahramany; G.R. Boroun

    2003-01-01

    A calculation of the proton structure function F2(x,Q2) is reported with an approximation method that relates the reduced cross section derivative and the F2(x, Q2) scaling violation at low x by using quadratic form for the structure function. This quadratic form approximation method can be used to determine the structure function F2 (x, Q2)from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low x. This new approach can determine the structure functions F2(x,Q2) with reasonable precision even for low x values which have not been investigated. We observe that the Q2 dependence is quadratic over the full kinematic covered range. To test the validity of our new determined structure functions, wefind the gluon distribution function in the leading order approximation with our new calculation for the structure functions and compare them with the QCD parton distribution functions.

  18. Experience of an application of stereotactic multiple arc radiotherapy (SMART) to metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramoto, Hideyuki; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Kato, Eriko; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Matsumoto, Akira; Kikuchi, Yuzo [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    A highly dose-localizing method of irradiation with linear accelerator, called stereotactic multiple arc radiotherapy (SMART), was applied to six cases of metastatic brain tumors from lung cancer. A custom-made immobilization device was used and fractionated irradiation was given to each case. One of them died of rapid spread of systemic metastases about two months after SMART, and in other cases, the response was not so enough. None of them, however, experienced acute or late toxicity. As a result, we intend a prospective dose-escalation study for searching the appropriate radiation dose. (author)

  19. Application of the homology method for quantification of low-attenuation lung region in patients with and without COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishio M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mizuho Nishio,1 Kazuaki Nakane,2 Yutaka Tanaka3 1Clinical PET Center, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Hyogo, Japan; 2Department of Molecular Pathology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine and Health Science, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Radiology, Chibune General Hospital, Osaka, Japan Background: Homology is a mathematical concept that can be used to quantify degree of contact. Recently, image processing with the homology method has been proposed. In this study, we used the homology method and computed tomography images to quantify emphysema.Methods: This study included 112 patients who had undergone computed tomography and pulmonary function test. Low-attenuation lung regions were evaluated by the homology method, and homology-based emphysema quantification (b0, b1, nb0, nb1, and R was performed. For comparison, the percentage of low-attenuation lung area (LAA% was also obtained. Relationships between emphysema quantification and pulmonary function test results were evaluated by Pearson’s correlation coefficients. In addition to the correlation, the patients were divided into the following three groups based on guidelines of the Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease: Group A, nonsmokers; Group B, smokers without COPD, mild COPD, and moderate COPD; Group C, severe COPD and very severe COPD. The homology-based emphysema quantification and LAA% were compared among these groups.Results: For forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity, the correlation coefficients were as follows: LAA%, -0.603; b0, -0.460; b1, -0.500; nb0, -0.449; nb1, -0.524; and R, -0.574. For forced expiratory volume in 1 second, the coefficients were as follows: LAA%, -0.461; b0, -0.173; b1, -0.314; nb0, -0.191; nb1, -0.329; and R, -0.409. Between Groups A and B, difference in nb0 was significant (P-value = 0.00858, and those in the other types of quantification were not significant.Conclusion: Feasibility of the

  20. Nucleon Spin Structure Functions in the Resonance Region and the Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing; FENG Qing-Guo

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the nucleon spin structure function gl and the difference between the proton and neutrontargets gp1 - gn1 , based on quark model calculation. Quark-hadron duality for the nucleon spin structure function is alsoanalyzed. Effects of the △(1232) and Roper P11(1440) resonances on the spin structure function and on the differencegn1 - gn1 are mentioned. The results of different models for the Roper resonance are also addressed.

  1. Rheumatoid lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung disease - rheumatoid arthritis; Rheumatoid nodules; Rheumatoid lung ... They often cause no symptoms. The cause of lung disease associated with rheumatoid arthritis is unknown. Sometimes, the ...

  2. Engineering Gyroid-Structured Functional Materials via Templates Discovered in Nature and in the Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liping; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di

    2015-10-01

    In search of optimal structures for functional materials fabrication, the gyroid (G) structure has emerged as a promising subject of widespread research due to its distinct symmetry, 3D interconnected networks, and inherent chiral helices. In the past two decades, researchers have made great progress fabricating G-structured functional materials (GSFMs) based on G templates discovered both in nature and in the lab. The GSFMs demonstrate extraordinary resonance when interacting with light and matter. The superior properties of GSFMs can be divided into two categories based on the dominant structural properties, namely, dramatic optical performances dominated by short-range symmetry and well-defined texture, and effective matter transport due to long-range 3D interconnections and high integrity. In this review, G templates suitable for fabrication of GSFMs are summarized and classified. State-of-the-art optical applications of GSFMs, including photonic bandgap materials, chiral devices, plasmonic materials, and matamaterials, are systematically discussed. Applications of GSFMs involved in effective electron transport and mass transport, including electronic devices, ultrafiltration, and catalysis, are highlighted. Existing challenges that may hinder the final application of GSFMS together with possible solutions are also presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Development and application of the near-infrared and white-light thoracoscope system for minimally invasive lung cancer surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yamin; Wang, Kun; He, Kunshan; Ye, Jinzuo; Yang, Fan; Zhou, Jian; Li, Hao; Chen, Xiuyuan; Wang, Jun; Chi, Chongwei; Tian, Jie

    2017-06-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, the white-light thoracoscope as a standard imaging tool is facing challenges of the low contrast between important anatomical or pathological regions and surrounding tissues. Recently, the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging shows superior advantages over the conventional white-light observation, which inspires researchers to develop imaging systems to improve overall outcomes of endoscopic imaging. We developed an NIR and white-light dual-channel thoracoscope system, which achieved high-fluorescent signal acquisition efficiency and the simultaneously optimal visualization of the NIR and color dual-channel signals. The system was designed to have fast and accurate image registration and high signal-to-background ratio by optimizing both software algorithms and optical hardware components for better performance in the NIR spectrum band. The system evaluation demonstrated that the minimally detectable concentration of indocyanine green (ICG) was 0.01 μM, and the spatial resolution was 35 μm. The in vivo feasibility of our system was verified by the preclinical experiments using six porcine models with the intravenous injection of ICG. Furthermore, the system was successfully applied for guiding the minimally invasive segmentectomy in three lung cancer patients, which revealed that our system held great promise for the clinical translation in lung cancer surgeries.

  4. Development of a rhesus monkey lung geometry model and application to particle deposition in comparison to humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; McClellan, Gene; Corley, Rick; Einstein, Daniel R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Harkema, Jack; Carey, Stephan A.; Schelegle, Edward; Hyde, Dallas; Kimbell, Julia S.; Miller, Frederick J.

    2012-11-01

    The exposure-dose-response characterization of an inhalation hazard established in an animal species needs to be translated to an equivalent characterization in humans relative to comparable doses or exposure scenarios. Here, the first geometry model of the conducting airways for rhesus monkeys is developed based upon CT images of the conducting airways of a 6-month-old male, rhesus monkey. An algorithm was developed for adding the alveolar region airways using published rhesus morphometric data. The resultant lung geometry model can be used in mechanistic particle or gaseous dosimetry models. Such dosimetry models require estimates of the upper respiratory tract volume of the animal and the functional residual capacity, as well as of the tidal volume and breathing frequency of the animal. The relationship of these variables to rhesus monkeys of differing body weights was established by synthesizing and modeling published data as well as modeling pulmonary function measurements on 121 rhesus control animals. Deposition patterns of particles up to 10 µm in size were examined for endotracheal and and up to 5 µm for spontaneous breathing in infant and young adult monkeys and compared to those for humans. Deposition fraction of respirable size particles was found to be higher in the conducting airways of infant and young adult rhesus monkeys compared to humans. Due to the filtering effect of the conducting airways, pulmonary deposition in rhesus monkeys was lower than that in humans. Finally, future research areas are identified that would either allow replacing assumptions or improving the newly developed lung model.

  5. Structure-Function Relationship of Hydrophiidae Postsynaptic Neurotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-18

    NIH Publication tb. 86-23, Revised 1985). For the protection of human subjects, the investigator(s) adhered to policies of applicable Federal Law 45 CFR...function information. The major neurotoxi . from Lapemis hardwickii. venom (Lapemis toxin) inhibits binding of 1-125 labeled a-bungarotoxin to the...discussed in detail by Paivianan et al. (1987). The main pertide reagents and protected amino acids were purchased from MilliGen. The progress of the

  6. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  7. Lung Involvement in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Privacy Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Lungs Lung involvement in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) has ... testing. (Krueger et al., 2013) What Are the Lung Features of TSC? Two forms of lung involvement ...

  8. Lung Nodules: Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Lung Nodules Lung Nodules Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask ... Kern, MD (June 01, 2016) What is a lung nodule? A lung nodule is also called a ...

  9. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearrangements in non-small-cell lung cancer: novel applications in diagnostics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Rodney E; Ansari, Junaid M; Wei, Eric X; Alexander, Jonathan S; Cotelingam, James

    2017-08-01

    The ALK gene, first identified as an anaplastic large cell lymphoma driver mutation, is dysregulated in nearly 20 different human malignancies, including 3-7% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLC). In NSCLC, ALK commonly fuses with the EML4, forming a constitutively active tyrosine kinase that drives oncogenic progression. Recently, several ALK-inhibiting drugs have been developed that are more effective than standard chemotherapeutic regimens in treating advanced ALK-positive NSCLC. For this reason, molecular diagnostic testing for dysregulated ALK expression is a necessary part of identifying optimal NSCLC treatment options. Here, we review the molecular pathology of ALK-positive NSCLC, ALK molecular diagnostic techniques, ALK-targeted NSCLC treatments, and drug resistance mechanisms to ALK-targeted therapies.

  10. Understanding the chemical properties of macerals and minerals in coal and its potential application for occupational lung disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xi; Finkelman, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    Recent increases in oil price further strengthen the argument that coal and coal products will play an increasingly important role in fulfilling the energy needs of our society. Coal is an aggregate of heterogeneous substances composed of organic (macerals) and inorganic (minerals) materials. The objective of this review was to assess whether some chemical parameters in coal play a role in producing environmental health problems. Basic properties of coal--such as chemical forms of the organic materials, structure, compositions of minerals--vary from one coal mine region to another as well as from coals of different ranks. Most importantly, changes in chemical properties of coals due to exposure to air and humidity after mining--a dynamic process--significantly affect toxicity attributed to coal and environmental fate. Although coal is an extremely complex and heterogeneous material, the fundamental properties of coal responsible for environmental and adverse health problems are probably related to the same inducing components of coal. For instance, oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) in the coal forms iron sulfate and sulfuric acid, which produces occupational lung diseases (e.g., pneumoconiosis) and other environmental problems (e.g., acid mine drainage and acid rain). Calcite (CaCO3) contained in certain coals alters the end products of pyrite oxidation, which may make these coals less toxic to human inhalation and less hazardous to environmental pollution. Finally, knowledge gained on understanding of the chemical properties of coals is illustrated to apply for prediction of toxicity due to coal possibly before large-scale mining and prevention of occupational lung disease during mining.

  11. Structure-function characterization reveals new catalytic diversity in the galactose oxidase and glyoxal oxidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Urresti, Saioa; Lafond, Mickael; Johnston, Esther M; Derikvand, Fatemeh; Ciano, Luisa; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Henrissat, Bernard; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Brumer, Harry

    2015-12-18

    Alcohol oxidases, including carbohydrate oxidases, have a long history of research that has generated fundamental biological understanding and biotechnological applications. Despite a long history of study, the galactose 6-oxidase/glyoxal oxidase family of mononuclear copper-radical oxidases, Auxiliary Activity Family 5 (AA5), is currently represented by only very few characterized members. Here we report the recombinant production and detailed structure-function analyses of two homologues from the phytopathogenic fungi Colletotrichum graminicola and C. gloeosporioides, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx, respectively, to explore the wider biocatalytic potential in AA5. EPR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis confirm a common active-site structure vis-à-vis the archetypal galactose 6-oxidase from Fusarium graminearum. Strikingly, however, CgrAlcOx and CglAlcOx are essentially incapable of oxidizing galactose and galactosides, but instead efficiently catalyse the oxidation of diverse aliphatic alcohols. The results highlight the significant potential of prospecting the evolutionary diversity of AA5 to reveal novel enzyme specificities, thereby informing both biology and applications.

  12. Asymptotical small-x behaviour of the spin structure functions $g_1$ and $g_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I

    1997-01-01

    We show that for small x and in the double logarithmic approximation (DLA) g_2 can be expressed through derivative of g_1 with respect to logarithm of the QCD coupling. Therefore the small-x behavior of the both structure functions is similar. The analytical expression for flavor nonsinglet structure function g_1 is presented and its asymptotical behaviour is calculated.

  13. Measurement of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} at LEP energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, J. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Abreu, P. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Adam, W. [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österr. Akad. d. Wissensch., Nikolsdorfergasse 18, AT-1050 Vienna (Austria); Adzic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, P.O. Box 60228, GR-15310 Athens (Greece); Albrecht, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Alemany-Fernandez, R. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Allmendinger, T. [Institut für Experimentelle Kernphysik, Universität Karlsruhe, Postfach 6980, DE-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Allport, P.P. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Amaldi, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Univ. di Milano-Bicocca and INFN-Milano, Piazza della Scienza 3, IT-20126 Milan (Italy); Amapane, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Università di Torino and INFN, Via P. Giuria 1, IT-10125 Turin (Italy); Amato, S. [Univ. Federal do Rio de Janeiro, C.P. 68528 Cidade Univ., Ilha do Fundão, BR-21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anashkin, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Padova and INFN, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35131 Padua (Italy); Andreazza, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Milano and INFN-Milano, Via Celoria 16, IT-20133 Milan (Italy); Andringa, S.; Anjos, N. [LIP, IST, FCUL, Av. Elias Garcia, 14-1" o, PT-1000 Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Antilogus, P. [LPNHE, IN2P3-CNRS, Univ. Paris VI et VII, 4 place Jussieu, FR-75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); and others

    2014-10-07

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} has been measured for the first time, using e{sup +}e{sup −} data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √(s)=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F{sub 2}{sup e} data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F{sub 2}{sup γ} analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  14. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abdallah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e− data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of s=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  15. Deformable object model and simulation. Application to lung cancer treatment; Modelisation et simulation parametrable d'objets deformables. Application aux traitements des cancers pulmonaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudet, V

    2006-06-15

    Ionising treatment against cancers such as conformal radiotherapy and hadron therapy are set with error margins that take into account statistics of tumour motions, for instance. We are looking for reducing these margins by searching deformable models that would simulate displacements occurring in lungs during a treatment. It must be personalized with the geometry obtained from CT scans of the patient and also it must be parameterized with physiological measures of the patient. In this Ph. D. thesis, we decided to use a mass-spring system to model lungs because of its fast and physically realist deformations obtained in animation. As a starting point, we chose the model proposed by Van Gelder in order to parameterize a mass-spring system with rheological characteristics of an homogeneous, linear elastic isotropic material in two dimensions (2D). However, we tested this model and proved it was false. Hence we did a Lagrangian study in order to obtain a parametric model with rectangular in 2D (cubic in 3D) elements. We also determined the robustness by testing with stretching, inflating, shearing and bending experiments and also by comparing results with other infinite element method. Thus, in this Ph.D. thesis, we explain how to obtain this parametric model, and how it will be linked to physiological data and how accurate it will be. (author)

  16. [Humidifier lung].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, P; de Haller, R; Pyrozynski, W J; Sturzenegger, E R; Brändli, O

    1981-02-07

    Breathing air from a humidifier or an air conditioning unit contaminated by various microorganisms can cause an acute lung disease involving fever, cough and dyspnea, termed "humidifier fever". This type of hypersensitivity pneumonitis was first described in 1959 by PESTALOZZI in the Swiss literature and subsequently by BANASZAK et al. in the Anglo-American. Here a chronic form of this disease which led to pulmonary fibrosis is described: A 37-year-old woman who works in a cheese shop presented with dyspnea which had been progressive over two years, weight loss, a diffuse reticular pattern radiographically and a severe restrictive defect in lung function tests. Open lung biopsy revealed chronic interstitial and alveolar inflammation with non-caseating granulomas and fibrotic changes. Circulating immune complexes and precipitins against the contaminated humidifier water and cheese mites were found, but no antibodies suggesting legionnaires' disease. Two out of five otherwise healthy employees of this cheese shop, where a new humidifying system had been installed 7 years earlier, also had precipitins against the contaminated water from the humidifier and the cheese mites. Despite ending of exposure and longterm steroid and immunosuppressive therapy, the signs and symptoms of pulmonary fibrosis persisted. Contrary to the acute disease, this chronic form is termed "humidifier lung". The importance is stressed of investigating the possibility of exposure to contaminated humidifiers or air conditioning units in all cases of newly detected pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Welders’ lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izidor Kern

    2010-02-01

    Conclusions: h is study coni rms that longterm welders may have symptoms with no functional disorders, but with prominent morphological changes. h e key to correct diagnosis is an occupational history of the patient. Diagnostic work-up includes funda-mental procedures in suspected interstitial lung disease. h e best therapy is cessation of exposure.

  18. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  19. Lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H H; Rørth, M

    1999-01-01

    The results of the many clinical trials published in 1997 had only modest impact on the treatment results using either cytostatic agents alone or combined with radiotherapy in lung cancer. In SCLC, combination chemotherapy including platin-compounds (cisplatin, carboplatin) and the podophyllotoxins...

  20. Nanoemulsions: Preparation, Structure, Functional Properties and their Antimicrobial Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Shams

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Recently, due to the interest of healthy lifestyle demand for research on novel methods of increasing the shelf-life of food products without the necessity of using preservatives has extended rapidly in the world. Ability of nanoemulsions to improve global food quality has attracted great attention in food preservation. This is as a result of a number ofattributes peculiar to nanoemulsions such as optical clarity, ease ofpreparation, thermodynamic stability and increased surface area. This review discusses the potential food applications of nanoemulsions as vehicles for the delivery of antimicrobial compounds. Moreover, the preparation, structure, and functional properties of nanoemulsions and their antimicrobial effects on foodborne pathogens and biofilms will be reviewed in detail. Antimicrobial nanoemulsions are formulated from the antimicrobial compounds that are approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for use in foods.Results and Conclusion: The antimicrobial activity of nanoemulsions is nonspecific, unlike that of antibiotics, thus they have a broad-spectrum of antimicrobial activity against bacteria (e.g., Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Staphylococcus aureus, enveloped viruses (e.g., HIV, and herpes simplex, fungi (e.g., Candida, Dermatophytes, and spores (e.g., anthrax at concentrations that are nontoxic in animals (while limiting the capacity for the generation of resistance and kill pathogens by interacting with their membranes. This physical kill-on-contact mechanism significantly reduces the possibility of the emergence of resistant strains. In general, more research is needed to improve the application processes of antimicrobial nanoemulsion, especially sensory aspects, to be appropriate for each product.Conflict of interests: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  1. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  2. The application of High-resolution CT scanning in the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease%高分辨CT扫描技术在肺间质性病变中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏毅; 倪傲; 李源

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨高分辨CT扫描技术,对肺间质性病变的诊断价值.方法 采用Philips MX8000 Dual 螺旋CT机对30例肺间质性病变患者,行高分辨CT技术扫描.结果 高分辨CT可清晰显示肺间质性病变的各种征象,肺间质性病变的高分辨CT主要表现为:(1)磨玻璃样密度影;(2)肺小叶间隔增厚;(3)小叶内间质增生;(4)网格状影;(5)胸膜下弧线影;(6)蜂窝肺;(7)牵拉支气管扩张;(8)胸膜增厚.病变分布以两肺中外带、胸膜下为主,病灶自肺尖向肺底逐渐加重,两肺基底部病变明显.结论 高分辨CT扫描具有良好的空间分辨率,能细致、准确地反映肺间质病变的影像特征,对肺间质性病变具有重要的诊断价值.%Objective To study the value of HRCT scanning technology in improving the diagnosis of interstitial lung disease. Methods 30 cases of interstitial lung disease were scanned throng high-resolution CT with Philips MX8000 Dual CT machine. Results High-resolution CT can clearly show various signs of interstitial lung disease. The Interstitial lung disease of High-resolution CT Perform-ance:( 1 ) ground-glass opacity;( 2 ) pulmonary interlobular septal thickening; ( 3 ) intralobular interstitial thickening;( 4 ) grid-like shadow ;( 5 ) pleural shadow off the assembly line;( 6 ) cell lung;( 7 ) traction bronchiectasis; ( 8 ) pleural thickening. The lesion mainly distributes in lateral and under pleural of two lungs. The infection aggravates gradually from lung' s point to lung' s bottom. Conclusion The application of high-resolution CT scan in the interstitial lung disease has important diagnostic value. As the high-resolution CT scan with a good spatial resolution, can detail, accurately reflect the images of interstitial lung disease characterized.

  3. New application of an old drug: Antitumor activity and mechanisms of doxycycline in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Qi; Zhao, Bo-Xin; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Ya-Tian; Liang, Qian-Ying; Cai, Yun; Zhang, Yun-Qi; Yang, Jiang-Hong; Song, Zhi-Hua; Li, Guo-Feng

    2016-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains one of the most aggressive tumors with a poor prognosis. The clinical outcome of SCLC patients has reached its plateau with the existing standard treatment and thus new therapies are urgently required. Accumulating evidences have indicated that doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, has antitumor activity against several malignancies. However, whether doxycycline has antitumor activity in SCLC and its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Our investigation demonstrated that doxycycline could significantly inhibit the proliferation and colony formulation of SCLC cells (pdoxycycline could induce remarkable apoptosis of H446 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. RT-PCR and western blot assays proved that apoptosis induction effect of doxycycline was achieved via inducing the expression of caspase-3 and bax, as well as attenuating the expression of survivin and bcl-2. Moreover, the wound healing assay and Transwell assay indicated that doxycycline could significantly suppress the migration and invasion of H446 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (pdoxycycline on the migration and invasion of H446 cells was achieved via decreasing the secretion of MMP-2, MMP-9 and VEGF, as well as increasing the secretion of TIMP-2. Taken together, doxycycline dose-dependently suppressed the proliferation, colony formulation, migration and invasion of SCLC cells, as well as induced apoptosis. These findings encourage further investigations on the potential of doxycycline as a candidate drug for the treatment of SCLC.

  4. Piecewise-diffeomorphic image registration: application to the motion estimation between 3D CT lung images with sliding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, Laurent; Vialard, François-Xavier; Baluwala, Habib Y; Schnabel, Julia A

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new strategy for modelling sliding conditions when registering 3D images in a piecewise-diffeomorphic framework. More specifically, our main contribution is the development of a mathematical formalism to perform Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping registration with sliding conditions. We also show how to adapt this formalism to the LogDemons diffeomorphic registration framework. We finally show how to apply this strategy to estimate the respiratory motion between 3D CT pulmonary images. Quantitative tests are performed on 2D and 3D synthetic images, as well as on real 3D lung images from the MICCAI EMPIRE10 challenge. Results show that our strategy estimates accurate mappings of entire 3D thoracic image volumes that exhibit a sliding motion, as opposed to conventional registration methods which are not capable of capturing discontinuous deformations at the thoracic cage boundary. They also show that although the deformations are not smooth across the location of sliding conditions, they are almost always invertible in the whole image domain. This would be helpful for radiotherapy planning and delivery.

  5. Independent lung ventilation in a newborn with asymmetric acute lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Nardo Matteo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Independent lung ventilation is a form of protective ventilation strategy used in adult asymmetric acute lung injury, where the application of conventional mechanical ventilation can produce ventilator-induced lung injury and ventilation-perfusion mismatch. Only a few experiences have been published on the use of independent lung ventilation in newborn patients. Case presentation We present a case of independent lung ventilation in a 16-day-old infant of 3.5 kg body weight who had an asymmetric lung injury due to respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We used independent lung ventilation applying conventional protective pressure controlled ventilation to the less-compromised lung, with a respiratory frequency proportional to the age of the patient, and a pressure controlled high-frequency ventilation to the atelectatic lung. This was done because a single tube conventional ventilation protective strategy would have exposed the less-compromised lung to a high mean airways pressure. The target of independent lung ventilation is to provide adequate gas exchange at a safe mean airways pressure level and to expand the atelectatic lung. Independent lung ventilation was accomplished for 24 hours. Daily chest radiograph and gas exchange were used to evaluate the efficacy of independent lung ventilation. Extubation was performed after 48 hours of conventional single-tube mechanical ventilation following independent lung ventilation. Conclusion This case report demonstrates the feasibility of independent lung ventilation with two separate tubes in neonates as a treatment of an asymmetric acute lung injury.

  6. The Structural-functional Organization of the Urban Landschaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile GUŢULEAC

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the anthropic landschaft characterizes its internal organization, the connections between its components and the natural-anthropic associations of an inferior degree.The anthropic layer is to be analyzed in analogy with the natural component of the landschaft, which includes architectural edifices, communications, the geological component,the anthropic vegetation, the barren heaps resulted from mining activities, etc. The parametres of the anthropic components of the landschaft are the free surface, the built surface, the heightof the buildings and the density.The different geographical elements are reconstituted on the basis of NTCs (National Territorial Complex, separated on subtypes according to their specific (NTC IV – functionallandschaft area, NTC III – human settlement, NTC II – technogene fenced-in district, NTC I– technogene lot. We emphasized the features of these organizational types after we had donemuch research in field and in laboratory. We managed to draw a landschaft – functional mapof Czernowitz town, with a scale of 1: 10 000. We managed to detect 125 types of anthropiccomplex of lanschaft.For the urban territory we proposed two types of classification for the landschaftsystems: 1. NTCs that existed before the intense industrial anthropization; 2. technohenenatural complexes. The map of the anthropic-landschaft complexes of the town can be used asa basis for the geo-chemical map and for some applicative maps, especially ecological ones.

  7. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  8. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Bodek, A

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  9. Partial volume correction using structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery: comparison with geometric transfer matrix method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Euitae; Shidahara, Miho; Tsoumpas, Charalampos; McGinnity, Colm J; Kwon, Jun Soo; Howes, Oliver D; Turkheimer, Federico E

    2013-06-01

    We validated the use of a novel image-based method for partial volume correction (PVC), structural-functional synergistic resolution recovery (SFS-RR) for the accurate quantification of dopamine synthesis capacity measured using [(18)F]DOPA positron emission tomography. The bias and reliability of SFS-RR were compared with the geometric transfer matrix (GTM) method. Both methodologies were applied to the parametric maps of [(18)F]DOPA utilization rates (ki(cer)). Validation was first performed by measuring repeatability on test-retest scans. The precision of the methodologies instead was quantified using simulated [(18)F]DOPA images. The sensitivity to the misspecification of the full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) of the scanner point-spread-function on both approaches was also assessed. In the in-vivo data, the ki(cer) was significantly increased by application of both PVC procedures while the reliability remained high (intraclass correlation coefficients >0.85). The variability was not significantly affected by either PVC approach (<10% variability in both cases). The corrected ki(cer) was significantly influenced by the FWHM applied in both the acquired and simulated data. This study shows that SFS-RR can effectively correct for partial volume effects to a comparable degree to GTM but with the added advantage that it enables voxelwise analyses, and that the FWHM used can affect the PVC result indicating the importance of accurately calibrating the FWHM used in the recovery model.

  10. Modeling structure-function relationships for diffusive drug transport in inert porous geopolymer matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämstorp, Erik; Strømme, Maria; Frenning, Göran

    2011-10-01

    A unique structure-function relationship investigation of mechanically strong geopolymer drug delivery vehicles for sustained release of potent substances is presented. The effect of in-synthesis water content on geopolymer pore structure and diffusive drug transport is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, N2 gas adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, compression strength test, drug permeation, and release experiments are performed. Effective diffusion coefficients are measured and compared with corresponding theoretical values as derived from pore size distribution and connectivity via pore-network modeling. By solely varying the in-synthesis water content, mesoporous and mechanically strong geopolymers with porosities of 8%-45% are obtained. Effective diffusion coefficients of the model drugs Saccharin and Zolpidem are observed to span two orders of magnitude (∼1.6-120 × 10(-8) cm(2) /s), comparing very well to theoretical estimations. The ability to predict drug permeation and release from geopolymers, and materials alike, allows future formulations to be tailored on a structural and chemical level for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery of highly potent substances.

  11. Preoperative radiological approach for hilar lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Higashino, Takanori; Watanabe, Hirokazu; Yoshimura, Masahiro; Sugimura, Kazuro [Kobe Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Takenaka, Daisuke [Kobe Ekisaikai Hospital (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Recent advances in CT, MR, and nuclear medicine have made it possible to evaluate morphological and functional information in hilar lung cancer patients more accurately and quantitatively. In this review, we describe recent advances in the radiological approach to hilar lung cancer, focusing on mediastinal invasion, lymph node metastasis, and pulmonary functional imaging. We believe that further basic studies as well as clinical applications of newer MR techniques will play an important role in the management of patients with lung cancer. (author)

  12. A Novel Approach for Analysis of the Log-Linear Age-Period-Cohort Model: Application to Lung Cancer Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengiz Mdzinarishvili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple, computationally efficient procedure for analyses of the time period and birth cohort effects on the distribution of the age-specific incidence rates of cancers is proposed. Assuming that cohort effects for neighboring cohorts are almost equal and using the Log-Linear Age-Period-Cohort Model, this procedure allows one to evaluate temporal trends and birth cohort variations of any type of cancer without prior knowledge of the hazard function. This procedure was used to estimate the influence of time period and birth cohort effects on the distribution of the age-specific incidence rates of first primary, microscopically confirmed lung cancer (LC cases from the SEER9 database. It was shown that since 1975, the time period effect coefficients for men increase up to 1980 and then decrease until 2004. For women, these coefficients increase from 1975 up to 1990 and then remain nearly constant. The LC birth cohort effect coefficients for men and women increase from the cohort of 1890–94 until the cohort of 1925–29, then decrease until the cohort of 1950–54 and then remain almost unchanged. Overall, LC incidence rates, adjusted by period and cohort effects, increase up to the age of about 72–75, turn over, and then fall after the age of 75–78. The peak of the adjusted rates in men is around the age of 77–78, while in women, it is around the age of 72–73. Therefore, these results suggest that the age distribution of the incidence rates in men and women fall at old ages.

  13. Molecular Epidemiology of Female Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Hee Yim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is still a leading cause of cancer mortality in the world. The incidence of lung cancer in developed countries started to decrease mainly due to global anti-smoking campaigns. However, the incidence of lung cancer in women has been increasing in recent decades for various reasons. Furthermore, since the screening of lung cancer is not as yet very effective, clinically applicable molecular markers for early diagnosis are much required. Lung cancer in women appears to have differences compared with that in men, in terms of histologic types and susceptibility to environmental risk factors. This suggests that female lung cancer can be derived by carcinogenic mechanisms different from those involved in male lung cancer. Among female lung cancer patients, many are non-smokers, which could be studied to identify alternative carcinogenic mechanisms independent from smoking-related ones. In this paper, we reviewed molecular susceptibility markers and genetic changes in lung cancer tissues observed in female lung cancer patients, which have been validated by various studies and will be helpful to understand the tumorigenesis of lung cancer.

  14. Interstitial lung disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease - discharge; Alveolitis - discharge; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis - discharge; IPP - discharge; Chronic interstitial lung - discharge; Chronic respiratory interstitial lung - discharge; Hypoxia - interstitial lung - discharge

  15. Construction and application of a lung cancer stem cell model: antitumor drug screening and molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effects of sanguinarine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia; Fang, Zhihong; Wu, Jianchun; Yin, Xiaoling; Fang, Yuan; Zhao, Fanchen; Zhu, Shiguo; Li, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer is a neoplasm with a 5-year survival rate of less than 15 % and a leading cause of death worldwide, despite recent progress in treatment and diagnostic methods. Lung cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are pivotal in lung cancer metastasis and drug resistance. This study aimed to develop lung CSCs that stably express stem cell properties through transfection to further screen traditional Chinese herbal compounds. Lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, which include various phenotypic subgroups, are normally characterized by high expression levels of pluripotent stem cell genes, particularly Nanog and OCT4. Plasmids containing Nanog and OCT4 were constructed and transfected into cells, and lung CSCs were identified not only in vitro using RT-PCR, Western blotting, plate cloning, sphere formation, drug resistance, and transwell migration but also in vivo using a nude mouse tumorigenicity assay. Subsequently, sanguinarine, which is derived from the whole leaves of the traditional Chinese medicine celandine, was identified through the high-throughput screening of a small-molecule compound library. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms of the effects of sanguinarine revealed that it significantly inhibited lung CSC proliferation, invasion, and apoptosis, possibly via downregulation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Our results indicate that lung CSCs established by gene transfection may provide a stable and effective method of constructing CSCs to effectively screen potential antitumor drugs. Furthermore, these results suggest that sanguinarine may be a natural antitumor compound that targets lung CSCs, laying a foundation for further clinical study.

  16. 呼出气冷凝液在COPD、哮喘、肺癌及间质性肺疾病中应用的研究进展%Advances of Application of Exhaled Breath Condensate in COPD, Asthma, Lung Cancer and Interstitial Lung Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨伟煌; 黄平

    2015-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate( EBC) is a new method for the detection of respiratory system diseases. Detecting real-time biomarkers in EBC evaluates acute and chronic airway inflammation and oxidative stress level.Since the EBC has non-invasive, real-time monitoring, simple, repeatable advantages, it can be used as diagnosis of lung disease, severity assessment, evaluation of drug efficacy and prognostic marker,and has good application prospects. EBC has extensive application in COPD, asthma, lung cancer and interstitial lung disease.In this paper, we review the advances of EBC in COPD, asthma, lung cancer and interstitial lung disease.%呼出气冷凝液(EBC)是一种新兴的呼吸道系统疾病检测方法。通过检测EBC中的实时生物标记物,以评价气道急慢性炎症、氧化应激水平。由于EBC具有无创、实时监测、简便、可重复等优点,具有良好的发展应用前景,因而可作为肺部疾病的诊断、疾病严重程度、药物疗效及预后评估,在COPD、哮喘、肺癌及间质性肺病得到广泛应用。本文对近年来EBC在COPD、哮喘、肺癌及间质性肺病中的研究做简要综述。

  17. Factorization and infrared properties of non-perturbative contributions to DIS structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2010-01-01

    Analytical expressions for the non-perturbative components of the hadronic scattering amplitudes and the DIS structure functions are not usually obtained from theoretical considerations, but are introduced phenomenologically by fitting the data. We derive some restrictions for such contributions from the general concepts of factorization and integrability. These restrictions are obtained in the context of both k_T and collinear factorizations. We also show that the use of the collinear factorization basically makes the DIS structure functions be dependent on the factorization scale. Our analysis shows that singular factors of the type x^{-a} in the initial parton densities can be used for the singlet component of the structure function F_1, provided a <1, but excludes the use of them for the other structure functions. The restrictions for the non-perturbative contributions we obtain can also be applied to other QCD reactions at high energies.

  18. Longitudinal and transverse structure functions in high Reynolds-number magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, J; Schäfer, T; Grauer, R

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scaling behavior of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in homogeneous and isotropic magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence by means of an exact hierarchy of structure function equations as well as by direct numerical simulations of two- and three-dimensional MHD turbulence. In particular, rescaling relations between longitudinal and transverse structure functions are derived and utilized in order to compare different scaling behavior in the inertial range. It is found that there are no substantial differences between longitudinal and transverse structure functions in MHD turbulence. This finding stands in contrast to the case of hydrodynamic turbulence which shows persistent differences even at high Reynolds numbers. We propose a physical picture that is based on an effective reduction of pressure contributions due to local regions of same magnitude and alignment of velocity and magnetic field fluctuations. Finally, our findings underline the importance of the pressure term for ...

  19. QCD analysis of neutrino charged current structure function F2 in deep inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, M.; Aleem, F.

    1985-08-01

    An analytic expression for the neutrino charged current structure function F2 (x, Q2) in deep inelastic scattering, consistent with quantum chromodynamics, is proposed. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment.

  20. Development and Preclinical Application of an Immunocompetent Transplant Model of Basal Breast Cancer with Lung, Liver and Brain Metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Aprelikova

    Full Text Available Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer that is associated with a poor prognosis and for which no targeted therapies currently exist. In order to improve preclinical testing for TNBC that relies primarily on using human xenografts in immunodeficient mice, we have developed a novel immunocompetent syngeneic murine tumor transplant model for basal-like triple-negative breast cancer. The C3(1/SV40-T/t-antigen (C3(1/Tag mouse mammary tumor model in the FVB/N background shares important similarities with human basal-like TNBC. However, these tumors or derived cell lines are rejected when transplanted into wt FVB/N mice, likely due to the expression of SV40 T-antigen. We have developed a sub-line of mice (designated REAR mice that carry only one copy of the C3(1/Tag-antigen transgene resulting from a spontaneous transgene rearrangement in the original founder line. Unlike the original C3(1/Tag mice, REAR mice do not develop mammary tumors or other phenotypes observed in the original C3(1/Tag transgenic mice. REAR mice are more immunologically tolerant to SV40 T-antigen driven tumors and cell lines in an FVB/N background (including prostate tumors from TRAMP mice, but are otherwise immunologically intact. This transplant model system offers the ability to synchronously implant the C3(1/Tag tumor-derived M6 cell line or individual C3(1/Tag tumors from various stages of tumor development into the mammary fat pads or tail veins of REAR mice. C3(1/Tag tumors or M6 cells implanted into the mammary fat pads spontaneously metastasize at a high frequency to the lung and liver. M6 cells injected by tail vein can form brain metastases. We demonstrate that irradiated M6 tumor cells or the same cells expressing GM-CSF can act as a vaccine to retard tumor growth of implanted tumor cells in the REAR model. Preclinical studies performed in animals with an intact immune system should more authentically replicate treatment

  1. A First Measurement of Low x Low $Q^{2}$ Structure Functions in Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, B T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Suwonjandee, N; Vaitaitis, A G; Vakili, M; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2001-01-01

    A new structure function analysis of CCFR deep inelastic nu-N and nubar-N scattering data is presented for previously unexplored kinematic regions down to Bjorken x=0.0045 and Q^2=0.3 GeV^2. Comparisons to charged lepton scattering data from NMC and E665 experiments are made and the behavior of the structure function F2_nu is studied in the limit Q^2 -> 0.

  2. Origin of the Q^2-dependence of the DIS structure functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2012-01-01

    We consider in detail the Q^2 -dependence of the DIS structure functions, with Q being the virtual photon momentum. Quite often this dependence is claimed to be originated by the Q^2-dependence of the QCD coupling. This leads to the small-x asymptotics of the structure functions with Q^2 -dependent intercepts. We demonstrate that the DGLAP parametrization alpha_s = alpha_s (Q^2) is an approximation valid in the region of large x (where 2pq can be approximated by Q^2) only, providing the factorization scale is also large. Outside this region, the DGLAP parametrization fails, so alpha_s should be replaced by an effective coupling which is independent of Q^2 at small x. As a consequence, intercepts of the structure functions are independent of Q^2. Nevertheless, the small-x asymptotics of the structure functions explicitly depend on Q^2, even when the coupling does not depend on it. We also consider the structure functions at small Q^2 and give a comment on power-Q^2 corrections to the structure functions at lar...

  3. Application value of ATP based bioluminescence tumor chemosensitivity assay in the chemotherapy for hydrothorax caused by non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaijian Le; Yuming Jia; Jing Wang; Maoqiong Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical value and application of ATP based bioluminescencetumor chemosensitivity assay (ATP-TCA) in the chemotherapy for hydrothorax caused by non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC). Methods: Hydrothorax specimens from 120 NSCLC patients were analyzed by ATP-TCA and the most sensitivechemotherapeutic drugs were used in NSCLC patients (treatment group). At the same time, 56 NSCLC patients with hydrothoraxwere admitted in our Hospital (Department of Oncology, The No. 2 People's Hospital of Yibin, China) and given chemotherapywithout guidance of the ATP-TCA (control group). Before the third chemotherapeutic cycle, clinical outcomes wereanalyzed in the two groups. Results: Effective rate of hydrothorax in treatment group was 67%, while 46% in control group(P < 0.05). In refractory hydrothorax patients, they were 69% and 40% (P < 0.05), respectively. In vitro results correlated wellwith clinical outcomes (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Effective rate of chemotherapy for hydrothorax in NSCLC is higher in treatmentgroup than that in control group. ATP-TCA is especially helpful for refractory hydrothorax.

  4. Reflux and Lung Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Eating Reflux and Lung Disease Reflux and Lung Disease Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find a Doctor Many people with chronic lung disease also suffer from gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). In this ...

  5. Nutrition for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How Do I Stay Healthy Share this page: Nutrition for Lung Cancer Key Points There is no ... lung cancer symptoms, making them worse or better. Nutrition Goals Each person's nutritional needs during lung cancer ...

  6. Lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    950304 The diagnosis and treatment of pulmonaryaspergilloma in the aged—a report of 17 cases.LI Di-anqin(李殿清),et al.Henan Provincial Pulmon DisHosp,Zhengzhou,450003.Chin J Geriatr 1994;13(6):338-339.Seventeen cases of pulmonary aspergilloma in theaged were reported.The primary diseases were pul-monary tuberculosis in 14 cases and pulmonary cyst,cancer of lung and pulmonary abscess in one each.In14 cases,the clinical manifestation was frequenthemoptysis;the occurrence rate was 82.4%.Among

  7. Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion: A Key Tool for Translational Science in the Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tane, Shinya; Noda, Kentaro; Shigemura, Norihisa

    2017-06-01

    Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) promises to be a comprehensive platform for assessment, reconditioning, and preservation of donor lungs and has been dramatically changing the face of clinical lung transplantation. Besides its increasing role in lung transplantation, EVLP has also been recognized as a useful tool for translational research involving the lungs. Based on recent remarkable evidence and experience using EVLP in lung transplantation, there is growing interest in, and expectations for, the use of EVLP beyond the field of lung transplantation. By combining EVLP with advances in regenerative medicine, stem cell biology, and oncology, the evolving technology of EVLP has tremendous potential to advance pulmonary medicine and science. In this review, we revisit recent advances in EVLP technology and research and discuss the future translation of EVLP applications into life-changing medicine. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The application of disposable coaxial biopsy instrument in lung biopsy%同轴活检枪在肺穿刺活检中的应用体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何剑; 朱柠; 陈小东

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical application value of a new type of Bard Max-Core coaxial biopsy system and com-pare the effectiveness and safety of different diameter biopsy guns.Methods This retrospective study included 286 patients who re-ceived CT-guided percutaneous lung biopsy using Bard MC disposable biopsy system.We divided patients into three groups:1 6G, 18G,and 20G group.Then,we evaluated the biopsy effectiveness,histological diagnosis rate and complication incidence of this new type of Bard Max-Core coaxial biopsy system.Results All lung biopsy specimens were successfully obtained.The total histological diagnosis rate was 80.8%.Patients with malignant lesions had higher histological diagnosis rate than patients with benign lesions. The histological diagnosis rate in 1 6G group was the highest among three groups.There was no significant difference among three groups regarding to the rate of diagnosis of malignant lesions.Group with 1 6G had the highest histological diagnosis rate among three groups in diagnosing begin lesions.The incidences of pneumothorax in three groups had no significant difference.The incidence of bleeding in 1 6G group was the highest among three groups.Conclusion The new Bard MC disposable coaxial biopsy system is a safe and effective instrument for lung biopsy.We should select the biopsy needles with appropriate diameter according to the fully as-sessment of patients'preoperative conditions.%目的:评价新型 Bard Max-Core 同轴活检枪实施肺穿刺活检的应用价值,比较不同直径活检枪的活检效果和安全性。方法分析使用 Bard Max-Core 活检枪行 CT 引导下肺穿刺活检的286例呼吸科住院病例,将病例分为3组:16G、18G 和20G 组,评价该系列活检枪的活检效果、不同疾病确诊率以及并发症情况。结果活检取材成功率100%,病理确诊率80.8%;恶性病变确诊率高于良性病变确诊率;16G 组确诊率高于18G、20G 组;恶性病变确诊率3

  9. Interstitial lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease; Alveolitis; Idiopathic pulmonary pneumonitis (IPP) ... The lungs contain tiny air sacs (alveoli), which is where oxygen is absorbed. These air sacs expand with each ...

  10. Strategies for lung regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Petersen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to the limited ability of the adult lung to regenerate and the frequency of lung disease, the lung is a tissue that can especially benefit from regenerative medicine. Prospects for lung regeneration have made great strides in the past year. In this review, we summarize recent progress and key challenges for approaches in lung regenerative medicine. With a focus on the matrix components critical for the development of regenerative lung tissues, we discuss possible cell sources for lung regeneration, key matrix effects on cell repopulation, and physical stimuli that will aid in the growth of lung tissues in vitro.

  11. The IASLC Lung Cancer Staging Project: Background Data and Proposals for the Application of TNM Staging Rules to Lung Cancer Presenting as Multiple Nodules with Ground Glass or Lepidic Features or a Pneumonic Type of Involvement in the Forthcoming Eighth Edition of the TNM Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detterbeck, Frank C; Marom, Edith M; Arenberg, Douglas A; Franklin, Wilbur A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Travis, William D; Girard, Nicolas; Mazzone, Peter J; Donington, Jessica S; Tanoue, Lynn T; Rusch, Valerie W; Asamura, Hisao; Rami-Porta, Ramón

    2016-05-01

    Application of tumor, node, and metastasis (TNM) classification is difficult in patients with lung cancer presenting as multiple ground glass nodules or with diffuse pneumonic-type involvement. Clarification of how to do this is needed for the forthcoming eighth edition of TNM classification. A subcommittee of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Staging and Prognostic Factors Committee conducted a systematic literature review to build an evidence base regarding such tumors. An iterative process that included an extended workgroup was used to develop proposals for TNM classification. Patients with multiple tumors with a prominent ground glass component on imaging or lepidic component on microscopy are being seen with increasing frequency. These tumors are associated with good survival after resection and a decreased propensity for nodal and extrathoracic metastases. Diffuse pneumonic-type involvement in the lung is associated with a worse prognosis, but also with a decreased propensity for nodal and distant metastases. For multifocal ground glass/lepidic tumors, we propose that the T category be determined by the highest T lesion, with either the number of tumors or m in parentheses to denote the multifocal nature, and that a single N and M category be used for all the lesions collectively-for example, T1a(3)N0M0 or T1b(m)N0M0. For diffuse pneumonic-type lung cancer we propose that the T category be designated by size (or T3) if in one lobe, as T4 if involving an ipsilateral different lobe, or as M1a if contralateral and that a single N and M category be used for all pulmonary areas of involvement. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SU-C-18A-04: 3D Markerless Registration of Lung Based On Coherent Point Drift: Application in Image Guided Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasehi Tehrani, J; Wang, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Guo, X [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States); Yang, Y [The University of New Mexico, New Mexico, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated a new probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift for real time 3D markerless registration of the lung motion during radiotherapy. Method: 4DCT image datasets Dir-lab (www.dir-lab.com) have been used for creating 3D boundary element model of the lungs. For the first step, the 3D surface of the lungs in respiration phases T0 and T50 were segmented and divided into a finite number of linear triangular elements. Each triangle is a two dimensional object which has three vertices (each vertex has three degree of freedom). One of the main features of the lungs motion is velocity coherence so the vertices that creating the mesh of the lungs should also have features and degree of freedom of lung structure. This means that the vertices close to each other tend to move coherently. In the next step, we implemented a probabilistic non-rigid registration method called coherent point drift to calculate nonlinear displacement of vertices between different expiratory phases. Results: The method has been applied to images of 10-patients in Dir-lab dataset. The normal distribution of vertices to the origin for each expiratory stage were calculated. The results shows that the maximum error of registration between different expiratory phases is less than 0.4 mm (0.38 SI, 0.33 mm AP, 0.29 mm RL direction). This method is a reliable method for calculating the vector of displacement, and the degrees of freedom (DOFs) of lung structure in radiotherapy. Conclusions: We evaluated a new 3D registration method for distribution set of vertices inside lungs mesh. In this technique, lungs motion considering velocity coherence are inserted as a penalty in regularization function. The results indicate that high registration accuracy is achievable with CPD. This method is helpful for calculating of displacement vector and analyzing possible physiological and anatomical changes during treatment.

  13. Structure-Function Analysis of the Non-Muscle Myosin Light Chain Kinase (nmMLCK) Isoform by NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling: Influence of MYLK Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kui; Ramirez, Benjamin; Mapes, Brandon; Shen, Grace R; Gokhale, Vijay; Brown, Mary E; Santarsiero, Bernard; Ishii, Yoshitaka; Dudek, Steven M; Wang, Ting; Garcia, Joe G N

    2015-01-01

    The MYLK gene encodes the multifunctional enzyme, myosin light chain kinase (MLCK), involved in isoform-specific non-muscle and smooth muscle contraction and regulation of vascular permeability during inflammation. Three MYLK SNPs (P21H, S147P, V261A) alter the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the non-muscle isoform of MLCK (nmMLCK) and are highly associated with susceptibility to acute lung injury (ALI) and asthma, especially in individuals of African descent. To understand the functional effects of SNP associations, we examined the N-terminal segments of nmMLCK by 1H-15N heteronuclear single quantum correlation (HSQC) spectroscopy, a 2-D NMR technique, and by in silico molecular modeling. Both NMR analysis and molecular modeling indicated SNP localization to loops that connect the immunoglobulin-like domains of nmMLCK, consistent with minimal structural changes evoked by these SNPs. Molecular modeling analysis identified protein-protein interaction motifs adversely affected by these MYLK SNPs including binding by the scaffold protein 14-3-3, results confirmed by immunoprecipitation and western blot studies. These structure-function studies suggest novel mechanisms for nmMLCK regulation, which may confirm MYLK as a candidate gene in inflammatory lung disease and advance knowledge of the genetic underpinning of lung-related health disparities.

  14. Needle Biopsy of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Needle Biopsy of the Lung Needle biopsy of the lung ... Needle Biopsy of Lung Nodules? What is Needle Biopsy of the Lung? A lung nodule is relatively ...

  15. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Lung Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... These are called diagnostic tests . General Information About Lung Cancer Key Points Lung cancer is a disease in ...

  16. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are available to help. HELPFUL WEB SITES ON LUNG CANCER American Lung Association www.lung.org Lungcancer.org www.lungcancer.org Lung Cancer Alliance www.lungcanceralliance.org Lung Cancer Online www. ...

  17. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  18. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  19. Structure-function investigations of DNA condensing agents with application to gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather Marie

    Lipid-based systems are notoriously poor for gene delivery, and their use has been primarily empirical. In order to improve these systems, it is imperative to obtain a greater understanding of molecular interactions between DNA and positively charged molecules. A variety of cationic molecules have been studied with DNA, in an attempt to correlate structural properties of these assemblies (using x-ray diffraction) with their efficiency as DNA carriers for gene delivery (using a luciferase assay). Several systems have been studied, some of which use the same charged amine moieties presented in three distinct morphologies: the multivalent salts spermine and spermidine, dendrimers, and dendrimeric lipids. The dendrimers somewhat approximate the properties of histories, cylindrical proteins that condense intracellular DNA. Structural studies of histone and DNA have also been conducted in order to better understand these interactions and their possible relevance to the gene delivery pathway. In addition, empirical evidence suggests that for successful in vivo gene delivery, cholesterol should be used as a helper lipid. The delivery efficiency and structural behavior of cholesterol and other sterol molecules have been studied in ternary lipid mixtures.

  20. Structure, function, evolution, and application of bacterial Pnu-type vitamin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jähme, Michael; Slotboom, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria can take up vitamins from the environment via specific transport machineries. Uptake is essential for organisms that lack complete vitamin biosynthesis pathways, but even in the presence of biosynthesis routes uptake is likely preferred, because it is energetically less costly. Pnu tra

  1. Alginate lyase: Review of major sources and classification, properties, structure-function analysis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Benwei; Yin, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Alginate lyases catalyze the degradation of alginate, a complex copolymer of α-L-guluronate and its C5 epimer β-D-mannuronate. The enzymes have been isolated from various kinds of organisms with different substrate specificities, including algae, marine mollusks, marine and terrestrial bacteria, and some viruses and fungi. With the progress of structural biology, many kinds of alginate lyases of different polysaccharide lyases families have been characterized by obtaining crystal structures, and the catalytic mechanism has also been elucidated. Combined with various studies, we summarized the source, classification and properties of the alginate lyases from different polysaccharide lyases families. The relationship between substrate specificity and protein sequence was also investigated. PMID:25831216

  2. Deep Inelastic Scattering from A=3 Nuclei and the Neutron Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Afnan; F. Bissey; J. Gomez; A. Katramatou; S. Liuti; W. Melnitchouk; G. Petratos; A.W. Thomas

    2003-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of deep inelastic scattering from {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H, focusing in particular on the extraction of the free neutron structure function, F{sup n}{sub 2}. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 1-2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of {sup 3}He to {sup 3}H structure functions, which leads to more than an order of magnitude improvement in the current uncertainty on the neutron to proton ratio F{sup 2n}{sub 2}/F{sup p}{sub 2} at large x. Theoretical uncertainties originating tom the nuclear wave function, including possible non-nucleonic components, are evaluated. Measurement of the {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H structure functions will, in addition, determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A [lte] 3 nuclei.

  3. Coronal turbulence and the angular broadening of radio sources - the role of the structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Ingale, M; Cairns, Iver

    2014-01-01

    The amplitude of density turbulence in the extended solar corona, especially near the dissipation scale, impinges on several problems of current interest. Radio sources observed through the turbulent solar wind are broadened due to refraction by and scattering off density inhomogeneities, and observations of scatter broadening are often employed to constrain the turbulence amplitude. The extent of such scatter broadening is usually computed using the structure function, which gives a measure of the spatial correlation measured by an interferometer. Most such treatments have employed analytical approximations to the structure function that are valid in the asymptotic limits $s \\gg l_{i}$ or $s \\ll l_{i}$, where $s$ is the interferometer spacing and $l_{i}$ is the inner scale of the density turbulence spectrum. We instead use a general structure function (GSF) that straddles these regimes, and quantify the errors introduced by the use of these approximations. We have included the effects of anisotropic scatteri...

  4. Non-singlet structure functions: Combining the leading logarithms resummation at small-x with DGLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ermolaev@mail.cern.ch; Greco, M. [Department of Physics and INFN, University Rome III, Rome (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, 188300 Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2005-08-25

    The explicit expressions for the non-singlet DIS structure functions F{sub 1} and g{sub 1}, obtained at small-x by resumming the leading logarithmic contributions to all orders, are discussed and compared in detail with the DGLAP evolution for different values of x and Q{sup 2}. The role played by the DGLAP inputs for the initial parton densities on the small-x behavior of the non-singlet structure functions is discussed. It is shown that the singular factors included into the fits ensure the Regge asymptotics of the non-singlet structure functions and mimic the impact of the total resummation of the leading logarithms found explicitly in our approach. Explicit expressions are presented which implement the NLO DGLAP contributions with our small-x results.

  5. Deep Inelastic Scattering from A=3 Nuclei and the Neutron Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Afnan; F. Bissey; J. Gomez; A. Katramatou; S. Liuti; W. Melnitchouk; G. Petratos; A.W. Thomas

    2003-03-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of deep inelastic scattering from {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H, focusing in particular on the extraction of the free neutron structure function, F{sup n}{sub 2}. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 1-2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of {sup 3}He to {sup 3}H structure functions, which leads to more than an order of magnitude improvement in the current uncertainty on the neutron to proton ratio F{sup 2n}{sub 2}/F{sup p}{sub 2} at large x. Theoretical uncertainties originating tom the nuclear wave function, including possible non-nucleonic components, are evaluated. Measurement of the {sup 3}He and {sup 3}H structure functions will, in addition, determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A [lte] 3 nuclei.

  6. Deep inelastic scattering from A=3 nuclei and the neutron structure function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Bissey, F.; Gomez, J.; Katramatou, A. T.; Liuti, S.; Melnitchouk, W.; Petratos, G. G.; Thomas, A. W.

    2003-09-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of deep inelastic scattering from 3He and 3H, focusing in particular on the extraction of the free neutron structure function Fn2. Nuclear corrections are shown to cancel to within 1 2% for the isospin-weighted ratio of 3He to 3H structure functions, which leads to more than an order of magnitude improvement in the current uncertainty in the neutron to proton ratio Fn2/Fp2 at large x. Theoretical uncertainties originating from the nuclear wave function, including possible non-nucleonic components, are evaluated. Measurements of the 3He and 3H structure functions will, in addition, determine the magnitude of the EMC effect in all A⩽3 nuclei.

  7. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

    2015-09-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal (σL) and transverse (σT) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= σLT for nuclei (RA) and for deuterium (RD) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, RA < RD.

  8. 胸部DR与低剂量螺旋CT扫描在肺癌筛选中的应用观察%Application and Observation of Thoracic DR and Low Dose Spiral CT Scanning in Lung Cancer Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    成洪桥

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨分析胸部DR与低剂量螺旋CT扫描在肺癌筛选中的应用价值。方法选择来我院进行肺癌治疗的300例患者,对他们分别采用胸部DR以及低剂量螺旋CT扫描,统计两种方法的检出率。结果胸部DR检出结节性病变患者24例,占8%,其中肺癌患者3例;低剂量螺旋CT扫描检出结节性病变患者51例,占17%,其中肺癌患者6例,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论采用低剂量螺旋CT扫描在肺癌筛选中的应用价值显著,能明显提高检出率。%Objective To investigate the application value of chest DR and low dose spiral CT scanning in lung cancer screening. Methods 300 patients came to our hospital for treatment of lung cancer, they were used on the chest DR and low dose spiral CT scanning, using statistical method for detection rate. Results Chest DR were detected in 24 cases, patients with nodular lesions accounted for 8%, of which 3 cases of lung cancer patients;low dose spiral CT scanning were detected in 51 cases, patients with nodular lesions accounted for 17%, of which 6 cases of lung cancer patients, with significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusion Using low dose spiral CT scanning in lung cancer screening has significant value, it can significantly improve the detection rate.

  9. Clinical Application of Death Pulse of Cough in the Prognosis of Lung Cancer%咳嗽“死脉”在肺癌预后中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟丽; 孙景环

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨咳嗽“死脉”在肺癌预后中的临床应用.方法:通过查阅古籍,总结、归纳“死脉”的种类和其临床应用.结果:古医家论述的“死脉”之“死”是病重、难治的脉象,即中医古书论述的危重期,“死脉”和患者死亡没有必然的联系,但“死脉”可以作为肺癌预后的判断标准之一.结论:咳嗽“死脉”对肺癌预后有一定的指导作用.%Objective: To investigate the clinical application of death pulse of cough in the prognosis of lung cancer. Methods; The categories and clinical applications of death pulse of cough were summarized through reference to ancient medical books. Results: The death pulse that the ancients discussed indicated serious and refractory diseases,the critical period discussed by some ancient Chinese medical books. The death pulse is not necessarily related with the deafh of patients,but it can be used as one of the criteria for prognosis of lung cancer. Conclusion; The death pulse of cough has a guiding role in the prognosis of lung cancer.

  10. Interstitial Lung Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interstitial lung disease is the name for a large group of diseases that inflame or scar the lungs. The inflammation and scarring make it hard to ... air is responsible for some types of interstitial lung diseases. Specific types include Black lung disease among ...

  11. Lung gallium scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallium 67 lung scan; Lung scan; Gallium scan - lung; Scan - lung ... Gallium is injected into a vein. The scan will be taken 6 to 24 hours after the gallium is injected. (Test time depends on whether your condition is acute or chronic .) ...

  12. A measurement of the ratio of the nucleon structure function in copper and deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashman, J.; Combley, F.; Salmon, D. (Sheffield Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Badelek, B.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Rondio, E.; Ropelewski, L. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. of Physics); Baum, G.; Caputo, M.C.; Hughes, V.W.; Oppenheim, R.F.; Papavassiliou, V.; Piegaia, R.; Schueler, K.P. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics); Beaufays, J.; Jacholkowska, A.; Niinikowski, T.; Osborne, A.M.; Rieubland, J.M. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Bee, C.P.; Brown, S.C.; Court, G.; Francis, D.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hayman, P.; Holt, J.R.; Jones, T.; Matthews, M.; Wimpenny, S.J. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Benchouk, C.; D' Agostini, G.; Montanet, F.; Pietrzyk, B. (Aix-Marseille-2 Univ., 13 - Marseille (France). Faculte des Sciences de Luminy); Bird, I.G.; Dyce, N.; Sloan, T. (Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Cheung, H.W.K.; Gibson, V.; Gillies, J.; Renton, P.; Taylor; European Muon Collaboration

    1993-02-01

    Results are presented on the ratios of the nucleon structure function in copper to deuterium from two separate experiments. The data confirm that the nucleon structure function, F[sub 2], is different for bound nucleons than for the quasi-free ones in the deuteron. The redistribution in the fraction of the nucleon's momentum carried by quarks is investigated and it is found that the data are compatible with no integral loss of quark momenta due to nuclear effects. (orig.).

  13. Non-singlet structure functions: Combining the leading logarithms resummation at small-x with DGLAP

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2005-01-01

    The explicit expressions for the non-singlet DIS structure functions obtained at small x by resumming the most singular logarithmic contributions are discussed and compared in detail with the DGLAP evolution for different values of x and Q^2. The role played by the initial conditions for the parton densities currently used in the DGLAP analysis, on the small-$x$ behavior of the non-singlet structure functions is discussed. Explicit expressions are presented which implement the NLO DGLAP contributions with our small-x results.

  14. QCD running coupling effects for the non-singlet structure function at small x

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2000-01-01

    A generalization of the leading-order DGLAP evolution at small x is performed for the non-singlet structure function by resumming the leading-order DGLAP anomalous dimension to all orders in the QCD coupling. Explicit expressions are obtained for the non-singlet structure function of the deep inelastic scattering, taking into account both the double-logarithmic and the single-logarithmic contributions, including the running alpha_s effects. It is shown that when these contributions are included, the asymptotic small-x behaviour is power-like, with an exponent of about 0.4.

  15. Charm structure functions and gluon shadowing effects with the AdS/CFT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Min; Hou, Zhao-Yu; Liu, Jia-Fu; Sun, Xian-Jing

    2012-08-01

    By means of the UGD function extracted from an AdS/CFT inspired saturation model, the charm and bottom structure functions are studied in fixed-order perturbation theory. It is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the recent HERA data. Then, this UGD function is also used to investigate net-kaon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies and the theoretical results fit well to the BRAHMS data. In the end of this paper, we give the predicted results for nuclear charm structure function at very small x where the popular shadowing parameterizations are invalid.

  16. Spin structure functions of the nucleon at low Q{sup 2} and {nu}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkert, V.D.

    1993-06-30

    Phenomenological approaches to describe the spin structure functions an spin sum rules for proton and neutrons at low momentum transfer Q{sup 2} and energy transfer {nu}, i.e. in the region of the nucleon resonances are discussed. Experiments to measure A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and N{sub 1}{sup n} structure functions at CEBAF in a Q{sup 2} range from 0.15 to 2.0 GeV{sup 2}, and a W range from threshold to 2.2 GeV are presented.

  17. Momentum Fractions carried by quarks and gluons in models of proton structure functions at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Choudhury, D K; Kalita, K

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports analysis of momentum fractions carried by quarks and gluons in models of Proton structure functions at small $x$. First, we analyze the model proposed by Lastovicka based on self-similarity sometime back. We then make a similar analysis for a second model based on the same notion which is also free from singularity in $x$ : $0structure function at small $x$, suggested by Block, Durand, Ha and McKay. The results are then compared with the corresponding study in perturbative and Lattice QCD.

  18. Charm structure functions and gluon shadowing effects with the AdS/CFT model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Min; HOU Zhao-Yu; LIU Jia-Fu; SUN Xian-Jing

    2012-01-01

    By means of the UGD function extracted from an AdS/CFT inspired saturation model,the charm and bottom structure functions are studied in fixed-order perturbation theory.It is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the recent HERA data.Then,this UGD function is also used to investigate net-kaon rapidity distribution in Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies and the theoretical results fit well to the BRAHMS data.In the end of this paper,we give the predicted results for nuclear charm structure function at very small x where the popular shadowing parameterizations are invalid.

  19. The Evolution of Unpolarized and Polarized Structure Functions at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Blümlein, Johannes; Vogt, A

    1996-01-01

    A survey is given of recent developments on the resummed small-$x$ evol= ution, in a framework based on the renormalization group equation, of non--singl= et and singlet structure functions in both unpolarized and polarized deep--inela= stic scattering. The available resummed anomalous dimensions are discussed for= all these cases, and the most important analytic and numerical results are compiled. The quantitative effects of these small-$x$ resummations on the evolution of the various parton densities and structure functions are presented, and their present uncertainties are investigated. An applicati= on to QED radiative corrections is given.

  20. On a two Pomeron description of the F_2 structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, A I

    2003-01-01

    We perform a global fit to the inclusive structure function considering a QCD inspired model describing the ep scattering. In lines of a two Pomeron approach, the structure function F_2 has a hard piece given by the model and the remaining soft contributions: the soft Pomeron and non-singlet content. We have investigated several choices for the soft Pomeron and its implication in the data description. In particular, we carefully estimated the relative role of the hard and the soft contributions in a large span of x and Q^2.

  1. Linear and quadratic static response functions and structure functions in Yukawa liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Péter; Donkó, Zoltán; Kalman, Gabor J; Golden, Kenneth I

    2014-08-01

    We compute linear and quadratic static density response functions of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids by applying an external perturbation potential in molecular dynamics simulations. The response functions are also obtained from the equilibrium fluctuations (static structure factors) in the system via the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. The good agreement of the quadratic response functions, obtained in the two different ways, confirms the quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem. We also find that the three-point structure function may be factorizable into two-point structure functions, leading to a cluster representation of the equilibrium triplet correlation function.

  2. Elucidation of structure-function relationships in plant major light-harvesting complex (LHC II) by nonlinear spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokstein, Heiko; Betke, Alexander; Krikunova, Maria; Teuchner, Klaus; Voigt, Bernd

    2012-03-01

    Conventional linear and time-resolved spectroscopic techniques are often not appropriate to elucidate specific pigment-pigment interactions in light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes (LHCs). Nonlinear (laser-) spectroscopic techniques, including nonlinear polarization spectroscopy in the frequency domain (NLPF) as well as step-wise (resonant) and simultaneous (non-resonant) two-photon excitation spectroscopies may be advantageous in this regard. Nonlinear spectroscopies have been used to elucidate substructure(s) of very complex spectra, including analyses of strong excitonic couplings between chlorophylls and of interactions between (bacterio)chlorophylls and "optically dark" states of carotenoids in LHCs, including the major antenna complex of higher plants, LHC II. This article shortly reviews our previous study and outlines perspectives regarding the application of selected nonlinear laser-spectroscopic techniques to disentangle structure-function relationships in LHCs and other pigment-protein complexes.

  3. Renormalon Model Predictions for Power-Corrections to Flavour Singlet Deep Inelastic Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, E; Mankiewicz, L; Schäfer, A

    1998-01-01

    We analyze power corrections to flavour singlet deep inelastic scattering structure functions in the framework of the infrared renormalon model. Our calculations, together with previous results for the non-singlet contribution, allow to model the x-dependence of higher twist corrections to F_2, F_L and g_1 in the whole x domain.

  4. Structure function of the UV variability of Q0957+561

    CERN Document Server

    Goicoechea, L J; Gil-Merino, R; Ullán, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed structure function analysis of the UV variability of Q0957+561. From new optical observations, we constructed normalized structure functions of the quasar luminosity at restframe wavelengths of 2100 and 2600 \\AA. Old optical records also allow the structure function to be obtained at 2100 \\AA, but 10 years ago in the observer's frame. These three structure functions are then compared to predictions of both simple and relatively sophisticated (incorporating two independent variable components) Poissonian models. We do not find clear evidence of a chromatic mechanism of variability. From the recent data, 100-d time-symmetric and 170-d time-asymmetric flares are produced at both restframe wavelengths. Taking into account measurements of time delays and the existence of an EUV/radio jet, reverberation is probably the main mechanism of variability. Thus, two types of EUV/X-ray fluctuations would be generated within or close to the jet and later reprocessed by the disc gas in the two emission ...

  5. Analysis of DIS structure functions of the nucleon within truncated Mellin moments approach

    CERN Document Server

    Kotlorz, D

    2016-01-01

    We present generalized evolution equations and factorization in terms of the truncated Mellin moments (TMM) of the parton distributions and structure functions. We illustrate the $x$ and $Q^2$ dependence of TMM in the polarized case. Using the TMM approach we compare the integrals of $g_1$ with HERMES and COMPASS data from the limited $x$-ranges.

  6. Nucleon Structure Function F2 in the Resonance Region and Quark-Hadron Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing; LI Ming-Fei

    2003-01-01

    Based on a simple nonrelativistic constituent quark model, the nucleon structure function F2 in theresonance region is estimated by taking the contributions from low-lying nucleon resonances into account. Calculatedresults are employed to study quark-hardon duality in the nucleon electron scattering process by comparing them to thescaling behavior from the data in deep inelastic scattering region.

  7. Comment on the recent COMPASS data on the spin structure function g{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Greco, M. [University Rome III, Department of Physics and INFN, Rome (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2008-11-15

    We examine the recent COMPASS data on the spin structure function g{sub 1} singlet. We show that it is rather difficult to use the data in the present form in order to draw conclusions on the initial parton densities. However, our tentative estimate is that the data better agree with positive than with negative initial gluon densities. (orig.)

  8. Generalization of the DGLAP for the structure function g_1 to the region of small x

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2005-01-01

    The explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet components of the DIS structure function g_1 comprising the DGLAP -expressions for the coefficient functions and the anomalous dimensions, and accounting for the total resummation of the most singular contributions to those are obtained.

  9. Comment on the recent COMPASS data on the spin structure function g_1

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2008-01-01

    We examine the recent COMPASS data on the spin structure function g_1 singlet. We show that it is rather difficult to use the data in the present form in order to draw conclusions on the initial parton densities. However, our tentative estimate is that the data better agree with positive rather than negative initial gluon densities.

  10. Physical Models Have Gender-Specific Effects on Student Understanding of Protein Structure-Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes-Lorman, Robin M.; Harris, Michelle A.; Chang, Wesley S.; Dent, Erik W.; Nordheim, Erik V.; Franzen, Margaret A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how basic structural units influence function is identified as a foundational/core concept for undergraduate biological and biochemical literacy. It is essential for students to understand this concept at all size scales, but it is often more difficult for students to understand structure-function relationships at the molecular…

  11. Bloom-Gilman Duality of Nucleon Spin Structure Function and Elastic Peak Contribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-Bing

    2005-01-01

    By employing the parametrization form of the nucleon spin structure function in the resonance region,which includes the contributions of the resonance peaks and of nonresonance background, we study Bloom-Gilman quark-hadron duality of g1 both in the inelastic resonance region and elastic one.

  12. The structure-function relationship of the lipases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misset, Onno; Gerritse, Gijs; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Winkler, Ulrich; Colson, Charles; Schanck, Karin; Lesuisse, Emmanuel; Dartois, Véronique; Blaauw, Mieke; Ransac, Stéphane; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1994-01-01

    Within the BRIDGE T-project on lipases we investigate the structure-function relationships of the lipases from Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Construction of an overproducing Bacillus strain allowed the purification of > 100 mg lipase from 30 I culture supernatant. After testing a lar

  13. The exponent (,2) of the proton structure function 2(,2) at low

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Choudhury; P K Sahariah

    2003-03-01

    The exponent of the structure function 2 ∼ - is calculated using the solution of the DGLAP equation for gluon at low reported recently by the present authors. The quantity is calculated both as a function of at fixed 2 and as a function of 2 at fixed and compared with the most recent data from H1.

  14. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  15. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions G1 and G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Al

    2003-04-02

    The SLAC experiment E155 was a deep-inelastic scattering experiment that scattered polarized electrons off polarized proton and deuteron targets in the effort to measure precisely the proton and deuteron spin structure functions. The nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are important quantities that help test our present models of nucleon structure. Such information can help quantify the constituent contributions to the nucleon spin. The structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and G{sub 1}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 40 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 48.4 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons and deuterons. In addition, the structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.7 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 17 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off transversely polarized protons and deuterons. The measurements of g{sub 1} confirm the Bjorken sum rule and find the net quark polarization to be {Delta}{Sigma} = 0.23 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.6 while g{sub 2} is found to be consistent with the g{sub 2}{sup WW} model.

  16. Nuclear Structure Functions at Low-$x$ in a Holographic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Agozzino, L; Colangelo, P

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering at low$-x$ are phenomenologically described changing the typical dynamical and/or kinematical scales characterizing the free nucleon case. In a holographic approach, this rescaling is an analytical property of the computed structure function $F_2(x,Q^2)$. This function is given by the sum of a conformal term and of a contribution due to quark confinement, depending on IR hard-wall parameter $z_0$ and on the mean square distances, related to a parameter $Q^\\prime$, among quarks and gluons in the target. The holographic structure function per nucleon in a nucleus $A$ is evaluated showing that a rescaling of the typical nucleon size, $z_0$ and $Q^\\prime$, due to nuclear binding, can be reabsorbed in a $Q^2$-rescaling scheme. The difference between neutron and proton structure functions and the effects of the longitudinal structure functions can also be taken into account. The obtained theoretical results favourably compare with the experimental data.

  17. Urban ecological stewardship: understanding the structure, function and network of community-based urban land management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erika s. Svendsen; Lindsay K. Campbell

    2008-01-01

    Urban environmental stewardship activities are on the rise in cities throughout the Northeast. Groups participating in stewardship activities range in age, size, and geography and represent an increasingly complex and dynamic arrangement of civil society, government and business sectors. To better understand the structure, function and network of these community-based...

  18. The Impact of the Structure, Function, and Resources of the Campus Security Office on Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia Anne

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this dissertation is college and university safety. This national quantitative study utilized resource dependency theory to examine relationships between the incidence of reported campus crimes and the structure, function, and resources of campus security offices. This study uncovered a difference in reported total crime rates,…

  19. New Structure Function Results at Low x and High $Q^{2}$ from HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Z

    2000-01-01

    A precise proton structure function F_2 at low x is measured. The data is interpreted in the framework of QCD with an extraction of gluon density xg. The charm contribution to F_2 is determined in an extended kinematic range. Neutral and charged current cross-sections at high Q^2 are also measured and compared with the Standard Model predictions.

  20. Spiders in Motion: Demonstrating Adaptation, Structure-Function Relationships, and Trade-Offs in Invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowlin, Melissa S.; McLeer, Dorothy F.; Danielson-Francois, Anne M.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary history and structural considerations constrain all aspects of animal physiology. Constraints on invertebrate locomotion are especially straightforward for students to observe and understand. In this exercise, students use spiders to investigate the concepts of adaptation, structure-function relationships, and trade-offs. Students…

  1. Clinical report on a computer-controlled hand-actuated stapling system for general lung surgery: the first application in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Yukitoshi; Matsui, Yoshio; Ogawa, Fumihiro; Amano, Hideki; Hara, Hidenori; Nezu, Kenji; Iyoda, Akira

    2009-08-01

    Computer-controlled stapling systems can improve lung tissue approximation during thoracic surgery. We report our experience with a handy system with computer-controlled placement of staples for lung resection in Japan. The iDrive system is the improved second version of the SurgAssist stapling system. It comprises a self-contained computer microprocessor and hand-held control unit combined with a digital loading unit (a power linear cutter with a blue or green cartridge) for use in open and minimally invasive thoracic surgery. The mounted control unit has two uses: (1) controlling accurate placement of the cartridge by orientating the tip of the rigid and curved shaft and (2) controlling the closure of the stapler and the firing. Each cartridge contains a programmed electronic device that triggers activation of the appropriate program in the self-contained microprocessor. The compression level on lung tissue is determined by the computer. From March to October 2008, the iDrive system was used 53 times in a consecutive series of 39 patients during open thoracic lung surgery. There were 12 women and 27 men. The following procedures were performed: lobectomy, segmentectomy, and wedge resection. The power linear cutters were used for stapling lung parenchyma for wedge resection in 6 patients, bullectomy in 1, segmentectomy in 2, and fissure division in 33. There were no stapling failures and no complications related to the staplers. The new computer-controlled stapling system may be safe and efficient for lung parenchymal tissue resection during open thoracic surgery.

  2. i-Tree: Tools to assess and manage structure, function, and value of community forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, S.; Nowak, D.; Endreny, T. A.; Kroll, C.; Maco, S.

    2011-12-01

    Trees in urban communities can mitigate many adverse effects associated with anthropogenic activities and climate change (e.g. urban heat island, greenhouse gas, air pollution, and floods). To protect environmental and human health, managers need to make informed decisions regarding urban forest management practices. Here we present the i-Tree suite of software tools (www.itreetools.org) developed by the USDA Forest Service and their cooperators. This software suite can help urban forest managers assess and manage the structure, function, and value of urban tree populations regardless of community size or technical capacity. i-Tree is a state-of-the-art, peer-reviewed Windows GUI- or Web-based software that is freely available, supported, and continuously refined by the USDA Forest Service and their cooperators. Two major features of i-Tree are 1) to analyze current canopy structures and identify potential planting spots, and 2) to estimate the environmental benefits provided by the trees, such as carbon storage and sequestration, energy conservation, air pollution removal, and storm water reduction. To cover diverse forest topologies, various tools were developed within the i-Tree suite: i-Tree Design for points (individual trees), i-Tree Streets for lines (street trees), and i-Tree Eco, Vue, and Canopy (in the order of complexity) for areas (community trees). Once the forest structure is identified with these tools, ecosystem services provided by trees can be estimated with common models and protocols, and reports in the form of texts, charts, and figures are then created for users. Since i-Tree was developed with a client/server architecture, nationwide data in the US such as location-related parameters, weather, streamflow, and air pollution data are stored in the server and retrieved to a user's computer at run-time. Freely available remote-sensed images (e.g. NLCD and Google maps) are also employed to estimate tree canopy characteristics. As the demand for i

  3. 呼出气体冷凝物在肺癌早期诊断中的应用%Application of exhaled breath condensate in early diagnosis of lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳蕾; 应可净

    2010-01-01

    As a new tool of detecting lung cancer, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is now becoming the focus of research because it is non-invasive and easy to obtain. It might be a new method to diagnose lung cancer, but EBC is still at the stage of laboratory research and there are a lot of problems to be solved. This paper explores the possibility of EBC clinical application by discussing the detection,analysis,clinical significance of lung cancer diagnosis,advantages and disadvantages of EBC.%呼出气体冷凝物作为一种尚处于研究阶段的新型检测肺癌的方法,因其非侵入性、易获得等优点越来越成为研究的焦点,且可能会成为诊断筛查肺癌的新型方法,但是其目前仍处于实验室研究阶段,尚有很多未解决的问题.本文从呼出气体冷凝物的检测、分析、对肺癌诊断的临床意义以及优缺点等方面进行论述,分析其应用于临床的可能性.

  4. Functional vascularized lung grafts for lung bioengineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrello, N. Valerio; Guenthart, Brandon A.; O’Neill, John D.; Kim, Jinho; Cunningham, Katherine; Chen, Ya-Wen; Biscotti, Mauer; Swayne, Theresa; Wobma, Holly M.; Huang, Sarah X. L.; Snoeck, Hans-Willem; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2017-01-01

    End-stage lung disease is the third leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 400,000 deaths per year in the United States alone. To reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with lung disease, new therapeutic strategies aimed at promoting lung repair and increasing the number of donor lungs available for transplantation are being explored. Because of the extreme complexity of this organ, previous attempts at bioengineering functional lungs from fully decellularized or synthetic scaffolds lacking functional vasculature have been largely unsuccessful. An intact vascular network is critical not only for maintaining the blood-gas barrier and allowing for proper graft function but also for supporting the regenerative cells. We therefore developed an airway-specific approach to removing the pulmonary epithelium, while maintaining the viability and function of the vascular endothelium, using a rat model. The resulting vascularized lung grafts supported the attachment and growth of human adult pulmonary cells and stem cell–derived lung-specified epithelial cells. We propose that de-epithelialization of the lung with preservation of intact vasculature could facilitate cell therapy of pulmonary epithelium and enable bioengineering of functional lungs for transplantation. PMID:28875163

  5. MOC-31 in the Application of the Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer%MOC-31在胸膜间皮瘤与肺癌鉴别诊断中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐文祥

    2015-01-01

    目的:对 MOC-31在肺癌鉴别和胸膜间皮瘤诊断中的应用给予探讨。方法随机选取我院2010年7月至2014年8月收治的肺癌和胸膜皮间瘤患者125例,对所有患者给予 MOC-31检测,将检验结果的阳性率给予比较。结果非小细胞肺癌和胸水脱落的肺癌细胞的阳性率明显高于上皮型胸膜间皮瘤和胸水脱落的间皮细胞,差异显著,具有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论在肺癌鉴别和胸膜间皮瘤的诊断中,MOC-31检测具有较高的应用价值,在临床中值得应用于推广。%Objective To MOC - 31 in the diagnosis of lung cancer to identify and pleural mesothelioma for discussion. Methods Randomly selected from July 2010 to August 2014 and the pleura skin tumor, 125 cases of patients with lung cancer, for al of the patients given MOC - 31 detection, inspection result of the positive rate for comparison. Results Non-smal cel lung cancer and chest water off the positive rate of lung cancer cel s was obviously higher than that of epithelial type pleural mesothelioma and chest between water loss of skin cel s,significant difference,statistical y significant(P0.05). Conclusion The identification and diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma in lung cancer, MOC - 31 detection has higher application value and worth in the clinical application in promotion.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... neoplasm of lung malignant tumor of lung pulmonary cancer pulmonary carcinoma pulmonary neoplasms respiratory carcinoma Related Information How are genetic conditions and genes named? Additional Information & Resources ... Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Non-Small Cell Encyclopedia: Lung Cancer--Small Cell ...

  7. Lung problems and volcanic smog

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... releases gases into the atmosphere. Volcanic smog can irritate the lungs and make existing lung problems worse. ... deep into the lungs. Breathing in volcanic smog irritates the lungs and mucus membranes. It can affect ...

  8. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: application of the additive model for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Pérez-Morales

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53 in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer.

  9. Polymorphisms associated with the risk of lung cancer in a healthy Mexican Mestizo population: Application of the additive model for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Rebeca; Méndez-Ramírez, Ignacio; Castro-Hernández, Clementina; Martínez-Ramírez, Ollin C.; Gonsebatt, María Eugenia; Rubio, Julieta

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in Mexico and worldwide. In the past decade, there has been an increase in the number of lung cancer cases in young people, which suggests an important role for genetic background in the etiology of this disease. In this study, we genetically characterized 16 polymorphisms in 12 low penetrance genes (AhR, CYP1A1, CYP2E1, EPHX1, GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTPI, XRCC1, ERCC2, MGMT, CCND1 and TP53) in 382 healthy Mexican Mestizos as the first step in elucidating the genetic structure of this population and identifying high risk individuals. All of the genotypes analyzed were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, but different degrees of linkage were observed for polymorphisms in the CYP1A1 and EPHX1 genes. The genetic variability of this population was distributed in six clusters that were defined based on their genetic characteristics. The use of a polygenic model to assess the additive effect of low penetrance risk alleles identified combinations of risk genotypes that could be useful in predicting a predisposition to lung cancer. Estimation of the level of genetic susceptibility showed that the individual calculated risk value (iCRV) ranged from 1 to 16, with a higher iCRV indicating a greater genetic susceptibility to lung cancer. PMID:22215955

  10. Advances and Clinical Application of Tumor Markers in Lung Cancer%肺癌肿瘤标志物的临床应用与研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明军

    2011-01-01

    癌胚抗原、神经元特异性烯醇化酶、细胞角蛋白19片段、前胃泌素释放肽和鳞状细胞癌抗原是常用的肺癌标志物.目前,单一的标志物不能用于无症状人群或高危人群的肺癌筛查,但对肺癌的鉴别诊断、疗效评价、复发或转移监测、预后判断具有重要临床价值.对Dickkopf-1、血浆激肽释放酶、MicroRNA等新发现的肺癌标志物还应进行大量的临床应用评价.今后,应积极探究对肺癌特异性和敏感性俱佳的标志物.%Carcinoma embryonic antigen(CEA), neuron-specific enolase( NSE ), cytokeratin-19 frag-ments,progastrin-releasing peptide( ProGRP )and squamous cell carcinoma antigen( SCCA )are commonly used tumor markers in lung cancer. Currently, single tumor markers can not be used for screening purposes either in asymptomatic populations or in those at high risk of lung cancer. However,they have important clini-cal value in the differential diagnosis,therapy efficacy evaluation,monitoring of recurrence or metastasis,and prognosis of lung cancer. A lot of clinical evaluation of Dickkopf-1, plasma kallikrein, MicroRNA and other newly discovered markers of lung cancer should be done. In the future,the lung cancer markers with superb sensitivity and specificity should be actively explored.

  11. Lungs and Respiratory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... even smaller tubes called bronchioles. Bronchioles end in tiny air sacs called alveoli, where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide actually takes place. Each lung houses about 300-400 million alveoli. The lungs also ...

  12. American Lung Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Washington DC West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming Impacted by Hurricane Harvey? We're here to help. Call our Lung ... more events Latest News Protecting Your Health After Hurricane Harvey August 31, 2017 For Download: Keeping Your Lungs ...

  13. New COMPASS results on the spin structure function $g_1^p$, and QCD fit

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfert, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN SPS has taken data with a polarised muon beam scattering off a polarised NH 3 target in 2011. The beam energy has been increased to 200 GeV compared to 160 GeV in 2007 and thus, higher values of Q 2 and lower values of x are reached. From these data the longitudinal double spin asymmetry A p 1 and the spin-dependent structure function g p 1 are extracted. The results are used in a NLO QCD fit to the world data to obtain the polarised parton distributions and also to test the Bjorken sum rule, connecting the integral of the non-singlet structure function with the ratio of the weak coupling constants

  14. Nuclear Structure Functions and Heavy Flavour Leptoproduction Off the Nucleus at Small x in Perturbative QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Armesto-Pérez, Nestor

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear structure functions and cross-sections for heavy flavour production in lepton-nucleus collisions are investigated in the low x region accessible now or in the near future. The scattering on a heavy nucleus is described by the sum of fan diagrams of BFKL pomerons, which is exact in the high-colour limit. The initial condition for the evolution at x=0.01 is taken from a saturation model, which reproduces the experimental data on the proton. The A dependence of the structure functions is well described by a power factor $A^\\alpha$, with $\\alpha$ reaching values as low as 1/2 at extremely low x. The total cross-sections for heavy flavour production reach values of the order of mb, and the corresponding transverse momentum distributions are sizeable up to transverse momenta larger than the initial large scale $\\sqrt{Q^2+4m_f^2}$.

  15. Nuclear medium effects in structure functions of nucleon at moderate $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Haider, H; Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Simo, I Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments performed on inclusive electron scattering from nuclear targets have measured the nucleon electromagnetic structure functions $F_1(x,Q^2)$, $F_2(x,Q^2)$ and $F_L(x,Q^2)$ in $^{12}C$, $^{27}Al$, $^{56}Fe$ and $^{64}Cu$ nuclei. The measurements have been done in the energy region of $1 GeV^2 < W^2 < 4 GeV^2$ and $Q^2$ region of $0.5 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 4.5 GeV^2$. We have calculated nuclear medium effects in these structure functions arising due to the Fermi motion, binding energy, nucleon correlations, mesonic contributions from pion and rho mesons and shadowing effects. The calculations are performed in a local density approximation using relativistic nucleon spectral function which include nucleon correlations. The numerical results are compared with the recent experimental data from JLab and also with some earlier experiments.

  16. Spin-dependent structure functions in nuclear matter and the polarized EMC effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloët, I C; Bentz, W; Thomas, A W

    2005-07-29

    An excellent description of both spin-independent and spin-dependent quark distributions and structure functions has been obtained with a modified Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model, which is free of unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks--hence incorporating an important aspect of confinement. We utilize this model to investigate nuclear medium modifications to structure functions and find that we are readily able to reproduce both nuclear matter saturation and the experimental F2N(A)/F2N ratio, that is, the European Muon Collaboration (EMC) effect. Applying this framework to determine g1p(A), we find that the ratio g1p(A)/g1p differs significantly from unity, with the quenching caused by the nuclear medium being about twice that of the spin-independent case. This represents an exciting result, which, if confirmed experimentally, will reveal much about the quark structure of nuclear matter.

  17. Extraction of Structure Functions from Quasielastic Electron Scattering (e,e') from Medium and Heavy Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K S

    2005-01-01

    Using a relativistic mean-field single particle knock-out model for (e,e') reactions on nuclei, we investigate approximate treatments of Coulomb distortion effects and the extraction of longitudinal and transverse structure functions. We show that an effective momentum approximation (EMA) when coupled with a focusing factor provides a good description of the transverse contributions to the (e,e') cross sections for electron energies above 300 MeV on 208Pb. This approximation is not as good for the longitudinal contributions even for incident electron eneriges above 1 GeV and if one requires very precise extraction of longitudinal and transverse structure functions in the quasielastic region it is necessary to utilize distortion factors based on a nuclear model and a more accurate inclusion of Coulomb distortion effects.

  18. Unified QCD evolution equations and the dominant behaviour of structure functions at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R; Peschanski, R; Wallon, S

    1994-01-01

    We consider a system of evolution equations for quark and gluon structure functions satisfying the leading-logarithmic behaviour due to both QCD collinear \\left(LLQ^2 \\right) and infrared (LL1/x) singularities. We show that these equations leave undetermined an arbitrary regular function of j in the Mellin-transformed weights. We consider the constraints resulting from energy-momentum conservation and from the decoupling of quark loops in the leading j -plane singularity. These constraints can be fulfilled without influencing the leading-log terms. As a particular consequence of the second constraint, the location of the leading singularity is determined in terms of the (LL1/x) and \\left(LLQ^2 \\right) kernels. It leads to a value significantly lower than the LL1/x evaluation, while remaining at j > 1, and compatible with the behaviour of structure functions observed at HERA.

  19. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  20. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Baillie, N; Zhang, J; Bosted, P; Bultmann, S; Christy, M E; Fenker, H; Griffioen, K A; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, S E; Melnitchouk, W; Tvaskis, V; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Aghasyan, M; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfini, M; Arrington, J; Avakian, H; Baghdasaryan, H; Battaglieri, M; Biselli, A S; Branford, 5 D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Dey, B; Djalali, C; Dodge, G; Domingo, J; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Egiyan, H; Alaoui, A El; Fassi, L El; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Fegan, S; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Guegan, B; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hungerford, E; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ispiryan, M; Isupov, E L; Jawalkar, S S; Jo, H S; Kalantarians, N; Khandaker, M; Khetarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; King, P M; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I J D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; McKinnon, B; Mineeva, T; Morrison, B; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, I; Niculescu, G; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Pereira, S Anefalos; Pisano, S; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seder, E; Sharabian, Y G; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S; Stepanyan, S S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zana, L; Zhao, B

    2011-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to < 100 MeV and their angles to < 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less than a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 < x < 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.

  1. Study of the hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    The hadronic photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is studied in the reaction $\\mathrm{e^+e^-} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{e^+e^-hadrons}$ at LEP with the L3 detector. The data, collected from 1991 to 1995 at a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 91 \\GeV$, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 140~pb$^{-1}$. The photon structure function $F^\\gamma_2$ is measured in the $Q^2$ interval $1.2 \\GeV^2 \\leq Q^2 \\leq 9.0 \\GeV^2$ and the $x$ interval $0.002 < x < 0.2$. $\\FF$ shows a linear growth with $\\ln Q^2$. The value of the slope $\\alpha^{-1}\\mathrm{d}\\FF(Q^2)/\\mathrm{d}\\ln{Q^2}$ is measured to be $0.079 \\pm 0.011 \\pm 0.009$.

  2. Off-shell Corrections and Moments of the Deep Inelastic Nuclear Structure Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Cothran, C D; Liuti, S

    1998-01-01

    We present an improved method for handling off-shell effects in deep inelastic nuclear scattering. With a firm understanding of the effects of the nuclear wave function, including these off-shell corrections as well as binding and nucleon-nucleon correlations, we can begin to examine the role of QCD in nuclei through an analysis of the moments of the nuclear structure function. Our analysis is aimed at extracting the Q^2 dependence of the moments of the nucleon structure function by using the recent high x world Iron data and by properly removing nuclear effects from the perturbative contribution. In addition, we compare quantitatively the behavior of the extracted moments with a simple O(1/Q^2) phenomenological form and we determine the mass term for this parametrization.

  3. A New Target in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: EML4-ALK Fusion Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan WANG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It was only 3 years ago that the fusion gene between echinoderm microtubule-associated protein-like4 (EML4 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK has been identified in a subset of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. EML4-ALK is most often detected in never smokers with lung adenocarcinoma and has unique pathologic features. EML4-ALK fusion gene is oncogenic, which could be suppressed by ALK-inhibitor through blocking the downstream signaling passway of EML4-ALK. This review will focus on the molecular structure, function, biology, detection method and the diagnostic and therapeutic meaning of EML4-ALK of lung cancer.

  4. Perturbative power Q^2-corrections to the structure function g(1)

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2006-01-01

    We show that regulating infrared divergencies generates power (\\sim 1/(Q^2)^k) corrections to the spin structure function g_1 at small x. We present the explicit series of such terms as well as the formulae for their resummation. These contributions are not included in the standard analysis of the experimental data. We argue that accounting for such terms can sizably change the impact of the other power corrections conventionally attributed to the higher twists.

  5. Nuclear Dependence in Weak Structure Functions and the Determination of Weak Mixing Angle

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Simo, I Ruiz; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2013-01-01

    We have studied nuclear medium effects in the weak structure functions $F^A_2(x)$ and $F^A_3(x)$ and in the extraction of weak mixing angle using Paschos Wolfenstein(PW) relation. We have modified the PW relation for nonisoscalar nuclear target. We have incorporated the medium effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, nuclear binding energy, nucleon correlations, pion $\\&$ rho cloud contributions, and shadowing and antishadowing effects.

  6. Hidden Color and the $b_1$ structure function of the deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    The $b_1$ structure function is an observable feature of a spin-1 system sensitive to non-nucleonic components of the target nuclear wave function. A simple model for hidden-color, six-quark configurations is proposed and found to give substantial contributions for values of $ x>0.2$. Good agreement with Hermes data is obtained. Predictions are made for an upcoming JLab experiment.

  7. On the Rise of the Proton Structure Function F_2 Towards Low x

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solovev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement of the derivative (d ln F_2 / d lnx)_(Q^2)= -lambda(x,Q^2) of the proton structure function F_2 is presented in the low x domain of deeply inelastic positron-proton scattering. For 5*10^(-5)=1.5 GeV^2, lambda(x,Q^2) is found to be independent of x and to increase linearly with ln(Q^2).

  8. Small x nonlinear evolution with impact parameter and the structure function data

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear evolution at small values of Bjorken x is evaluated numerically using the dipole framework with impact parameter dependence. Confinement effects are modeled by including masses into the evolution. Sensitivity of the predictions due to different prescriptions of the cuts on large dipole sizes is investigated. Running coupling effects are taken into account in this analysis. Finally, a comparison with the inclusive data from HERA on the structure functions F2 and FL is performed.

  9. The contribution of off-shell gluons to the longitudinal structure function F{sub L}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotikov, A.V. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lipatov, A.V. [Department of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zotov, N.P. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-03-01

    We present the results for the structure function F{sub L} for a gluon target having a non-zero transverse momentum square at order {alpha}{sub s}. The results of a double convolution (with respect to the Bjorken variable x and the transverse momentum) of the perturbative part and the unintegrated gluon densities are compared with recent experimental data for F{sub L} at low x values and with the predictions of other approaches. (orig.)

  10. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  11. Is it possible to unify the QCD evolution of structure functions in X and $Q^{2}$?

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1995-01-01

    We start from the two existing QCD evolution equations for structure functions, the BFKL and DGLAP equations, and discuss the theoretical hints for a unifying picture of the evolution in x and Q^2. The main difficulty is due to the property of angular ordering of the gluon radiation driving the evolution and the cancellation of the related collinear singularities. At the leading \\log\\ 1/x and leading \\log \\ Q^2 accuracy, we find a unified set of equations satisfying the constraints.

  12. Moments of structure functions for $N_f=2$ near the physical point

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, G S; Gläßle, B; Göckeler, M; Najjar, J; Rödl, R; Schäfer, A; Schiel, R; Sternbeck, A; Söldner, W

    2013-01-01

    We report on our on-going study of the lower moments of iso-vector polarised and unpolarised structure functions, $g_A$ and $\\langle x\\rangle_{u-d}$, respectively, and the iso-vector scalar and tensor charge, for $N_f=2$ non-perturbatively improved clover fermions. With pion masses which go down to about 150 MeV, we investigate finite volume effects and excited state contributions.

  13. Precision measurement of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g2 and asymmetries A2

    Science.gov (United States)

    E155 Collaboration; Anthony, P. L.; Arnold, R. G.; Averett, T.; Band, H. R.; Benmouna, N.; Boeglin, W.; Borel, H.; Bosted, P. E.; Bültmann, S. L.; Court, G. R.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Decowski, P.; Depietro, P.; Egiyan, H.; Erbacher, R.; Erickson, R.; Fatemi, R.; Frlez, E.; Griffioen, K. A.; Harris, C.; Hughes, E. W.; Hyde-Wright, C.; Igo, G.; Johnson, J.; King, P.; Kramer, K.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lawrence, D.; Liang, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Lombard-Nelsen, R. M.; McKee, P.; McNulty, D. E.; Meyer, W.; Mitchell, G. S.; Mitchell, J.; Olson, M.; Penttila, S.; Peterson, G. A.; Pitthan, R.; Pocanic, D.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.; Raue, B. A.; Reyna, D.; Ryan, P.; Rochester, L. S.; Rock, S.; Rondon-Aramayo, O.; Sabatie, F.; Smith, T.; Sorrell, L.; Lorant, S. St.; Szalata, Z.; Terrien, Y.; Tobias, A.; Toole, T.; Trentalange, S.; Wesselmann, F. R.; Wright, T. R.; Zeier, M.; Zhu, H.; Zihlmann, B.

    2003-01-01

    We have measured the spin structure functions g2p and g2d and the virtual photon asymmetries A2p and A2d over the kinematic range /0.020. The Efremov-Leader-Teryaev integral is consistent with zero within our measured kinematic range. The absolute value of A2 is significantly smaller than the A2<√R(1+A1)/2 limit.

  14. Coarse-Grained Multifractality Analysis Based on Structure Function Measurements to Discriminate Healthy from Distressed Foetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souad Oudjemia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a combined coarse-grained multifractal method to discriminate between distressed and normal foetuses. The coarse-graining operation was performed by means of a coarse-grained procedure and the multifractal operation was based on a structure function. The proposed method was evaluated by one hundred recordings including eighty normal foetuses and twenty distressed foetuses. We found that it was possible to discriminate between distressed and normal foetuses using the Hurst exponent, singularity, and Holder spectra.

  15. Heart-lung transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Bartley P.; Magliato, Kathy E.

    2014-01-01

    Heart-lung transplantation itself is not a particularly difficult operation technically. It is the setting in which this procedure is performed which is difficult. The three issues of importance in a successful outcome are appropriate harvest of the heart-lung bloc from the donor, careful explant of the heart and lungs of the recipient, and finally the implant of the heart-lung bloc into the recipient. None of this requires extraordinary technical skill, but does require careful coordination ...

  16. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  17. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  18. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondoker M. Akram

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  19. Nuclear uncertainties in the spin-dependent structure functions for direct dark matter detection

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdeno, David G; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Peiro, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    We study the effect that uncertainties in the nuclear spin-dependent structure functions have in the determination of the dark matter (DM) parameters in a direct detection experiment. We show that different nuclear models that describe the spin-dependent structure function of specific target nuclei can lead to variations in the reconstructed values of the DM mass and scattering cross-section. We propose a parametrization of the spin structure functions that allows us to treat these uncertainties as variations of three parameters, with a central value and deviation that depend on the specific nucleus. The method is illustrated for germanium and xenon detectors with an exposure of 300 kg yr, assuming a hypothetical detection of DM and studying a series of benchmark points for the DM properties. We find that the effect of these uncertainties can be similar in amplitude to that of astrophysical uncertainties, especially in those cases where the spin-dependent contribution to the elastic scattering cross-section i...

  20. Scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions in the interplanetary medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Carbone

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling exponents of the velocity structure functions, obtained from the velocity fluctuations measured in the interplanetary space plasma. Using the expression for the energy transfer rate which seems the most relevant in describing the evolution of the pseudo-energy densities in the interplanetary medium, we introduce an energy cascade model derived from a simple fragmentation process, which takes into account the intermittency effect. In the absence and in the presence of the large-scale magnetic field decorrelation effect the model reduces to the fluid and the hydromagnetic p-model, respectively. We show that the scaling exponents of the q-th power of the velocity structure functions, as obtained by the model in the absence of the decorrelation effect, furnishes the best-fit to the data analyzed from the Voyager 2 velocity field measurements at 8.5 AU. Our results allow us to hypothesize a new kind of scale-similarity for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence when the decorrelation effect is at work, related to the fourth-order velocity structure function.

  1. Regression analysis of the structure function for reliability evaluation of continuous-state system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamiz, M.L., E-mail: mgamiz@ugr.e [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Martinez Miranda, M.D. [Departamento de Estadistica e I.O., Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Technical systems are designed to perform an intended task with an admissible range of efficiency. According to this idea, it is permissible that the system runs among different levels of performance, in addition to complete failure and the perfect functioning one. As a consequence, reliability theory has evolved from binary-state systems to the most general case of continuous-state system, in which the state of the system changes over time through some interval on the real number line. In this context, obtaining an expression for the structure function becomes difficult, compared to the discrete case, with difficulty increasing as the number of components of the system increases. In this work, we propose a method to build a structure function for a continuum system by using multivariate nonparametric regression techniques, in which certain analytical restrictions on the variable of interest must be taken into account. Once the structure function is obtained, some reliability indices of the system are estimated. We illustrate our method via several numerical examples.

  2. Measurement of the deuteron elastic structure functions at large momentum transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Kathleen Rae [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    1999-08-01

    The cross section for elastic electron-deuteron scattering has been measured using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. Scattered electrons and recoiling deuterons were detected in coincidence in the two 4 GeV/c High Resolution Spectrometers (HRS) of Hall A. The deuteron elastic structure functions A(Q2) and B(Q2) have been extracted from these data. Results for the measurement of A(Q2) in the range of 0.7 ≤ Q2 ≤ 6.0 (GeV/c)2 are reported. Results for the magnetic structure function, B(Q2), are presented in the range of 0.7 ≤ Q2≤ 1.35 (GeV/c)2. The results for both structure functions are compared to predictions of meson-nucleon based models, both with and without the inclusion of meson-exchange currents. The A(Q2) results are compared to predictions of the dimensional scaling quark model and perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The results can provide insights into the transition from meson-nucleon to quark-gluon descriptions of the nuclear two-body system.

  3. Pion and kaon structure functions at 12 GeV JLab and EIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Pions and kaons are, along with protons and neutrons, the main building blocks of nuclear matter. They are connected to the Goldstone modes of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, the mechanism thought to generate all hadron mass in the visible universe. The distribution of the fundamental constituents, the quarks and gluons, is expected to be different in pions, kaons, and nucleons. However, experimental data are sparse. As a result, there has been persistent doubt about the behavior of the pion's valence quark structure function at large Bjorken-x and virtually nothing is known about the contribution of gluons. A 12 GeV JLab experiment using tagged DIS may contribute to the resolution of the former. The Electron-Ion Collider with an acceptance optimized for forward physics could provide access to structure functions over a larger kinematic region. This would allow for measurements testing if the origin of mass is encoded in the differences of gluons in pions, kaons, and nucleons, and measurements testing assumptions used in the extraction of structure functions and the pion and kaon form factors. Electroweak measurements at an EIC would also potentially allow to disentangle the role of quark flavors at high x. In this talk we will discuss the prospects of such measurements. Supported in part by NSF grants PHY-1306227 and PHY-1306418.

  4. Tests of perturbative QCD using CCFR data for measurements of nucleon structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Leung, W.C.; Quintas, P.Z.; Sciulli, F.; Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Blair, R.E.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States) Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States) Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-04-01

    We present measurements of nucleon structure functions, F[sub 2](x, Q[sup 2]) and xF[sub 3](x, Q[sup 2]), from the high-statistics, high-energy neutrino-iron scattering experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. The existing high-statistics xF[sub 3] determination by the CDHSW collaboration is compared to our data. The data presented here constitute the first corroboration of the QCD prediction of xF[sub 3] evolution at low-x, and yields [Lambda][anti M][anti S] = 210 [+-] 28 [+-] 41 MeV, and a determination of the GLS sum rule at Q[sup 2] = 3 GeV[sup 2], S[sub GLS] = [integral][sup 1][sub x] xF[sub 3]/x dx = 2.50 [+-] 0.018(stat.) [+-]0.078 (syst.). Our value of [Lambda][anti M][anti S] yields [alpha][sub s](M[sub z]) = .111 [+-] .002 [+-] .003 [+-] .003 (scale). Comparison of the neutrino determination of F[sub 2](x, Q[sup 2]) with that obtained from the charged-lepton (e or [mu]) scattering leads to a precise test of the mean-square charge prediction by the Quark Parton Model. The SLAC-CCFR and BCDMS structure function provide a consistent and precise set of structure functions over a large range of Q[sup 2]. (orig.)

  5. 重度肺气肿的内镜下肺减容治疗技术%Application of endoscopic lung volume reduction technique in severe emphysema

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟晶; 郭述良; 贾晋伟; 李一诗

    2013-01-01

    慢性阻塞性肺病(chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases,COPD)在世界范围的发病率和死亡率占主要因素.COPD发展至重度肺气肿阶段时严重影响患者生活质量.内镜肺减容术(endoscopic lung volume reduction,ELVR)是通过支气管镜技术使过度充气的肺叶产生不张,疗效较传统的内科治疗更为确切,与外科肺减容术相比,ELVR以其微创,操作相对简单,并发症和死亡率降低等优点,引起了世界医学界的广泛研究.目前国内外研究较多的内镜下肺减容技术主要包括支气管内单向活瓣技术(one-way endobronchial valves,EBV)、气道旁路支架(airway bypass stents,ABS)、聚合物肺减容术(polymeric lung volume reduction,PLVR)、经支气管镜热蒸汽消融术(bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation,BTVA)和肺减容弹簧圈(lung volume reduction coil,LVRC)等5种.本文将就上述内镜肺减容技术作一综述.%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide.Once the disease develops into severe emphysema,it seriously affects the patients' life quality.Endoscopic lung volume reduction(ELVR) with bronchoscopic techniques to bring about atelectasis of the hyperinflated lobe has been developed and studied widely over the past decade,because it has a better clinical effect than the traditional medicine treatment.The techniques have the advantages of minimally invasive and simple with less complications and lower mortality compared to the open surgical approach.Nowadays the most commonly used ELVR techniques include one-way endobronchial valves (EBV),airway bypass stents (ABS),polymeric lung volume reduction (PLVR),bronchoscopic thermal vapor ablation (BTVA) and lung volume reduction coil (LVRC).In this paper the ELVR techniques are reviewed.

  6. Sex Differences and Sex Steroids in Lung Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Sex differences in the biology of different organ systems and the influence of sex hormones in modulating health and disease are increasingly relevant in clinical and research areas. Although work has focused on sex differences and sex hormones in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, and neuronal systems, there is now increasing clinical evidence for sex differences in incidence, morbidity, and mortality of lung diseases including allergic diseases (such as asthma), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, as well as pulmonary hypertension. Whether such differences are inherent and/or whether sex steroids play a role in modulating these differences is currently under investigation. The purpose of this review is to define sex differences in lung structure/function under normal and specific disease states, with exploration of whether and how sex hormone signaling mechanisms may explain these clinical observations. Focusing on adult age groups, the review addresses the following: 1) inherent sex differences in lung anatomy and physiology; 2) the importance of certain time points in life such as puberty, pregnancy, menopause, and aging; 3) expression and signaling of sex steroid receptors under normal vs. disease states; 4) potential interplay between different sex steroids; 5) the question of whether sex steroids are beneficial or detrimental to the lung; and 6) the potential use of sex steroid signaling as biomarkers and therapeutic avenues in lung diseases. The importance of focusing on sex differences and sex steroids in the lung lies in the increasing incidence of lung diseases in women and the need to address lung diseases across the life span. PMID:22240244

  7. Detection of early subclinical lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis by lung ventilation imaging with hyperpolarised gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Horsley, Alex; Taylor, Chris J; Smith, Laurie; Hughes, David; Horn, Felix C; Swift, Andrew J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Hughes, Paul J; Norquay, Graham; Stewart, Neil J; Collier, Guilhem J; Teare, Dawn; Cunningham, Steve; Aldag, Ina; Wild, Jim M

    2017-08-01

    Hyperpolarised (3)He ventilation-MRI, anatomical lung MRI, lung clearance index (LCI), low-dose CT and spirometry were performed on 19 children (6-16 years) with clinically stable mild cystic fibrosis (CF) (FEV1>-1.96), and 10 controls. All controls had normal spirometry, MRI and LCI. Ventilation-MRI was the most sensitive method of detecting abnormalities, present in 89% of patients with CF, compared with CT abnormalities in 68%, LCI 47% and conventional MRI 22%. Ventilation defects were present in the absence of CT abnormalities and in patients with normal physiology, including LCI. Ventilation-MRI is thus feasible in young children, highly sensitive and provides additional information about lung structure-function relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Measurements of the Separated Longitudinal Structure Function F_L from Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets at Low Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Tvaskis, V; Niculescu, I; Abbott, D; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Avery, S; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A; Blok, H P; Boeglin, W U; Bosted, P E; Brash, E; Breuer, H; Chang, G; Chant, N; Christy, M E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Khayari, N El; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gaskell, D; Garrow, K; Gilman, R; Gueye, P; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Horn, T; Huber, G M; Jackson, H; Jiang, X; Jones, M K; Joo, K; Kelly, J J; Keppel, C E; Kuhn, J; Kinney, E; Klein, A; Kubarovsky, V; Liang, M; Liang, Y; Lolos, G; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; Mbianda, G; McGrath, E; Mckee, D; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchyan, H; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; Navasardyan, T; Niculescu, G; Nozar, M; Ostapenko, T; Papandreou, Z; Potterveld, D; Reimer, P E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R; Stoler, P; Tadevosyan, V; Tang, L; Telfeyan, J; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Uzzle, A; Vidakovic, S; Villano, A; Vulcan, W F; Wang, M; Warren, G; Wesselmann, F; Wojtsekhowski, B; Wood, S A; Xu, C; Yan, C; Yuan, L; Zheng, X; Zihlmann, B; Zhu, H

    2016-01-01

    Structure functions, as measured in lepton-nucleon scattering, have proven to be very useful in studying the quark dynamics within the nucleon. However, it is experimentally difficult to separately determine the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and consequently there are substantially less data available for the longitudinal structure function in particular. Here we present separated structure functions for hydrogen and deuterium at low four--momentum transfer squared, Q^2< 1 GeV^2, and compare these with parton distribution parameterizations and a k_T factorization approach. While differences are found, the parameterizations generally agree with the data even at the very low Q^2 scale of the data. The deuterium data show a smaller longitudinal structure function, and smaller ratio of longitudinal to transverse cross section R, than the proton. This suggests either an unexpected difference in R for the proton and neutron or a suppression of the gluonic distribution in nuclei.

  9. Lung function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930500 Application of flow volume loops on di-agnosis of pulmonary diseases.WANG Shuchuan(王枢传),et al.Dept Thoraic Med,TianjinChest Hosp,Tianjin,300000.Tianjin Med J1993;21(5):262—263.Seven flow volume loops in patients with vari-ous pulmonary diseases were presented.Case 1showed a normal picture of flow volume loops.Case 2,a patient with chronic bronchitis,pre-sented a typical and characteristic obstructiveconfiguration.Case 3,a patient with asthma,re-sulted in a reversible obstructive picture withgreat change before and after inhalation of abronchodilator.Case 4,a long term smoker,hada picture of small airway obstruction.Though

  10. 体外膜肺氧合在肺移植围手术期的应用30例%Perioperative application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in lung transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑明峰; 陈静瑜; 朱幸沨; 何毅军; 张稷; 叶书高; 刘峰; 陈若; 卫栋

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the perioperative application of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in lung transplantation. Methods Thirty patients with primary and end-stage pulmonary disease accompanied by pulmonary hypertension were subjected to operation under the accessory of ECMO. Eighteen patients received single-lung transplantation and 12 patients bilateral sequential lung transplantation without sternal division in our hospital from November 2005 to July 2009. In 2 patients ECMO was given before operation and maintained for 19 days and 6 days respectively. In the remaining patients, ECMO pipeline was placed after anesthesia. After lung trarnsplantation,ECMO was removed after the recipients' oxygen saturation and hemodynamics were stable. Results In all recipients lung transplantation was successfully done. ECOM was removed in 27recipients after operation, and the rest 3 recipients were supported by ECMO after operation: the ECMO was removed at 36th h and 7th day after lung transplantation in two patients respectively,and another one was supported by ECMO for 5 days after operation and suffered acute kidney failure, and died of multiple organ failure 2 weeks post-transplantation. Two recipients were infected in thigh arteriovenous cut and one suffered femoral artery thrombosis, but all of them got better and discharged from hospital after treatment. Conclusion ECMO can be used for lung transplantation on patients with primary and secondary pulmonary hypertension. The complications may be associated with patients'serious condition and unstable hemodynamics. Early detection and active and effective treatment can improve patient's prognosis.%目的 总结体外膜肺氧合(ECMO)在肺移植围手术期应用的经验.方法 30例原发性终末期肺病伴继发性肺动脉高压的患者在肺移植术中应用了ECMO,其中单肺移植18例,不横断胸骨序贯式双肺移植12例.在术前使用ECMO维持者2例,分别维持19 d和6 d;其他患者在麻醉

  11. Factorization and infrared properties of non-perturbative contributions to DIS structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Greco, M. [University Roma Tre, Department of Physics (Italy); INFN, Rome (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    In this paper we present a new derivation of QCD factorization. We deduce the k{sub T} and collinear factorizations for the DIS structure functions by consecutive reductions of a more general theoretical construction. We begin by studying the amplitude of forward Compton scattering off a hadron target, representing this amplitude as a set of convolutions of two blobs connected by the simplest, two-parton intermediate states. Each blob in the convolutions can contain both the perturbative and non-perturbative contributions. We formulate conditions for separating the perturbative and non-perturbative contributions and attributing them to the different blobs. After that the convolutions correspond to QCD factorization. Then we reduce this totally unintegrated (basic) factorization first to k{sub T} -factorization and finally to collinear factorization. In order to yield a finite expression for the Compton amplitude, the integration over the loop momentum in the basic factorization must be free of both ultraviolet and infrared singularities. This obvious mathematical requirement leads to theoretical restrictions on the non-perturbative contributions (parton distributions) to the Compton amplitude and the DIS structure functions related to the Compton amplitude through the Optical Theorem. In particular, our analysis excludes the use of the singular factors x{sup -a} (with a >0) in the fits for the quark and gluon distributions because such factors contradict the integrability of the basic convolutions for the Compton amplitude. This restriction is valid for all DIS structure functions in the framework of both k{sub T} -factorization and collinear factorization if we attribute the perturbative contributions only to the upper blob. The restrictions on the non-perturbative contributions obtained in the present paper can easily be extended to other QCD processes where the factorization is exploited. (orig.)

  12. A structure-function study of MID1 mutations associated with a mild Opitz phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnayer, Laila; Khuri, Sawsan; Merheby, Hassan Al-Ali; Meroni, Germana; Elsas, Louis J

    2006-03-01

    The X-linked form of Opitz syndrome (OS) affects midline structures and produces a characteristic, but heterogeneous, phenotype that may include severe mental retardation, hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, cleft lip/cleft palate, congenital heart disease, laryngotracheal defects, and hypospadias. The MID1 gene was implicated in OS by linkage to Xp22. It encodes a 667 amino acid protein that contains a RING finger motif, two B-box zinc fingers, a coiled-coil, a fibronectin type III (FNIII) domain, and a B30.2 domain. Several mutations in MID1 are associated with severe OS. Here, we describe an intelligent male with a milder phenotype characterized by hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, widow's peak, mild hypospadias, pectus excavatum, and a surgically corrected tracheo-esophageal fistula. He has an above average intelligence and no cleft lip/palate or heart disease. We identified a novel mutation in MID1 (P441L) which is in exon 8 and functionally associated with the FNIII domain. While OS phenotypes have been attributed to mutations in the C-terminal part of MID1, little is currently known about the structure-function relationships of MID1 mutations, and how they affect phenotype. We find from a literature review that missense mutations within the FNIII domain of MID1 are associated with a milder presentation of OS than missense mutations elsewhere in MID1. All truncating mutations (frameshift, insertions/deletions) lead to severe OS. We used homology analysis of the MID1 FNIII domain to investigate structure-function changes caused by our missense mutation. This and other missense mutations probably cause disruption of protein-protein interactions, either within MID1 or between MID1 and other proteins. We correlate these protein structure-function findings to the absence of CNS or palatal changes and conclude that the FNIII domain of the MID1 protein may be involved in midline differentiation after neural tube and palatal structures are completed.

  13. Spin Structure Functions of the Deuteron Measured with CLAS in and above the Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmawardane, Kahanawita [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    Spin structure functions of the nucleon in the region of large x and small to moderate Q2 continue to be of high current interest. The first moment of the spin structure function g1, γ1, goes through a rapid transition from the photon point (Q2=0), where it is constrained by the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule, to the deep inelastic limit where it is sensitive to the nucleon spin fraction carried by quarks. The interesting behavior in the transition region is dominated by baryon resonance excitations. We concluded an experiment to measure these observables for deuterium as part of the ''EG1'' run group in Jefferson Lab's Hall B. We used a highly polarized electron beam with energies from 1.6 GeV to 5.7 GeV and a cryogenic polarized ND3 target together with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) to accumulate over 11 billion events. In this thesis, we present results for the spin structure function g$d\\atop{1}$ (x,Q2), as well as its first moment, γ$d\\atop{1}$(Q2) in and above the resonance region over a Q2 range from 0.05 to 5 Gev2, based on the data taken with beam energies of 1.6 and 5.7 GeV. We also extract the behavior of A$d\\atop{1}$(x) at large x. Our data are consistent with the Hyperfine-perturbed quark model calculation which predicts that A$d\\atop{1}$ (x → 1) → 1. We also see evidence for duality in g$d\\atop{1}$ (x, Q2) at Q2 > GeV2.

  14. A detailed study of nucleon structure function in nuclei in the valence quark region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, N. [INFN-Laboratori, Nazionali di Frascati (Italy)

    1994-04-01

    The so called {open_quotes}EMC effect{close_quotes} discovered during the 1980`s, has caused a big controversy in the community of nuclear and high energy physicists; during the last ten years, five experiments have been performed in different laboratories and several hundreds of papers about the possible interpretation of the modification of the nucleon structure function inside nuclei have been published. However, from the experimental point of view, the main goal of four experiments (EMC, BCDMS, NMC, FNAL) has been to emphasize the region of low x{sub b}, where shadowing effects appear. In the region of valence quarks and nuclear effects (x{sub b} > 0.1 - 0.2) the most reliable data presently available are from the SLAC E139 experiment performed in 1983 with only 80 hours of beam time. New precise data in the valence quark region are necessary to measure separate structure functions F{sub 2}(x{sub b}, Q{sup 2}) and R{sup lt}(x{sub b},Q{sup 2}) = {sigma}{sub l}/{sigma}{sub t}, and to investigate the real A-dependence of the ratio between bound and free-nucleon structure functions which is not completely defined by the SLAC data. Moreover, from the nuclear physics point of view, a measurement on some unexplored nuclei, like {sup 3}He and {sup 48}Ca, would be of great interest. The intermediate scaling region (0.1 < x{sub b} < 0.7) would be accessible at CEBAF if the machine energy will reach 6-8 GeV, as suggested by all the tests performed on the RF cavities. This physics program has been already presented in two letter of intents.

  15. Gluon contribution to the structure function $g_{2}(x,Q^{2})$

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the one-loop twist-3 gluon contribution to the flavor-singlet structure function g_2(x,Q^2) in polarized deep-inelastic scattering and find that it is dominated by the contribution of the three-gluon operator with the lowest anomalous dimension (for each moment N). The similar property was observed earlier for the nonsinglet distributions, although the reason is in our case different. The result is encouraging and suggests a simple evolution pattern of g_2(x,Q^2) in analogy with the conventional description of twist-2 parton distributions.

  16. Measurement of the Low-x Behaviour of the Photon Structure Function $F2-\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauke, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schmitt, S.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Ward, J.J.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The photon structure function F2-gamma(x,Q**2) has been measured using data taken by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies of 91Gev, 183Gev and 189Gev, in Q**2 ranges of 1.5 to 30.0 GeV**2 (LEP1), and 7.0 to 30.0 GeV**2 (LEP2), probing lower values of x than ever before. Since previous OPAL analyses, new Monte Carlo models and new methods, such as multi-variable unfolding, have been introduced, reducing significantly the model dependent systematic errors in the measurement.

  17. Structure, function and physiological consequences of virally encoded chemokine seven transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Smit, M J; Waldhoer, M

    2008-01-01

    A number of human and animal herpes viruses encode G-protein coupled receptors with seven transmembrane (7TM) segments-most of which are clearly related to human chemokine receptors. It appears, that these receptors are used by the virus for immune evasion, cellular transformation, tissue targeting...... pathogenesis is still poorly understood. Here we focus on the current knowledge of structure, function and trafficking patterns of virally encoded chemokine receptors and further address the putative roles of these receptors in virus survival and host -cell and/or -immune system modulation. Finally, we...

  18. Perturbative Q{sup 2}-power corrections to the structure function g{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Greco, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma (Italy); INFN, Roma (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    We show that ({proportional_to}1/(Q{sup 2}){sup k}) power corrections to the spin structure function g{sub 1} at small x are generated perturbatively from the regulated infrared divergencies. We present the explicit series of such terms as well as the formulae for their resummation. These contributions are not included in the standard analysis of the experimental data. We argue that accounting for such terms can sizably change the impact of the power corrections conventionally attributed to the higher twists. (orig.)

  19. Description of the spin structure function g_1 at arbitrary $x$ and arbitrary Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2007-01-01

    The explicit expressions describing the structure function g_1 at arbitrary x and Q^2 are obtained. In the first place, they combine the well-known DGLAP expressions for g_1 with the total resummation of leading logarithms of x, which makes possible to cover the kinematic region of arbitrary x and large Q^2. In order to cover the small-Q^2 region the shift Q^2 -> Q^2 + mu^2 in the large-Q^2 expressions for g_1 is suggested and values of mu are estimated. The expressions obtained do not require singular factors x^{-a} in the fits for initial parton densities.

  20. Small -x behavior of the non-singlet and singlet structure functions g_1

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2003-01-01

    Explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet structure functions g_1 at the small $x$-region are obtained. They include the total resummation of double-logarithmic contributions and accounting for the running QCD coupling effects. We predict that both the non-singlet and singlet g_1 asymptotically ~ x^{- \\Delta}, with the singlet intercept = 0.86 and being more than twice larger than the non-singlet intercept = 0.4. The impact of the initial quark and gluon densities on the sign of g_1 at x << 1 is discussed.

  1. Human protamines and the developing spermatid:their structure, function, expression and relationship with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VincentW.Aoki; DouglasT.Carrell

    2003-01-01

    During spermiogenesis, the protamine proteins play an integral role in spennatid chromatin compaction.Recent research has focused on many facets of protamine biology, including protamine gene and protein structure/function relationships, mechanisms of protamine expression regulation and involvement of the protamines in male fertility. In this paper, we review our current understanding of the structure and function of the protamine-1 (P1) and protamine-2 (P2) proteins and genes, the expression and regulation of these genes and the relationship between the protamines and male fertility. In addition, we offer a brief outlook on future investigation into protamine proteins.

  2. QED Correction to Asymmetry for Polarized ep Scattering from the Method of Electron Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Igor Akushevich; Nikolai Merenkov

    2004-03-01

    The electron structure function method is applied to calculate model-independent radiative corrections to an asymmetry of electron-proton scattering. The representations for both spin-independent and spin-dependent parts of the cross-section are derived. Master formulae take into account the leading corrections in all orders and the main contribution of the second order next-to-leading ones and have accuracy at the level of one per mille. Numerical calculations illustrate our analytical results for both elastic and deep inelastic events.

  3. A study of nuclear effect in $F_3$ structure function in the deep inelastic $\

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, M Sajjad; Singh, S K; Vacas, M J Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We study nuclear effect in the $F^A_3(x)$ structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, target mass correction, shadowing and anti-shadowing corrections. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations for nuclear matter. Results for $F^A_3(x)$ have been compared with the results reported at NuTeV and also with some of the older experiments reported in the literature.

  4. Microscopic Calculation of the Inclusive Electron Scattering Structure Function in 16O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen H.

    2000-02-01

    We calculate the charge form factor and the longitudinal structure function for 16O and compare with the available experimental data, up to a momentum transfer of 4 fm-1. The ground-state correlations are generated using the coupled-cluster [ exp\\(S\\)] method, together with the realistic v18 NN interaction and the Urbana IX three-nucleon interaction. Center-of-mass corrections are dealt with by adding a center-of-mass Hamiltonian to the usual internal Hamiltonian, and by means of a many-body expansion for the computation of the observables measured in the center-of-mass system.

  5. Microscopic calculation of the inclusive electron scattering structure function in O-16

    CERN Document Server

    Mihaila, B; Mihaila, Bogdan; Heisenberg, Jochen

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the charge form factor and the longitudinal structure function for $^{16}$O and compare with the available experimental data, up to a momentum transfer of 4 fm$^{-1}$. The ground state correlations are generated using the coupled cluster [exp(S}] method, together with the realistic v-18 NN interaction and the Urbana IX three-nucleon interaction. Center-of-mass corrections are dealt with by adding a center-of-mass Hamiltonian to the usual internal Hamiltonian, and by means of a many-body expansion for the computation of the observables measured in the center-of-mass system.

  6. Strangeness content and structure function of the nucleon in a statistical quark model

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, L A; Tomio, L

    1999-01-01

    The strangeness content of the nucleon is determined from a statistical model using confined quark levels, and is shown to have a good agreement with the corresponding values extracted from experimental data. The quark levels are generated in a Dirac equation that uses a linear confining potential (scalar plus vector). With the requirement that the result for the Gottfried sum rule violation, given by the new muon collaboration (NMC), is well reproduced, we also obtain the difference between the structure functions of the proton and neutron, and the corresponding sea quark contributions. (27 refs).

  7. Gold-plated moments of nucleon structure functions in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lensky, Vadim; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We obtain leading- and next-to-leading order predictions of chiral perturbation theory for several prominent moments of nucleon structure functions. These free-parameter free results turn out to be in overall agreement with the available empirical information on all of the considered moments, in the region of low-momentum transfer ($Q^2 < 0.3$ GeV$^2$). Especially surprising is the situation for the $\\delta_{LT}$ moment, which thus far was not reproducible for proton and neutron simultaneously in chiral perturbation theory. This problem, known as the "$\\delta_{LT}$ puzzle," is not seen in the present calculation.

  8. Measurements of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q{sup 2}) for 0.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Alexa; B. D. Anderson; K. A. Aniol; K. Arundell; L. Auerbach; F. T. Baker; J. Berthot; P. Y. Bertin; W. Bertozzi; L. Bimbot; W. U. Boeglin; E. J. Brash; V. Breton; H. Breuer; E. Burtin; J. R. Calarco; L. S. Cardman; C. Cavata; C.-C. Chang; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; E. Cisbani; D. S. Dale; N. Degrande; R. De Leo; A. Deur; N. d' Hose; B. Diederich; J. J. Domingo; M. B. Epstein; L. A. Ewell; J. M. Finn; K. G. Fissum; H. Fonvieille; B. Frois; S. Frullani; H. Gao; J. Gao; F. Garibaldi; A. Gasparian,; S. Gilad; R. Gilman; A. Glamazdin; C. Glashausser; J. Gomez; V. Gorbenko; J.-O. Hansen; R. Holmes; M. Holtrop; C. Howell; G. M. Huber; C. Hyde-Wright; M. Iodice; C. W. de Jager; S. Jaminion; J. Jardillier; M. K. Jones; C. Jutier,; W. Kahl; S. Kato; A. T. Katramatou; J. J. Kelly; S. Kerhoas; A. Ketikyan; M. Khayat; K. Kino; L. H. Kramer; K. S. Kumar; G. Kumbartzki; M. Kuss; G. Lavessiere; A. Leone; J. J. LeRose; M. Liang; R. A. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; G. J. Lolos; R. W. Lourie; R. Madey,; K. Maeda; S. Malov; D. M. Manley; D. J. Margaziotis; P. Markowitz; J. Marroncle; J. Martino; C. J. Martoff; K. McCormick; J. McIntyre; R. L. J. van der Meer; S. Mehrabyan; Z.-E. Meziani; R. Michaels; G. W. Miller; J. Y. Mougey; S. K. Nanda; D. Neyret; E. A. J. M. Offermann; Z. Papandreou; C. F. Perdrisat; R. Perrino; G. G. Petratos; S. Platchkov; R. Pomatsalyuk; D. L. Prout; V. A. Punjabi; T. Pussieux; G. Quemener; R. D. Ransome; O. Ravel; Y. Roblin; D. Rowntree; G. Rutledge; P. M. Rutt; A. Saha; T. Saito; A. J. Sarty; A. Serdarevic,; T. Smith; K. Soldi; P. Sorokin; P. A. Souder; R. Suleiman; J. A. Templon; T. Terasawa; L. Todor; H. Tsubota; H. Ueno; P. E. Ulmer; G. M. Urciuoli; L. Van Hoorebeke; P. Vernin; B. Vlahovic; H. Voskanyan; J. W. Watson; L. B. Weinstein; K. Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; B. B. Wojtsekhowski; D. G. Zainea; W-M. Zhang; J. Zhao; Z.-L. Zhou

    1999-02-15

    The deuteron elastic structure function A(Q{sup 2}) has been extracted in the range 0.7 < or = Q{sup 2} < or = 6.0 (GeV/c){sup 2} from cross section measurements of elastic electron-deuteron scattering in coincidence using the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Laboratory. The data are compared to theoretical models, based on the impulse approximation with the inclusion of meson-exchange currents, and to predictions of quark dimensional scaling and perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  9. Target mass corrections for spin-dependent structure functions in collinear factorization

    CERN Document Server

    Accardi, A

    2008-01-01

    We derive target mass corrections (TMC) for the spin-dependent nucleon structure function g1 and polarization asymmetry A1 in collinear factorization at leading twist. The TMCs are found to be significant for g1 at large xB, even at relatively high Q^2 values, but largely cancel in A1. A comparison of TMCs obtained from collinear factorization and from the operator product expansion shows that at low Q^2 the corrections drive the proton A1 in opposite directions.

  10. First Measurement of the Tensor Structure Function $b_{1}$ of the Deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Baturin, V; Beckmann, M; Belostotskii, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, Helmut B; Borisov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E G; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Feshchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Graw, G; Grebenyuk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Gregor, I M; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikas, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lü, H; Lü, J; Lu, S; Ma, B Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Miklukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Pickert, N; Potashov, S Yu; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T A; Shutov, V; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S P; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A R; Tkabladze, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; Van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, M C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2005-01-01

    The \\Hermes experiment has investigated the tensor spin structure of the deuteron using the 27.6 GeV/c positron beam of \\Hera. The use of a tensor polarized deuteron gas target with only a negligible residual vector polarization enabled the first measurement of the tensor asymmetry $\\At$ and the tensor structure function $\\bd$ for average values of the Bj{\\o}rken variable $0.01 <5 {\\rm GeV^2}$. The quantities $\\At$ and $\\bd$ are found to be non-zero. The rise of $\\bd$ for decreasing values of $x$ can be interpreted to originate from the same mechanism that leads to nuclear shadowing in unpolarized scattering.

  11. Moments of the neutron g2 structure function at intermediate Q2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvignon, P.; Liyanage, N.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Slifer, K.; Aniol, K.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Camsonne, A.; Cates, G. D.; Chang, C. C.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Deur, A.; Dutta, D.; Ent, R.; Feuerbach, R.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Gorbenko, V.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Ibrahim, H.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kelleher, A.; Kelly, J.; Keppel, C.; Kim, W.; Korsch, W.; Kramer, K.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Ma, B.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; McCormick, K.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Paschke, K.; Reitz, B.; Saha, A.; Shneor, R.; Singh, J.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, K.; Wijesooriya, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Woo, S.; Yang, J.-C.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab E01-012 Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We present new experimental results for the 3He spin structure function g2 in the resonance region at Q2 values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c )2. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were extracted. Our main result, the inelastic contribution to the neutron d2 matrix element, was found to be small at =2.4 (GeV/c ) 2 and in agreement with the lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for 3He and the neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low x unmeasured region.

  12. Measurement of the open-charm contribution to the diffractive proton structure function

    CERN Document Server

    Chekanov, S; Krakauer, D A; Loizides, J H; Magill, S; Musgrave, B; Repond, J; Yoshida, R; Mattingly, M C K; Antonioli, P; Bari, G; Basile, M; Bellagamba, L; Boscherini, D; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Contin, A; Corradi, M; De Pasquale, S; Giusti, P; Iacobucci, G; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Palmonari, F; Pesci, A; Sartorelli, G; Zichichi, A; Aghuzumtsyan, G; Bartsch, D; Brock, I; Goers, S; Hartmann, H; Hilger, E; Irrgang, P; Jakob, H P; Kappes, A; Katz, U F; Kind, O; Meyer, U; Paul, E; Rautenberg, J; Renner, R; Stifutkin, A; Tandler, J; Voss, K C; Wang, M; Weber, A; Bailey, D S; Brook, N H; Cole, J E; Foster, B; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Robins, S; Rodrigues, E; Scott, J; Tapper, R J; Wing, M; Capua, M; Mastroberardino, A; Schioppa, M; Susinno, G; Kim, J Y; Kim, Y K; Lee, J H; Lim, I T; Pac, M Y; Caldwell, A; Helbich, M; Liu, X; Mellado, B; Ning, Y; Paganis, S; Ren, Z; Schmidke, W B; Sciulli, F; Chwastowski, J; Eskreys, Andrzej; Figiel, J; Olkiewicz, K; Stopa, P; Zawiejski, L; Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Grabowska-Bold, I; Kisielewska, D; Kowal, A M; Kowal, M; Kowalski, T; Przybycien, M B; Suszycki, L; Szuba, D; Szuba, J; Kotanski, A; Slominski, W; Bauerdick, L A T; Behrens, U; Bloch, I; Borras, K; Chiochia, V; Dannheim, D; Drews, G; Fourletova, J; Fricke, U; Geiser, A; Göbel, F; Göttlicher, P; Gutsche, O; Haas, T; Hain, W; Hartner, G F; Hillert, S; Kahle, B; Kötz, U; Kowalski, H; Kram, G; Labes, H; Lelas, D; Löhr, B; Mankel, R; Melzer-Pellmann, I A; Moritz, M; Nguyen, C N; Notz, D; Petrucci, M C; Polini, A; Raval, A; Schneekloth, U; Selonke, F; Stoesslein, U; Wessoleck, H; Wolf, G; Youngman, C; Zeuner, W; Schlenstedt, S; Barbagli, G; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Pelfer, P G; Bamberger, A; Benen, A; Coppola, N; Germany, L M; Bell, M; Bussey, P J; Doyle, A T; Glasman, C; Hamilton, J; Hanlon, S; Lee, S W; Lupi, A; Saxon, D H; Skillicorn, I O; Gialas, I; Bodmann, B; Carli, T; Holm, U; Klimek, K; Krumnack, N; Lohrmann, E; Milite, M; Salehi, H; Stonjek, S; Wick, K; Ziegler, A; Collins-Tooth, C; Foudas, C; Goncalo, R; Long, K R; Tapper, A D; Cloth, P; Filges, D; Nagano, K; Tokushuku, K; Yamada, S; Yamazaki, Y; Barakbaev, A N; Boos, E G; Pokrovskiy, N S; Zhautykov, B O; Lim, H; Son, D; Barreiro, F; González, O; Labarga, L; Del Peso, J; Tassi, E; Terron, J; Vázquez, M; Barbi, M; Corriveau, F; Gliga, S; Lainesse, J; Padhi, S; Stairs, D G; Tsurugai, T; Antonov, A; Danilov, P; Dolgoshein, B A; Gladkov, D; Sosnovtsev, V V; Suchkov, S; Dementiev, R K; Ermolov, P F; Golubkov, Yu A; Katkov, I I; Khein, L A; Korzhav--, I A; Kuzmin, V A; Levchenko, B B; Lukina, O Yu; Proskuryakov, A S; Shcheglova, L M; Vlasov, N N; Zotkin, S A; Grijpink, S; Koffeman, E; Kooijman, P; Maddox, E; Pellegrino, A; Schagen, S; Tiecke, H G; Velthuis, J J; Wiggers, L; De Wolf, E; Brümmer, N; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Ling, T Y; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cottrell, A; Devenish, R C E; Ferrando, J; Grzelak, G; Patel, S; Sutton, M R; Walczak, R; Bertolin, A; Brugnera, R; Carlin, R; Dal Corso, F; Dusini, S; Garfagnini, A; Limentani, S; Longhin, A; Parenti, A; Posocco, M; Stanco, L; Turcato, M; Heaphy, E A; Metlica, F; Oh, B Y; Whitmore, J J; Iga, Y; D'Agostini, Giulio; Marini, G; Nigro, A; Hart, J C; McCubbin, N A; Heusch, C A; Park, I H; Pavel, N; Abramowicz, H; Gabareen, A; Kananov, S; Kreisel, A; Levy, A; Kuze, M; Abe, T; Fusayasu, T; Kagawa, S; Kohno, T; Tawara, T; Yamashita, T; Hamatsu, R; Hirose, T; Inuzuka, M; Kitamura, S; Matsuzawa, K; Nishimura, T; Arneodo, M; Ferrero, M I; Monaco, V; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Koop, T; Levman, G M; Martin, J F; Mirea, A; Butterworth, J M; Gwenlan, C; Hall-Wilton, R; Jones, T W; Lightwood, M S; West, B J; Ciborowski, J; Ciesielski, R; Nowak, R J; Pawlak, J M; Sztuk, J; Tymieniecka, T; Ukleja, A; Ukleja, J; Adamus, M; Plucinsky, P P; Eisenberg, Y; Gladilin, L K; Hochman, D; Karshon, U; Kcira, D; Lammers, S; Li, L; Reeder, D D; Savin, A A; Smith, W H; Dhawan, S; Straub, P B; Bhadra, S; Catterall, C D; Fourletov, S; Hartner, G; Menary, S R; Soares, M; Standage, J

    2003-01-01

    Production of D*+/-(2010) mesons in diffractive deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 82 pb^{-1}. Diffractive events were identified by the presence of a large rapidity gap in the final state. Differential cross sections have been measured in the kinematic region 1.5 1.5 GeV and |\\eta(D*+/-)| < 1.5. The measured cross sections are compared to theoretical predictions. The results are presented in terms of the open-charm contribution to the diffractive proton structure function. The data demonstrate a strong sensitivity to the diffractive parton densities.

  13. Nucleon $g-2$ Structure Function at Large $x$ and Quark-Gluons Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zein-Eddine Meziani

    2009-12-01

    We discuss two recently carried out experiments at Jefferson Lab that measured with precision the spin structure function of the nucleon g2, aiming at the determination of the twist-3 matrix element known as d2 for both the proton and the neutron. This matrix element is related to the average Lorentz color force that a quark experiences just at the instant it is struck. It is also interpreted as a measurement of a linear combination of the electric and magnetic “color polarizability” in the nucleon.

  14. High energy factorization predictions for the charm structure function $F_{2}^{c}$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Munier, S

    1998-01-01

    High energy factorization predictions for F2^c are derived using BFKL descriptions of the proton structure function F2 at HERA. The model parameters are fixed by a fit of F2 at small x. Two different approaches of the non perturbative proton input are shown to correspond to the factorization at the gluon or quark level, respectively. The predictions for F2^c are in agreement with the data within the present error bars. However, the photon wave-function formulation (factorization at quark level) predicts significantly higher F2^c than both gluon factorization and a next-leading order DGLAP model.

  15. Recent COMPASS results on the polarized structure function $g_{1}^{d}$ of the deuteron

    CERN Document Server

    Quintans, Catarina

    2007-01-01

    The study of the spin dependent structure functions of the deuteron is part of a broad physics program addressed by the COMPASS collaboration at CERN. The longitudinal spin asymmetry $A^{d}_{1}$ is evaluated from data on inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarised muons off a large $^{6}$LiD polarised target. Recent results on $g^{d}_{1}$ both for low and high Q$^{2}$ are presented. The obtained values for the first moment $\\Gamma^{d}_{1}$ and the flavor-singlet axial current $a_{0}$ are also shown.

  16. Nucleon structure functions from. nu. sub. mu. -Fe scattering at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.H.; Sandler, P.H. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison (USA)); Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Arroyo, C.; Bachmann, K.T.; Blair, R.E.; Foudas, C.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H. (Columbia Univ., New York (USA)); Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.O.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.; Schellman, H.; Yovanovitch, D. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; De Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Preliminary measurements of structure functions have been made from a sample of 1,281,000 {nu}{sub {mu}} and 270,000 anti {nu}{sub {mu}} charged current events with 30 GeV < E{sub {nu}} < 600 GeV. These include a new value of the Gross-Llewellyn Smith Sum Rule, {integral} (1/x)(xF{sub 3})dx = 2.66 {+-} .03 (stat) {+-} .08 (syst), the ratio of cross sections, {sigma}(anti {nu}{sub {mu}})/{sigma}({nu}{sub {mu}}) = .511 {+-} .002 (stat) {+-} .005 (syst), and an analysis of the Q{sup 2} evolution of xF{sub 3}. (orig.).

  17. Structure functions and particle production in the cumulative region two different exponentials

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, M

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of the recently proposed QCD based parton model for the cumulative phenomena in the interactions with nuclei two mechanisms for particle production, direct and spectator ones, are analysed. It is shown that due to final state interactions the leading terms of the direct mechanism contribution are cancelled and the spectator mechanism is the dominant one. It leads to a smaller slope of the cumulative particle production rates compared to the slope of the nuclear structure function in the cumulative region x>1, in agreement with the recent experimental data.

  18. Photon structure functions and azimuthal correlations of lepton pairs in tagged $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palit, S; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Rind, O; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Ziegler, F; Zilizi, G

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the QED structure of the photon based on the reaction ee to ee gamma /sup (*)/(P/sup 2/) gamma *(Q/sup 2/) to ee mu mu are discussed. This review is an update of the discussion of the results on the QED structure of the photon and covers the published measurements of the photon structure functions F/sub 2//sup gamma /, F/sub A//sup gamma / and F/sub B//sup gamma / and of the differential cross-section d sigma /dx for the exchange of two virtual photons. (10 refs).

  19. Measurement of the photon structure function F2 gamma with the L3 detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2005-01-01

    The e+e- -> e+e- hadrons reaction, where one of the two electrons is detected in a low polar-angle calorimeter, is analysed in order to measure the hadronic photon structure function F2gamma . The full high-energy and high-luminosity data set, collected with the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies 189-209GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 608/pb is used. The Q^2 range 11-34GeV^2 and the x range 0.006-0.556 are considered. The data are compared with recent parton density functions.

  20. Automatic system for quantification and visualization of lung aeration on chest computed tomography images: the Lung Image System Analysis - LISA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felix, John Hebert da Silva; Cortez, Paulo Cesar, E-mail: jhsfelix@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Teleinformatica; Holanda, Marcelo Alcantara [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Walter Cantidio. Dept. de Medicina Clinica

    2010-12-15

    High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) is the exam of choice for the diagnostic evaluation of lung parenchyma diseases. There is an increasing interest for computational systems able to automatically analyze the radiological densities of the lungs in CT images. The main objective of this study is to present a system for the automatic quantification and visualization of the lung aeration in HRCT images of different degrees of aeration, called Lung Image System Analysis (LISA). The secondary objective is to compare LISA to the Osiris system and also to specific algorithm lung segmentation (ALS), on the accuracy of the lungs segmentation. The LISA system automatically extracts the following image attributes: lungs perimeter, cross sectional area, volume, the radiological densities histograms, the mean lung density (MLD) in Hounsfield units (HU), the relative area of the lungs with voxels with density values lower than -950 HU (RA950) and the 15th percentile of the least density voxels (PERC15). Furthermore, LISA has a colored mask algorithm that applies pseudo-colors to the lung parenchyma according to the pre-defined radiological density chosen by the system user. The lungs segmentations of 102 images of 8 healthy volunteers and 141 images of 11 patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) were compared on the accuracy and concordance among the three methods. The LISA was more effective on lungs segmentation than the other two methods. LISA's color mask tool improves the spatial visualization of the degrees of lung aeration and the various attributes of the image that can be extracted may help physicians and researchers to better assess lung aeration both quantitatively and qualitatively. LISA may have important clinical and research applications on the assessment of global and regional lung aeration and therefore deserves further developments and validation studies. (author)

  1. Impact of the anti-aquaporin-4 autoantibody on inner retinal structure, function and structure-function associations in Japanese patients with optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshiko; Mori, Sotaro; Ueda, Kaori; Kurimoto, Takuji; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Yamada, Yuko; Nakashima, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    Purpose An autoantibody against aquaporin-4 (AQP4 Ab) is highly specific for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder and plays a pathogenic role in this disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of AQP4 Ab on inner retinal structure, function, and the structure−function relationships in eyes with optic neuritis. Methods Thirty five eyes from 25 cases who had received visual function tests and RTVue optical coherence tomography (OCT) measurement at least six months after the latest episode of optic neuritis were enrolled. Patients with multiple sclerosis were excluded. AQP4 Ab was measured using a cell-based assay. Visual acuity, mean deviation (MD) of the Humphrey visual field SITA standard 30–2 tests, retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), ganglion cell complex (GCC) thicknesses, and other clinical variables were compared between the AQP4 Ab-positive and -negative groups. Parameters associated with visual functions were evaluated by generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Results The AQP4 Ab-positive group (20 eyes from 12 cases) had a higher proportion of bilateral involvement and longer duration of follow-up than the AQP4 Ab-negative group (15 eyes from 13 cases). Linear mixed effect models revealed worse MD and visual acuity in AQP4 Ab-positive eyes than those in AQP4 Ab-negative eyes after adjusting for within-patient inter-eye dependence, whereas there were no differences in RNFL and GCC thickness between the two groups. In seropositive eyes, GEE regression analyses revealed that depending on age and the number of recurrences of ON episodes, OCT parameters correlated strongly with MD and more weakly with visual acuity. Conclusions Reductions in RNFL and GCC thickness were proportional to the visual field defect in eyes with AQP4 Ab but not in eyes without AQP4 Ab. The presence of AQP4 Ab probably plays a critical role in retinal ganglion cell loss in optic neuritis. PMID:28199381

  2. Spatial analysis of lung, colorectal, and breast cancer on Cape Cod: An application of generalized additive models to case-control data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschengrau Ann

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of geographic information from cancer and birth defect registries has increased public demands for investigation of perceived disease clusters. Many neighborhood-level cluster investigations are methodologically problematic, while maps made from registry data often ignore latency and many known risk factors. Population-based case-control and cohort studies provide a stronger foundation for spatial epidemiology because potential confounders and disease latency can be addressed. Methods We investigated the association between residence and colorectal, lung, and breast cancer on upper Cape Cod, Massachusetts (USA using extensive data on covariates and residential history from two case-control studies for 1983–1993. We generated maps using generalized additive models, smoothing on longitude and latitude while adjusting for covariates. The resulting continuous surface estimates disease rates relative to the whole study area. We used permutation tests to examine the overall importance of location in the model and identify areas of increased and decreased risk. Results Maps of colorectal cancer were relatively flat. Assuming 15 years of latency, lung cancer was significantly elevated just northeast of the Massachusetts Military Reservation, although the result did not hold when we restricted to residences of longest duration. Earlier non-spatial epidemiology had found a weak association between lung cancer and proximity to gun and mortar positions on the reservation. Breast cancer hot spots tended to increase in magnitude as we increased latency and adjusted for covariates, indicating that confounders were partly hiding these areas. Significant breast cancer hot spots were located near known groundwater plumes and the Massachusetts Military Reservation. Discussion Spatial epidemiology of population-based case-control studies addresses many methodological criticisms of cluster studies and generates new exposure

  3. Investigation of nuclear structure function and angular distribution of scattered leptons from 40Ca and 56Fe nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Zolfagharpour

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, we calculate nuclear structure function and EMC effect of 40Ca and 56Fe nuclei. To achive the goals, we consider Fermi motion and binding energy contrbiution in the harmonic oscillator model. In this model, harmonic oscillator parameter ħω related to shells root mean square radius and for free nucleon structure functions, is obtained from GRV’s free nucleon structure functions. Then, we calculate differential cross section of lepton scattering from those nuclei at the E=4.8 GeV and E=4.032 GeV. The obtained results show good agreement with available experimental data.

  4. Coupled analysis of in vitro and histology tissue samples to quantify structure-function relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Acar

    Full Text Available The structure/function relationship is fundamental to our understanding of biological systems at all levels, and drives most, if not all, techniques for detecting, diagnosing, and treating disease. However, at the tissue level of biological complexity we encounter a gap in the structure/function relationship: having accumulated an extraordinary amount of detailed information about biological tissues at the cellular and subcellular level, we cannot assemble it in a way that explains the correspondingly complex biological functions these structures perform. To help close this information gap we define here several quantitative temperospatial features that link tissue structure to its corresponding biological function. Both histological images of human tissue samples and fluorescence images of three-dimensional cultures of human cells are used to compare the accuracy of in vitro culture models with their corresponding human tissues. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior work on a quantitative comparison of histology and in vitro samples. Features are calculated from graph theoretical representations of tissue structures and the data are analyzed in the form of matrices and higher-order tensors using matrix and tensor factorization methods, with a goal of differentiating between cancerous and healthy states of brain, breast, and bone tissues. We also show that our techniques can differentiate between the structural organization of native tissues and their corresponding in vitro engineered cell culture models.

  5. Structure-function studies of the lustrin A polyelectrolyte domains, RKSY and D4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wustman, Brandon A; Weaver, James C; Morse, Daniel E; Evans, John Spencer

    2003-01-01

    The lustrin superfamily represents a unique group of biomineralization proteins localized between layered aragonite mineral plates (i.e., nacre layers) in mollusk shell. These proteins not only exhibit elastomeric behavior within the mineralized matrix, but also adhesion to the aragonite-containing composite layer. One member of the lustrin superfamily, Lustrin A, has been sequenced; the protein is organized into defined, modular sequence domains that are hypothesized to perform separate functions (i.e., force unfolding, mineral adhesion, intermolecular binding) within the Lustrin A protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and in vitro mineralization assays, we investigated structure-function relationships for two Lustrin A putative mineral binding domains, the 30 AA Arg, Lys, Tyr, Ser-rich (RKSY) and the 24 AA Asp-rich (D4) sequence regions domain of the Lustrin A protein. The results indicate that both sequences adopt open, unfolded structures that represent either extended or random coil states. Using geologic calcite overgrowth assays and scanning electron microscopic analyses, we observe that the RKSY polypeptide does not significantly perturb calcium carbonate growth. However, the D4 domain does influence crystal growth in a concentration-dependent manner. Collectively, our data indicate that D4, and not the RKSY domain, exhibits structure-function activity consistent with a mineral binding region.

  6. On The $Q^2$ Dependence of The Spin Structure Function In The Resonance Region

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Z; Li, Zhenping; Li, Zhujun

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, we show what we can learn from the CEBAF experiments on spin-structure functions, and the transition from the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule in the real photon limit to the spin dependent sum rules in the deep inelastic scattering, and how the asymmetry $A_1(x,Q^2)$ approaches the scaling limit in the resonance region. The spin structure function in the resonance region alone can not determine the spin-dependent sum rule due to the kinematic restriction of the resonance region. The integral $\\int_0^1 \\frac {A_1(x,Q^2)F_2(x,Q^2)}{2x(1+R(x,Q^2))}dx$ is estimated from $Q^2=0$ to $2.5$ GeV$^2$. The result shows that there is a region where both contributions from the baryon resonances and the deep inelastic scattering are important, thus provides important information on the high twist effects on the spin dependent sum rule.

  7. Structure Functions in Wall-bounded Flows at High Reynolds Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiang; Marusic, Ivan; Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    The scaling of the structure function Dij = (where i = 1,2,3 and r is the two-point displacement, ui is the velocity fluctuation in the xi direction), is studied in wall-bounded flows at high Reynolds number within the framework of the Townsend attached eddy model. While the scaling of Dij has been the subject of several studies, previous work focused on the scaling of D11 for r = (Δx ,0,0) (for streamwise velocity component and displacements only in the streamwise direction). Using the Hierarchical-Random-Additive formalism, a recently developed attached-eddy formalism, we propose closed-form formulae for the structure functionDij with two-point displacements in arbitrary directions, focusing on the log region . The work highlights new scalings that have received little attention, e.g. the scaling of Dij for r =(0, Δy, Δz) and for i ≠ j . As the knowledge on Dij leads directly to that of the Reynolds stress, statistics of the filtered flow field, etc., an analytical formula of Dij for arbitrary r can be quite useful for developing physics-based models for wall-bounded flows and validating existing LES and reduced order models.

  8. Using adjoint sensitivity as a local structure function in variational data assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Hello

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available One approach recently proposed in order to improve the forecast of weather events, such as cyclogenesis, is to increase the number of observations in areas depending on the flow configuration. These areas are obtained using, for example, the sensitivity to initial conditions of a selected predicted cyclone. An alternative or complementary way is proposed here. The idea is to employ such an adjoint sensitivity field as a local structure function within variational data assimilation, 3D-Var in this instance. Away from the sensitive area, observation increments project on the initial fields with the usual climatological (or weakly flow-dependent, in the case of 4D-Var structure functions. Within the sensitive area, the gradient fields are projected using all the available data in the zone, conventional or extra, if any. The formulation of the technique is given and the approach is further explained by using a simple 1D scheme. The technique is implemented in the ARPEGE/IFS code and applied to 11 FASTEX (Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Track Experiment cyclone cases, together with the targeted observations performed at the time of the campaign. The new approach is shown to allow for the desired stronger impact of the available observations and to systematically improve the forecasts of the FASTEX cyclones, unlike the standard 3D-Var.

  9. Ligand structure-function relationships in the vitamin D endocrine system from the perspective of drug development (including cancer treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Anthony W; Mizwicki, Mathew T; Okamura, William H

    2003-01-01

    It has become readily apparent to many scientists and pharmaceutical companies that the vitamin D endocrine system offers a wide array of drug development opportunities. There are already successes, as noted by 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 (Roche, and Abbott) for renal osteodystrophy and osteoporosis and 1alpha(OH)D3 (Leo, Chugai, Teijin) for renal osteodystrophy and (in Japan) osteoporosis, 1alpha,24(OH)2-24-cyclopropyl-D3 (Dovonex) and 1alpha,24(OH)2D3 (Teijin) for psoriasis, and 19-nor-1alpha,25(OH)2D2 (Abbott) for renal osteodystrophy, as well as drugs under active development. Yet there are still many important and challenging drug development frontiers, particularly in the area of cancer treatment and immune system disorders where exploration is only in the initial early stages. In addition, the application of vitamin D-related drugs in neurology and brain pathology should not be overlooked. It is to be hoped that the cellular and molecular basis for the vexing problem of analog-induced hypercalcemia will be elucidated. Given that there are believed to be over 2000 analogs of 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 already available for consideration, it is to be expected that over the next decade a significant number of new vitamin D structure-function drug development projects will be brought to conclusion.

  10. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation......Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  11. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... with vitamins A, C and E and beta-carotene offers no protection against the development of lung cancer. On the contrary, beta-carotene supplementation has, in two major randomised intervention trials, resulted in an increased mortality. Smoking remains the leading cause of lung cancer. The adverse effects...

  12. Diet and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, P; Lange, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. While cigarette smoking is of key importance, factors such as diet also play a role in the development of lung cancer. MedLine and Embase were searched with diet and lung cancer as the key words. Recently published reviews...... and large well designed original articles were preferred to form the basis for the present article. A diet rich in fruit and vegetables reduces the incidence of lung cancer by approximately 25%. The reduction is of the same magnitude in current smokers, ex-smokers and never smokers. Supplementation...... are only ameliorated to a minor degree by a healthy diet....

  13. The Application of Doubling Time in the Diagnosis of Following Up Lung Nodules%倍增时间的测定在肺小结节随访中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周科峰; 朱斌; 秦国初; 何健; 李丹燕; 窦鑫

    2012-01-01

    目的 评估倍增时间的测定在肺小结节病变随访中的应用价值.材料和方法 初次胸部CT检查发现肺部小结节的病灶(直径?3cm)并有复查资料的患者共202例(确诊108例).其中直径< 5mm组16例,5~ 10mm组38例,11 ~20mm组123例,21~ 30mm组2 5例;按照结节的密度:实质性结节127例,部分实性的结节65例,磨玻璃样结节10例.采用GE Lightspeed Pro16螺旋CT扫描,工作站为AW4.2的高级肺结节分析(Advanced Lung Analysis,ALA)数据后处理软件,重建肺结节体积并计算其倍增时间及生长率,并与最终临床结果作对照.结果 磨玻璃样结节均重建失败,直径< 5mm的结节部分重建失败.良性或炎性结节其生长速度非常快,倍增时间小于30天,或生长速度非常缓慢或负生长,倍增时间超过180天以上或者为负值.恶性结节倍增时间分别为腺癌136±2天,鳞癌89±7天,大细胞癌118±9天,小细胞癌35±4天,转移癌61±5天.结论 在肺部小结节难以定性时,倍增时间可以作为定性诊断的重要指标.%Objective To evaluate the application value of doubling time in lung nodules lesions in the following-up. Materials and Methods 202 patients (108 cases diagnosed) who were found the lung nodule lesions (< 3 cm in diameter) by chest CT and had underwent CT scan at least twice. In all lesions, 16 cases in the group of diameter < 5mm, 38 cases in 5 - 10mm, 123 cases in 11 ~ 20mm and 25 cases in 21 ~ 30mm group. According to the density of nodes: 127 cases of substantial nodules, part of the solid nodules 65 cases, ground glass opacity nodules 10 cases. Using the GE Lightspeed Prol6 spiral CT and AW4.2 workstation, we reconstructed the lung nodules and calculated its volume doubling time with Advanced Lung Analysis software, taking the final clinical results as a control. Results Ground glass opacity sample nodules are all failed to reconstruct, and parts of nodules diameter < 5mm are also failed.Benign or

  14. Extraction of Structure Function and Gluon Distribution Function at Low-x from Cross Section Derivative by Regge Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.R. Boroun

    2005-01-01

    An approximation method based on Regge behavior is presented. This new method relates the reduced cross section derivative and the structure function Regge behavior at Iow x. With the use of this approximation method,the C and λ parameters are calculated from the HERA reduced cross section data taken at low-x. Also, we calculate the structure functions F2(x, Q2) even for low-x values, which have not been investigated. To test the validity of calculated structure functions, we find the gluon distribution function in the Leading order approximation based on Regge behaviour of structure function and compare to the NLO QCD fit to H1 data and NLO parton distribution function.

  15. Multilocality and fusion rules on the generalized structure functions in two-dimensional and three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkioulekas, Eleftherios

    2016-09-01

    Using the fusion-rules hypothesis for three-dimensional and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence, we generalize a previous nonperturbative locality proof to multiple applications of the nonlinear interactions operator on generalized structure functions of velocity differences. We call this generalization of nonperturbative locality to multiple applications of the nonlinear interactions operator "multilocality." The resulting cross terms pose a new challenge requiring a new argument and the introduction of a new fusion rule that takes advantage of rotational symmetry. Our main result is that the fusion-rules hypothesis implies both locality and multilocality in both the IR and UV limits for the downscale energy cascade of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence and the downscale enstrophy cascade and inverse energy cascade of two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence. We stress that these claims relate to nonperturbative locality of generalized structure functions on all orders and not the term-by-term perturbative locality of diagrammatic theories or closure models that involve only two-point correlation and response functions.

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  17. [Diagnostics and surgery of combined lung echinococcosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafin, A Z; Diad'kov, A V; Aĭdemirov, A N; Malanka, M I; Abdokov, A D

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of surgical treatment of 162 patients with lung echinococcosis was made. The main group consisted of 74 patients with combined forms of echinococcosis of the lung and other organs. They were treated in clinic in the period of time since 1982 till 2011 years. The control group included of 88 patients with echinococcosis of lung and the patients were followed-up in the period of time since 1991 till 2000. Plasma technology was applied in all patients of control group. The patients from main group (25) were operated by using the conventional methods and 49 patients - with the application of plasma technology. An analysis shows a reliable reduction of the rate of postoperative complications after application of plasma technology in 4 times. The lethality significantly decreased in this group of patients.

  18. Diffusion and perfusion MRI of the lung and mediastinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzler, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.Henzler@umm.de [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University (Germany); Schmid-Bindert, Gerald [Interdisciplinary Thoracic Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University (Germany); Schoenberg, Stefan O.; Fink, Christian [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim - Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2010-12-15

    With ongoing technical improvements such as multichannel MRI, systems with powerful gradients as well as the development of innovative pulse sequence techniques implementing parallel imaging, MRI has now entered the stage of a radiation-free alternative to computed tomography (CT) for chest imaging in clinical practice. Whereas in the past MRI of the lung was focused on morphological aspects, current MRI techniques also enable functional imaging of the lung allowing for a comprehensive assessment of lung disease in a single MRI exam. Perfusion imaging can be used for the visualization of regional pulmonary perfusion in patients with different lung diseases such as lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, pulmonary embolism or for the prediction of postoperative lung function in lung cancer patients. Over the past years diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) of the thorax has become feasible with a significant reduction of the acquisition time, thus minimizing artifacts from respiratory and cardiac motion. In chest imaging, DW-MRI has been mainly suggested for the characterization of lung cancer, lymph nodes and pulmonary metastases. In this review article recent MR perfusion and diffusion techniques of the lung and mediastinum as well as their clinical applications are reviewed.

  19. 穴位贴敷治疗肺系疾病的影响因素分析%Analysis on the Influencing Factors of Acupoint Application Therapy in the Treatment of Lung System Disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙博文; 马铁明

    2016-01-01

    目的:穴位贴敷疗法可以有效治疗肺系疾病,文章探讨了影响贴敷疗法的因素。方法对贴敷治疗肺系疾病临床研究进行搜索及初步整理归纳。结果①贴敷药物多以张氏组方为基础方加减;②剂型上最常用生姜汁调和;③贴敷时机上,有多在三伏天、三九天,也有不拘泥于季节时间进行的。④成人贴敷时间2~6 h,儿童贴敷时间0.5~2 h;⑤选穴上,肺腧、膻中、定喘等使用频率高。结论穴位贴敷法应在主穴上加适当的配穴,调整药物剂型,以患者耐受性为度,不断提高临床观察规范性,从而提高穴位贴敷的疗效。%Objective Acupoint application therapy is effective for the treatment of disorders in lung system. In the paper,the influencing factors were explored to the acupoint application therapy. Methods The clinical study on the treatment of lung system disorders with acupoint application therapy was retrieved and collected preliminarily. Results 1. Zhang′s formula is the basis in acupoint application therapy. 2. Fresh gin-ger juice is used for the preparations. 3. This therapy is commonly during the dog days and the three nine -day periods after the winter solstice or in any season when necessary. 4. The duration of treatment is 2h to 6h for adults and 0. 5h to 2h for children. 5. Regarding the acupoints,Feishu(BL13),Shanzhong(CV17)and Dingchuan(EX - B1)are highly used. Conclusion For the acupoint application therapy,the supplementary points should be added on the basis of the main point. The drug forms should be adjusted in terms of patient′s tolerance. The clinical observation should be normalized constantly to improve the efficacy of this therapy.

  20. Complications in Transbronchial Lung Biopsy

    OpenAIRE

    Hue, Sung Ho

    1987-01-01

    Transbronchial lung biopsy was performed in 68 patients with various lung diseases. As an inital diagnostic procedure in diffuse and localized lung diseases, trasbronchial lung biopsy offers an attractive alternative to open lung biopsy. Recently imporvement in the development of medical technology has greatly facilitated this technique, but it must be kept in mind that a transbronchial lung biopsy is not without complication and sometimes potentially serious complications may occur. This stu...

  1. Haemophilia, AIDS and lung epithelial permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Doherty, M.J.; Page, C.J.; Harrington, C.; Nunan, T.; Savidge, G. (Haemophilia Centre and Coagulation Research Unit, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rayne Institute, St. Thomas' Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1990-01-01

    Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer was measured in HIV antibodypositive haemophiliacs (11 smokers, 26 nonsmokers, 5 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP)). Lung {sup 99m}Tc DTPA transfer as a marker of lung epithelial permeability was measured as the half time of transfer (from airspace into blood). This half time was faster in smokers compred to nonsmokers and the transfer curve was monoexponential. In nonsmokers no difference was observed between asymptomatic HIV-positive haemophiliacs and normal subjects, with the exception of the lung bases. At the lung basis in HIV-positive haemophiliac nonsmokers the transfer was faster than in normal individuals, implying increased alveolar permeability. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia resulted in a rapid transfer of {sup 99m}Tc DTPA (mean T50 of 2 minutes) and the transfer curve was biphasic, confirming previous observations in homosexual HIV antibody-positive patients with PCP. These changes returned to a monoexponential profile by 6 weeks following successful treatment. The DTPA lung transfer study may enable clinicians to instigate therapy for PCP without the need for initial bronchoscopy and provide a noninvasive method for the reassessment of patients should further respiratory signs or symptoms develop. This method is considered to be highly cost-effective in that it obviates the use of factor VIII concentrates required to cover bronchoscopic procedures and, with its early application and ease of use as a follow-up investigation, permits the evaluation of patients on an outpatient basis, thus reducing hospital costs. (au).

  2. The Q$^2$ evolution of the Hadronic Photon Structure Function $F^\\gamma_2$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Button, A M; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chéreau, X J; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Easo, S; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Gong, Z F; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kapustinsky, J S; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Lacentre, P E; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lavorato, A; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Migani, D; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Timmermans, C

    1999-01-01

    New measurements at a centre-of-mass energy of 183 GeV of the hadronic photon structure function F2(x) in the Q2 interval, 9 GeV2 < Q2 < 30 GeV2, are presented. The data, collected in 1997, with the L3 detector, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 51.9 pb-1. Combining with the data taken at centre-of-mass energies of 91 GeV, the evolution of F2 with Q2 is measured in the Q2 range from 1.2 GeV2 to 30 GeV2. F2 shows a linear growth with ln(Q2); the value of the slope (alpha-1)dF2(Q2)/dln(Q2) is measured in two x bins from 0.01 to 0.2 and is higher than predictions.

  3. Extraction of structure functions for lepton-nucleus scattering in the quasi-elastic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. S.; Kim, Hungchong; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; So, W. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of a relativistic single-particle model, we calculate inclusive electron-nucleus scattering by electromagnetic current, and neutrino-nucleus scattering by neutral and charged current in the quasi-elastic region. The longitudinal, the transverse, and the transverse-interference structure functions are extracted from the theoretical cross section by using the Rosenbluth separation method at fixed momentum transfer and scattering angle and then compared with each other from the viewpoint of these current interactions. The position of peak for the electron scattering shifts to higher energy transfer than that for the neutrino scattering. The axial and pseudoscalar terms turn out to play an important role in the neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  4. Evolution equation for the structure function g_2(x,Q^2)

    CERN Document Server

    Braun, V M; Manashov, A N

    2001-01-01

    We perform an extensive study of the scale dependence of flavor-singlet contributions to the structure function g_2(x,Q^2) in polarized deep-inelastic scattering. We find that the mixing between quark-antiquark-gluon and three-gluon twist-3 operators only involves the three-gluon operator with the lowest anomalous dimension and is weak in other cases. This means, effectively, that only those three-gluon operators with the lowest anomalous dimension for each moment are important, and allows to formulate a simple two-component parton-like description of g_2(x,Q^2) in analogy with the conventional description of twist-2 parton distributions. The similar simplification was observed earlier for the nonsinglet distributions, although the reason is in our case different.

  5. Higher-Twist Contribution to Pion Structure Function 4-Fermi Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Capitani, S; Horsley, R; Klaus, B; Linke, V; Rakow, P E L; Schäfer, A; Schierholz, G

    2000-01-01

    We present quenched lattice QCD results for the contribution of higher-twist operators to the lowest non-trivial moment of the pion structure function. To be specific, we consider the combination $F_2^{\\pi^+} + F_2^{\\pi^-} - 2 F_2^{\\pi^0}$ which has $I = 2$ and receives contributions from 4-Fermi operators only. We introduce the basis of lattice operators. The renormalization of the operators is done perturbatively in the $\\bar{\\rm{MS}}$ scheme using the 't Hooft-Veltman prescription for $\\gamma_5$, taking particular care of mixing effects. The contribution is found to be of $O(f_\\pi^2/Q^2)$, relative to the leading contribution to the moment of $F_2^{\\pi^+}$.

  6. Two Comments to Utilization of Structure Function Approach in Deep Inelastic Scattering Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Ilichev, A S

    2002-01-01

    The "returning to resonance" mechanism can be used to obtain the simple procedure of taking radiative corrections (RC) to deep inelastic scattering (DIS) cross sections into account in the framework of Drell-Yan picture. Iteration procedure is proposed. Kinematical region y\\to 1 can be described in the framework of Drell-Yan picture using the structure function approach. The large RC in the lowest order reflect the Sudakov form factor suppression, which can be taken into account in all orders of perturbation theory. Based on explicit calculation in two lowest orders of perturbation theory we construct the cross section in y\\to 1 region obeying renormalization group equations and including the Sudakov-like form factor suppression.

  7. The Deuteron Spin-dependent Structure Function $g^{d}_1$ and its First Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Alexakhin, V.Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Becker, M.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Demchenko, D.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Horn, I.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ivanchin, I.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, D.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kubart, J.; Kuhn, R.; Kukhtin, V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Masek, L.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Matthia, D.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagel, T.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nikolaev, K.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Procureur, S.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rondio, E.; Rozhdestvensky, A.M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, I.A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schroeder, W.; Seeharsch, D.; Seimetz, M.; Setter, D.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Trippel, S.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhao, J.; Zvyagin, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present a measurement of the deuteron spin-dependent structure function g^d_1 based on the data collected by the COMPASS experiment at CERN during the years 2002-2004. The data provide an accurate evaluation for \\Gamma^d_1, the first moment of g^d_1(x), and for the matrix element of the singlet axial current, a_0. The results of QCD fits in the next to leading order (NLO) on all g1 deep inelastic scattering data are also presented. They provide two solutions with the gluon spin distribution function \\Delta_G positive or negative, which describe the data equally well. In both cases, at Q^2 = 3(GeV/c)^2 the first moment of \\Delta G is found to be of the order of 0:2 - 0:3 in absolute value.

  8. Singlet structure function g{sub 1} at small x and small Q{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermolaev, B.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Greco, M. [Rome III Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physics; INFN, Rome (Italy); Troyan, S.I. [St. Petersburg Institute of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    Explicit expressions for the singlet spin structure function g{sub 1} at small x and small Q{sup 2} are obtained with a total resummation of the leading logarithmic contributions. It is shown that g{sub 1} practically does not depend on x in this kinematic region. In contrast, it would be interesting to investigate its dependence on the invariant energy 2pq, because g{sub 1}, being positive at small 2pq, can turn negative at greater values of this variable. The position of the turning point is sensitive to the ratio of the initial quark and gluon densities, so its experimental detection would enable one to estimate this ratio. (orig.)

  9. Overview of the spin structure function g_1 at arbitrary x and Q^2

    CERN Document Server

    Ermolaev, B I; Troyan, S I

    2009-01-01

    In the present paper we summarize our results on the structure function g_1 and present explicit expressions for the non-singlet and singlet components of g_1 which can be used at arbitrary x and Q^2. These expressions combine the well-known DGLAP-results for the anomalous dimensions and coefficient functions with the total resummation of the leading logarithmic contributions and the shift of Q^2 -> Q^2 + \\mu^2, with \\mu/\\Lambda_{QCD} approx 10 (approx 55) for the non-singlet (singlet) components of g_1 respectively. In contrast to DGLAP, these expressions do not require the introduction of singular parameterizations for the initial parton densities. We also apply our results to describe the experimental data in the kinematic regions beyond the reach of DGLAP.

  10. Unpolarized structure functions and the parton distributions for nucleon in an independent quark model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Barik; R N Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Considering the nucleon as consisting entirely of its valence quarks confined independently in a scalar-vector harmonic potential; unpolarized structure functions 1(,2) and 2(x,2) are derived in the Bjorken limit under certain simplifying assumptions; from which valence quark distribution functions (,2) and (,2) are appropriately extracted satisfying the normalization constraints. QCD-evolution of these input distributions from a model scale of 2=0.07 GeV2 to a higher $Q^{2}$ scale of $Q^{2}_{0} = 15$ GeV2 yields (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) and (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) in good agreement with experimental data. The gluon and sea-quark distributions such as (,$Q^{2}_{0}$) and (, $Q^{2}_{0}$) are dynamically generated with a reasonable qualitative agreement with the available data; using the leading order renormalization group equations with appropriate valence-quark distributions as the input.

  11. Measurement of the tensor structure function b1 of the deuteron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, N; Akopov, Z; Amarian, M; Ammosov, V V; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetissian, A; Avetissian, E; Bailey, P; Balin, D; Baturin, V; Beckmann, M; Belostotski, S; Bernreuther, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Böttcher, H; Borissov, A; Borysenko, A; Bouwhuis, M; Brack, J; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Capitani, G P; Chen, T; Chiang, H C; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Devitsin, E; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elalaoui-Moulay, A; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Fechtchenko, A; Felawka, L; Fox, B; Frullani, S; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Garrow, K; Garutti, E; Gaskell, D; Gavrilov, G; Gharibyan, V; Graw, G; Grebeniouk, O; Greeniaus, L G; Gregor, I M; Hafidi, K; Hartig, M; Hasch, D; Heesbeen, D; Henoch, M; Hertenberger, R; Hesselink, W H A; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hommez, B; Iarygin, G; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Kaiser, R; Kinney, E; Kisselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Krauss, B; Krivokhijine, V G; Lagamba, L; Lapikás, L; Laziev, A; Lenisa, P; Liebing, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lipka, K; Lorenzon, W; Lu, H; Lu, J; Lu, S; Ma, B-Q; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Masoli, F; Mexner, V; Meyners, N; Mikloukho, O; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Y; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W-D; Oganessyan, K; Ohsuga, H; Pickert, N; Potashov, S; Potterveld, D H; Raithel, M; Reggiani, D; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Savin, I; Schäfer, A; Schill, C; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Seitz, B; Shanidze, R; Shearer, C; Shibata, T-A; Shutov, V; Simani, M C; Sinram, K; Stancari, M; Statera, M; Steffens, E; Steijger, J J M; Stenzel, H; Stewart, J; Stinzing, F; Stösslein, U; Tait, P; Tanaka, H; Taroian, S; Tchuiko, B; Terkulov, A; Tkabladze, A; Trzcinski, A; Tytgat, M; Vandenbroucke, A; van der Nat, P B; van der Steenhoven, G; Vetterli, M C; Vikhrov, V; Vincter, M G; Vogel, C; Vogt, M; Volmer, J; Weiskopf, C; Wendland, J; Wilbert, J; Ye, Y; Ye, Z; Yen, S; Zihlmann, B; Zupranski, P

    2005-12-09

    The Hermes experiment has investigated the tensor spin structure of the deuteron using the 27.6 GeV/c positron beam of DESY HERA. The use of a tensor-polarized deuteron gas target with only a negligible residual vector polarization enabled the first measurement of the tensor asymmetry A(d)zz and the tensor structure function b(d)1 for average values of the Bjorken variable 0.01 <5 GeV2. The quantities A(d)zz and b(d)1 are found to be nonzero. The rise of b(d)1 for decreasing values of x can be interpreted to originate from the same mechanism that leads to nuclear shadowing in unpolarized scattering.

  12. Nuclear effects in F{sub 3} structure function of nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athar, M. Sajjad [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India)], E-mail: sajathar@rediffmail.com; Singh, S.K. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202 002 (India); Vacas, M.J. Vicente [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2008-10-02

    We study nuclear effects in the F{sub 3}{sup A}(x) structure function in the deep inelastic neutrino reactions on iron by using a relativistic framework to describe the nucleon spectral functions in the nucleus. The results for the ratio R(x,Q{sup 2})=(F{sub 3}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}))/(AF{sub 3}{sup N}(x,Q{sup 2})) and the Gross-Llewellyn Smith (GLS) integral G(x,Q{sup 2})={integral}{sub x}{sup 1}dxF{sub 3}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}) in nuclei are discussed and compared with the recent results available in literature from theoretical and phenomenological analyses of experimental data.

  13. Nuclear medium modification of the F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) structure function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajjad Athar, M., E-mail: sajathar@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202 002 (India); Ruiz Simo, I.; Vicente Vacas, M.J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Centro Mixto Universidad de Valencia - CSIC, 46100 Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    We study the nuclear effects in the electromagnetic structure function F{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) in the deep inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering process by taking into account Fermi motion, binding, pion and rho meson cloud contributions. Calculations have been done in a local density approximation using relativistic nuclear spectral functions which include nucleon correlations. The ratios R{sub F}{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2})=(2F{sub 2}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2}))/(AF{sub 2}{sup D}(x,Q{sup 2})) are obtained and compared with recent JLab results for light nuclei with special attention to the slope of the x distributions. This magnitude shows a non-trivial A dependence and it is insensitive to possible normalization uncertainties. The results have also been compared with some of the older experiments using intermediate mass nuclei.

  14. Moments of the neutron $g_2$ structure function at intermediate $Q^2$

    CERN Document Server

    Solvignon, P; Chen, J -P; Choi, Seonho; Slifer, K; Aniol, K; Averett, T; Boeglin, W; Camsonne, A; Cates, G D; Chang, C C; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Deur, A; Dutta, D; Ent, R; Feuerbach, R; Frullani, S; Gao, H; Garibaldi, F; Gilman, R; Glashausser, C; Gorbenko, V; Hansen, O; Higinbotham, D W; Ibrahim, H; Jiang, X; Jones, M; Kelleher, A; Kelly, J; Keppel, C; Kim, W; Korsch, W; Kramer, K; Kumbartzki, G; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Ma, B; Margazioti, D J; Markowitz, P; McCormick, K; Meziani, Z -E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Camacho, C Munoz; Paschke, K; Reitz, B; Saha, A; Shneor, R; Singh, J; Sulkosky, V; Tobias, A; Urciuoli, G M; Wang, K; Wijesooriya, K; Wojtsekhowski, B; Woo, S; Yang, J -C; Zheng, X; Zhu, L

    2013-01-01

    We present new experimental results of the $^3$He spin structure function $g_2$ in the resonance region at $Q^2$ values between 1.2 and 3.0 (GeV/c)$^2$. Spin dependent moments of the neutron were then extracted. The resonance contribution to the neutron $d_2$ matrix element was found to be small at $\\ $=2.4 (GeV/c)$^2$ and in agreement with the Lattice QCD calculation. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule for neutron was tested with the measured data and using the Wandzura-Wilczek relation for the low $x$ unmeasured region. A small deviation was observed at $Q^2$ values between 0.5 and 1.2 (GeV/c)$^2$ for the neutron.

  15. Interpretation of the structure function of rotation measure in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Siyao

    2016-01-01

    The observed structure function (SF) of rotation measure (RM) varies as a broken power-law function of angular scales. The systematic shallowness of its spectral slope is inconsistent with the standard Kolmogorov scaling. This motivates us to examine the statistical analysis on RM fluctuations. The correlations of RM constructed by Lazarian & Pogosyan (2016) are demonstrated to be adequate in explaining the observed features of RM SFs through a direct comparison between the theoretically obtained and observationally measured SF results. By segregating the density and magnetic field fluctuations and adopting arbitrary indices for their respective power spectra, we find that when the SFs of RM and emission measure have a similar form over the same range of angular scales, the statistics of the RM fluctuations reflect the properties of density fluctuations. RM SFs can be used to evaluate the mean magnetic field along the line of sight, but cannot serve as an informative source on the properties of turbulent ...

  16. STRUCTURAL FUNCTIONAL MODEL OF ACADEMIC STAFF INTERACTION WITHIN A UNIVERSITY COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Silkina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research analyzes the possibility of coordinated activity of academic staff affiliated to secondary and higher educational institutions within a university complex. The applied methods integrate the analysis of regulatory documents and cooperation expertise of academic staff along with general modeling methods based on the structural and functional approach. The research outcomes reveal the spheres and types of academic staff interaction at various educational levels; the principles and conditions of the interaction in question being defined. The authors demonstrate a structural functional model, determining the organizational and professional aspects, as well as the results of academic staff interaction within the university complex. Implementation of the given model can facilitate the effective integration of split-level educational organizations into the university complex structure.

  17. Measurements of the longitudinal structure function and |$V_{cs}$| in the CCFR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, U K; Arroyo, C G; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Budd, H S; Conrad, J; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Lamm, M J; Lefmann, W C; Marsh, W; McFarland, K S; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Quintas, P Z; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino nucleon interactions in the CCFR detector are used to extract the structure functions, F_2, xF_3(nu), xF_3(nubar) and R(longitudinal) in the kinematic region 0.01

  18. Low $Q^{2}$ low $\\times$ structure function analysis of CCFR data for $F_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Tamminga, B H; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; Barbaro, L; Barbaro, P D; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, Arie; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D A; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Formaggio, J A; Frey, R; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; King, B J; Kinnel, T; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Mishra, S R; Naples, D; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Sciulli, F J; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Smith, W H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A G; Yang, U K; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of structure functions (SFs) from neutrino and muon deep inelastic scattering data have shown discrepancies in F2 for x < 0.1. A new SF analysis of the CCFR collaboration data examining regions in x down to x=.0015 and 0.4 < Q^2 < 1.0 is presented. Comparison to corrected charged lepton scattering results for F2 from the NMC and E665 experiments are made. Differences between muon and neutrino scattering allow that the behavior of F2 from muon scattering could be different from F2 from neutrino scattering as Q^2 approaches zero. Comparisons between F2 muon and F2 neutrino are made in this limit.

  19. Nucleon spin structure II: Spin structure function $g_1^p$ at small $x$

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The spin structure function $g_1^p$ of the proton is studied in a two component framework, where the perturbative evolution of parton distributions and nonperturbative vector meson dominance model are used. We predict the $g_1^p$ asymmetric behavior at small $x$ from lower $Q^2$ to higher $Q^2$. We find that the contribution of the large gluon helicity dominates $g_1^p$ at $x>10^{-3}$ but mixed with nonperturbative component which complicates the asymptomatic behavior of $g_1^p$ at $x<10^{-3}$. The results are compatible with the data including the HERA early estimations and COMPASS new results. The predicted strong $Q^2$- and $x$-dependence of $g_1^p$ at $0.01

  20. Measurement of the proton structure function $F_L(x,Q^2)$ at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Del Degan, M; Delcourt, B; Delvax, J; Deák, M; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jöhnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Jnsson, L; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, Ll; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Murín, P; Müller, K; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, Th; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagoulias, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopoulou, Th; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schöning, A; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vazdik, Y; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, Ch; Wünsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F; Zácek, J; Zálesák, J; De Boer, Y

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement is reported of the longitudinal proton structure function F_L(x,Q^2) at the ep collider HERA. It is based on inclusive deep inelastic e^+p scattering cross section measurements with a positron beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 575 and 460 GeV. Employing the energy dependence of the cross section, F_L is measured in a range of squared four-momentum transfers 12 < Q^2 < 90 GeV^2 and low Bjorken x 0.00024 < x < 0.0036. The F_L values agree with higher order QCD calculations based on parton densities obtained using cross section data previously measured at HERA.

  1. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production.

  2. [Peculiarities of the structural-functional organization of motor neuropil of dragonfly thoracic ganglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikova, S I; Sviderskiĭ, V L; Gorelkin, V S

    2012-01-01

    The work considers the structural-functional relations existing in the motor neuropil of thoracic ganglia of dragonflies - the animals able to perform very complex and fast maneuvers in the flight. The motor neuropil in dragonflies is shown to be more differentiated than in the lees mobile insects, while motor nuclei in neuropil are more clearly outlined and closer to each other. There are revealed dendrites of motoneurons of pedal muscles (the middle nucleus), which are running into the anterior and posterior nuclei that contain dendrites of motoneurons of wing muscles. A possible role of such approaching is discussed for close functional interaction of wing and foot muscles, which is necessary to dragonflies during flight at their catching of large insects with aid of legs. Peculiarities are considered in structural organization of motoneurons of wing muscles dragonflies and locusts, which indicate the greater functional possibilities peculiar to motoneurons of the dragonflies motor apparatus.

  3. Measurement of the Photon Structure Function at High $Q^{2}$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Iashvili, I; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Likhoded, S A; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Lugnier, L; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musy, M; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Raspereza, A V; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosier-Lees, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, M; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zöller, M

    2000-01-01

    The structure functions of real and virtual photons are derivedfrom cross section measurements of the reaction$\\rm e^+e^-\\rightarrow e^+e^- + \\hbox{hadrons}$ at LEP.The reaction is studied at $\\sqrt{\\rm {s}} \\simeq 91$ GeV with the L3detector. One of the final state electrons is detected at a large angle relative to the beam direction, leading to $Q^2$ values between40 GeV$^2$ and 500 GeV$^2$.The other final state electron is either undetected or it is detected ata four-momentum transfer squared $P^2$ between 1 GeV$^2$ and 8 GeV$^2$.These measurements are compared with predictions of the Quark PartonModel and other QCD based models.

  4. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  5. A measurement of the proton structure function F$_{2}$(x,Q$^{2}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, T; Andreev, V; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Arpagaus, M; Aïd, S; Babaev, A; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bergstein, H; Bernardi, G; Bernet, R; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Brasse, F W; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Buschhorn, G W; Bán, J; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charles, F; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Colombo, M G; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Coutures, C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Danilov, M V; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; De Wolf, E A; Deffur, E; Del Buono, L; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duboc, J; Duhm, H; Düllmann, D; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichenberger, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Erlichmann, H; Evrard, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Forbush, M; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Gamerdinger, K; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Gellrich, A; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Goritchev, P A; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hamon, O; Hampel, M; Hanlon, E M; Hapke, M; Haynes, W J; Heatherington, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hildesheim, W; Hill, P; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Huet, Patrick; Hufnagel, H; Höppner, M; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jabiol, M A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johannsen, K; Johnson, D P; Johnson, L; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kasselmann, P; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Ko, W; Kolanoski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Krüger, U P; Krüner-Marquis, U; Kubenka, J P; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhöfer, J; Kuznik, B; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Lamarche, F; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lanius, P; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Leverenz, C; Levonian, S; Ley, C; Lindner, A; Lindström, G; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Loch, P; Lohmander, H; Lubimov, V; López, G C; Lüke, D; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Masson, S; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Mercer, D; Merz, T; Meyer, C A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Obrock, U; Olsson, J E; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pichler, C; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Prosi, R; Pérez, E; Raupach, F; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Ribarics, P; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riess, S; Rietz, M; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rylko, R; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sahlmann, N; Sankey, D P C; Savitsky, M M; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schwind, A; Schöning, A; Seehausen, U; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shooshtari, H; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Soloviev, Yu V; Spiekermann, J; Spitzer, H; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Stella, B; Stephens, K; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Strachota, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Sánchez, E; Tapprogge, Stefan; Taylor, R E; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Vartapetian, A H; Vazdik, Ya A; Vecko, M; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walker, I W; Walther, A; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wellisch, H P; West, L R; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wright, A E; Wulff, N; Wünsch, E; Yiou, T P; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zimmer, M; Zimmermann, W; Zomer, F; Zuber, K; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W; Niebergall, Friedrich

    1995-01-01

    A measurement of the proton structure function F_{\\!2}(x,Q^2) is reported for momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 4.5 GeV^2 and 1600 GeV^2 and for Bjorken x between 1.8\\cdot10^{-4} and 0.13 using data collected by the HERA experiment H1 in 1993. It is observed that F_{\\!2} increases significantly with decreasing x, confirming our previous measurement made with one tenth of the data available in this analysis. The Q^2 dependence is approximately logarithmic over the full kinematic range covered. The subsample of deep inelastic events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap in the hadronic energy flow close to the proton remnant is used to measure the "diffractive" contribution to F_{\\!2}.

  6. Lung alveolar epithelium and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvol, Harriet; Flamein, Florence; Epaud, Ralph; Clement, Annick; Guillot, Loic

    2009-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) comprise a group of lung disorders characterized by various levels of inflammation and fibrosis. The current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of ILD strongly suggests a central role of the alveolar epithelium. Following injury, alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) may actively participate in the restoration of a normal alveolar architecture through a coordinated process of re-epithelialization, or in the development of fibrosis through a process known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Complex networks orchestrate EMT leading to changes in cell architecture and behaviour, loss of epithelial characteristics and gain of mesenchymal properties. In the lung, AECs themselves may serve as a source of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts by acquiring a mesenchymal phenotype. This review covers recent knowledge on the role of alveolar epithelium in the pathogenesis of ILD. The mechanisms underlying disease progression are discussed, with a main focus on the apoptotic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and the developmental pathway.

  7. Structural-functional brain changes in depressed patients during and after electroconvulsive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yrondi, Antoine; Péran, Patrice; Sauvaget, Anne; Schmitt, Laurent; Arbus, Christophe

    2016-11-23

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a non-pharmacological treatment that is effective in treating severe and treatment-resistant depression. Although the efficacy of ECT has been demonstrated to treat major depressive disorder (MDD), the brain mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. Structural-functional changes occur with the use of ECT as a treatment for depression based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this reason, we have tried to identify the changes that were identified by MRI to try to clarify some operating mechanisms of ECT. We focus to brain changes on MRI [structural MRI (sMRI), functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imging (DTI)] after ECT. A systematic search of the international literature was performed using the bibliographic search engines PubMed and Embase. The research focused on papers published up to 30 September 2015. The following Medical Subject Headings (MESH) terms were used: electroconvulsive therapy AND (MRI OR fMRI OR DTI). Papers published in English were included. Four authors searched the database using a predefined strategy to identify potentially eligible studies. There were structural changes according to the sMRI performed before and after ECT treatment. These changes do not seem to be entirely due to oedema. This investigation assessed the functional network connectivity associated with the ECT response in MDD. ECT response reverses the relationship from negative to positive between the two pairs of networks. We found structural-functional changes in MRI post-ECT. Because of the currently limited MRI data on ECT in the literature, it is necessary to conduct further investigations using other MRI technology.

  8. Structure, function and toxicity of alpha-synuclein: the Bermuda triangle in synucleinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Piqué, Anna; Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Outeiro, Tiago Fleming

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease belongs to a group of currently incurable neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the misfolding and accumulation of alpha-synuclein aggregates that are commonly known as synucleinopathies. Clinically, synucleinopathies are heterogeneous, reflecting the somewhat selective neuronal vulnerability characteristic of each disease. The precise molecular underpinnings of synucleinopathies remain unclear, but the process of aggregation of alpha-synuclein appears as a central event. However, there is still no consensus with respect to the toxic forms of alpha-synuclein, hampering our ability to use the protein as a target for therapeutic intervention. To decipher the molecular bases of synucleinopathies, it is essential to understand the complex triangle formed between the structure, function and toxicity of alpha-synuclein. Recently, important steps have been undertaken to elucidate the role of the protein in both physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we provide an overview of recent findings in the field of alpha-synuclein research, and put forward a new perspective over paradigms that persist in the field. Establishing whether alpha-synuclein has a causative role in all synucleinopathies will enable the identification of targets for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for this devastating group of disorders. Alpha-synuclein is the speculated cornerstone of several neurodegenerative disorders known as Synucleinopathies. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying the pathogenic effects of this protein remain unknown. Here, we review the recent findings in the three corners of alpha-synuclein biology - structure, function and toxicity - and discuss the enigmatic roads that have accompanied alpha-synuclein from the beginning. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  9. Measuring structural-functional correspondence: spatial variability of specialised brain regions after macro-anatomical alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Martin A; Goebel, Rainer

    2012-01-16

    The central question of the relationship between structure and function in the human brain is still not well understood. In order to investigate this fundamental relationship we create functional probabilistic maps from a large set of mapping experiments and compare the location of functionally localised regions across subjects using different whole-brain alignment schemes. To avoid the major problems associated with meta-analysis approaches, all subjects are scanned using the same paradigms, the same scanner and the same analysis pipeline. We show that an advanced, curvature driven cortex based alignment (CBA) scheme largely removes macro-anatomical variability across subjects. Remaining variability in the observed spatial location of functional regions, thus, reflects the "true" functional variability, i.e. the quantified variability is a good estimator of the underlying structural-functional correspondence. After localising 13 widely studied functional areas, we found a large variability in the degree to which functional areas respect macro-anatomical boundaries across the cortex. Some areas, such as the frontal eye fields (FEF) are strongly bound to a macro-anatomical location. Fusiform face area (FFA) on the other hand, varies in its location along the length of the fusiform gyrus even though the gyri themselves are well aligned across subjects. Language areas were found to vary greatly across subjects whilst a high degree of overlap was observed in sensory and motor areas. The observed differences in functional variability for different specialised areas suggest that a more complete estimation of the structure-function relationship across the whole cortex requires further empirical studies with an expanded test battery.

  10. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  11. Lung needle biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... biopsy Lung tissue biopsy References Ettinger DS. Lung cancer and other pulmonary neoplasms. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's ... 2010:chap 47. Read More Aspiration ... by: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  12. Screening for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Infante, Maurizio V; Pedersen, Jesper H

    2010-01-01

    In lung cancer screening with low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDCT), the proportion of stage I disease is 50-85%, and the survival rate for resected stage I disease can exceed 90%, but proof of real benefit in terms of lung cancer mortality reduction must come from the several randomized...

  13. Lung Diseases and Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Lung Diseases and Conditions Breathing is a complex process. If ... to a disease called COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). COPD prevents proper airflow in and out of your lungs and can hinder gas exchange in the air ...

  14. MRI of the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich (ed.) [University Clinic Heidelberg (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2009-07-01

    For a long time, only chest X-ray and CT were used to image lung structure, while nuclear medicine was employed to assess lung function. During the past decade significant developments have been achieved in the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), enabling MRI to enter the clinical arena of chest imaging. Standard protocols can now be implemented on up-to-date scanners, allowing MRI to be used as a first-line imaging modality for various lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, pulmonary hypertension and even lung cancer. The diagnostic benefits stem from the ability of MRI to visualize changes in lung structure while simultaneously imaging different aspects of lung function, such as perfusion, respiratory motion, ventilation and gas exchange. On this basis, novel quantitative surrogates for lung function can be obtained. This book provides a comprehensive overview of how to use MRI for imaging of lung disease. Special emphasis is placed on benign diseases requiring regular monitoring, given that it is patients with these diseases who derive the greatest benefit from the avoidance of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  15. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  16. Lung transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100120.htm Lung transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 5 Go to slide 2 out of ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The lungs, which reside in the thorax, or chest cavity, ...

  17. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  18. Lung cancer in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrera-Rodriguez R

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Raúl Barrera-Rodriguez,1 Jorge Morales-Fuentes2 1Biochemistry and Environmental Medicine Laboratory, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, 2Lung Cancer Medical Service, National Institute of Respiratory Disease, Tlalpan, Mexico City, Distrito Federal, Mexico Both authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Recent biological advances in tumor research provide clear evidence that lung cancer in females is different from that in males. These differences appear to have a direct impact on the clinical presentation, histology, and outcomes of lung cancer. Women are more likely to present with lung adenocarcinoma, tend to receive a diagnosis at an earlier age, and are more likely to be diagnosed with localized disease. Women may also be more predisposed to molecular aberrations resulting from the carcinogenic effects of tobacco, but do not appear to be more susceptible than men to developing lung cancer. The gender differences found in female lung cancer make it mandatory that gender stratification is used in clinical trials in order to improve the survival rates of patients with lung cancer.Keywords: lung cancer, adenocarcinoma, women, genetic susceptibility, genetic differences, tobacco

  19. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  20. Your Lung Operation: After Your Operation

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgeons Education Patients and Family Skills Programs Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD After Your Operation Back to Your Lung Operation Your Lung Operation DVD Welcome Your Lung ...