WorldWideScience

Sample records for luminosity factor

  1. Luminosity and Redshift Dependence of the Covering Factor of AGNs viewed with WISE and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Toba, Yoshiki; Matsuhara, Hideo; Malkan, Matthew A; Gandhi, Poshak; Nakagawa, Takao; Isobe, Naoki; Shirahata, Mai; Oi, Nagisa; Ohyama, Youichi; Takita, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Chisato; Yano, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the dependence of the covering factor (CF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) (i) on the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity and (ii) on the redshift. We constructed 12- and 22-micron luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.006 < z < 0.3 using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) data. Combining the WISE catalog with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data, we selected 223,982 galaxies at 12 micron and 25,721 galaxies at 22 micron for spectroscopic classification. We then identified 16,355 AGNs at 12 micron and 4,683 AGNs at 22 micron by their optical emission lines and cataloged classifications in the SDSS. Following that, we estimated the CF as the fraction of type 2 AGN in all AGNs whose MIR emissions are dominated by the active nucleus (not their host galaxies) based on their MIR colors. We found that (i) the CF decreased with increasing MIR luminosity, regardless of the choice of type 2 AGN classification criteria, and (ii) the CF did not change significantly ...

  2. Lorentz factor - Beaming corrected energy/luminosity correlations and GRB central engine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuang-Xi; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2017-03-01

    We work on a GRB sample whose initial Lorentz factors (Γ0) are constrained by the afterglow onset method and the jet opening angles (θj) are determined by the jet break time. We confirm the Γ0-Eγ,iso correlation by Liang et al. (2010), and the Γ0-Lγ,iso correlation by Lü et al. (2012). Furthermore, we find correlations between Γ0 and the beaming corrected γ-ray energy (Eγ) and mean γ-ray luminosity (Lγ). By also including the kinetic energy of the afterglow, we find rough correlations (with larger scatter) between Γ0 and the total (γ-ray plus kinetic) energy and the total mean luminosity, both for isotropic values and beaming corrected values: these correlations allow us to test the data with GRB central engine models. Limiting our sample to the GRBs that likely have a black hole central engine, we compare the data with theoretical predictions of two types of jet launching mechanisms from BHs, i.e. the non-magnetized ν ν bar -annihilation mechanism, and the strongly magnetized Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We find that the data are more consistent with the latter mechanism, and discuss the implications of our findings for GRB jet composition.

  3. Luminosity and redshift dependence of the covering factor of active galactic nuclei viewed with WISE and Sloan digital sky survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toba, Y.; Matsuhara, H. [Department of Space and Astronautical Science, the Graduate University for Advanced Studies (Sokendai), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Oyabu, S. [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan); Malkan, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Gandhi, P. [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1-3LE (United Kingdom); Nakagawa, T.; Isobe, N.; Shirahata, M.; Oi, N.; Takita, S.; Yano, K. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Ohyama, Y. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617 Taiwan (China); Yamauchi, C., E-mail: toba@ir.isas.jaxa.jp [Misato Observatory, 180 Matsugamine, Misato-cho, Kaiso-gun, Wakayama 640-1366 (Japan)

    2014-06-10

    In this work, we investigate the dependence of the covering factor (CF) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) on the mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity and the redshift. We constructed 12 and 22 μm luminosity functions (LFs) at 0.006 ≤z ≤ 0.3 using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data. Combining the WISE catalog with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic data, we selected 223,982 galaxies at 12 μm and 25,721 galaxies at 22 μm for spectroscopic classification. We then identified 16,355 AGNs at 12 μm and 4683 AGNs at 22 μm by their optical emission lines and cataloged classifications in the SDSS. Following that, we estimated the CF as the fraction of Type 2 AGN in all AGNs whose MIR emissions are dominated by the active nucleus (not their host galaxies) based on their MIR colors. We found that the CF decreased with increasing MIR luminosity, regardless of the choice of Type 2 AGN classification criteria, and the CF did not change significantly with redshift for z ≤ 0.2. Furthermore, we carried out various tests to determine the influence of selection bias and confirmed that similar dependences exist, even when taking these uncertainties into account. The luminosity dependence of the CF can be explained by the receding torus model, but the 'modified' receding torus model gives a slightly better fit, as suggested by Simpson.

  4. Light, Luminosity and the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Short interview to Lucio Rossi, project leader of the High Luminosity LHC, about the concept of light in physics, light and luminosity in particle accelerators and the High Luminosity LHC project. On the occasion of International Year of Light 2015.

  5. High Luminosity LHC Project Description

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, Giorgio; Rossi, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is a novel configuration of the Large Hadron Collider, aiming at increasing the luminosity by a factor five or more above the nominal LHC design, to allow increasing the integrated luminosity, in the high luminosity experiments ATLAS and CMS, from the 300 fb-1 of the LHC original design up to 3000 fb-1 or more. This paper contains a short description of the main machine parameters and of the main equipment that need to be developed and installed. The preliminary cost evaluation and the time plan are presented, too. Finally, the international collaboration that is supporting the project, the governance and the project structure are discussed, too.

  6. Luminosity monitor at PEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Franklin, M.E.B.

    1981-02-01

    The luminosity monitor system utilized by the MKII Detector and by the PEP operators is described. This system processes information from 56 photomultipliers and calculates independent luminosities for each of the 3 colliding bunches in PEP. Design considerations, measurement techniques, and sources of error in the luminosity measurement are discussed.

  7. The Protostellar Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Offner, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The protostellar luminosity function (PLF) is the present-day luminosity function of the protostars in a region of star formation. It is determined using the protostellar mass function (PMF) in combination with a stellar evolutionary model that provides the luminosity as a function of instantaneous and final stellar mass. As in McKee & Offner (2010), we consider three main accretion models: the Isothermal Sphere model, the Turbulent Core model, and an approximation of the Competitive Accretion model. We also consider the effect of an accretion rate that tapers off linearly in time and an accelerating star formation rate. For each model, we characterize the luminosity distribution using the mean, median, maximum, ratio of the median to the mean, standard deviation of the logarithm of the luminosity, and the fraction of very low luminosity objects. We compare the models with bolometric luminosities observed in local star forming regions and find that models with an approximately constant accretion time, suc...

  8. Satellite Luminosities in Galaxy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Skibba, Ramin A.; Sheth, Ravi K.; Martino, Matthew C.

    2007-01-01

    Halo model interpretations of the luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering assume that there is a central galaxy in every sufficiently massive halo, and that this central galaxy is very different from all the others in the halo. The halo model decomposition makes the remarkable prediction that the mean luminosity of the non-central galaxies in a halo should be almost independent of halo mass: the predicted increase is about 20% while the halo mass increases by a factor of more than 20. In c...

  9. LHC smashes luminosity record

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN particle-physics lab has surpassed its luminosity goals for 2016, delivering 40 inverse femtobarns against a target of 25. For 2016 the LHC was expected to reach a peak luminosity of 1034 cm‑2s‑1, but by the end of the run it was regularly operating 30% above that figure.

  10. A Luminosity Calorimeter for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowicz, H; Kananov, S; Levy, A; Sadeh, I

    2009-01-01

    For the relative precision of the luminosity measurement at CLIC, a preliminary target value of 1% is being assumed. This may be accomplished by constructing a finely granulated calorimeter, which will measure Bhabha scattering at small angles. In order to achieve the design goal, the geometrical parameters of the calorimeter need to be defined. Several factors influence the design of the calorimeter; chief among these is the need to minimize the error on the luminosity measurement while avoiding the intense beam background at small angles. In this study the geometrical parameters are optimized for the best performance of the calorimeter. In addition, the suppression of physics background to Bhabha scattering is investigated and a set of selection cuts is introduced.

  11. properties and luminosity functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hektor Monteiro

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present an investigation of a sample of 1072 stars extracted from the Villanova Catalog of Spectroscopically Identified White Dwarfs (2005 on-line version, studying their distribution in the Galaxy, their physical properties and their luminosity functions. The distances and physical properties of the white dwarfs are determined through interpolation of their (B-V or (b-y colors in model grids. The solar position relative to the Galactic plane, luminosity function, as well as separate functions for each white dwarf spectral type are derived and discussed. We show that the binary fraction does not vary significantly as a function of distance from the Galactic disk out to 100 pc. We propose that the formation rates of DA and non-DAs have changed over time and/or that DAs evolve into non-DA types. The luminosity functions for DAs and DBs have peaks possibly related to a star burst event.

  12. An Anthropology of Luminosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...

  13. LHC Luminosity Modeling for RUNII

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniou, Fanouria; Hostettler, Michael; Lamont, Mike; Papadopoulou, Stefania; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Papotti, Giulia; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua, Belen; Wyszynski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    After a long shut-down (LS1), LHC restarted its operation on April 2015 at a record energy of 6.5TeV, achieving soon a good luminosity performance. In this paper, a luminosity model based on the three main components of the LHC luminosity degradation (intrabeam scattering, synchrotron radiation and luminosity burn-off), is compared with data from runII. Based on the observations, other sources of luminosity degradation are discussed and the model is refined. Finally, based on the experience from runI and runII, the model is used for integrated luminosity projections for the HL-LHC beam parameters.

  14. GRB as luminosity indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are found at much higher redshifts (z>6) than Supernova Ia (z~1), and hence, they can be used to probe very primitive universe. However, radiation mechanism of GRB remains a puzzle, unlike Supernova Ia. Through comprehensive description, both empirical and physical, we shall discuss the most likely way to use the constituent pulses of a GRB to find the radiation mechanism as well as using the pulses as luminosity indicators.

  15. A luminosity model of RHIC gold runs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-11-01

    In this note, we present a luminosity model for RHIC gold runs. The model is applied to the physics fills in 2007 run without cooling, and with the longitudinal cooling applied to one beam only. Having good comparison, the model is used to project a fill with the longitudinal cooling applied to both beams. Further development and possible applications of the model are discussed. To maximize the integrated luminosity, usually the higher beam intensity, smaller longitudinal and transverse emittance, and smaller {beta} are the directions to work on. In past 10 years, the RHIC gold runs have demonstrated a path toward this goal. Most recently, a successful commissioning of the bunched beam stochastic cooling, both longitudinal and transverse, has offered a chance of further RHIC luminosity improvement. With so many factors involved, a luminosity model would be useful to identify and project gains in the machine development. In this article, a preliminary model is proposed. In Section 2, several secondary factors, which are not yet included in the model, are identified based on the RHIC operation condition and experience in current runs. In Section 3, the RHIC beam store parameters used in the model are listed, and validated. In Section 4, the factors included in the model are discussed, and the luminosity model is presented. In Section 5, typical RHIC gold fills without cooling, and with partial cooling are used for comparison with the model. Then a projection of fills with more coolings is shown. In Section 6, further development of the model is discussed.

  16. To High Luminosity and beyond!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    This week marks a major milestone for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC - see here) project, as it moves from the design study to the machine construction phase. HL-LHC will extend the LHC’s discovery potential, increasing luminosity by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value and allowing the scientific community to study new phenomena.    Composer Domenico Vicinanza (left) directs the musical performance of sonified LHC data during a special Hi-Lumi event (see box). The green light was given during the 5th Joint HiLumi LHC-LARP annual meeting that took place at CERN from 26 to 30 October 2015. The meeting saw the participation of more than 230 experts from all over the world to discuss the results and achievements of the HiLumi LHC Design Study. During the week, these experts approved the first version of the HL-LHC Technical Design Report – the document that, following the Preliminary Design Report issued in 2014, describes in detail how the LHC upgrade progra...

  17. Achieving high luminosity in the Fermilab Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, S.D.

    1991-05-01

    Fermilab has embarked upon a program, christened Fermilab III, to raise the luminosity in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider over the next five years by at least a factor of thirty beyond the currently achieved level of 1.6{times}10{sup 30}cm{sup {minus}2}sec{sup {minus}1}. Components of the program include implementation of electrostatic separators, Antiproton Source improvements, installation of cold compressors, doubling the existing linac output energy, and the construction of a new accelerator--the Fermilab Main Injector. Basic limitations in the achievement of higher luminosity in the Tevatron, the strategy developed to achieve the Fermilab III goals, and the evolution of luminosity throughout the period will be discussed. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Different Luminosity Correlation of GRBs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Z. B. Zhang; H. C. Liu; L. Y. Jiang; D. Y. Chen

    2014-09-01

    We report our recent understanding about a tight correlation between relative spectral lag and luminosity (or redshift) for -ray bursts. The latest investigations indicate that the empirical correlations got from BATSE bursts also exist for Swift/BAT ones. The special luminosity-lag correlation is much similar to that of the luminosity with pulse number proposed by Schaefer (2003), but largely different from most others ever discovered. Note that our newly built luminosity-lag correlation predicts that luminosity should evolve with cosmological redshift as p ∝ (1 + )2.4 ± 0.7 that is excellently confirmed by Salvaterra et al. (2012) and Geng & Huang (2013). In addition, it is also surprisingly found that the luminosity-lag correlation can account for both long and short Swift/BAT bursts, which might be an evidence of the same radiation mechanism for diverse burst groups.

  19. High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) general infographics

    CERN Multimedia

    Landua, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity LHC, which is expected to be operational after 2025, will increase the LHC’s luminosity by a factor of 10. To achieve this major upgrade, several technologies, some of which are completely innovative, are being developed.

  20. Relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities of flat-spectrum radio quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Zhao-Yu Chen; Yi-Ping Qin; Min-Feng Gu; Lian-Zhong Lü; Cheng-Yue Su; You-Bing Li; Ye Chen

    2011-01-01

    We employ a sample of 362 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) to calculate their integrated luminosities by integrating the spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed with multi-band (radio, IR, optical, UV and X-ray) data.We compare these luminosities with those estimated from monochromatic luminosities by multiplying them by the conventional bolometric correction factors.Our analysis shows that the integrated luminosities calculated from the SED are much larger than the bolometric luminosities estimated from monochromatic luminosities.Their departing behavior tightly correlates with radio luminosities.The relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities are explored, which are regarded as empirical relations that might be more suitable to be applied to estimate integrated luminosities of FSRQs from their monochromatic luminosities.

  1. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy root s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for root s = 2.76, 7 and 8TeV (proton-pr

  2. High luminosity muon collider design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.; Gallardo, J.

    1996-10-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. We discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  3. Luminosity monitor studies for TESLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napoly, O. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee; Schulte, D. [European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1997-11-01

    The feasibility of a luminosity monitor based on a radiative Bhabha detector is investigated n the context of the TESLA linear collider. Another option based on low energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pair calorimetry is also discussed. In order to monitor the beam parameters at the interaction point by optimizing the luminosity, these detectors should be able to provide a relative measurement of the luminosity with a resolution better that 1% using a fraction of the TESLA bunch train. (author) 8 refs.

  4. RHIC PLANS TOWARDS HIGHER LUMINOSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.

    2007-06-25

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is designed to provide luminosity over a wide range of beam energies and species, including heavy ions, polarized protons, and tric beam collisions. In the first seven years of operation there has been a rapid increase in the achieved peak and average luminosity, substantially exceeding design values. Work is presently underway to achieve the Enhanced Design parameters. Planned major upgrades include the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), RHIC-11, and construction of an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). We review the expected RHIC upgrade performance. Electron cooling and its impact on the luminosity both for heavy ions and protons are discussed in detail.

  5. The unexpected clustering of the optical afterglow luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Nardini, M; Ghirlanda, G; Tavecchio, F; Firmani, C; Lazzati, D

    2006-01-01

    We studied the behaviour of the optical afterglow lightcurves of a sample of 24 Gamma--Ray Bursts (GRBs) with known redshift and published estimates of the optical extinction in the source frame, detected before the SWIFT satellite launch. We found an unexpected clustering of the optical luminosities at 12 hours in the source frame. The distribution of the optical luminosities is narrower than the distribution of X-ray luminosities at the same time. Few (3) bursts stand apart from the main optical distribution, being fainter by a factor of about 15. We also analysed the optical luminosities of the SWIFT burst with known redshift finding that the luminosity distribution is similar to the pre SWIFT GRBs one, even if they have a different mean redshift. These results can suggest the existence of a family of intrinsically optically under--luminous dark GRBs.

  6. Beam Imaging and Luminosity Calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Klute, Markus; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a method to reconstruct two-dimensional proton bunch densities using vertex distributions accumulated during LHC beam-beam scans. The $x$-$y$ correlations in the beam shapes are studied and an alternative luminosity calibration technique is introduced. We demonstrate the method on simulated beam-beam scans and estimate the uncertainty on the luminosity calibration associated to the beam-shape reconstruction to be below 1\\%.

  7. The High Luminosity LHC Project

    CERN Document Server

    Bruning, O

    2015-01-01

    This presentation reviews the status of the high luminosity LHC project, and highlights the main challenges from the technology and beam physics point of view. It will mention the outcome of the 2015 Cost and Schedule review for the HL-LHC project and summarizes the status of the high field quadrupole and crab cavity development.

  8. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determin...

  9. The white dwarf luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Berro, Enrique; Oswalt, Terry D.

    2016-06-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for ∼ 10 Gyr. Their observed properties provide information about the history of the Galaxy, its dark matter content and a host of other interesting astrophysical problems. Examples of these include an independent determination of the past history of the local star formation rate, identification of the objects responsible for the reported microlensing events, constraints on the rate of change of the gravitational constant, and upper limits to the mass of weakly interacting massive particles. To carry on these tasks the essential observational tools are the luminosity and mass functions of white dwarfs, whereas the theoretical tools are the evolutionary sequences of white dwarf progenitors, and the corresponding white dwarf cooling sequences. In particular, the observed white dwarf luminosity function is the key manifestation of the white dwarf cooling theory, although other relevant ingredients are needed to compare theory and observations. In this review we summarize the recent attempts to empirically determine the white dwarf luminosity function for the different Galactic populations. We also discuss the biases that may affect its interpretation. Finally, we elaborate on the theoretical ingredients needed to model the white dwarf luminosity function, paying special attention to the remaining uncertainties, and we comment on some applications of the white dwarf cooling theory. Astrophysical problems for which white dwarf stars may provide useful leverage in the near future are also discussed.

  10. Free-free absorption effects on Eddington luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    2003-01-01

    In standard treatments the Eddington luminosity is calculated by assuming that the electron-photon cross section is well described by the Thomson cross section which is gray (frequency independent). Here we discuss some consequence of the introduction of free-free opacity in the Eddington luminosity computation: in particular, due to the dependence of free-free emission on the square of the gas density, it follows that the associated absorption cross section increases linearly with the gas density, so that in high density environments Eddington luminosity is correspondingly reduced. We present a summary of an ongoing exploration of the parameter space of the problem, and we conclude that Eddington luminosity in high density environments can be lowered by a factor of ten or more, making it considerably easier for black holes to accelerate and eject ambient gas.

  11. The white dwarf luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    García-Berro, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    White dwarfs are the final remnants of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Their evolution is essentially a cooling process that lasts for $\\sim 10$ Gyr. Their observed properties provide information about the history of the Galaxy, its dark matter content and a host of other interesting astrophysical problems. Examples of these include an independent determination of the past history of the local star formation rate, identification of the objects responsible for the reported microlensing events, constraints on the rate of change of the gravitational constant, and upper limits to the mass of weakly interacting massive particles. To carry on these tasks the essential observational tools are the luminosity and mass functions of white dwarfs, whereas the theoretical tools are the evolutionary sequences of white dwarf progenitors, and the corresponding white dwarf cooling sequences. In particular, the observed white dwarf luminosity function is the key manifestation of the white dwarf cooling theory, although other...

  12. Absolute luminosity measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Hopchev, Plamen

    2011-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC running at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer'' scan method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using both proton-gas and proton-proton interactions. The beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. We describe both methods and compare the two results. In addition, we present the techniques used to transport the absolute luminosity measurement ...

  13. Updating quasar bolometric luminosity corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Runnoe, Jessie C; Shang, Zhaohui

    2012-01-01

    Bolometric corrections are used in quasar studies to quantify total energy output based on a measurement of a monochromatic luminosity. First, we enumerate and discuss the practical difficulties of determining such corrections, then we present bolometric luminosities between 1 \\mu m and 8 keV rest frame and corrections derived from the detailed spectral energy distributions of 63 bright quasars of low to moderate redshift (z = 0.03-1.4). Exploring several mathematical fittings, we provide practical bolometric corrections of the forms L_iso=\\zeta \\lambda L_{\\lambda} and log(L_iso)=A+B log(\\lambda L_{\\lambda}) for \\lambda= 1450, 3000, and 5100 \\AA, where L_iso is the bolometric luminosity calculated under the assumption of isotropy. The significant scatter in the 5100 \\AA\\ bolometric correction can be reduced by adding a first order correction using the optical slope, \\alpha_\\lambda,opt. We recommend an adjustment to the bolometric correction to account for viewing angle and the anisotropic emission expected fr...

  14. High Luminosity LHC: challenges and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, G.; Barranco, J.; Bertarelli, A.; Biancacci, N.; Bruce, R.; Brüning, O.; Buffat, X.; Cai, Y.; Carver, L. R.; Fartoukh, S.; Giovannozzi, M.; Iadarola, G.; Li, K.; Lechner, A.; Medina Medrano, L.; Métral, E.; Nosochkov, Y.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pellegrini, D.; Pieloni, T.; Qiang, J.; Redaelli, S.; Romano, A.; Rossi, L.; Rumolo, G.; Salvant, B.; Schenk, M.; Tambasco, C.; Tomás, R.; Valishev, S.; Van der Veken, F. F.

    2016-12-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will undergo a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its rate of collisions by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity by a factor ten. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 T superconducting magnets, including Nb3Sn-based magnets never used in accelerators before, compact superconducting cavities for longitudinal beam rotation, new technology and physical processes for beam collimation. The dynamics of the HL-LHC beams will be also particularly challenging and this aspect is the main focus of this paper.

  15. Initial luminosity functions of starburst galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnovsky, S.; Izotova, I.

    2016-12-01

    For the sample of about 800 starburst galaxies the initial luminosity functions which appear the distributions of galaxy luminosities at zero starburst age are considered based on the data of luminosities of galaxies in the recombination Hα emission line in the regions of ionised hydrogen and the ultraviolet continuum. We find the initial luminosity functions for the starburst galaxies with Hα emission and ultraviolet continuum are satisfactory approximated with log-normal function.

  16. Luminosity monitoring and calibration of BLM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛镇; 蔡啸; 俞伯祥; 方建; 孙希磊; 石峰; 王志刚; 交正华; 孙丽君; 刘宏邦; 章爱武; 许咨宗; 王晓东; 汪晓莲; 胡涛; 王至勇; 傅成栋; 鄢文标; 吕军光; 周莉

    2011-01-01

    The BEPC II Luminosity Monitor (BLM) monitors relative luminosity per bunch. The counting rates of gamma photons, which are proportional to the luminosities from the BLM at the center of mass system energy of the φ(3770) resonance, are obtained with a sta

  17. Optimizing integrated luminosity of future hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2108454; Schulte, Daniel; Zimmermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The integrated luminosity, a key figure of merit for any particle-physics collider, is closely linked to the peak luminosity and to the beam lifetime. The instantaneous peak luminosity of a collider is constrained by a number of boundary conditions, such as the available beam current, the maximum beam-beam tune shift with acceptable beam stability and reasonable luminosity lifetime (i.e., the empirical “beam-beam limit”), or the event pileup in the physics detectors. The beam lifetime at high-luminosity hadron colliders is largely determined by particle burn off in the collisions. In future highest-energy circular colliders synchrotron radiation provides a natural damping mechanism, which can be exploited for maximizing the integrated luminosity. In this article, we derive analytical expressions describing the optimized integrated luminosity, the corresponding optimum store length, and the time evolution of relevant beam parameters, without or with radiation damping, while respecting a fixed maximum value...

  18. The Ultraviolet Luminosity Function of the Earliest Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    O'Shea, Brian W; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich AMR calculations of high redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. These simulations contain hundreds of well-resolved galaxies at $z \\sim 25-8$, and make several novel, testable predictions. Most critically, we show that the ultraviolet luminosity function of our simulated galaxies is consistent with observations of high-z galaxy populations at the bright end of the luminosity function (M$_{1600} \\leq -17$), but at lower luminosities is essentially flat rather than rising steeply, as has been inferred by Schechter function fits to high-z observations. This flattening of the luminosity function is due to two factors: (i) the strong dependence of the stellar fraction on halo virial mass in our simulated galaxy population, with lower-mass halos having systematically lower stellar fractions and thus lower luminosities at a given halo virial mass; and (ii)...

  19. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S. [University of Wyoming, Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Runnoe, J. C. [Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 413 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Green, R. F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  20. Determination of the Absolute Luminosity at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    White, Simon Mathieu; Puzo, P

    2010-01-01

    For particle colliders, the most important performance parameters are the beam energy and the luminosity. High energies allow the particle physics experiments to study and observe new effects. The luminosity describes the ability of the collider to produce the required number of useful interactions or events. It is defined as the proportionality factor between the event rate, measured by the experiments, and the cross section of the observed event which describes its probability to occur. The absolute knowledge of the luminosity therefore allows for the experiments to measure the absolute cross sections. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was designed to produce proton proton collisions at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV. This energy would be the highest ever reached in a particle accelerator. The knowledge and understanding of particle physics at such high energy is based on simulations and theoretical predictions. As opposed to e+ e- colliders, for which the Bhabba scattering cross section can be accurately ...

  1. Luminosity Spectrum Reconstruction at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The model is used within a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  2. Differential Luminosity Measurement using Bhabha Events

    CERN Document Server

    Poss, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    A good knowledge of the luminosity spectrum is mandatory for many measurements at future e+e- colliders. As the beam-parameters determining the luminosity spectrum cannot be measured precisely, the luminosity spectrum has to be measured through a gauge process with the detector. The measured distributions, used to reconstruct the spectrum, depend on Initial State Radiation, cross-section, and Final State Radiation. To extract the basic luminosity spectrum, a parametric model of the luminosity spectrum is created, in this case the spectrum at the 3 TeV CLIC. The model is used in a reweighting technique to extract the luminosity spectrum from measured Bhabha event observables, taking all relevant effects into account. The centre-of-mass energy spectrum is reconstructed within 5% over the full validity range of the model. The reconstructed spectrum does not result in a significant bias or systematic uncertainty in the exemplary physics benchmark process of smuon pair production.

  3. Luminosity monitoring and calibration of BLM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Zhen; CAI Xiao; YU Bo-Xiang; FANG Jian; SUN Xi-Lei; SHI Feng; WANG Zhi-Gang; AN Zheng-Hua; SUN Li-Jun; LIU Hong-Bang; ZHANG Ai-Wu; XU Zi-Zong; WANG Xiao-Dong; WANG Xiao-Lian; HU Tao; WANG Zhi-Yong; FU Cheng-Dong; YAN Wen-Biao; L(U) Jun-Guang; ZHOU Li

    2011-01-01

    The BEPCⅡLuminosity Monitor(BLM)monitors relative luminosity per bunch.The counting rates of gamma photons,which are proportional to the luminosities from the BLM at the center of mass system energy of the ψ(3770)resonance,are obtained with a statistical error of 0.01% and a systematic error of 4.1%.Absolute luminosities are also determined by the BESⅢ End-cap Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter(EEMC)using Bhabha events with a statistical error of 2.3% and a systematic error of 3.5%.The calibration constant between the luminosities obtained with the EEMC and the counting rates of the BLM are found to be 0.84±0.03(x1026 cm-2·count-1).With the calibration constant,the counting rates of the BLM can be scaled up to absolute luminosities.

  4. Luminosity and Crab Waist Collision Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Wanwei

    2015-01-01

    In high energy physics, the luminosity is one useful value to characterize the performance of a particle collider. To gain more available data, we need to maximize the luminosity in most collider experiments. With the discussions of tune shift involved the beam dynamics and a recently proposed "crabbed waist" scheme of beam-beam collisions, we present some qualitative analysis to increase the luminosity. In addition, beam-beam tune shifts and luminosities of $e^{+}e^{-}$, $pp$/$p\\bar{p}$, and $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ colliders are discussed.

  5. Galaxy luminosity function and the morphological type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Sanz, J.L.

    1988-09-01

    The morphological luminosity function is obtained assuming that galaxies form only at high-density regions with the matter distribution represented by a filtered Gaussian random field. The results obtained for cold dark matter spectra (adiabatic and isocurvature fluctuations) with Omega = 1 are compared with observations for galaxies of different Hubble types, finding that both scenarios provide distributions that are close to the observations for global thresholds between the values of 2.5 and 3 and standard mass-luminosity ratios for each type. In every case, a bell-shaped luminosity function was found, which looks similar for each morphological type but differing in the mean luminosity. 33 references.

  6. Cepheids : the period-luminosity relation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beaulieu, JP

    1997-01-01

    The Cepheids are relatively young, bright, periodic supergiant variable stars showing a correlation between their periods and luminosities. Since the beginning of the century, the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation has been the corner stone of distance determination, and of the measure of the correl

  7. Luminosity limits for funnels in thick accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nityananda, R.; Narayan, R. (Raman Research Inst., Bangalore (India))

    1982-11-01

    A narrow, highly luminous funnel in a thick accretion disc is a common feature of many models for active galactic nuclei. The constraints on the luminosity imposed by the effects of radiation forces on the funnel are examined. The treatment allows properly for the irradiation of any part of the funnel by the rest, an important effect for this problem. It is found that the maximum luminosity of a funnel of small semi-angle phi is reduced below the Eddington limit Lsub(E) by a factor phi/sup 2/ if the funnel is to be in strict equilibrium. Even with allowance for flow induced viscous stresses, the luminosity cannot exceed of the order of Lsub(E)phi. In contrast, current models have luminosities of the order of Lsub(E)/phi. It is shown that the resulting large unbalanced forces at the funnel surface cause a significant outflow of matter which should be incorporated in the model for consistency. These results do not depend on the detailed angular momentum distribution over the disc surface but only on the funnel geometry.

  8. BDS tuning and luminosity monitoring in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, Barbara; Latina, Andrea; Marin, Eduardo; Pfingstner, Jurgen; Schulte, Daniel; Snuverink, Jochem; Tomas, Rogelio; Zamudio, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    The emittance preservation in the Beam Delivery System (BDS) is one of the major challenges in CLIC. The fast detuning of the final focus optics requires an on-­line tuning procedure in order to keep luminosity close to the maximum. Different tuning techniques have been applied to the CLIC BDS and in particular to the Final Focus System (FFS) in order to mitigate static and dynamic imperfections. Some of them require a fast luminosity measurement. Here we study the possibility to use beam-­beam backgrounds processes at CLIC 3 TeV CM energy as fast luminosity signal. In particular the hadrons multiplicity in the detector region is investigated.

  9. Luminosity determination at HERA-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Adams, M. [Dortmund Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Agari, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (DE)] (and others)

    2007-05-15

    A detailed description of an original method used to measure the luminosity accumulated by the HERA-B experiment for a data sample taken during the 2002-2003 HERA running period is reported. We show that, with this method, a total luminosity measurement can be achieved with a typical precision, including overall systematic uncertainties, at a level of 5% or better. We also report evidence for the detection of {delta}-rays generated in the target and comment on the possible use of such delta rays to measure luminosity. (orig.)

  10. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  11. THE z = 5 QUASAR LUMINOSITY FUNCTION FROM SDSS STRIPE 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Jiang Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 92420 (United States); Shen Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W. Niel [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); DeGraf, Colin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Ge Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Streblyanska, Alina, E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2013-05-10

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M{sub 1450} < -26) with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data covering {approx}6000 deg{sup 2}, then extend to lower luminosities (M{sub 1450} < -24) with newly discovered, faint z {approx} 5 quasars selected from 235 deg{sup 2} of deep, coadded imaging in the SDSS Stripe 82 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 < z < 5.1 quasars that is highly complete, with 73 spectroscopic identifications out of 92 candidates. Our color selection method is also highly efficient: of the 73 spectra obtained, 71 are high-redshift quasars. These observations reach below the break in the luminosity function (M{sub 1450}{sup *}{approx}-27). The bright-end slope is steep ({beta} {approx}< -4), with a constraint of {beta} < -3.1 at 95% confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of {approx}2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M{sub 1450} < -26) from z = 5 to z = 6 than from z = 4 to z = 5, suggesting a more rapid decline in quasar activity at high redshift than found in previous surveys. Our model for the quasar luminosity function predicts that quasars generate {approx}30% of the ionizing photons required to keep hydrogen in the universe ionized at z = 5.

  12. The SDSS DR6 Luminosity Functions of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D

    2008-01-01

    We present number counts, luminosity functions (LFs) and luminosity densities of galaxies obtained using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Sixth Data Release in all SDSS photometric bands. Thanks to the SDSS DR6, galaxy statistics have increased by a factor of ~9 in the u-band and by a factor of ~4-5 in the rest of the SDSS bands with respect to the previous work of Blanton et al. (2003b). In addition, we have achieved a high redshift completeness in our galaxy samples. Firstly, by making use of the survey masks, provided by the NYU-VAGC DR6, we have been able to define an area on the sky of high angular redshift completeness. Secondly, we guarantee that brightness-dependent redshift incompleteness is small within the magnitude ranges that define our galaxy samples. With these advances, we have estimated very accurate SDSS DR6 LFs in both the bright and the faint end. In the {0.1}^r-band, our SDSS DR6 luminosity function is well fitted by a Schechter LF with parameters Phi_{*}=0.90 +/- 0.07$, M_{*}-5log_{10}h=-20....

  13. MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Bergmann, Benedikt; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Ashba, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Bekhouche, Khaled [Biskra University (Algeria); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Lipniacka, Anna [Bergen University (Norway)

    2016-07-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s) =8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX luminosity measurements are below 0.3% for one minute intervals.

  14. Spatial and luminosity distributions of galactic satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Cole, Shaun; Eke, Vincent; Frenk, Carlos; Helly, John

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the luminosity functions and projected number density profiles of galactic satellites around isolated primaries of different luminosity. We measure these quantities for model satellites placed into the Millennium and Millennium II dark matter simulations by the GALFORM semi-analytic galaxy formation model for different bins of primary galaxy magnitude and we investigate their dependence on satellite luminosity. We compare our model predictions to the data of Guo et al. from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8). First, we use a mock light-cone catalogue to verify that the method we used to count satellites in the SDSS DR8 is unbiased. We find that the radial distributions of model satellites can be fitted by a Navarro-Frenk-White profile similar to those around comparable primary galaxies in the SDSS DR8, with only slight differences at low luminosities and small projected radii. However, when splitting the satellites by colour, the model and SDSS satellite systems no longer resemble one another, with many red model satellites in contrast to the dominant blue fraction at similar luminosity in the SDSS. The few model blue satellites are also significantly less centrally concentrated in the halo of their stacked primary than their SDSS counterparts. We discuss how these discrepancies may reflect inadequacies in the treatment of the processes that determine the star formation histories of small galaxies in the model.

  15. ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cinca, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb−1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb−1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data a...

  16. Development of automatic luminosity calculation framework

    CERN Document Server

    Lavicka, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Up-to-date knowledge on the collected number of events and integrated luminosity is crucial for the ALICE data taking and trigger strategy planning. The purpose of the project is to develop a framework for the automatic recalculation of achieved statistics and integrated luminosity on a daily basis using information from the ALICE data base. We have been encouraged encouraged to work on the improvement of available luminosity calculation algorithms, in particular accounting for pile-up corrections. Results are represented in a form of trending plots and summary tables for different trigger classes and stored in the personal web site of the author with an outlook on the possibility to story it in the ALICE monitoring repository.

  17. CLIC Post-Collision Line Luminosity Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B; Deacon, L; Geschwendtner, E

    2011-01-01

    The CLIC post collision line is designed to transport the un-collided beams and the products of the collided beams with a total power of 14MW to the main beam dump. Full Monte Carlo simulation has been done for the description of the CLIC luminosity monitoring in the post collision line. One method of the luminosity diagnostic is based on the detection of high energy muons produced by beamstrahlung photons in the main beam dump. The disrupted beam and the beamstrahlung photons produce at the order of 106 muons per bunch crossing per cm2, with energies higher than 10 GeV. Threshold Cherenkov counters are considered after the beam dump for the detection of these high energy muons. Another method for luminosity monitoring is presented using the direct detection of the beamstrahlung photons.

  18. The BRAN luminosity detectors for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matis, H. S.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Turner, W. C.; Bravin, E.; Miyamoto, R.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the several phases which led, from the conceptual design, prototyping, construction and tests with beam, to the installation and operation of the BRAN (Beam RAte of Neutrals) relative luminosity monitors for the LHC. The detectors have been operating since 2009 to contribute, optimize and maintain the accelerator performance in the two high luminosity interaction regions (IR), the IR1 (ATLAS) and the IR5 (CMS). The devices are gas ionization chambers installed inside a neutral particle absorber 140 m away from the Interaction Points in IR1 and IR5 and monitor the energy deposited by electromagnetic showers produced by high-energy neutral particles from the collisions. The detectors have the capability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity at the 40 MHz bunch rate, as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation during the nominal LHC operation. The devices have operated since the early commissioning phase of the accelerator over a broad range of luminosities reaching 1.4×1034 cm-2 s-1 with a peak pileup of 45 events per bunch crossing. Even though the nominal design luminosity of the LHC has been exceeded, the BRAN is operating well. After describing how the BRAN can be used to monitor the luminosity of the collider, we discuss the technical choices that led to its construction and the different tests performed prior to the installation in two IRs of the LHC. Performance simulations are presented together with operational results obtained during p-p operations, including runs at 40 MHz bunch rate, Pb-Pb operations and p-Pb operations.

  19. Powering the High-Luminosity Triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarino, A

    2015-01-01

    The powering of the magnets in the LHC High-Luminosity Triplets requires production and transfer of more than 150 kA of DC current. High precision power converters will be adopted, and novel High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) current leads and MgB2 based transfer lines will provide the electrical link between the power converters and the magnets. This chapter gives an overview of the systems conceived in the framework of the LHC High-Luminosity upgrade for feeding the superconducting magnet circuits. The focus is on requirements, challenges and novel developments.

  20. Luminosity Targets for FCC-hh

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, F.; Buffat, X.; Schulte, D.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the choice of target values for the peak and integrated luminosity of a future high-energy frontier circular hadron collider (FCC-hh). We review the arguments on the physics reach of a hadron collider. Next we show that accelerator constraints will limit the beam current and the turnaround time. Taking these limits into account, we derive an expression for the ultimate integrated luminosity per year, depending on a possible pile-up limit imposed by the physics experiments. We finally benchmark our result against the planned two phases of FCC-hh [1, 2, 3

  1. Using Spectral Flux Ratios to Standardize SN Ia Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, S; Antilogus, P; Aragon, C; Baltay, C; Bongard, S; Buton, C; Childress, M; Chotard, N; Copin, Y; Gangler, E; Loken, S; Nugent, P; Pain, R; Pécontal, E; Pereira, R; Perlmutter, S; Rabinowitz, D; Rigaudier, G; Runge, K; Scalzo, R; Smadja, G; Swift, H; Tao, C; Thomas, R C; Wu, C

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to standardize Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) luminosities to ~<0.13 magnitudes using flux ratios from a single flux-calibrated spectrum per SN. Using Nearby Supernova Factory spectrophotomery of 58 SNe Ia, we performed an unbiased search for flux ratios which correlate with SN Ia luminosity. After developing the method and selecting the best ratios from a training sample, we verified the results on a separate validation sample and with data from the literature. We identified multiple flux ratios whose correlations with luminosity are stronger than those of light curve shape and color, previously identified spectral feature ratios, or equivalent width measurements. In particular, the flux ratio R(642/443) = F(642 nm) / F(443 nm) has a correlation of 0.95 with SN Ia absolute magnitudes. Using this single ratio as a correction factor produces a Hubble diagram with a residual scatter standard deviation of 0.125 +- 0.011 mag, compared with 0.161 +- 0.015 mag when fit with the SALT2 light cur...

  2. High-Luminosity LHC moves to the next phase

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    This week saw several meetings vital for the medium-term future of CERN.    From Monday to Wednesday, the Resource Review Board, RRB, that oversees resource allocation in the LHC experiments, had a series of meetings. Thursday then saw the close-out meeting for the Hi-Lumi LHC design study, which was partially funded by the European Commission. These meetings focused on the High Luminosity upgrade for the LHC, which responds to the top priority of the European Strategy for Particle Physics adopted by the CERN Council in 2013. This upgrade will transform the LHC into a facility for precision studies, the logical next step for the high-energy frontier of particle physics. It is a challenging upgrade, both for the LHC and the detectors. The LHC is already the highest luminosity hadron collider ever constructed, generating up to a billion collisions per second at the heart of the detectors. The High Luminosity upgrade will see that number rise by a factor of five from 2025. For the detectors...

  3. EU supports the LHC high-luminosity study

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The design collision energy and luminosity of the LHC are already at record numbers, making the machine one of the most complex scientific instruments ever built. However, to extend its discovery potential even further, a major upgrade of the LHC will be required around 2020. This will increase its average luminosity by a factor of 5 to 10 beyond its design value. Fifteen worldwide institutions and the European Union are supporting the initial design phase of the project through the HiLumi LHC programme, whose kick-off meeting will take place on 16-18 November.   The CERN team that has successfully built and tested the Short Magnet Coil – a small 40 cm long magnet capable of producing a 12.5 T magnetic field. The upgrade of the LHC will require about 10 years of design, construction and implementation. The new machine configuration will be called “High Luminosity LHC” (HL-LHC). The similarly named “HiLumi LHC” is the EU programme that supports...

  4. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Rogers, A.; Willingale, R.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs; and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate density evolution component is an artefact of poor parametrization of the CSFRD at high redshifts rather than indicating evolution in the formation rate of early epoch GRBs. We conclude that the single brightest region of a GRB light curve holds no special property; by incorporating pulse data from the totality of GRB emission we boost the GRB population statistics by a factor of 5, rule out some models utilized to explain deficiencies in GRB formation rate modelling, and constrain more tightly some of the observed parameters of GRB behaviour.

  5. On the mass-luminosity relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccluskey, G. E., Jr.; Kondo, Y.

    1972-01-01

    The results of a least-squares study of the mass-luminosity relation for eclipsing and visual binary stars consisting of main sequence components are presented. Two methods are discussed. First, the values of the coefficients A and B in the relation log M = A + BM sub BOL are determined. Then a technique which permits the determination of alpha and beta in the relation M = alpha L beta, when only the sum of the masses, and not the individual masses of each component, is known. The results and a comparison of the two methods are discussed. It is found that the following mass-luminosity relation represents the observational data satisfactorily: log M = 0.504 - 0.103 M sub BOL, -8 less than or equal to M sub BOL less than or equal to +10.5. A discussion of the data and of the possibility that separate mass-luminosity relations may exist for visual and eclipsing binaries is given. The possibility that more than one mass-luminosity relation is required in the range -8 less than or equal to M sub BOL less than or equal to +13 is also discussed.

  6. Academic Training - LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2006-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE SERIES 13, 14, 15, March, from 11:00 to 12:00 - 16 March from 10:00 to 12:00 Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 14, 15 March, Council Room on 13, 16 March LHC luminosity upgrade: detector challenges A. De Roeck / CERN-PH, D. Bortoletto / Purdue Univ. USA, R. Wigmans / Texas, Tech Univ. USA, W. Riegler / CERN-PH, W. Smith / Wisconsin Univ. USA The upgrade of the LHC machine towards higher luminosity (1035 cm-2s-1) has been studied over the last few years. These studies have investigated scenarios to achieve the increase in peak luminosity by an order of magnitude, as well as the physics potential of such an upgrade and the impact of a machine upgrade on the LHC DETECTORS. This series of lectures will cover the following topics: Physics motivation and machine scenarios for an order of magnitude increase in the LHC peak luminosity (lecture 1) Detector challenges including overview of ideas for R&D programs by the LHC experiments: tracking and calorimetry, other new detector ...

  7. The Local Luminosity Function at 25 Microns

    CERN Document Server

    Shupe, D L; Hacking, P B; Huchra, J P; Shupe, David L.; Fang, Fan; Hacking, Perry B.; Huchra, John P.

    1998-01-01

    The local luminosity function at 25 $\\mu$m provides the basis for interpreting the results of deep mid-infrared surveys planned or in progress with space astrophysics missions including ISO, WIRE and SIRTF. We have selected a sample of 1458 galaxies from the IRAS Faint Source Survey with a flux density limit of 250 mJy at 25 $\\mu$m. The local luminosity function is derived using both parametric and non-parametric maximum-likelihood techniques, and the classical $1/V_{max}$ estimator. Comparison of these results shows that the $1/V_{max}$ estimate of the luminosity function is significantly affected by the Local Supercluster. A maximum-likelihood fit to the radial density shows no systematic increase that would be caused by density evolution of the galaxy population. The density fit is used to correct the $1/V_{max}$ estimate. We also demonstrate the high quality and completeness of our sample by a variety of methods. The luminosity function derived from this sample is compared to previously published estimate...

  8. How covariant is the galaxy luminosity function?

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the error properties of certain galaxy luminosity function (GLF) estimators. Using a cluster expansion of the density field, we show how, for both volume and flux limited samples, the GLF estimates are covariant. The covariance matrix can be decomposed into three pieces: a diagonal term arising from Poisson noise; a sample variance term arising from large-scale structure in the survey volume; an occupancy covariance term arising due to galaxies of different luminosities inhabiting the same cluster. To evaluate the theory one needs: the mass function and bias of clusters, and the conditional luminosity function (CLF). We use a semi-analytic model (SAM) galaxy catalogue from the Millennium run N-body simulation and the CLF of Yang et al. (2003) to explore these effects. The GLF estimates from the SAM and the CLF qualitatively reproduce results from the 2dFGRS. We also measure the luminosity dependence of clustering in the SAM and find reasonable agreement with 2dFGRS results for bright galaxies. ...

  9. MPX Detectors as LHC Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086061; Asbah, Nedaa; Bergmann, Benedikt; Bekhouche, Khaled; Caforio, Davide; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik; Leroy, Claude; Lipniacka, Anna; Nessi, Marzio; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Soueid, Paul; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX lum...

  10. The low-luminosity end of the radius-luminosity relationship for active galactic nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, M.C.; Denney, K.D.; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hß broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of nine new AGNs imaged...... reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hß time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hß BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R BLR-L relationship. The best...

  11. Luminosity measurement method for the LHC: Event selection and absolute luminosity determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasny, M.W., E-mail: krasny@lpnhep.in2p3.fr [LPNHE, Pierre and Marie Curie University, CNRS-IN2P3, Tour 33, RdC, 4, pl. Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Chwastowski, J. [Institute of Teleinformatics, Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Warszawska 24, 31-115 Kraków (Poland); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Cyz, A.; Słowikowski, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-11-21

    In our earlier papers Krasny et al. [1,2] have proposed a new luminosity measurement method which uses lepton pairs produced in peripheral collisions of the LHC beam particles, and identified the requirements for a new, specialized luminosity detector which is indispensable for their efficient on-line selection. In this paper we use the base-line detector model, with no precise timing capabilities, to evaluate the statistical and systematic accuracy of the method. We propose the complete event selection procedure and demonstrate that it allows to collect a sufficiently large sample of e{sup +}e{sup −} pairs to achieve a better than 1% statistical accuracy of the luminosity measurement over less than one-month-long running time intervals. We argue that the absolute luminosity measurement systematic errors can be kept below 1%. The proposed method can be directly applied to the LHC running periods for which the machine instantaneous luminosity does not exceed the L=10{sup 33}s{sup −1}cm{sup −2} value. Two ways extending the method to the large pile-up periods corresponding to higher instantaneous luminosities are proposed.

  12. The Mid-Infrared Luminosity Evolution and Luminosity Function of Quasars with SDSS and WISE

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, J; Gerber, A

    2016-01-01

    We determine the 22$\\mu$m luminosity evolution and luminosity function for quasars from a data set of over 20,000 objects obtained by combining flux-limited Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Wide field Infrared Survey Explorer mid-infrared data. We apply methods developed in previous works to access the intrinsic population distributions non-parametrically, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population of quasars exhibits positive luminosity evolution with redshift in the mid-infrared, but with considerably less mid-infrared evolution than in the optical or radio bands. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolution and local mid-infrared luminosity function. The latter displays a sharp flattening at local luminosities below $\\sim 10^{31}$ erg sec$^{-1}$ Hz$^{-1}$, which has been reported previously at 15 $\\mu$m for AGN classified as both type-1 and type-2. We calculate the integrated total emission from quasars at 2...

  13. LHC operation at higher energy and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Papotti, G

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Geneva) was commissioned and operated in the years 2009-2013 up to a beam energy of 4 TeV. A peak luminosity of 0.77 · 1034 cm−2s−1 was reached and an integrated luminosity of around 29 fb−1 was delivered to both ATLAS and CMS. This performance allowed the discovery of a scalar boson. The LHC is presently in a shutdown phase dedicated to consolidation and maintenance that will allow the restart of beam operation in early 2015 at an increased beam energy of 6.5 to 7TeV. Maximum acceptable pileup, effectiveness of electron-cloud scrubbing, and fast loss events are some of the issues that will shape the choice of operational parameters, cycle setup, and the commissioning strategy. The baseline choices and options for the restart after the shutdown are presented. In addition the roadmap for future performance upgrades is sketched.

  14. RR Lyrae period luminosity relations with Spitzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Jillian R.; Marengo, Massimo; CRRP Team

    2017-01-01

    RR Lyrae variable stars have long been known to be valuable distance indicators, but only recently has a well defined period luminosity relationship been utilized at infrared wavelengths. In my thesis, I am combining Spitzer Space Telescope data of RR Lyrae stars obtained as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Program with ground based NIR data to characterize the period-luminosity-metallicity (PLZ) relation and provide an independent Population II calibration of the cosmic distance scale. I will discuss the ongoing efforts to calibrate this relation using objects such as M4 and NGC 6441 and how the first data release from the Gaia mission impacts our findings. I will also compare my preliminary empirical relations to theoretical PLZ relations derived from stellar pulsation models.

  15. Solar gravitational energy and luminosity variations

    CERN Document Server

    Fazel, Z; Lefebvre, S; Ajabshirizadeh, A; Pireaux, S; 10.1016/j.newst.2007.05.003

    2009-01-01

    Due to non-homogeneous mass distribution and non-uniform velocity rate inside the Sun, the solar outer shape is distorted in latitude. In this paper, we analyze the consequences of a temporal change in this figure on the luminosity. To do so, we use the Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) as an indicator of luminosity. Considering that most of the authors have explained the largest part of the TSI modulation with magnetic network (spots and faculae) but not the whole, we could set constraints on radius and effective temperature variations (dR, dT). However computations show that the amplitude of solar irradiance modulation is very sensitive to photospheric temperature variations. In order to understand discrepancies between our best fit and recent observations of Livingston et al. (2005), showing no effective surface temperature variation during the solar cycle, we investigated small effective temperature variation in irradiance modeling. We emphasized a phase-shift (correlated or anticorrelated radius and irradianc...

  16. Luminosity measurements in ATLAS with MPX detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Jakubek, Jan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Solc, Jaroslav; Sopko, Vit; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [Universite de Montreal (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The ATLAS-MPX detectors are based on Medipix2 silicon devices designed by CERN for the detection of different types of radiation. These detectors are successfully operating in the ATLAS detector at 16 places and collect data independent of the ATLAS data-recording chain. Recently it has been recognized that these detectors are well suited for luminosity measurements. Results from these studies are presented.

  17. The Luminosity of Population III Star Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    DeSouza, Alexander L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e., with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using 2+1D nonaxisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disk (i.e., $M_{\\rm disk} / M_{*} \\gtrsim 0.1$), whose evolution we follow for a further 30--40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disk. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of $10^6\\,\\LSun$. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5--10${\\times}$ greater th...

  18. Luminosity Measurement at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Caron, B L; Pinfold, J L

    2006-01-01

    Two novel methods of measuring the luminosity delivered to the ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider experiments are presented. The production of $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pair via two photon interactions and single $W^{\\pm}/Z^{0}$ boson production are evaluated as methods for the measurement and monitoring of the proton-proton luminosity at the LHC. The characteristics of the $\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ pairs from coherent $\\gamma \\gamma$ interactions are examined for both matrix element and equivalent photon based monte carlo generators with subsequent simulation of the ATLAS detector effects. The application of specific kinematic and vertex fit requirements is shown to offer a strong method of isolating signal from background and in turn yield an accurate offline measurement of the delivered luminosity via the pure QED process. The choice of kinematic cuts is shown to reduce the overall uncertainty in the method by limiting the size of corrections to the two photon interaction cross section to the level of 1\\%. B...

  19. Axions and the white dwarf luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Isern, J; García-Berro, E; Torres, S

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of white dwarfs can be described as a simple cooling process. Recently, it has been possible to determine with an unprecedented precision their luminosity function, that is, the number of stars per unit volume and luminosity interval. Since the shape of the bright branch of this function is only sensitive to the average cooling rate, we use this property to check the possible existence of axions, a proposed but not yet detected weakly interacting particle. We show here that the inclusion of the axion emissivity in the evolutionary models of white dwarfs noticeably improves the agreement between the theoretical calculations and the observational white dwarf luminosity function, thus providing the first positive indication that axions could exist. Our results indicate that the best fit is obtained for m_a cos^2beta ~ 2-6 meV, where m_a is the mass of the axion and cos^2beta is a free parameter, and that values larger than 10 meV are clearly excluded.

  20. Probing the Ultraviolet Luminosity Function of the Earliest Galaxies with the Renaissance Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Brian W.; Wise, John H.; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from the Renaissance Simulations, a suite of extremely high-resolution and physics-rich AMR calculations of high-redshift galaxy formation performed on the Blue Waters supercomputer. These simulations contain hundreds of well-resolved galaxies at z˜ 25-8, and make several novel, testable predictions. Most critically, we show that the ultraviolet luminosity function of our simulated galaxies is consistent with observations of high-z galaxy populations at the bright end of the luminosity function ({M}1600≤slant -17), but at lower luminosities is essentially flat rather than rising steeply, as has been inferred by Schechter function fits to high-z observations, and has a clearly defined lower limit in UV luminosity. This behavior of the luminosity function is due to two factors: (i) the strong dependence of the star formation rate (SFR) on halo virial mass in our simulated galaxy population, with lower-mass halos having systematically lower SFRs and thus lower UV luminosities; and (ii) the fact that halos with virial masses below ≃ 2× {10}8 {M}⊙ do not universally contain stars, with the fraction of halos containing stars dropping to zero at ≃ 7× {10}6 {M}⊙ . Finally, we show that the brightest of our simulated galaxies may be visible to current and future ultra-deep space-based surveys, particularly if lensed regions are chosen for observation.

  1. Revisiting the Completeness and the Luminosity Function in High-Redshift Low-Luminosity Quasar Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Niida, Mana; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kenta; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Toba, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have derived quasar luminosity functions (QLFs) at various redshifts. However, the faint side of the QLF at high redshifts is still too uncertain. An accurate estimate of the survey completeness is essential to derive an accurate QLF for use in studying the luminosity-dependent density evolution of the quasar population. Here we investigate how the luminosity dependence of quasar spectra (the Baldwin effect) and the attenuation model for the inter-galactic medium (IGM) affect the completeness estimates. For this purpose, we revisit the completeness of quasar surveys specifically at $z\\sim4-5$, using the COSMOS images observed with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. As the result, we find that the completeness estimates are sensitive to the luminosity dependence of the quasar spectrum and difference in the IGM attenuation models. At $z\\sim4$, the number density of quasars when we adopt the latest IGM model and take the luminosity dependence of spectra into account are $(3.49\\pm1.62)\\times10^{-7}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ ma...

  2. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    for lower luminosity sources, as expected, but also for the higher luminosity sources such as the PG quasars. After accounting for the host galaxy starlight, we revisit the well-known broad-line region radius--luminosity relationship for nearby AGN. We find the power-law slope of the relationship for the H...

  3. NLC Luminosity as a Function of Beam Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Nosochkov, Yu M; Raubenheimer, T O; Seryi, Andrei

    2002-01-01

    Realistic calculation of NLC luminosity has been performed using particle tracking in DIMAD and beam-beam simulations in GUINEA-PIG code for various values of beam emittance, energy and beta functions at the Interaction Point (IP). Results of the simulations are compared with analytic luminosity calculations. The optimum range of IP beta functions for high luminosity was identified.

  4. Deriving Kinetic Luminosity Functions from the Low-Frequency Radio Luminosity Functions of FRII Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapinska, Anna D.; Uttley, P.; Kaiser, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    FRII radio galaxies are relatively simple systems which can be used to determine the influence of jets on their environments. Even simple analytical models of FRII evolution can link the observed lobe luminosities and sizes to fundamental properties such as jet power and density of the ambient medium; these are crucial for understanding AGN feedback. However, due to strong flux selection effects interpreting FRII samples is not straightforward. To overcome this problem we construct Monte Carlo simulations to create artificial samples of radio galaxies. We explore jet power and external density distributions by using them as the simulation input parameters. Further, we compute radio luminosity functions (RLF) and fit them to the observed low-frequency radio data that cover redshifts up to z 2, which gives us the most plausible distributions of FRIIs' fundamental properties. Moreover, based on these RLFs, we obtain the kinetic luminosity functions of these powerful sources.

  5. Pin-Hole Luminosity Monitor with Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norem, James H.; Spencer, James E.

    Previously, the generalized luminosity { L} was defined and calculated for all incident channels based on an NLC e+e- design. Alternatives were then considered to improve the differing beam-beam effects in the e-e-, eγ and γγ channels. Regardless of the channel, there was a large flux of outgoing, high energy photons that were produced from the beam-beam interaction e.g. beamstrahlung that needs to be disposed of and whose flux depended on { L}. One approach to this problem is to consider it a resource and attempt to take advantage of it by disposing of these straight-ahead photons in more useful ways than simply dumping them. While there are many options for monitoring the luminosity, any method that allows feedback and optimization in real time and in a non-intercepting and non-interfering way during normal data taking is extremely important - especially if it provides other capabilities such as high resolution tuning of spot sizes and can be used for all incident channels without essential modifications to their setup. Our "pin-hole" camera appears to be such a device if it can be made to work with high energy photons in ways that are compatible with the many other constraints and demands on space around the interaction region. The basis for using this method is that it has, in principle, the inherent resolution and bandwidth to monitor the very small spot sizes and their stabilities that are required for very high, integrated luminosity. While there are many possible, simultaneous uses of these outgoing photon beams, we limit our discussion to a single, blind, proof-of-principle experiment that was done on the FFTB line at SLAC to certify the concept of a camera obscura for high energy photons.

  6. CLOC: Cluster Luminosity Order-Statistic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Fumagalli, Michele; Fall, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    CLOC computes cluster order statistics, i.e. the luminosity distribution of the Nth most luminous cluster in a population. It is flexible and requires few assumptions, allowing for parametrized variations in the initial cluster mass function and its upper and lower cutoffs, variations in the cluster age distribution, stellar evolution and dust extinction, as well as observational uncertainties in both the properties of star clusters and their underlying host galaxies. It uses Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to search parameter space to find best-fitting values for the parameters describing cluster formation and disruption, and to obtain rigorous confidence intervals on the inferred values.

  7. The Luminosity Function of M3

    CERN Document Server

    Rood, R T; Paltrinieri, B; Ferraro, F R; Pecci, F F; Dorman, B; Chieffi, A; Straniero, O; Buonanno, R

    1999-01-01

    We present a high precision, large sample luminosity function (LF) for the Galactic globular cluster M3. With a combination of ground based and Hubble Space Telescope data we cover the entire radial extent of the cluster. The observed LF is well fit by canonical standard stellar models from the red giant branch (RGB) tip to below the main sequence turnoff point. Specifically, neither the RGB LF-bump nor subgiant branch LF indicate any breakdown in the standard models. On the main sequence we find evidence for a flat initial mass function and for mass segregation due to the dynamical evolution of the cluster.

  8. Hydrogen-Ion Potential of Antibiotics According to the Environment Factors Temperature and Luminosity Potencial hidrogenionico de antimicrobianos, según los factores ambientales de temperatura y luminosidad Potencial hidrogeniônico de antimicrobianos, segundo os fatores ambientais temperatura e luminosidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maria Coelho Crepaldi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experimental study was to measure the pH of antibiotics administered by intravenous infusion - ceftriaxone sodium, vancomycin hydrochloride, metrodinazole, penicillin G potassium and amikacin sulfate - after reconstitution with sterile water and dilution with NaCl 0.9% or dextrose 5% in water, according to temperature and luminosity of the environment. The results showed that variation in the drugs' pH was less than 1.0 value and that some antibiotics remained acidic after dilution and maintained this chemical profile in all situations studied, suggesting that the studied environmental factors did not change the solutions' acid base characteristic. Some pH values measured characterize risk for the development of chemical phlebitis and infiltration, and it is important for clinical practice to emphasize the profile of intravenous solutions of antibiotics, considering method of dilution, and time to infusion.El objetivo de este estudio experimental fue medir el pH de los antibióticos de administración intravenosa ceftriaxona sódica, clorhidrato de vancomicina, metronidazol, penicilina G potásica y sulfato de amikacina, después de reconstitución con agua destilada y dilución con NaCl a 0,9%, o suero glucosado a 5%, considerando la influencia de la temperatura y luminosidad ambientales, así como el tiempo de exposición, en el comportamiento químico de esos fármacos. Los resultados demostraron variaciones que no ultrapasaron 1,0 (valor de pH y que algunos antimicrobianos, eminentemente ácidos después de la dilución, mantuvieron ese comportamiento en todas las situaciones estudiadas, no sugiriendo la influencia de factores ambientales en el comportamiento químico de las soluciones. Considerando que algunos valores de pH encontrados pueden contribuir para el desarrollo de flebitis química e infiltración, es importante enfatizar que para la práctica clínica en salud, existe la necesidad de conocer las caracter

  9. The Luminosity Dependence of the Galaxy Merger Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, D R

    2008-01-01

    We measure the number of companions per galaxy (Nc) as a function of r-band absolute magnitude for both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Croton et al. (2006) semi-analytic catalog applied to the Millennium Run simulation. For close pairs with projected separations of 5-20 h^{-1} kpc, velocity differences less than 500 km/s, and luminosity ratios between 1:2 and 2:1, we find good agreement between the observations and simulations, with Nc consistently close to 0.02 over the range -22 < M_r < -18. For larger pair separations, Nc(M_r) instead becomes increasingly steep towards the faint end, implying that luminosity-dependent clustering plays an important role on small scales. Using the simulations to assess and correct for projection effects, we infer that the real-space Nc(M_r) for close pairs peaks at about M*, and declines by at least a factor of two as M_r becomes fainter. Conversely, by measuring the number density of close companions, we estimate that at least 90% of all major mergers occur betw...

  10. The Evolving Luminosity Function of Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, M J I; Jannuzi, B T; Brand, K; Benson, A J; Brodwin, M; Croton, D J; Eisenhardt, P R M; Brown, Michael J. I.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Brand, Kate; Benson, Andrew J.; Brodwin, Mark; Croton, Darren J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.

    2006-01-01

    We trace the assembly history of red galaxies since z=1, by measuring their evolving space density with the B-band luminosity function. Our sample of 39599 red galaxies, selected from 6.96 square degrees of imaging from the NOAO Deep Wide-Field and Spitzer IRAC Shallow surveys, is an order of magnitude larger, in size and volume, than comparable samples in the literature. We measure a higher space density of z=0.9 red galaxies than some of the recent literature, in part because we account for the faint yet significant galaxy flux which falls outside of our photometric aperture. The B-band luminosity density of red galaxies, which effectively measures the evolution of ~L* galaxies, increases by only 36 percent from z=0 to z=1. If red galaxy stellar populations have faded by 1.24 B-band magnitudes since z=1, the stellar mass contained within the red galaxy population has roughly doubled over the past 8 Gyr. This is consistent with star-forming galaxies being transformed into ~L* red galaxies after a decline in ...

  11. LHC Report: a break from luminosity production

    CERN Multimedia

    Jan Uythoven for the LHC team

    2016-01-01

    The LHC has been in great shape over the last few months, delivering over 20 fb-1 of integrated luminosity before the ICHEP conference in Chicago at the beginning of August. This is not much below the 25 fb-1 target for the whole of 2016. With this success in mind, a break in luminosity production was taken for six days, starting on 26 July 2016, for a machine development period.   This year, 20 days of the LHC schedule are devoted to machine development with the aim of carrying out detailed studies of the accelerator. The 20 days are divided over five different periods, called MD blocks. They can be seen as an investment in the future, so the machine can produce collisions more efficiently in the months and years to come. A detailed programme is worked out for each MD block, whereby different specialist teams are assigned periods of four to twelve hours, depending on the topic, to perform their previously approved tests. The MD program continues 24 hours per day, as in normal physics operation. One...

  12. Low EUV Luminosities Impinging on Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pascucci, I; Gorti, U; Hollenbach, D; Hendler, N P; Brooks, K J; Contreras, Y

    2014-01-01

    The amount of high-energy stellar radiation reaching the surface of protoplanetary disks is essential to determine their chemistry and physical evolution. Here, we use millimetric and centimetric radio data to constrain the EUV luminosity impinging on 14 disks around young (~2-10Myr) sun-like stars. For each object we identify the long-wavelength emission in excess to the dust thermal emission, attribute that to free-free disk emission, and thereby compute an upper limit to the EUV reaching the disk. We find upper limits lower than 10$^{42}$ photons/s for all sources without jets and lower than $5 \\times 10^{40}$ photons/s for the three older sources in our sample. These latter values are low for EUV-driven photoevaporation alone to clear out protoplanetary material in the timescale inferred by observations. In addition, our EUV upper limits are too low to reproduce the [NeII] 12.81 micron luminosities from three disks with slow [NeII]-detected winds. This indicates that the [NeII] line in these sources prima...

  13. LHC Report: A new luminosity record

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    After about one month of operation, the LHC has already accumulated an integrated luminosity of 28 pb-1, which corresponds to over 50% of the total delivered to the experiments in 2010. This impressive start to the LHC run in 2011 bodes well for the rest of year.   Following careful collimator set-up and validation, the first phase of beam commissioning 2011 has come to an end. The first stable beams were declared on Sunday 13 March with a moderate 3 bunches per beam and an initial luminosity of 1.6 × 1030 cm-2s-1. Machine protection tests continued during the following week as the commissioning team made absolutely sure that all critical systems (beam dumps, beam interlock system, etc.) were functioning properly. When these tests had finished, the way was opened to increased intensity and the LHC quickly moved through the first part of its planned, staged intensity increase. Fills with increasing numbers of bunches were delivered to the experiments, culminating in a fill with 200...

  14. Jet Cleansing: Pileup Removal at High Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-01-01

    One of the greatest impediments to extracting useful information from high luminosity hadron-collider data is radiation from secondary collisions (i.e. pileup) which can overlap with that of the primary interaction. In this paper we introduce a simple jet-substructure technique termed cleansing which can consistently correct for large amounts of pileup in an observable independent way. Cleansing works at the subjet level, combining tracker and calorimeter-based data to reconstruct the pileup-free primary interaction. The technique can be used on its own, with various degrees of sophistication, or in concert with jet grooming. We apply cleansing to both kinematic and jet shape reconstruction, finding in all cases a marked improvement over previous methods both in the correlation of the cleansed data with uncontaminated results and in measures like S/rt(B). Cleansing should improve the sensitivity of new-physics searches at high luminosity and could also aid in the comparison of precision QCD calculations to co...

  15. Infrared Luminosity Function of the Coma Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, L; Rieke, M J; Hinz, J L; Kelly, D M; Blaylock, M; Bai, Lei; Rieke, George H.; Rieke, Marcia J.; Hinz, Joannah L.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Blaylock, Myra

    2006-01-01

    Using mid-IR and optical data, we deduce the total infrared (IR) luminosities of galaxies in the Coma cluster and present their infrared luminosity function (LF). The shape of the overall Coma IR LF does not show significant differences from the IR LFs of the general field, which indicates the general independence of global galaxy star formation on environment up to densities $\\sim$ 40 times greater than in the field (we cannot test such independence above $L_{ir} \\approx 10^{44} {\\rm ergs s}^{-1}$). However, a shallower faint end slope and a smaller $L_{ir}^{*}$ are found in the core region (where the densities are still higher) compared to the outskirt region of the cluster, and most of the brightest IR galaxies are found outside of the core region. The IR LF in the NGC 4839 group region does not show any unique characteristics. By integrating the IR LF, we find a total star formation rate in the cluster of about 97.0 $M_{\\sun}{\\rm yr}^{-1}$. We also studied the contributions of early- and late-type galaxie...

  16. The Low-Luminosity End of the Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Bentz, Misty C; Grier, Catherine J; Barth, Aaron J; Peterson, Bradley M; Vestergaard, Marianne; Bennert, Vardha N; Canalizo, Gabriela; De Rosa, Gisella; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gates, Elinor L; Greene, Jenny E; Li, Weidong; Malkan, Matthew A; Pogge, Richard W; Stern, Daniel; Treu, Tommaso; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-01-01

    We present an updated and revised analysis of the relationship between the Hbeta broad-line region (BLR) radius and the luminosity of the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we have carried out two-dimensional surface brightness decompositions of the host galaxies of 9 new AGNs imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. The surface brightness decompositions allow us to create "AGN-free" images of the galaxies, from which we measure the starlight contribution to the optical luminosity measured through the ground-based spectroscopic aperture. We also incorporate 20 new reverberation-mapping measurements of the Hbeta time lag, which is assumed to yield the average Hbeta BLR radius. The final sample includes 41 AGNs covering four orders of magnitude in luminosity. The additions and updates incorporated here primarily affect the low-luminosity end of the R-L relationship. The best fit to the relationship using a Bayesian analysis finds a slope of alpha = 0.533 (+0.035/-0.033), consistent ...

  17. Operation of the Run IIB D0 Luminosity System and Determination of the Run IIB Luminosity Constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prewitt, Michelle Victoria; /Rice U.

    2010-04-01

    The luminosity system is an integral part of the D0 detector that must be properly maintained to provide accurate luminosity measurements for physics analysis. After the addition of a readout layer to the silicon vertex detector in 2006, it was necessary to re-calculate the effective inelastic cross section to which the luminosity monitor is sensitive. The preliminary analysis showed that the luminosity constant did not change with the addition of the extra layer of silicon. A full study of the revised luminosity constant including a complete analysis of systematic uncertainties has been completed. The luminosity constant was determined to be {sigma}{sub eff} = 48.3 {+-} 1.9 {+-} 0.6 mb, which reduces the D0 contribution to the luminosity measurement uncertainty by almost 3%.

  18. Cryogenic Test of Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, B; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, C; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, L; Li, Z; Marques, C; Skaritka, J; Verdú-Andres, S; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109 . We report the test results of this design.

  19. Upgrade of RHIC Vacuum Systems for High Luminosity Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Smart, Loralie; Todd, Robert J; Weiss, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    With increasing ion beam intensity during recent RHIC operations, pressure rises of several decades were observed at most room temperature sections and at a few cold sections. The pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam ion induced desorption and have been one of the major intensity and luminosity limiting factors for RHIC. Improvement of the warm sections has been carried out in the last few years. Extensive in-situ bakes, additional UHV pumping, anti-grazing ridges and beam tube solenoids have been implemented. Several hundred meters of NEG coated beam pipes have been installed and activated. Vacuum monitoring and interlock were enhanced to reduce premature beam aborts. Preliminary measures, such as pumping before cool down to reduce monolayer condensates, were also taken to suppress the pressure rises in the cold sections. The effectiveness of these measures in reducing the pressure rises during machine studies and during physics runs are discussed...

  20. 60 micron luminosity evolution of rich clusters of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, D.M.; Rieke, G.H. (Steward Observatory, Tucson, AZ (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The average 60-micron flux has been determined for a collection of optically selected galaxy clusters at redshifts ranging from 0.30 to 0.92. The result, 26 mJy per cluster, represents the faintest flux determination known of using the IRAS data base. The flux from this set of clusters has been compared to the 60-micron flux from a sample of nearby galaxy clusters. It is found that the far-infrared luminosity evolution in cluster galaxies can be no more than a factor of 1.7 from z = 0.4 to the present epoch. This upper limit is close to the evolution predicted for simple aging of the stellar populations. Additional processes such as mergers, cannibalism, or enhanced rates of starbursts appear to occur at a low enough level that they have little influence on the far-infrared emission from clusters over this redshift range. 38 refs.

  1. libprofit: Image creation from luminosity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, A. S. G.; Taranu, D.; Tobar, R.

    2016-12-01

    libprofit is a C++ library for image creation based on different luminosity profiles. It offers fast and accurate two-dimensional integration for a useful number of profiles, including Sersic, Core-Sersic, broken-exponential, Ferrer, Moffat, empirical King, point-source and sky, with a simple mechanism for adding new profiles. libprofit provides a utility to read the model and profile parameters from the command-line and generate the corresponding image. It can output the resulting image as text values, a binary stream, or as a simple FITS file. It also provides a shared library exposing an API that can be used by any third-party application. R and Python interfaces are available: ProFit (ascl:1612.004) and PyProfit (ascl:1612.005).

  2. LIGHT and LUMINOSITY, from Einstein to LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Prof. ROSSI, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    After an introduction on the concept of light in physics, this talk will focus on CERN’s High Luminosity LHC project, aiming at extending the discovery potential of CERN’s flagship accelerator by increasing its “luminosity” (ie the number of particles that can be squeezed inside the accelerator to maximize the number of collisions). To achieve this objective, many new technologies are being developed at CERN and many collaborating institutes worldwide, especially in the field of superconductivity. Lucio Rossi, the main speaker, is the head of the HL-LHC project, based at CERN. Giorgio Apollinari, Director for the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) will speak through a videoconference from Fermilab (USA). The event is webcast live and will be followed by Fermilab and other institutes in the USA.

  3. The metallicity-luminosity relation at medium redshift based on faint CADIS emission line galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, C; Hippelein, H

    2004-01-01

    The emission line survey within the Calar Alto Deep Imaging Survey (CADIS) detects galaxies with very low continuum brightness by using an imaging Fabry-Perot interferometer. With spectroscopic follow-up observations of MB>~-19 CADIS galaxies using FORS2 at the VLT and DOLORES at TNG we obtained oxygen abundances of 5 galaxies at z~0.4 and 10 galaxies at z~0.64. Combining these measurements with published oxygen abundances of galaxies with MB<~-19 we find evidence that a metallicity-luminosity relation exists at medium redshift, but it is displaced to lower abundances and higher luminosities compared to the metallicity-luminosity relation in the local universe. Comparing the observed metallicities and luminosities of galaxies at z<3 with Pegase2 chemical evolution models we have found a favoured scenario in which the metallicity of galaxies increases by a factor of ~2 between z~0.7 and today, and their luminosity decreases by ~0.5-0.9mag.

  4. Superconducting Quadrupole Prototype for the ISR high luminosity (low beta) insertion

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    In colliders, smaller beam cross-section means higher luminosity. Beam-size being proportional to the square-root of the "beta function" value, a small beta means small beam size, hence high luminosity. In 1973 a study was launched on low-beta insertions using superconducting quadrupole magnets, which focus beams to very small sizes at the beam crossing points . In 1976 the first prototype of a superconducting quadrupole was tested. Here we see Theodor Tortschanoff with the prototype of 1.25 m magnetic length. Manufacture of 8 quadrupoles (4 of L=1.15 m, 4 of L=0.65 m) began at Alsthom in 1978. They were installed at intersection I8 of the ISR, enhancing luminosity there by a factor 7 until final low-beta operation in December 1983. For details see "Yellow Report" CERN 76-16. See also pictures 7702307, 7702308, 7702182,7510214X,7510217X.

  5. Magnet Design of the 150 mm Aperture Low-β Quadrupoles for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ferracin, P; Anerella, M; Borgnolutti, F; Bossert, R; Cheng, D; Dietderich, D R; Felice, H; Ghosh , A; Godeke, A; Izquierdo Bermudez, S; Fessia, P; Krave, S; Juchno, M; Perez, J C; Oberli, L; Sabbi, G; Todesco, E; Yu, M

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project is aimed at studying and implementing the necessary changes in the LHC to increase its luminosity by a factor five. Among the magnets that will be upgraded are the 16 superconducting low-β quadrupoles placed around the two high luminosity interaction regions (ATLAS and CMS experiments). In the current baseline scenario, these quadrupole magnets will have to generate a gradient of 140 T/m in a coil aperture of 150 mm. The resulting conductor peak field of more than 12 T will require the use of Nb3Sn superconducting coils. We present in this paper the HL-LHC low-β quadrupole design, based on the experience gathered by the US LARP program, and, in particular, we describe the support structure components to pre-load the coils, withstand the electro-magnetic forces, provide alignment and LHe containment, and integrate the cold mass in the LHC IRs.

  6. The Morphological Type Dependence of K-band Luminosity Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Devereux, Nick; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Willmer, C N A

    2009-01-01

    Differential 2.2um (K-band) luminosity functions are presented for a complete sample of 1570 nearby Vgsr < 3000 km/s, where Vgsr is the velocity measured with respect to the Galactic standard of rest), bright (K < 10 mag), galaxies segregated by visible morphology. The K-band luminosity function for late-type spirals follows a power law that rises towards low luminosities whereas the K-band luminosity functions for ellipticals, lenticulars and bulge-dominated spirals are peaked with a fall off at both high and low luminosities. However, each morphological type (E, S0, S0/a-Sab, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd) contributes approximately equally to the overall K-band luminosity density in the local universe, and by inference, the stellar mass density as well.

  7. Redshift and luminosity evolution of the intrinsic alignments of galaxies in Horizon-AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisari, N.; Laigle, C.; Codis, S.; Dubois, Y.; Devriendt, J.; Miller, L.; Benabed, K.; Slyz, A.; Gavazzi, R.; Pichon, C.

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsic galaxy shape and angular momentum alignments can arise in cosmological large-scale structure due to tidal interactions or galaxy formation processes. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations have recently come of age as a tool to study these alignments and their contamination to weak gravitational lensing. We probe the redshift and luminosity evolution of intrinsic alignments in Horizon-AGN between z = 0 and 3 for galaxies with an r-band absolute magnitude of Mr ≤ -20. Alignments transition from being radial at low redshifts and high luminosities, dominated by the contribution of ellipticals, to being tangential at high redshift and low luminosities, where discs dominate the signal. This cannot be explained by the evolution of the fraction of ellipticals and discs alone: intrinsic evolution in the amplitude of alignments is necessary. The alignment amplitude of elliptical galaxies alone is smaller in amplitude by a factor of ≃2, but has similar luminosity and redshift evolution as in current observations and in the non-linear tidal alignment model at projected separations of ≳1 Mpc. Alignments of discs are null in projection and consistent with current low-redshift observations. The combination of the two populations yields an overall amplitude a factor of ≃4 lower than observed alignments of luminous red galaxies with a steeper luminosity dependence. The restriction on accurate galaxy shapes implies that the galaxy population in the simulation is complete only to Mr ≤ -20. Higher resolution simulations will be necessary to avoid extrapolation of the intrinsic alignment predictions to the range of luminosities probed by future surveys.

  8. CMS Luminosity Measurements for the 2016 Data Taking Period

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The measurement of the integrated luminosity delivered to the CMS Experiment during the 2016 LHC proton-proton run at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ is presented. The Pixel Cluster Counting method is used and the absolute luminosity scale calibration is derived from an analysis of Van der Meer Scans performed in May 2016. The overall uncertainty of the luminosity measurement is estimated to be $2.5\\%$.

  9. The Local [CII] 158 um Emission Line Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmati, Shoubaneh; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Armus, Lee; Capak, Peter; Faisst, Andreas; Masters, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We present, for the first time, the local [CII] 158 um emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S_60 um > 5.24 Jy. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range ~10^(7-9) (Lo) from both the 1/V_max and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for f...

  10. The IR Luminosity Functions of Rich Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Lei; Rieke, Marcia J; Christlein, Daniel; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2008-01-01

    We present MIPS observations of the cluster A3266. About 100 spectroscopic cluster members have been detected at 24 micron. The IR luminosity function in A3266 is very similar to that in the Coma cluster down to the detection limit L_IR~10^43 ergs/s, suggesting a universal form of the bright end IR LF for local rich clusters with M~10^15 M_sun. The shape of the bright end of the A3266-Coma composite IR LF is not significantly different from that of nearby field galaxies, but the fraction of IR-bright galaxies (SFR > 0.2M_sun/yr) in both clusters increases with cluster-centric radius. The decrease of the blue galaxy fraction toward the high density cores only accounts for part of the trend; the fraction of red galaxies with moderate SFRs (0.2 < SFR < 1 M_sun/yr) also decreases with increasing galaxy density. These results suggest that for the IR bright galaxies, nearby rich clusters are distinguished from the field by a lower star-forming galaxy fraction, but not by a change in L*_IR. The composite IR LF...

  11. Luminosity distributions of Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ashall, Chris; Sasdelli, Michele; Prentice, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We have assembled a dataset of 165 low redshift, $z<$0.06, publicly available type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). We produce maximum light magnitude ($M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$) distributions of SNe Ia to explore the diversity of parameter space that they can fill. Before correction for host galaxy extinction we find that the mean $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-18.58\\pm0.07$mag and $-18.72\\pm0.05$mag respectively. Host galaxy extinction is corrected using a new method based on the SN spectrum. After correction, the mean values of $M_{B}$ and $M_{V}$ of SNe Ia are $-19.10\\pm0.06$ and $-19.10\\pm0.05$mag respectively. After correction for host galaxy extinction, `normal' SNeIa ($\\Delta m_{15}(B)<1.6$mag) fill a larger parameter space in the Width-Luminosity Relation (WLR) than previously suggested, and there is evidence for luminous SNe Ia with large $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$. We find a bimodal distribution in $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$, with a pronounced lack of transitional events at $\\Delta m_{15}(B)$=1.6 mag. We confirm that ...

  12. The Luminosity Function of IRAS PSCz Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, T T; Ishii, T T; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Yoshikawa, Kohji; Ishii, Takako T.

    2003-01-01

    We estimated the luminosity function (LF) of IRAS galaxies in the PSCz catalogue. The faint end of the PSCz LF is slightly steeper than that of the LF derived by Saunders et al. (1990; S90). Using an analytical form for the LF used by S90, we obtain the following parameters: \\alpha = 1.23 \\pm 0.04, L_*=(8.85 \\pm 1.75) \\times 10^8 h^{-2} L_\\odot, \\sigma =0.724 \\pm 0.010, and \\phi_* = (2.34 \\pm 0.30) \\times 10^{-2} h^3 Mpc^{-3}. We also examined the evolution in the sample by a simple assumption \\phi_*(z) \\propto (1+z)^P, and found P=3.40 \\pm 0.70. It does not affect the three parameters, \\alpha, L_*, and \\sigma, but \\phi_*(z=0) is overestimated up to \\sim 15% if we ignore evolution. We estimated the temperature dependence of the LF. The LFs of warm and cool galaxies are quite different: the LF of warm galaxies has a very steep faint end with \\alpha =1.37. We also discuss a lump found at the brightest end of the LF.

  13. The Luminosities of the Coldest Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Tinney, C G; Kirkpatrick, J Davy; Cushing, Mike; Morley, Caroline V; Wright, Edward L

    2014-01-01

    In recent years brown dwarfs have been extended to a new Y-dwarf class with effective temperatures colder than 500K and masses in the range 5-30 Jupiter masses. They fill a crucial gap in observable atmospheric properties between the much colder gas-giant planets of our own Solar System (at around 130K) and both hotter T-type brown dwarfs and the hotter planets that can be imaged orbiting young nearby stars (both with effective temperatures of in the range 1500-1000K). Distance measurements for these objects deliver absolute magnitudes that make critical tests of our understanding of very cool atmospheres. Here we report new distances for nine Y dwarfs and seven very-late T dwarfs. These reveal that Y dwarfs do indeed represent a continuation of the T dwarf sequence to both fainter luminosities and cooler temperatures. They also show that the coolest objects display a large range in absolute magnitude for a given photometric colour. The latest atmospheric models show good agreement with the majority of these ...

  14. Flavour Physics with High-Luminosity Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    With the first dedicated B-factory experiments BaBar (USA) and BELLE (Japan) Flavour Physics has entered the phase of precision physics. LHCb (CERN) and the high luminosity extension of KEK-B together with the state of the art BELLE II detector will further push this precision frontier. Progress in this field always relied on close cooperation between experiment and theory, as extraction of fundamental parameters often is very indirect. To extract the full physics information from existing and future data, this cooperation must be further intensified. This MIAPP programme aims in particular to prepare for this task by joining experimentalists and theorists in the various relevant fields, with the goal to build the necessary tools in face of the challenge of new large data sets. The programme will begin with a focus on physics with non-leptonic final states, continued by semileptonic B meson decays and Tau decays, and on various aspects of CP symmetry violation closer to the end. In addition, in the final ...

  15. Multiwavelength Characteristics of Period-Luminosity Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Madore, Barry F

    2011-01-01

    We present a physically motivated explanation for the observed, monotonic increase in slope, and the simultaneous (and also monotonic) decrease in the width/scatter of the Leavitt Law (the Cepheid Period-Luminosity (PL) relation) as one systematically moves from the blue and visual into the near and mid-infared. We calibrate the wavelength-dependent, surface-brightness sensitivities to temperature using the observed slopes of PL relations from the optical through the mid-infrared, and test the calibration by comparing the theoretical predictions with direct observations of the wavelength dependence of the scatter in the Large Magellanic Cloud Cepheid PL relation. In doing so we find the slope of the Period-Radius (PR) relation is c = 0.724 +/- 0.006. Investigating the effect of differential reddening suggests that this value may be overestimated by as much as 10%; however the same slope of the PR relation fits the (very much unreddened) Cepheids in IC1613, albeit with lower precision. The discussion given is ...

  16. ATLAS gets its own luminosity detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    During the winter shutdown, the ATLAS collaboration has completed the installation of ALFA, the detector system that aims at the LHC absolute luminosity at Point 1 analysing the elastic scattering of protons at small angles.   Upper and lower ALFA Roman Pots as installed in sector 8-1 of the LHC tunnel, 240 metres from the ATLAS Interaction Point. The detectors of the ALFA system are installed at ± 240 meters from the interaction point 1, on either side of the ATLAS detector. The whole system consists of four stations, two on each side of the interaction point. Each station is equipped with two Roman Pots; each pot – that is separated from the vacuum of the accelerator by a thin window but is connected with bellows to the beam-pipe – can be moved very close to the beam. “The Roman Pot technique has been used successfully in the past for the measurement of elastic scattering very close to the circulating beam,” says Patrick Fassn...

  17. Higher luminosities via alternative incident channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J.E.

    1985-04-01

    We show that PEP provides some unique opportunities for one and two photon physics with real photons as well as for QCD studies with internal targets. Photon beams would avoid the major limitation on the luminosity of present machines and could provide PEP an ideal b-physics factory producing the full range of J/sub c//sup PC/ and J/sub b//sup PC/ states that may not be observable otherwise as well as allow a whole new class of ''missing-mass'' experiments. These latter particles are the pseudo-Goldstone bosons and their supersymmetric counterparts. These and related possibilities like a single-pass, ''free electron laser'' facility or even synchrotron radiation beam lines all favor a mini-maxi configuration for the low-beta insertions in PEP. This allows more diverse experiments without excluding any ongoing experimental programs. Such possibilities have interesting implications for a number of proposed facilities including the SSC. Some systematic machine physics studies over a range of energies are suggested. 24 refs., 6 figs.

  18. Bolometric Luminosity Correction of H2O Maser AGNs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Q. Guo; J. S. Zhang; J. Wang

    2014-09-01

    For the H2O maser host AGN sample, we derived their bolometric luminosity corrections, based on their X-ray data and [O III] emission line luminosities. Our results for maser AGNs is comparable to that of non-maser AGNs.

  19. Upgrade of the D0 luminosity monitor readout system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, John; Bridges, Lloyd; Casey, Brendan; Enari, Yuji; Green, Johnny; Johnson, Marvin; Kwarciany, Rick; Miao, Chyi-Chiang; Partridge, Richard; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Wang,; /Brown U. /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We describe upgrades to the readout system for the D0 Luminosity Monitor. The D0 Luminosity Monitor consists of plastic scintillation detectors with fine-mesh photomultiplier readout that cover the pseudorapidity range 2.7 < |{eta}| < 4.4. The detector is designed to provide a precise measurement of the rate for non-diffractive inelastic collisions that is used to calculate the TeVatron luminosity at D0. The new readout system is based on custom VME electronics that make precise time-of-flight and charge measurements for each luminosity counter. These measurements are used to identify beam crossings with non-diffractive interactions by requiring in-time hits in both the forward and backward luminosity counters. We have also significantly increased signal/noise for the photomultiplier signals by developing a new front-end preamplifier and improving the grounding scheme.

  20. Evolution of the cluster X-ray luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullis, C.R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Henry, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    and a maximum likelihood analysis of the observed luminosity-redshift distribution fit with a model luminosity function. The negative evolution signal is more than 3 sigma regardless of the adopted local luminosity function or cosmological framework. Our results and those from several other surveys......We report measurements of the cluster X-ray luminosity function out to z = 0.8 based on the final sample of 201 galaxy systems from the 160 Square Degree ROSAT Cluster Survey. There is little evidence for any measurable change in cluster abundance out to z similar to 0.6 at luminosities of less...... large mass aggregations at sufficiently early times in cosmological history, when the universe has yet to assemble these clusters to present-day volume densities....

  1. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Ellingson, E.; /Colorado U., CASA; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  2. Correlation analysis of radio properties and accretion-disk luminosity for low luminosity AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Renzhi; Zhang, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the jet power and accretion disk luminosity is investigated and analyzed with our model for 7 samples of low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). The main results are: (1) the power-law correlation index ($P_{jet} \\propto L_{disk}^{\\mu}$) typically ranges $\\mu=0.4-0.7$ for the LLAGN samples, and there is a hint of steep index for the LLAGN sample which hosted by a high fraction of elliptical galaxies, and there are no significant correlation between the $\\mu$ and the LLAGN types (Seyfert, LINER); (2) for $\\mu \\approx$1, as noted in Liu et al., the accretion disk dominates the jet power and the black hole (BH) spin is not important, for the LLAGN samples studied in this paper we find that the $\\mu$ is significantly less than unity, implying that BH spin may play a significant role in the jet power of LLAGNs; (3) the BH spin-jet power is negatively correlated with the BH mass in our model, which means a high spin-jet efficiency in the `low' BH-mass LLAGNs; (4) an anti-correlation ...

  3. Luminosity measurement and beam condition monitoring at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The BRIL system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. In expectation of higher luminosity and denser proton bunch spacing during LHC Run II, many of the BRIL subsystems are being upgraded and others are being added to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) will deliver an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. Data from each of the subsystems will be collected and combined in the BRIL DAQ framework, which will publish it to CMS and LHC. The current status of installation and commissioning results for the BRIL subsystems are given.

  4. Limitation on the luminosity of e+e- storage rings due to beamstrahlung

    CERN Document Server

    Telnov, V I

    2013-01-01

    Particle loss due to the emission of single energetic beamstrahlung photons in beam collisions is shown to impose a fundamental limit on storage-ring luminosities at energies greater than 2E~140 GeV for head-on collisions and 2E~40 GeV for crab-waist collisions. Above these threshold energies, the suppression factor due to beamstrahlung scales as 1/E^{4/3}, and for a fixed power of synchrotron radiation, the luminosity L is proportional to R/E^{13/3}, where R is the collider radius. For 2E > 150 GeV, both collision schemes have similar luminosity limits. The luminosities attainable at storage-ring and linear-collider (LC) 2E=240 GeV Higgs factories are comparable; at higher energies, LCs are preferable. This conference paper is based on my recent PRL publication [1], supplemented with additional comments on linac-ring e+e- colliders and ring e+e- colliders with charge compensation (four-beam collisions).

  5. The Luminosity Function of Fermi-detected Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajello, M.; Shaw, M.S.; Romani, R.W.; Dermer, C.D.; Costamante, L.; King, O.G.; Max-Moerbeck, W.; Readhead, A.; Reimer, A.; Richards, J.L.; Stevenson, M.

    2012-04-16

    Fermi has provided the largest sample of {gamma}-ray selected blazars to date. In this work we use a complete sample of FSRQs detected during the first year of operation to determine the luminosity function (LF) and its evolution with cosmic time. The number density of FSRQs grows dramatically up to redshift {approx}0.5-2.0 and declines thereafter. The redshift of the peak in the density is luminosity dependent, with more luminous sources peaking at earlier times; thus the LF of {gamma}-ray FSRQs follows a luminosity-dependent density evolution similarly to that of radio-quiet AGN. Also using data from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope we derive the average spectral energy distribution of FSRQs in the 10 keV-100GeV band and show that there is no correlation of the peak {gamma}-ray luminosity with {gamma}-ray peak frequency. The coupling of the SED and LF allows us to predict that the contribution of FSRQs to the Fermi isotropic {gamma}-ray background is 9.3{sub -1.0}{sup +1.6}% ({+-}3% systematic uncertainty) in the 0.1-100GeV band. Finally we determine the LF of unbeamed FSRQs, finding that FSRQs have an average Lorentz factor of {gamma} = 11.7{sub -2.2}{sup +3.3}, that most are seen within 5{sup o} of the jet axis, and that they represent only {approx}0.1% of the parent population.

  6. A giant radio halo in the low luminosity X-ray cluster Abell 523

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, G; Girardi, M; Govoni, F; Murgia, M; Vacca, V; Bagchi, J

    2011-01-01

    Radio halos are extended and diffuse non-thermal radio sources present at the cluster center, not obviously associated with any individual galaxy. A strong correlation has been found between the cluster X-ray luminosity and the halo radio power. We observe and analyze the diffuse radio emission present in the complex merging structure Abell 523, classified as a low luminosity X-ray cluster, to discuss its properties in the context of the halo total radio power versus X-ray luminosity correlation. We reduced VLA archive observations at 1.4 GHz to derive a deep radio image of the diffuse emission, and compared radio, optical, and X-ray data. Low-resolution VLA images detect a giant radio halo associated with a complex merging region. The properties of this new halo agree with those of radio halos in general discussed in the literature, but its radio power is about a factor of ten higher than expected on the basis of the cluster X-ray luminosity. Our study of this giant radio source demonstrates that radio halos...

  7. Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program for the Luminosity Increasing at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with approximately 10,000 channels and is operating successfully (data quality efficiency above 99%) in ATLAS, since the start of the LHC collisions. The LHC is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade, in 2022, for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), where the luminosity will be increased by a factor of 10 above the original design value. The ATLAS upgrade program for high luminosity is split into three phases: Phase 0 occurred during 2013-2014 (Long Shutdown 1), and prepared the LHC for run 2; Phase 1, foreseen for 2019 (Long Shutdown 2), will prepare the LHC for run 3, whereafter the peak luminosity reaches 2-3 x 10^{34} cm^{2}s^{-1}; finally, Phase 2, which is foreseen for 2024 (Long Shutdown 3), will prepare the collider for the HL-LHC operation (5-7 x 10^{34} cm^{2}s^{-1}). The TileCal main activities for Phase 0 were the installation of the new low v...

  8. Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program for the Luminosity Increasing at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira, Augusto Santiago; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with approximately 10,000 channels and is operating successfully (data quality efficiency above 99%) in ATLAS, since the start of the LHC collisions. The LHC is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade, in 2022, for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), where the luminosity will be increased by a factor of 10 above the original design value. The ATLAS upgrade program for high luminosity is split into three phases: Phase 0 occurred during 2013-2014 (Long Shutdown 1), and prepared the LHC for run 2; Phase 1, foreseen for 2019 (Long Shutdown 2), will prepare the LHC for run 3, whereafter the peak luminosity reaches 2-3 x 10^{34} cm^{2}s^{-1}; finally, Phase 2, which is foreseen for 2023 (Long Shutdown 3), will prepare the collider for the HL-LHC operation (5-7 x 10^{34} cm^{2}s^{-1}). The TileCal main activities for Phase 0 were the installation of the new low v...

  9. Correlations of the IR Luminosity and Eddington Ratio with a Hard X-ray Selected Sample of AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushotzy, Richard F.; Winter, Lisa M.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Tueller, Jack

    2008-01-01

    We use the SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample of hard x-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) with a median redshift of 0.03 and the 2MASS J and K band photometry to examine the correlation of hard x-ray emission to Eddington ratio as well as the relationship of the J and K band nuclear luminosity to the hard x-ray luminosity. The BAT sample is almost unbiased by the effects of obscuration and thus offers the first large unbiased sample for the examination of correlations between different wavelength bands. We find that the near-IR nuclear J and K band luminosity is related to the BAT (14 - 195 keV) luminosity over a factor of 10(exp 3) in luminosity (L(sub IR) approx.equals L(sub BAT)(sup 1.25) and thus is unlikely to be due to dust. We also find that the Eddington ratio is proportional to the x-ray luminosity. This new result should be a strong constraint on models of the formation of the broad band continuum.

  10. Precision luminosity measurement with the OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Arcelli, S

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary, high precision measurement of the luminosity of the LEP colliding beams for the LEP I data recorded between 1993 and 1995 with the OPAL experiment is presented, the measurement is based on the OPAL Silicon-Tungten luminosity monitor, which detects electrons from small-angle Bhabha scattering at angles between approximately 25 and 58 mrad. The overall experimental uncertainty on the measured luminosity is 3.3*10/sup -4/. Such uncertainty contributes negligibly to the uncertainty on the OPAL cross section measurements near the Z /sup 0/ resonance. (3 refs).

  11. Nearby debris disk systems with high fractional luminosity reconsidered

    CERN Document Server

    Moor, A; Apai, D; Derekas, A; Grady, C; Henning, T; Kiss, C; Kiss, L L; Henning, Th.; Kiss, Cs.

    2006-01-01

    By searching the IRAS and ISO databases we compiled a list of 60 debris disks which exhibit the highest fractional luminosity values (fd>10^-4) in the vicinity of the Sun (d5x10^-4 are younger than 100Myr. The distribution of the disks in the fractional luminosity versus age diagram indicates that (1) the number of old systems with high fd is lower than was claimed before; (2) there exist many relatively young disks of moderate fractional luminosity; and (3) comparing the observations with a current theoretical model of debris disk evolution a general good agreement could be found.

  12. Cryogenic test of double quarter wave crab cavity for the LHC High luminosity upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Alberty, L. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Calaga, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cullen, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Capatina, O. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Hammons, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Marques, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Verdu-Andres, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109. We report the test results of this design.

  13. Evolution of Galaxy Luminosity Function Using Photometric Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, B H F; Benoist, C; da Costa, L N; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Ogando, R L C; de Simoni, F; Mesquita, A A

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of using photometric redshifts for studying the evolution of both the global galaxy luminosity function (LF) and that for different galaxy types. To this end we compare LFs obtained using photometric redshifts from the CFHT Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) D1 field with those from the spectroscopic survey VIMOS VLT Deep Survey (VVDS) comprising ~4800 galaxies. We find that for z<2, in the interval of magnitudes considered by this survey, the LFs obtained using photometric and spectroscopic redshifts show a remarkable agreement. This good agreement led us to use all four Deep fields of CFHTLS comprising ~386000 galaxies to compute the LF of the combined fields and estimate directly the error in the parameters based on field-to-field variation. We find that the characteristic absolute magnitude M* of Schechter fits fades by ~0.7mag from z~1.8 to z~0.3, while the characteristic density phi* increases by a factor of ~4 in the same redshift bin. We use the galaxy classification provided by the templ...

  14. Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Tile Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new two-level hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubbl...

  15. Upgrade of the ATLAS Calorimeters for Higher LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Ryne Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the LHC will bring instantaneous and total luminosities which are a factor 5-7 beyond the original design of the ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) and Tile Calorimeters and their read-out systems. Due to radiation requirements and a new hardware trigger concept the read-out electronics will be improved in two phases. In Phase-I, a dedicated read-out of the LAr Calorimeters will provide higher granularity input to the trigger, in order to mitigate pile-up effects and to reduce the background rates. In Phase-II, completely new read-out electronics will allow a digital processing of all LAr and Tile Calorimeter channels at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing frequency and a transfer of calibrated energy inputs to the trigger. Results from system design and performance of the developed read-out components, including fully functioning demonstrator systems already operated on the detector, will be reported. Furthermore, the current Forward Calorimeter (FCal) may suffer from signal degradation and argon bubble form...

  16. Optical Variability Properties of High Luminosity AGN Classes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. S. Stalin; Gopal-Krishna; Ram Sagar; Paul J. Wiita

    2004-03-01

    We present the results of a comparative study of the intra-night optical variability (INOV) characteristics of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, which involves a systematic intra-night optical monitoring of seven sets of high luminosity AGNs covering the redshift range ≃ 0.2 to ≃ 2.2. The sample, matched in the optical luminosity – redshift (-) plane, consists of seven radio-quiet quasars (RQQs), eight radio lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs), five radio core-dominated quasars (CDQs) and six BL Lac objects (BLs). Systematic CCD observations, aided by a careful data analysis procedure, have allowed us to detect INOV with amplitudes as low as about 1%. Present observations cover a total of 113 nights (720 hours) with only a single qusar monitored as continuously as possible on a given night. Considering the cases of only unambiguous detections of INOV we have estimated duty cycles (DCs) of 17%, 12%, 20% and 61% for RQQs, LDQs, CDQs, and BLs, respectively. The much lower amplitude and DC of INOV shown by RQQs compared to BLs may be understood in terms of their having optical synchrotron jets which are modestly misdirected from us. From our fairly extensive dataset, no general trend of a correlation between the INOVamplitude and the apparent optical brightness of the quasar is noticed. This suggests that the physical mechanisms of INOV and long term optical variability (LTOV) do not have a one-to-one relationship and different factors are involved. Also, the absence of a clear negative correlation between the INOV and LTOV characteristics of blazars of our sample points toward an inconspicuous contribution of accretion disk fluctuations to the observed INOV. The INOV duty cycle of the AGNs observed in this program suggests that INOV is associated predominantly with the highly polarized optical emission components. We also report new VLA imaging of two RQQs (1029 + 329 & 1252 + 020) in our sample which has yielded a 5 GHz detection in one of them (1252 + 020; 5GHz

  17. The relation between bar formation, galaxy luminosity, and environment

    CERN Document Server

    Corsini, E M; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Aguerri, J A L; Zarattini, S

    2013-01-01

    We derive the bar fraction in three different environments ranging from the field to Virgo and Coma clusters, covering an unprecedentedly large range of galaxy luminosities (or, equivalently, stellar masses). We confirm that the fraction of barred galaxies strongly depends on galaxy luminosity. We also show that the difference between the bar fraction distributions as a function of galaxy luminosity (and mass) in the field and Coma cluster are statistically significant, with Virgo being an intermediate case. We interpret this result as a variation of the effect of environment on bar formation depending on galaxy luminosity. We speculate that brighter disk galaxies are stable enough against interactions to keep their cold structure, thus, the interactions are able to trigger bar formation. For fainter galaxies the interactions become strong enough to heat up the disks inhibiting bar formation and even destroying the disks. Finally, we point out that the controversy regarding whether the bar fraction depends on...

  18. Unified Treatment of the Luminosity Distance in Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Yoo, Jaiyul

    2016-01-01

    Comparing the luminosity distance measurements to its theoretical predictions is one of the cornerstones in establishing the modern cosmology. However, as shown in Biern & Yoo, its theoretical predictions in literature are often plagued with infrared divergences and gauge-dependences. This trend calls into question the sanity of the methods used to derive the luminosity distance. Here we critically investigate four different methods --- the geometric approach, the Sachs approach, the Jacobi mapping approach, and the geodesic light cone (GLC) approach to modeling the luminosity distance, and we present a unified treatment of such methods, facilitating the comparison among the methods and checking their sanity. All of these four methods, if exercised properly, can be used to reproduce the correct description of the luminosity distance.

  19. The Intrinsic Quasar Luminosity Function: Accounting for Accretion Disk Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, M A; Brotherton, M S; Runnoe, J C; Green, R F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic --- in part due to its disk-like structure --- but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic l...

  20. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  1. A mixture evolution scenario of AGN radio luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Zunli; Zhou, Ming; Mao, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mixture evolution scenario to model the evolution of the steep spectrum AGN (active galactic nuclear) radio luminosity function (RLF) based on a Bayesian method. In this scenario, the shape of RLF is determined together by the density and luminosity evolution. Our models indicate that the density evolution is positive until a redshift of $\\thicksim 0.9$ and then turns to be negative, while the luminosity evolution is positive to a higher redshift ($z \\thicksim 5$ for model B and $z \\thicksim 3.5$ for model C) and then turns to be negative. Our mixture evolution model works well, and the modeled RLFs are in good agreement with previous determinations. The mixture evolution scenario can naturally explain the luminosity dependent evolution of the RLFs.

  2. Precision of MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Kladiva, Edward [IEP SAS Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    A network consisting of MPX detectors based on Medipix2 silicon pixel devices were originally adapted for measuring the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. We demonstrate that the MPX network, which consists of 16 MPX detectors, is a self-contained luminosity monitor system. As the MPX detectors are collecting data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with good precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The variations of the MPX luminosity measurements around the fitted curve lead to a relative uncertainty on the luminosity measurement below 0.3% for one minute time intervals.

  3. The K-band luminosity functions of cluster galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, R

    2016-01-01

    We derive the galaxy luminosity function in the $K_s$ band for galaxies in 24 clusters to provide a local reference for higher redshift studies and to analyse how and if the luminosity function varies according to environment and cluster properties. We use new, deep $K$ band imaging and match the photometry to available redshift information and to optical photometry from the SDSS or the UKST/POSS: $>80\\%$ of the galaxies to $K \\sim 14.5$ have measured redshifts. We derive composite luminosity functions, for the entire sample and for cluster subsamples . We consider the luminosity functions for red sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The full composite luminosity function has $K^*=12.79 \\pm 0.14$ ($M_K=-24.81$) and $\\alpha=-1.41 \\pm 0.10$. We find that $K^*$ is largely unaffected by the environment but that the slope $\\alpha$ increases towards lower mass clusters and clusters with Bautz-Morgan type $<$ II. The red sequence luminosity function seems to be approximately universal (within errors) in all environm...

  4. Frequency domain analysis of triggered lightning return stroke luminosity velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, F. L.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.; Moore, R. C.

    2017-02-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to time domain return stroke luminosity signals to calculate the phase and group velocities and the amplitude of the luminosity signals as a function of frequency measured between 4 m and 115 m during 12 triggered lightning strokes. We show that pairs of time domain luminosity signals measured at different heights can be interpreted as the input and the output of a system whose frequency domain transfer function can be determined from the measured time domain signals. From the frequency domain transfer function phase we find the phase and group velocities, and luminosity amplitude as a function of triggered lightning channel height and signal frequency ranging from 50 kHz to 300 kHz. We show that higher-frequency luminosity components propagate faster than the lower frequency components and that higher-frequency luminosity components attenuate more rapidly than lower frequency components. Finally, we calculate time domain return stroke velocities as a function of channel height using two time delay techniques: (1) measurement at the 20% amplitude level and (2) cross correlation.

  5. Upgrade plans for the Hadronic-Endcap Calorimeter of ATLAS for the high luminosity stage of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadov, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Cheplakov, A; Dominguez, R; Fischer, A; Habring, J; Hambarzumjan, A; Javadov, N; Kiryunin, A; Kurchaninov, L; Menke, S; Molinas Conde, I; Nagel, M; Oberlack, H; Reimann, O; Schacht, P; Strizenec, P; Vogt, S; Wichmann, G; Cadabeschi, Mircea Ioan; Langstaff, Reginald Roy; Lenckowski, Mark Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The expected increase of the instantaneous luminosity of a factor seven and of the total integrated luminosity by a factor 3-5 at the second phase of the upgraded high luminosity LHC compared to the design goals for LHC makes it necessary to re-evaluate the radiation hardness of the read-out electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter. The current cold electronics made of GaAs ASICs have been tested with neutron and proton beams to study their degradation under irradiation and the effect it would have on the ATLAS physics programme. New, more radiation hard technologies which could replace the current amplifiers have been studied as well: SiGe bipolar, Si CMOS FET and GaAs FET transistors have been irradiated with neutrons and protons with fluences up to ten times the total expected fluences for ten years of running of the high luminosity LHC. The performance measurements of the current read-out electronics and potential future technologies and expected performance degradations under high luminosity ...

  6. High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) Preliminary Design Report

    CERN Document Server

    Apollinari, G; Béjar Alonso, I; Brüning, O; Lamont, M; Rossi, L

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is one of the largest scientific instruments ever built. Since opening up a new energy frontier for exploration in 2010, it has gathered a global user community of about 7,000 scientists working in fundamental particle physics and the physics of hadronic matter at extreme temperature and density. To sustain and extend its discovery potential, the LHC will need a major upgrade in the 2020s. This will increase its luminosity (rate of collisions) by a factor of five beyond the original design value and the integrated luminosity (total collisions created) by a factor ten. The LHC is already a highly complex and exquisitely optimised machine so this upgrade must be carefully conceived and will require about ten years to implement. The new configuration, known as High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), will rely on a number of key innovations that push accelerator technology beyond its present limits. Among these are cutting-edge 11-12 tesla superconducting magnets, compact superconducting cav...

  7. A luminosity measurement at LEP using the L3 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koffeman, E.N.

    1996-06-25

    To perform high precision measurements at particle colliders it is crucial to know the exact intensity of the colliding beams. In particle physics this quantity is generally referred to as the luminosity. The determination of the luminosity in one of the experiments (L3) is the topic of this thesis. The implementation and the use of a silicon strip detector in L3, will be described in detail. In chapter one the most important parameters measured at LEP are discussed, preceded by a short introduction to the Standard Model. The process generally used for luminosity measurements in electron positron colliders is small angle Bhabha scattering. This process is discussed at the end of chapter one. In chapter two the characteristics of the collider and the L3 experiment are given. Together with the signature of the small angle Bhabha scattering, these experimental conditions determine the specifications for the design of the luminosity monitor. The general features of silicon strip detectors for their application in high energy physics are presented in chapter three. Some special attention is given to the behaviour of the sensors used for the tracking detector in the luminosity monitor. The more specific design details of the luminosity monitor are constricted to chapter four. In chapter five the conversion from detector signals into ccordinates relevant for the analysis is explained. The selection of the small angle Bhabha scattering events and the subsequent determination of the luminosity, are presented in chapter six. Systematic uncertainties are carefully studied. Important for a good understanding of the Bhabha selection are the events where a photon is produced in the scattering process. These events are separately studied. In chapter seven a comparison is presented between the radiative events observed in the data and their modelling in the Bhlumi Monte Carlo programme. (orig.).

  8. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio

  9. Operation of the ATLAS end-cap calorimeters at sLHC luminosities, an experimental study

    CERN Document Server

    Ferencei, J; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The expected increase of luminosity at sLHC by a factor of ten with respect to LHC luminosities has serious consequences for the signal reconstruction, radiation hardness requirements and operations of the ATLAS liquid argon calorimeters (EMEC, HEC, FCAL) in the endcap, respectively forward region. Small modules of each type of calorimeter have been built. The layout and the components used are very close to the ones used in the construction of the ATLAS calorimeter. The goal is to simulate in the high intensity proton beam at IHEP /Protvino the particle impact as expected for ATLAS in sLHC. Depending on the position in pseudorapidity |η|, each forward calorimeter has to cope with a different particle and energy flux. Placing absorber elements in-between the various small calorimeter modules, the particle and energy flux as expected in ATLAS later - given the variation due to |η| and longitudinal position - can be simulated very well.

  10. Restriction on the energy and luminosity of e(+)e(-) storage rings due to beamstrahlung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telnov, V I

    2013-03-15

    The role of beamstrahlung in high-energy e(+)e(-) storage-ring colliders (SRCs) is examined. Particle loss due to the emission of single energetic beamstrahlung photons is shown to impose a fundamental limit on SRC luminosities at energies 2E(0)≳140  GeV for head-on collisions and 2E(0)≳40  GeV for crab-waist collisions. With beamstrahlung taken into account, we explore the viability of SRCs in the 2E(0)=240-500   GeV range, which is of interest in the precision study of the Higgs boson. At 2E(0)=240  GeV, SRCs are found to be competitive with linear colliders; however, at 2E(0)=400-500  GeV, the attainable SRC luminosity would be a factor 15-25 smaller than desired.

  11. THE LUMINOSITIES OF PROTOSTARS IN THE SPITZER c2d AND GOULD BELT LEGACY CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, Michael M.; Arce, Hector G. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Allen, Lori E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Evans II, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C. [Herzberg Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Chapman, Nicholas L. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Cieza, Lucas A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Hatchell, Jennifer [Astrophysics Group, Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kirk, Jason M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC-ESA, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Peterson, Dawn E. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Spezzi, Loredana, E-mail: michael.dunham@yale.edu [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Motivated by the long-standing 'luminosity problem' in low-mass star formation whereby protostars are underluminous compared to theoretical expectations, we identify 230 protostars in 18 molecular clouds observed by two Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy surveys of nearby star-forming regions. We compile complete spectral energy distributions, calculate L{sub bol} for each source, and study the protostellar luminosity distribution. This distribution extends over three orders of magnitude, from 0.01 L{sub Sun} to 69 L{sub Sun }, and has a mean and median of 4.3 L{sub Sun} and 1.3 L{sub Sun }, respectively. The distributions are very similar for Class 0 and Class I sources except for an excess of low luminosity (L{sub bol} {approx}< 0.5 L{sub Sun }) Class I sources compared to Class 0. 100 out of the 230 protostars (43%) lack any available data in the far-infrared and submillimeter (70 {mu}m <{lambda} < 850 {mu}m) and have L{sub bol} underestimated by factors of 2.5 on average, and up to factors of 8-10 in extreme cases. Correcting these underestimates for each source individually once additional data becomes available will likely increase both the mean and median of the sample by 35%-40%. We discuss and compare our results to several recent theoretical studies of protostellar luminosities and show that our new results do not invalidate the conclusions of any of these studies. As these studies demonstrate that there is more than one plausible accretion scenario that can match observations, future attention is clearly needed. The better statistics provided by our increased data set should aid such future work.

  12. The radio luminosity function and redshift evolution of radio-mode and quasar-mode AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracy, Mike

    2016-08-01

    The properties of the AGN population indicate that there are two fundamentally different accretion modes operating. In the quasar-mode, material is accreted onto the supermassive black hole via a small, thin, optically luminous accretion disc. Accretion in this mode is recognisable by emission lines in the optical spectrum. However, there is a population of AGN observable only by their radio emission and without optical emission lines. These radio-mode AGN are likely powered by radiatively inefficient accretion from a hot gas halo. I will describe the cosmic evolution of these two populations via radio luminosity functions. The radio luminosity functions are constructed from a new survey of over 4000 radio galaxies out to z=1, all with confirmed redshifts and their accretion mode classified from their optical spectra. This is 20 times larger than the only other survey used to make such a measurement. The radio-mode AGN population displays no statistically significant evolution in space density out to redshift z=1. In contrast the quasar mode AGN exhibits rapid evolution in space density, increasing by a factor of 8 over the same redshift range. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power for the quasar-mode AGN in comparison to the radio-mode AGN and we demonstrate this is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes. The radio luminosity function is used to estimate the total amount of mechanical energy available for radio mode feedback as a function of redshift, and is found to be in good agreement with cosmological models and previous measurements. Again, by separating by accretion mode, the previously estimated increase in available mechanical energy per unit volume out to z=1 (approximately a factor of 2) can be attributed to the rapid evolution of the quasar-mode AGN, while for the classical radio-mode AGN the total mechanical energy output remains roughly

  13. Luminosity functions for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the luminosity function for low-mass objects to constrain the stellar initial mass function at the low-mass end is reported. The ways in which luminosity functions for low-mass stars are affected by star formation histories, brown dwarf and premain-sequence cooling rates and main-sequence mass luminosity relations, and the IMF are examined. Cooling rates and the mass-luminosity relation are determined through a new series of evolutionary calculations for very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in the range 0.05-0.50 solar mass. Model luminosity functions are constructed for specific comparison with the results of four recent observational surveys. The likelihood that the stellar mass function in the solar neighborhood is increasing at masses near the bottom of the main sequence and perhaps at lower masses is confirmed. In the most optimistic case, brown dwarfs contribute half of the local missing disk mass. The actual contribution is likely to be considerably less.

  14. An X-ray luminosity analysis for FRIs and FRIIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Radio galaxies are divided into two groups according to their luminosities at 178 MHz, namely Fa- naroff-Riley type Is (FRIs) and Fanaroff-Riley type IIs (FRIIs) with FRIs showing lower radio luminosities than FRIIs. In this paper, the X-ray data are compiled for 183 radio galaxies (61 FRIs and 122 FRIIs), from the available literature, for the analysis of the X-ray properties. The 1 keV X-ray luminosities are calculated and discussed for the two groups, and an averaged X-ray luminosity of logLX1 keV = 41.30±2.51 erg·s-1·keV-1 is found for FRIs, which is lower than that for FRIIs, logLX1 KeV = 43.39±3.06 erg·s-1·keV-1. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test indicates that the probability for the X-ray luminosity distributions of the two groups to be from the same parent distribution is 1.44×10-10. We also discuss the origin and the mechanism of the X-ray emission for FRIs and FRIIs.

  15. An X-ray luminosity analysis for FRIs and FRIIs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ChunLing; FAN dunHui

    2009-01-01

    Radio galaxies are divided into two groups according to their luminosities at 178 MHz,namely Fa-naroff-Riley type Is (FRIIs) and Fanaroff-Riley type IIs (FRIIs) with FRIs showing lower radio luminosities than FRIIs.In this paper,the X-ray data are compiled for 183 radio galaxies (61 FRIs and 122 FRIIs),from the available literature,for the analysis of the X-ray properties.The 1 keV X-ray luminosities are calculated and discussed for the two groups,and an averaged X-ray luminosity of logLx1 keV= 41.30±2.51 erg· s-1.keV-1 is found for FRIs,which is lower than that for FRIIs,logLx1 KeV= 43.39±3.06 erg·s-1 keV-1.A Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test indicates that the probability for the X-ray luminosity distributions of the two groups to be from the same parent distribution is 1.44×1010.We also discuss the origin and the mechanism of the X-ray emission for FRIs and FRIIs.

  16. Performance evaluation and optimization of the luminosity detector ALFA

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Sune; Grafström, P; Joram, C

    2010-01-01

    The startup of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) has initialized a new era in particle physics. The standard model of particle physics has for the last 40 years with tremendous success described all measurements with phenomenal precision. The experiments at the LHC will test the standard model in a new energy regime. To normalize the measurements and understand the potential discoveries of the LHC experiments it is often crucial to know the interaction rate - the absolute luminosity. The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) detector will measure luminosity by numerous methods. But for most of the methods only the relative luminosity is measured with good precision. The absolute scale has to be provided from elsewhere. Therefore ATLAS plans to measure the flux of protons scattered under very small angles as this flux relates directly and with good precision to the absolute luminosity. This will be done by the ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) detector. The detectors will be positioned about 240 m from the interac...

  17. An early separation scheme for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Sterbini, G

    2010-01-01

    The present document is organized in five chapters. In the first chapter the framework of the study is described, developing the motivations, the goals and the requirements for the LHC Luminosity Upgrade. We analyze the need for the crossing angle and its impact on the peak luminosity of the collider. After having introduced the Early Separation Scheme, we explain how it may overcome some limitations of the present machine. We compare the nominal LHC crossing scheme with the proposed one underlining its potential in terms of performance and its issues with respect to the integration in the detectors. An analysis of the integrated magnetic field required is given. In the second chapter we introduce one of the most powerful aspect of the scheme: the luminosity leveling. After the description of the physical model adopted, we compare the results of its analytical and numerical solutions. All the potential improvement due to the Early Separation Scheme are shown on the luminosity plane (peak luminosity versus int...

  18. The galaxy luminosity function and the Local Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Whitbourn, J R

    2016-01-01

    Whitbourn & Shanks (2014) have reported evidence for a local void underdense by ~15% extending to 150-300h-1Mpc around our position in the Southern Galactic Cap (SGC). Assuming a local luminosity function they modelled K- and r-limited number counts and redshift distributions in the 6dFGS/2MASS and SDSS redshift surveys and derived normalised n(z) ratios relative to the standard homogeneous cosmological model. Here we test further these results using maximum likelihood techniques that solve for the galaxy density distributions and the galaxy luminosity function simultaneously. We confirm the results from the previous analysis in terms of the number density distributions, indicating that our detection of the 'Local Hole' in the SGC is robust to the assumption of either our previous, or newly estimated, luminosity functions. However, there are discrepancies with previously published K and r band luminosity functions. In particular the r-band luminosity function has a steeper faint end slope than the r0.1 re...

  19. LHCb: LHCb Muon System Performance at High Luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    Pinci, D

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector was conceived to operate with an average Luminosity of $2 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. During the last year of LHC run, the whole apparatus has shown to be able to perfectly acquire and manage data produced at a Luminosity as high as $4 \\times 10^{32}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$. In these conditions, all sub-detectors operated at average particle rates higher than the design ones and in particular the Multi-Wire Proportional Chambers equipping the Muon System had to sustain a particle rate as high as 250 kHz/cm$^{2}$. In order to study the possibility of increasing the Luminosity of operation of the whole experiment several tests were performed. The effective beam Luminosity at the interaction point of LHCb was increased in several steps up to $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ and in each step the behavior of all the detectors in the Muon System was recorded. The data analysis has allowed to study the performance of the Muon System as a function of the LHC Luminosity and the results are r...

  20. An X-ray luminosity analysis for FRIs and FRIIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunling; Fan, Junhui

    2009-09-01

    Radio galaxies are divided into two groups according to their luminosities at 178 MHz, namely Fanaroff-Riley type Is (FRIs) and Fanaroff-Riley type IIs (FRIIs) with FRIs showing lower radio luminosities than FRIIs. In this paper, the X-ray data are compiled for 183 radio galaxies (61 FRIs and 122 FRIIs), from the available literature, for the analysis of the X-ray properties. The 1 keV X-ray luminosities are calculated and discussed for the two groups, and an averaged X-ray luminosity of log L {X/1 keV} = 41.30±2.51 erg·s-1·keV-1 is found for FRIs, which is lower than that for FRIIs, log L {X/1 keV} = 43.39±3.06 erg·s-1·keV-1. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test indicates that the probability for the X-ray luminosity distributions of the two groups to be from the same parent distribution is 1.44×10-10. We also discuss the origin and the mechanism of the X-ray emission for FRIs and FRIIs.

  1. The luminosity function of young star clusters: implications for the maximum mass and luminosity of clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Gieles, M; Bastian, N; Stein, I; Gieles, Mark; Larsen, Soeren; Bastian, Nate; Stein, Ilaan

    2005-01-01

    We introduce a method to relate a possible truncation of the star cluster mass function at the high mass end to the shape of the cluster luminosity function (LF). We compare the observed LFs of five galaxies containing young star clusters with synthetic cluster population models with varying initial conditions. The LF of the SMC, the LMC and NGC 5236 are characterized by a power-law behavior NdL~L^-a dL, with a mean exponent of = 2.0 +/- 0.2. This can be explained by a cluster population formeda with a constant cluster formation rate, in which the maximum cluster mass per logarithmic age bin is determined by the size-of-sample effect and therefore increases with log(age/yr). The LFs of NGC 6946 and M51 are better described by a double power-law distribution or a Schechter function. When a cluster population has a mass function that is truncated below the limit given by the size-of-sample effect, the total LF shows a bend at the magnitude of the maximum mass, with the age of the oldest cluster in the populati...

  2. L1Track: A fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS high luminosity upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2016-07-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware-based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide a higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and high accuracy tracking information in time for the decision taking process. In this context, the feasibility of potential approaches aimed at providing low-latency high-quality tracking at Level 1 is discussed.

  3. The European Large Area ISO Survey - IX. The 90-mu m luminosity function from the Final Analysis sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serjeant, S; Carraminana, A; Gonzales-Solares, E; Heraudeau, P; Mujica, R; Perez-Fournon, [No Value; Sedgwick, N; Rowan-Robinson, M; Franceschini, A; Babbedge, T; del Burgo, C; Ciliegi, P; Efstathiou, A; La Franca, F; Gruppioni, C; Hughes, D; Lari, C; Oliver, S; Pozzi, F; Stickel, M; Vaccari, M

    2004-01-01

    We present the 90-mum luminosity function of the Final Analysis of the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS), extending the sample size of our previous analysis (Paper IV) by about a factor of 4. Our sample extends to z = 1.1, similar to50 times the comoving volume of Paper IV, and 10(7.7)

  4. Clustering Segregation with Ultraviolet Luminosity in Lyman Break Galaxies at z~3 and Its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giavalisco, Mauro; Dickinson, Mark

    2001-03-01

    We report on the clustering properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z~3. The correlation length of flux-limited samples of LBGs depends on their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity at λ~1700 Å, with fainter galaxies being less strongly clustered in space. We have used three samples with progressively fainter flux limits: two extracted from our ground-based survey and one from the Hubble Deep Fields (both North and South). The correlation length decreases by a factor of ~3 over the range of limiting magnitudes that we have probed, namely, 25limit include galaxies with smaller mass. We have compared the observed scaling properties of the clustering strength with those predicted for cold dark matter (CDM) halos and found that (1) the clustering strength of LBGs follows, within the errors, the same scaling law with the volume density as the halos; and (2) the scaling law predicted for the galaxies using the halo mass spectrum and a number of models for the relationship that maps the halos' mass into the galaxies' UV luminosity depends only on how tightly mass and UV luminosity correlate but is otherwise insensitive to the details of the models. We interpret these results as additional evidence that the strong spatial clustering of LBGs is due to galaxy biasing, supporting the theory of biased galaxy formation and gravitational instability as the primary physical mechanism for the formation of structure. We have also fitted models of the mass-UV luminosity relationship to the data to reproduce simultaneously from the CDM halo mass spectrum the dependence of the correlation length with the UV luminosity and the luminosity function. We have found that (1) a scale invariant relationship between mass and UV luminosity (e.g., a power law) is not supported by the observations, suggesting that the properties of star formation of galaxies change along the mass spectrum of the observed LBGs; (2) the scatter of the UV luminosity of LBGs of given mass must be relatively

  5. The X-Ray and Mid-infrared Luminosities in Luminous Type 1 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Harrison, Chris M.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Alberts, Stacey; Alexander, David M.; Brodwin, Mark; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel

    2017-03-01

    Several recent studies have reported different intrinsic correlations between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) mid-IR luminosity ({L}{MIR}) and the rest-frame 2–10 keV luminosity (L X) for luminous quasars. To understand the origin of the difference in the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, we study a sample of 3247 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 AGNs collected from Boötes, XMM-COSMOS, XMM-XXL-North, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the Swift/XRT footprint spanning over four orders of magnitude in luminosity. We carefully examine how different observational constraints impact the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, including the inclusion of X-ray-nondetected objects, possible X-ray absorption in type 1 AGNs, X-ray flux limits, and star formation contamination. We find that the primary factor driving the different {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations reported in the literature is the X-ray flux limits for different studies. When taking these effects into account, we find that the X-ray luminosity and mid-IR luminosity (measured at rest-frame 6 μ {{m}}, or {L}6μ {{m}}) of our sample of type 1 AGNs follow a bilinear relation in the log–log plane: {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.84+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s‑1 + (44.60 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}}< {10}44.79 erg s‑1, and {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.40+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s‑1 + (44.51 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}} ≥slant {10}44.79 erg s‑1. This suggests that the luminous type 1 quasars have a shallower {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} correlation than the approximately linear relations found in local Seyfert galaxies. This result is consistent with previous studies reporting a luminosity-dependent {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relation and implies that assuming a linear {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} relation to infer the neutral gas column density for X-ray absorption might overestimate the column densities in luminous quasars.

  6. A dynamical calibration of the mass-luminosity relation at very low stellar masses and young ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Laird M; Lenzen, Rainer; Guirado, Jose C; Nielsen, Eric L; Mamajek, Eric E; Brandner, Wolfgang; Hartung, Markus; Lidman, Chris; Biller, Beth

    2005-01-20

    Mass is the most fundamental parameter of a star, yet it is also one of the most difficult to measure directly. In general, astronomers estimate stellar masses by determining the luminosity and using the 'mass-luminosity' relationship, but this relationship has never been accurately calibrated for young, low-mass stars and brown dwarfs. Masses for these low-mass objects are therefore constrained only by theoretical models. A new high-contrast adaptive optics camera enabled the discovery of a young (50 million years) companion only 0.156 arcseconds (2.3 au) from the more luminous (> 120 times brighter) star AB Doradus A. Here we report a dynamical determination of the mass of the newly resolved low-mass companion AB Dor C, whose mass is 0.090 +/- 0.005 solar masses. Given its measured 1-2-micrometre luminosity, we have found that the standard mass-luminosity relations overestimate the near-infrared luminosity of such objects by about a factor of approximately 2.5 at young ages. The young, cool objects hitherto thought to be substellar in mass are therefore about twice as massive, which means that the frequency of brown dwarfs and planetary mass objects in young stellar clusters has been overestimated.

  7. Jet Luminosity from Neutrino-Dominated Accretion Flows in GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Kawanaka, Norita

    2013-01-01

    A hyperaccretion disk around a stellar-mass black hole is a plausible model for the central engine that powers gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We estimate the luminosity of a jet driven by magnetohydrodynamic processes such as the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism as a function of mass accretion rate, the black hole mass, and other accretion parameters. We show that the jet is most efficient when the accretion flow is cooled via optically-thin neutrino emission, and that its luminosity is much larger than the energy deposition rate through neutrino annihilation provided that the black hole is spinning rapidly enough. Also, we find a significant jump in the jet luminosity at the transition mass accretion rate between the advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) regime and the neutrino-dominated accretion flow (NDAF) regime. This may cause the large variability observed in the prompt emission of GRBs.

  8. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, F. Lasagni

    2016-07-01

    In 2015 LHC is starting a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely rebuilt, both the detector and the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics features a new read-out board (LUCROD) for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and a revisited LUMAT board for combination of signals from the two detectors. This note describes the new board design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  9. AGN Broad Line Regions Scale with Bolometric Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Trippe, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    The masses of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be derived spectroscopically via virial mass estimators based on selected broad optical/ultraviolet emission lines. These estimates commonly use the line width as a proxy for the gas speed and the monochromatic continuum luminosity as a proxy for the radius of the broad line region. However, if the size of the broad line region scales with bolometric rather than monochromatic AGN luminosity, mass estimates based on different emission lines will show a systematic discrepancy which is a function of the color of the AGN continuum. This has actually been observed in mass estimates based on H-alpha / H-beta and C IV lines, indicating that AGN broad line regions indeed scale with bolometric luminosity. Given that this effect seems to have been overlooked as yet, currently used single-epoch mass estimates are likely to be biased.

  10. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor, LUCID, and its read-out electronics have been completely rebuilt for the LHC Run II in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy ($\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV) and the 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive $^{207}$Bi sources that produce internal-conversion electrons with energy above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count signals with amplitude above a predefined threshold (hits) as well as the integrated pulseheight of the signals, which makes it possible to measure luminosity with complementary methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be described, together with the results of the 2015 luminosity measurement.

  11. LUCID Upgrade for ATLAS Luminosity Measurement in Run II.

    CERN Document Server

    Ucchielli, Giulia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The main ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID and its read-out electronics has been completely rebuilt for the 2015 LHC run in order to cope with a higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The LUCID detector is measuring Cherenkov light produced in photomultiplier quartz windows and in quartz optical fibers. It has a novel calibration system that uses radioactive Bi$^{207}$ sources that produces internal conversion electrons above the Cherenkov threshold in quartz. The new electronics can count particle hits above a threshold but also the integrated pulseheight of the signals from the particles which makes it possible to measure luminosity with new methods. The new detector, calibration system and electronics will be covered by the contribution as well as the results of the luminosity measurements with the detector in 2015.

  12. Luminosity Anti-leveling with Crossing Angle (MD 1669)

    CERN Document Server

    Gorzawski, Arkadiusz; Ponce, Laurette; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Wenninger, Jorg; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    A significant fraction of the LHC luminosity ($\\sim$30\\% in 2016) is lost due to the presence (and necessity) of the crossing angles at the IPs. At the LHC the crossing angle is typically set to a value that provides sufficient separation of the beams at the start of fills for the peak bunch intensities. As the bunch intensity decays during a fill, it is possible to reduce the crossing angle and recover some luminosity. A smooth crossing angle reduction procedure must be developed to take advantage of this option during stable beam operation. During this MD a smooth procedure for luminosity leveling with crossing angle was tested. It was demonstrated that the orbit was well controlled, beam losses were low and the offset leveled experiments ALICE and LHCb were not affected by crossing angle leveling in ATLAS and CMS.

  13. High luminosity interaction region design for collisions with detector solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Milardi, C; Raimondi, P; Sensolini, G; Sgamma, F

    2010-01-01

    An innovatory interaction region has been recently conceived and realized on the Frascati DA{\\Phi}NE lepton collider. The concept of tight focusing and small crossing angle adopted until now to achieve high luminosity in multibunch collisions has evolved towards enhanced beam focusing at the interaction point with large horizontal crossing angle, thanks to a new compensation mechanism for the beam-beam resonances. The novel configuration has been tested with a small detector without solenoidal field yielding a remarkable improvement in terms of peak as well as integrated luminosity. The high luminosity interaction region has now been modified to host a large detector with a strong solenoidal field which significantly perturbs the beam optics introducing new design challenges in terms of interaction region optics design, beam transverse coupling control and beam stay clear requirements

  14. ATLAS Future Plans: Upgrade and the Physics with High Luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan S.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The ATLAS experiment is planning a series of detector upgrades to cope with the planned increases in instantaneous luminosity and multiple interactions per crossing to maintain its physics capabilities. During the coming decade, the Large Hadron Collider will collide protons on protons at a center of mass energy up to 14 TeV with luminosities steadily increasing in a phased approach to over 5 × 1034 cm−2s−1. The resulting large data sets will significantly enhance the physics reach of the ATLAS detector building on the recent discovery of the Higgs-like boson. The planned detector upgrades being designed to cope with the increasing luminosity and its impact on the ATLAS physics program will be discussed.

  15. Luminosity of particle beams from thick accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narayan, R.; Nityananda, R.; Wiita, P.J.

    1983-12-01

    The interaction of the radiation produced in the funnels of thick, highly luminous accretion discs with the walls of these funnels is investigated. Some processes not considered in an earlier discussion have been included. The turbulent mixing of the surface layer with deeper regions acts to reduce the luminosity associated with outflowing matter. The modification of the radiation field by the moving walls is also important. It is found, for the specific funnel geometry studied, corresponding to a radiation luminosity of 8.5 times the Eddington limit Lsub(E), that up to 1.5 Lsub(E) can be carried away as a particle beam, even for an optically thin funnel. This particle luminosity is sensitive to the sound velocity and the mixing efficiency in the walls.

  16. Environmental effects on the Coma cluster luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Lobo, C; Durret, F; Gerbal, D; Lefèvre, O; Mazure, A; Slezak, E

    1996-01-01

    Using our catalogue of V_{26.5} isophotal magnitudes for 6756 galaxies in a region covering 60~\\times~25~arcmin^2 in the center of the Coma cluster, plus 267 galaxies in a region of 9.7~\\times~9.4~arcmin^2 around NGC~4839, we derive the luminosity function in the magnitude range 13.5\\leq V_{26.5} < 21.0 (corresponding to the absolute magnitude range -22.24 < M_{V26.5} \\leq -14.74). The luminosity function for this region is well fitted by the combination of a gaussian in its bright part and of a steep Schechter function (of index \\alpha =-1.8) in its faint part. Luminosity functions derived for individual regions surrounding the brightest galaxies show less steep slopes, strongly suggesting the existence of environmental effects. The implications of such effects and galaxy formation scenarios are discussed.

  17. Challenges in Finding AGNs in the Low Luminosity Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyapal, Shobita; Abel, Nick; Secrest, Nathan; Singh, Amrit; Ellison, Sara

    2016-08-01

    Low luminosity AGNs are an important component of the AGN population. They are often found in the lowest mass galaxies or galaxies that lack classical bulges, a demographic that places important constraints to models of supermassive black hole seed formation and merger-free models of AGN fueling. The detection of AGNs in this low luminosity regime is challenging both because star formation in the host galaxy can dominate the optical spectrum and gas and dust can obscure the central engine at both optical and X-ray wavelengths. Thus while mid-infrared color selection and X-ray observations at energies review the effectiveness of uncovering AGNs in the low luminosity regime using multiwavength investigations, with a focus on infrared spectroscopic signatures.

  18. On the origin of the correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities in pre-main-sequence stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendigutía, I.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rigliaco, E.; Fairlamb, J. R.; Calvet, N.; Muzerolle, J.; Cunningham, N.; Lumsden, S. L.

    2015-09-01

    Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (Lacc and Lline) of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) Lacc-Lline correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L*) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the Lacc-Lline correlations depend on the Lacc-L* relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the Lacc-L* correlation immediately implies that Lacc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the Lacc-Lline correlations alone do not prove any physical connection with accretion but can only be used with practical purposes to roughly estimate accretion rates. When looking for correlations with possible physical meaning, we suggest that Lacc/L* and Lline/L* should be used instead of Lacc and Lline. Finally, the finding that Lacc has a steeper dependence on L* for T Tauri stars than for intermediate-mass Herbig Ae/Be stars is also discussed. That is explained from the magnetospheric accretion scenario and the different photospheric properties in the near-UV.

  19. On the origin of the correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities in pre-main sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Mendigutía, I; Rigliaco, E; Fairlamb, J R; Calvet, N; Muzerolle, J; Cunningham, N; Lumsden, S L

    2015-01-01

    Correlations between the accretion luminosity and emission line luminosities (L_acc and L_line) of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars have been published for many different spectral lines, which are used to estimate accretion rates. Despite the origin of those correlations is unknown, this could be attributed to direct or indirect physical relations between the emission line formation and the accretion mechanism. This work shows that all (near-UV/optical/near-IR) L_acc-L_line correlations are the result of the fact that the accretion luminosity and the stellar luminosity (L_star) are correlated, and are not necessarily related with the physical origin of the line. Synthetic and observational data are used to illustrate how the L_acc-L_line correlations depend on the L_acc-L_star relationship. We conclude that because PMS stars show the L_acc-L_star correlation immediately implies that L_acc also correlates with the luminosity of all emission lines, for which the L_acc-L_line correlations alone do not prove any phy...

  20. Comparative study of the relationships between CO isotopic luminosities and infrared luminosity for the Galactic dense cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Combining the 12CO(1-0),13CO(1-0),and C18O(1-0) data with IRAS four band data,we here estimate the physical parameters such as size,viral mass,and CO J=1-0 isotopic and infrared luminosities for 29 dense molecular clouds from two published CO samples. We further analyze the various correlations between CO J=1-0 isotopic luminosities and infrared luminosity(star formation rate,SFR) and discuss the relationships between the molecular gas tracers and SFR. The results show that 12CO(1-0),13CO(1-0) and C18O(1-0) luminosities have tight correlations with each other. CO J=1-0 isotopic luminosities and SFR show weak correlations with larger scatter than the HCN-IR correlations of 47 dense cores in the Galaxy and 65 external star-forming galaxies. This might be interpreted as that both the SFR and star formation efficiency are mainly determined by the molecular gas at high volume density rather than high column density.

  1. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Grah; on behalf of the FCAL Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs for a fast luminosity measure and the determination of beam parameters. The FCAL system is designed as a universal system fitting all detector concepts. It was implemented and simulated as a subsystem of the large detector concept [1]. The studies are carried out within the FCAL collaboration.

  2. System Design of the ATLAS Absolute Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Anghinolfi, Francis; Franz, Sebastien; Iwanski, W; Lundberg, B; PH-EP

    2007-01-01

    The ATLAS absolute luminosity monitor is composed of 8 roman pots symmetrically located in the LHC tunnel. Each pot contains 23 multi anode photomultiplier tubes, and each one of those is fitted with a front-end assembly called PMF. A PMF provides the high voltage biasing of the tube, the frontend readout chip and the readout logic in a very compact arrangement. The 25 PMFs contained in one roman pot are connected to a motherboard used as an interface to the backend electronics. The system allows to configure the front-end electronics from the ATLAS detector control system and to transmit the luminosity data over Slink.

  3. The luminosity calibration of the uvby-$\\beta$ photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Jordi, C; Masana, E; Torra, J; Figueras, F; Domingo, A; Gómez, A E; Mennessier, M O

    2000-01-01

    The ESA HIPPARCOS satellite has provided astrometry of unprecedented accuracy, allowing to reassess, improve and refine the pre-HIPPARCOS luminosity calibrations. We review the "classical" absolute magnitude calibrations with the Stroemgren-Crawford intermediate-band photometric system. A small zero point correction of about 2-4% seems necessary, as well as to refine the dependences on metallicity and projected rotational velocity. The need of a rigorous statistical treatment of the extremely precise HIPPARCOS to derive definite dependences of the luminosity on physical stellar parameters is emphasized.

  4. Missing baryons traced by the galaxy luminosity density in the large-scale WHIM filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Nevalainen, J; Liivamägi, L J; Branchini, E; Roncarelli, M; Giocoli, C; Heinämäki, P; Saar, E; Tamm, A; Finoguenov, A; Nurmi, P; Bonamente, M

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach to the missing baryons problem. Building on the common assumption that the missing baryons are in the form of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM), we further assumed here that the galaxy luminosity density can be used as a tracer of the WHIM. The latter assumption is supported by our finding of a significant correlation between the WHIM density and the galaxy luminosity density in the hydrodynamical simulations of Cui et al. (2012). We further found that the fraction of the gas mass in the WHIM phase is substantially (by a factor of $\\sim$1.6) higher within the large scale galactic filaments, i.e. $\\sim$70\\%, compared to the average in the full simulation volume of $\\sim$0.1\\,Gpc$^3$. The relation between the WHIM overdensity and the galaxy luminosity overdensity within the galactic filaments is consistent with linear: $\\delta_{\\rm whim}\\,=\\,0.7\\,\\pm\\,0.1\\,\\times\\,\\delta_\\mathrm{LD}^{0.9 \\pm 0.2}$. We applied our procedure to the line of sight to the blazar H2356-309 and found e...

  5. The Dependence of Type Ia Supernova Luminosities on their Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, M; Howell, D A; Neill, J D; Astier, P; Balland, C; Basa, S; Carlberg, R G; Fouchez, D; Guy, J; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Pain, R; Palanque-Delabrouille, N; Perrett, K M; Pritchet, C J; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Baumont, S; Hsiao, E; Kronborg, T; Lidman, C; Perlmutter, S; Walker, E S

    2010-01-01

    (Abridged) Precision cosmology with Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) makes use of the fact that SN Ia luminosities depend on their light-curve shapes and colours. Using Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and other data, we show that there is an additional dependence on the global characteristics of their host galaxies: events of the same light-curve shape and colour are, on average, 0.08mag (~4.0sigma) brighter in massive host galaxies (presumably metal-rich) and galaxies with low specific star-formation rates (sSFR). SNe Ia in galaxies with a low sSFR also have a smaller slope ("beta") between their luminosities and colours with ~2.7sigma significance, and a smaller scatter on SN Ia Hubble diagrams (at 95% confidence), though the significance of these effects is dependent on the reddest SNe. SN Ia colours are similar between low-mass and high-mass hosts, leading us to interpret their luminosity differences as an intrinsic property of the SNe and not of some external factor such as dust. If the host stellar mass is in...

  6. On the local radio luminosity function of galaxies; 1, the Virgo cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, G

    1999-01-01

    We cross-correlate the galaxies brighter than mB=18 in the Virgo cluster with the radio sources in the NVSS survey (1.4 GHz), resulting in 180 radio-optical identifications. We determine the radio luminosity function of the Virgo galaxies, separately for the early- and late-types. Late-type galaxies develop radio sources with a probability proportional to their optical luminosity. In fact their radio/optical (RB) distribution is gaussian, centered at log RB=-0.5, i.e. the radio luminosity is 0.3 of the optical one. The probability of late-type galaxies to develop radio sources is almost independent of their detailed Hubble type, except for Sa (and S0+S0a) which are a factor of 5 less frequent than later types at any RB. Giant elliptical galaxies feed "monster" radio sources with a probability strongly increasing with mass. However the frequency of fainter radio sources is progressively less sensitive on the system mass. The faintest giant E galaxies (MB=-17) have a probability of feeding low power radio sourc...

  7. Optical Luminosity Functions of the Abell Galaxy Cluster ABCG 209 at z=0.21

    CERN Document Server

    Mercurio, A; Merluzzi, P; Girardi, M; La Barbera, F; Busarello, G

    2003-01-01

    We derive the luminosity functions in three bands (BVR) for the rich galaxy cluster ABCG 209 at z=0.21. The data cover an area of ~78 arcmin^2 in the B and R band, while a mosaic of three pointings was obtained in the V band, covering an area of approximately 160 arcmin^2. The galaxy sample is complete to B = 22.8 (N_gal = 339), V = 22.5 (N_gal = 1078) and R = 22.0 (N_gal = 679). The luminosity functions present dips in the range V = 20.5-21.5 and R = 20.0-21.0 and therefore are better described by a sum of two Schechter functions for bright and for faint galaxies respectively. We find a marked luminosity segregation in the sense that the number ratio of bright-to-faint galaxies decreases by a factor ~4 from the center to outer regions. Our analysis supports the idea that ABCG 209 is an evolved cluster, resulting from the merger of two or more sub-clusters.

  8. Low-luminosity X-ray sources and the Galactic ridge X-ray emission

    CERN Document Server

    Warwick, R S

    2014-01-01

    Using the XMM-Newton Slew Survey, we construct a hard-band selected sample of low-luminosity Galactic X-ray sources. Two source populations are represented, namely coronally-active stars and binaries (ASBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), with X-ray luminosities collectively spanning the range 10^(28-34) erg/s (2-10 keV). We derive the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity function (XLF) and volume emissivity of each population. Scaled to the local stellar mass density, the latter is found to be 1.08 +/- 0.16 x 10^28 erg/s/M and 2.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^27 erg/s/M, for the ASBs and CVs respectively, which in total is a factor 2 higher than previous estimates. We employ the new XLFs to predict the X-ray source counts on the Galactic plane at l = 28.5 deg and show that the result is consistent with current observational constraints. The X-ray emission of faint, unresolved ASBs and CVs can account for a substantial fraction of the Galactic ridge X-ray emission (GRXE). We discuss a model in which roughly 80 per cent of the 6-10 keV...

  9. Connections between the Radio, Optical and Soft X-ray Luminosities for Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Cai-Juan Pan; You-Bing Li; Yu-Tao Zhou

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the connections between radio, optical and soft X-ray luminosities with a sample of 538 FSRQs. We find that the radio luminosity is strongly correlated with the optical luminosity, as well as with the soft X-ray luminosity. We also find that the optical luminosity is strongly correlated with the soft X-ray luminosity.

  10. Truncation of the Inner Accretion Disk Around a Black Hole at Low Luminosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John A.; Yamoka, Kazutaka; Corbel, Stephane; Kaaret, Philip; Kalemci, Emrah; Migliari, Simone

    2011-01-01

    Most black hole binaries show large changes in X-ray luminosity caused primarily by variations in mass accretion rate. An important question for understanding black hole accretion and jet production is whether the inner edge of the accretion disk recedes at low accretion rate. Measurements of the location of the inner edge (R(sub in)) can be made using iron emission lines that arise due to fluorescence of iron in the disk, and these indicate that R(sub in) is very close to the black hole at high and moderate luminosities (greater than or equal to 1% of the Eddington luminosity, L(sub Edd). Here, we report on X-ray observations of the black hole GX 339-4 in the hard state by Suzaku and the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer that extend iron line studies to 0.14% L(sub Edd) and show that R(sub in) increases by a factor of greater than 27 over the value found when GX 339-4 was bright. The exact value of R(sub in) depends on the inclination of the inner disk (i), and we derive 90% confidence limits of R(sub in) greater than 35 R(sub g) at i = 0 degrees and R(sub in) greater than 175 R(sub g) at i = 30 degrees. This provides direct evidence that the inner portion of the disk is not present at low luminosity, allowing for the possibility that the inner disk is replaced by advection- or magnetically dominated accretion flows.

  11. Cosmic downsizing of powerful radio galaxies to low radio luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Rigby, E E; Best, P N; Rosario, D; Röttgering, H J A

    2015-01-01

    At bright radio powers ($P_{\\rm 1.4 GHz} > 10^{25}$ W/Hz) the space density of the most powerful sources peaks at higher redshift than that of their weaker counterparts. This paper establishes whether this luminosity-dependent evolution persists for sources an order of magnitude fainter than those previously studied, by measuring the steep--spectrum radio luminosity function (RLF) across the range $10^{24} 10^{26}$ W/Hz the redshift of the peak space density increases with luminosity, whilst at lower radio luminosities the position of the peak remains constant within the uncertainties. This `cosmic downsizing' behaviour is found to be similar to that seen at optical wavelengths for quasars, and is interpreted as representing the transition from radiatively efficient to inefficient accretion modes in the steep-spectrum population. This conclusion is supported by constructing simple models for the space density evolution of these two different radio galaxy classes; these are able to successfully reproduce the ...

  12. The luminosity function of high-redshift QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Fontanot, F; Monaco, P; Vanzella, E; Nonino, M; Brandt, W N; Grazian, A; Mao, J; Fontanot, Fabio; Cristiani, Stefano; Monaco, Pierluigi; Vanzella, Eros; Nonino, Mario; Grazian, Andrea; Mao, Jirong

    2006-01-01

    We measure the luminosity function of QSOs in the redshift range 3.5 < z < 5.2 for the absolute magnitude interval -21 < M_{145} < -28. Suitable criteria are defined to select faint QSOs in the GOODS fields, checking their effectiveness and completeness in detail. The confirmed sample of faint QSOs is compared with a brighter one derived from the SDSS. Using a Monte-Carlo technique we estimate the properties of the luminosity function. Our results show that models based on pure density evolution show better agreement with observation than models based on pure luminosity evolution, even if a different break magnitude with respect to z ~ 2.1 is required at 3.5 < z < 5.2. According to our modeling a faint-end slope steeper than low-redshift observations is required to reproduce the data, moreover models with a steep bright-end slope score a higher probability than models with a bright-end flattening. Determining the faint-end of the luminosity function at these redshifts provides important cons...

  13. A new record peak luminosity for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Two weeks of dedicated machine development paid off last weekend when the LHC ran for physics with three nominal intensity (∼1011 protons) bunches in each beam.   This brought a new record peak luminosity of around 8×1029 cm-2 s-1, and allowed the LHC to double the integrated luminosity delivered to the experiments since 30 March from 16 to 32 inverse nanobarns over the weekend. After a few more fills in this configuration, the number of bunches will be raised to six per beam, which will in turn allow the peak luminosity to break the 1030 cm-2 s-1 barrier for the first time, well on the way to achieving the 2010 objective of 1032 cm-2 s-1. This peak luminosity goal requires 800 nominal bunches per beam squeezed to a beta of 3.5 metres. The plan for 2011 is to run the LHC in this configuration over about 10 months, thus achieving the objective of recording one inverse femtobarn of data in total. The machine development period also allowed the TOTEM detectors to be set up with 45...

  14. The Radius-Luminosity Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Netzer, Hagai

    2009-01-01

    We present high-resolution HST images of all 35 AGNs with optical reverberation-mapping results, which we have modeled to create a nucleus-free image of each AGN host galaxy. From the nucleus-free images, we determine the host-galaxy contribution to ground-based spectroscopic luminosity measureme...

  15. A Single Bremsstrahlung Monitor to Measure Luminosity at LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The luminosity, the beam divergence and the longitudinal polarization can be measured at an interaction point of LEP by dectecting the energy, the angular distribution and the circular polarization of the single bremsstrahlung photons (SB) emitted at very forward angle. The luminosity can be measured by this met than by the conventional method of detecting small angle Bhabha scattering. The bunch to bunch relative luminosity can be monitored at a few per mil level in few minutes. Absolute values of the luminosity and of the polarization can be measured with a precision of the order of 1\\%. \\\\ \\\\ The apparatus to detect SB photons consists of a low Z absorber and of an EM calorimeter made of lead and scintillating fibres. Both the total energy and the space distribution of the SB photons are measured. This apparatus has been designed and built at the Department of Physics and INFN Section of the University of Rome ``La Sapienza''. Later on, together with suitable monocrystal converters, it may be used also for...

  16. Upgraded Fast Beam Conditions Monitor for CMS online luminosity measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn

    2014-01-01

    The CMS beam and radiation monitoring subsystem BCM1F during LHC Run I consisted of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the tracker detector volume, for the purpose of fast monitoring of beam background and collision products. Effort is ongoing to develop the use of BCM1F as an online bunch-by-bunch luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. To prepare for the expected increase in the LHC luminosity and the change from 50 ns to 25 ns bunch separation, several changes to the system are required, including a higher number of sensors and upgraded electronics. In particular, a new real-time digitizer with large memory was developed and is being integrated into a multi-subsystem framework for luminosity measurement. Current results from Run II preparation will be shown, including results from the January 201...

  17. Upgraded Fast Beam Conditions Monitor for CMS online luminosity measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn; Hempel, Maria; Henschel, Hans; Karacheban, Olena; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Novgorodova, Olga; Penno, Marek; Walsh, Roberval; Dabrowski, Anne; Guthoff, Moritz; Loos, R; Ryjov, Vladimir; Burtowy, Piotr; Lokhovitskiy, Arkady; Odell, Nathaniel; Przyborowski, Dominik; Stickland, David P; Zagozdzinska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The CMS beam condition monitoring subsystem BCM1F during LHC Run I consisted of 8 individual diamond sensors situated around the beam pipe within the tracker detector volume, for the purpose of fast monitoring of beam background and collision products. Effort is ongoing to develop the use of BCM1F as an online bunch-by-bunch luminosity monitor. BCM1F will be running whenever there is beam in LHC, and its data acquisition is independent from the data acquisition of the CMS detector, hence it delivers luminosity even when CMS is not taking data. To prepare for the expected increase in the LHC luminosity and the change from 50 ns to 25 ns bunch separation, several changes to the system are required, including a higher number of sensors and upgraded electronics. In particular, a new real-time digitizer with large memory was developed and is being integrated into a multi-subsystem framework for luminosity measurement. Current results from Run II preparation will be discussed, including results from the January 201...

  18. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Amaral-Rogers, A; O'Brien, P T

    2016-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs, and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate d...

  19. Pairwise velocities in the Halo Model: Luminosity and Scale Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Slosar, A; Tasitsiomi, A; Slosar, Anze; Seljak, Uros; Tasitsiomi, Argyro

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the properties of the pairwise velocity dispersion as a function of galaxy luminosity in the context of a halo model. We derive the distribution of velocities of pairs at a given separation taking into account both one-halo and two-halo contributions. We show that pairwise velocity distribution in real space is a complicated mixture of host-satellite, satellite-satellite and two-halo pairs. The peak value is reached at around 1 Mpc/h and does not reflect the velocity dispersion of a typical halo hosting these galaxies, but is instead dominated by the satellite-satellite pairs in high mass clusters. This is true even for cross-correlations between bins separated in luminosity. As a consequence the velocity dispersion at a given separation can decrease with luminosity, even if the underlying typical halo host mass is increasing, in agreement with some recent observations. We compare our findings to numerical simulations and find a good agreement. Numerical simulations also suggest a luminosity de...

  20. Direct Oxygen Abundances for Low Luminosity LVL Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, Danielle A; Marble, Andrew R; van Zee, Liese; Engelbracht, Charles W; Lee, Janice C; Kennicutt, Robert C; Jr.,; Calzetti, Daniela; Dale, Daniel A; Johnson, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    We present MMT spectroscopic observations of HII regions in 42 low luminosity galaxies in the LVL. For 31 galaxies, we measured the temperature sensitive [O III] line at a strength of 4 sigma or greater, and thus determine direct oxygen abundances. Our results provide the first direct estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 galaxies. Oxygen abundances were compared to B-band and 4.5 micron luminosities and stellar masses in order to characterize the luminosity-metallicity (L-Z) and mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationships at low-luminosity. We present and analyze a "Combined Select" sample composed of 38 objects (drawn from our parent sample and the literature) with direct oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (TRGB or Ceph). Consistent with previous studies, the B-band and 4.5 micron L-Z relationships were found to be 12+log(O/H)=(6.27+/-0.21)+(-0.11+/-0.01)M_B and 12+log(O/H)=(6.10+/-0.21)+(-0.10+/-0.01)M_[4.5] (sigma=0.15 and 0.14). For this sample, we derive a M-Z relationship of 12+log(O/H)=(5....

  1. PANDA luminosity detector software: preparation for expected challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavdina, A. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Denig, A.; Jasinski, P.; Michel, M.; Pflueger, S.; Fritsch, M. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Precise determination of the luminosity is crucial for planned PANDA experiment (FAIR, Germany). For the luminosity measurement we will exploit the differential cross section of the elastic pp scattering in dependence of the scattering angle. The Luminosity Detector (LMD) should have full azimuthal angle acceptance and good spatial resolution to achieve the needed precision for the measurement. These requirements can be succeeded by four planes of thin silicon pixel sensors. In parallel to the prototype construction, the reconstruction software is under development. Monte Carlo based simulation is used to proof the design concept, test the reconstruction under different conditions and study expected distortions of the simulated ideal world by real life effects. Those effects include possible technical problems (e.g. sensor misalignment or broken sensors) as well as challenges not related directly to the LMD set-up (e.g. physical background or radiation damage). Moreover the extraction of the luminosity relies on a sophisticated fit to the data with a combination of the theory model, non-uniform detector resolution and reconstruction efficiency. A special framework was developed to simplify fitting procedure.

  2. Cosmological tests with the FSRQ gamma-ray luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Houdun; Melia, Fulvio; Zhang, Li

    2016-11-01

    The extensive catalogue of gamma-ray selected flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) produced by Fermi during a four-year survey has generated considerable interest in determining their gamma-ray luminosity function (GLF) and its evolution with cosmic time. In this paper, we introduce the novel idea of using this extensive database to test the differential volume expansion rate predicted by two specific models, the concordance Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) and Rh = ct cosmologies. For this purpose, we use two well-studied formulations of the GLF, one based on pure luminosity evolution (PLE) and the other on a luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on one-parameter cumulative distributions (in luminosity, redshift, photon index and source count), we confirm the results of earlier works showing that these data somewhat favour LDDE over PLE; we show that this is the case for both ΛCDM and Rh = ct. Regardless of which GLF one chooses, however, we also show that model selection tools very strongly favour Rh = ct over ΛCDM. We suggest that such population studies, though featuring a strong evolution in redshift, may none the less be used as a valuable independent check of other model comparisons based solely on geometric considerations.

  3. Pixel-Cluster Counting Luminosity Measurement In ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    McCormack, William Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of the delivered luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A fundamental ingredient of the strategy to control the systematic uncertainties affecting the absolute luminosity has been to compare the measure- ments of several luminometers, most of which use more than one counting technique. The level of consistency across the various methods provides valuable cross-checks as well as an estimate of the detector-related systematic uncertainties. This poster describes the development of a luminosity algorithm based on pixel-cluster counting in the recently installed ATLAS inner b-layer (IBL), using data recorded during the 2015 pp run at the LHC. The noise and background contamination of the luminosity-associated cluster count is minimized by a multi-component fit to the measured cluster-size distribution in the forward pixel modules of the IBL. The linearity, long-term stability and statistical precision of the cluster- counting method a...

  4. Pixel-Cluster Counting Luminosity Measurement in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    McCormack, William Patrick; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement of the delivered luminosity is a key component of the ATLAS physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). A fundamental ingredient of the strategy to control the systematic uncertainties affecting the absolute luminosity has been to compare the measurements of several luminometers, most of which use more than one counting technique. The level of consistency across the various methods provides valuable cross-checks as well as an estimate of the detector-related systematic uncertainties. This poster describes the development of a luminosity algorithm based on pixel-cluster counting in the recently installed ATLAS inner b-layer (IBL), using data recorded during the 2015 pp run at the LHC. The noise and background contamination of the luminosity-associated cluster count is minimized by a multi-component fit to the measured cluster-size distribution in the forward pixel modules of the IBL. The linearity, long-term stability and statistical precision of the cluster-counting method are ...

  5. The Luminosity Function and Mass Function in the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Holtzmann, J A; Baum, W A; Grillmair, C J; Groth, E J; Light, R M; Lynds, R; O'Neil, E J; Holtzman, Jon A.; Watson, Alan M.; Baum, William A.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Groth, Edward J.; Light, Robert M.; Lynds, Roger; Neil, Earl J. O'

    1998-01-01

    We present deep photometry obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in a field in Baade's Window in the Galactic bulge. We derive a luminosity function down to I ~ 24.3, or V ~ 27.5, corresponding to M ~ 0.3 Msun. The luminosity function from the turnoff down to this level appears remarkably similar to that observed in the solar neighborhood. We derive a mass function using both an empirical local mass-luminosity relation and a mass-luminosity relation from recent stellar model calculations, allowing for the presence of binaries and photometric errors. The mass function has a power law form with dN/dM proportional to M^{-2.2} for M >~ 0.7 Msun. However, we find strong evidence for a break in the mass function slope around 0.5-0.7 Msun, with a significantly shallower slope at lower masses. The value of the slope for the low masses depends on the assumed binary fraction and the accuracy of our completeness correction. This mass function should directly reflect the initial mass function.

  6. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Can-Min; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 {\\em Swift}/BAT GRBs. Parameterized the peak luminosity of individual GRBs evolves as $L_{\\rm p}\\propto{\\rm }(1+z)^{k}$, we get $k=1.49\\pm0.19$ using the non-parametric $\\tau$ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power-law with a break that evolves as $L_{\\rm b}\\propto (1+z)^{k_{\\rm b}}$, we obtain $k_{\\rm b}=1.14^{+0.99}_{-0.47}$ through simulations based on assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate (SFR) incorporating with cosmic metallicity history. The derived $k$ and $k_b$ values are systematically smaller than that reported in previous papers. By removing the observa...

  7. LHC Report: Boost in bunches brings record luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Having hit a luminosity of around 8.4x1032 cm-2 s-1 with 768 bunches per beam, the LHC went into a 5-day machine development (MD) program on Wednesday 4 May. Operators are now working on increasing the number of particle bunches in the machine towards a 2011 maximum of around 1380 bunches. The team is already hitting major milestones, recording another record-breaking peak luminosity on Monday 23 May.   Former LHC Project Leader Lyn Evans (to the right) and Laurette Ponce, the engineer-in-charge when the recent luminosity record was achieved. The MD periods improve our understanding of the machine, with the aim of increasing its short- and long-term performance. This one also included tests of the machine’s configurations for special physics runs and a future high luminosity LHC. It was an intense program and overall it went very well, with most measurements carried out successfully. Highlights included: commissioning a dedicated machine setup for TOTEM and ALFA; succe...

  8. Upgrade of the CMS Tracker for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The LHC machine is planning an upgrade program which will smoothly bring the luminosity to about $ 5 \\times 10^{34}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ in 2028, possibly reaching an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$ by the end of 2037. This High Luminosity LHC scenario, HL-LHC, will require a preparation program of the LHC detectors known as Phase-2 Upgrade. The current CMS Tracker, including both inner pixel and outer strip systems, is already running beyond design specifications and will not be able to survive HL-LHC radiation conditions. CMS will need a completely new device in order to fully exploit the demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity. The upgrade plan includes extending the Pixel Detector in the forward region from the current coverage of $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 2.4 $ to $ \\lvert \\eta \\rvert < 4$, where up to seven forward- and four extension disks will compose the new detector. Additionally, the new outer system should also have trigger capabilities. To achieve such goals, R\\&...

  9. Radial U-band Coma galaxy luminosity functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, M; Hoekstra, H; van Dokkum, PG; van der Hulst, JM; Hibbard, JE; Rupen, MP; VanGorkom, JH

    2001-01-01

    We have mapped 1.3 degree(2) of the Coma cluster from the core to beyond the NGC4839 group. Here, we present radial U-band Coma galaxy luminosity functions (LF). The central LF can be represented by a Schechter function, but the radial LFs have very different shapes. We speculate that the derived st

  10. Cosmological Tests with the FSRQ Gamma-ray Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Houdun; Zhang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The extensive catalog of $\\gamma$-ray selected flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) produced by \\emph{Fermi} during a four-year survey has generated considerable interest in determining their $\\gamma$-ray luminosity function (GLF) and its evolution with cosmic time. In this paper, we introduce the novel idea of using this extensive database to test the differential volume expansion rate predicted by two specific models, the concordance $\\Lambda$CDM and $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ cosmologies. For this purpose, we use two well-studied formulations of the GLF, one based on pure luminosity evolution (PLE) and the other on a luminosity-dependent density evolution (LDDE). Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on one-parameter cumulative distributions (in luminosity, redshift, photon index and source count), we confirm the results of earlier works showing that these data somewhat favour LDDE over PLE; we show that this is the case for both $\\Lambda$CDM and $R_{\\rm h}=ct$. Regardless of which GLF one chooses, however, we also show that...

  11. DIRECT OXYGEN ABUNDANCES FOR LOW-LUMINOSITY LVL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D. [Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Marble, Andrew R.; Engelbracht, Charles W. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Van Zee, Liese [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, 727 East 3rd Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Lee, Janice C. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, 710 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Dale, Daniel A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Johnson, Benjamin D., E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: cengelbracht@as.arizona.edu, E-mail: amarble@nso.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jlee@stsci.edu, E-mail: calzetti@astro.umass.edu, E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu, E-mail: johnson@iap.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98 bis Bvd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2012-08-01

    We present MMT spectroscopic observations of H II regions in 42 low luminosity galaxies in the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey. For 31 of the 42 galaxies in our sample, we were able to measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line at a strength of 4{sigma} or greater, and thus determine oxygen abundances using the 'direct' method. Our results provide the first 'direct' estimates of oxygen abundance for 19 of these galaxies. 'Direct' oxygen abundances were compared to B-band luminosities, 4.5 {mu}m luminosities, and stellar masses in order to characterize the luminosity-metallicity and mass-metallicity relationships at low luminosity. We present and analyze a 'Combined Select' sample composed of 38 objects (drawn from a sub-set of our parent sample and the literature) with 'direct' oxygen abundances and reliable distance determinations (based on the tip of the red giant branch or Cepheid variables). Consistent with previous studies, the B band and 4.5 {mu}m luminosity-metallicity relationships for the 38 objects were found to be 12 + log(O/H) = (6.27 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.11 {+-} 0.01)M{sub B} and 12 + log(O/H) = (6.10 {+-} 0.21) + (- 0.10 {+-} 0.01)M{sub [4.5]} with dispersions of {sigma} = 0.15 and 0.14, respectively. The slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships have been reported to be different for galaxies with luminosities greater than that of the LMC. However, the similarity of the slopes of the optical and near-IR L-Z relationships for our sample probably reflects little influence by dust extinction in the low luminosity galaxies. For this sample, we derive a mass-metallicity relationship of 12 + log(O/H) = (5.61 {+-} 0.24) + (0.29 {+-} 0.03)log (M{sub *}), which agrees with previous studies; however, the dispersion ({sigma} = 0.15) is not significantly lower than that of the L-Z relationships. Because of the low dispersions in these relationships, if an accurate distance is available

  12. Finding and characterising WHIM structures using the luminosity density method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Jukka; Liivamägi, L. J.; Tempel, E.; Branchini, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Giocoli, C.; Heinämäki, P.; Saar, E.; Bonamente, M.; Einasto, M.; Finoguenov, A.; Kaastra, J.; Lindfors, E.; Nurmi, P.; Ueda, Y.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a new method to approach the missing baryons problem. We assume that the missing baryons reside in a form of Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium, i.e. the WHIM. Our method consists of (a) detecting the coherent large scale structure in the spatial distribution of galaxies that traces the Cosmic Web and that in hydrodynamical simulations is associated to the WHIM, (b) mapping its luminosity into a galaxy luminosity density field, (c) using numerical simulations to relate the luminosity density to the density of the WHIM, (d) applying this relation to real data to trace the WHIM using the observed galaxy luminosities in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and 2dF redshift surveys. In our application we find evidence for the WHIM along the line of sight to the Sculptor Wall, at redshifts consistent with the recently reported X-ray absorption line detections. Our indirect WHIM detection technique complements the standard method based on the detection of characteristic X-ray absorption lines, showing that the galaxy luminosity density is a reliable signpost for the WHIM. For this reason, our method could be applied to current galaxy surveys to optimise the observational strategies for detecting and studying the WHIM and its properties. Our estimates of the WHIM hydrogen column density N H in Sculptor agree with those obtained via the X-ray analysis. Due to the additional N H estimate, our method has potential for improving the constrains of the physical parameters of the WHIM as derived with X-ray absorption, and thus for improving the understanding of the missing baryons problem.

  13. The K-band luminosity functions of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Propris, Roberto

    2017-03-01

    We derive the galaxy luminosity function in the Ks band for galaxies in 24 clusters to provide a local reference for higher redshift studies and to analyse how and if the luminosity function varies according to environment and cluster properties. We use new, deep K-band imaging and match the photometry to available redshift information and to optical photometry from the SDSS or the UKST/POSS: More than 80 per cent of the galaxies to K ∼ 14.5 have measured redshifts. We derive composite luminosity functions, for the entire sample and for cluster subsamples. We consider the luminosity functions for red-sequence and blue cloud galaxies. The full composite luminosity function has K* = 12.79 ± 0.14 (MK = -24.81) and α = -1.41 ± 0.10. We find that K* is largely unaffected by the environment, but that the slope α increases towards lower mass clusters and clusters with Bautz-Morgan type function seems to be approximately universal (within errors) in all environments: It has parameters K* = 13.16 ± 0.15 (MK = -24.44) and α = -1.00 ± 0.12 (for all galaxies). Blue galaxies do not show a good fit to a Schechter function, but the best values for its parameters are K* = 13.51 ± 0.41 (MK = -24.09) and α = -1.60 ± 0.29: We do not have enough statistics to consider environmental variations for these galaxies. We find some evidence that K* in clusters is brighter than in the field and α is steeper, but note that this comparison is based (for the field) on 2MASS photometry, while our data are considerably deeper.

  14. Constraints on Accretion Disk Physics in Low Luminosity Radio Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Stefi; Noel-Storr, Jacob; O'Dea, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    It is currently believed that essentially all galaxies harbor a massive black hole in their nuclei. If this is true, then it becomes hard to understand why we do not see the luminosity released by the inevitable accretion of the galaxy ISM onto the black hole in all galaxies. The differences in AGN output between the two classes of narrow-line radio galaxies (FRI and FRII) may hold the vital clue. High radio luminosity FRIIs generally show strong high-excitation narrow lines and are believed to be the obscured counterparts of radio loud quasars. Low radio luminosity FRIs by contrast have weaker, low-ionization lines and low ratios of optical to radio luminosities. A large difference in accretion rate and radiative efficiency between FRI and FRIIs would explain the difference in the optical properties and also provide a new unification between different classes of active galaxies in which the dominant parameter is accretion rate. Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations already exist for most of a well defined sample of FRIs. However, the previously observed objects are the 'famous' ones, e.g., M87, M84, NGC315, 3C264, 3C31. Thus, the existing datasets are highly selected. Here we propose a very small request to complete the sample. We propose IRAC observations in all 4 bands, and MIPS photometry at 24 and 70 microns of 8, and 7 sources, respectively, for a total request of 1.7 hrs. These observations will complete the sample at very little cost in observing time. The large amount of existing complmentary data at multiple wavebands will greatly enhance the legacy value of the proposed observations. By completing the sample, the proposed IRAC and MIPS observations will produce a well defined and very well studied sample of nearby low luminosity radio galaxies. We will use the completed sample to investigate the properties of the accretion disk radiation, and the circumnuclear obscuring material.

  15. Research and Development for a Free-Running Readout System for the ATLAS LAr Calorimeters at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Hils, Maximilian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS Liquid Argon (LAr) Calorimeters were designed and built to measure electromagnetic and hadronic energy in proton-proton collisions produced at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies up to 14 TeV and instantaneous luminosities up to $10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2} \\text{s}^{-1}$. The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) programme is now developed for up to 5-7 times the design luminosity, with the goal of accumulating an integrated luminosity of $3000~\\text{fb}^{-1}$. In the HL-LHC phase, the increased radiation levels require a replacement of the front-end electronics of the LAr Calorimeters. Furthermore, the ATLAS trigger system is foreseen to increase the trigger accept rate by a factor 10 to 1 MHz and the trigger latency by a factor of 20 which requires a larger data volume to be buffered. Therefore, the LAr Calorimeter read-out will be exchanged with a new front-end and a high bandwidth back-end system for receiving data from all 186.000 channels at 40 MHz LHC bunch-crossing frequency and for off-detector buffering...

  16. Wedge Absorbers for Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago (main); Snopok, Pavel [IIT, Chicago; Summers, Don [Mississippi U.

    2016-06-01

    A high-energy high-luminosity muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance to ~25 microns (normalized) while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. Ionization cooling using high-field solenoids (or Li Lens) can reduce transverse emittances to ~100 microns in readily achievable configurations, confirmed by simulation. Passing these muon beams at ~100 MeV/c through cm-sized diamond wedges can reduce transverse emittances to ~25 microns, while increasing longitudinal emittance by a factor of ~5. Implementation will require optical matching of the exiting beam into downstream acceleration systems.

  17. Hydrostatic equilibrium of a porous intracluster medium: implications for mass fraction and X-ray luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Nusser, Adi

    2007-01-01

    The presence of dilute hot cavities in the intracluster medium (ICM) at the cores of clusters of galaxies changes the relation between gas temperature and its X-ray emission properties. Using the hydrostatic equations of a porous medium we solve for the ICM density for a given temperature as a function of the filling factor of dilute bubbles. We find that at a given temperature, the core X-ray luminosity increases with the filling factor. If the frequency of AGNs in clusters were higher in the past, then the filling factor is correspondingly affected, with implications for the cluster scaling relations. This is especially important for the core properties, including the temperature-luminosity ($L_X-T$) relation and estimates of the core gas mass. The results imply an epoch-dependent sensitivity of the $L_X-T$ relation in the core to the porosity of the ICM. Detection of such an effect would give new insights into AGN feedback.

  18. The 60-. mu. m and far-infrared luminosity functions of IRAS galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, W.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Lawrence, A. (Queen Mary Coll., London (UK). Astronomy Unit); Efstathiou, G. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Astrophysics); Kaiser, N. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy Canadian Inst. for Theoretical Astrophysics, Toronto, Ont. (Canada)); Ellis, R.S.; Frenk, C.S. (Durham Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-15

    The 60-{mu}m luminosity function for galaxies detected by IRAS is determined from a compilation of samples with highly complete redshift information totalling 2818 galaxies, including the new QMC-Cambridge-Durham survey and samples including many nearby, low-luminosity galaxies. We use clustering-independent maximum likelihood methods throughout. A non-parametric estimator is used to determine the shape of the luminosity function, and the best parameter set found for a suitable analytic form. We find the luminosity function to be well described by a Gaussian dependence on log(luminosity), changing over to a very flat power law at low luminosities. (author).

  19. The Luminosity Measurement for the DZERO Experiment at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snow, Gregory R. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Primary project objective: The addition of University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) human resources supported by this grant helped ensure that Fermilab’s DZERO experiment had a reliable luminosity measurement through the end of Run II data taking and an easily-accessible repository of luminosity information for all collaborators performing physics analyses through the publication of its final physics results. Secondary project objective: The collaboration between the UNL Instrument Shop and Fermilab’s Scintillation Detector Development Center enhanced the University of Nebraska’s future role as a particle detector R&D and production facility for future high energy physics experiments. Overall project objective: This targeted project enhanced the University of Nebraska’s presence in both frontier high energy physics research in DZERO and particle detector development, and it thereby served the goals of the DOE Office of Science and the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) for the state of Nebraska.

  20. The FCC-ee design study: luminosity and beam polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Koratzinos, M

    2015-01-01

    The FCC-ee accelerator is considered within the FCC design study as a possible first step towards the ultimate goal of a 100 TeV hadron collider. It is a high luminosity e+e- storage ring collider, designed to cover energies of around 90, 160, 240 and 350GeV ECM (for the Z peak, the WW threshold, the ZH and ttbar cross-section maxima respectively) leading to different operating modes. We report on the current status of the design study, on the most promising concepts and relevant challenges. The expected luminosity performance at all energies, and first studies on transverse polarization for beam energy calibrations will be presented.

  1. The Relation Between the Globular Cluster Mass and Luminosity Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Kruijssen, J M Diederik

    2009-01-01

    The relation between the globular cluster luminosity function (GCLF, dN/dlogL) and globular cluster mass function (GCMF, dN/dlogM) is considered. Due to low-mass star depletion, dissolving GCs have mass-to-light (M/L) ratios that are lower than expected from their metallicities. This has been shown to lead to an M/L ratio that increases with GC mass and luminosity. We model the GCLF and GCMF and show that the power law slopes inherently differ (1.0 versus 0.7, respectively) when accounting for the variability of M/L. The observed GCLF is found to be consistent with a Schechter-type initial cluster mass function and a mass-dependent mass-loss rate.

  2. Silicon Sensors for Trackers at High-Luminosity Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-01-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than the one of LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge ...

  3. 4D fast tracking for experiments at high luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, N.; Cardini, A.; Calabrese, R.; Fiorini, M.; Luppi, E.; Marconi, U.; Petruzzo, M.

    2016-11-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of the high luminosity LHC is a big challenge that requires new instrumentation and innovative solutions. We present here a conceptual design and simulation studies of a fast timing pixel detector with embedded real-time tracking capabilities. The system is conceived to operate at 40 MHz event rate and to reconstruct tracks in real-time, using precise space and time 4D information of the hit, for fast trigger decisions. This work is part of an R&D project aimed at building an innovative tracking detector with superior time (10 ps) and position (10 μm) resolutions to be used in very harsh radiation environments, for the ultimate flavour physics experiment at the high luminosity phase of the LHC.

  4. Nb$_{3}$Sn magnet development for LHC luminosity upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Wanderer, P

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main points of magnet R&D for a LHC Luminosity Upgrade carried on through the LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) work on magnets at Berkeley, Fermilab, and BNL. Work on materials and on racetrack magnets is described in some detail. The others areas of LARP work are only outlined here and discussed in detail in other talks at this meeting.

  5. ATLAS Higgs Physics Prospects at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koffas, Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Higgs physics prospects at the high-luminosity LHC are presented, assuming an energy of sqrt(s) = 14 TeV and a data sample of 3000 fb-1. In particular, the ultimate precision attainable on the couplings measurements of the 125 GeV particle with elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the search for the Standard Model di-Higgs production, which could lead to the measurement of the Higgs boson self-coupling.

  6. High-field Magnet Development toward the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollinari, Giorgio [Fermilab

    2014-07-01

    The upcoming Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) will rely on the use of Accelerator Quality Nb3Sn Magnets which have been the focus of an intense R&D effort in the last decade. This contribution will describe the R&D and results of Nb3Sn Accelerator Quality High Field Magnets development efforts, with emphasis on the activities considered for the HL-LHC upgrades.

  7. Dynamic aperture studies for the LHC high luminosity lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria, R. de [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Giovannozzi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); McIntosh, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Nosochkov, Y. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cai, Y. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wang, M. -H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Since quite some time, dynamic aperture studies have been undertaken with the aim of specifying the required field quality of the new magnets that will be installed in the LHC ring in the framework of the high-luminosity upgrade. In this paper the latest results concerning the specification work will be presented, taking into account both injection and collision energies and the field quality contribution from all the magnets in the newly designed interaction regions.

  8. Correlation Analysis of Multi-Wavelength Luminosity of Fermi Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Xiongwei Bi; Wanquan He; Jiajin Tian; Zhimei Ding; Shuping Ge

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the correlations between luminosities (R, O, X, ) in radio, optical, X-ray and -ray wave bands for Fermi blazars, and found that there are significant correlations between R and , X and and O and for blazars, BL Lacs and FSRQs, but no correlation between and O for BL Lacs. These results suggest that for Fermi blazars, the high energy -ray emission can be related with radio, X-ray and optical emissions.

  9. Luminosity Limitations in Linear Colliders Based on Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei

    2016-01-01

    Particle acceleration in plasma creates a possibility of exceptionally high accelerating gradients and appears as a very attractive option for future linear electron-positron and/or photon-photon colliders. These high accelerating gradients were already demonstrated in a number of experiments. However, a linear collider requires exceptionally high beam brightness which still needs to be demonstrated. In this article we discuss major phenomena which limit the beam brightness of accelerated beam and, consequently, the collider luminosity.

  10. Gravitational luminosity of a hot plasma in R^2 gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Niri, B Nadiri; Corda, C

    2016-01-01

    The R^{2}-gravity contribution to energy loss of a hot plasma due to the gravitational bremsstrahlung is calculated in the linearized theory on the basis of classical Coulomb scattering of plasma constituents in small-angle scattering approximation. The explicit dependence of the gravitational luminosity on the plasma temperature is derived and its relevance to the Einstein gravity is demonstrated. The result when applied to the Sun as a hot plasma, shows very good agreement with available data.

  11. LHC abort gap cleaning studies during luminosity operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Bravin, E; Goddard, B; Höfle, W; Jacquet, D; Jeff, A; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Roncarolo, F; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    The presence of significant intensities of un-bunched beam is a potentially serious issue in the LHC. Procedures using damper kickers for cleaning both the Abort Gap (AG) and the buckets targeted for injection, are currently in operation at flat bottom. Recent observations of relatively high population of the AG during physics runs brought up the need for AG cleaning during luminosity operation. In this paper the results of experimental studies performed in October 2011 are presented.

  12. Intermediate-luminosity events : bridge between CCSNe and SLSNe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Rupak

    2016-07-01

    Development on supernova research in last decade has confirmed that there is a distinct class of events which are more luminous (~ -21 mag) with broad peak than canonical core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). These are superluminous supernovae (SLSNe). The powering mechanism of SLSNe are yet not resolved. Interaction of SN-shock with circumstellar medium (CSM), presence of a spin-down magnetar or pair-instability (PISNe) are the proposed theories. Although photometric and spectroscopic behaviors of SLSNe differ from those of CCSNe to some extent; the recent un-targeted surveys have found several events which fall in between these two classes, both in terms of peak luminosity and broadness of lightcurve. Study of these intermediate-luminosity events are important to understand the differences and similarities in powering mechanisms of CCSNe and SLSNe and hence the natures of their progenitors. In this contribution, we will discuss about the lightcurve and spectral behaviors of few such intermediate-luminosity events to explore the connection between powering mechanisms of CCSNe and SLSNe as well as the natures of their progenitors.

  13. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Beche, J F; Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Re, V; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Turner, W C

    2000-01-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~235 W at design luminosity 10/sup 34/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desire...

  14. Parallax and Luminosity Measurements of an L Subdwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, Adam J; Lépine, Sébastien; Munn, Jeffrey A; Luginbuhl, Christian B; Henden, Arne A; Guetter, Harry H; Canzian, Blaise C

    2007-01-01

    We present the first parallax and luminosity measurements for an L subdwarf, the sdL7 2MASS J05325346+8246465. Observations conducted over three years by the USNO infrared astrometry program yield an astrometric distance of 26.7+/-1.2 pc and a proper motion of 2.6241+/-0.0018"/yr. Combined with broadband spectral and photometric measurements, we determine a luminosity of log(Lbol/Lsun) = -4.24+/-0.06 and Teff = 1730+/-90 K (the latter assuming an age of 5-10 Gyr), comparable to mid-type L field dwarfs. Comparison of the luminosity of 2MASS J05325346+8246465 to theoretical evolutionary models indicates that its mass is just below the sustained hydrogen burning limit, and is therefore a brown dwarf. Its kinematics indicate a ~110 Myr, retrograde Galactic orbit which is both eccentric (3 <~ R <~ 8.5 kpc) and extends well away from the plane (Delta_Z = +/-2 kpc), consistent with membership in the inner halo population. The relatively bright J-band magnitude of 2MASS J05325346+8246465 implies significantly r...

  15. On the accuracy of the high redshift cluster luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, Roberto P; Barrientos, Luis F

    2008-01-01

    We study the reliability of the statistical background subtraction method for computing the Ks-band luminosity function of cluster galaxies at z~1 using mock Red-sequence Cluster Survey cluster catalogues constructed from GALFORM semi-analytic galaxies. The underlying cluster luminosity function in the mocks are compatible with recent estimates at z~1 by several authors. We simulate different samples where the number of clusters with Ks-band photometry goes from 5 to a maximum of 50, in order to find the most suitable observational sample to carry out this study; the current observational status in the nIR wavelength range has been reached using 5 real clusters at z~1. We compute the composite luminosity function for several samples of galaxy clusters with masses 1.5x10^14 M_sun assuming a flux limited, complete sample of galaxies down to Ks=21.0 magnitudes. We find that the Schechter fit parameters Ks* and alpha for a sample of galaxies with no redshift information are rather poorly constrained if both param...

  16. Luminosity measurement method for the LHC: The detector requirement studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasny, M.W., E-mail: Mieczyslaw.Krasny@cern.ch [LPNHE, Pierre and Marie Curie University, CNRS-IN2P3, Tour 33, RdC, 4, pl. Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Chwastowski, J. [Institute of Teleinformatics, Faculty of Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Cracow University of Technology, ul. Warszawska 24, 31-115 Kraków (Poland); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland); Cyz, A.; Słowikowski, K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Kraków (Poland)

    2013-11-21

    In our earlier paper [1] we have proposed a new luminosity measurement method for the LHC collider. It is based on the detection of lepton pairs produced in the peripheral collisions of the LHC beam particles and allows to reach better than 1% accuracy of the theoretical control of the event rate. In order to implement this method a new, specialized luminosity detector must be incorporated within the fiducial volume of one of the existing LHC detectors. In this paper the requirement studies for such a detector are presented. They are driven, almost exclusively, by its capacity to identify, within the level 1 trigger latency of the host detector, the bunch crossings with exclusive, coplanar pairs of opposite charge particles. It is shown that a tracking detector with the azimuthal hit resolution of 2 mrad allows us to reduce the rate of background events to the requisite O(1kHz) level while retaining a sufficiently large fraction of the signal events for the precise luminosity measurement.

  17. The effect of large scale inhomogeneities on the luminosity distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouzakis, Nikolaos; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Tzavara, Eleftheria

    2007-02-01

    We study the form of the luminosity distance as a function of redshift in the presence of large scale inhomogeneities, with sizes of order 10 Mpc or larger. We approximate the Universe through the Swiss-cheese model, with each spherical region described by the Lemaitre Tolman Bondi metric. We study the propagation of light beams in this background, assuming that the locations of the source and the observer are random. We derive the optical equations for the evolution of the beam area and shear. Through their integration we determine the configurations that can lead to an increase of the luminosity distance relative to the homogeneous cosmology. We find that this can be achieved if the Universe is composed of spherical void-like regions, with matter concentrated near their surface. For inhomogeneities consistent with the observed large scale structure, the relative increase of the luminosity distance is of the order of a few per cent at redshifts near 1, and falls short of explaining the substantial increase required by the supernova data. On the other hand, the effect we describe is important for the correct determination of the energy content of the Universe from observations.

  18. An analytic method to compute star cluster luminosity statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Robert L.; Krumholz, Mark R.; Fumagalli, Michele; Fall, S. Michael

    2014-03-01

    The luminosity distribution of the brightest star clusters in a population of galaxies encodes critical pieces of information about how clusters form, evolve and disperse, and whether and how these processes depend on the large-scale galactic environment. However, extracting constraints on models from these data is challenging, in part because comparisons between theory and observation have traditionally required computationally intensive Monte Carlo methods to generate mock data that can be compared to observations. We introduce a new method that circumvents this limitation by allowing analytic computation of cluster order statistics, i.e. the luminosity distribution of the Nth most luminous cluster in a population. Our method is flexible and requires few assumptions, allowing for parametrized variations in the initial cluster mass function and its upper and lower cutoffs, variations in the cluster age distribution, stellar evolution and dust extinction, as well as observational uncertainties in both the properties of star clusters and their underlying host galaxies. The method is fast enough to make it feasible for the first time to use Markov chain Monte Carlo methods to search parameter space to find best-fitting values for the parameters describing cluster formation and disruption, and to obtain rigorous confidence intervals on the inferred values. We implement our method in a software package called the Cluster Luminosity Order-Statistic Code, which we have made publicly available.

  19. Disk galaxies with broken luminosity profiles from cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Serrano, Francisco J; Doménech-Moral, Mariola; Domínguez-Tenreiro, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    We simulate the cosmological formation of three disk galaxies using the zoom-in technique and including a detailed treatment of chemical evolution and cooling. The resulting galaxies have a rather high disk-to-total ratio for a cosmological simulation and thin stellar disks. They present a break in the luminosity profile at 3.0 +- 0.5 disk scale lengths, while showing an exponential mass profile without any apparent breaks, in line with recent observational results. Since the stellar mass profile is exponential, only differences in the stellar populations can be the cause of the luminosity break. Although we find a cutoff for the star formation rate imposed by a density threshold in our star formation model, it does not coincide with the luminosity break and is located at 4.3 +- 0.4 disk scale lengths, with star formation going on between both radii. The color profiles and the age profiles are "U-shaped", with the minimum for both profiles located approximately at the break radius. The SFR to stellar mass rat...

  20. A Search for Low-Luminosity BL Lacertae Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Travis A.; Stocke, John T.; Perlman, Eric S.

    1999-05-01

    Many properties of BL Lacs have become explicable in terms of the ``relativistic beaming'' hypothesis, whereby BL Lacs are FR 1 radio galaxies viewed nearly along the jet axis. However, a possible problem with this model is that a transition population between beamed BL Lacs and unbeamed FR 1 galaxies has not been detected. A transition population of ``low-luminosity BL Lacs'' was predicted to exist in abundance in X-ray-selected samples such as the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) by Browne & Marcha. However, these BL Lacs may have been misidentified as clusters of galaxies. We have conducted a search for such objects in the EMSS with the ROSAT High-Resolution Imager (HRI) here we present ROSAT HRI images, optical spectra, and VLA radio maps for a small number of BL Lacs that were previously misidentified in the EMSS catalog as clusters of galaxies. While these objects are slightly lower in luminosity than other EMSS BL Lacs, their properties are too similar to the other BL Lacs in the EMSS sample to ``bridge the gap'' between BL Lacs and FR 1 radio galaxies. Also, the number of new BL Lacs found is too low to alter significantly the X-ray luminosity function or value for the X-ray-selected EMSS BL Lac sample. Thus, these observations do not explain fully the discrepancy between the X-ray- and radio-selected BL Lac samples.

  1. Applying the luminosity function statistics in the fireshell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel Lemos, L. J.; Bianco, C. L.; Ruffini, R.

    2015-12-01

    The luminosity function (LF) statistics applied to the data of BATSE, GBM/Fermi and BAT/Swift is the theme approached in this work. The LF is a strong statistical tool to extract useful information from astrophysical samples, and the key point of this statistical analysis is in the detector sensitivity, where we have performed careful analysis. We applied the tool of the LF statistics to three GRB classes predicted by the Fireshell model. We produced, by LF statistics, predicted distributions of: peak ux N(Fph pk), redshift N(z) and peak luminosity N(Lpk) for the three GRB classes predicted by Fireshell model; we also used three GRB rates. We looked for differences among the distributions, and in fact we found. We performed a comparison between the distributions predicted and observed (with and without redshifts), where we had to build a list with 217 GRBs with known redshifts. Our goal is transform the GRBs in a standard candle, where a alternative is find a correlation between the isotropic luminosity and the Band peak spectral energy (Liso - Epk).

  2. Beam dynamics studies to develop LHC luminosity model

    CERN Document Server

    Campogiani, Giovanna; Papaphilippou, Ioannis

    The thesis project aims at studying the different physical processes that are impacting luminosity, one of the key figures of merit of a collider operation. In particular the project focuses on extracting the most relevant parameters for the high-energy part of the model, which is mostly dominated by the beam-beam effect. LHC luminosity is degraded by parasitic collisions that reduce the beam lifetime and the particles stability in the collider. This instability is due to the non-linear effects of one beam electromagnetic field on another in the interaction region. Such parasitic encounters can be as many as 16 per interaction region, piling up to around 180 000 per second. Our goal is to study the evolution of charge density distribution in the beam, by tracking particles through a symplectic integrator that includes the beam-beam effect. In particular we want to obtain data on the halo particles, which are more sensible to instability, to better characterise the beam lifetime and monitor the luminosity evol...

  3. Gauge-Invariance and Infrared Divergences in the Luminosity Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Biern, Sang Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the luminosity distance have played a key role in discovering the late-time cosmic accel- eration. However, when accounting for inhomogeneities in the Universe, its interpretation has been plagued with infrared divergences in its theoretical predictions, which are in some cases used to explain the cosmic ac- celeration without dark energy. The divergences in most calculations are artificially removed by imposing an infrared cut-off scale. For the first time, we show that a gauge-invariant calculation of the luminosity distance is devoid of such divergences and consistent with the equivalence principle, eliminating the need to impose a cut-off scale. We present proper numerical calculations of the luminosity distance using the gauge-invariant expression and demonstrate that the numerical results with an ad hoc cut-off scale in previous calculations have negligible systematic errors as long as the cut-off scale is larger than the horizon scale. We discuss the origin of infrared divergences and t...

  4. CONTRIBUTION OF THE ACCRETION DISK, HOT CORONA, AND OBSCURING TORUS TO THE LUMINOSITY OF SEYFERT GALAXIES: INTEGRAL AND SPITZER OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sazonov, S.; Churazov, E.; Krivonos, R.; Revnivtsev, M.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A. [Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Willner, S. P.; Goulding, A. D.; Jones, C.; Murray, S. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hickox, R. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Gorjian, V.; Werner, M. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Forman, W. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-01

    We estimate the relative contributions of the supermassive black hole (SMBH) accretion disk, corona, and obscuring torus to the bolometric luminosity of Seyfert galaxies, using Spitzer mid-infrared (MIR) observations of a complete sample of 68 nearby active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the INTEGRAL all-sky hard X-ray (HX) survey. This is the first HX-selected (above 15 keV) sample of AGNs with complementary high angular resolution, high signal-to-noise, MIR data. Correcting for the host galaxy contribution, we find a correlation between HX and MIR luminosities: L{sub 15{mu}m}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.74{+-}0.06}{sub HX}. Assuming that the observed MIR emission is radiation from an accretion disk reprocessed in a surrounding dusty torus that subtends a solid angle decreasing with increasing luminosity (as inferred from the declining fraction of obscured AGNs), the intrinsic disk luminosity, L{sub Disk}, is approximately proportional to the luminosity of the corona in the 2-300 keV energy band, L{sub Corona}, with the L{sub Disk}/L{sub Corona} ratio varying by a factor of 2.1 around a mean value of 1.6. This ratio is a factor of {approx}2 smaller than for typical quasars producing the cosmic X-ray background. Therefore, over three orders of magnitude in luminosity, HX radiation carries a large, and roughly comparable, fraction of the bolometric output of AGNs. We estimate the cumulative bolometric luminosity density of local AGNs at {approx}(1-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3}. Finally, the Compton temperature ranges between kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 and Almost-Equal-To 6 keV for nearby AGNs, compared to kT{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 2 keV for typical quasars, confirming that radiative heating of interstellar gas can play an important role in regulating SMBH growth.

  5. The Evolution of the Optical and Near-Infrared Galaxy Luminosity Functions and Luminosity Densities to z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlen, T; Somerville, R S; Moustakas, L A; Dickinson, M; Ferguson, H C; Giavalisco, M; Dahlen, Tomas; Mobasher, Bahram; Somerville, Rachel S.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Dickinson, Mark; Ferguson, Henry C.; Giavalisco, Mauro

    2005-01-01

    Using Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based U through K- band photometry from the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS), we measure the evolution of the luminosity function and luminosity density in the rest-frame optical (UBR) to z ~ 2, bridging the poorly explored ``redshift desert'' between z~1 and z~2. We also use deep near-infrared observations to measure the evolution in the rest-frame J-band to z~1. Compared to local measurements from the SDSS, we find a brightening of the characteristic magnitude, (M*), by ~2.1, \\~0.8 and ~0.7 mag between z=0.1 and z=1.9, in U, B, and R bands, respectively. The evolution of M* in the J-band is in the opposite sense, showing a dimming between redshifts z=0.4 and z=0.9. This is consistent with a scenario in which the mean star formation rate in galaxies was higher in the past, while the mean stellar mass was lower, in qualitative agreement with hierarchical galaxy formation models. We find that the shape of the luminosity function is strongly dependent on sp...

  6. Analysis of Channel Luminosity Characteristics in Rocket-Triggered Lightning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Weitao; ZHANG Yijun; ZHOU Xiuji; MENG Qing; ZHENG Dong; MA Ming; WANG Fei; CHEN Shaodong; QIE Xiushu

    2008-01-01

    A comparison is made of the high-speed(2000 fps)photographic records in rocket-triggered negative lightning between two techniques.The analysis shows that:the initial speed of upward positive leader (UPL)in altitude-triggered negative lightning(ATNL)is about one order of magnitude less than that in classically triggered negative lightning(CTNL),while the triggering height of ATNL is higher than that of CTNL;the afterglow time of metal-vaporized part of the lightning channel Call endure for about 160-170 ms,thus the luminosity of the air-ionized part can reflect the characteristics of the current in the lightning channel better than that of the metal-vaporized part.According to the different characteristics of the luminosity change of the lightning channel,together with the observation of the electric field changes,three kinds of processes after return-stroke(RS)can be distinguished:the continuous decaying type without M component,the isolated type and the continuing type with M component,corresponding to different wave shapes of the continuous current.The geometric mean of the interval of RS with M component is 77 ms,longer than that(37 ms)of RS without M component.And the initial continuous current(ICC)with M component also has a longer duration compared to the ICC without M component.The distinction in the relative luminosity between the lightning channel before RS and that before M component is obvious:the former is very weak or even cannot be observed,while the latter is still considerably luminous.

  7. Toward a Pop II Mass-Luminosity Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Eric P.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Deliyannis, Constantine; Demarque, Pierre

    1999-08-01

    The observing runs contained within this proposal are part of a long term goal of constraining the variation of the Mass-Luminosity Relation as a function of composition. Using a sequence of Mosaic II images (U,V,R,I & H-alpha) we propose to make a detailed study of binaries and the general population of 2 globular clusters and three open clusters. The specific clusters were selected to have a wide range of chemical composition, from -2.2 main-sequence binary stars, blue straggler stars, SX Phe pulsators and cataclysmic variables and construct a precise CMD to search for evidence of a binary sequence. The luminosity function of M30 will be compared with that derived from my team's HST data of that cluster's core (HST-GO-7379). Comparison of these two data sets, combined with Yale stellar evolutionary models (with co-I Demarque) will allow me to study the degree of mass segregation in this dynamically evolved cluster. As part of my ongoing project to constrain the Pop II Mass-Luminosity Relation (NSF-9902667) I will follow-up the detection of any detached main-sequence binaries with spectroscopic observations (with co-Is Orosz & Deliyannis) to determine the masses of the components. We also propose to obtain spectroscopic observations of an uncrowded binary candidate detected during previous work on NGC 6752. If this object and other binaries we hope to detect are double- lined spectroscopic binaries, our observations of radial velocity variations will allow the precise determination of masses. Single-lined spectroscopic binaries will allow us to derive the mass-ratio of the systems and begin to constrain the unknown mass-ratio distribution of binaries in clusters. I will be spending this coming year at CTIO on an NSF fellowship specifically to pursue this project.

  8. Discovery of a low-luminosity spiral DRAGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, D. D.; Mao, M. Y.; Mitsuishi, I.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Clarke, A. O.; Babazaki, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Suganuma, R.; Matsumoto, H.; Tawara, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Standard galaxy formation models predict that large-scale double-lobed radio sources, known as DRAGNs, will always be hosted by elliptical galaxies. In spite of this, in recent years a small number of spiral galaxies have also been found to host such sources. These so-called spiral DRAGNs are still extremely rare, with only 5 cases being widely accepted. Here we report on the serendipitous discovery of a new spiral DRAGN in data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 322 MHz. The host galaxy, MCG+07-47-10, is a face-on late-type Sbc galaxy with distinctive spiral arms and prominent bulge suggesting a high black hole mass. Using WISE infra-red and GALEX UV data we show that this galaxy has a star formation rate of 0.16-0.75 M⊙ yr-1, and that the radio luminosity is dominated by star-formation. We demonstrate that this spiral DRAGN has similar environmental properties to others of this class, but has a comparatively low radio luminosity of L1.4 GHz = 1.12 × 1022 W Hz-1, two orders of magnitude smaller than other known spiral DRAGNs. We suggest that this may indicate the existence of a previously unknown low-luminosity population of spiral DRAGNS. FITS cutout image of the observed spiral DRAGN MCG+07-47- 10 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/L8

  9. The space density and X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Magaretha L.; Knigge, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We combine two complete, X-ray flux-limited surveys, the ROSAT Bright Survey (RBS) and the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey, to measure the space density (ρ) and X-ray luminosity function (Φ) of non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs). The combined survey has a flux limit of FX≳ 1.1 × 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 over most of its solid angle of just over ?, but is as deep as ≃10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 over a small area. The CV sample that we construct from these two surveys contains 20 non-magnetic systems. We carefully include all sources of statistical error in calculating ρ and Φ by using Monte Carlo simulations; the most important uncertainty proves to be the often large errors in distances estimates. If we assume that the 20 CVs in the combined RBS and NEP survey sample are representative of the intrinsic population, the space density of non-magnetic CVs is ?. We discuss the difficulty in measuring Φ in some detail - in order to account for biases in the measurement, we have to adopt a functional form for Φ. Assuming that the X-ray luminosity function of non-magnetic CVs is a truncated power law, we constrain the power-law index to -0.80 ± 0.05. It seems likely that the two surveys have failed to detect a large, faint population of short-period CVs, and that the true space density may well be a factor of 2 or 3 larger than what we have measured; this is possible, even if we only allow for undetected CVs to have X-ray luminosities in the narrow range 28.7 log(LX/erg s-1) < 29.7. However, ρ as high as 2 × 10-4 pc-3 would require that the majority of CVs has X-ray luminosities below LX= 4 × 1028 erg s-1 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band.

  10. Prospects for physics at high luminosity with CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varela João

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The precision measurements of the properties of the recently discovered Higgs-like boson will be central to the future LHC physics program. In parallel the search for New Physics beyond the SM will continue. Higher luminosity will extend the mass reach and allow sensitive searches for possible subtle signatures for new physics. In this paper we review the potential sensitivity of CMS to a selection of relevant future physics scenarios accessible with the LHC upgrades and a correspondingly upgraded CMS detector.

  11. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolome, E.; Boix, G. E-mail: gaelle.boix@cern.ch; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Clemente, S.; Fernandez, E.; Garrido, L.; Lorenz, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Wright, A

    2000-03-11

    Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices.

  12. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomé, E.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Clemente, S.; Fernández, E.; Garrido, L.; Lorenz, E.; Martínez, M.; Merino, G.; Riu, I.; Sánchez, F.; Wright, A.

    2000-03-01

    Avalanche Photo-Diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices.

  13. APD performance in a luminosity monitor at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomé, E; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Clemente, S; Fernández, E; Garrido, L; Lorenz, E; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Wright, A

    2000-01-01

    Avalanche photo-diodes (APDs) are being used as optical readout elements in a sampling electromagnetic calorimeter made of alternate layers of tungsten and plastic scintillators. The calorimeter serves as a small-angle luminosity monitor in the stray magnetic field of the ALEPH detector at LEP (CERN). Its scintillators are coupled both to APDs and conventional PMTs simultaneously via wavelength shifter fibres. In this paper we present results on the overall performance of the APDs, including gain and stability versus time and energy, based on the direct comparison of the two photosensitive devices. (6 refs).

  14. Total infrared luminosity estimation from local galaxies in AKARI all sky survey

    CERN Document Server

    Solarz, A; Pollo, A

    2016-01-01

    We aim to use the a new and improved version of AKARI all sky survey catalogue of far-infrared sources to recalibrate the formula to derive the total infrared luminosity. We cross-match the faint source catalogue (FSC) of IRAS with the new AKARI-FIS and obtained a sample of 2430 objects. Then we calculate the total infrared (TIR) luminosity $L_{\\textrm{TIR}}$ from the Sanders at al. (1996) formula and compare it with total infrared luminosity from AKARI FIS bands to obtain new coefficients for the general relation to convert FIR luminosity from AKARI bands to the TIR luminosity.

  15. A proposal to upgrade the ATLAS RPC system for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The architecture of the present trigger system in the ATLAS Muon Barrel was designed according to a reference luminosity of 10^34 cm-2 s-1 with a safety factor of 5, with respect to the simulated background rates, now confirmed by LHC Run-1 data. HL-LHC will provide a luminosity 5 times higher and an order of magnitude higher background. As a result, the performance demand increases, while the detector being susceptible to ageing effects. Moreover, the present muon trigger acceptance in the barrel is just above 70%, due to the presence of the barrel toroid structures. This scenario induced the ATLAS muon Collaboration to propose an appropriate upgrade plan, involving both detector and trigger-readout electronics, to guarantee the performance required by the physics program for the 20 years scheduled. This consists in installing a layer of new generation RPCs in the inner barrel, to increase the redundancy, the selectivity, and provide almost full acceptance. The first 10% of the system, corresponding to the e...

  16. The Connection Between Galaxy Environment and the Luminosity Function Slopes of Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, David O; Lee, Janice C; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far ultra-violet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ~65,000 star-forming regions (i.e., FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (alpha) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that alpha correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (Sigma_SFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity f...

  17. Disk Outflows and High-Luminosity True Type 2 AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Elitzur, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    The absence of intrinsic broad line emission has been reported in a number of active galactic nuclei (AGN), including some with high Eddington ratios. Such "true type 2 AGN" are inherent to the disk-wind scenario for the broad line region: Broad line emission requires a minimal column density, implying a minimal outflow rate and thus a minimal accretion rate. Here we perform a detailed analysis of the consequences of mass conservation in the process of accretion through a central disk. The resulting constraints on luminosity are consistent with all the cases where claimed detections of true type 2 AGN pass stringent criteria, and predict that intrinsic broad line emission can disappear at luminosities as high as about 4x$10^{46}$ erg s$^{-1}$ and any Eddington ratio, though more detections can be expected at Eddington ratios below about 1%. Our results are applicable to every disk outflow model, whatever its details and whether clumpy or smooth, irrespective of the wind structure and its underlying dynamics. ...

  18. An upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for 2015 LHC luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Ohm, C

    2014-01-01

    The LHC collides protons at a rate of 40 MHz and each collision produces $\\sim$1.5~MB of data from the ATLAS detector. The ATLAS trigger system is implemented in three levels and selects only the most interesting collision events to reduce the event storage rate to about 400 Hz. The first level is implemented in custom electronics and reduces the input rate to $\\sim$75 kHz with a decision latency of $\\sim$2.5 us. It is also responsible for initiating the read-out of data from all the sub-detectors in ATLAS. Based primarily on information from calorimeters and muon trigger detectors, the Central Trigger Processor (CTP) produces the Level-­1 trigger decision. After a very successful first run, the LHC is now being upgraded to operate with increased luminosity and a center-of-mass energy of up to 14 TeV. To cope with the higher luminosities, the Level-1 trigger system will have to perform a more refined selection in order to not lose interesting physics data while keeping the total Level-1 rate below 100~kHz. I...

  19. LHC Report: spring cleaning over, bunches of luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Scrubbing was completed on Wednesday 13 April. The run had seen over 1000 bunches per beam successfully circulating at 450 GeV. Measurements showed that electron cloud activity in the cold regions had been suppressed. A decrease of vacuum activity in the warm regions demonstrated that the cleaning had also achieved the required results there. As discussed in the last Bulletin, the scrubbing was performed with high intensity bunches with 50 nanosecond spacing. Given the potential luminosity performance with this spacing (more bunches, higher bunch intensity from the injectors) and in the light of the results of the scrubbing run, the decision was taken to continue the 2011 physics run with this bunch spacing.   A few issues with 50 nanosecond spacing had to be resolved when standard operations for luminosity production resumed. Once things had been tidied up, stable beams were provided for the experiments, firstly with 228 bunches per beam and then with 336 bunches per beam. The 336 bunch fill that w...

  20. An Upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for 2014 Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Bertelsen, H; Childers, T; Dam, M; Dobson, E; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Gabaldon, C; Gorini, B; Haas, S; Kaneda, M; Maettig, S; Messina, A; Pauly, T; Pöttgen, R; Spiwoks, R; Wengler, T; Xella, S

    2012-01-01

    During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 4*10^33 cm-2*s-1 and produced events with up to 24 interactions per colliding proton bunch. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of ~400Hz and, at the same time, selecting those events considered interesting. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and a decision latency of less than 2.5us. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, and the Central Trigger Processor which are implemented in custom built VME electronics. The Central Trigger Processor collects trigger information from all Level-1 systems and produces a Level-1 trigger decision that initiates the readout of all ATLAS detectors. In 2014, the LHC will run at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV, compared to the current 8 TeV, and the luminosity will exceed 10^34 cm^-2*s^-1. With higher ...

  1. An upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for post-2014 LHC luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Anders, G; The ATLAS collaboration; Bertelsen, H; Childers, T; Dam, M; Dobson, E; Ellis, N; Farthouat, P; Gabaldon, C; Gorini, B; Haas, S; Kaneda, M; Maettig, S; Messina, A; Ohm, C; Pauly, T; Poettgen, R; Spiwoks, R; Wengler, T; Xella, S

    2012-01-01

    During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 6.7 · 10^33 cm−2s−1 and produced events with up to 40 interactions per colliding proton bunch. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS trigger in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 400 Hz without discarding those events considered interesting. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger, with an output rate of 75 kHz and a decision latency of less than 2.5 μ s. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, and the Central Trigger Processor which are implemented in custom built VME electronics. The Central Trigger Processor collects trigger information from all Level-1 systems and produces a Level-1 trigger decision that initiates the readout of all ATLAS detectors. After 2014, the LHC will run at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV, compared to the current 8 TeV, and the luminosity will exceed 10^34 cm−2s−1. Wit...

  2. An Upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for 2014 LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 4*10^33 cm-2*s-1 and produced events with up to 24 interactions per colliding proton bunch. Thisplaces stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of ~400Hz and, atthe same time, selecting those events considered interesting. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and adecision latency of less than 2.5us. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, and the Central Trigger Processor which are implemented in custom builtVME electronics. The Central Trigger Processor collects trigger information from all Level-1 systems and produces a Level-1 trigger decision that initiates the readout of all ATLAS subdetectors. In 2014, the LHC will run at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV, compared to the current 8 TeV, and the luminosity will exceed 10^34 cm^-2*s^-1. With higher l...

  3. An Upgraded ATLAS Central Trigger for 2014 LHC Luminosities

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneda, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    During 2011, the LHC reached instantaneous luminosities of 4*10^33 cm^-1*s^-1 and produced events with up to 24 interactions per colliding proton bunch. This places stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS Trigger in order to reduce the 40MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of ~400Hz and, at the same time, selecting those events considered interesting. The Level-1 Trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS Trigger, with an output rate of 75kHz and a decision latency of less than 2.5us. It is primarily composed of the Calorimeter Trigger, Muon Trigger, and the Central Trigger Processor which are implemented in custom built VME electronics. The Central Trigger Processor collects trigger information from all Level-1 systems and produces a Level-1 trigger decision that initiates the readout of all ATLAS sub-detectors. In 2014, the LHC will run at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV, compared to the current 8 TeV, and the luminosity will exceed 10^34 cm^-1*s^-1. With h...

  4. Physics prospects at the high luminosity LHC with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Simioni, Eduard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The physics prospects at the luminosity upgrade of LHC, HL-LHC, with a data set equivalent to 3000 fb-1 simulated in the ATLAS detector, are presented and discussed. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of 125 GeV Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as the searches for partners associated with this new particle. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions at the LHC energy scale. Supersymmetry is still one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks. The sensitivity to electro-weakinos has reached the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future high-luminosity LHC runs. Prospects for searches for new heavy bosons and dark matter candidates at 14 TeV pp col...

  5. Luminosity Function of the Cluster of Galaxies Abell 566

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the Luminosity Function (LF) of the cluster of galaxies Abell 566. The photometric data of 15 intermediate-bands are obtained from the Beijing- Arizona-Taiwan-Connecticut (BATC) photometric sky survey. For each of the 15 wavebands, the LF of cluster galaxies is well modelled by the Schechter function, with characteristic luminosities from -18.0 to -21.9 magnitude, from the a- to the p-band. Morphological dependence of the LF is investigated by separating the cluster members into 'red' and 'blue' subsamples. It is clear that late type galaxies have a steeper shape of LF than the early type galaxies. We also divided the sample galaxies by their local environment. It was found that galaxies in the sparser region have steeper shape of LF than galaxies in the denser region. Combining the results of morphological and environmental dependence of LFs, we show that Abell 566 is a well relaxed cluster with positive evidence of galaxy interaction and merger, and excess number of bright early type galaxies located in its denser region.

  6. A two-mode planetary nebula luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Rodríguez-González, A; Esquivel, A; Raga, A C; Stasińska, G; Peña, M; Mayya, D

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function (PNLF) that includes two populations in the distribution. Our PNLF is a direct extension of the canonical function proposed by Jacoby et al. (1987), in order to avoid problems related with the histogram construction, it is cast in terms of cumulative functions. We are interested in recovering the shape of the faint part of the PNLF in a consistent manner, for galaxies with and without a dip in their PN luminosity functions. The parameters for the two mode PNLF are obtained with a genetic algorithm, which obtains a best fit to the PNLF varying all of the parameters simultaneously in a broad parameter space. We explore a sample of 9 galaxies with various Hubble types and construct their PNLF. All of the irregular galaxies, except one, are found to be consistent with a two-mode population, while the situation is less clear for ellipticals and spirals.For the case of NGC\\, 6822, we show that the two-mode PNLF is consistent with previous studies of the star for...

  7. The Luminosity Function of the Milky Way Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Koposov, S; Evans, N W; Hewett, P C; Irwin, M J; Gilmore, G; Zucker, D B; Rix, H -W; Fellhauer, M; Bell, E F; Glushkova, E V

    2007-01-01

    We quantify the algorithmic detectability of stellar Milky Way satellites in data release 5 (DR5) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and use this to estimate the luminosity function of faint satellite galaxies in our halo. We develop a satellite detection algorithm based on the convolution of the DR5 star catalog with a kernel of zero net flux that is the difference of a narrow positive Gaussian and a much wider negative Gaussian, which removes the background star-count level. This permits us to assess the significance of any (positive) detection in terms of deviations of this map. The efficiency of this algorithm is tested by computing the recovery rate of a large set of mock objects added to SDSS DR5 as a function of their luminosity, size and distance from the Sun. Most of the recent Milky Way satellite discoveries, made by SDSS, are shown to lie very close to the survey's detection limits. Calculating the maximum accessible volume $V_{max}$ for all faint detected objects makes it possible for the fir...

  8. Relativistic Cosmology Number Densities and the Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Iribarrem, Alvaro S; Ribeiro, Marcelo B; Stoeger, William R

    2012-01-01

    This paper studies the connection between the relativistic number density of galaxies down the past light cone in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker spacetime with non-vanishing cosmological constant and the galaxy luminosity function (LF) data. It extends the redshift range of previous results presented in Albani et al. (2007, arXiv:astro-ph/0611032) where the galaxy distribution was studied out to z=1. Observational inhomogeneities were detected at this range. This research also searches for LF evolution in the context of the framework advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003, arXiv:astro-ph/0304094), further developing the theory linking relativistic cosmology theory and LF data. Selection functions are obtained using the Schechter parameters and redshift parametrization of the galaxy luminosity functions obtained from an I-band selected dataset of the FORS Deep Field galaxy survey in the redshift range 0.5

  9. Differential Density Statistics of Galaxy Distribution and the Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Albani, V V L; Ribeiro, M B; Stöger, W R; Albani, Vinicius V. L.; Iribarrem, Alvaro S.; Ribeiro, Marcelo B.; Stoeger, William R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper uses data obtained from the galaxy luminosity function (LF) to calculate two types of radial number densities statistics of the galaxy distribution as discussed in Ribeiro (2005), namely the differential density $\\gamma$ and the integral differential density $\\gamma^\\ast$. By applying the theory advanced by Ribeiro and Stoeger (2003), which connects the relativistic cosmology number counts with the astronomically derived LF, the differential number counts $dN/dz$ are extracted from the LF and used to calculate both $\\gamma$ and $\\gamma^\\ast$ with various cosmological distance definitions, namely the area distance, luminosity distance, galaxy area distance and redshift distance. LF data are taken from the CNOC2 galaxy redshift survey and $\\gamma$ and $\\gamma^\\ast$ are calculated for two cosmological models: Einstein-de Sitter and an $\\Omega_{m_0}=0.3$, $\\Omega_{\\Lambda_0}=0.7$ standard cosmology. The results confirm the strong dependency of both statistics on the distance definition, as predicted in...

  10. Luminosity Optimization for a Higher-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Dominguez, O

    2011-01-01

    A Higher-Energy Large Hadron Collider (HE-LHC) is an option to further push the energy frontier of particle physics beyond the present LHC. A beam energy of 16.5 TeV would require 20 T dipole magnets in the existing LHC tunnel, which should be compared with 7 TeV and 8.33 T for the nominal LHC. Since the synchrotron radiation power increases with the fourth power of the energy, radiation damping becomes significant for the HE-LHC. It calls for transverse and longitudinal emittance control vis-a-vis beam-beam interaction and Landau damping. The heat load from synchrotron radiation, gas scattering, and electron cloud also increases with respect to the LHC. In this paper we discuss the proposed HE-LHC beam parameters; the time evolution of luminosity, beam-beam tune shifts, and emittances during an HE-LHC store; the expected heat load; and luminosity optimization schemes for both round and flat beams.

  11. On the Form of the HII Region Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Oey, M S

    1997-01-01

    Observed variations in the HII region luminosity function (HII LF) seen in spiral arm vs. interarm regions, and different galactic Hubble type, can be explained simply by evolutionary effects and maximum number of ionizing stars per cluster. We present Monte Carlo simulations of the HII LF, drawing the number of ionizing stars N_* from a power-law distribution of constant slope, and the stellar masses from a Salpeter IMF with an upper-mass limit of 100 M_sol. We investigate the evolution of the HII LF, as determined by stellar main-sequence lifetimes and ionizing luminosities, for a single burst case and continuous creation of the nebular population. Shallower HII LF slopes measured for the arms of spiral galaxies can be explained as a composite slope, expected for a zero-age burst population, whereas the interarm regions tend to be dominated by evolved rich clusters described by a single, steeper slope. Steeper slopes in earlier-type galaxies can be explained simply by a lower maximum N_* cutoff found for th...

  12. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balunas, William Keaton; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of $7.5 × 10^{34}$ cm$^{−2}$s$^{−1}$, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architectur...

  13. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    George, Simon; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1}, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture and ...

  14. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Benjamin William; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of 7.5 × 1034 cm−2s−1, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture and expected ...

  15. ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition Upgrades for High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Balunas, William Keaton; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at CERN is planning a second phase of upgrades to prepare for the "High Luminosity LHC", a 4th major run due to start in 2026. In order to deliver an order of magnitude more data than previous runs, 14 TeV protons will collide with an instantaneous luminosity of $7.5 \\times 10^{34} cm^{-2}s^{-1}$, resulting in much higher pileup and data rates than the current experiment was designed to handle. While this extreme scenario is essential to realise the physics programme, it is a huge challenge for the detector, trigger, data acquisition and computing. The detector upgrades themselves also present new requirements and opportunities for the trigger and data acquisition system. Initial upgrade designs for the trigger and data acquisition system are shown, including the real time low latency hardware trigger, hardware-based tracking, the high throughput data acquisition system and the commodity hardware and software-based data handling and event filtering. The motivation, overall architecture an...

  16. Revisiting the luminosity function of single halo white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Cojocaru, R; Althaus, L G; Isern, J; García-Berro, E

    2015-01-01

    White dwarfs are the fossils left by the evolution of low-and intermediate-mass stars, and have very long evolutionary timescales. This allows us to use them to explore the properties of old populations, like the Galactic halo. We present a population synthesis study of the luminosity function of halo white dwarfs, aimed at investigating which information can be derived from the currently available observed data. We employ an up-to-date population synthesis code based on Monte Carlo techniques, that incorporates the most recent and reliable cooling sequences for metal poor progenitors as well as an accurate modeling of the observational biases. We find that because the observed sample of halo white dwarfs is restricted to the brightest stars only the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function can be used for such purposes, and that its shape function is almost insensitive to the most relevant inputs, like the adopted cooling sequences, the initial mass function, the density profile of the stellar spher...

  17. The dynamical state of galaxy groups and their luminosity content

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Hector J

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the dependence of the luminosity function of galaxies in groups (LF) on group dynamical state. We use the Gaussianity of the velocity distribution of galaxy members as a measurement of the dynamical equilibrium of groups identified in the SDSS Data Release 7 by Zandivarez & Martinez. We apply the Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit test to distinguish between groups according to whether they have Gaussian or Non-Gaussian velocity distributions, i.e., whether they are relaxed or not. For these two subsamples, we compute the $^{0.1}r-$band LF as a function of group virial mass and group total luminosity. For massive groups, ${\\mathcal M}>5 \\times 10^{13} \\ M_{\\odot} \\ h^{-1}$, we find statistically significant differences between the LF of the two subsamples: the LF of groups that have Gaussian velocity distributions have a brighter characteristic absolute magnitude ($\\sim0.3$ mag) and a steeper faint end slope ($\\sim0.25$). We detect a similar effect when comparing the LF of bright ($M^{group}_{^{0...

  18. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00379172; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 1 at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson. The boson’s properties are found to be compatible with those of the Standard Model Higgs boson. It is now revealing the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and (possibly) the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model that are the primary goals of the just restarted LHC. The ultimate precision will be reached at the high-luminosity LHC run with a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. In this contribution physics prospects are presented for ATLAS for the integrated luminosities 300 and 3000 fb−1: the ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons, its trilinear self-coulping, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future LHC runs. For all these studies, a parameterised simulation of the upgraded ATLAS detector is used and expected pileup condition...

  19. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  20. Silicon sensors for trackers at high-luminosity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Timo

    2015-10-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system that was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than in the current LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 Collaboration "Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders" to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented.

  1. A Catalog of Intermediate-luminosity X-ray Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Colbert, E

    2002-01-01

    ROSAT, and now Chandra, X-ray images allow studies of extranuclear X-ray point sources in galaxies other than our own. X-ray observations of normal galaxies with ROSAT and Chandra have revealed that off-nuclear, compact, Intermediate-luminosity (Lx 2-10 keV >= 1e39 erg/s) X-ray Objects (IXOs, a.k.a. ULXs) are quite common. Here we present a catalog and finding charts for 87 IXOs in 54 galaxies, derived from all of the ROSAT HRI imaging data for galaxies with cz <= 5000 km/s from the Third Reference Catalog of Bright Galaxies (RC3). We have defined the cutoff Lx for IXOs so that it is well above the Eddington luminosity of a 1.4 Msol black hole (10^{38.3} erg/s), so as not to confuse IXOs with ``normal'' black hole X-ray binaries. This catalog is intended to provide a baseline for follow-up work with Chandra, and with space- and ground-based survey work at wavelengths other than X-ray. We demonstrate that elliptical galaxies with IXOs have a larger number of IXOs per galaxy than non-elliptical galaxies with...

  2. Detector Development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  3. The Galaxy UV Luminosity Function Before the Epoch of Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Charlotte; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for the evolution of the galaxy ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function (LF) across cosmic time where star formation is linked to the assembly of dark matter halos under the assumption of a halo mass dependent, but redshift independent, star formation efficiency. This model improves on previous work by introducing a new self-consistent treatment of the halo star formation history, which allows us to make predictions at redshift $z>10$ (lookback time $\\lesssim500$ Myr), when growth is rapid. With a calibration at a single redshift to set the stellar to halo mass ratio, and no further degrees of freedom, our model captures the evolution of the UV LF over all the available observations ($0\\lesssim z\\lesssim10$). The significant drop in the luminosity density of currently detectable galaxies beyond $z\\sim8$ is explained by a shift of star formation toward less massive, fainter galaxies. Assuming that star formation proceeds down to atomic cooling halos, we derive a reionization optical depth $\\tau...

  4. Lyman Break Galaxies at z~5 Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, I; Tamura, N; Ando, M; Wada, S; Watanabe, C; Akiyama, M; Aoki, K

    2003-01-01

    (abridged) We present results of a search for Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ~ 5 in a 618 square-arcmin field including the HDF-N taken by Subaru Prime Focus Camera. Utilizing the published redshift data of the HDF-N and its flanking fields, the color selection criteria are chosen so that LBGs are picked out most efficiently and least contaminated by foreground objects. The numbers of LBG candidates detected are 310 in 23.0 < I_c < 25.5. The rest-frame UV luminosity function(LF) of LBGs at z ~ 5 is derived statistically. The fraction of contamination is estimated to be ~50% in the faintest magnitude range. The completeness of the survey is ~80% at the bright part of the sample, and ~20% in the faintest magnitude range (25.0 < I_c <= 25.5). The LF of LBG candidates at z ~ 5 does not show a significant difference from those at z ~ 3 and 4, though there might be a slight decrease in the fainter part. The UV luminosity density within the observational limit is 0.56 - 0.69 times smaller than that obt...

  5. Absolute luminosity measurements with the LHCb detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Brisbane, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Caicedo Carvajal, J M; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Constantin, F; Conti, G; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Almagne, B; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Deissenroth, M; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Eames, C; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; d'Enterria, D G; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hofmann, W; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koblitz, S; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kukulak, S; Kumar, R; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Luisier, J; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Mclean, C; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nardulli, J; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Nies, S; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B; Palacios, J; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilar, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; du Pree, T; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shao, B; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skottowe, H P; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Styles, N; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vervink, K; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wacker, K; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-01-01

    Absolute luminosity measurements are of general interest for colliding-beam experiments at storage rings. These measurements are necessary to determine the absolute cross-sections of reaction processes and are valuable to quantify the performance of the accelerator. LHCb has applied two methods to determine the absolute scale of its luminosity measurements for proton-proton collisions at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In addition to the classic ``van der Meer scan'' method a novel technique has been developed which makes use of direct imaging of the individual beams using beam-gas and beam-beam interactions. This beam imaging method is made possible by the high resolution of the LHCb vertex detector and the close proximity of the detector to the beams, and allows beam parameters such as positions, angles and widths to be determined. The results of the two methods have comparable precision and are in good agreement. Combining the two methods, an overall precision of 3.5\\% in the absolute lumi...

  6. The Discovery of a Low-Luminosity SPIRAL DRAGN

    CERN Document Server

    Mulcahy, D D; Mitsuishi, I; Scaife, A M M; Clarke, A O; Babazaki, Y; Kobayashi, H; Suganuma, R; Matsumoto, H; Tawara, Y

    2016-01-01

    Standard galaxy formation models predict that large-scale double-lobed radio sources, known as DRAGNs, will always be hosted by elliptical galaxies. In spite of this, in recent years a small number of spiral galaxies have also been found to host such sources. These so-called spiral DRAGNs are still extremely rare, with only $\\sim 5$ cases being widely accepted. Here we report on the serendipitous discovery of a new spiral DRAGN in data from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) at 322 MHz. The host galaxy, MCG+07-47-10, is a face-on late-type Sbc galaxy with distinctive spiral arms and prominent bulge suggesting a high black hole mass. Using WISE infra-red and GALEX UV data we show that this galaxy has a star formation rate of 0.16-0.75 M$_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, and that the radio luminosity is dominated by star-formation. We demonstrate that this spiral DRAGN has similar environmental properties to others of this class, but has a comparatively low radio luminosity of $L_{\\rm 1.4GHz}$ = 1.12$\\times$10$^{22}$...

  7. ATLAS Higgs Physics Prospects at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Koffas, Thomas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The High-Luminosity Large Hadron Collider will provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the properties of the Higgs boson and eventually probe for new physics beyond the Standard Model. The large anticipated data sample will allow for more precise investigations of topics already studied with earlier data samples, as well as for studies of processes that are accessible only with the much larger statistics. Rates and signal strengths will be measured for a variety of Higgs-boson production and decay modes, allowing extraction of the Higgs boson couplings. Particular final states will allow differential cross-sections to be measured for all production modes, and for studies of the Higgs width and CP properties, as well as the tensor structure of its coupling to bosons. An important part of the High-Luminosity LHC experimental program will be investigations of the Higgs self-coupling, which is accessible via studies of di-Higgs production. In this note the projections of the ATLAS physics reach in the Higgs...

  8. The Discovery of Low-Luminosity BL Lacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Travis A.; Stocke, John T.

    1995-12-01

    Many of the properties of BL Lacs have become explicable in terms of the ``relativistic beaming'' hypothesis whereby BL Lacs are ``highly beamed'' FR-I radio galaxies (i.e. our line of sight to these objects is nearly along the jet axis). Further, radio-selected BL Lacs (RBLs) are believed to be seen nearly ``on-axis'' (the line-of-sight angle theta ~ 8deg ) while X-ray selected BL Lacs (XBLs) are seen at larger angles (theta ~ 30deg ; the X-ray emitting jet is believed to be less collimated). However, a major problem with this model was that a transition population between beamed BL Lacs and unbeamed FR-Is had not been detected. Low-luminosity BL Lacs may be such a transition population, and were predicted to exist by Browne and Marcha (1993). We present ROSAT HRI images, VLA radio maps and optical spectra which confirm the existence of low-luminosity BL Lacs, objects which were previously mis-identified in the EMSS catalog as clusters of galaxies. Thus our results strengthen the relativistic beaming hypothesis.

  9. The CLASS BL Lac sample: The Radio Luminosity Function

    CERN Document Server

    Marcha, M J M

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new sample of BL Lac objects selected from a deep (30 mJy) radio survey of flat spectrum radio sources (the CLASS blazar survey, henceforth CBS). The sample is one of the largest well defined samples in the low power regime with a total of 130 sources of which 55 satisfy the 'classical' optical BL Lac selection criteria, and the rest have indistinguishable radio properties. The primary goal of this study is to establish the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) on firm statistical ground at low radio luminosities where previous samples have not been able to investigate. The gain of taking a peek at lower powers is the possibility to search for the flattening of the LF which is a feature predicted by the beaming model but which has remained elusive to observational confirmation. In this study we extend for the first time the BL Lac RLF down to very low radio powers ~10^22 W/Hz, ie, two orders of magnitude below the RLF currently available in the literature. In the process we confirm the importa...

  10. A Search for Low-Luminosity BL Lacertae Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Rector, T A; Perlman, E S; Rector, Travis A.; Stocke, John T.; Perlman, Eric S.

    1999-01-01

    Many properties of BL Lacs have become explicable in terms of the "relativistic beaming" hypothesis whereby BL Lacs are FR-1 radio galaxies viewed nearly along the jet axis. However, a possible problem with this model is that a transition population between beamed BL Lacs and unbeamed FR-1s has not been detected. A transition population of "low-luminosity BL Lacs" was predicted to exist in abundance in X-ray-selected samples such as the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EMSS) by Browne & Marcha. However, these BL Lacs may have been misidentified as clusters of galaxies. We have conducted a search for such objects in the EMSS with the ROSAT HRI; and here we present ROSAT HRI images, optical spectra and VLA radio maps for a small number of BL Lacs which were previously misidentified in the EMSS catalog as clusters of galaxies. While these objects are slightly lower in luminosity than other EMSS BL Lacs, their properties are too similar to the other BL Lacs in the EMSS sample to "bridge the gap" b...

  11. Luminosity determination at ANKE with different reference reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Christopher; Goslawski, Paul; Mielke, Malte; Papenbrock, Michael; Schroeer, Daniel; Taeschner, Alexander; Khoukaz, Alfons [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2013-07-01

    A high precision measurement on the mass of the eta meson was the main objective of the COSY proposal Nr. 187. In detail the meson production reaction dp → {sup 3}HeX has been studied with X being the eta meson identified by the missing mass technique. However, parallel to the already very successfully performed eta mass determination, the obtained data also allow for studies on total and differential cross sections for the reaction dp → {sup 3}Heη close to threshold as well as for a study of the ABC-effect in the channel dp → {sup 3}Heπ{sup +}π{sup -}. For this purpose a careful data normalization and luminosity determination is required. While dp-elastic scattering is commonly used as reference reaction for the luminosity determination at ANKE, an independent normalization channel is of high interest as cross reference. Therefore, the {sup 3}Heπ{sup 0} final state is analyzed in parallel and the results are compared to the dp-elastic scattering data. The method and recent results are presented.

  12. A MASSIF Effort To Determine The Mass-Luminosity Relation for Stars of Various Ages, Metallicities, and Evolution States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Todd J.; Beedict, G. Fritz; Gies, Douglas R.; Golimowski, David A.; Ianna, Philip A.; Mason, Brian; McArthur, Barbara; Nelan, Edmund; Torres, Guillermo

    2004-01-01

    The MASSIF (Masses and Stellar Systems with Interferometry) Team will use SIM to investigate the mass content of the Galaxy - from huge stars to barely glimmering brown dwarfs, and from hot white dwarfs to exotic black holes. We will target various samples of the Galactic population to determine and relate the fundamental characteristics of mass, luminosity, age, composition, and multiplicity - attributes that together yield an extensive understanding of the stars. Our samples will include distant clusters that span a factor of 5000 in age, and commonplace stars and substellar objects that lurk near the Sun. The principal goals of the MASSIF Key Project are to (1) define the mass-luminosity relation for main sequence stars in five fundamental clusters so that effects of age and metallicity can be mapped (Trapezium, TW Hydrae, Pleiades, Hyades, and M67), and (2) determine accurate masses for representative examples of nearly every type of star, stellar descendant or brown dwarf in the Galaxy.

  13. Performance of the first short model 150 mm aperture Nb$_3$Sn Quadrupole MQXFS for the High- Luminosity LHC upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chlachidze, G.; et al.

    2016-08-30

    The US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP) and CERN combined their efforts in developing Nb3Sn magnets for the High-Luminosity LHC upgrade. The ultimate goal of this collaboration is to fabricate large aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles for the LHC interaction regions (IR). These magnets will replace the present 70 mm aperture NbTi quadrupole triplets for expected increase of the LHC peak luminosity by a factor of 5. Over the past decade LARP successfully fabricated and tested short and long models of 90 mm and 120 mm aperture Nb3Sn quadrupoles. Recently the first short model of 150 mm diameter quadrupole MQXFS was built with coils fabricated both by the LARP and CERN. The magnet performance was tested at Fermilab’s vertical magnet test facility. This paper reports the test results, including the quench training at 1.9 K, ramp rate and temperature dependence studies.

  14. A Systematic Search for Molecular Outflows Toward Candidate Low-Luminosity Protostars and Very Low Luminosity Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Kamber R; Dunham, Michael M

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of 9 candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate Very Low Luminosity Objects (VeLLOs; L_int < 0.1 L_sun). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope catalogued by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star forming regions. Each object was observed in 12CO and 13CO J = 2-1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30 arcsecond resolution. Using 5-point grid maps we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows fro...

  15. Tolman's Luminosity-Distance, Poincare's Light-Distance and Cayley-Klein's Hyperbolic Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Pierseaux, Yves

    2009-01-01

    We deduce Tolman's formula of luminosity-distance in Cosmology from Poincare's definition of light-distance with Lorentz Transformation (LT).In Minkowskian metric, if distance is proper time (as it is often argued) then light-distance must be also the shortest distance, like proper duration (unlike Einstein's longest length within rest system). By introducing Poincare's proper light-distance in Einstein's basic synchronization we deduce a dilated distance between observer and receding mirror (with relativistic Doppler factor). Such a distance corresponds not to an Euclidean distance (Einstein's rigid rod) but to an Hyperbolic distance (Cayley-Klein) with a Lobatchevskian Horizon. From a basic proportionality hyperbolic distance-velocity, we deduce the law of Hubble. By following Penrose's Lobatchevskian representation of LT, we transform Special Relativity (SR) into an Hyperbolic Cosmological Relativity (HCR). by using only the LT but the whole LT. In Hyperbolic Rotation motion (basic active LT or Einstein's ...

  16. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinali, M; Bondy, M I Ferretti; Hoek, M; Lauth, W; Rosner, C; Sfienti, C; Thiel, M

    2015-01-01

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investi...

  17. An Anthropology of Luminosity: The Agency of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the relationship between light, material culture and social experiences. It argues that understanding light as a powerful social agent, in its relationship with people, things, colours, shininess and places, may facilitate an appreciation of the active social role...... of luminosity in the practice of day-to-day activities. The article surveys an array of past conceptions of light within philosophy, natural science and more recent approaches to light in the fields of anthropology and material culture studies. A number of implications are discussed, and by way of three case...... studies it is argued that light may be used as a tool for exercising social intimacy and inclusion, of shaping moral spaces and hospitality, and orchestrating movement, while working as a metaphor as well as a material agent in these social negotiations. The social comprehension of light is a means...

  18. NGC 5548 in a Low-Luminosity State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Misty C.; Denney, Kelly D.; Cackett, Edward M.;

    2007-01-01

    flux variations in the continuum and the Hbeta line of 6.3 (+2.6/-2.3) days. Combining our measurements with those of previous campaigns, we determine a weighted black hole mass of M_BH = 6.54 (+0.26/-0.25) x 10^7 M_sun based on all broad emission lines with suitable variability data. We confirm...... between the luminosity and the time lag in NGC 5548 and measure a slope that is consistent with alpha = 0.5, the naive expectation for the broad line region for an assumed form of r ~ L^alpha. This value is also consistent with the slope recently determined by Bentz et al. for the population...

  19. Operating microscope in Endodontics: visual magnification and luminosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Moreira Feix

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The surgical microscope has been used in Endodontics in order to minimize the obscurity of the surgical field, because it provides a high magnification and luminosity, thereby enhancing the procedures performed and providing a final result of higher quality. Objective and literature review: The objective of this study was to review the literature by addressing the current situation of the operating microscope in Endodontics, emphasizing its advantages and limitations. Despite being a technological tool that is relatively costly and that requires a period of learning and adaptation, the use of this apparatus has been spreading gradually. Conclusion: The importance of magnification is scientifically based in Dentistry,in such a way that its use has provided significant improvement to Endodontics with regards to vision and lighting of the operative field, by offering better quality of work with proportional success rates in treatments, besides improving communication between professionals and patients and assisting in the documentation for legal purposes.

  20. 3rd ECFA High Luminosity LHC Experiments Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The third ECFA Workshop will gather again the theory, accelerator and experiments communities to discuss the future experiments at the High Luminosity LHC. While the previous workshops, provided a panorama of the exciting physics goals and challenges for the experiments, the project is now entering a new stage with the preparation of Technical Design Reports for ATLAS and CMS upgrades and with the execution of the ALICE and LHCb upgrades. The emphasis of this meeting will be on: the progress in the theoretical concepts and the framework developed to assess the physics reach of the experiments, including experience with the run II data analyses; the discussion of accelerator options to facilitate the experiment operation and enhance the performance; and the optimization of the detector design and related techniques. Progress in common experimental developments will also be reported, along with new ideas to operate a the extreme rates and collision pile-up conditions.

  1. The Physics Landscape of the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Mangano, M

    2015-01-01

    We review the status of HEP after the first run of the LHC and discuss the opportunities offered by the HL-LHC, in light of the needs for future progress that are emerging from the data. The HL-LHC will push to the systematic limit the precision of most measurements of the Higgs boson, and will be necessary to firmly establish some of the more rare decays foreseen by the Standard Model, such as the decays to dimuons and to a Z+ photon pair. The HL-LHC luminosity will provide additional statistics required by the quantitative study of any discovery the LHC may achieve during the first 300 inverse femtobarn, and will further extend the discovery potential of the LHC, particularly for rare, elusive or low-sensitivity processes.

  2. CMS HCAL Endcap Simulations for the High Luminosity LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    The long-term high luminosity upgrade to the LHC will increase the levels of radiation affecting the CMS calorimeters. By the end of Phase 2, parts of the electromagnetic and hadronic endcap calorimeters could receive up to 10 MRad of radiation. A model of the radiation damage to HCAL, which has been implemented in the CMS fast simulation, will be described. The effects of radiation on physics capabilities with jets will be presented, with the most important effect coming from scaling of photodetector noise due to recalibration. In addition, a standalone Geant4 simulation with a simplified geometry can be used to test configurations with new radiation-hard ECALs. Results for pion response and resolution with new configurations will be shown.

  3. Developing radio beam geometry and luminosity models of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Gonthier, P L; Giacherio, B M; Arevalo, R A; Harding, A K

    2006-01-01

    Our recent studies of pulsar population statistics suggest that improvements of radio and gamma-ray beam geometry and luminosity models require further refinement. The goal of this project is to constrain the viewing geometry for some radio pulsars, especially three-peaked pulse profiles, in order to limit the uncertainty of the magnetic inclination and impact angles. We perform fits of the pulse profile and position angle sweep of radio pulsars for the available frequencies. We assume a single core and conal beams described by Gaussians. We incorporate three different size cones with frequency dependence from the work of Mitra & Deshpande (1999). We obtain separate spectral indices for the core and cone beams and explore the trends of the ratio of core to cone peak fluxes. This ratio is observed to have some dependence with period. However, we cannot establish the suggested functional form of this ratio as indicated by the work of Arzoumanian, Chernoff & Cordes (2002).

  4. Globular Clusters and the Mira Period-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Feast, M W; Menzies, J; Feast, Michael; Whitelock, Patricia; Menzies, John

    2002-01-01

    A globular cluster distance scale based on Hipparcos parallaxes of subdwarfs has been used to derive estimates of M_K for cluster Miras, including one in the SMC globular cluster NGC121. These lead to a zero-point of the Mira infrared period-luminosity relation, PL(K), in good agreement with that derived from Hipparcos parallaxes of nearby field Miras. The mean of these two estimates together with data on LMC Miras yields an LMC distance modulus of 18.60 +/- 0.10 in evident agreement with a metallicity corrected Cepheid modulus (18.59 +/- 0.10). The use of luminous AGB stars as extragalactic population indicators is also discussed.

  5. Two Massive, Low-Luminosity Cores Toward Infrared Dark Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Swift, Jonathan J

    2009-01-01

    This article presents high-resolution interferometric mosaics in the 850 micron waveband of two massive, quiescent infrared dark clouds. The two clouds were chosen based on their likelihood to represent environments preceding the formation of massive stars. The brightest compact sources detected in each cloud have masses of approximately 110 and 60 solar masses with radii < 0.1 pc, implying mean volume densities of approximately 1 million particles per cubic centimeter and mean column densities of about 1 gram per square centimeter. Supplementary data show these cores to be cold and inactive. Low upper limits to their bolometric luminosities and temperatures place them at a very early stage of evolution while current models of massive star formation suggest they have the potential to form massive stars.

  6. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  7. Silicon sensors for trackers at high-luminosity environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peltola, Timo, E-mail: timo.peltola@helsinki.fi

    2015-10-01

    The planned upgrade of the LHC accelerator at CERN, namely the high luminosity (HL) phase of the LHC (HL-LHC foreseen for 2023), will result in a more intense radiation environment than the present tracking system that was designed for. The required upgrade of the all-silicon central trackers at the ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments will include higher granularity and radiation hard sensors. The radiation hardness of the new sensors must be roughly an order of magnitude higher than in the current LHC detectors. To address this, a massive R&D program is underway within the CERN RD50 Collaboration “Development of Radiation Hard Semiconductor Devices for Very High Luminosity Colliders” to develop silicon sensors with sufficient radiation tolerance. Research topics include the improvement of the intrinsic radiation tolerance of the sensor material and novel detector designs with benefits like reduced trapping probability (thinned and 3D sensors), maximized sensitive area (active edge sensors) and enhanced charge carrier generation (sensors with intrinsic gain). A review of the recent results from both measurements and TCAD simulations of several detector technologies and silicon materials at radiation levels expected for HL-LHC will be presented. - Highlights: • An overview of the recent results from the RD50 collaboration. • Accuracy of TCAD simulations increased by including both bulk and surface damage. • Sensors with n-electrode readout and MCz material offer higher radiation hardness. • 3D detectors are a promising choice for the extremely high fluence environments. • Detectors with an enhanced charge carrier generation under systematic investigation.

  8. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Ménard, Brice; Mo, Houjun

    2016-07-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in z ˜ 0 groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about Mr = -12 mag or L = 107 L⊙, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from 1012 to 1015 M⊙. We find a characteristic scale, Mr ˜ -18 mag or L ˜ 109 L⊙, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellites. This ubiquitous faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the satellite luminosity functions can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over the entire range of observables. Combining these conditional luminosity functions with the dark matter halo mass function, we accurately recover the entire field luminosity function over 10 visual magnitudes and reveal that satellite galaxies dominate the field luminosity function at magnitudes fainter than -17. We find that the luminosity functions of blue and red satellite galaxies show distinct shapes and we present estimates of the stellar mass fraction as a function of halo mass and galaxy type. Finally, using a simple model, we demonstrate that the abundances and the faint-end slopes of blue and red satellite galaxies can be interpreted in terms of their formation history, with two distinct modes separated by some characteristic time.

  9. The jets-accretion relation, mass-luminosity relation in Fermi blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Xiong; Zhang, Haojing; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Cha, Yongjuan; Chen, Yongyun; Huang, Xia; Wang, Yuwei

    2015-05-01

    A sample of 111 Fermi blazars each with a well-established radio core luminosity, broad-line luminosity, bolometric luminosity and black hole mass has been compiled from the literatures. We present a significant correlation between radio core and broad-line emission luminosities that supports a close link between accretion processes and relativistic jets. Analysis reveals a relationship of which is consistant with theoretical predicted coefficient and supports that blazar jets are powered by energy extraction from a rapidly spinning Kerr black hole through the magnetic field provided by the accretion disk. Through studying the correlation between the intrinsic bolometric luminosity and the black hole mass, we find a relationship of which supports mass-luminosity relation for Fermi blazars derived in this work is a powerlaw relation similar to that for main-sequence stars. Finally, EVOLUTIONARY SEQUENCE OF BLAZARS is discussed.

  10. The faint end of the 250 micron luminosity function at z < 0.5

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L; Bethermin, M; Bourne, N; Cooray, A; Cowley, W; Dunne, L; Dye, S; Eales, S; Farrah, D; Lacey, C; Loveday, J; Maddox, S; Oliver, S; Viero, M

    2016-01-01

    Aims. We aim to study the 250 micron luminosity function (LF) down to much fainter luminosities than achieved by previous efforts. Methods. We developed a modified stacking method to reconstruct the 250 micron LF using optically selected galaxies from the SDSS survey and Herschel maps of the GAMA equatorial fields and Stripe 82. Our stacking method not only recovers the mean 250 micron luminosities of galaxies that are too faint to be individually detected, but also their underlying distribution functions. Results. We find very good agreement with previous measurements in the overlapping luminosity range. More importantly, we are able to derive the LF down to much fainter luminosities (around 25 times fainter) than achieved by previous studies. We find strong positive luminosity evolution \\propto (1 + z)^4.89\\pm1.07 and moderate negative density evolution \\propto (1 + z)^-1.02\\pm0.54 over the redshift range z=[0.02, 0.5].

  11. Measurement of the luminosity in the ZEUS experiment at HERA II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, L.; Bold, T. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland); Andruszkow, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Nuclear Physics] [and others

    2013-06-15

    The luminosity in the ZEUS detector was measured using photons from electron bremsstrahlung. In 2001 the HERA collider was upgraded for operation at higher luminosity. At the same time the luminosity-measuring system of the ZEUS experiment was modified to tackle the expected higher photon rate and synchrotron radiation. The existing lead-scintillator calorimeter was equipped with radiation hard scintillator tiles and shielded against synchrotron radiation. In addition, a magnetic spectrometer was installed to measure the luminosity independently using photons converted in the beam-pipe exit window. The redundancy provided a reliable and robust luminosity determination with a systematic uncertainty of 1.7%. The experimental setup, the techniques used for luminosity determination and the estimate of the systematic uncertainty are reported.

  12. Measurement of the Luminosity in the ZEUS Experiment at HERA II

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Bold, T; Borzemski, P; Buettner, C; Caldwell, A; Chwastowski, J; Daniluk, W; Drugakov, V; Eskreys, A; Figiel, J; Galas, A; Gil, M; Helbich, M; Januscheck, F; Jurkiewicz, P; Kisielewska, D; Klein, U; Kotarba, A; Lohmann, W; Ning, Y; Oliwa, K; Olkiewicz, K; Paganis, S; Pieron, J; Przybycien, M; Ren, Z; Ruchlewicz, W; Schmidke, W; Schneekloth, U; Sciulli, F; Stopa, P; Sztuk-Dambietz, J; Suszycki, L; Sutiak, J; Wierba, W; Zawiejski, L

    2013-01-01

    The luminosity in the ZEUS detector was measured using photons from electron bremsstrahlung. In 2001 the HERA collider was upgraded for operation at higher luminosity. At the same time the luminosity-measuring system of the ZEUS experiment was modified to tackle the expected higher photon rate and synchrotron radiation. The existing lead-scintillator calorimeter was equipped with radiation hard scintillator tiles and shielded against synchrotron radiation. In addition, a magnetic spectrometer was installed to measure the luminosity independently using photons converted in the beam-pipe exit window. The redundancy provided a reliable and robust luminosity determination with a systematic uncertainty of 1.7%. The experimental setup, the techniques used for luminosity determination and the estimate of the systematic uncertainty are reported.

  13. The Correlation between Optical Spectral Index and Continuum Luminosity Variation in the Seyfert 1 Galaxy NGC 5548

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Zhi Kong; Xue-Bing Wu; Jin-Lin Han; Yu-Feng Mao

    2004-01-01

    Using the archived optical spectra of NGC 5548 between 1989 and 2001,we derived the optical spectral index by fitting the spectra in wavelength windows unaffected by strong emission lines. We found that the index is anti-correlated with the continuum luminosity at 5100 A with a correlation coefficient of -0.8. Based on the standard thin accretion disk model, we investigated whether the correlation is related to the variations of the dimensionless accretion rate m (mass accretion rate in Eddington unit), or the inner radius of the accretion disk Rin, or both. The correlation can be modeled well using a co-variable mode of Rin/Rs = 12.5m-0.8(Rs is Schwarzschild radius). As luminosity increases, m increases from 0.05 to0.16 and at the same time Rin decreases from 133.9Rs to 55.5Rs, consistent with the prediction for a transition radius within which an ADAF structure exists. We concluded that the change of both inner accretion radius and the dimensionless accretion rate are key factors for the variations of spectral index and luminosity in the optical band for NGC 5548.

  14. Confirmation of a Steep Luminosity Function for Ly alpha Emitters at z 5.7: a Major Component of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina L.; Martin, Crystal L.; Sawicki, Marcin; McCarthy, Patrick; Villaneuva, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct and robust measurement of the faint-end slope of the Ly-alpha emitter (LAE) luminosity function at z = 5.7. Candidate LAEs from a low-spectral-resolution blind search with IMACS on Magellan- Baade were targeted at higher resolution to distinguish high redshift LAEs from foreground galaxies. All but 2 of our 42 single-emission-line systems are fainter than F = 2.0×10(exp-17) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2), making these the faintest emission-lines observed for a z = 5.7 sample with known completeness, an essential property for determining the faint end slope of the LAE luminosity function. We find 13 LAEs as compared to 29 foreground galaxies, in very good agreement with the modeled foreground counts predicted in Dressler et al. (2011a) that had been used to estimate a faint-end slope of alpha = -2.0 for the LAE luminosity function. A 32% LAE fraction, LAE/(LAE+foreground) within the flux interval F = 2-20 × 10(exp-18) ergs s(exp-1) cm(exp-2) constrains the faint end slope of the luminosity function to -1.95 greater than alpha greater than -2.35 (1 delta). We show how this steep LF should provide, to the limit of our observations, more than 20% of the flux necessary to maintain ionization at z = 5.7, with a factor-of-ten extrapolation in flux reaching more than 55%. We suggest that this bodes well for a comparable contribution by similar, low-mass star forming galaxies at higher-redshift - within the reionization epoch at z greater than approximately 7, only 250 Myr earlier - and that such systems provide a substantial, if not dominant, contribution to the late-stage reionization of the IGM.

  15. Energy and Beam-Offset dependence of the Luminosity weighted depolarization for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Esberg, Jakob; Uggerhoj, Ulrik; Dalena, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We report on simulations of e+e- depolarization due to beam-beam effects. These effects are studied for CLIC at 3 TeV, using GUINEA PIG++. We find a strong energy dependence of the luminosity weighted depolarization. In the luminosity peak at CLIC the total luminosity weighted depolarization remains below the one per-mil level. The effect of a vertical offset on the energy dependent depolarization is investigated. The depolarization in the luminosity peak remains below per-cent level even for 5sy offsets.

  16. Distances to dense cores that contain very low luminosity objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheswar, G.; Lee, C. W.; Dib, S.

    2011-12-01

    Aims: We estimate the distances to dense molecular cores that harbour very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs) detected by the Spitzer Space Telescope and attempt to confirm their VeLLO nature. Methods: The cloud distances are estimated using a near-IR photometric method. We use a technique that performs a spectral classification of stars lying towards the fields containing the clouds as either main-sequence stars or giants. In this technique, the observed (J - H) and (H - Ks) colours are dereddened simultaneously using trial values of AV and a normal interstellar extinction law. The best fit of the dereddened colours to the intrinsic colours giving a minimum value of χ2 then yields the corresponding spectral type and AV for the star. The main-sequence stars, thus classified, are then utilized in an AV versus distance plot to bracket the cloud distances. The typical error in the estimation of distances to the clouds are found to be ~18%. Results: We estimate distances to seven cloud cores, IRAM 04191, L1521F, BHR 111, L328, L673-7, L1014, and L1148 using the above method. These clouds contain VeLLO candidates. The estimated distances to the cores are found to be 127 ± 25 pc (IRAM 04191), 136 ± 36 pc (L1521F), 355 ± 65 pc (BHR 111), 217 ± 30 pc (L328), 240 ± 45 pc (L673-7), 258 ± 50 pc (L1014), and 301 ± 55 pc (L1148). We re-evaluated the internal luminosities of the VeLLOs discovered in these seven clouds using the distances estimated from this work. Except for L1014 - IRS (Lint = 0.15 L⊙), all other VeLLO candidates are found to be consistent with the definition of a VeLLO (Lint ≤ 0.1 L⊙). In addition to the cores that harbour VeLLO candidates, we also obtained distances to the clouds L323, L675, L676, CB 188, L1122, L1152, L1155, L1157, and L1158, which are located in the directions of the above seven cores. Towards L1521F and L1148, we found evidence of multiple dust layers.

  17. L1Track: a Fast Level 1 Track Trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, Alessandro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC, the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increased by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC design. Due to this the pile-up collisions will increase by a similar factor. The earliest, hardware based, ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide an higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment. The Level 1 trigger architecture needs therefore to be improved. A new Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which, in addition of the “regions of interest” identified by the calorimetry and the muon chambers, also includes the possibility of extracting tracking information and use it for the decision taking process. The expected trigger rates at HL-LHC and the available latency are the key ingredients that will drive the new design. A low-latency and accurate tracking trigger system is being developed in the context of this additional trigger refinement. The design results in a substantial modification of the A...

  18. LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS OF SPITZER-IDENTIFIED PROTOSTARS IN NINE NEARBY MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryukova, E.; Megeath, S. T.; Allen, T. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Gutermuth, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Pipher, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Allen, L. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, Tucson, AZ (United States); Myers, P. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Muzerolle, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming (SF) molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. These clouds encompass a variety of SF environments, including both low-mass and high-mass SF regions, as well as dense clusters and regions of sparsely distributed star formation. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine near- and mid-infrared photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and Spitzer to create 1-24 {mu}m spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities, we derive a relationship between bolometric luminosity, mid-IR luminosity (integrated from 1-24 {mu}m), and SED slope. Estimations of the bolometric luminosities for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high-mass SF clouds (Orion, Mon R2, and Cep OB3) peak near 1 L{sub Sun} and show a tail extending toward luminosities above 100 L{sub Sun }. The luminosity functions of the low-mass SF clouds (Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Taurus, Lupus, and Chamaeleon) do not exhibit a common peak, however the combined luminosity function of these regions peaks below 1 L{sub Sun }. Finally, we examine the luminosity functions as a function of the local surface density of young stellar objects. In the Orion molecular clouds, we find a significant difference between the luminosity functions of protostars in regions of high and low stellar density, the former of which is biased toward more luminous sources. This may be the result of primordial mass segregation, although this interpretation is not unique. We compare our luminosity

  19. Variability Selected Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M.; Brandt, W. N.; Xue, Y. Q.; Paolillo, D. M.; Alexander, F. E.; Bauer, F. E.; Lehmer, B. D.; Luo, B.; Shemmer, O.; Schneider, D. P.; Vignail, C.

    2012-01-01

    The 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and other deep X-ray surveys have been highly effective at selecting active galactic nuclei (AGN). However, cosmologically distant low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN) have remained a challenge to identify due to significant contribution from the host galaxy. We identify long-term X ray variability (approx. month years, observed frame) in 20 of 92 CDF-S galaxies spanning redshifts approx equals 00.8 - 1.02 that do not meet other AGN selection criteria. We show that the observed variability cannot be explained by X-ray binary populations or ultraluminous X-ray sources, so the variability is most likely caused by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. The variable galaxies are not heavily obscured in general, with a stacked effective power-law photon index of Gamma(sub Stack) approx equals 1.93 +/- 0.13, and arc therefore likely LLAGN. The LLAGN tend to lie it factor of approx equal 6-89 below the extrapolated linear variability-luminosity relation measured for luminous AGN. This may he explained by their lower accretion rates. Variability-independent black-hole mass and accretion-rate estimates for variable galaxies show that they sample a significantly different black hole mass-accretion-rate space, with masses a factor of 2.4 lower and accretion rates a factor of 22.5 lower than variable luminous AGNs at the same redshift. We find that an empirical model based on a universal broken power-law power spectral density function, where the break frequency depends on SMBH mass and accretion rate, roughly reproduces the shape, but not the normalization, of the variability-luminosity trends measured for variable galaxies and more luminous AGNs.

  20. How accurate are infrared luminosities from monochromatic photometric extrapolation?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Zesen; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Template-based extrapolations from only one photometric band can be a cost-effective method to estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosities ($L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$) of galaxies. By utilizing multi-wavelength data that covers across 0.35--500\\,$\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields, we investigate the accuracy of this monochromatic extrapolated $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ based on three IR spectral energy distribution (SED) templates (\\citealt[CE01]{Chary2001}; \\citealt[DH02]{Dale2002}; \\citealt[W08]{Wuyts2008a}) out to $z\\sim 3.5$. We find that the CE01 template provides the best estimate of $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ in {\\it Herschel}/PACS bands, while the DH02 template performs best in {\\it Herschel}/SPIRE bands. To estimate $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$, we suggest that extrapolations from the available longest wavelength PACS band based on the CE01 template can be a good estimator. Moreover, if PACS measurement is unavailable, extrapolations from SPIRE observations but based on the \\cite{Dale2002} template can also provide ...

  1. The mass-luminosity relation in an introductory astronomy lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.

    2016-11-01

    Exposing students in general education science courses of lower mathematical levels to experiments that make use of quantitative skills such as collecting and analyzing data is very important because they provide examples of how science is actually done. Experiments with relatively simple procedures that are also interesting and engaging which serve this purpose can be hard to find. This can especially be true for introductory college astronomy courses; however, courses of this type often do still have a laboratory component because most students, regardless of major, are required to take at least one laboratory science course. When required to work with data in a quantitative fashion, the difficulty students with lower mathematical skills often have is that any actual physical meaning of an experiment can become completely lost in a procedure that, to them, seems to be purely an exercise in complex mathematics and for which they have resorted to simply following by rote, from which, perhaps needless to say, they are likely to learn little or nothing. I have seen this happen numerous times and it has inspired me to focus on attempting to develop meaningful laboratory experiences for students of lower mathematical level courses, such as introductory astronomy and conceptual physics, that involve both the gathering and analysis of numerical data. What follows is a simple experiment of this type on the mass-luminosity relation for stars on the main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram that has proven useful for an introductory astronomy laboratory course.

  2. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slawinska, Magdalena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model. Precise measurements of the boson properties, and the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1 at the high-luminosity LHC. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks and electro-weakinos in the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presente...

  3. Close stars and accretion in Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S

    2004-01-01

    Quasar accretion disks are believed to form stars by self-gravity. Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (LLAGN) are much dimmer galactic centers, and are often believed to be quasars that ran out of gaseous fuel. LLAGN accretion disks should thus co-exist with thousands to millions of stars or proto-stars left from the previous stronger accretion activity. In principle, these stars may produce several important effects: (i) contribute to the optical/UV spectra of some LLAGN; (ii) reprocessing of the stellar radiation in the dusty disks could dominate the LLAGN infra-red spectra; (iii) deplete the (accretion) gas disk much faster than it can accrete onto the supper-massive black hole (SMBH); (iv) stars, individually or in groups, may slow down and modulate the accretion flow significantly due to their inertia. In this way they may produce the LLAGN cut-off disks; (v) alternatively, frequent enough stellar collisions and resulting stellar disruptions could keep the inner disk empty. Here we explore these ideas...

  4. Luminosity measurements with the LUCID detector in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Valentinetti, Sara

    La misura della luminosità è un obiettivo importante per tutta la fisica del modello standard e per la scoperta di nuova fisica, poiché è legata alla sezione d'urto (σ) e al rate di produzione (R) di un determinato processo dalla relazione L = R*σ. Nell'eserimento ATLAS a LHC è installato un monitor di luminosità dedicato chiamato LUCID (Luminosity measurements Using Cherenkov Integrating Detector). Grazie ai dati acquisiti durante il 2010 la valutazione off-line delle performances del LUCID e l'implementazione di controlli on-line sulla qualità dei dati raccolti è stata possibile. I dati reali sono stati confrontati con i dati Monte Carlo e le simulazioni sono state opportunamente aggiustate per ottimizzare l'accordo tra i due. La calibrazione della luminosità relativa che permette di ottenere una valutazione della luminosità assoluta è stata possibile grazie ai cosiddetti Van der Meer scan, grazie ai quale è stata ottenuta una precisione dell'11%. L'analisi della fisica del decadimento della Z...

  5. Electromagnetic Luminosity of the Coalescence of Charged Black Hole Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    The observation of a possible electromagnetic counterpart by the Fermi GBM group to the aLIGO detection of the merger of a black hole binary has spawned a number of ideas about its source. Furthermore, observations of fast radio bursts (FRBs) have similarly resulted in a range of new models that might endow black hole binaries with electromagnetic signatures. In this context, even the unlikely idea that astrophysical black holes may have significant charge is worth exploring, and here we present results from the simulation of weakly charged black holes as they orbit and merge. Our simulations suggest that a black hole binary with mass comparable to that observed in GW150914 could produce the level of electromagnetic luminosity observed by Fermi GBM ($10^{49}$ ergs/s) with a non-dimensional charge of $q \\equiv Q/M = 10^{-4}$ assuming good radiative efficiency. However even a charge such as this is difficult to imagine avoiding neutralization long enough for the binary to produce its electromagnetic counterpart...

  6. The Luminosity Function of Low-Redshift Abell Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Barkhouse, Wayne A; López-Cruz, Omar

    2007-01-01

    We present the results from a survey of 57 low-redshift Abell galaxy clusters to study the radial dependence of the luminosity function (LF). The dynamical radius of each cluster, r200, was estimated from the photometric measurement of cluster richness, Bgc. The shape of the LFs are found to correlate with radius such that the faint-end slope, alpha, is generally steeper on the cluster outskirts. The sum of two Schechter functions provides a more adequate fit to the composite LFs than a single Schechter function. LFs based on the selection of red and blue galaxies are bimodal in appearance. The red LFs are generally flat for -22 -18. The blue LFs contain a larger contribution from faint galaxies than the red LFs. The blue LFs have a rising faint-end component (alpha ~ -1.7) for M_Rc > -21, with a weaker dependence on radius than the red LFs. The dispersion of M* was determined to be 0.31 mag, which is comparable to the median measurement uncertainty of 0.38 mag. This suggests that the bright-end of the LF is...

  7. ATLAS physics prospects with the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Khanov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson of about 125 GeV mass with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model.Precise measurements of the properties of this new boson, and the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC, including its luminosity upgrade, HL-LHC, that should allow the collection of 3000 fb-1 of data per experiment. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. The electroweak sector is further studied with the analysis of the vector boson scattering, testing the SM predictions. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Mode...

  8. Type II intermediate-luminosity optical transients (ILOTs)

    CERN Document Server

    Kashi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    We propose that in a small fraction of intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs) powered by a strongly interacting binary system, the ejected mass in the equatorial plane can block the central source from our line of sight. We can therefore observe only radiation that is reprocessed by polar outflow, much as in type~II active galactic nuclei (AGN). An ejection of $M_{\\rm ej,e}=10^{-4} ~\\rm{M_\\odot} ~ (1 ~\\rm{M_\\odot})$ at 30 degrees from the equatorial plane and at a velocity of $v_{\\rm e} = 100 ~\\rm{km~s^{-1}}$ will block the central source in the NIR for about 5 years (500 years). During that period of time the object might disappear in the visible band, and be detected only in the IR band due to polar dust. We raise the possibility that the recently observed disappearance of a red giant in the visible, designated N6946-BH1, is a type~II ILOT rather than a failed supernova. For this case we estimate that the ejected mass in the polar direction was $M_{\\rm ej,p}\\approx 10^{-3} ~\\rm{M_\\odot}$. Our sc...

  9. Cepheid Period-Luminosity Relation from the AKARI Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M; Neilson, Hilding; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we derive the period-luminosity (P-L) relation for Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids based on mid-infrared AKARI observations. AKARI's IRC sources were matched to the OGLE-III LMC Cepheid catalog. Together with the available I band light curves from the OGLE-III catalog, potential false matches were removed from the sample. This procedure excluded most of the sources in the S7 and S11 bands: hence only the P-L relation in the N3 band was derived in this paper. Random-phase corrections were included in deriving the P-L relation for the single epoch AKARI data, even though the derived P-L relation is consistent with the P-L relation without random-phase correction, though there is a \\sim 7 per-cent improvement in the dispersion of the P-L relation. The final adopted N3 band P-L relation is N3 = -3.246 log(P) + 15.844, with a dispersion of 0.149.

  10. Cepheid period-luminosity relation from the AKARI observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Neilson, Hilding; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we derive the period-luminosity (P-L) relation for Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) Cepheids based on mid-infrared AKARI observations. AKARI's Infrared Camera sources were matched to the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment-III (OGLE-III) LMC Cepheid catalogue. Together with the available I-band light curves from the OGLE-III catalogue, potential false matches were removed from the sample. This procedure excluded most of the sources in the S7 and S11 bands; hence, only the P-L relation in the N3 band is derived in this paper. Random-phase corrections were included in deriving the P-L relation for the single-epoch AKARI data; even though the derived P-L relation is consistent with the P-L relation without random-phase correction, however there is an ~7 per cent improvement in the dispersion of the P-L relation. The final adopted N3-band P-L relation is N3 = -3.246 log(P) + 15.844, with a dispersion of 0.149.

  11. Removing Known SPS Intensity Limitations for High Luminosity LHC Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena; Bohl, Thomas; Cruikshank, Paul; Goddard, Brennan; Kaltenbacher, Thomas; Lasheen, Alexandre; Perez Espinos, Jaime; Repond, Joël; Salvant, Benoit; Vollinger, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In preparation of the SPS as an LHC injector its impedance was significantly reduced in 1999 - 2000. A new SPS impedance reduction campaign is planned now for the High Luminosity (HL)-LHC project, which requires bunch intensities twice as high as the nominal one. One of the known intensity limitations is a longitudinal multi-bunch instability with a threshold 3 times below this operational intensity. The instability is presently cured using the 4th harmonic RF system and controlled emittance blow-up, but reaching the HL-LHC parameters cannot be assured without improving the machine impedance. Recently the impedance sources responsible for this instability were identified and implementation of their shielding and damping is foreseen during the next long shutdown (2019 - 2020) in synergy with two other important upgrades: amorphous carbon coating of (part of) the vacuum chamber against the e-cloud effect and rearrangement of the 200 MHz RF system. In this paper the strategy of impedance reduction is presented t...

  12. Jet and disk luminosities in tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, Tsvi; Tchekhovskoy, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDE) in which a star is devoured by a massive black hole at a galac- tic center pose a challenge to our understanding of accretion processes. Within a month the accretion rate reaches super-Eddington levels. It then drops gradually over a time scale of a year to sub-Eddington regimes. The initially geometrically thick disk becomes a thin one and eventually an ADAF at very low accretion rates. As such, TDEs explore the whole range of accretion rates and configurations. A challenging question is what the corresponding light curves of these events are. We explore numerically the disk luminosity and the conditions within the inner region of the disk using a fully general relativistic slim disk model. Those conditions determine the magnitude of the magnetic field that engulfs the black hole and this, in turn, determines the Blandford-Znajek jet power. We estimate this power in two different ways and show that they are self-consistent. We find, as expected earlier from analytic argu- ments ...

  13. On the luminosity distance and the epoch of acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Sutherland, Will

    2015-01-01

    Standard cosmological models based on general relativity (GR) with dark energy predict that the Universe underwent a transition from decelerating to accelerating expansion at a moderate redshift $z_{acc} \\sim 0.7$. Clearly, it is of great interest to directly measure this transition in a model-independent way, without the assumption that GR is the correct theory of gravity. We explore to what extent supernova (SN) luminosity distance measurements provide evidence for such a transition: we show that, contrary to intuition, the well-known "turnover" in the SN distance residuals $\\Delta\\mu$ relative to an empty (Milne) model does not give firm evidence for such a transition within the redshift range spanned by SN data. The observed turnover in that diagram is predominantly due to the negative curvature in the Milne model, {\\em not} the deceleration predicted by $\\Lambda$CDM and relatives. We show that there are several advantages in plotting distance residuals against a flat, non-accelerating model $(w = -1/3)$,...

  14. EVN observations of low-luminosity flat-spectrum AGNs

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Thean, A; Dennett-Thorpe, J

    2001-01-01

    We present and discuss the results of VLBI (EVN) observations of three low-luminosity (P(5 GHz)<10^25 W/Hz) Broad Emission Line AGNs carefully selected from a sample of flat spectrum radio sources (CLASS). Based on the total and the extended radio power at 5 GHz and at 1.4 GHz respectively, these objects should be technically classified as radio-quiet AGN and thus the origin of their radio emission is not clearly understood. The VLBI observations presented in this paper have revealed compact radio cores which imply a lower limit on the brightness temperature of about 3X10^8 K. This result rules out a thermal origin for the radio emission and strongly suggests an emission mechanism similar to that observed in more powerful radio-loud AGNs. Since, by definition, the three objects show a flat (or inverted) radio spectrum between 1.4 GHz and 8.4 GHz, the observed radio emission could be relativistically beamed. Multi-epoch VLBI observations can confirm this possibility in two years time.

  15. Luminosities of Disk--accreting Non--magnetic Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Thampan, A V

    2002-01-01

    Disk accretion onto a neutron star possessing a weak surface magnetic field ($B \\le 10^8$ G) provides interesting X-ray emission scenarios, and is relevant for understanding X-ray bursters and low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The standard (Newtonian) theory of disk-accretion predicts that the matter spiralling in from infinity loses one-half of its total gravitational energy in the extended disk, and the remainder in a narrow boundary layer girdling the neutron star. The ratio of the boundary layer luminosity to that from the disk ($E_{\\rm BL}/E_{\\rm D}$) is, therefore, unity. On incorporation of general relativity without rotation (Schwarzschild solution), $E_{\\rm BL}/E_{\\rm D}$ is seen to be as high as 6. We construct rotating sequences of neutron stars for three representative equations of state. We show here that for a neutron star rotating at a limit where centrifugal force balances the inward gravitational force, $E_{\\rm BL}/E_{\\rm D}\\sim 0$.

  16. The dust grain size - stellar luminosity trend in debris discs

    CERN Document Server

    Pawellek, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    The cross section of material in debris discs is thought to be dominated by the smallest grains that can still stay in bound orbits despite the repelling action of stellar radiation pressure. Thus the minimum (and typical) grain size $s_\\text{min}$ is expected to be close to the radiation pressure blowout size $s_\\text{blow}$. Yet a recent analysis of a sample of Herschel-resolved debris discs showed the ratio $s_\\text{min}/s_\\text{blow}$ to systematically decrease with the stellar luminosity from about ten for solar-type stars to nearly unity in the discs around the most luminous A-type stars. Here we explore this trend in more detail, checking how significant it is and seeking to find possible explanations. We show that the trend is robust to variation of the composition and porosity of dust particles. For any assumed grain properties and stellar parameters, we suggest a recipe of how to estimate the "true" radius of a spatially unresolved debris disc, based solely on its spectral energy distribution. The r...

  17. Isochrones and Luminosity Functions for Old White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Richer, H B; Limongi, M; Chieffi, A; Straniero, O; Fahlman, G G; Richer, Harvey B.; Hansen, Brad; Limongi, Marco; Chieffi, Alessandro; Straniero, Oscar; Fahlman, Gregory G.

    1999-01-01

    Using a new grid of models of cooling white dwarfs, we calculate isochrones and luminosity functions in the Johnson-Kron/Cousins and HST filter sets for systems containing old white dwarfs. These new models incorporate a non-grey atmosphere which is necessary to properly describe the effects of molecular opacity at the cool temperatures of old white dwarfs. The various functions calculated and extensively tabulated and plotted are meant to be as utilitarian as possible for observers so all results are listed in quantities that observers will obtain. The tables and plots developed should eventually prove critical in interpreting the results of HST's Advanced Camera observations of the oldest white dwarfs in nearby globular clusters, in understanding the results of searches for old white dwarfs in the Galactic halo, and in determining ages for star clusters of all ages using white dwarfs. As a practical application we demonstrate the use of these results by deriving the white dwarf cooling age of the old Galact...

  18. Quasar UV luminosity function evolution up to z = 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, S.; Gallerani, S.; Ferrara, A.; Greig, B.; Feruglio, C.

    2017-04-01

    We study the redshift evolution of the quasar (QSO) UV luminosity function (LF) for 0.5 up to date observational data and, in particular, the recently discovered population of faint active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We fit the QSO LF using either a double power-law function or a Schechter function, finding that both forms provide good fits to the data. We derive empirical relations for the LF parameters as a function of redshift and, based on these results, predict the QSO UV LF at z = 8. From the inferred LF evolution, we compute the redshift evolution of the QSO/AGN comoving ionizing emissivity and hydrogen photoionization rate. If faint AGNs are included, the contribution of QSOs to reionization increases substantially. However, their level of contribution critically depends on the detailed shape of the QSO LF, which can be constrained by efficient searches of high-z QSOs. To this aim, we predict the expected (i) number of z > 6 QSOs detectable by ongoing and future near-infrared surveys (as EUCLID and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope), and (ii) number counts for a single radio-recombination line observation with Square Kilometre Array-MID (FoV = 0.49 deg2) as a function of the Hnα flux density, at 0 < z < 8. These surveys (even at z < 6) will be fundamental to better constrain the role of QSOs as reionization sources.

  19. ESTIMATING DISTANCES TO ELLIPTIC GALAXIES WITH A MASS-LUMINOSITY-RELATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANALBADA, TS; BERTIN, G; STIAVELLI, M

    1995-01-01

    We argue that the physical reason for the success of the Fundamental Plane and the D-n-sigma relation as distance estimators for elliptical galaxies is the existence of a relation between luminosity and mass with small intrinsic scatter. Therefore a better understanding of the luminosity and mass va

  20. Modeling the Near-Infrared Luminosity Function of Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, A. A.; Lada, E. A.; Lada, C. J.

    1999-12-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments designed to evaluate the usefulness of near-infrared luminosity functions for constraining the Initial Mass Function (IMF) of young (0-10 Myr) stellar populations. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we create a suite of model luminosity functions systematically varying each of these basic underlying relations: the underlying IMF, cluster star forming history, and theoretical pre-main sequence mass-to-luminosity relations. Our modeling techniques also allow us to explore the effects of unresolved binaries, infrared excess emission from circumstellar disks, and interstellar extinction on the cluster luminosity function. From this numerical modeling, we find that the luminosity function of a young stellar population is considerably more sensitive to variations in the underlying initial mass function than to either variations in the star forming history or assumed pre-main-sequence (PMS) mass-to-luminosity relation. To illustrate the potential effectiveness of using the KLF of a young cluster to constrain its IMF, we model the observed K band luminosity function of the nearby Trapezium cluster. Our derived mass function for the Trapezium spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass (5>Msun>0.02) and has a peak near the hydrogen burning limit. Below the hydrogen burning limit, the mass function steadily decreases with decreasing mass throughout the brown dwarf regime. We also test the hypothesis of a space varying IMF by performing model fits to the K band luminosity functions of several other young clusters.

  1. Run II performance of luminosity and beam condition monitors at CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, Jessica Lynn [DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The BRIL (Beam Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity) system of CMS consists of instrumentation to measure the luminosity online and offline, and to monitor the LHC beam conditions inside CMS. An accurate luminosity measurement is essential to the CMS physics program, and measurement of the beam background is necessary to ensure safe operation of CMS. Many of the BRIL subsystems have been upgraded and others have been added for LHC Run II to complement the existing measurements. The beam condition monitor (BCM) consists of several sets of diamond sensors used to measure online luminosity and beam background with a single-bunch-crossing resolution. The BCM also detects when beam conditions become unfavorable for CMS running and may trigger a beam abort to protect the detector. The beam halo monitor (BHM) uses quartz bars to measure the background of the incoming beams at larger radii. The pixel luminosity telescope (PLT) consists of telescopes of silicon sensors designed to provide a CMS online and offline luminosity measurement. In addition, the forward hadronic calorimeter (HF) delivers an independent luminosity measurement, making the whole system robust and allowing for cross-checks of the systematics. An overview of the performance during 2015 LHC running for the new/updated BRIL subsystems will be given, including the uncertainties of the luminosity measurements.

  2. Size dependence of the radio-luminosity-mechanical-power correlation in radio galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabala, S. S. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Godfrey, L. E. H., E-mail: Stanislav.Shabala@utas.edu.au [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2013-06-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in active galactic nucleus jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of Fanaroff-Riley Type II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, (Q{sub jet}/10{sup 36} W)=1.5{sub −0.8}{sup +1.8}(L{sub 151}/10{sup 27} W Hz{sup −1}){sup 0.8}(1+z){sup 1.0}(D/kpc){sup 0.58±0.17}, where D is source size and L {sub 151} the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio-luminosity-jet-power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent in the sample. Such bias will affect the accuracy of the kinetic luminosity function derived from lobe radio luminosities and should be treated with caution.

  3. Study of luminosity leveling with crossing angle for polarized proton program at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blackler, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Luo, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, G. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-01-25

    Luminosity leveling has been requested by experiments in the past and it is also foreseen in the future at RHIC. There are some options to do this, some well tested and some are potential. In this report, we present the theoretical and experimental study on leveling luminosity by crossing angle.

  4. The luminosity dependence of clustering and higher order correlations in the PSCz survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szapudi, [No Value; Branchini, E; Frenk, CS; Maddox, S; Saunders, W

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the spatial clustering of galaxies in the PSCz galaxy redshift survey, as revealed by the two-point correlation function, the luminosity mark correlations and the moments of counts-in-cells. We construct volume-limited subsamples at different depths and search for a luminosity depende

  5. Electron-Electron Luminosity in the Next Linear COLLIDER—A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, F.; Thompson, K. A.; Helm, R. H.

    In this paper, we discuss some operational aspects of electron-electron collisions at the Next Linear Collider (NLC) and estimate the luminosity attainable in such a machine. We also consider the use of two future technologies which could simplify the operation and improve the luminosity in an e-e- collider: polarized rf guns and plasma lenses.

  6. The Relationship between Radio Luminosity and Core-Dominance Parameter for XBLs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong-Xiang Wang; Y. Liu; Fei-Peng Pi; Jiang-He Yang

    2011-03-01

    In this work, we investigate the correlation between the luminosity and the core-dominance parameter for a sample of X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs), and found that the extended luminosity is strongly anti-correlated with the core-dominance parameter while the core (or the total) luminosity is not correlated with the core-dominance parameter. If this is the case, then we can expect that the lower extended luminosity XBLs and their core luminosity is relatively higher. This can be explained by a relativistic beaming model since in this case, the viewing angle is smaller and the emissions dominate the extended emissions. Therefore, the anti-correlation is in fact the result of the relativistic beaming model.

  7. Optical Luminosities and Mass-to-Light Ratios of Nearby Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1999-01-01

    We analyze a sample of 105 clusters having virial mass homogeneously estimated and for which galaxy magnitudes are available with a well defined high degree of completeness. In particular, we consider a subsample of 89 clusters with B_j band galaxy magnitudes taken from the COSMOS/UKST Southern Sky Object Catalogue. We compute cluster luminosities L_{B_j} within several clustercentric distances and within the virialization radius R_{vir}. In particular, we use the luminosity function and background counts estimated by Lumsden et al. (1997) on the Edinburgh/Durham Southern Galaxy Catalogue. We analyze the effect of several uncertainties connected to photometric data, fore/background removal, and extrapolation below the completeness limit of the photometry, in order to assess the robustness of our cluster luminosity estimates. We draw our results on the relations between luminosity and dynamical quantities from the COSMOS sample by considering mass and luminosities determined within the virialization radius. We...

  8. The connection between galaxy environment and the luminosity function slopes of star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David O.; Dale, Daniel A.; Lee, Janice C.; Thilker, David; Calzetti, Daniela; Kennicutt, Robert C.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first study of GALEX far-ultraviolet (FUV) luminosity functions of individual star-forming regions within a sample of 258 nearby galaxies spanning a large range in total stellar mass and star formation properties. We identify ˜65 000 star-forming regions (i.e. FUV sources), measure each galaxy's luminosity function, and characterize the relationships between the luminosity function slope (α) and several global galaxy properties. A final sample of 82 galaxies with reliable luminosity functions are used to define these relationships and represent the largest sample of galaxies with the largest range of galaxy properties used to study the connection between luminosity function properties and galaxy environment. We find that α correlates with global star formation properties, where galaxies with higher star formation rates and star formation rate densities (ΣSFR) tend to have flatter luminosity function slopes. In addition, we find that neither stochastic sampling of the luminosity function in galaxies with low-number statistics nor the effects of blending due to distance can fully account for these trends. We hypothesize that the flatter slopes in high ΣSFR galaxies is due to higher gas densities and higher star formation efficiencies which result in proportionally greater numbers of bright star-forming regions. Finally, we create a composite luminosity function composed of star-forming regions from many galaxies and find a break in the luminosity function at brighter luminosities. However, we find that this break is an artefact of varying detection limits for galaxies at different distances.

  9. SuperB: a Linear High-Luminosity B Factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, J.; Bettarini, S.; Biagini, M.; Bonneaud, G.; Cai, Y.; Calderini, G.; Ciuchini, M.; Dubois-Felsmann, G.P.; Ecklund, S.; Forti, F.; Gershon, T.J.; Giorgi, M.A.; Hitlin, D.G.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Lusiani, A.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Neri, N.; Novokhatski, A.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; /Caltech /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale

    2006-02-08

    This paper is based on the outcome of the activity that has taken place during the recent workshop on ''SuperB in Italy'' held in Frascati on November 11-12, 2005. The workshop was opened by a theoretical introduction of Marco Ciuchini and was structured in two working groups. One focused on the machine and the other on the detector and experimental issues.. The present status on CP is mainly based on the results achieved by BABAR and Belle. Establishment of the indirect CP violation in B sector in 2001 and of the direct CP violation in 2004 thanks to the success of PEP-II and KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric B Factories operating at the center of mass energy corresponding to the mass of the {Upsilon}(4S ). With the two B Factories taking data, the Unitarity Triangle is now beginning to be over constrained by improving the measurements of the sides and now also of the angles {alpha}, and {gamma}. We are also in presence of the very intriguing results about the measurements of sin2{beta} in the time dependent analysis of decay channels via penguin loops, where b {yields} s{bar s}s and b {yields} s{bar d}d. {tau} physics, in particular LFV search, as well as charm and ISR physics are important parts of the scientific program of a SuperB Factory. The physics case together with possible scenarios for the high luminosity SuperB Factory based on the concepts of the Linear Collider and the related experimental issues are discussed.

  10. Ultra-faint ultraviolet galaxies at z ∼ 2 behind the lensing cluster A1689: The luminosity function, dust extinction, and star formation rate density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alavi, Anahita; Siana, Brian; Freeman, William R.; Dominguez, Alberto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Richard, Johan [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Charles André, F-69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France); Stark, Daniel P.; Robertson, Brant [Department of Astronomy, Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Rm N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Scarlata, Claudia [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Teplitz, Harry I.; Rafelski, Marc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kewley, Lisa, E-mail: anahita.alavi@email.ucr.edu [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2014-01-10

    extinction correction of 4.2 over all luminosities and a Kroupa initial mass function) of 0.148{sub −0.020}{sup +0.023} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} Mpc{sup –3}, significantly higher than previous determinations because of the additional population of fainter galaxies and the larger dust correction factors.

  11. L1Track: a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Cerri, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    With the planned high-luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC), the ATLAS detector will see its collision rate increase by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the current LHC operation. The earliest hardware based ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will have to provide an higher rejection factor in a more difficult environment: a new improved Level 1 trigger architecture is under study, which includes the possibility of extracting with low latency and hight accuracy tracking information on time for the decision taking process. The expected trigger rates at HL-LHC and the available latency are the key ingredients that will drive the new design. The Level 1 track trigger (L1Track) design requires substantial modification of the ATLAS silicon detector readout philosophy: a precursor of the potential merging of detector and trigger architectures in the future silicon detectors at particle colliders. We will discuss potential approaches that are being actively considered to fulfil the demanding HL-LHC constrain...

  12. The galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters: the faint-end upturn and the connection to the field luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Lan, Ting-Wen; Mo, Houjun

    2015-01-01

    We characterize the luminosity functions of galaxies residing in $z\\sim0$ groups and clusters over the broadest ranges of luminosity and mass reachable by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Our measurements cover four orders of magnitude in luminosity, down to about $M_r=-12$ mag or $L=10^7\\,L_\\odot$, and three orders of magnitude in halo mass, from $10^{12}$ to $10^{15} \\, {\\rm M}_\\odot$. We find a characteristic scale, $M_r\\sim-18$ mag or $L\\sim10^9\\, L_\\odot$, below which the slope of the luminosity function becomes systematically steeper. This trend is present for all halo masses and originates mostly from red satellite galaxies. The ubiquitous presence of this faint-end upturn suggests that it is formation, rather than halo-specific environmental effect, that plays a major role in regulating the stellar masses of faint satellites. We show that the observed luminosity functions of satellite galaxies can be described in a simple manner by a double Schechter function with amplitudes scaling with halo mass over t...

  13. Characterizing the evolving K -band luminosity function using the UltraVISTA, CANDELS and HUDF surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortlock, Alice; McLure, Ross J.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; McLeod, Derek J.; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther; Parsa, Shaghayegh; Dunlop, James S.; Bruce, Victoria A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a new study of the K-band galaxy luminosity function (KLF) at redshifts z ≤ 3.75, based on a nested combination of the UltraVISTA, Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Legacy Extragalactic Survey and HUDF surveys. The large dynamic range in luminosity spanned by this new data set (3-4 dex over the full redshift range) is sufficient to clearly demonstrate for the first time that the faint-end slope of the KLF at z ≥ 0.25 is relatively steep (-1.3 ≤ α ≤ -1.5 for a single Schechter function), in good agreement with recent theoretical and phenomenological models. Moreover, based on our new data set, we find that a double Schechter function provides a significantly improved description of the KLF at z ≤ 2. At redshifts z ≥ 0.25, the evolution of the KLF is remarkably smooth, with little or no evolution evident at faint (MK ≥ -20.5) or bright magnitudes (MK ≤ -24.5). Instead, the KLF is seen to evolve rapidly at intermediate magnitudes, with the number density of galaxies at MK ≃-23 dropping by a factor of ≃5 over the redshift interval 0.25 ≤ z ≤ 3.75. Motivated by this, we explore a simple description of the evolving KLF based on a double Schechter function with fixed faint-end slopes (α1 = -0.5, α2 = -1.5) and a shared characteristic magnitude (MK^{star }). According to this parametrization, the normalization of the component which dominates the faint end of the KLF remains approximately constant, with φ ^{star }2 decreasing by only a factor of ≃2 between z ≃0 and 3.25. In contrast, the component which dominates the bright end of the KLF at low redshifts evolves dramatically, becoming essentially negligible by z ≃3. Finally, we note that within this parametrization, the observed evolution of MK^{star } between z ≃0 and 3.25 is entirely consistent with MK^{star } corresponding to a constant stellar mass of M⋆ ≃5 × 1010 M⊙ at all redshifts.

  14. Gamma-ray luminosity function of gamma-ray bright AGNs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Debbijoy Bhattacharya; P. Sreekumar; R. Mukherjee

    2009-01-01

    Detection of γ-ray emissions from a class of active galactic nuclei (viz blazars),has been one of the important findings from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO). However, their-γ-ray luminosity function has not been well determined. Few at-tempts have been made in earlier works, where BL Lacs and Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) have been considered as a single source class. In this paper, we investigated the evolution and γ-ray luminosity function of FSRQs and BL Lacs separately. Our investi-gation indicates no evolution for BL Lacs, however FSRQs show significant evolution. Pure luminosity evolution is assumed for FSRQs and exponential and power law evolu-tion models are examined. Due to the small number of sources, the low luminosity end index of the luminosity function for FSRQs is constrained with an upper limit. BL Lac lu-minosity function shows no signature of break. As a consistency check, the model source distributions derived from these luminosity functions show no significant departure from the observed source distributions.

  15. The total infrared luminosity may significantly overestimate the star formation rate of recently quenched galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hayward, Christopher C; Ashby, Matthew L N; Fazio, Giovanni; Hernquist, Lars; Martínez-Galarza, Juan Rafael; Noeske, Kai; Smith, Howard A; Wuyts, Stijn; Zezas, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The total infrared (IR) luminosity is very useful for estimating the star formation rate (SFR) of galaxies, but converting the IR luminosity into an SFR relies on assumptions that do not hold for all galaxies. We test the effectiveness of the IR luminosity as an SFR indicator by applying it to synthetic spectral energy distributions generated from three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations of isolated disc galaxies and galaxy mergers. In general, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity agrees well with the true instantaneous SFR of the simulated galaxies. However, for the major mergers in which a strong starburst is induced, the SFR inferred from the IR luminosity can overestimate the instantaneous SFR during the post-starburst phase by greater than two orders of magnitude. Even though the instantaneous SFR decreases rapidly after the starburst, the stars that were formed in the starburst remain dust-obscured and thus produce significant IR luminosity. Consequently, use of the IR luminosity as an SFR indica...

  16. Nearby Galaxies in the 2micron All Sky Survey I. K-band Luminosity Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Devereux, Nick; Ashby, M L N; Willmer, C N A; Hriljac, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Differential K-band luminosity functions (LFs) are presented for a complete sample of 1613 nearby bright galaxies segregated by visible morphology. The LF for late-type spirals follows a power law that rises towards low luminosities whereas the LFs for ellipticals, lenticulars and bulge-dominated spirals are peaked and decline toward both higher and lower luminosities. Each morphological type (E, S0, S0/a-Sab, Sb-Sbc, Sc-Scd) contributes approximately equally to the overall K-band luminosity density of galaxies in the local universe. Type averaged bulge/disk ratios are used to subtract the disk component leading to the prediction that the K-band LF for bulges is bimodal with ellipticals dominating the high luminosity peak, comprising 60% of the bulge luminosity density in the local universe with the remaining 40% contributed by lenticulars and the bulges of spirals. Overall, bulges contribute 30% of the galaxy luminosity density at K in the local universe with spiral disks making up the remainder. If bulge lu...

  17. Evidence Against an Edge-On Disk Around the Extrasolar Planet 2MASS 1207 b and a New Thick Cloud Explanation for its Under-Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Skemer, Andrew J; Sz\\Hucs, László; Apai, Dániel; Pascucci, Ilaria; Biller, Beth A

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) Since the discovery of the first directly-imaged, planetary-mass object, 2MASS 1207 b, several works have sought to explain a disparity between its observed temperature and luminosity. Given its known age, distance, and spectral type, 2MASS 1207 b is under-luminous by a factor of ~10 (~2.5 mags) when compared to standard models of brown-dwarf/giant-planet evolution. In this paper, we study three possible sources of 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity. First, we investigate Mohanty et al. (2007)'s hypothesis that a near edge-on disk might be responsible for 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity. We conclude that the hypothesis is unlikely due to the lack of variability seen in multi-epoch photometry and unnecessary due to the increasing sample of under-luminous brown-dwarfs/giant-exoplanets that cannot be explained by an edge-on disk. Next, we test the analogous possibility that a spherical shell of dust, could explain 2MASS 1207 b's under-luminosity. Models containing enough dust to create ~2.5 mags of extin...

  18. Cold Dust Emission from X-ray AGN in the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Dependence on Luminosity, Obscuration & AGN Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Willott, C J; Geach, J E; Harrison, C M; Alaghband-Zadeh, S; Alexander, D M; Bourne, N; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Farrah, D; Jarvis, M; Michalowski, M J; Page, M; Smith, D J B; Swinbank, A M; Symeonidis, M; Van der Werf, P P

    2015-01-01

    We study the 850um emission in X-ray selected AGN in the 2 sq-deg COSMOS field using new data from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. We find 19 850um bright X-ray AGN in a high-sensitivity region covering 0.89 sq-deg with flux densities of S850=4-10 mJy. The 19 AGN span the full range in redshift and hard X-ray luminosity covered by the sample - 0.71 X-ray AGN - S850=0.71+/-0.08mJy. We explore trends in the stacked 850um flux densities with redshift, finding no evolution in the average cold dust emission over the redshift range probed. For Type 1 AGN, there is no significant correlation between the stacked 850um flux and hard X-ray luminosity. However, in Type 2 AGN the stacked submm flux is a factor of 2 higher at high luminosities. When averaging over all X-ray luminosities, no significant differences are found in the stacked submm fluxes of Type 1 and Type 2 AGN as well as AGN separated on the basis of X-ray hardness ratios and optical-to-infrared colours. However, at log10(LX) >44.4, dependences in ave...

  19. MUSE Deep-Fields: The Lya Luminosity Function in the Hubble Deep Field South at 2.91 < z < 6.64

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, Alyssa B; Blaizot, Jeremy; Wisotzki, Lutz; Herenz, Edmund Christian; Garel, Thibault; Richard, Johan; Bacon, Roland; Bina, David; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Contini, Thierry; Brock, Mark den; Hashimoto, Takuya; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Pello, Roser; Schaye, Joop; Schmidt, Kasper B

    2016-01-01

    We present the first estimate of the Ly{\\alpha} luminosity function using blind spectroscopy from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer, MUSE, in the Hubble Deep Field South. Using automatic source-detection software, we assemble a homogeneously-detected sample of 59 Ly{\\alpha} emitters covering a flux range of -18.0 < log10 (F) < -16.3 (erg s^-1 cm^-2), corresponding to luminosities of 41.4 < log10 (L) < 42.8 (erg s^-1). As recent studies have shown, Ly{\\alpha} fluxes can be underestimated by a factor of two or more via traditional methods, and so we undertake a careful assessment of each object's Ly{\\alpha} flux using a curve-of-growth analysis to account for extended emission. We describe our self-consistent method for determining the completeness of the sample, and present an estimate of the global Ly{\\alpha} luminosity function between redshifts 2.91 < z < 6.64 using the 1/Vmax estimator. We find the luminosity function is higher than many number densities reported in the literature by ...

  20. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bai, Mei [Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany). Inst. for Advanced Simulation; Duan, Zhe [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Luo, Yun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Marusic, Aljosa [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shen, Xiaozhe [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-03

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  1. The Truncated Lognormal Distribution as a Luminosity Function for SWIFT-BAT Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Zaninetti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the luminosity function (LF in Gamma ray bursts (GRBs depends on the adopted cosmology, each one characterized by its corresponding luminosity distance. Here, we analyze three cosmologies: the standard cosmology, the plasma cosmology and the pseudo-Euclidean universe. The LF of the GRBs is firstly modeled by the lognormal distribution and the four broken power law and, secondly, by a truncated lognormal distribution. The truncated lognormal distribution fits acceptably the range in luminosity of GRBs as a function of the redshift.

  2. Expected performance for an upgraded ATLAS detector at High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    This note summarises the expected performance of the ATLAS detector after the upgrades for the High-Luminosity LHC. The performance evaluations are based on full simulation of the upgraded Phase-II detector with in-time and out-of-time pile-up for luminosities up to $7.5\\times10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ corresponding to an average of number of inelastic collisions per bunch crossing of up to 200. The simulation uses an updated and optimised design of the inner tracker upgrade and an improved reconstruction software, resulting in improved performance compared to previous studies for High-Luminosity LHC.

  3. The truncated lognormal distribution as a luminosity function for SWIFT-BAT gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2016-01-01

    The determination of the luminosity function (LF) in gamma ray bursts (GRBs) depends on the adopted cosmology, each one characterized by its corresponding luminosity distance. Here we analyse three cosmologies: the standard cosmology, the plasma cosmology, and the pseudo-Euclidean universe. The LF of the GRBs is firstly modeled by the lognormal distribution and the four broken power law, and secondly by a truncated lognormal distribution. The truncated lognormal distribution fits acceptably the range in luminosity of GRBs as a function of the redshift.

  4. SUSY and BSM physics prospects at the high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Clerbaux, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Prospects on searches for new physics at the high-luminosity LHC are presented for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. Two integrated luminosity scenarios are assumed 300 fb$^{-1}$, corresponding to the end of the LHC run 3, and 3000 fb$^{-1}$, the integrated luminosity expected to be collected during the LHC phase 2. Results for strongly produced and weakly produced supersymmetric particles are first detailed. A selection of results on searches for new physics beyond the standard model is then given, in particular the search for heavy resonances in various decay channels and the search for dark matter candidates.

  5. A Close Examination of the Measurement and Parametrization of Luminosity Functions in an Expanding Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lake, S E; Tsai, C -W; Lam, A

    2016-01-01

    The astronomy community has at its disposal a large back catalog of public spectroscopic galaxy redshift surveys that can be used for the measurement of luminosity functions. Utilizing the back catalog with new photometric surveys to maximum efficiency requires modeling the color selection bias imposed on selection of target galaxies by flux limits at multiple wavelengths. The likelihood derived herein can address, in principle, all possible color selection biases through the use of a generalization of the luminosity function, $\\Phi(L)$, over the space of all spectra: the spectro-luminosity functional, $\\Psi[L_\

  6. Monte Carlo simulations of the luminosity function of hot white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, S; Krzesinski, J; Kleinman, S J

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the population of the hot branch of the white dwarf luminosity function. We used the most up-to-date stellar evolutionary models and we implemented a full description of the observational selection biases. Our theoretical results are compared with the luminosity function of hot white dwarfs obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), for both DA and non-DA white dwarfs. For non-DA white dwarfs we find an excellent agreement with the observational data, while for DA white dwarfs our simulations show some discrepancies with the observations for the brightest luminosity bins, those corresponding to L>= 10 L_sun.

  7. Rest-frame UV Single-epoch Black Hole Mass Estimates of Low-luminosity AGNs at Intermediate Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouzos, Marios; Woo, Jong-Hak; Matsuoka, Kenta; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Onken, Christopher A.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Park, Dawoo; Nagao, Tohru; Kim, Sang Chul

    2015-12-01

    The ability to accurately derive black hole (BH) masses at progressively higher redshifts and over a wide range of continuum luminosities has become indispensable in the era of large-area extragalactic spectroscopic surveys. In this paper, we present an extension of existing comparisons between rest-frame UV and optical virial BH mass estimators to intermediate redshifts and luminosities comparable to the local Hβ reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We focus on the Mg ii, C iv, and C iii] broad emission lines and compare them to both Hα and Hβ. We use newly acquired near-infrared spectra from the Fiber-fed Multi-object Spectrograph instrument on the Subaru telescope for 89 broad-lined AGNs at redshifts between 0.3 and 3.5, complemented by data from the AGES survey. We employ two different prescriptions for measuring the emission line widths and compare the results. We confirm that Mg ii shows a tight correlation with Hα and Hβ, with a scatter of ∼0.25 dex. The C iv and C iii] estimators, while showing larger scatter, are viable virial mass estimators after accounting for a trend with the UV-to-optical luminosity ratio. We find an intrinsic scatter of ∼0.37 dex between Balmer and carbon virial estimators by combining our data set with previous high redshift measurements. This updated comparison spans a total of three decades in BH mass. We calculate a virial factor for C iv/C iii] {log}{f}{{C}{{IV}}/{{C}}{{III}}]}=0.87 with an estimated systematic uncertainty of ∼0.4 dex and find excellent agreement between the local reverberation mapped AGN sample and our high-z sample.

  8. A proposed Drift Tubes-seeded muon track trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzobon, N., E-mail: nicola.pozzobon@pd.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Lazzizzera, I. [Università degli Studi di Trento, Trento (Italy); Trento Institute for Fundamental Physics and Applications, Trento (Italy); Vanini, S.; Zotto, P. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2016-07-11

    The LHC program at 13 and 14 TeV, after the observation of the candidate SM Higgs boson, will help clarify future subjects of study and shape the needed tools. Any upgrade of the LHC experiments for unprecedented luminosities, such as the High Luminosity-LHC ones, must then maintain the acceptance on electroweak processes that can lead to a detailed study of the properties of the candidate Higgs boson. The acceptance of the key lepton, photon and hadron triggers should be kept such that the overall physics acceptance, in particular for low-mass scale processes, can be the same as the one the experiments featured in 2012. In such a scenario, a new approach to early trigger implementation is needed. One of the major steps will be the inclusion of high-granularity tracking sub-detectors, such as the CMS Silicon Tracker, in taking the early trigger decision. This contribution can be crucial in several tasks, including the confirmation of triggers in other subsystems, and the improvement of the on-line momentum measurement resolution. A muon track-trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC is presented. A back-extrapolation of Drift Tubes trigger primitives is proposed to match tracks found at Level 1 with muon candidates. The main figures-of-merit are presented, featuring sharp thresholds and less contamination from lower momentum muons, and an expected rate reduction of a factor of 5–10 at typical thresholds with respect to the muon trigger configuration used in 2012.

  9. A proposed Drift Tubes-seeded muon track trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzobon, N.; Lazzizzera, I.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.

    2016-07-01

    The LHC program at 13 and 14 TeV, after the observation of the candidate SM Higgs boson, will help clarify future subjects of study and shape the needed tools. Any upgrade of the LHC experiments for unprecedented luminosities, such as the High Luminosity-LHC ones, must then maintain the acceptance on electroweak processes that can lead to a detailed study of the properties of the candidate Higgs boson. The acceptance of the key lepton, photon and hadron triggers should be kept such that the overall physics acceptance, in particular for low-mass scale processes, can be the same as the one the experiments featured in 2012. In such a scenario, a new approach to early trigger implementation is needed. One of the major steps will be the inclusion of high-granularity tracking sub-detectors, such as the CMS Silicon Tracker, in taking the early trigger decision. This contribution can be crucial in several tasks, including the confirmation of triggers in other subsystems, and the improvement of the on-line momentum measurement resolution. A muon track-trigger for the CMS experiment at the High Luminosity-LHC is presented. A back-extrapolation of Drift Tubes trigger primitives is proposed to match tracks found at Level 1 with muon candidates. The main figures-of-merit are presented, featuring sharp thresholds and less contamination from lower momentum muons, and an expected rate reduction of a factor of 5-10 at typical thresholds with respect to the muon trigger configuration used in 2012.

  10. eta ' transition form factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amo Sanchez, del P.; Raven, H.G.; Snoek, H.; BaBar, Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    eta((')) transition form factors in the momentum-transfer range from 4 to 40 GeV(2). The analysis is based on 469 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected at PEP-II with the BABAR detector at e(+)e(-) center-of-mass energies near 10.6 GeV.

  11. Interpreting broad emission-line variations II: Tensions between luminosity, characteristic size and responsivity

    CERN Document Server

    Goad, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the variability behaviour of the broad Hb emission-line to driving continuum variations in the best-studied AGN NGC 5548. For a particular choice of BLR geometry, Hb surface emissivity based on photoionization models, and using a scaled version of the 13 yr optical continuum light curve as a proxy for the driving ionizing continuum, we explore several key factors that determine the broad emission line luminosity L, characteristic size R(RW), and variability amplitude (i.e., responsivity) eta, as well as the interplay between them. For fixed boundary models which extend as far as the hot-dust the predicted delays for Hb are on average too long. However, the predicted variability amplitude of Hb provides a remarkably good match to observations except during low continuum states. We suggest that the continuum flux variations which drive the redistribution in Hb surface emissivity F(r) do not on their own lead to large enough changes in R(RW) or eta(eff). We thus investigate dust-bounded BLRs for w...

  12. A First Baseline for the Magnets in the High Luminosity LHC Insertion Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Todesco, E; Ambrosio, G; Arduini, G; Cerutti, F; De Maria, R; Esposito, L; Fartoukh, S; Ferracin, P; Felice, H; Gupta, R; Kersevan, R; Mokhov, N; Nakamoto, T; Rakno, I; Rifflet, J M; Rossi, L; Sabbi, G L; Segreti, M; Toral, F; Xu, Q; Wanderer, P; van Weelderen, R

    2014-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project aims at accumulating 3000 fb-1 in the years 2023-2035, i.e. ten times more w.r.t. the nominal LHC performance expected for 2010- 2021. One key element to reach this challenging performance is a new insertion region to reduce the beam size in the interaction point by approximately a factor two. This requires larger aperture magnets in the region spanning from the interaction point to the matching section quadrupoles. This aperture has been fixed to 150 mm for the inner triplet quadrupoles in 2012. In this paper we give a first baseline of the interaction region. We discuss the main motivations that lead us to choose the technology, the combination of fields/gradients and lengths, the apertures, the quantity of superconductor, and the operational margin. Key elements are also the constraints given by the energy deposition in terms of heat load and radiation damage; we present the main features related to shielding and heat removal.

  13. The Bright End of the UV Luminosity Function at z~8: New Constraints from CANDELS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Oesch, P A; Illingworth, G D; Gonzalez, V; Trenti, M; van Dokkum, P G; Franx, M; Labbe, I; Carollo, C M; Magee, D

    2012-01-01

    We present new z~8 galaxy candidates from a search over ~95 arcmin^2 of WFC3/IR data. These are used to determine the bright end of the UV luminosity function (LF) of star-forming galaxies at z~8. Our analysis is based on newly acquired WFC3/IR imaging data obtained as part of the CANDELS Multi-Cycle Treasury program over the GOODS South field, which allows us to triple the search area for bright z~8 galaxies in the GOODS South. These new data are combined with existing deep optical ACS imaging to search for relatively bright (M_UV<-19.5 mag) z~8 galaxy candidates using the Lyman Break technique. To minimize contamination from lower redshift galaxies, we make full use of all optical data and impose strict non-detection criteria based on an optical chi^2_opt flux measurement. In the whole search area we identify 11 candidate z~8 galaxies, spanning a magnitude range H_160,AB =25.8-27.5 mag. The new data show that the UV LF is a factor ~2 lower at M_UV < -19.5 mag than previously determined. Combining this...

  14. The design of a fast Level-1 track trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of ATLAS.

    CERN Document Server

    Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high/luminosity upgrade of the LHC will increase the rate of the proton-proton collisions by approximately a factor of 5 with respect to the initial LHC-design. The ATLAS experiment will upgrade consequently, increasing its robustness and selectivity in the expected high radiation environment. In particular, the earliest, hardware based, ATLAS trigger stage ("Level 1") will require higher rejection power, still maintaining efficient selection on many various physics signatures. The key ingredient is the possibility of extracting tracking information from the brand new full-silicon detector and use it for the process. While fascinating, this solution poses a big challenge in the choice of the architecture, due to the reduced latency available at this trigger level (few tens of micro-seconds) and the high expected working rates (order of MHz). In this paper, we review the design possibilities of such a system in a potential new trigger and readout architecture, and present the performance resulting from a d...

  15. The power of relativistic jets is larger than the luminosity of their accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, G; Maraschi, L; Celotti, A; Sbarrato, T

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models for the production of relativistic jets from active galactic nuclei predict that jet power arises from the spin and mass of the central black hole, as well as the magnetic field near the event horizon. The physical mechanism mechanism underlying the contribution from the magnetic field is the torque exerted on the rotating black hole by the field amplified by the accreting material. If the squared magnetic field is proportional to the accretion rate, then there will be a correlation between jet power and accretion luminosity. There is evidence for such a correlation, but inadequate knowledge of the accretion luminosity of the limited and inhomogeneous used samples prevented a firm conclusion. Here we report an analysis of archival observations of a sample of blazars (quasars whose jets point towards Earth) that overcomes previous limitations. We find a clear correlation between jet power as measured through the gamma-ray luminosity, and accretion luminosity as measured by the broad emission...

  16. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2016-01-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A pixelated luminosity detector counts coincidences in several three layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to measure the luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point.The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background.A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cerenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fused quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules...

  17. Analysis of luminosity distributions and shape parameters of strong gravitational lensing elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Biernaux, J; Sluse, D; Chantry, V

    2016-01-01

    Luminosity profiles of galaxies acting as strong gravitational lenses can be tricky to study. Indeed, strong gravitational lensing images display several lensed components, both point-like and diffuse, around the lensing galaxy. Those objects limit the study of the galaxy luminosity to its inner parts. Therefore, the usual fitting methods perform rather badly on such images. Previous studies of strong lenses luminosity profiles using software such as GALFIT or IMFITFITS and various PSF-determining methods have resulted in discrepant results. The present work aims at investigating the causes of those discrepancies, as well as at designing more robust techniques for studying the morphology of early-type lensing galaxies with the ability to subtract a lensed signal from their luminosity profiles. We design a new method to independently measure each shape parameter, namely, the position angle, ellipticity, and half-light radius of the galaxy. Our half-light radius measurement method is based on an innovative sche...

  18. Modeling the Near-Infrared Luminosity Functions of Young Stellar Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Münch, A; Lada, C J; Muench, August A.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Lada, Charles J.

    1999-01-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments designed to evaluate the usefulness of near-infrared luminosity functions for constraining the Initial Mass Function (IMF) of young stellar populations. From this numerical modeling, we find that the luminosity function of a young stellar population is considerably more sensitive to variations in the underlying initial mass function than to either variations in the star forming history or assumed pre-main-sequence (PMS) mass-to-luminosity relation. To illustrate the potential effectiveness of using the KLF of a young cluster to constrain its IMF, we model the observed K band luminosity function of the nearby Trapezium cluster. Our derived mass function for the Trapezium spans two orders of magnitude in stellar mass (5 Msun to 0.02 Msun), has a peak near the hydrogen burning limit, and has an IMF for Brown Dwarfs which steadily decreases with decreasing mass.

  19. Redshift and luminosity evolution of the intrinsic alignments of galaxies in Horizon-AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Chisari, Nora Elisa; Codis, Sandrine; Dubois, Yohan; Devriendt, Julien; Miller, Lance; Benabed, Karim; Slyz, Adrianne; Gavazzi, Raphael; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsic galaxy shape and angular momentum alignments can arise in cosmological large-scale structure due to tidal interactions or galaxy formation processes. Cosmological hydrodynamical simulations have recently come of age as a tool to study these alignments and their contamination to weak gravitational lensing. We probe the redshift and luminosity evolution of intrinsic alignments in Horizon-AGN between $z=0$ and $z=3$ for galaxies with an $r$-band absolute magnitude of $M_r\\leq-20$. Alignments transition from being radial at low redshifts and high luminosities, dominated by the contribution of ellipticals, to being tangential at high redshift and low luminosities, where discs dominate the signal. This cannot be explained by the evolution of the fraction of ellipticals and discs alone: intrinsic evolution in the amplitude of alignments is necessary. We constrain the evolution of the alignment amplitude as a function of luminosity for elliptical galaxies alone and find it to be in good agreement with curre...

  20. Strip Detector for the ATLAS Detector Upgrade for the High - Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1*10^35 cm2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1*10^16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The physics motivations, required performance characteristics and basic design of the proposed upgrade of the strip detector will be a subject of this talk. Present ideas and solutions for the strip detector and current research and development program will be discussed.

  1. Strip Detector for the ATLAS Detector Upgrade for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sperlich, Dennis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1*10^35 cm2s-1 after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1*10^16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The physics motivations, required performance characteristics and basic design of the proposed upgrade of the strip detector will be a subject of this talk. Present ideas and solutions for the strip detector and current research and development program will be discussed.

  2. High luminosity interaction region design for collisions inside high field detector solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    Milardi, Catia; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Sgamma, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    An innovatory interaction region has been recently conceived and realized on the Frascati DA{\\Phi}NE lepton collider. The concept of tight focusing and small crossing angle adopted to achieve high luminosity in multibunch collisions has evolved towards enhanced beam focusing at the interaction point with large horizontal crossing angle, thanks to a new compensation mechanism for the beam-beam resonances. The novel configuration has been tested with a small detector without solenoidal field yielding a remarkable improvement in terms of peak as well as integrated luminosity. The high luminosity interaction region has now been modified to host a large detector with a strong solenoidal field which significantly perturbs the beam optics introducing new design challenges in terms of interaction region optics design, beam transverse coupling control and beam stay clear requirements. Interaction region design criteria as well as the luminosity results relevant to the structure test are presented and discussed.

  3. Cosmic Variance and Its Effect on the Luminosity Function Determination in Deep High z Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M

    2007-01-01

    We study cosmic variance in deep high redshift surveys and its influence on the determination of the luminosity function for high redshift galaxies. For several survey geometries relevant for HST and JWST instruments, we characterize the distribution of the galaxy number counts. This is obtained by means of analytic estimates via the two point correlation function in extended Press-Schechter theory as well as by using synthetic catalogs extracted from N-body cosmological simulations of structure formation. We adopt a simple luminosity - dark halo mass relation to investigate the environment effects on the fitting of the luminosity function. We show that in addition to variations of the normalization of the luminosity function, a steepening of its slope is also expected in underdense fields, similarly to what is observed within voids in the local universe. Therefore, to avoid introducing artificial biases, caution must be taken when attempting to correct for field underdensity, such as in the case of HST UDF i...

  4. The luminosity-specific Planetary Nebulae density in Local Group galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, R. L. M.; Buzzoni, A.; Arnaboldi, M.

    The value of the α ratio, the number of PNe per unit bolometric luminosity in a galaxy, is computed using stellar population synthesis models covering the whole range of Hubble types of galaxies.Model predictions are compared with the PNe counts in the Local Group, which indicate a fairly constant value of α - between 1 and 6 PNe per 10^7 solar luminosities - along the Hubble sequence.

  5. Determination of the integrated luminosity at HERA using elastic QED Compton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    A measurement of the integrated luminosity at the ep collider HERA is presented, exploiting the elastic QED Compton process ep{yields}e{gamma}p. The electron and the photon are detected in the backward calorimeter of the H1 experiment. The integrated luminosity of the data recorded in 2003 to 2007 is determined with a precision of 2.3%. The measurement is found to be compatible with the corresponding result obtained using the Bethe-Heitler process.

  6. An analytical solution in the complex plane for the luminosity distance in flat cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zaninetti, L

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytical solution for the luminosity distance in spatially flat cosmology with pressureless matter and the cosmological constant. The complex analytical solution is made of a real part and a negligible imaginary part. The real part of the luminosity distance allows finding the two parameters $H_0$ and $\\om$. A simple expression for the distance modulus for SNs of type Ia is reported in the framework of the minimax approximation.

  7. Overview of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.B.; Gallardo, J.C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Center for Accelerator Physics

    1997-03-01

    Muon Colliders have unique technical and physics advantages and disadvantages when compared with both hadron and electron machines. They should be regarded as complementary. Parameters are given of a 4 TeV high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider, and of a 0.5 TeV lower luminosity demonstration machine. The authors discuss the various systems in such muon colliders.

  8. Abort Gap Cleaning tests performed on 13 October 2011 during luminosity operation

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, A; Jeff, A; Roncarolo, F; Höfle, W; Valuch, D; Kain, V; Goddard, B; Meddahi, M; Uythoven, J; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    Following the abort gap cleaning tests performed on 7 October 2011 [1] additional tests were carried out on 13 October 2011 to further investigate the effects of the cleaning on the luminosity production. The abort gap cleaning parameters (strength and duration of the beam excitation kick) were varied and the cleaning effectiveness measured together with the change in luminosity. The outcome is summarised in this note.

  9. The jets-accretion relation, mass-luminosity relation in Fermi blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Haojing; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Cha, Yongjuan; Chen, Yongyun; Huang, Xia; Wang, Yuwei

    2015-01-01

    A sample of 111 Fermi blazars each with a well-established radio core luminosity, broad-line luminosity, bolometric luminosity and black hole mass has been compiled from the literatures.We present a significant correlation between radio core and broad-line emission luminosities that supports a close link between accretion processes and relativistic jets. Analysis reveals a relationship of $\\rm{LogL_{BLR}\\sim(0.81\\pm0.06)LogL_{R}^{C}}$ which is consistant with theoretical predicted coefficient and supports that blazar jets are powered by energy extraction from a rapidly spinning Kerr black hole through the magnetic field provided by the accretion disk. Through studying the correlation between the intrinsic bolometric luminosity and the black hole mass, we find a relationship of $\\rm{{Log}\\frac{L_{in}}{L_{\\odot}}=(0.95\\pm0.26){Log}\\frac{M}{M_{\\odot}}+(3.53\\pm2.24)}$ which supports mass-luminosity relation for Fermi blazars derived in this work is a powerlaw relation similar to that for main-sequence stars. Fina...

  10. Mass-luminosity relation for FGK main sequence stars: metallicity and age contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Gafeira, Ricardo; Fernandes, João

    2012-01-01

    The stellar mass-luminosity relation (MLR) is one of the most famous empirical "laws", discovered in the beginning of the 20th century. MLR is still used to estimate stellar masses for nearby stars, particularly for those that are not binary systems, hence the mass cannot be derived directly from the observations. It's well known that the MLR has a statistical dispersion which cannot be explained exclusively due to the observational errors in luminosity (or mass). It is an intrinsic dispersion caused by the differences in age and chemical composition from star to star. In this work we discuss the impact of age and metallicity on the MLR. Using the recent data on mass, luminosity, metallicity, and age for 26 FGK stars (all members of binary systems, with observational mass-errors \\leq 3%), including the Sun, we derive the MLR taking into account, separately, mass-luminosity, mass-luminosity-metallicity, and mass-luminosity-metallicity-age. Our results show that the inclusion of age and metallicity in the MLR, ...

  11. Size dependence of the radio luminosity - mechanical power correlation in radio galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Shabala, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    We examine the relationship between source radio luminosity and kinetic power in Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) jets. We show that neglecting various loss processes can introduce a systematic bias in the jet powers inferred from radio luminosities for a sample of radio galaxies. This bias can be corrected for by considering source size as well as radio luminosity; effectively the source size acts as a proxy for source age. Based on a sample of FR-II radio sources with jet powers derived from the measured hotspot parameters, we empirically determine a new expression for jet power that accounts for the source size, Q_jet / 10^{36} W = 1.5 (L_151 / 10^{27} W/Hz)^{0.8} (1+z)^{1.0} (D / kpc)^{0.58 \\pm 0.17}, where D is source size and L_151 the 151 MHz radio luminosity. By comparing a flux-limited and volume-limited sample, we show that any derived radio luminosity - jet power relation depends sensitively on sample properties, in particular the source size distribution and the size-luminosity correlation inherent i...

  12. Fossil group origins V. The dependence of the luminosity function on the magnitude gap

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Barrena, R; Boschin, W; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Girardi, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kundert, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    In nature we observe galaxy aggregations that span a wide range of magnitude gaps between the two first-ranked galaxies of a system ($\\Delta m_{12}$). There are systems with gaps close to zero (e.g., the Coma cluster), and at the other extreme of the distribution, the largest gaps are found among the so-called fossil systems. Fossil and non-fossil systems could have different galaxy populations that should be reflected in their luminosity functions. In this work we study, for the first time, the dependence of the luminosity function parameters on $\\Delta m_{12}$ using data obtained by the fossil group origins (FOGO) project. We constructed a hybrid luminosity function for 102 groups and clusters at $z \\le 0.25$. We stacked all the individual luminosity functions, dividing them into bins of $\\Delta m_{12}$, and studied their best-fit Schechter parameters. We additionally computed a relative luminosity function, expressed as a function of the central galaxy luminosity, which boosts our capacity to detect differ...

  13. Re-analysis of the Radio Luminosity Function of Galactic H II Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, R.; De Zotti, G.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Carey, S. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have re-analyzed continuum and recombination lines radio data available in the literature in order to derive the luminosity function (LF) of Galactic H II regions. The study is performed by considering the first and fourth Galactic quadrants independently. We estimate the completeness level of the sample in the fourth quadrant at 5 Jy, and the one in the first quadrant at 2 Jy. We show that the two samples (fourth or first quadrant) include, as well as giant and supergiant H II regions, a significant number of subgiant sources. The LF is obtained, in each Galactic quadrant, with a generalized Schmidt's estimator using an effective volume derived from the observed spatial distribution of the considered H II regions. The re-analysis also takes advantage of recently published ancillary absorption data allowing to solve the distance ambiguity for several objects. A single power-law fit to the LFs retrieves a slope equal to -2.23 ± 0.07 (fourth quadrant) and to -1.85 ± 0.11 (first quadrant). We also find marginal evidence of a luminosity break at L knee = 1023.45 erg s-1 Hz-1 for the LF in the fourth quadrant. We convert radio luminosities into equivalent Hα and Lyman continuum luminosities to facilitate comparisons with extragalactic studies. We obtain an average total H II regions Lyman continuum luminosity of 0.89 ± 0.23 × 1053 s-1, corresponding to 30% of the total ionizing luminosity of the Galaxy.

  14. Luminosity and surface brightness distribution of K-band galaxies from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Anthony J; Cross, Nicholas J G

    2008-01-01

    We present luminosity and surface brightness distributions of 36,663 galaxies with K-band photometry from the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS) Large Area Survey (LAS), Data Release 3 and optical photometry from Data Release 5 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Various features and limitations of the new UKIDSS data are examined, such as a problem affecting Petrosian magnitudes of extended sources. Selection limits in K- and r-band magnitude, K-band surface brightness and K-band radius are included explicitly in the 1/Vmax estimation of the space density and luminosity function. The bivariate brightness distribution in K-band absolute magnitude and surface brightness is presented and found to display a clear luminosity-surface brightness correlation that flattens at high luminosity and broadens at low luminosity, consistent with similar analyses at optical wavelengths. Best fitting Schechter function parameters for the K-band luminosity function are found to be M*-5log h=-23.17 +/- 0.04, alpha=-0.8...

  15. Fast polycrystalline CdTe detectors for bunch-by-bunch luminosity monitoring in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brambilla, A; Jolliot, M; Bravin, E

    2008-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimisation of beam parameters. Polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors have previously been tested, showing their high potential to fulfil the requirements of luminosity measurement in the severe environment of the LHC interaction regions. Further, the large signal yield and the fast response time should allow bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity at 40 MHz with high accuracy. Four luminosity monitors with two rows of five polycrystalline CdTe detectors each have been fabricated and will be installed at both sides of the low-luminosity interaction points ALICE and LHC-b. A detector housing was specially designed to meet the mechanical constraints in the LHC. A series of elementary CdTe detectors were fabricated and tested, of which 40 were selected for the luminosity monitors. A sensitivity of 104 electrons per minimum ioni...

  16. The $z < 1.2$ optical luminosity function from a sample of $\\sim410 \\, 000$ galaxies in bootes

    CERN Document Server

    Beare, Richard A; Pimbblet, Kevin A; Bian, Fuyan; Lin, Yen-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Using a sample of ~410 000 galaxies to depth I_AB = 24 over 8.26 deg^2 in the Bootes field (~10 times larger than z~1 luminosity function studies in the prior literature), we have accurately measured the evolving B-band luminosity function of red galaxies at z<1.2 and blue galaxies at z<1.0. In addition to the large sample size, we utilise photometry that accounts for the varying angular sizes of galaxies, photometric redshifts verified with spectroscopy, and absolute magnitudes that should have very small random and systematic errors. Our results are consistent with the migration of galaxies from the blue cloud to the red sequence as they cease to form stars, and with downsizing in which more massive and luminous blue galaxies cease star formation earlier than fainter less massive ones. Comparing the observed fading of red galaxies with that to be expected from passive evolution alone, we find that the stellar mass contained within the red galaxy population has increased by a factor of ~3.6 from z~1.1 ...

  17. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Watson, L. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Dasyra, K. M. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS:UMR8112), 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); Dietrich, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45601 (United States); Ferrarese, L. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BV V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  18. Stellar Velocity Dispersion Measurements in High-Luminosity Quasar Hosts and Implications for the AGN Black Hole Mass Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Grier, C J; Watson, L C; Peterson, B M; Bentz, M C; Dasyra, K M; Dietrich, M; Ferrarese, L; Pogge, R W; Zu, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the NIFS instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8-m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of black holes and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass black holes are not offset with respect to the MBH-sigma relation exhibited by lower-luminosity AGNs with lower-mass black holes, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor hfi that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M_BH-sigma relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain = 4...

  19. The $H\\alpha$ Luminosity Function and Global Star Formation Rate From Redshifts of One to Two

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, L; Freudling, W; Teplitz, H I; Malumuth, E M; Weymann, R J; Malkan, M A; Yan, Lin; Carthy, Patrick J. Mc; Freudling, Wolfram; Teplitz, Harry I.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Weymann, Ray J.; Malkan, Matthew A.

    1999-01-01

    We present a luminosity function for H$\\alpha$ emission from galaxies at redshifts between 0.7 and 1.9 based on slitless spectroscopy with NICMOS on HST. The luminosity function is well fit by a Schechter function over the range $6 \\times 10^{41} < L(H\\alpha) < 2 \\times 10^{43} erg/sec$ with $L^* = 7 \\times 10^{42} erg/sec$ and $\\phi^* = 1.7 \\times 10^{-3} Mpc^{-3}$ for $H_0=50 km/s Mpc^{-1}$ and $q_0=0.5$. We derive a volume averaged star formation rate at $z = 1.3 \\pm 0.5$ of 0.13 M_{ødot} yr^{-1} Mpc^{-3} without correction for extinction. The SFR that we derive at $\\sim 6500 \\AA is a factor of 3 higher than that deduced from 2800 \\AA continua. If this difference is due entirely to reddening, the extinction correction at 2800 \\AA is quite significant. The precise magnitude of the total extinction correction at rest-frame UV wavelengths (e.g. 2800 \\AA and 1500 \\AA) is sensitive to the relative spatial distribution of the stars, gas and dust, as well as on the extinction law. In the extreme case of a ...

  20. An Investigation of X-ray Luminosity versus Crystalline Powder Granularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borade, Ramesh; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; ,

    2012-03-07

    At the High-throughput Discovery of Scintillator Materials Facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scintillators are synthesized by solid-state reaction or melt mixing, forming crystalline powders. These powders are formed in various granularity and the crystal grain size affects the apparent luminosity of the scintillator. To accurately predict a "full-size" scintillator's crystal luminosity, the crystal luminosity as a function of crystal granularity size has to be known. In this study, we examine Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO), Lu{sub 2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LSO), YAlO{sub 3}:Ce (YAP:Ce), and CsBa{sub 2}I{sub 5}:Eu{sup 2+} (CBI) luminosities as a function of crystalline grain size. The highest luminosities were measured for 600- to 1000-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for BGO and LSO, for 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain sizes for CBI, and for crystal grains larger than 165{micro}m for YAP:Ce. Crystal grains that were larger than 1 mm had a lower packing fraction, and smaller grains were affected by internal scattering. We measured a 34% decrease in luminosity for BGO when decreasing from the 600- to 1000- {micro}m crystal grain size range down to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range. The corresponding luminosity decrease for LSO was 44% for the same grain size decrease. YAP:Ce exhibited a luminosity decrease of 47% when the grain size decreased from the 165- to 310-{micro}m crystal grains to the 20- to 36-{micro}m range, and CBI exhibited a luminosity decrease of 98% when the grain size decreased from the 310- to 600-{micro}m crystal grain range to the 36- to 50-{micro}m range. We were able to very accurately estimate full-size crystal luminosities from crystalline grains that are larger than 90 {micro}m.

  1. Novel calibrations of virial black hole mass estimators in active galaxies based on X-ray luminosity and optical/near-infrared emission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, F.; La Franca, F.; Onori, F.; Bianchi, S.

    2017-02-01

    Context. It is currently only possible to accurately weigh, through reverberation mapping (RM), the masses of super massive black holes (BHs) in active galactic nuclei (AGN) for a small group of local and bright broad line AGN. Statistical demographic studies can be carried out considering the empirical scaling relation between the size of the broad line region (BLR) and the AGN optical continuum luminosity. There are still biases, however, against low-luminosity or reddened AGN, in which the rest-frame optical radiation can be severely absorbed or diluted by the host galaxy and the BLR emission lines can be hard to detect. Aims: Our purpose is to widen the applicability of virial-based single-epoch (SE) relations to measure reliably the BH masses for low-luminosity or intermediate and type 2 AGN, which the current methodology misses. We achieve this goal by calibrating virial relations based on unbiased quantities: the hard X-ray luminosities in the 2-10 keV and 14-195 keV bands that are less sensitive to galaxy contamination, and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the most important rest-frame near-infrared (NIR) and optical BLR emission lines. Methods: We built a sample of RM AGN with both X-ray luminosity, broad optical and NIR FWHM measurements available to calibrate new virial BH mass estimators. Results: We found that the FWHM of the Hα, Hβ, and NIR lines (i.e. Paα, Paβ, and He iλ10830) all correlate with each other with negligible or small offsets. This result allowed us to derive virial BH mass estimators based on either the 2-10 keV or 14-195 keV luminosity. We also took into account the recent determination of the different virial coefficients, f, for pseudo- and classical bulges. By splitting the sample according to the bulge type and adopting separate f factors, we found that our virial relations predict BH masses of AGN hosted in pseudo-bulges 0.5 dex smaller than in classical bulges. Assuming the same average f factor for both populations

  2. Luminosity measurement in H1; Mesure de la luminosite pour l'experience H1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisson, T

    2006-10-15

    At HERA, luminosity is determined on-line and bunch by bunch by measuring the Bremsstrahlung spectrum from e-p collisions. The Hl collaboration has built a completely new luminosity system in order to sustain the harsh running conditions after the fourfold luminosity increase. Namely, the higher synchrotron radiation doses and the increased event pile-up have governed the design of the two major components, a radiation resistant quartz-fibre electro-magnetic calorimeter, and a fast read-out electronic with on-line energy histogram loading at a rate of 500 kHz. The group was in charge of the electronic and the on-line data analysis of the new luminosity system. In this thesis, I present analysis tools and methods to improve the precision of the luminosity measurement. The energy scale and acceptance calculation methods set out in this thesis permit these values to be determined every four minutes, to an accuracy of 0.5 parts per thousand for the energy scale and 2 parts per thousand for the acceptance. From these results, the degree of accuracy obtained on the luminosity measurement is between 6.5 and 9.5 parts per thousand. These results are currently undergoing validation, with the aim of becoming the standard H1 method. I also studied quasi-elastic Compton events to cross-check the luminosity measurement using the 2003- 2004 and 2005 data. Indeed, this process has a well calculable cross section and a clear experimental signature. The leptonic final state consists of a coplanar e-gamma system, both observable in the central H1 detector. (author)

  3. Evidence for a fast evolution of the UV luminosity function beyond redshift 6 from a deep HAWK-I survey of the GOODS-S field

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Boutsia, K; Grazian, A; Pentericci, L; Bouwens, R; Dickinson, M; Giavalisco, M; Santini, P; Cristiani, S; Fiore, F; Gallozzi, S; Giallongo, E; Maiolino, R; Mannucci, F; Menci, N; Moorwood, A; Nonino, M; Paris, D; Renzini, A; Rosati, P; Salimbeni, S; Vanzella, E

    2009-01-01

    We perform a deep search for galaxies in the redshift range 6.51, Y-J6 (M_1500 ~- 19.5 to -21.5). After accounting for the expected incompleteness, we rule out at a 99% confidence level a Luminosity Function constant from z=6 to z=7, even including the effects of cosmic variance. For galaxies brighter than M_1500=-19.0 we derive a luminosity density rho_UV=1.5^{+2.0}_{-0.9} 10^25 erg/s/Hz/Mpc3, implying a decrease by a factor 3.5 from z=6 to z~6.8. On the basis of our findings, we make predictions for the surface densities expected in future surveys, either based on ULTRA-VISTA or on HST-WFC3, evaluating the best observational strategy to maximise their impact.

  4. Analytical properties of the $R^{1/m}$ luminosity law

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe some analytical properties of the R^{1/m} law proposed by Sersic (1968) to categorize the photometric profiles of elliptical galaxies. In particular, we present the full asymptotic expansion for the dimensionless scale factor b(m) that is introduced when referring the profile to the standard effective radius. Surprisingly, our asymptotic analysis turns out to be useful even for values of m as low as unity, thus providing a unified analytical tool for observational and theoretical investigations based on the R^{1/m} law for the entire range of interesting photometric profiles, from spiral to elliptical galaxies.

  5. Modeling the Near-Infrared Luminosity Functions of Young Stellar Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, August A.; Lada, Elizabeth A.; Lada, Charles J.

    2000-04-01

    We present the results of numerical experiments designed to evaluate the usefulness of near-infrared (NIR) luminosity functions for constraining the initial mass function (IMF) of young stellar populations. We test the sensitivity of the NIR K-band luminosity function (KLF) of a young stellar cluster to variations in the underlying IMF, star-forming history, and pre-main-sequence mass-to-luminosity relations. Using Monte Carlo techniques, we create a suite of model luminosity functions systematically varying each of these basic underlying relations. From this numerical modeling, we find that the luminosity function of a young stellar population is considerably more sensitive to variations in the underlying initial mass function than to either variations in the star-forming history or assumed pre-main-sequence (PMS) mass-to-luminosity relation. Variations in a cluster's star-forming history are also found to produce significant changes in the KLF. In particular, we find that the KLFs of young clusters evolve in a systematic manner with increasing mean age. Our experiments indicate that variations in the PMS mass-to-luminosity relation, resulting from differences in adopted PMS tracks, produce only small effects on the form of the model luminosity functions and that these effects are mostly likely not detectable observationally. To illustrate the potential effectiveness of using the KLF of a young cluster to constrain its IMF, we model the observed KLF of the nearby Trapezium cluster. With knowledge of the star-forming history of this cluster obtained from optical spectroscopic studies, we derive the simplest underlying IMF whose model luminosity function matches the observations. Our derived mass function for the Trapezium spans 2 orders of magnitude in stellar mass (5>Msolar>0.02) and has a peak near the hydrogen-burning limit. Below the hydrogen-burning limit, the mass function steadily decreases with decreasing mass throughout the brown dwarf regime. Comparison

  6. A luminous hot accretion flow in the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus NGC 7213

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Fu-Guo; Ma, Renyi; Yang, Qi-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    The radio luminosity, $L_R$, of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) NGC~7213 weakly correlates with its 2--10 keV X-ray luminosity, $L_X$, when $L_X$ is low, and apparently strongly when $L_X$ is high. Such a hybrid correlation in an individual AGN is unexpected as it deviates from the fundamental plane of AGN activity. On the other hand, a similar correlation pattern is present in the black-hole X-ray binary H1743--322, where it has been modelled as due to switching between different modes of accretion. For NGC~7213, we propose that its $L_R$--$L_X$ correlation is due to the presence of a luminous hot accretion flow, which radiative efficiency is sensitive to the accretion rate. Given the low luminosity of the source, $L_X\\sim 10^{-4}$ of the Eddington luminosity, the viscosity parameter is determined to be small in NGC 7213, $\\alpha\\approx 0.01$. We also examine the broad-band spectrum from radio to X-rays, the time lag between the radio and X-ray light curves, and the implied size and the Lore...

  7. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inntjore Levinsen, Y.; Dalena, B.; Tomás, R.; Schulte, D.

    2014-05-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of σy=1 nm vertically and σx=45 nm horizontally. With exceptionally small and flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded due to the combination of the experimental solenoid field and a large crossing angle. The two main effects reducing the luminosity are y-x'-coupling and an increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field increases the beam emittance and results in unrecoverable luminosity degradation. A novel approach to evaluate the ISR effect from a realistic solenoid field without knowledge of the full compensation of the geometric aberrations is presented. This approach is confirmed by a detailed study of the correction techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR for CLIC at 3 TeV has been evaluated, and found to be around 4% to 5% for the solenoid design under study.

  8. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Color and Luminosity Dependence of Galaxy Clustering at z~1

    CERN Document Server

    Coil, Alison L; Croton, Darren; Cooper, Michael C; Davis, Marc; Faber, S M; Gerke, Brian F; Koo, David C; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Wechsler, Risa H; Weiner, Benjamin J

    2007-01-01

    We present measurements of the color and luminosity dependence of galaxy clustering at z~1 in the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey. Using volume-limited subsamples in bins of both color and luminosity, we find that: 1) The clustering dependence is much stronger with color than with luminosity and is as strong with color at z~1 as is found locally. We find no dependence of the clustering amplitude on color for galaxies on the red sequence, but a significant dependence on color for galaxies within the blue cloud. 2) For galaxies in the range L/L*~0.7-2, a stronger large-scale luminosity dependence is seen for all galaxies than for red and blue galaxies separately. The small-scale clustering amplitude depends significantly on luminosity for blue galaxies, with brighter samples having a stronger rise on scales r_p<0.5 Mpc/h. 3) Redder galaxies exhibit stronger small-scale redshift-space distortions ("fingers of god"), and both red and blue populations show large-scale distortions in xi(r_p,pi) due to coherent infa...

  9. The local sub-mm luminosity functions and predictions from Spitzer to Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, S; Serjeant, Stephen; Harrison, Diana

    2004-01-01

    We present new determinations of the local sub-mm luminosity functions, solving the ``sub-mm Olbers' Paradox.'' We also present predictions of source counts and luminosity functions in current and future far-infrared to sub-mm surveys. Using the sub-mm colour temperature relations from the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey, and the discovery of excess 450 micron excess emission in these galaxies, we interpolate and extrapolate the IRAS detections to make predictions of the SEDs of all 15411 PSC-z galaxies from 50-1300 microns. Despite the long extrapolations we find excellent agreement with (a) the 90 micron luminosity function of Serjeant et al. (2001), (b) the 850 micron luminosity function of Dunne et al. (2000), (c) the mm-wave photometry of Andreani & Franceschini (1996); (d) the asymptotic differential and integral source count predictions at 50-1300 microns by Rowan-Robinson (2001). We find the local 850 micron sub-mm luminosity density converges to (7.3+/-0.2)x10^{19} h_{65} W/Hz/Mpc^3. Remarkabl...

  10. The local sub-mm luminosity functions and predictions from ASTRO-F/SIRTF to Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Serjeant, S; Serjeant, Stephen; Harrison, Diana

    2003-01-01

    We present new determinations of the local sub-mm luminosity functions. We find the local sub-mm luminosity density converging to 7.3+/-0.2 x 10^19 W/Hz/Mpc^3 /h_65 at 850um solving the ``sub-mm Olbers' Paradox.'' Using the sub-mm colour temperature relations from the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey, and the discovery of excess 450um excess emission in these galaxies, we interpolate and extrapolate the IRAS detections to make predictions of the SEDs of all 15411 PSC-z galaxies from 50-3000um. Despite the long extrapolations we find excellent agreement with (a) the 90um luminosity function of Serjeant et al. (2001), (b) the 850um luminosity function of Dunne et al. (2000), (c) the mm-wave photometry of Andreani & Franceschini (1996); (d) the asymptotic differential and integral source count predictions at 50-3000um by Rowan-Robinson (2001). Remarkably, the local luminosity density and the extragalactic background light together strongly constrain the cosmic star formation history for a wide class of evo...

  11. Dependence of Fanaroff-Riley dichotomy of radio galaxies on luminosity and redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Ashok K

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the Fanaroff-Riley (FR) I/II dichotomy of radio galaxies on their luminosities and redshifts. Because of a very strong redshift-luminosity correlation (Malmquist bias) in a flux-limited sample, any redshift-dependent effect could appear as a luminosity related effect and vice versa. A question could then arise - do all the morphological differences seen in the two classes (FR I and II types) of sources, usually attributed to the differences in their luminosities, could these all as well be a result of mainly a cosmological evolutionary effect (e.g., due to the changing ambient density) with cosmic epoch? Even a sharp break in luminosity, seen among the two classes, could after all reflect a rather critical ambient density value. A doubt on these lines does not seem to have been raised in past and things have never been examined keeping this particular aspect in mind. We want to ascertain the customary prevalent view in the literature that the systematic differences in the two ...

  12. Luminosity Functions of Spitzer Identified Protostars in Nine Nearby Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kryukova, E; Gutermuth, R A; Pipher, J; Allen, T S; Allen, L E; Myers, P C; Muzerolle, J

    2012-01-01

    We identify protostars in Spitzer surveys of nine star-forming molecular clouds within 1 kpc: Serpens, Perseus, Ophiuchus, Chamaeleon, Lupus, Taurus, Orion, Cep OB3, and Mon R2, which combined host over 700 protostar candidates. Our diverse cloud sample allows us to compare protostar luminosity functions in these varied environments. We combine photometry from 2MASS J, H, and Ks bands and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS 24 micron bands to create 1 - 24 micron spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Using protostars from the c2d survey with well-determined bolometric luminosities (Lbol), we derive a relationship between Lbol, L_MIR (integrated from 1 - 24 microns), and SED slope. Estimations of Lbol for protostar candidates are combined to create luminosity functions for each cloud. Contamination due to edge-on disks, reddened Class II sources, and galaxies is estimated and removed from the luminosity functions. We find that luminosity functions for high mass star forming clouds peak near 1 Lsun and show a tail extending ...

  13. Far Infrared Luminosity Function of Local Star-forming Galaxies in the AKARI Deep Field South

    CERN Document Server

    Sedgwick, Chris; Pearson, Chris; Matsuura, Shuji; Shirahata, Mai; Oyabu, Shinki; Goto, Tomotsugu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Clements, D L; Negrello, Mattia; White, Glenn J

    2011-01-01

    We present a far-infrared galaxy luminosity function for the local universe. We have obtained 389 spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies observed at 90 microns in the AKARI Deep Field South, using the AAOmega fibre spectrograph via optical identifications in the digitized sky survey and 4m-class optical imaging. For the luminosity function presented in this paper, we have used those galaxies which have redshifts 0luminosity function has been prepared using the 1/Vmax method. We also separate the luminosity function between galaxies which show evidence of predominantly star-forming activity and predominantly active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in their optical spectra. Our luminosity function is in good agreement with the previous 90 micron lumino...

  14. Galaxy cluster X-ray luminosity scaling relations from a representative local sample (REXCESS)

    CERN Document Server

    Pratt, G W; Arnaud, M; Böhringer, H

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) We examine the X-ray luminosity scaling relations of 31 nearby galaxy clusters from the Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey (REXCESS). The objects are selected in X-ray luminosity only, optimally sampling the cluster luminosity function; temperatures range from 2 to 9 keV and there is no bias toward any particular morphological type. Pertinent values are extracted in an aperture corresponding to R_500, estimated using the tight correlation between Y_X and total mass. The data exhibit power law relations between bolometric X-ray luminosity and temperature, Y_X and total mass, all with slopes that are significantly steeper than self-similar expectations. We examine the causes for the steepening, finding that the primary driver appears to be a systematic variation of the gas content with mass. Scatter about the relations is dominated in all cases by the presence of cool cores. The logarithmic scatter about the raw X-ray luminosity-temperature relation is approximately 30%, and that abou...

  15. Dark-ages reionization & galaxy formation simulation IV: UV luminosity functions of high-redshift galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chuanwu; Angel, P W; Duffy, Alan R; Geil, Paul M; Poole, Gregory B; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J Stuart B

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present calculations of the UV luminosity function predictions from the Dark-ages Reionization And Galaxy-formation Observables from Numerical Simulations (DRAGONS) project, which combines N-body, semi-analytic and semi-numerical modeling designed to study galaxy formation during the Epoch of Reionization. Using galaxy formation physics including supernova feedback, the model naturally reproduces the UV LFs for high-redshift star-forming galaxies from $z{\\sim}5$ through to $z{\\sim}10$. We investigate the predicted luminosity-star formation rate (SFR) relation, finding that variable SFR histories of galaxies result in a scatter around the mean relation of $0.1$-$0.3$ dex depending on UV luminosity. We find close agreement between the model and observationally derived SFR functions. We use our predicted luminosities to investigate the luminosity function below current detection limits, and the ionizing photon budget for reionization. We predict that the slope of the UV LF remains steep below cu...

  16. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2070952; Valishev, Aleksander; Shatilov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical β∗ values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  17. The HerMES sub-millimetre local and low-redshift luminosity functions

    CERN Document Server

    Marchetti, L; Franceschini, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Bethermin, M; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Burgarella, D; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Farrah, D; Feltre, A; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Heinis, S; Ibar, E; Ivison, R J; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Page, M J; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Perez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rigopoulou, D; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Symeonidis, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Wang, L; Wardlow, J; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2015-01-01

    We used wide area surveys over 39 deg$^2$ by the HerMES collaboration, performed with the Herschel Observatory SPIRE multi-wavelength camera, to estimate the low-redshift, $0.02luminosity functions (LFs) of galaxies at 250, 350 and 500$\\,\\mu$m. SPIRE flux densities were also combined with Spitzer photometry and multi-wavelength archival data to perform a complete SED fitting analysis of SPIRE detected sources to calculate precise k-corrections, as well as the bolometric infrared (8-1000$\\,\\mu$m) luminosity functions and their low-$z$ evolution from a combination of statistical estimators. Integration of the latter prompted us to also compute the local luminosity density (LLD) and the comoving star formation rate density (SFRD) for our sources, and to compare them with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. The luminosity functions show significant and rapid luminosity evolution already at low redshifts, $0.02

  18. The Galaxy Cluster Mid-Infrared Luminosity Function at 1.3

    CERN Document Server

    Wylezalek, Dominika; De Breuck, Carlos; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Galametz, Audrey; Gonzalez, Anthony H; Jarvis, Matt; Hatch, Nina; Seymour, Nick; Stanford, Spencer A

    2014-01-01

    We present 4.5 {\\mu}m luminosity functions for galaxies identified in 178 candidate galaxy clusters at 1.3 1.3. The luminosity functions are derived for different redshift and richness bins, and the IRAC imaging reaches depths of m*+2, allowing us to measure the faint end slopes of the luminosity functions. We find that {\\alpha} = -1 describes the luminosity function very well in all redshifts bins and does not evolve significantly. This provides evidence that the rate at which the low mass galaxy population grows through star formation, gets quenched and is replenished by in-falling field galaxies does not have a major net effect on the shape of the luminosity function. Our measurements for m* are consistent with passive evolution models and high formation redshifts z_f ~ 3. We find a slight trend towards fainter m* for the richest clusters, implying that the most massive clusters in our sample could contain older stellar populations, yet another example of cosmic downsizing. Modelling shows that a contribu...

  19. PHAT XIII: The Cepheid Period-Luminosity Relation in M31 Based on the PHAT Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner-Kaiser, R; Dalcanton, J J; Williams, B F; Dolphin, A

    2015-01-01

    Using Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) observations from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT), we present new period-luminosity relations for Cepheid variables in M31. Cepheid from several ground-based studies are identified in the PHAT pho- tometry to derive new Period-Luminosity and Wesenheit Period-Luminosity relations in the NIR and visual filters. We derive a distance modulus to M31 of 24.51+/-0.08 in the IR bands and 24.32+/-0.09 in the visual bands, including the first PL relations in the F475W and F814W filters for M31. Our derived visual and IR distance moduli dis- agree at slightly more than a 1-{\\sigma} level. Differences in the Period-Luminosity relations between ground-based and HST observations are investigated for a subset of Cepheids. We find a significant discrepancy between ground-based and HST Period-Luminosity relations with the same Cepheids, suggesting adverse effects from photometric contam- ination in ground-based ...

  20. ATLAS Upgrades Towards the High Luminosity LHC: extending the discovery potential

    CERN Document Server

    Cinca, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    After successful LHC operation at the center-of-mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV in 2011 and 2012, plans are actively advancing for a series of upgrades, culminating roughly 10 years from now in the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project, delivering of order five times the LHC nominal instantaneous luminosity along with luminosity levelling. The final goal is to extend the data set from about few hundred fb-1 expected for LHC running to 3000 fb-1 by around 2030. Current planning in ATLAS also has significant upgrades to the detector during the consolidation of the LHC to reach full LHC energy and further upgrades to accommodate running already beyond nominal luminosity this decade. The challenge of coping with HL-LHC instantaneous and integrated luminosity, along with the associated radiation levels, requires further major changes to the ATLAS detector. The designs are developing rapidly for an all-new inner-tracker, significant upgrades in the calorimeter and muon systems, as well as improved triggers and data acqui...

  1. An Alternative High Luminosity LHC with Flat Optics and Long-Range Beam-Beam Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fartoukh, Stephane [CERN; Valishev, Alexander [Fermilab; Shatilov, Dmitry [BINP, Novosibirsk

    2015-06-01

    In the baseline scenario of the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the geometric loss of luminosity in the two high luminosity experiments due to collisions with a large crossing angle is recovered by tilting the bunches in the interaction region with the use of crab cavities. A possible backup scenario would rely on a reduced crossing angle together with flat optics (with different horizontal and vertical $\\beta^{\\ast}$values) for the preservation of luminosity performance. However, the reduction of crossing angle coupled with the flat optics significantly enhances the strength of long-range beam-beam interactions. This paper discusses the possibility to mitigate the long-range beam-beam effects by current bearing wire compensators (or e-lens). We develop a new HL-LHC parameter list and analyze it in terms of integrated luminosity performance as compared to the baseline. Further, we evaluate the operational scenarios using numerical simulations of single-particle dynamics with beam-beam effects.

  2. The dependence of the estimated luminosities of ULX on spectral models

    CERN Document Server

    Devi, A Senorita; Agrawal, V K; Singh, K Y

    2007-01-01

    Data from {\\it Chandra} observations of thirty nearby galaxies were analyzed and 365 X-ray point sources were chosen whose spectra were not contaminated by excessive diffuse emission and not affected by photon pile up. The spectra of these sources were fitted using two spectral models (an absorbed power-law and a disk blackbody) to ascertain the dependence of estimated parameters on the spectral model used. It was found that the cumulative luminosity function depends on the choice of the spectral model, especially for luminosities $> 10^{40}$ ergs/s. In accordance with previous results, a large number ($\\sim 80$) of the sources have luminosities $> 10^{39}$ ergs/s (Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources) with indistinguishable average spectral parameters (inner disk temperature $\\sim 1$ keV and/or photon index $\\Gamma \\sim 2$) with those of the lower luminosities ones. After considering foreground stars and known background AGN,we identify four sources whose minimum luminosity exceed $10^{40}$ ergs/s, and call them Ext...

  3. X-ray luminosity functions of different morphological and X-ray type AGN populations

    CERN Document Server

    Pović, M; Sánchez-Portal, M; Bongiovanni, A; Cepa, J; Lorenzo, M Fernández; Lara-López, M A; Gallego, J; Ederoclite, A; Márquez, I; Masegosa, J; Alfaro, E; Castañeda, H; González-Serrano, J I; González, J J; 10.1002/asna.201211840

    2013-01-01

    Luminosity functions are one of the most important observational clues when studying galaxy evolution over cosmic time. In this paper we present the X-ray luminosity functions of X-ray detected AGN in the SXDS and GWS fields. The limiting fluxes of our samples are 9.0x10^(-15) and 4.8x10^(-16) erg/cm^2/sec^(-1) in the 0.5 - 7.0 keV band in the two fields, respectively. We carried out analysis in three X-ray bands and in two redshift intervals up to z < 1.4. Moreover, we derive the luminosity functions for different optical morphologies and X-ray types. We confirm strong luminosity evolution in all three bands, finding the most luminous objects at higher redshift. However, no signs of density evolution are found in any tested X-ray band. We obtain similar results for compact and early-type objects. Finally, we observe the `Steffen effect', where X-ray type-1 sources are more numerous at higher luminosities in comparison with type-2 sources.

  4. The Luminosity Function of Quasars. Major Mergers of Haloes,Growth of Massive Black Holes and Evolving Luminosity Function of Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Hatziminaoglou, E; Solanes, J M; Manrique, A; Salvador-Solé, E; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Mathez, Guy; Solanes, Jose-Maria; Manrique, Alberto; Salvador-Sole, Eduard

    2003-01-01

    We construct a physically motivated analytical model for the quasar luminosity function, based on the joint star formation and feeding of massive black holes suggested by the observed correlation between the black hole mass and the stellar mass of the hosting spheroids. The parallel growth of massive black holes and host galaxies is assumed to take place at the occasion of major mergers suffered by haloes. The halo major merger rate is computed in the frame of the extended Press-Schechter model. The evolution of black holes on cosmological timescales is achieved by the integration of the governing set of differential equations, established from a few reasonable assumptions that account for the distinct (Eddington-limited or supply-limited) accretion regimes. Finally, the typical lightcurves of the reactivated quasars are obtained under the assumption that, in such accretion episodes, the fall of matter onto the black hole is achieved in a self-regulated stationary way. The predicted quasar luminosity function...

  5. Relation between the "Double-Hump" Behavior in the Radio Band and the Broad-Line Luminosity for Blazars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hua Xie; Hong Dai; Jian-Ming Hao; Lei-Ming Du; Xiong Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The physics behind the spectral energy distribution (SED) of blazars remains open.We assembled 36 blazars to tackle the factors that control their SED. Now, many blazar spectra have the "double hump" feature in the radio and far-IR frequencies. For these a parameter,△, is created to characterize the behavior of the SED. We found a significant correlation between the broad-line luminosity (LBLR) and △. Because LBLR is an indicator of the accreting power of the source in blazars, we derived a linear correlation,△∝ (M)1/3. 18, which suggests that the SED of blazars may depend on the accretion rate, like that of BL Lac objects. We also found a significant correlation between (m) and△ for a sample of 11 blazars (out of one of 36)with available black hole masses. This implies the Eddington accretion ratio may influence the shape of the SED of blazars.

  6. Baryon Loading Efficiency and Particle Acceleration Efficiency of Relativistic Jets: Cases for Low Luminosity BL Lacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic jets launched by supermassive black holes, so-called active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are known as the most energetic particle accelerators in the universe. However, the baryon loading efficiency onto the jets from the accretion flows and their particle acceleration efficiencies have been veiled in mystery. With the latest data sets, we perform multi-wavelength spectral analysis of quiescent spectra of 13 TeV gamma-ray detected high-frequency-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) following one-zone static synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. We determine the minimum, cooling break, and maximum electron Lorentz factors following the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) theory. We find that HBLs have {P}B/{P}e˜ 6.3× {10}-3 and the radiative efficiency {ɛ }{{rad,jet}}˜ 6.7× {10}-4, where P B and P e is the Poynting and electron power, respectively. By assuming 10 leptons per one proton, the jet power relates to the black hole mass as {P}{{jet}}/{L}{{Edd}}˜ 0.18, where {P}{{jet}} and {L}{{Edd}} is the jet power and the Eddington luminosity, respectively. Under our model assumptions, we further find that HBLs have a jet production efficiency of {η }{{jet}}˜ 1.5 and a mass loading efficiency of {ξ }{{jet}}≳ 5× {10}-2. We also investigate the particle acceleration efficiency in the blazar zone by including the most recent Swift/BAT data. Our samples ubiquitously have particle acceleration efficiencies of {η }g˜ {10}4.5, which is inefficient to accelerate particles up to the ultra-high-energy-cosmic-ray (UHECR) regime. This implies that the UHECR acceleration sites should not be the blazar zones of quiescent low power AGN jets, if one assumes the one-zone SSC model based on the DSA theory.

  7. A Level 1 Tracking Trigger for the CMS Experiment at the LHC Phase 2 Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzobon, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The second decade of Large Hadron Collider operations, from about 2020 onwards, envisages a remarkable increase in collider instantaneous luminosity, one order of magnitude above the project one. This luminosity increase presents several challenges to the LHC experiments. The present tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment must be replaced with a system providing excellent tracking quality at higher luminosities, as well as Tracking Trigger inputs to the existing “Level 0” CMS trigger system at the full 40 MHz bunch-crossing rate. The minimal requirements for a Tracking Trigger would be the capability to confirm the presence of high-pT tracks associated with Calorimeter and/or Muon Level 0 triggers. The ability to provide eective isolation criteria may also be required, and would in any case substantially improve the Trigger performance. Maintaining the data rates generated by Tracking Trigger inputs within a manageable bandwidth requires sensor modules able to locally sparsify the data. Measuring...

  8. Impact of detector solenoid on the Compact Linear Collider luminosity performance

    CERN Document Server

    Levinsen, Yngve Inntjore; Tomas, Rogelio; Schulte, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In order to obtain the necessary luminosity with a reasonable amount of beam power, the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) design includes an unprecedented collision beam size of {\\sigma} = 1 nm vertically and {\\sigma} = 45 nm horizontally. Given the small and very flat beams, the luminosity can be significantly degraded from the impact of the experimental solenoid field in combination with a large crossing angle. Main effects include y-x'-coupling and increase of vertical dispersion. Additionally, Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation (ISR) from the orbit deflection created by the solenoid field, increases the beam emittance. A detailed study of the impact from a realistic solenoid field and the associated correction techniques for the CLIC Final Focus is presented. In particular, the impact of techniques to compensate the beam optics distortions due to the detector solenoid main field and its overlap with the final focus magnets are shown. The unrecoverable luminosity loss due to ISR has been evaluated, and found to...

  9. Luminosity Loss due to Beam Distortion and the Beam-Beam Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Juhao; Raubenheimer, Tor O; Seryi, Andrei; Sramek, Christopher K

    2005-01-01

    In a linear collider, sources of emittance dilution such as transverse wakefields or dispersive errors will couple the vertical phase space to the longitudinal position within the beam (the so-called ‘banana effect'). When the Intersection Point (IP) disruption parameter is large, these beam distortions will be amplified by a single bunch kink instability which will lead to luminosity loss. We study this phenomena both analytically using linear theory and via numerical simulation. In particular, we examine the dependence of the luminosity loss on the wavelength of the beam distortions and the disruption parameter. This analysis may prove useful when optimizing the vertical disruption parameter for luminosity operation with given beam distortions.

  10. Initial test results of an ionization chamber shower detector for a LHC luminosity monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Datte, P S; Haguenauer, Maurice; Manfredi, P F; Manghisoni, M; Millaud, J E; Placidi, Massimo; Ratti, L; Riot, V J; Schmickler, Hermann; Speziali, V; Traversi, G; Turner, W C

    2003-01-01

    A novel segmented multigap pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for optimization of the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ionization chambers are to be installed in the front quadrupole and 0 degrees neutral particle absorbers in the high luminosity interaction regions (IRs) and sample the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast pulse-shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. In this paper, we report the initial results of our second test of this instrumentation in a super proton synchrotron (SPS) external proton beam. Single 300 GeV protons are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC. The capability of instrumentation to measure the luminosity of individual bunches in a 40 MHz bunch train is demonstrated. (10 refs) .

  11. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: -> Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. -> Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. -> Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  12. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Lukic, Strahinja

    2013-01-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement at CLIC at 3 TeV CM energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations: - Correction of the angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation (ISR) effects, based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. - Deconvolution of the luminosity spectrum distortion due to the ISR emission. - Correction of the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution. All procedures were tested by simulation. Bhabha events were generated using BHLUMI, and used in Guinea-PIG to simulate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. Residual uncertainties after correction are listed in a table in the conclusions. The beam-beam related systematic counting uncertainty in the luminosity peak can be reduced to the order of permille.

  13. Exploring Low Luminosity Quasar Diversity at z ~ 2.5 with the Gran Telescopio Canarias

    CERN Document Server

    Sulentic, J W; Marziani, P

    2013-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a pencil-beam spectroscopic survey of low-luminosity quasars at z ~ 2.2-2.5. Our goal is to compare these sources with low redshift analogues of similar luminosity. High s/n and moderate resolution spectra were obtained for 15 sources using the faint object spectrograph Osiris on the 10m Gran Telescopio Canarias. The new data make possible an almost unprecedented comparison between sources with the same (moderate) luminosity at widely different cosmic epochs. Preliminary analysis of our spectra confirms the presence of a relatively evolved population of quasars radiating at modest Eddington ratios. A notable difference between the low and high z quasars may involve the presence of lower metallicity quasars at high redshift.

  14. The Relationship Between Luminosity and Broad-Line Region Size in Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspi, Shai; Maoz, Dan; Netzer, Hagai;

    2005-01-01

    We reinvestigate the relationship between the characteristic broad-line region size (R_blr) and the Balmer emission-line, X-ray, UV, and optical continuum luminosities. Our study makes use of the best available determinations of R_blr for a large number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from...... of analysis, our results are generally consistent. Assuming a power-law relation R_blr \\propto L^\\alpha, we find the mean best-fitting \\alpha is about 0.67+/-0.05 for the optical continuum and the broad H\\beta luminosity, about 0.56+/-0.05 for the UV continuum luminosity, and about 0.70+/-0.14 for the X...

  15. Infall-driven protostellar accretion and the solution to the luminosity problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padoan, Paolo; Haugbølle, Troels; Nordlund, Åke

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of mass infall in the formation and evolution of protostars. To avoid ad hoc initial and boundary conditions, we consider the infall resulting self-consistently from modeling the formation of stellar clusters in turbulent molecular clouds. We show that infall rates....... The simulation reproduces well the observed characteristic values and scatter of protostellar luminosities and matches the observed protostellar luminosity function. The luminosity problem is therefore solved once realistic protostellar infall histories are accounted for, with no need for extreme accretion...... episodes. These results are based on a simulation of randomly driven magnetohydrodynamic turbulence on a scale of 4 pc, including self-gravity, adaptive-mesh refinement to a resolution of 50 AU, and accreting sink particles. The simulation yields a low star formation rate, consistent with the observations...

  16. Constraining properties of GRB magnetar central engines using the observed plateau luminosity and duration correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Rowlinson, A; Dainotti, M; O'Brien, P T; Wijers, R A M J; van der Horst, A J

    2014-01-01

    An intrinsic correlation has been identified between the luminosity and duration of plateaus in the X-ray afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs; Dainotti et al. 2008), suggesting a central engine origin. The magnetar central engine model predicts an observable plateau phase, with plateau durations and luminosities being determined by the magnetic fields and spin periods of the newly formed magnetar. This paper analytically shows that the magnetar central engine model can explain, within the 1$\\sigma$ uncertainties, the correlation between plateau luminosity and duration. The observed scatter in the correlation most likely originates in the spread of initial spin periods of the newly formed magnetar and provides an estimate of the maximum spin period of ~35 ms (assuming a constant mass, efficiency and beaming across the GRB sample). Additionally, by combining the observed data and simulations, we show that the magnetar emission is most likely narrowly beamed and has $\\lesssim$20% efficiency in conversion of rot...

  17. Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the wavelength dependence of galaxy structure versus redshift and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Rebecca; Baldry, Ivan; Holwerda, Boris Häußler Benne W; Hopkins, Andrew M; Kelvin, Lee S; Lange, Rebecca; Moffett, Amanda J; Popescu, Cristina C; Taylor, Edward N; Tuffs, Richard J; Vika, Marina; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2015-01-01

    We study how the sizes and radial profiles of galaxies vary with wavelength, by fitting S\\'ersic functions simultaneously to imaging in nine optical and near-infrared bands. To quantify the wavelength dependence of effective radius we use the ratio, $\\mathcal{R}$, of measurements in two restframe bands. The dependence of S\\'ersic index on wavelength, $\\mathcal{N}$, is computed correspondingly. Vulcani et al. (2014) have demonstrated that different galaxy populations present sharply contrasting behaviour in terms of $\\mathcal{R}$ and $\\mathcal{N}$. Here we study the luminosity dependence of this result. We find that at higher luminosities, early-type galaxies display a more substantial decrease in effective radius with wavelength, whereas late-types present a more pronounced increase in S\\'ersic index. The structural contrast between types thus increases with luminosity. By considering samples at different redshifts, we demonstrate that lower data quality reduces the apparent difference between the main galaxy...

  18. The puzzling theoretical predictions for the luminosity of clumping He burning stars

    CERN Document Server

    Castellani, V; Girardi, L; Marconi, M; Moroni, P G P; Weiss, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with theoretical predictions for He burning models in a range of masses covering the so-called Red Giant Branch phase transition. Taking as a guideline the observational constraints given by Hipparcos parallaxes to the predicted luminosity of models originated from Red Giant progenitors with He core undergoing electron degeneracy, we compare models by various authors as recently appeared in the literature, disclosing sensitive differences in the predicted luminosity. The solidity of these theoretical predictions is investigated by exploring the effects of varying the assumptions about the efficiency of core overshooting or the amount of mass loss, giving quantitative estimates of the related uncertainties. However, one finds that theoretical predictions concerning the luminosity of the red giant clump in the Hipparcos sample is scarcely affected by these mechanisms.A comparison among theoretical predictions as recently given by different authors convincingly demonstrates that the different lu...

  19. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): maximum likelihood determination of the luminosity function and its evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Loveday, J; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Brown, M J I; Driver, S P; Kelvin, L S; Phillipps, S

    2015-01-01

    We describe modifications to the joint stepwise maximum likelihood method of Cole (2011) in order to simultaneously fit the GAMA-II galaxy luminosity function (LF), corrected for radial density variations, and its evolution with redshift. The whole sample is reasonably well-fit with luminosity (Qe) and density (Pe) evolution parameters Qe, Pe = 1.0, 1.0 but with significant degeneracies characterized by Qe = 1.4 - 0.4Pe. Blue galaxies exhibit larger luminosity density evolution than red galaxies, as expected. We present the evolution-corrected r-band LF for the whole sample and for blue and red sub-samples, using both Petrosian and Sersic magnitudes. Petrosian magnitudes miss a substantial fraction of the flux of de Vaucouleurs profile galaxies: the Sersic LF is substantially higher than the Petrosian LF at the bright end.

  20. The Star Formation and AGN luminosity relation: Predictions from a semi-analytical model

    CERN Document Server

    Gutcke, Thales A; Maccio`, Andrea V; Lacey, Cedric

    2015-01-01

    In a Universe where AGN feedback regulates star formation in massive galaxies, a strong correlation between these two quantities is expected. If the gas causing star formation is also responsible for feeding the central black hole, then a positive correlation is expected. If powerful AGNs are responsible for the star formation quenching, then a negative correlation is expected. Observations so far have mainly found a mild correlation or no correlation at all (i.e. a flat relation between star formation rate (SFR) and AGN luminosity), raising questions about the whole paradigm of "AGN feedback". In this paper, we report the predictions of the GALFORM semi-analytical model, which has a very strong coupling between AGN activity and quenching of star formation. The predicted SFR-AGN luminosity correlation appears negative in the low AGN luminosity regime, where AGN feedback acts, but becomes strongly positive in the regime of the brightest AGN. Our predictions reproduce reasonably well recent observations by Rosa...

  1. Analisys of the Luminosity-Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation in cosmological simulations

    CERN Document Server

    De Rossi, M E; Scannapieco, C; Rossi, Maria Emilia De; Tissera, Patricia Beatriz; Scannapieco, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    We study the Luminosity-Metallicity Relation and the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation by performing chemo-dynamical simulations in a cosmological scenario. Our results predict a tight linear correlation between oxygen chemical abundance and luminosity for galactic systems up to z=3. The Luminosity-Metallicity Relation evolves with redshift in such a way that systems at a given oxygen abundance were ~3 dex brighter at z=3 compared to local ones, in good agreement with observations. We determin also a characteristic stellar mass M_c~10^(10.2) M_sun/h above which the Stellar Mass-Metallicity Relation starts to flatten. We encounter that this mass arises as a consequence of the hierarchical aggregation of structure in a LCDM universe and segregates two galactic populations with different astophysical properties.

  2. Towards a Level-1 tracking trigger for the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, T A D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    At the high luminosity HL-LHC, upwards of 160 individual proton-proton interactions (pileup) are expected per bunch-crossing at luminosities of around $5\\times10^{34}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. A proposal by the ATLAS collaboration to split the ATLAS first level trigger in to two stages is briefly detailed. The use of fast track finding in the new first level trigger is explored as a method to provide the discrimination required to reduce the event rate to acceptable levels for the read out system while maintaining high efficiency on the selection of the decay products of electroweak bosons at HL-LHC luminosities. It is shown that available bandwidth in the proposed new strip tracker is sufficiency for a region of interest based track trigger given certain optimisations, further methods for improving upon the proposal are discussed.

  3. Clustering, Cosmology and a New Era of Black Hole Demographics: The Conditional Luminosity Function of AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution stretching back to z~5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGNs inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGNs and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, we present a method to observationally constrain the Conditional Luminosity Function (CLF) of AGNs at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function -- all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is illustrated at z≈0 and 0.9 using the limited data that is currently available, and a clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both, supporting the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering. In addition, the CLF predicts that z≈0.9 quasars may be commonly hosted by haloes with Mh ~ 1014 M⊙. These `young cluster' environments may provide the necessary interactions between gas-rich galaxies to fuel luminous accretion. The results derived from this method will be useful to populate AGNs of different luminosities in cosmological simulations.

  4. The local space density of Sb-Sdm galaxies as function of their scalesize, surface brightness and luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    De Jong, R S; Jong, Roelof S. de; Lacey, Cedric

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the dependence of the local space density of spiral galaxies on luminosity, scalesize and surface brightness. We derive bivariate space density distributions in these quantities from a sample of about 1000 Sb-Sdm spiral galaxies, corrected for selection effects in luminosity and surface brightness. The structural parameters of the galaxies were corrected for internal extinction using a description depending on galaxy surface brightness. We find that the bivariate space density distribution of spiral galaxies in the (luminosity, scalesize)-plane is well described by a Schechter luminosity function in the luminosity dimension and a log-normal scale size distribution at a given luminosity. This parameterization of the scalesize distribution was motivated by a simple model for the formation of disks within dark matter halos, with halos acquiring their angular momenta through tidal torques from neighboring objects, and the disk specific angular momentum being proportional to that of the parent halo....

  5. Luminosity control and beam orbit stability with beta star leveling at LHC and HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gorzawski, Arkadiusz Andrzej; Wenninger, Jorg

    This thesis describes the wide subject of the luminosity leveling and its requirements for the LHC and the HL-LHC. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different leveling methods focusing the thesis on the beta star leveling technique. We review the beams offset build--up due to the environmental (i.e. natural ground motion) and mechanical (i.e. moving quadrupole) sources. We quantify the instrumentation requirements for the reliable and reproducible operation with small offsets at the interaction points. Last but not least, we propose a novel method for the beam offset stabilization at the collision point based on the feedback from the luminosity.

  6. Populations of High-Luminosity Density-Bounded HII Regions in Spiral Galaxies? Evidence and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, J. E.; Rozas, M.; Zurita, A.; Watson, R. A.; Knapen, J. H.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present evidence that the H II regions of high luminosity in disk galaxies may be density bounded, so that a significant fraction of the ionizing photons emitted by their exciting OB stars escape from the regions. The key piece of evidence is the presence, in the Ha luminosity functions (LFs) of the populations of H iI regions, of glitches, local sharp peaks at an apparently invariant luminosity, defined as the Stromgren luminosity Lstr), LH(sub alpha) = Lstr = 10(sup 38.6) (+/- 10(sup 0.1)) erg/ s (no other peaks are found in any of the LFs) accompanying a steepening of slope for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr This behavior is readily explicable via a physical model whose basic premises are: (a) the transition at LH(sub alpha) = Lstr marks a change from essentially ionization bounding at low luminosities to density bounding at higher values, (b) for this to occur the law relating stellar mass in massive star-forming clouds to the mass of the placental cloud must be such that the ionizing photon flux produced within the cloud is a function which rises more steeply than the mass of the cloud. Supporting evidence for the hypothesis of this transition is also presented: measurements of the central surface brightnesses of H II regions for LH(sub alpha) less than Lstr are proportional to L(sup 1/3, sub H(sub alpha)), expected for ionization bounding, but show a sharp trend to a steeper dependence for LH(sub alpha) greater than Lstr, and the observed relation between the internal turbulence velocity parameter, sigma, and the luminosity, L, at high luminosities, can be well explained if these regions are density bounded. If confirmed, the density-bounding hypothesis would have a number of interesting implications. It would imply that the density-bounded regions were the main sources of the photons which ionize the diffuse gas in disk galaxies. Our estimates, based on the hypothesis, indicate that these regions emit sufficient Lyman continuum not only to

  7. Are the luminosities of RR Lyrae stars affected by second parameter effects?

    CERN Document Server

    Van den Bergh, S

    1995-01-01

    There is a serious discrepancy between the distance to the LMC derived from the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation and that obtained by using the Galactic calibration for the luminosity of RR Lyrae stars. It is suggested that this problem might be due to the fact that second parameter effects make it inappropriate to apply Galactic calibrations to RR Lyrae variables in the Magellanic Clouds, i.e. Mv(RR) could depend on both [Fe/H] and on one or more second parameters.

  8. Simulation study of real-time monitor for BEPC-Ⅱ luminosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A fast and real time luminosity monitor system will be used in the BEPC-Ⅱ(Beijing Electron Positron Collider,China).Photons generated in radiative Bhabha scattering at the interaction point are transformed into charged particles,and then the luminosity of each bunch pair is measured through collecting the Cherenkov light produced by charged particles in fused silica.The whole process happening in the detector is simulated.The physics acceptance and detection threshold with the monitor accu-racy of 1% are set based on the simulation spectra of photoelectron yield calibrated by e-beam data.

  9. Luminosity determination for the dd→αK+K-experiment at ANKE/COSY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Xiao-Hua; Dzyuba Alexey; Biischer Markus

    2009-01-01

    High resolution studies of a0/f0(980) decays into channels involving open strangeness are currently being performed at COSY-Jfilich.As a "filter" for isospin-zero intermediate states,i.e.to selectively produce the fo(980) resonance,the dd→αK+K- reaction was measured with the magnetic ANKE spectrometer.In order to determine the luminosity of this experiment,the elastically and quasi-elastically scattered deuterons were recorded simultaneously with the αK + K- events.Here we report about the luminosity determination via investigating the (quasi-) elastic deuterons at ANKE.

  10. The European Large Area ISO Survey - IV. The preliminary 90-mu m luminosity function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serjeant, S.; Efstathiou, A.; Oliver, S.;

    2001-01-01

    We present the luminosity function of 90-mum-selected galaxies from the European Large Area ISO Survey (ELAIS), extending to z = 0.3. Their luminosities are in the range 10(9)

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: modeling of the luminosity and colour dependence in the Data Release 10

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Hong; Zehavi, Idit; Xu, Haojie; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Weinberg, David H; Bahcall, Neta A; Berlind, Andreas A; Comparat, Johan; McBride, Cameron K; Ross, Ashley J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin A; Swanson, Molly E C; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Wake, David A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the luminosity and colour dependence of clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Tenth Data Release. The halo occupation distribution framework is adopted to model the projected two-point correlation function measurements on small and intermediate scales (from $0.02$ to $60\\,h^{-1}{\\rm {Mpc}}$) and to interpret the observed trends and infer the connection of galaxies to dark matter halos. We find that luminous red galaxies reside in massive halos of mass $M{\\sim}10^{13}$--$10^{14}\\,h^{-1}{\\rm M_\\odot}$ and more luminous galaxies are more clustered and hosted by more massive halos. The strong small-scale clustering requires a fraction of these galaxies to be satellites in massive halos, with the fraction at the level of 5--8 per cent and decreasing with luminosity. The characteristic mass of a halo hosting on average one satellite galaxy above a luminosity threshold is about a factor $8.7$ larger than that of a halo hosting a centra...

  12. The Demographics of Broad-Line Quasars in the Mass-Luminosity Plane. I. Testing FWHM-Based Virial Black Hole Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Yue

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) We jointly constrain the LF and BHMF of quasars using a Bayesian approach that describes the underlying active BHMF and Eddington ratio distribution to match the observed distributions in the quasar mass-luminosity plane, based on ~58,000 uniformly selected quasars from the SDSS DR 7 at z~0.4-5. We take into account the selection effect of the sample flux limit; more importantly, we deal with the statistical scatter between true BH masses and FWHM-based single-epoch virial mass estimates, as well as potential luminosity-dependent biases of these mass estimates. The LF is tightly constrained in the regime sampled by SDSS quasars, and makes reasonable predictions when extrapolated to ~3 magnitudes fainter than the SDSS flux limit. On the other hand, we find it difficult to constrain the BHMF to within a factor of a few at z>~0.7. This is mainly driven by the unknown luminosity-dependent bias of these virial mass estimators and its degeneracy with other model parameters, and secondly driven by the fac...

  13. Catalog of Galaxy Morphology in Four Rich Clusters: Luminosity Evolution of Disk Galaxies at 0.33

    CERN Document Server

    Saintonge, A; Ellingson, E; Yee, H K C; Carlberg, R G; Saintonge, Amelie; Schade, David; Ellingson, Erica; Yee, Howard K.C.; Carlberg, Raymond G.

    2005-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of four rich, X-ray luminous, galaxy clusters (0.33luminosity profiles are fitted with three models: exponential disk, de Vaucouleurs bulge, and a disk-plus-bulge hybrid model. The best fit is selected and produces a quantitative assessment of the morphology of each galaxy: the principal parameters derived being B/T, the ratio of bulge to total luminosity, the scale lengths and half-light radii, axial ratios, position angles and surface brightnesses of each component. Cluster membership is determined using a statistical correction for field galaxy contamination, and a mass normalization factor (mass within boundaries of the observed fields) is derived for each cluster. In the present paper, this catalog of measurements is used to investigate the luminosity evolution of di...

  14. ALMA spectroscopic survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: CO luminosity functions and the evolution of the cosmic density of molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Decarli, Roberto; Aravena, Manuel; Carilli, Chris; Bouwens, Rychard; da Cunha, Elisabete; Daddi, Emanuele; Ivison, R J; Popping, Gergö; Riechers, Dominik; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, Mark; Weiss, Axel; Anguita, Timo; Assef, Roberto; Bauer, Franz; Bell, Eric F; Bertoldi, Frank; Chapman, Scott; Colina, Luis; Cortes, Paulo C; Cox, Pierre; Dickinson, Mark; Elbaz, David; Gónzalez-López, Jorge; Ibar, Edo; Infante, Leopoldo; Hodge, Jacqueline; Karim, Alex; Fevre, Olivier Le; Magnelli, Benjamin; Neri, Roberto; Oesch, Pascal; Ota, Kazuaki; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sargent, Mark; Sheth, Kartik; van der Wel, Arjen; van der Werf, Paul; Wagg, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we use ASPECS, the ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the {\\em Hubble} Ultra Deep Field (UDF) in band 3 and band 6, to place blind constraints on the CO luminosity function and the evolution of the cosmic molecular gas density as a function of redshift up to $z\\sim 4.5$. This study is based on galaxies that have been solely selected through their CO emission and not through any other property. In all of the redshift bins the ASPECS measurements reach the predicted `knee' of the CO luminosity function (around $5\\times10^{9}$ K km/s pc$^2$). We find clear evidence of an evolution in the CO luminosity function with respect to $z\\sim 0$, with more CO luminous galaxies present at $z\\sim 2$. The observed galaxies at $z\\sim 2$ also appear more gas-rich than predicted by recent semi-analytical models. The comoving cosmic molecular gas density within galaxies as a function of redshift shows a factor 3-10 drop from $z \\sim 2$ to $z \\sim 0$ (with significant error bars), and possibly a decline at $z>3$. This tre...

  15. Luminosity determination in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; Aben, R; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agricola, J; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Verzini, M J Alconada; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alstaty, M; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Piqueras, D Álvarez; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Coutinho, Y Amaral; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Santos, S P Amor Dos; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Bella, L Aperio; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Navarro, L Barranco; Barreiro, F; da Costa, J Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Noccioli, E Benhar; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Kuutmann, E Bergeaas; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertram, I A; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besjes, G J; Bylund, O Bessidskaia; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; 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Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Nedden, M Zur; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-01-01

    The luminosity determination for the ATLAS detector at the LHC during pp collisions at [Formula: see text] 8 TeV in 2012 is presented. The evaluation of the luminosity scale is performed using several luminometers, and comparisons between these luminosity detectors are made to assess the accuracy, consistency and long-term stability of the results. A luminosity uncertainty of [Formula: see text] is obtained for the [Formula: see text] of pp collision data delivered to ATLAS at [Formula: see text] 8 TeV in 2012.

  16. Luminosity determination in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

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Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; Fressard-Batraneanu, Silvia; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Louis Guillaume; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gascon Bravo, Alberto; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisen, Marc; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Geng, Cong; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Ghneimat, Mazuza; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gignac, Matthew; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuli, Francesco; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Giulia; Gonella, Laura; Gongadze, Alexi; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goudet, Christophe Raymond; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gravila, Paul Mircea; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Grevtsov, Kirill; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Groh, Sabrina; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guan, Wen; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Hadef, Asma; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Haney, Bijan; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hartmann, Nikolai Marcel; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Jochen Jens; Heinrich, Lukas; Heinz, Christian; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooberman, Benjamin Henry; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huo, Peng; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Ito, Fumiaki; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jain, Vivek; Jakobi, Katharina Bianca; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanneau, Fabien; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Hai; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Johnson, William Joseph; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Sarah; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Köhler, Markus Konrad; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kaluza, Adam; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kanjir, Luka; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kasahara, Kota; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Kentaro, Kawade; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Kolb, Mathis; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Kowalewska, Anna Bozena; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozakai, Chihiro; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuechler, Jan Thomas; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lammers, Sabine; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Lazzaroni, Massimo; Le, Brian; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Quilleuc, Eloi; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Lerner, Giuseppe; Leroy, Claude; Lesage, Arthur; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Dave; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Qi; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Lionti, Anthony Eric; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanlin; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Longo, Luigi; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lopez Solis, Alvaro; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Haonan; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luedtke, Christian; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Luzi, Pierre Marc; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Lyubushkin, Vladimir; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Ma, Yanhui; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Maneira, José; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousos, Athanasios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mansour, Jason Dhia; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Manzoni, Stefano; Mapelli, Livio; Marceca, Gino; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mc Fadden, Neil Christopher; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McClymont, Laurie; McDonald, Emily; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Melini, Davide; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Melo, Matej; Meloni, Federico; Menary, Stephen Burns; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Miano, Fabrizio; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mondragon, Matthew Craig; Mönig, Klaus; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montalbano, Alyssa; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Mori, Tatsuya; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Muškinja, Miha; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naryshkin, Iouri; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nguyen Manh, Tuan; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nodulman, Lawrence; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Norjoharuddeen, Nurfikri; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Rourke, Abigail Alexandra; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Adam Jackson; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pascuzzi, Vincent; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penwell, John; Peralva, Bernardo; Perego, Marta Maria; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrov, Mariyan; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Peyaud, Alan; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pin, Arnaud Willy J; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; 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Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shaikh, Nabila Wahab; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyed Ruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Sicho, Petr; Sickles, Anne Marie; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; 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    2016-01-01

    The luminosity determination for the ATLAS detector at the LHC during pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV in 2012 is presented. The evaluation of the luminosity scale is performed using several luminometers, and comparisons between these luminosity detectors are made to assess the accuracy, consistency and long-term stability of the results. A luminosity uncertainty of dL/L = +/- 1.9% is obtained for the 22.7 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collision data delivered to ATLAS at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV in 2012.

  17. Improved luminosity determination in pp collisions at [Formula: see text] using the ATLAS detector at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thong, W M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torchiani, I; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Triplett, N; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Berg, R; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Poel, E; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walch, S; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wall, R; Waller, P; Walsh, B; Wang, C; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watanabe, I; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, A T; Waugh, B M; Weber, M S; Weber, P; Weidberg, A R; Weigell, P; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wendland, D; Weng, Z; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Werth, M; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Weydert, C; Whalen, K; Wheeler-Ellis, S J; White, A; White, M J; White, S; Whitehead, S R; Whiteson, D; Whittington, D; Wicek, F; Wicke, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wijeratne, P A; Wildauer, A; Wildt, M A; Wilhelm, I; Wilkens, H G; Will, J Z; Williams, E; Williams, H H; Willis, W; Willocq, S; Wilson, J A; Wilson, M G; Wilson, A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winkelmann, S; Winklmeier, F; Wittgen, M; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wong, W C; Wooden, G; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wraight, K; Wright, M; Wrona, B; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wulf, E; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xiao, M; Xie, S; Xu, C; Xu, D; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, H; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, S; Yamamura, T; Yamanaka, T; Yamaoka, J; Yamazaki, T; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, U K; Yang, Y; Yang, Z; Yanush, S; Yao, L; Yao, Y; Yasu, Y; Ybeles Smit, G V; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yilmaz, M; Yoosoofmiya, R; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Young, C; Young, C J; Youssef, S; Yu, D; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zajacova, Z; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zaytsev, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zendler, C; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zenz, S; Zerwas, D; Zevi Della Porta, G; Zhan, Z; Zhang, D; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, L; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, N; Zhou, Y; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    The luminosity calibration for the ATLAS detector at the LHC during pp collisions at [Formula: see text] in 2010 and 2011 is presented. Evaluation of the luminosity scale is performed using several luminosity-sensitive detectors, and comparisons are made of the long-term stability and accuracy of this calibration applied to the pp collisions at [Formula: see text]. A luminosity uncertainty of [Formula: see text] is obtained for the 47 pb(-1) of data delivered to ATLAS in 2010, and an uncertainty of [Formula: see text] is obtained for the 5.5 fb(-1) delivered in 2011.

  18. Instrumentation for beam radiation and luminosity measurement in the CMS experiment using novel detector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Moritz

    2017-02-01

    The higher energy and luminosity of the LHC initiated the development of dedicated technologies for radiation monitoring and luminosity measurement. A dedicated pixelated luminosity detector measures coincidences in several three-layer telescopes of silicon pixel detectors to arrive at a luminosity for each colliding LHC bunch pair. In addition, charged particle tracking allows to monitor the location of the collision point. The upgraded fast beam conditions monitor measures the particle flux using 24 two-pad single crystalline diamond sensors, equipped with a fast front-end ASIC produced in 130 nm CMOS technology. The excellent time resolution is used to separate collision products from machine induced background. A new beam-halo monitor at larger radius exploits Cherenkov light produced by relativistic charged particles in fuzed quartz crystals to provide direction sensitivity and time resolution to separate incoming and outgoing particles. The back-end electronics of the beam monitoring systems includes dedicated modules with high bandwidth digitizers developed in both VME and microTCA standards for per bunch beam measurements and gain monitoring. All new and upgraded sub-detectors have been taking data from the first day of LHC operation in April 2015. Results on their commissioning and essential characteristics using data since the start-up of LHC will be presented.

  19. Sub-mm Emission Line Deep Fields: CO and [CII] Luminosity Functions out to z = 6

    CERN Document Server

    Popping, Gergö; Decarli, Roberto; Spaans, Marco; Somerville, Rachel S; Trager, Scott C

    2016-01-01

    Now that ALMA is reaching its full capabilities, observations of sub-mm emission line deep fields become feasible. Deep fields are ideal to study the luminosity function of sub-mm emission lines, ultimately tracing the atomic and molecular gas properties of galaxies. We couple a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation with a radiative transfer code to make predictions for the luminosity function of CO J=1-0 up to CO J=6-5 and [CII] at redshifts z=0-6. We find that: 1) our model correctly reproduces the CO and [CII] emission of low- and high-redshift galaxies and reproduces the available constraints on the CO luminosity function at z1.5 and the CO luminosity of individual galaxies at intermediate redshifts. We argue that this is driven by a lack of cold gas in galaxies at intermediate redshifts as predicted by cosmological simulations of galaxy formation. This may lay at the root of other problems theoretical models face at the same redshifts.

  20. The 2-10 keV luminosity as a Star Formation Rate indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Ranalli, P; Setti, G

    2003-01-01

    Radio and far infrared luminosities of star-forming galaxies follow a tight linear relation. Making use of ASCA and BeppoSAX observations of a well-defined sample of nearby star-forming galaxies, we argue that tight linear relations hold between the X-ray, radio and far infrared luminosities. The effect of intrinsic absorption is investigated taking NGC3256 as a test case. It is suggested that the hard X-ray emission is directly related to the Star Formation Rate. Star formation processes may also account for most of the 2-10 keV emission from LLAGNs of lower X-ray luminosities (for the same FIR and radio luminosity). Deep Chandra observations of a sample of radio-selected star-forming galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North show that the same relation holds also at high (0.2< z< 1.3) redshift. The X-ray/radio relations also allow a derivation of X-ray number counts up to very faint fluxes from the radio Log N-Log S, which is consistent with current limits and models. Thus the contribution of star-formi...

  1. The Mid-IR luminosity function of galaxies in the ELAIS Southern fields

    CERN Document Server

    Pozzi, F; Oliver, S; Matute, I; La Franca, F; Lari, C; Zamorani, G; Franceschini, A; Rowan-Robinson, M

    2004-01-01

    We present the first determination of the 15micron luminosity functio galaxies from the European Large Area ISO survey (ELAIS) southern fields. We have adopted a new criterion to separate the quiescent, non-evolving and the starburst, evolving populations based on the ratio of mid-infrared to optical luminosities. Strong evolution is suggested by our data for the starburst galaxy population, while normal spiral galaxies are consistent with no evolution. The starburst population must evolve both in luminosity and in density with rates of the order L(z) (1+z)^(3.5) and rho(z) (1+z)^3.8 up to z~1. The evolutionary parameters of our model have been tested by comparing the model predictions with other observables, like source counts at all flux density levels (from 0.1 to 300 mJy) and redshift distributions and luminosity functions at high-z (0.7 < z < 1.0 from HDF-N data). The agreement between our model predictions and the observed data is remarkably good. We use our data to estimate the star-formation den...

  2. Upgrade of the ATLAS hadronic Tile Calorimeter for the High luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Solodkov, Alexander; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment. TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillators as active medium. The scintillators are read-out by wavelength shifting fibers coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The analogue signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will have a peak luminosity of 5x10ˆ34 cm-2s-1, five times higher than the design luminosity of the LHC. TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics for the high luminosity programme of the LHC starting in 2026. All signals will be digitized and then transferred directly to the off-detector electronics, where the signals will be reconstructed, stored, and sent to the first level of trigger at a rate of 40 MHz. This will provide better precision of the calorimeter signals used by the trigger system and will a...

  3. Detailed Shape and Evolutionary Behavior of the X-ray Luminosity Function of Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaji, T; Salvato, M; Brusa, M; Cappelluti, N; Civano, F; Puccetti, S; Elvis, M; Brunner, H; Fotopoulou, S; Ueda, Y; Griffiths, R E; Koekemoer, A M; Akiyama, M; Comastri, A; Gilli, R; Lanzuisi, G; Merloni, A; Vignali, C

    2015-01-01

    We construct the rest-frame 2--10 keV intrinsic X-ray luminosity function of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) from a combination of X-ray surveys from the all-sky Swift BAT survey to the Chandra Deep Field-South. We use ~3200 AGNs in our analysis, which covers six orders of magnitude in flux. The inclusion of the XMM and Chandra COSMOS data has allowed us to investigate the detailed behavior of the XLF and evolution. In deriving our XLF, we take into account realistic AGN spectrum templates, absorption corrections, and probability density distributions in photometric redshift. We present an analytical expression for the overall behavior of the XLF in terms of the luminosity-dependent density evolution, smoothed two power-law expressions in 11 redshift shells, three-segment power-law expression of the number density evolution in four luminosity classes, and binned XLF. We observe a sudden flattening of the low luminosity end slope of the XLF slope at z>~0.6. Detailed structures of the AGN downsizing have been als...

  4. Pulse simulations and heat flow measurements for the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter under high-luminosity conditions

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)758133; Zuber, Kai

    The high luminosity phase of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is an important step for further and more detailed studies of the Standard Model of particle physics as well as searches for new physics. The necessary upgrade of the ATLAS detector is a challenging task as the increased luminosity entails many problems for the different detector parts. The liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter suffers signal-degradation effects and a high voltage drop of the supply potential under high-luminosity conditions. It is possible that the argon starts to boil due to the large energy depositions. The effect of the high-luminosity environment on the liquid-argon Forward Calorimeter has been simulated in order to investigate the level of signal degradation. The results show a curvature of the triangular pulse shape that appears prolonged when increasing the energy deposit. This effect is caused by the drop in the electric potential that produces a decrease in the electric field across the liquid-argon gap in the Forward Calorim...

  5. LEP3: A High Luminosity e+e- Collider to study the Higgs Boson

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A; Assmann, R W; Butterworth, A; Janot, P; Jimenez, J M; Grojean, C; Milanese, A; Modena, M; Osborne, J A; Zimmermann, F; Piekarz, H; Oide, K; Yokoya, K; Ellis, J; Klute, M; Zanetti, M; Velasco, M; Telnov, V; Rivkin, L; Murray, B; Cai, Y

    2012-01-01

    The LHC experiments discovered a new particle of mass around 125 GeV, candidate for the scalar Higgs boson of the Standard Model. An e+e- collider operating close to the ZH threshold could be the tool of choice for studying this unique particle in detail. We present here the concept of a storage ring collider, which we call LEP3. Preliminary studies show that at a centre-of-mass energy of 240 GeV, near-constant luminosities of 10^34 cm^{-2}s^{-1} are possible in up to four collision points, while respecting a number of constraints including beamstrahlung. The integrated luminosity is 100fb^{-1}/y per interaction point, 20,000 e+e- --> ZH events would be produced per year and per experiment. LEP3 could also operate in multi-bunch mode at the Z resonance, with luminosities of several\\times10^35 cm^{-2}s^{-1}, yielding O(10^11) Z decays per year, as well as just above the WW threshold. The short luminosity lifetime requires the use of top-up injection, which, in turn calls for a full-energy injector. The present...

  6. The Evolution of the Luminosity Function in Deep Fields A Comparison with CDM Models

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, F; Giallongo, E; Fontana, A; Cristiani, S; D'Odorico, S

    2001-01-01

    The galaxy Luminosity Function (LF) has been estimated in the rest frame B luminosity at 0luminosity of the low luminosity objects. The implications of our resul...

  7. Response of circumnuclear water masers to luminosity changes in an active galactic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A

    2000-01-01

    Circumnuclear water masers can respond in two ways to changes in the luminosity of an active galactic nucleus. First, an increase in the X-ray luminosity can lead to an increase in the maser emissivity; and second, an increase in the intrinsic bolometric luminosity may result in a temporary decrease in the difference between the gas and dust temperature and a consequent decrease in the maser output. Whilst the latter effect can occur over a period shorter than the thermal timescale, the former effect cannot. Quantitative estimates of the response of the water maser emissivity to changes in either the X-ray or bolometric luminosity are presented, together with estimates of the relevant timescales. Either mechanism could account for recent observations by Gallimore et al. which suggest that the water maser variability in two widely separated regions of the circumnuclear gas in NGC 1068 have been coordinated by a signal from the active nucleus. For either mechanism, a minimum H2 density ~ 1.E+8 cm-3 is needed to...

  8. Upgrade of Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment. TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillators as active medium. The scintillators are read-out by wavelength shifting fibers coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The analogue signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The High Luminosity Large Hadron collider (HL-LHC) will have a peak luminosity of 5x10^34 cm-2s-1, five times higher than the design luminosity of the LHC. TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics for the high luminosity programme of the LHC in 2026. The calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent directly to the off-detector electronics, where the signals are reconstructed and shipped to the first level of trigger at a rate of 40 MHz. This will provide a better precision of the calorimeter signals used by the trigger system and will allow th...

  9. Upgrade of Tile Calorimeter of the ATLAS detector for the High Luminosity LHC.

    CERN Document Server

    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the hadronic calorimeter of ATLAS covering the central region of the ATLAS experiment. TileCal is a sampling calorimeter with steel as absorber and scintillators as active medium. The scintillators are read-out by wavelength shifting fibers coupled to photomultiplier tubes (PMT). The analogue signals from the PMTs are amplified, shaped and digitized by sampling the signal every 25 ns. The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) will have a peak luminosity of $5 * 10^{34} cm^{-2} s ^{-1} $, five times higher than the design luminosity of the LHC. TileCal will undergo a major replacement of its on- and off-detector electronics for the high luminosity programme of the LHC in 2026. The calorimeter signals will be digitized and sent directly to the off-detector electronics, where the signals are reconstructed and shipped to the first level of trigger at a rate of 40 MHz. This will provide a better precision of the calorimeter signals used by the trigger system and will allo...

  10. On the faint end of the high redshift AGN luminosity function

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, F; Shankar, Francesco; Mathur, Smita; Shankar, Francesco; Mathur, Smita

    2007-01-01

    Using the results of recent optical surveys we conclude that the {\\it non}-detection of quasars down to faint magnitudes implies a significant flattening of the high redshift (z~6) optical active galactic nuclei (AGN) luminosity function for M_{1450}>-26.7. We find that all the data are consistent with a faint-end slope for the optical AGN luminosity function of \\beta=-2.2 and \\beta=-2.8, at the 90% and 99% confidence level respectively, flatter than the bright-end slope of \\beta'~ -3.2. We also show that X-ray deep surveys have probed even fainter magnitudes than the optical ones yielding more significant constraints on the shallow faint-end slope of the optical luminosity function. The inclusion of Type II AGN candidates, detected in the Chandra deep fields, hints towards an higher normalization for the total AGN luminosity function, if these sources lie at 5

  11. The luminosity function and surface brightness distribution of HI selected galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH; Sprayberry, D

    2001-01-01

    We measure the z = 0 B-band optical luminosity function (LF) for galaxies selected in a blind Hi survey. The total LF of the Hi selected sample is flat, with Schechter parameters M*= -19.38+(+1.02)(-0.62) + 5 log h(100) mag and alpha = -1.03(-0.15)(+0.25), in good agreement with LFs of optically sel

  12. Constraining properties of GRB magnetar central engines using the observed plateau luminosity and duration correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rowlinson; B.P. Gompertz; M. Dainotti; R.A.M.J. Wijers; A.J. van der Horst

    2014-01-01

    An intrinsic correlation has been identified between the luminosity and duration of plateaus in the X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; Dainotti et al. 2008), suggesting a central engine origin. The magnetar central engine model predicts an observable plateau phase, with plateau durations an

  13. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  14. Galaxy UV-luminosity Function and Reionisation Constraints on Axion Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bozek, Brandon; Silk, Joseph; Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2014-01-01

    If the dark matter (DM) were composed of axions, then structure formation in the Universe would be suppressed below the axion Jeans scale. Using an analytic model for the halo mass function of a mixed dark matter model with axions and CDM, combined with the abundance-matching technique, we construct the UV luminosity function. Axions suppress high-$z$ galaxy formation and the UV-luminosity function is truncated at a faintest limiting magnitude. From the UV-luminosity function, we predict the reionisation history of the universe and find that axion dark matter causes reionisation to occur at lower redshift. We search for evidence of axions using the Hubble ultra-deep field UV-luminosity function in the redshift range $z=6$ to $10$, and the optical depth to reionisation, $\\tau$, as measured from CMB polarisation. All probes we consider consistently exclude $m_a\\lesssim 10^{-23}\\text{ eV}$ from contributing more than half of the DM, with our strongest constraint ruling this model out at more than $8\\sigma$ signi...

  15. Reverberation Measurements of Quasars and the Size-Mass-Luminosity Relations in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kaspi, S

    2000-01-01

    A 7.5 years spectrophotometric monitoring program of 28 Palomar-Green quasars to determine the size of their broad emission line region (BLR) is reviewed. We find both the continuum and the emission line fluxes of all quasars to vary during this period. Seventeen objects has adequate sampling for reverberation mapping and in all of them we find the Balmer line variations to lag those of the continuum by ~100 days. This study increases the available luminosity range for studying the size-mass-luminosity relations in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by two orders of magnitude and doubles the number of objects suitable for such studies. Combining our results with data available for Seyfert 1 galaxies, we find the BLR size to scale with the rest-frame 5100 A luminosity as L^{0.70 +/- 0.03}. This result is different from previous studies, and suggests that the effective ionization parameter in AGNs may be a decreasing function of luminosity. We are also able to constrain, subject to the assumption that gravity domina...

  16. Commissioning of the Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsen, Sune; Hansen, Peter; Hansen, Jørgen Beck

    The startup of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) has initialized a new era in particle physics. The standard model of particle physics has for the last 40 years with tremendous success described all measurements with phenomenal precision. The experiments at the LHC are testing the standard model in a new energy regime. To normalize the measurements and understand the potential discoveries of the LHC experiments it is often crucial to know the interaction rate - the absolute luminosity. The ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) detector will measure luminosity by numerous methods. But for most of the methods only the relative luminosity is measured with good precision. The absolute scale has to be provided from elsewhere. ATLAS is like the other LHC experiments mainly relying of absolute luminosity calibration from van der Meer scans (beam separation scans). To cross check and maybe even improve the precision; ATLAS has built a sub-detector to measure the flux of protons scattered under very small angles as this flux...

  17. On the correlation between radio and gamma-ray luminosities of active galactic nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mücke, A.; Pohl, M.

    1997-01-01

    in flux-limited samples if intrinsic scatter does not exceed similar to 40 % of the original gamma-ray luminosity. However, if mean flux values of high variable sources are used we find the chance probability of high Spearman's correlation coefficient be significant underestimated. The analysis presented...

  18. Long Term Optical and Infrared Reverberation Mapping of High and Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Barth, Aaron; Brandt, Niel; Dawson, Kyle; Green, Paul; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Joner, Mike; Kenney, John; McGreer, Ian; Nordgren, Tyler; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Tao, Charling

    2016-08-01

    Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust have been limited to very low luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN) that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). Cycle 11-12's two year baseline allowed for the reverberation mapping of 17 high luminosity quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project. By combining ground based monitoring from Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes with Spitzer data we have for the first time detected dust reverberation in quasars. We propose to continue this project to capitalize on the continuing optical motnoring from the ground and to increase the confidence in the detected lags. Additionally, the Call for Proposals asks for up to 1000 hours of observations in the Spitzer CVZ to accommodate battery charging needs. We propose to add to our quasar sample five lower luminosity Seyfert galaxies from the Pan-STARRS ground based optical survey that are in the Spitzer CVZ, which will increase the luminosity range of AGN we are studying and, combined with additional ground based observatories, provide for a continuous monitoring campaign lasting 2 years and thus provide the most detailed study of dust around AGN to date.

  19. A study of VH->Vbb for High Luminosity LHC Running

    CERN Document Server

    Glaysher, Paul; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For Standard Model Higgs boson production in the decay mode H -> bb in association with a W or Z boson for High Luminosity LHC Running, the expected signal significance and signal strength is presented for 300 fb-1 and 3000 fb-1 with an average pile-up of =60 and =140 respectively.

  20. Predicting the redshift 2 Halpha luminosity function using [OIII] emission line galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Vihang; Colbert, James W; Dai, Sophia; Dressler, Alan; Henry, Alaina; Malkan, Matt; Rafelski, Marc; Siana, Brian; Teplitz, Harry; Bagley, Micaela; Beck, Melanie; Ross, Nathaniel R; Rutkowski, Michael; Wang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Upcoming space-based surveys such as Euclid and WFIRST-AFTA plan to measure Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations (BAOs) in order to study dark energy. These surveys will use IR slitless grism spectroscopy to measure redshifts of a large number of galaxies over a significant redshift range. In this paper, we use the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) to estimate the expected number of Halpha (Ha) emitters observable by these future surveys. WISP is an ongoing HST slitless spectroscopic survey, covering the 0.8-1.65micron wavelength range and allowing the detection of Ha emitters up to z~1.5 and [OIII] emitters to z~2.3. We derive the Ha-[OIII] bivariate line luminosity function for WISP galaxies at z~1 using a maximum likelihood estimator that properly accounts for uncertainties in line luminosity measurement, and demonstrate how it can be used to derive the Ha luminosity function from exclusively fitting [OIII] data. Using the z~2 [OIII] line luminosity function, and assuming that the relation betwe...

  1. The Bright End of the Luminosity Function of Red Sequence Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Loh, Y S; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Strauss, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    We study the bright end of the luminosity distribution of galaxies in fields with Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using 2099 square degree of SDSS imaging data, we search for luminous (> L*) early-type galaxies within 1.0 Mpc/h of a volume-limited sample of 12,608 spectroscopic LRG in the redshift range 0.12 < z < 0.38. Most of these objects lie in rich environments, with the LRG being the brightest object within 1.0 Mpc/h. The luminosity gap, M12, between the first and second-rank galaxies within 1.0 Mpc/h is large (~0.8 mag), substantially larger than can be explained with an exponentially decaying luminosity function of galaxies. The brightest member is less luminous (by 0.1 to 0.2 mag), and shows a larger gap in LRG selected groups than in cluster-like environments. The large luminosity gap shows little evolution with redshift to z = 0.4, ruling out the scenario that these LRG selected brightest cluster or group galaxies grow by recent cannibalism of cluster mem...

  2. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Belomestnykh, Sergei; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Fedotov, Alexei; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Hahn, Harald; Hao, Yue; He, Ping; Jackson, William; Jain, Animesh; Johnson, Elliott C; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jrg; Luo, Yun; Mahler, George; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Minty, Michiko; Parker, Brett; Pikin, Alexander; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Rao, Triveni; Roser, Thomas; Skaritka, John; Sheehy, Brian; Tepikian, Steven; Than, Yatming; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsentalovich, Evgeni; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Wang, Gang; Webb, Stephen; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Wencan; Zelenski, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. A new ERL accelerator, which provide 5-30 GeV electron beam, will ensure 10^33 to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 level luminosity.

  3. An anticorrelation between X-ray luminosity and Hα equivalent width in X-ray binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fender, R.P.; Russell, D.M.; Knigge, C.; Soria, R.; Hynes, R.I.; Goad, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report an anticorrelation between continuum luminosity and the equivalent width (EW) of the Ha emission line in X-ray binary systems. The effect is evident both in a universal monotonic increase in Ha EW with time following outbursts, as systems fade, and in a comparison between measured EWs and

  4. Luminosity-Metallicity Relation for dIrr Galaxies in the Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Saviane, Ivo; Held, Enrico V; Alloin, Danielle; Rich, R Michael; Bresolin, Fabio; Rizzi, Luca

    2008-01-01

    (abridged) The present work is a first step to collect homogeneous abundances and near-infrared (NIR) luminosities for a sample of dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies, located in nearby groups. The use of NIR luminosities is intended to provide a better proxy to mass than the blue luminosities commonly used in the literature; in addition, selecting group members reduces the impact of uncertain distances. Accurate abundances are derived to assess the galaxy metallicity. Optical spectra are collected for Hii regions in the dIrrs, allowing the determination of oxygen abundances by means of the temperature-sensitive method. For each dIrr galaxy H-band imaging is performed and the total magnitudes are measured via surface photometry. This high-quality database allows us to build a well-defined luminosity-metallicity relation in the range -13 >= M(H) >= -20. The scatter around its linear fit is reduced to 0.11 dex, the lowest of all relations currently available. There might exist a difference between the relation for ...

  5. RD50 Status Report 2008 - Radiation hard semiconductor devices for very high luminosity colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Balbuena, Juan Pablo; Campabadal, Francesca; Díez, Sergio; Fleta, Celeste; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Rafí, Joan Marc; Ullán, Miguel; Creanza, Donato; De Palma, Mauro; Fedele, Francesca; Manna, Norman; Kierstead, Jim; Li, Zheng; Buda, Manuela; Lazanu, Sorina; Pintilie, Lucian; Pintilie, Ioana; Popa, Andreia-Ioana; Lazanu, Ionel; Collins, Paula; Fahrer, Manuel; Glaser, Maurice; Joram, Christian; Kaska, Katharina; La Rosa, Alessandro; Mekki, Julien; Moll, Michael; Pacifico, Nicola;