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Sample records for luminescent mercaptosuccinic acid-coated

  1. Synthesis and bio-imaging application of highly luminescent mercaptosuccinic acid-coated CdTe nanocrystals.

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    Erbo Ying

    Full Text Available Here we present a facile one-pot method to prepare high-quality CdTe nanocrystals in aqueous phase. In contrast to the use of oxygen-sensitive NaHTe or H(2Te as Te source in the current synthetic methods, we employ more stable sodium tellurite as the Te source for preparing highly luminescent CdTe nanocrystals in aqueous solution. By selecting mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA as capping agent and providing the borate-citrate acid buffering solution, CdTe nanocrystals with high quantum yield (QY >70% at pH range 5.0-8.0 can be conveniently prepared by this method. The influence of parameters such as the pH value of the precursor solution and the molar ratio of Cd(2+ to Na(2TeO(3 on the QY of CdTe nanocrystals was systematically investigated in our experiments. Under optimal conditions, the QY of CdTe nanocrystals is even high up to 83%. The biological application of luminescent MSA-CdTe to HEK 293 cell imaging was also illustrated.

  2. Passive tumor targeting and imaging by using mercaptosuccinic acid-coated near-infrared quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Guimiao Lin,1 Xiaomei Wang,1 Feng Yin,2 Ken-Tye Yong2 1The Engineering Lab of Synthetic Biology and Research Institute of Uropoiesis and Reproduction, School of Medicine, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China; 2School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore Abstract: In this paper, we demonstrate the preparation of monodispersed quantum dots (QDs as near-infrared (NIR optical probes for in vivo pancreatic cancer targeting and imaging. The design of these luminescent probes involves functionalizing NIR QDs with ligand mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA, which targets the tumor site by enhanced permeability and retention effect. The colloidal and optical stability of the QDs can be maintained for >1 week. In vivo optical imaging studies in nude mice bearing pancreatic tumor show that the probes accumulate at tumor sites for >2.5 hours following intravenous injection of the functionalized NIR QDs. Tumor-labeling studies showed no evidence of harmful effects on the treated animals, even at a dose as high as ~50 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that the engineered MSA-functionalized QDs can serve as a diagnostic platform for early detection of cancer, as well as in image-guided precise surgical resection of tumors. Keywords: QDs, near-infrared, mercaptosuccinic acid, pancreatic cancer, tumor targeting

  3. Synthesis of molecularly imprinted silica nanospheres embedded mercaptosuccinic acid-coated CdTe quantum dots for selective recognition of λ-cyhalothrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiao [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Meng, Minjia; Song, Zhilong; Gao, Lin; Li, Hongji [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Dai, Jiangdong; Zhou, Zhiping [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Li, Chunxiang, E-mail: weixiaokeyan@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Pan, Jianming; Yu, Ping; Yan, Yongsheng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2014-09-15

    In this study, a simple procedure for the determination of λ-cyhalothrin was reported. CdTe quantum dots (QDs) capped by molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared and characterized by spectrofluorometer, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) was chosen as a stabilizer for CdTe QDs synthesis. The MSA stabilizer which comprises both thioglycolic acid (TGA)-like and 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-like moieties could accelerate the whole growth process of CdTe QDs comparing with TGA-like or MPA-like stabilizer. Meanwhile, the spectrofluorometer was used to evaluate the optical stability, effect of pH, and selective and sensitive determination of λ-cyhalothrin (LC). Moreover, LC could quench the fluorescence of the molecularly imprinted silica nanospheres (CdTe@SiO{sub 2}@MIPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, which was best described by a Stern–Volmer-type equation. - Highlights: • We choose Mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) as the stabilizer for CdTe QDs synthesis. • The composite materials were prepared by the reverse microemulsion method. • The composite materials can be used for the direct analysis of relevant real samples.

  4. Synthesis of Colloidal Quantum Dots Coated with Mercaptosuccinic Acid for Early Detection and Therapeutics of Oral Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocelin, G.; Arivarasan, A.; Ganesan, M.; Prasad, N. Rajendra; Sasikala, G.

    2016-04-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are gaining widespread recognition for its luminescence behavior and unique photo physical properties as a bio-marker and inorganic fluorophore. In spite of such rampant advantages, its application is clinically hampered depending on the surface coating decreasing its luminescence efficiency. The present study reports preparation of CdTe QDs capped with biologically active thiol based material, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) for diagnosis of oral cancer (KB) cells by acting as a fluorophore marking targeted tumor cells and at the same time exhibiting certain cytotoxic effects. Synthesized MSA coated CdTe QDs is spherical in shape with an average particle size of 3-5nm. In vitro, the rapid uptake of MSA CdTe QDs in oral cancer cell lines were assessed through fluorescence microscopy. Further, this study evaluates the therapeutic efficiency of MSA CdTe QDs in human oral cancer cell lines using MTT analysis. MSA CdTe QDs exhibit significant cytotoxicity in oral cancer cells in a dose dependent manner with low IC50 when compared with other raw CdTe QDs. MSA CdTe QDs were also treated with human lymphocytes (normal cells) to assess and compare the toxicity profile of QDs in normal and oral tumors. The results of our present study strengthen our hypothesis of using MSA CdTe QDs as detector for tracking and fluorescence imaging of oral cancer cells and exhibiting sufficient cytotoxicity in them.

  5. Complexes with Mercaptosuccinic Acid and Hydrazine as Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Devipriya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of hydrazine and mercaptosuccinic acid with metal ions forms\tcomplexes with general formula [Ln(N2H42CH2(COOCH(SH(COO1.5]·(H2O, where Ln = La(III, Pr(III, Nd(III, Sm(III, and Gd(III at pH 5. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-visible spectroscopic, thermal and X-ray diffraction studies. The IR data reveal that the acid moiety in the complexes is present as dianion due to the deprotonation of COOH groups by lanthanides in these complexes, leaving –SH group unionized and hydrazine as bidental neutral ligand showing absorptions in the range of 945–948 cm−1. The thermoanalytical data evince that the complexes are stable up to 103°C and undergo complete decomposition in the range of 550–594°C resulting in metal oxides. SEM images of La2O3 and Gd2O3 residues show their nano sized clusters suggesting that the complexes may be used as precursors for nano La2O3 and Gd2O3, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction patterns show isomorphism among the complexes. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes have been computed by Coats-Redfern equation.

  6. Antibacterial performance of alginic acid coating on polyethylene film

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karbassi, Elika; Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Lehocký, Marian; Humpolíček, Petr; Vesel, Alenka; Novák, Igor; Sáha, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Alginic acid coated polyethylene films were examined in terms of surface properties and bacteriostatic performance against two most representative bacterial strains, that is, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus...

  7. Stability Investigation of Ligand-Exchanged CdSe/ZnS-Y (Y = 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid or Mercaptosuccinic Acid through Zeta Potential Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Thuy Vo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots have been considered to be promising candidates for bioapplications because of their high sensitivity, rapid response, and reliability. The synthesis of high-quality quantum dots that can be dissolved in water and other biological media is a crucial step toward their further application in biology. Starting with a one-pot reaction and the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR method, we produced the CdSe/ZnS core/shell structure. Through a ligand-exchange mechanism, we coated the as-made CdSe/ZnS structure with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA or mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA. Various techniques, including photoluminescence (PL, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, were utilized to characterize the ligand-coated CdSe/ZnS structure. The results show enhanced luminescence intensity, CdSe surface passivation by ZnS, and successful coating with MPA and MSA. The stability of quantum dots in solutions with different pH values was investigated by performing zeta potential measurements. The results revealed that the quantum dots shifted from displaying hydrophobic to hydrophilic behavior and could be connected with bioagents.

  8. Synthesis of porous starch xerogels modified with mercaptosuccinic acid to remove hazardous gardenia yellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Liping; Zhu, Xinyi; Dai, Hongxia; Tao, Yongxin; Zhou, Xiaoying; Liu, Wenjie; Kong, Yong

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) molecules were inserted into potato starch, leading to the breaking of intrinsic H-bonds within macromolecular chains of starch and the formation of intermolecular H-bonds between MSA and starch, which could be verified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-TR). MSA modified porous starch xerogels (PSX/MSA) were obtained after freeze-drying the MSA modified starch, and they were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), exhibiting the intriguing porous structure due to the separation of starch chains by MSA molecules. The PSX/MSA were then used as the adsorbents to remove gardenia yellow (GY), a natural colorant with genotoxicity. Due to the porous structure of PSX and the introduced carboxyl groups from MSA, the adsorption capacity of the PSX/MSA was much higher than that of the starch xerogels alone (SX). The adsorption behaviors of GY by the PSX/MSA fitted both the Freundlich isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and the efficient adsorption of GY suggested that the PSX/MSA might be potential adsorbents for the removal of dyes from contaminated aquatic systems.

  9. Application of mercaptosuccinic acid capped CdTe quantum dots for latent fingermark development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuejiao; Liu, Jianjun; Zuo, Shengli; Yu, Yingchun; Cai, Kaiyang; Yang, Ruiqin

    2013-09-10

    The aqueous synthesis of mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) solution for quickly and sensitively developing latent fingermarks is described. The rapid growth mechanism of CdTe/MSA QDs, which depends on the molecule structure of MSA, is briefly discussed and compared with that of thioglycolic acid (TGA) and mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) capped CdTe QDs. Development of latent fingermarks with the synthesized CdTe/MSA QDs was faster and the ridge details were clearer compared with CdTe/TGA QDs. In addition, latent fingermarks developed with CdTe/MSA QDs showed less background and better contrast than that of gentian violet or rhodamine 6G. Latent fingermarks could be well developed on black tape, scotch tape, tinfoil, aluminum alloy, stainless steel as well as on the adhesive side of yellow tape, even when the latter were aged up to seven days. As immersion time greatly reduced to 10 s by using CdTe/MSA QDs, a preliminary result of latent fingermark development by spraying was presented also.

  10. Luminescence Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to instrumentation for stimulated luminescence studies, with special focus on luminescence dating using the natural dosimeters, quartz and feldspars. The chapter covers basic concepts in luminescence detection, and thermal and optical stimulation, and reference...

  11. Synthesis, characterization and cytotoxicity of S-nitroso-mercaptosuccinic acid-containing alginate/chitosan nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, Amedea B.; Fabbri, Giulia K.; Pelegrino, Milena T.; Silva, Letícia C.; Rodrigues, Tiago

    2017-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous free radical, which plays key roles in several biological processes including vasodilation, neurotransmission, inhibition of platelet adhesion, cytotoxicity against pathogens, wound healing, and defense against cancer. Due to the relative instability of NO in vivo (half-life of ca. 0.5 seconds), there is an increasing interest in the development of low molecular weight NO donors, such as S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs), which are able to prolong and preserve the biological activities of NO in vivo. In order to enhance the sustained NO release in several biomedical applications, RSNOs have been successfully allied to nanomaterials. In this context, this work describes the synthesis and characterization of the NO donor S-nitroso-mercaptosuccinic acid (S-nitroso-MSA), which belongs to the class of RSNOs, and its incorporation in polymeric biodegradable nanoparticles composed by alginate/chitosan. First, chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by gelation process with sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP), followed by the addition of the alginate layer, to enhance the nanoparticle protection. The obtained nanoparticles presented a hydrodynamic diameter of 343 ± 38 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.36 ± 0.1, and zeta potential of - 30.3 ± 0.4 mV, indicating their thermal stability in aqueous suspension. The negative zeta potential value was assigned to the presence of alginate chains on the surface of chitosan/TPP nanoparticles. The encapsulation efficiency of the NO donor into the polymeric nanoparticles was found to be 98 ± 0.2%. The high encapsulation efficiency value was attributed to the positive interactions between the NO donor and the polymeric content of the nanoparticles. Kinetics of NO release from the nanoparticles revealed a spontaneous and sustained release of therapeutic amounts of NO, for several hours under physiological temperature. The incubation of NO-releasing alginate/chitosan nanoparticles with human hepatocellular carcinoma

  12. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  13. Photo-crosslinked hyaluronic acid coated upconverting nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, Jiri; Kettou, Sofiane; Matuska, Vit; Svozil, Vit; Huerta-Angeles, Gloria; Pospisilova, Martina; Nesporova, Kristina; Velebny, Vladimir

    2017-02-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-coated inorganic nanoparticles display enhanced interaction with the CD44 receptors which are overexpressed in many types of cancer cells. Here, we describe a modification of core-shell β-NaY0.80Yb0.18Er0.02F4@NaYF4 nanoparticles (UCNP) by HA derivative bearing photo-reactive groups. UCNP capped with oleic acid were firstly transferred to aqueous phase by an improved protocol using hydrochloric acid or lactic acid treatment. Subsequently, HA bearing furanacryloyl moieties (HA-FU) was adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface and crosslinked by UV irradiation. The crosslinking resulted in stable HA coating, and no polymer desorption was observed. As-prepared UCNP@HA-FU show a hydrodynamic diameter of about 180 nm and are colloidally stable in water and cell culture media. The cellular uptake by normal human fibroblasts and MDA MB-231 cancer cell line was investigated by upconversion luminescence imaging.

  14. Luminescent quantum clusters of gold in bulk by albumin-induced core etching of nanoparticles: metal ion sensing, metal-enhanced luminescence, and biolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeeb Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Retnakumari, Archana; Koyakutty, Manzoor; Nair, Shantikumar; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2010-09-03

    The synthesis of a luminescent quantum cluster (QC) of gold with a quantum yield of approximately 4 % is reported. It was synthesized in gram quantities by the core etching of mercaptosuccinic acid protected gold nanoparticles by bovine serum albumin (BSA), abbreviated as Au(QC)@BSA. The cluster was characterized and a core of Au(38) was assigned tentatively from mass spectrometric analysis. Luminescence of the QC is exploited as a "turn-off" sensor for Cu(2+) ions and a "turn-on" sensor for glutathione detection. Metal-enhanced luminescence (MEL) of this QC in the presence of silver nanoparticles is demonstrated and a ninefold maximum enhancement is seen. This is the first report of the observation of MEL from QCs. Folic acid conjugated Au(QC)@BSA was found to be internalized to a significant extent by oral carcinoma KB cells through folic acid mediated endocytosis. The inherent luminescence of the internalized Au(QC)@BSA was used in cell imaging.

  15. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attallah, Olivia A., E-mail: olivia.adly@hu.edu.eg [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt); Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department, Heliopolis University, 11777 El Salam, Cairo (Egypt); Girgis, E. [Solid State Physics Department, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Lab, CEAS, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A. [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt)

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  16. Luminescence enhancement of PPO/PVT scintillators by CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Jiang, Ke

    2015-03-15

    Oleic acid coated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemistry method. The average size of the nanoparticles is 12 nm, and the nanoparticles are dispersible in polyvinyl toluene (PVT) monomer due to the oleic acid coating. Different amounts of as-synthesized CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are then loaded into PVT matrix with 0.5 wt% 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) by bulk polymerization. The luminescence of PPO/PVT is enhanced by CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles to 3 and 2.5 times under UV and X-ray excitation, respectively. This enhancement is due to the energy transfer from CeF{sub 3} to PPO, the increase of the stopping power by doping CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles into PPO/PVT and the escape of charges from CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Oleic acid coated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles were synthesized by a wet chemistry method. • The luminescence of PPO/PVT is enhanced by CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles under UV and X-ray excitations. • This enhancement is due to the energy transfer from CeF{sub 3} to PPO in PVT matrix. • The escape of charges from CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles also contribute to the luminescence enhancement. • These nanocomposite materials could be promising for radiation detection.

  17. Citric acid-coated gold nanoparticles for visual colorimetric recognition of pesticide dimethoate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Aqib Iqbal; Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha

    2016-08-01

    A colorimetric chemo-sensor based on citric acid-coated gold NPs (C-GNP) showed a linear increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing concentration of pesticide dimethoate (DM). The limit of detection was found to be between 8.25± 0.3 and 20 ± 9.5 ppm. The increase in fluorescence intensity was suggested to have originated from the soft-soft interaction between C-GNPs and DM via sulfur group which is absent in pesticide dicofol (DF). Similar studies with citric acid-coated silver NPs (C-SNPs) did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity. The microscopic studies suggested aggregation of C-GNPs in the presence of DM but not in case of DF.

  18. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attallah, Olivia A.; Girgis, E.; Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M. S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20-30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications.

  19. Water-dispersible ascorbic-acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles for contrast enhancement in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, V.; Jayaprabha, K. N.; Joy, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles of size ~5 nm surface functionalized with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) form a stable dispersion in water with a hydrodynamic size of ~30 nm. The anti-oxidant property of ascorbic acid is retained after capping, as evidenced from the capability of converting methylene blue to its reduced leuco form. NMR relaxivity studies show that the ascorbic-acid-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide aqueous nanofluid is suitable as a contrast enhancement agent for MRI applications, coupled with the excellent biocompatibility and medicinal values of ascorbic acid.

  20. One-stop genomic DNA extraction by salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongwu; Kadam, Ulhas S; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2013-11-15

    Salicylic acid-coated magnetic nanoparticles were prepared via a modified one-step synthesis and used for a one-stop extraction of genomic DNA from mammalian cells. The synthesized magnetic particles were used for magnetic separation of cells from the media by nonspecific binding of the particles as well as extraction of genomic DNA from the lysate. The quantity and quality were confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction. The entire process of extraction and isolation can be completed within 30 min. Compared with traditional methods based on centrifugation and filtration, the established method is fast, simple, reliable, and environmentally friendly. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  2. Polysiloxane-based luminescent elastomers prepared by thiol-ene "click" chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yujing; Lu, Haifeng; Xue, Lei; Wang, Xianming; Wu, Lianfeng; Feng, Shengyu

    2014-09-26

    Side-chain vinyl poly(dimethylsiloxane) has been modified with mercaptopropionic acid, methyl 3-mercaptopropionate, and mercaptosuccinic acid. Coordinative bonding of Eu(III) to the functionalized polysiloxanes was then carried out and crosslinked silicone elastomers were prepared by thiol-ene curing reactions of these composites. All these europium complexes could be cast to form transparent, uniform, thin elastomers with good flexibility and thermal stability. The networks were characterized by FTIR, NMR, UV/Vis, and luminescence spectroscopy as well as by scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The europium elastomer luminophores exhibited intense red light at 617 nm under UV excitation at room temperature due to the (5)D0 →(7)F2 transition in Eu(III) ions. The newly synthesized luminescent materials offer many advantages, including the desired mechanical flexibility. They cannot be dissolved or fused, and so they have potential for use in optical and electronic applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing-Fung; Sheu, Jer-Jia

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF.

  4. Enzymatic polymerization of natural anacardic acid and antibiofouling effects of polyanacardic acid coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelikani, Rahul; Kim, Yong Hwan; Yoon, Do-Young; Kim, Dong-Shik

    2009-05-01

    Anacardic acid, separated from cashew nut shell liquid, is well known for its strong antibiotic and antioxidant activities. Recent findings indicate that phenolic compounds from plant sources have an effect on Gram-negative bacteria biofilm formation. In this work, a polyphenolic coating was prepared from anacardic acid using enzymatic synthesis and tested for its effects on biofilm formation of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Natural anacardic acid was enzymatically polymerized using soybean peroxidase. Hydrogen peroxide and phenothiazine-10-propionic acid were used as an oxidizing agent and redox mediator, respectively. Nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses showed the formation of oxyphenylene and phenylene units through the phenol rings. No linkage through the alkyl chain was observed, which proved a high chemo-selectivity of the enzyme. Aqueous solvents turned out to play an important role in the polymer production yield and molecular weight. With 2-propanol, the highest production yield (61%) of polymer (molecular weight = 3,900) was observed, and with methanol, higher-molecular-weight polymers (5,000) were produced with lower production yields (43%). The resulting polyanacardic acid was cross-linked on a solid surface to form a permanent natural polymer coating. The FTIR analysis indicates that the cross-linking between the polymers took place through the unsaturated alkyl side chains. The polyanacardic acid coating was then tested for its antibiofouling effect against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and compared with the antibiofouling effects of polycardanol coatings reported in the literature. The polyanacardic acid coating showed more reduction in biofilm formation on its surface than polycardanol coatings in the case of Gram-positive bacteria, while in the case of Gram-negative bacteria, it showed a similar reduction in biofilm formation as polycardanol.

  5. Magnetic hyperthermia studies on water-soluble polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Surendra, M. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India); Annapoorani, S. [Anna University of Technology, Department of Nanotechnology (India); Ansar, Ereath Beeran; Harikrishna Varma, P. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Bioceramics Laboratory (India); Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report on synthesis and hyperthermia studies in the water-soluble ferrofluid made of polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with different particle sizes. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method and particle size was varied as 6, 10, and 14 nm by varying the precursor to surfactant concentration. PAA surfactant bonding and surfactant thickness were studied by FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. At room temperature, nanoparticles show superparamagnetism and saturation magnetization was found to vary from 33 to 44 emu/g with increase in the particle size from 6 to 14 nm, and this increase was attributed to the presence of a magnetic inert layer of 4 Å thick. Effect of particle size, concentration, and alternating magnetic field strength at 275 kHz on specific absorption rate were studied by preparing ferrofluids in deionized water at different concentrations. Ferrofluids at a concentration of 1.25 g/L, with 10 min of AMF exposure of strength ∼15.7 kA/m show stable temperatures ∼48, 58, and 68 °C with increase in the particle sizes 6, 10, and 14 nm. A maximum specific absorption rate of 251 W/g for ferrofluid with a particle size of 10 nm at 1.25 g/L, 15.7 kA/m, and 275 kHz was observed. Viability of L929 fibroblasts is measured by MTT assay cytotoxicity studies using the polyacrylic acid-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  6. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing-Fung, E-mail: jacklin@cc.feu.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Design, Far East University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sheu, Jer-Jia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF. - Highlights: • The feedforward ANN is applied for modeling of retardance in CA coated FFs. • ANN can predict the retardance at excellent program with acceptable error to MR. • The proposed ANN has high ability for the prediction of retardance.

  7. Effective Removal of Tetracycline from Aqueous Solution by Organic Acid-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang; Liang, Yuyan; Chen, Xuelan; Xu, Wei; Wu, Kesheng; Wei, Hua; Xiong, Yonghua

    2016-03-01

    Self-assembled iron oxide nanocomposites are good magnetic nano-adsorbents that can be prepared using simple methods. Four types of organic acid-functionalised (oleic acid, undecenoic acid, caprylic acid or hexanoic acid) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesised through a one-pot chemisorption method for the removal of tetracycline (TC) from aqueous solution. The undecenoic acid-coated MNPs (UA-MNPs) exhibited the highest adsorption efficiency and can be easily retrieved with a low-gradient magnetic separator (0.4 Tesla) at pH 5.0 aqueous solution. The TC adsorption process on the UA-MNPs followed the Langmuir isotherm and the maximum adsorption capacities increased from 86.96 mg g(-1) to 222.2 mg g(-1) with the increase in temperature from 288 K to 318 K. The kinetics of adsorption fits pseudo-second-order model perfectly with a rate constant, 5.946 g mg(-1) min(-1) at 298 K. The positive values of the enthalpy (AH) and the negative value of the free energy (AG) indicated an endothermic and spontaneous adsorption process of TC on the UA-MNPs. Moreover, the UA-MNPs possessed excellent ability to adsorb the other three major types of TC antibiotics, including chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and doxycycline.

  8. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  9. Cr(VI) adsorption and reduction by humic acid coated on magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenjun; Cai, Quan; Xu, Wei; Yang, Mingwei; Cai, Yong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; O'Shea, Kevin E

    2014-07-15

    Easily separable humic acid coated magnetite (HA-Fe3O4) nanoparticles are employed for effective adsorption and reduction of toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III). The adsorption and reduction of Cr(VI) is effective under acidic, neutral, and basic pH conditions. The chromium adsorption nicely fits the Langmuir isotherm model, and the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous media by HA-Fe3O4 particles follows pseudo-second-order kinetics. Characterization of the Cr-loaded HA-Fe3O4 materials by X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) indicates Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III) while the valence state of the iron core is unchanged. Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and X-ray diffraction measurements also indicate no detectable transformation of the Fe3O4 core occurs during Cr(VI) adsorption and reduction. Thus, suggesting HA on the surface of HA-Fe3O4 is responsible for the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The functional groups associated with HA act as ligands leading to the Cr(III) complex via a coupled reduction-complexation mechanism. Cr K-edge EXAFS demonstrates the Cr(III) in the Cr-loaded HA-Fe3O4 materials has six neighboring oxygen atoms likely in an octahedral geometry with average bond lengths of 1.98 Å. These results demonstrate that easily separable HA-Fe3O4 particles have promising potential for removal and detoxification of Cr(VI) in aqueous media.

  10. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henning

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC to black carbon (BC ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA. Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH, which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  11. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henning

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying nitrogen, respectively argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC to black carbon (BC ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA. Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings lead to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH, which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume, that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  12. Hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of soot particles: uncoated, succinic or sulfuric acid coated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, S.; Ziese, M.; Kiselev, A.; Saathoff, H.; Möhler, O.; Mentel, T. F.; Buchholz, A.; Spindler, C.; Michaud, V.; Monier, M.; Sellegri, K.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-05-01

    The hygroscopic growth and droplet activation of uncoated soot particles and such coated with succinic acid and sulfuric acid were investigated during the IN-11 campaign at the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) facility. A GFG-1000 soot generator applying either nitrogen or argon as carrier gas and a miniCAST soot generator were utilized to generate soot particles. Different organic carbon (OC) to black carbon (BC) ratios were adjusted for the CAST-soot by varying the fuel to air ratio. The hygroscopic growth was investigated by means of the mobile Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS-mobile) and two different Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzers (HTDMA, VHTDMA). Two Cloud Condensation Nucleus Counter (CCNC) were applied to measure the activation of the particles. For the untreated soot particles neither hygroscopic growth nor activation was observed at a supersaturation of 1%, with exception of a partial activation of GFG-soot generated with argon as carrier gas. Coatings of succinic acid lead to a detectable hygroscopic growth of GFG-soot and enhanced the activated fraction of GFG- (carrier gas: argon) and CAST-soot, whereas no hygroscopic growth of the coated CAST-soot was found. Sulfuric acid coatings led to an OC-content dependent hygroscopic growth of CAST-soot. Such a dependence was not observed for activation measurements. Coating with sulfuric acid decreased the amount of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH), which were detected by AMS-measurements in the CAST-soot, and increased the amount of substances with lower molecular weight than the initial PAHs. We assume that these reaction products increased the hygroscopicity of the coated particles in addition to the coating substance itself.

  13. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  14. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  15. Luminescence from Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations of photoluminescene (PL and electroluminescence (EL from poroussilicon (PS have prompted many theoretical and experimental studies. Bulk crystalline Si is anindirect band gap material in which .recombination is dominated by non-radiative processes.Therefore, it cannot be used as light-emitting component in Si circuits. PS is a new material formed byanodisation ofsingle crystal Si wafers in hydro fluoric (liF solution. Luminescence from this materialis being explored for technological applications all over the world. The mechanism of luminescence isstill not well-understood. Several models have been proposed but still the facts about the strong lightemission at room temperature are unknown. This paper presents a review of the fabrication process andstudies on luminescent properties of PS. A hybrid model based on quantum confinement of carriers inthe nanometer size Si crystallites having a large number of surface states is suggested to explain theobserved properties.

  16. Acid-coated Textiles (pH 5.5-6.5)--a New Therapeutic Strategy for Atopic Eczema?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Teresa; Rothmaier, Markus; Zander, Holger; Ring, Johannes; Gutermuth, Jan; Anliker, Mark D

    2015-07-01

    Increased transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and decreased skin capacitance are characteristic features of the disturbed epidermal barrier in atopic eczema (AE). The "acid mantle", which is a slightly acidic film on the surface of the skin has led to the development of acidic emollients for skin care. In this context, the effect of citric acid-coated textiles on atopic skin has not been examined to date. A textile carrier composed of cellulose fibres was coated with a citric acid surface layer by esterification, ensuring a constant pH of 5.5-6.5. Twenty patients with AE or atopic diathesis were enrolled in the study. In a double-blind, half-side experiment, patients had to wear these textiles for 12 h a day for 14 days. On day 0 (baseline), 7 and 14, tolerability (erythema, pruritus, eczema, wearing comfort) and efficacy on skin barrier were assessed by TEWL skin hydration (corneometry/capacitance), pH and clinical scoring of eczema (SCORAD). Citric acid-coated textiles were well tolerated and improved eczema and objective parameters of skin physiology, including barrier function and a reduced skin surface pH, with potential lower pathogenic microbial colonisation.

  17. CCD Luminescence Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  18. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  19. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  20. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  1. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  2. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. Adipic acid is a frequently employed surrogate for such slightly soluble organic materials. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they, in most cases, agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing "wet" (deliquesced solution droplets and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Wet adipic acid particles follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. In addition, the effect of adipic acid coatings on the CCN activity of both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. When a water-soluble core is coated by adipic acid, the CCN-hindering effect of particle phase is eliminated. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. If the soot particle is relatively small (dcore≤102 nm, the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  3. Linear birefringence and dichroism in citric acid coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing-Fung, E-mail: jacklin@cc.feu.edu.tw [Graduate School of Computer Application Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Tsai, Chun-Chin [Department of Optoelectronic Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Meng-Zhe [Graduate School of Computer Application Engineering, Far East University, No. 49, Zhonghua Road, Xinshi District, Tainan, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-12-15

    To prepare highly dispersed water-based Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), we adopted the co-precipitation method and used citric acid (CA) as the surfactant. Via transmission electronic microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and X-ray diffractometry, we characterized the dispersibility and size of the products. Through two single-parameter experiments, including the pH value of suspension and the action of double centrifugations, the appropriate parameters' values were determined. Further, to produce CA coated MNPs with good magneto-optical properties as high retardance and low dichroism, the orthogonal design method was used to find the optimal parameters' values, including pH value of suspension after coating was 5, molar ratio of CA to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} MNPs was 0.06, volume of CA was 40 ml, and coating temperature was 70 °C. Above all, the linear birefringence and dichroism of the best CA coated ferrofluid we produced were measured by a Stokes polarimeter as 23.6294° and 0.3411 under 64.5 mT, respectively. Thus, the biomedical applications could be performed hereafter. - Highlights: • We examine pH changes about retardance/dichroism of citric acid coated ferrofluid. • We examine centrifugal action about dispersity of citric acid coated ferrofluid. • Dispersity of coated suspensions with different pH is investigated by DLS results. • Optimum combination and influence sequence obtained by Taguchi method is found. • Molar ratio of CA to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} deeply influences the retardance and dichroism of FFs.

  4. CCN activation experiments with adipic acid: effect of particle phase and adipic acid coatings on soluble and insoluble particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Hings

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Slightly soluble atmospherically relevant organic compounds, such as adipic acid, may influence particle CCN activity and therefore cloud formation. The 11 published experimental studies on the CCN activity of adipic acid particles are not consistent with each other nor do they in most cases agree with the Köhler theory. The CCN activity of adipic acid aerosol particles was studied over a significantly wider range of conditions than in any previous single study. The work spans the conditions of the previous studies and also provides alternate methods for producing wet and dry adipic acid particles without the need to produce them by atomization of aqueous solutions. The CCN effect of adipic acid coatings on both soluble and insoluble particles has also been studied. The CCN activation of the small (dm<150 nm initially dry particles is subject to a deliquescence barrier, while for the larger particles the activation follows the Köhler curve. Adipic acid particles prepared in a wet state follow the Köhler curve over the full range of particle diameters studied. The experiments suggest that the scatter in the previously published CCN measurements is most likely due to the difficulty of producing uncontaminated adipic acid particles by atomization of solutions and possibly also due to uncertainties in the calibration of the instruments. The addition of a hydrophilic soluble compound to dry adipic acid eliminates the effect of particle phase, that is, the effect of the deliquescence barrier to CCN activation. An adipic acid coating on hydrophobic soot yields a CCN active particle. For the relatively small soot particles (dcore=88 and 102 nm the CCN activity of the coated particles approaches the deliquescence line of adipic acid, suggesting that the total size of the particle determines CCN activation and the soot core acts as a scaffold.

  5. Luminescence dating of Netherlands’ sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we review: 1) the development of the methodology; 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands’ sediments; and 3) geological applications of the method in the Netherlands. Our review shows that optically stimulated luminescence dating of quartz grains using the single aliquot regenerative dose method yi...

  6. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  7. New luminescent materials and filters for Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Ronda, C.R.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    In a Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC), short-wavelength light isconverted by a luminescent material into long-wavelength light, which is guided towards a photovoltaic cell. In principle, an LSC allows for high concentration, but in practice this is prevented by lossmechanisms like limited sunlig

  8. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  9. Power dependence of upconversion luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Güdel, H.U.

    Spectroscopic data are of essential value for understanding the excitation mechanisms in luminescent and laser materials. Special attention has been devoted to the investigation of upconversion-induced luminescence, partly because of the availability of near-infrared pump sources for the excitation

  10. Facile synthesis of mercaptosuccinic acid-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots with improved cell viability on different cancer cells and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parani, Sundararajan; Bupesh, Giridharan; Manikandan, Elayaperumal; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi Samuel

    2016-11-01

    Water-soluble, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by successive growth of CdS and ZnS shells on the as-synthesized CdTe/CdSthin core/shell quantum dots. The formation of core/double shell structured QDs was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, PL decay studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core/double shell QDs exhibited good photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) which is 70% higher than that of the parent core/shell QDs, and they are stable for months. The average particle size of the core/double shell QDs was ˜3 nm as calculated from the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. The cytotoxicity of the QDs was evaluated on a variety of cancer cells such as HeLa, MCF-7, A549, and normal Vero cells by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay. The results showed that core/double shell QDs were less toxic to the cells when compared to the parent core/shell QDs. MCF-7 cells showed proliferation on incubation with QDs, and this is attributed to the metalloestrogenic activity of cadmium ions released from QDs. The core/double shell CdTe/CdS/ZnS (CSS) QDs were conjugated with transferrin and successfully employed for the biolabeling and fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells. These core/double shell QDs are highly promising fluorescent probe for cancer cell labeling and imaging applications.

  11. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  12. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  13. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  14. Eu2+ activated persistent luminescent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with luminescence and persistent luminescence of Eu2+ activated materials and aims at unraveling the mechanism behind the persistent luminescence, in particular the role of Dy3+ in the physical process leading to persistent luminescence. The second aim of this thesis is the

  15. Comet assay assessment of oleic acid-coated magnetite nanoparticles on human SHSY5Y neuronal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joao Paulo Teixeira

    2015-05-01

    Thus, the main objective of this work was to examine possible genotoxic effects of ION (crystalline phase magnetite, covered by oleic acid on human SHSY5Y neuronal cells by the standard alkaline comet assay, along with its OGG1 enzyme modified version to analyse oxidative DNA damage. Previously we evaluated the possible interference of the ION with the comet assay methodology and with OGG1 enzyme activity. ION were dispersed both in complete and serum-free cell culture media, and cells were exposed to four concentrations in the range 10-200 µg/ml for 3 and 24 h. Results obtained showed increases in DNA damage, both primary and oxidative, after treatment with oleic acid-coated ION, even though the highest concentrations were found to interfere with OGG1 enzyme activity in incomplete cell culture medium. The results of this study encourage the need for checking the suitability of comet assay when used for testing genotoxicity of nanomaterials. Further investigations are required to assess the ability of ION to induce oxidative stress, and to elucidate the specific mechanism involved in primary DNA damage induced by these ION.

  16. Eu2+ activated persistent luminescent materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with luminescence and persistent luminescence of Eu2+ activated materials and aims at unraveling the mechanism behind the persistent luminescence, in particular the role of Dy3+ in the physical process leading to persistent luminescence. The second aim of this thesis is the preparation and characterization of persistent luminescence phosphors emitting at different colors, especially yellow and red, where there is a need for better afterglow materials. A range of aluminates, ...

  17. Luminescence decay of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The luminescence decay pattern of porous silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of porous silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.

  18. Temperature lags of luminescence measurements in a commercial luminescence reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitis, George [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kiyak, Nafiye G. [ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile, 34980 Istanbul (Turkey); Polymeris, George S., E-mail: gspolymeris@ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beşevler, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    The temperature recorded in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence equipments is not the temperature of the sample but that of the heating element on which the thermocouple is attached. Depending upon the rate of heating, a temperature difference appears between the samples and the heating element, termed as temperature lag, which could have serious effects on the curve shapes and trapping parameters. In the present work the temperature lag effect is studied in a newly developed luminescence equipment measuring both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that the temperature lag could be large for heating rates above 2 K/s and it is strongly dependent upon the sample holder. A simple approximation method is proposed in order to both predict as well as correct for temperature lag effects in luminescence measurements.

  19. Luminescent and Non-Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Challenges andd Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We present new phosphors and filters that facilitate this. Another type of lightguide-based concentrators, diffraction-based, is discussed as well.

  20. Luminescent and Non-Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Challenges andd Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We present new phosphors and filters that facilitate this. Another type of lightguide-based concentrators, diffraction-based, is discussed as well.

  1. Lipoamino Acid Coated Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Concentration and Time Dependently Enhanced Growth of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cell Line (Hep-G2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Gholami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION have been widely used in medicine for magnetic resonance imaging, hyperthermia, and drug delivery applications. The effect of SPION on animal cells has been a controversial issue on which there are many contradictions. This study focused on preparation of SPION with novel biocompatible coatings, their characterization, and cytotoxicity evaluation. An amino acid (glycine and two novel lipo-amino acids (2 amino-hexanoic acid and 2 amino-hexadecanoic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by various physicochemical means such as X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR. The cytotoxicity profile of the synthesized nanoparticles on Hep-G2 cells as measured by MTT assay showed the nanoparticles are nontoxic and the cell growth is promoted by SPION. Moreover, lipoamino acid coating SPION appear more beneficial than the other ones. By increasing concentration of SPION, growth enhancing impact will attenuate and toxicity will appear. Although the aggregation of SPION can affect the results, the gradual delivery of ferric/ferrous ions into cells is the main cause of this growth promotion effect. Conclusively, this study shows that lipoamino acid coating SPION can be used for various biomedical purposes.

  2. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, J. S. T.; Vallini, F.; Montoya, S. A.; Ferrari, L.; Shahin, S.; Riley, C. T.; Kanté, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Liu, Z.; Fainman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  3. Lanthanide-based luminescence biolabelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Mohamadou; Nonat, Aline; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-04-14

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes display unrivalled spectroscopic properties, which place them in a special category in the luminescent toolbox. Their long-lived line-like emission spectra are the cornerstones of numerous analytical applications ranging from ultrasensitive homogeneous fluoroimmunoassays to the study of molecular interactions in living cells with multiplexed microscopy. However, achieving such minor miracles is a result of years of synthetic efforts and spectroscopic studies to understand and gather all the necessary requirements for the labels to be efficient. This feature article intends to survey these criteria and to discuss some of the most important examples reported in the literature, before explaining in detail some of the applications of luminescent lanthanide labels to bioanalysis and luminescence microscopy. Finally, the emphasis will be put on some recent applications that hold great potential for future biosensing.

  4. Detrimental nonlocality in luminescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Luminescence studies are used to investigate the local properties of various light-emitting materials. A critical issue of these studies is presented that the signals often lack all advantages of luminescence-studies of high locality, and may originate from an extended spatial region of even a few millimeters in size or the whole sample, i.e., places other than intended for investigation. This is a key problem for research and development in photonics. Due to this nonlocality, information indicating defects, irregularities, nonuniformities and inhomogeneities is lost. The issue refers to typical structures with a strong built-in electric field. Such fields exist intentionally in most photonic structures and occur unintentionally in many other materials investigated by applied physics. We reveal [using test samples prepared with focused ion beam (FIB) on an AlGaAs/GaAs laser heterostructure with an InGaAs quantum well (QW)] that nonlocality increases at low temperatures. This is contrary to the widely expected outcome, as low-temperature luminescence measurements are usually assumed to be free from disturbances. We explain many effects observed due to nonlocality in luminescence studies and prove that separation of the investigated area by focused ion beam milling is a practical solution enabling truly local luminescence measurements. All conclusions drawn using the example of cathodoluminescence are useful for other luminescence techniques.

  5. Ice nucleation of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles and implication for cloud properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar; Sanders, Cassandra; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-01

    Ice nucleation properties of atmospherically relevant dust minerals coated with soluble materials are not yet well understood. We determined ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid-coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw; 75 to 110%) for five different mineral dust types: (1) Arizona test dust, (2) illite, (3) montmorillonite, (4) K-feldspar, and (5) quartz. The particles were dry dispersed and size selected at 200 nm, and we determined the fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw. Under water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability. Under water-supersaturated conditions, however, we did not observe a significant coating effect (i.e., the bare and coated dust particles had nearly similar nucleating properties). X-ray diffraction patterns of the coated particles indicated that acid treatment altered the crystalline nature of the surface and caused structural disorder; thus, we concluded that the lack of such structured order reduced the ice nucleation efficiency of the coated particles in deposition ice nucleation mode. In addition, our single column model results show that coated particles significantly modify cloud properties such as ice crystal number concentration and ice water content compared to bare particles in water-subsaturated conditions. However, in water-supersaturated conditions, cloud properties differ only at warmer temperatures. These modeling results imply that future aged dust particle simulations should implement coating parameterizations to accurately predict cloud properties.

  6. Polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles: An oxidase mimic applied for colorimetric assay to organophosphorus pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Xiang; Xue, Shi-Fan; Deng, Jingjing; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2016-11-15

    It is important and urgent to develop reliable and highly sensitive methods that can provide on-site and rapid detection of extensively used organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) for their neurotoxicity. In this study, we developed a novel colorimetric assay for the detection of OPs based on polyacrylic acid-coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (PAA-CeO2) as an oxidase mimic and OPs as inhibitors to suppress the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Firstly, highly dispersed PAA-CeO2 was prepared in aqueous solution, which could catalyze the oxidation of TMB to produce a color reaction from colorless to blue. And the enzyme of AChE was used to catalyze the substrate of acetylthiocholine (ATCh) to produce thiocholine (TCh). As a thiol-containing compound with reducibility, TCh can decrease the oxidation of TMB catalyzed by PAA-CeO2. Upon incubated with OPs, the enzymatic activity of AChE was inhibited to produce less TCh, resulting in more TMB catalytically oxidized by PAA-CeO2 to show an increasing blue color. The two representative OPs, dichlorvos and methyl-paraoxon, were tested using our proposed assay. The novel assay showed notable color change in a concentration-dependent manner, and as low as 8.62 ppb dichlorvos and 26.73 ppb methyl-paraoxon can be readily detected. Therefore, taking advantage of such oxidase-like activity of PAA-CeO2, our proposed colorimetric assay can potentially be a screening tool for the precise and rapid evaluation of the neurotoxicity of a wealth of OPs.

  7. Estimation of luminescence lifetime in frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fu-Jun; Xu Zheng; Zhao Su-Ling; Lou Zhi-Dong; Yang Sheng-Yi; Xu Xu-Rong

    2006-01-01

    Absorption is the origin of luminescence. But it must be noticed that the lifetime of luminescence might reversely influence the rate of absorption. In this paper, it is reported that the luminescence intensity of copper and manganese changes with the driving frequency at constant voltage. The variation of luminescent intensity depends only on the lifetime of luminescence but not on the type of quenching or other factors. Generally the rate of absorption is dominantly determined by the material property and the lifetime of luminescence centres, the absorption of shorter lifetime centre will be larger than that of the longer lifetime centre at the same excited condition.

  8. Instant luminescence chronologies? High resolution luminescence profiles using a portable luminescence reader

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, M. D.; Stein, S.; Ashurst, R.A.; Selby, K.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a robust chronology is fundamental to most palaeoenvironmental studies. However, the number and positioning of dated points is critical. Using a portable luminescence reader, it is possible to rapidly generate high resolution down core relative age profiles. Profiles of portable luminescence data from two coastal dunes were evaluated and compared with the results of particle size analysis, stratigraphy, and an independent historical chronology. Results show that, even in young sa...

  9. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  10. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  11. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  12. Alginic acid-coated chitosan nanoparticles loaded with legumain DNA vaccine: effect against breast cancer in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Liu

    Full Text Available Legumain-based DNA vaccines have potential to protect against breast cancer. However, the lack of a safe and efficient oral delivery system restricts its clinical application. Here, we constructed alginic acid-coated chitosan nanoparticles (A.C.NPs as an oral delivery carrier for a legumain DNA vaccine. First, we tested its characteristic in acidic environments in vitro. DNA agarose electrophoresis data show that A.C.NPs protected DNA better from degradation in acidic solution (pH 1.5 than did chitosan nanoparticles (C.NPs. Furthermore, size distribution analysis showed that A.C.NPs tended to aggregate and form micrometer scale complexes in pH<2.7, while dispersing into nanoparticles with an increase in pH. Mice were intragastrically administrated A.C.NPs carrying EGFP plasmids and EGFP expression was detected in the intestinal Peyer's patches. Full-length legumain plasmids were loaded into different delivery carriers, including C.NPs, attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and A.C.NPs. A.C.NPs loaded with empty plasmids served as a control. Oral vaccination was performed in the murine orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer model. Our data indicate that tumor volume was significantly smaller in groups using A.C.NPs or attenuated Salmonella typhimurium as carriers. Furthermore, splenocytes co-cultured them with 4T1 cells pre-stimulated with CoCl2, which influenced the translocation of legumain from cytoplasm to plasma membrane, showed a 4.7 and 2.3 folds increase in active cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD3(+/CD8(+/CD25(+ when treated with A.C.NPs carriers compared with PBS C.NPs. Our study suggests that C.NPs coated with alginic acid may be a safe and efficient tool for oral delivery of a DNA vaccine. Moreover, a legumain DNA vaccine delivered orally with A.C.NPs can effectively improve autoimmune response and protect against breast cancer in mice.

  13. Self absorption in luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are photovoltaic devices made of thin transparent material, in which luminescent particles are dispersed. The incident light enters the device through its large facets and is subsequently absorbed by the luminescent particles, which re-emit it whilst changing its dire

  14. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  15. Micro-modulated luminescence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Imaging depth of optical microscopy has been fundamentally limited to millimeter or sub-millimeter due to light scattering. X-ray microscopy can resolve spatial details of few microns deeply inside a sample but the contrast resolution is still inadequate to depict heterogeneous features at cellular or sub-cellular levels. To enhance and enrich biological contrast at large imaging depth, various nanoparticles are introduced and become essential to basic research and molecular medicine. Nanoparticles can be functionalized as imaging probes, similar to fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins. LiGa5O8:Cr3+ nanoparticles were recently synthesized to facilitate luminescence energy storage with x-ray pre-excitation and the subsequently stimulated luminescence emission by visible/near-infrared (NIR) light. In this paper, we suggest a micro-modulated luminescence tomography (MLT) approach to quantify a nanophosphor distribution in a thick biological sample with high resolution. Our numerical simulation studies demonst...

  16. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishko, C. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Fecht, B. A.

    The goal of the Measurement of Chemiluminescence project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  17. Visible Light-Driven Photocatalytic Activity of Oleic Acid-Coated TiO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized from Absolute Ethanol Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Li,Huihui; Liu, Bin; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    The one-step synthesis of oleic acid-coated TiO2 nanoparticles with visible light-driven photocatalytic activity was reported by this manuscript, using oleic acid-ethanol as crucial starting materials. The photocatalytic degradation of nitrogen monoxide (deNOx) in the gas phase was investigated in a continuous reactor using a series of TiO2 semiconductors, prepared from oleic acid- or acetic acid-ethanol solution. The surface modification on TiO2 by organic fatty acid, oleic acid, could reinv...

  18. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  19. Multicolored luminescent CdS nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The observation of efficient blue, green, orange and red luminescence from CdS nanocrystals made by using a reverse micelle method was reported. The blue luminescence about 480 nm is attributed to the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs.The red luminescence around 650 nm is due to the radiative recombination of the exciton trapped in the nanocrystal surface defect states. The combination of different portion of band-edge emission and surface trap state emission results in green and orange luminescence for the nanocrystals. The CdS nanocrystals with efficient multicolored luminescence may find potential application in full color displays and biolabelings.

  20. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  1. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  2. New Opportunities for Lanthanide Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Claude G. Bünzli; Steve Comby; Anne-Sophie Chauvin; Caroline D. B. Vandevyver

    2007-01-01

    Trivalent lanthanide ions display fascinating optical properties. The discovery of the corresponding elements and their first industrial uses were intimately linked to their optical properties. This relationship has been kept alive until today when many high-technology applications of lanthanide-containing materials such as energy-saving lighting devices, displays, optical fibers and amplifiers, lasers, responsive luminescent stains for biomedical analyses and in cellulo sensing and imaging, heavily rely on the brilliant and pure-color emission of lanthanide ions. In this review we first outlined the basics of lanthanide luminescence with emphasis on f-f transitions, the sensitization mechanisms, and the assessment of the luminescence efficiency of lanthanide-containing emissive molecular edifices. Emphasis was then put on two fast developing aspects of lanthanide luminescence: materials for telecommunications and light emitting diodes, and biomedical imaging and sensing. Recent advances in NIR-emitting materials for plastic amplifiers and waveguides were described, together with the main solutions brought by researchers to minimize non-radiative deactivation of excited states. The demonstration in 1999 that erbium tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) displayed a bright green emission suitable for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) was followed by realizing that in OLEDs, 25% of the excitation energy leads to singlet states and 75% to triplet states. Since lanthanide ions are good triplet quenchers, they now also play a key role in the development of these lighting devices. Luminescence analyses of biological molecules are among the most sensitive analytical techniques known. The long lifetime of the lanthanide excited states allows time-resolved spectroscopy to be used, suppressing the sample autofluorescence and reaching very low detection limits. Not only visible lanthanide sensors are now ubiquitously provided in medical diagnosis and in cell imaging, but the

  3. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals are

  4. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals

  5. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  6. Developments in luminescence measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Denby, Phil M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our continuing investigation and development of new measurement facilities for use in irradiation, optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection; these facilities have potential application to all forms of luminescence-based retrospective dosimetry, and are particularly...... intended for use with the Riso TL/OSL reader. We have investigated the potential of new more powerful blue (455 nm) and green (530nm) LEDs, and of gated counting combined with pulsed stimulation light techniques using conventional LEDs. Measurement of time-resolved OSL has resulted in a method of real......; both types are very stable and reproducible. Other recent developments include the modification of a Riso reader to measure both thermally and optically stimulated electrons (TSE and OSE) from granular or chip phosphors. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  7. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far...... retrospective assessment of accident doses received by the population after a nuclear accident. The development of new luminescence techniques after the Chernobyl accident has considerably improved the sensitivity and precision in the evaluation of accident doses. This paper reviews the development work...

  8. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  9. Luminescence properties of a Fibonacci photonic quasicrystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, V; Valappil, N V; Shi, Z; Deych, L; Lisyansky, A A; Menon, V M

    2009-04-13

    An active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal is realized via spin coating. Luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal are studied experimentally and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations for steady-state luminescence spectra.

  10. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu2+ ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence pro...

  11. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  12. Solid-matrix luminescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1993-01-15

    Several interactions with lumiphors adsorbed on filter paper were elucidated from experiments with moisture, modulus and heavy-atom salts. The data were interpreted using static and dynamic quenching models, heavy-atom theory, and a theory related to the modulus of paper. With cyclodextrin-salt matrices, it was shown that 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl was very effective for obtaining strong room-temperature fluorescence and moderate room-temperature phosphorescence from adsorbed stereoisomeric tetrols. Extensive photophysical information was obtained for the four tetrols on 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl. The photophysical information acquired was used to develop a method for characterizing two of the tetrols. Work with model compounds adsorbed on deuterated sodium acetate showed that C-H vibrations in the undeuterated sodium acetate were not responsible for the deactivation of the excited triplet state in the model phosphors investigated. A considerable amount of solution luminescence and solid-matrix luminescence data were compared. The most important finding was that in several cases the room-temperature solid-matrix luminescence quantum yields were greater than the solution low-temperature quantum yield values.

  13. Visible Light-Driven Photocatalytic Activity of Oleic Acid-Coated TiO2 Nanoparticles Synthesized from Absolute Ethanol Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huihui; Liu, Bin; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-12-01

    The one-step synthesis of oleic acid-coated TiO2 nanoparticles with visible light-driven photocatalytic activity was reported by this manuscript, using oleic acid-ethanol as crucial starting materials. The photocatalytic degradation of nitrogen monoxide (deNOx) in the gas phase was investigated in a continuous reactor using a series of TiO2 semiconductors, prepared from oleic acid- or acetic acid-ethanol solution. The surface modification on TiO2 by organic fatty acid, oleic acid, could reinvest TiO2 photocatalyst with the excellent visible light response. The deNOx ability is almost as high as 30 % destruction in the visible light region (λ > 510 nm) which is similar to the nitrogen-doped TiO2. Meanwhile, acetic acid, a monobasic acid, has a weaker ability on visible light modification of TiO2.

  14. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah; van de Goot, Frank; Ruijter, Jan; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof Jan

    2017-01-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered

  15. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Guralnik, Benny; Porat, N.

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ~0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative...

  16. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  17. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  18. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  19. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Guralnik, Benny; Porat, N.;

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ~0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative...

  20. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  1. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny;

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  2. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-07-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  3. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...... of these processes is, in general, thermally dependent, and leads either to enhancement or quenching of the luminescence with increasing temperature. Previous studies have measured the combined thermal activation characteristics of all three processes, and show a strong dependence on stimulation energy....... In this article, an initial attempt is made to isolate only the recombination part of the luminescence cycle, and determine its thermal characteristics separately. A Variety of luminescence transitions are examined in a range of both alkali and plagioclase feldspars; three distinct emission types are identified...

  4. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Feng [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Aldea, Gabriela [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Iasi, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Nunzi, Jean-Michel, E-mail: nunzijm@queensu.c [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod){sub 3}) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  5. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  6. Functional silk: colored and luminescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansil, Natalia C; Koh, Leng Duei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-03-15

    Silkworm silk is among the most widely used natural fibers for textile and biomedical applications due to its extraordinary mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility. A number of physical and chemical processes have also been developed to reconstruct silk into various forms or to artificially produce silk-like materials. In addition to the direct use and the delicate replication of silk's natural structure and properties, there is a growing interest to introduce more new functionalities into silk while maintaining its advantageous intrinsic properties. In this review we assess various methods and their merits to produce functional silk, specifically those with color and luminescence, through post-processing steps as well as biological approaches. There is a highlight on intrinsically colored and luminescent silk produced directly from silkworms for a wide range of applications, and a discussion on the suitable molecular properties for being incorporated effectively into silk while it is being produced in the silk gland. With these understanding, a new generation of silk containing various functional materials (e.g., drugs, antibiotics and stimuli-sensitive dyes) would be produced for novel applications such as cancer therapy with controlled release feature, wound dressing with monitoring/sensing feature, tissue engineering scaffolds with antibacterial, anticoagulant or anti-inflammatory feature, and many others.

  7. Solid-surface luminescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized several interactions that are very important in solid-matrix luminescence. With silica gel chromatoplates and filter paper, simple equations were derived for calculating the individual contributions to the percent decrease in luminescence due to either moisture or to a quenching gas. For sodium acetate as a solid matrix and p-aminobenzoate as a model compound, it was concluded that p-aminobenzoate was incorporated into the crystal structure of sodium acetate, and the triplet energy was lost be skeletal vibrations in sodium acetate. Also, with the same system is was shown that p-aminobenzoate did not undergo rotational relaxation, and thus rotational processes did not contribute to the deactivation of the triplet state. Several results were obtained from model compounds adsorbed on filter paper under different temperature and humidity conditions and with a variety of heavy atoms present. Fundamental photophysical equations were used in calculating several basic parameters that revealed information on rate processes and how the absorbed energy was distributed in an adsorbed lumiphor. The most important advancement with filter paper was the development of equations that relate phosphorescence parameters of adsorbed phosphors to the Young's modulus of filter paper. These equations are based on a fundamental theory that relates the hydrogen-bonding network of paper to the modulus of paper.

  8. Upconversion luminescence in Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Zhiwei; Song, Pingxin; Jiang, Benxue; Zhou, Guoqing; Xu, Jun; Deng, Peizhen; Bourdet, Gilbert; Christophe Chanteloup, Jean; Zou, Ji-Ping; Fulop, Annabelle

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we present results on upconversion luminescence performed on Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets under 940 nm excitation. The upconversion luminescence was ascribed to Yb 3+ cooperative luminescence and the presence of rare earth impurity ions. The cooperative luminescence spectra as a function of Yb concentration were measured and the emission intensity variation with Yb concentration was discussed. Yb 3+ energy migration quenched the cooperative luminescence of Yb:YAG crystals with doping level over 15 at%.

  9. Luminescence Properties of a Fibonacci Photonic Quasicrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Passias, Vasilios; Shi, Zhou; Deych, Lev; Lisyansky, Alexander; Menon, Vinod M

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of an active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal via spin coating. Manipulation of the luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal is presented and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  10. Stability of uncoated and fulvic acids coated manufactured CeO2 nanoparticles in various conditions: From ultrapure to natural Lake Geneva waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriekhova, Olena; Stoll, Serge

    2016-08-15

    Understanding the behavior of engineered nanoparticles in natural water and impact of water composition in changing conditions is of high importance to predict their fate once released into the environment. In this study we investigated the stability of uncoated and Suwannee River fulvic acids coated CeO2 manufactured nanoparticles in various environmental conditions. The effect of pH changes on the nanoparticle and coating stability was first studied in ultrapure water as well as the variation of zeta potentials and sizes with time in presence of fulvic acids at environmental pH. Then the stability of CeO2 in synthetic and natural Lake Geneva waters was investigated as a function of fulvic acids concentration. Our results indicate that the adsorption of environmentally relevant concentrations of Suwannee River fulvic acids promotes CeO2 stabilization in ultrapure water as well as synthetic water and that the coating stability is high upon pH variations. On the other hand in natural Lake Geneva water CeO2 NPs are found in all cases aggregated due to the effect of heterogeneous organic and inorganic compounds.

  11. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  12. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat ether with triglycol chain by azide–alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  13. Luminescence properties of uranyl-acetate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Hannes; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) was applied to characterize uranium(VI)- acetate species based on their luminescence properties. In contrast to previous interpretations, no indications were detected for the existence of the 1: 3 complex.

  14. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can....... Based on the studies of residual luminescence as a function of depth into a rock surface discussed above, a model is developed that relates this increase in residual luminescence to the exposure time. The model is then further developed using the quartz OSL signal from buried quartzite cobbles...

  15. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far...... retrospective assessment of accident doses received by the population after a nuclear accident. The development of new luminescence techniques after the Chernobyl accident has considerably improved the sensitivity and precision in the evaluation of accident doses. This paper reviews the development work......, especially on optically stimulated luminescence methods for retrospective assessment of accident doses carried out at Riso National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of Helsinki as part bf a joint European Union research project. We demonstrate that doses lower than 100 mGy can be measured from...

  16. Orbital surveys of solar stimulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, W. R.; Theisen, A. F.; Tyson, R. M.; Granata, J. S.

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an electro-optical device for imaging natural and manmade materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the sun. An airborne FLD has been used to detect geochemically stressed vegetation, drought-stressed agricultural crops, industrial and residential pollution effluents, marine oil seeps, phosphate rock, uranium-bearing sandstone, and bioluminescent ocean plankton. Three-dimensional perspective plots of excitation and emission spectra, measured with a laboratory spectrometer, graphically depict similarities and differences in luminescence properties between sample materials. The laboratory data also include luminescence intensities at six Fraunhofer lines in the visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Both the airborne and laboratory data suggest the feasibility of delineating and monitoring at least some of these luminescing materials from orbital altitude, such as a test flight aboard the Space Shuttle using an improved third-generation FLD.

  17. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  18. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  19. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  20. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  1. A thermo-responsive supramolecular organogel: dual luminescence properties and luminescence conversion induced by Cd(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinxian; Zhang, Jinjin; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2014-12-14

    A simple dual luminescent acylhydrazone-functionalized benzimidazole derivative (L) was blended with ethylene glycol affording a thermo-responsive green-light-emitting supramolecular gel (G-gel). This G-gel can convert to a blue-light-emitting gel (B-gel) by strongly increasing the luminescence of the benzimidazole moiety upon addition of one equivalent of Cd(2+).

  2. Fabrication of Poly(γ-glutamic acid)-coated Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles and Their Application in Heavy Metal Removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常菁; 仲兆祥; 徐虹; 姚忠; 陈日志

    2013-01-01

    In this study, poly(γ-glutamic acid)-coated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (γ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs) were successfully fabricated using the co-precipitation method. Fe3O4 MNPs were also prepared for comparison. The av-erage size and specific surface area results reveal thatγ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs (52.4 nm, 88.41 m2·g-1) have smaller particle size and larger specific surface area than Fe3O4 MNPs (62.0 nm, 76.83 m2·g-1). Theγ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs can remove over 99%of Cr3+, Cu2+and Pb2+, and over 77%of Ni2+in deionized water, much higher thanγ-PGA and Fe3O4 MNPs, attributed to the larger specific surface area ofγ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs. With the solution pH higher than 6.0,γ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs demonstrate better removal activity. The adsorption isotherm ofγ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs for Cr3+ fits the Freundlich model well, with the adsorption capacity of 24.60 mg·g-1. γ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs are strongly attracted by permanent magnet, so it is easy to separate them completely from water. With their high effi-ciency for heavy metal removal and easier separation,γ-PGA/Fe3O4 MNPs have great potential applications in wa-ter treatment.

  3. Luminescence Decay Dynamics and Trace Biomaterials Detection Potential of Surface-Functionalized Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwan H; Aijmo, Jacob; Ma, Lun; Yao, Mingzhen; Zhang, Xing; Como, John; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J; Huang, Juyang; Chen, Wei

    2008-10-22

    We have studied the luminescence decay and trace biomaterials detection potential of two surface-functionalized nanoparticles, poly(ethylene glycol) bis(carboxymethyl) ether-coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb (~20 nm) and thioglycolic acid-coated ZnS/Mn (~5 nm). Upon UV excitation, these nanoparticles emitted fluorescence peaking at 540 and 597 nm, respectively, in solution. Fluorescence imaging revealed that these nanoparticles targeted the trace biomaterials from fingerprints that were deposited on various nonporous solid substrates. Highly ordered, microscopic sweat pores within the friction ridges of the fingerprints were labeled with good spatial resolutions by the nanoparticles on aluminum and polymethylpentene substrates, but not on glass or quartz. In solution, these nanoparticles exhibited multicomponent fluorescence decays of resolved lifetimes ranging from nano-to microseconds and of average lifetimes of ~24 and 130 micros for the coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb and ZnS:Mn, respectively. The long microsecond-decay components are associated with the emitters at or near the nanocrystal core surface that are sensitive to the size, surface-functionalization, and solvent exposure of the nanoparticles. When the nanoparticles were bound to the surface of a solid substrate and in the dried state, a decrease in the microsecond decay lifetimes was observed, indicative of a change in the coating environment of the nanocrystal surface upon binding and solvent removal. The average decay lifetimes for the surface-bound ZnS:Mn in the dried state were ~60, 30, and 11 micros on quartz, aluminum, and polymethylpentene, respectively. These values were still 2 orders of magnitude longer than the typical fluorescence decay background of most substrates (e.g., ~0.36 micros for polymethylpentene) in trace forensic evidence detections. We conclude that coated ZnS: Mn nanoparticles hold great promise as a nontoxic labeling agent for ultrasensitive, time-gated, trace evidence detections in nanoforensic

  4. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  5. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  6. Luminescence kinetics of phosphors after excitation by electron beam

    OpenAIRE

    Ваганов, Виталий; Полисадова, Елена Фёдоровна; Мархабаева, А. А.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence decay of industrial phosphors based on yttrium-aluminum garnet has beeninvestigated at the excitation by an electron beam. The ratio of slow and fast component amplitude in the kinetics of luminescence decay was estimated. It is shown that the luminescence decay time depends on the composition of the phosphor. The luminescence decay time can be used for analysis of the phosphors, to determine their quality.

  7. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D. J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Ronda, R.C.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of this material; we discuss possible solutions for this. Furthermore, the use of broad-band cholesteric filters to prevent escape of luminescent radiation from this phosphor is investigated both experim...

  8. Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si were measured under an N_2 laser excitation. The luminescence shows a nonexponential decay with an initial time constant of less than 5 ns and more than 200 ns for the secondary decay. The luminescence is considered to be associated with localized states, which are probably conduction and valence sublevels in Si microstructures.

  9. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, R.C.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of

  10. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, C.R.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introducea phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardlyany reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator isthe large scattering of this

  11. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, C.R.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introducea phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardlyany reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator isthe large scattering of this m

  12. Luminescence engineering in plasmonic meta-surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Tapashree; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence is a phenomenon of significant interest due to its wide range of technological applications in plasmonics, nanolasers, spasers, lasing spasers, loss compensation and gain in metamaterials, and luminescent media. Nanostructured materials are known to have very different luminescence characteristics to bulk samples or planar films. Here we show that by engineering a nanostructured meta-surface, we can choose the position of photoluminescence absorption and emission lines of thin gold films. The nanostructuring also aids to strong enhancement of the emission from gold, by a factor of 76 in our experiments. This enhancement is determined by the relative position of the engineered absorption and emission lines to the exciting laser wavelength and the intrinsic properties of the constituent material. These luminescence-engineered materials combined with a resonant material, as in the lasing spaser, or with the power of reconfigurable metamaterials promise huge potential as tunable nanoscale light ...

  13. Luminescence properties of dilute bismide systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breddermann, B., E-mail: benjamin.breddermann@physik.uni-marburg.de [Faculty of Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Bäumner, A.; Koch, S.W.; Ludewig, P.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K. [Faculty of Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Hader, J.; Moloney, J.V. [Nonlinear Control Strategies Inc, 3542 N. Geronimo Ave., Tucson, AZ 85705 (United States); Broderick, C.A.; O' Reilly, E.P. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-10-15

    Systematic photoluminescence measurements on a series of GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1−x} samples are analyzed theoretically using a fully microscopic approach. Based on sp{sup 3}s{sup ⁎} tight-binding calculations, an effective k·p model is set up and used to compute the band structure and dipole matrix elements for the experimentally investigated samples. With this input, the photoluminescence spectra are calculated using a systematic microscopic approach based on the semiconductor luminescence equations. The detailed theory-experiment comparison allows us to quantitatively characterize the experimental structures and to extract important sample parameters. - Highlights: • Measurement of photoluminescence spectra of a home grown series of dilute bismides. • Fully microscopic calculation of luminescence spectra from detailed band structure. • Quantitative experiment-theory comparison of luminescence spectra. • Thorough understanding of optoelectronic properties of dilute bismide material system. • Promising perspectives for the development of new device applications.

  14. Luminescent iridium complexes for detection of molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen E; Davies, David L; Klair, Anne-K Duhme; Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Shalini

    2012-01-14

    Reactions of [Ir(C^N)(2)Cl](2) [HC^N = 2-(3-R-phenyl)pyridine, 2-(3-R-phenylpyrazole) R = H, Me] with Me(2)-phencat give luminescent complexes [Ir(C^N)(2)(Me(2)-phencat)][PF(6)] (Me(2)-2a, b, c)[PF(6)]. Deprotection of the methoxy groups with BBr(3) is problematic as simultaneous bromination of the cyclometallated phenyl groups occurs. However, deprotection of Me(2)-phencat with BBr(3) followed by complexation with [Ir(C^N)(2)Cl](2) gives luminescent complexes [Ir(C^N)(2)(H(2)-phencat)][PF(6)] (H(2)-3a, c)[PF(6)], which are luminescent sensors for molybdate.

  15. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  16. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this progr......Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes...

  17. The Control of Drug Release and Vascular Endothelialization after Hyaluronic Acid-Coated Paclitaxel Multi-Layer Coating Stent Implantation in Porcine Coronary Restenosis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, In-Ho; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Yong Hwan; Lim, Kyung Seob; Park, Dae Sung; Shim, Jae Won; Kim, Jung Ha; Ahn, Youngkeun; Hong, Young Joon; Sim, Doo Sun

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives Hyaluronic acid (HA) is highly biocompatible with cells and the extracellular matrix. In contrast to degradation products of a synthetic polymer, degradation products of HA do not acidify the local environment. The aim of this study was to fabricate an HA-coated paclitaxel (PTX)-eluting stent via simple ionic interactions and to evaluate its effects in vitro and in vivo. Materials and Methods HA and catechol were conjugated by means of an activation agent, and then the stent was immersed in this solution (resulting in a HA-coated stent). After that, PTX was immobilized on the HA-coated stent (resulting in a hyaluronic acid-coated paclitaxel-eluting stent [H-PTX stent]). Study groups were divided into 4 groups: bare metal stent (BMS), HA, H-PTX, and poly (L-lactide)-coated paclitaxel-eluting stent (P-PTX). Stents were randomly implanted in a porcine coronary artery. After 4 weeks, vessels surrounding the stents were isolated and subjected to various analyses. Results Smoothness of the surface was maintained after expansion of the stent. In contrast to a previous study on a PTX-eluting stent, in this study, the PTX was effectively released up to 14 days (a half amount of PTX in 4 days). The proliferation of smooth muscle cells was successfully inhibited (by 80.5±12.11% at 7 days of culture as compared to the control) by PTX released from the stent. Animal experiments showed that the H-PTX stent does not induce an obvious inflammatory response. Nevertheless, restenosis was clearly decreased in the H-PTX stent group (9.8±3.25%) compared to the bare-metal stent group (29.7±8.11%). Conclusion A stent was stably coated with PTX via simple ionic interactions with HA. Restenosis was decreased in the H-PTX group. These results suggest that HA, a natural polymer, is suitable for fabrication of drug-eluting stents (without inflammation) as an alternative to a synthetic polymer.

  18. The cadmium–mercaptoacetic acid complex contributes to the genotoxicity of mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSe-core quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang WK

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Weikun Tang,1 Junpeng Fan,1 Yide He,1 Bihai Huang,2 Huihui Liu,1 Daiwen Pang,2 Zhixiong Xie11College of Life Sciences, 2College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs have many potential clinical and biological applications because of their advantages over traditional fluorescent dyes. However, the genotoxicity potential of QDs still remains unclear. In this paper, a plasmid-based system was designed to explore the genotoxic mechanism of QDs by detecting changes in DNA configuration and biological activities. The direct chemicobiological interactions between DNA and mercaptoacetic acid-coated CdSe-core QDs (MAA–QDs were investigated. After incubation with different concentrations of MAA–QDs (0.043, 0.13, 0.4, 1.2, and 3.6 µmol/L in the dark, the DNA conversion of the covalently closed circular (CCC DNA to the open circular (OC DNA was significantly enhanced (from 13.9% ± 2.2% to 59.9% ± 12.8% while the residual transformation activity of plasmid DNA was greatly decreased (from 80.7% ± 12.8% to 13.6% ± 0.8%, which indicated that the damages to the DNA structure and biological activities induced by MAA–QDs were concentration-dependent. The electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data suggested that the observed genotoxicity might be correlated with the cadmium–mercaptoacetic acid complex (Cd–MAA that is formed in the solution of MAA–QDs. Circular dichroism spectroscopy and transformation assay results indicated that the Cd–MAA complex might interact with DNA through the groove-binding mode and prefer binding to DNA fragments with high adenine and thymine content. Furthermore, the plasmid transformation assay could be used as an effective method to evaluate the genotoxicities of nanoparticles.Keywords: genotoxicity, MAA CdSe quantum dots, cadmium–MAA complex, transformation assay, DNA 

  19. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dick K G; Broer, Dirk J; Debije, Michael G; Keur, Wilco; Meijerink, Andries; Ronda, Cees R; Verbunt, Paul P C

    2012-05-07

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of this material; we discuss possible solutions for this. Furthermore, the use of broad-band cholesteric filters to prevent escape of luminescent radiation from this phosphor is investigated both experimentally and using simulations. Simulations are also used to predict the ultimate performance of luminescent concentrators.

  1. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Guidelli, Eder; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films.

  2. Structural changes and relaxations monitored by luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yang, B; Townsend, P D

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence data have often been used to study imperfections and to characterize lattice distortions because the signals are sensitive to changes of structure and composition. Previous studies have included intentionally added probe ions such as rare earth ions to sense distortions in local crystal fields caused by modified structural environments. An under-exploited extension of this approach was to use luminescence to monitor crystalline phase changes. A current overview of this new and powerful technique shows that continuous scanning of the sample temperatures immediately offered at least three types of signatures for phase transitions. Because of high sensitivity, luminescence signals were equally responsive to structural changes from inclusions and nanoparticles. These coupled to the host material via long-range interactions and modified the host signals. Two frequently observed examples that are normally overlooked are from nanoparticle inclusions of water and CO2. Examples also indicated that phase transitions were detected in more diverse materials such as superconductors and fullerenes. Finally, luminescence studies have shown that in some crystalline examples, high dose ion implantation of surface layers could induce relaxations and/or structural changes of the entire underlying bulk material. This was an unexpected result and therefore such a possibility has not previously been explored. However, the implications for ion implication are significant and could be far more general than the examples mentioned here.

  3. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    34 2008 IEEE/ LEOS Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics Conference, Freiburg Germany, August 2008, pp. 64- 65. 3. J. R. Hazelton, E. G. Yukihara, M. W. Blair...A.J.J. , Prokic, M. and Brouwer , J.C., 2006. Optically and thermally stimulated luminescence characteristics of MgO:Tb3+. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 119

  4. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho;

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  5. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  6. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  7. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of young sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A.T.; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of young (< 1000 years) sediments is used increasingly in a wide variety of late-Holocene studies as a mean of establishing contemporary sedimentation rates or the timing of sediment deposition. This paper provides a summary of the basic principles o...

  8. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  9. Probing luminescence from nonspherical bubble collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The luminescence from single laser produced cavitation bubbles for varying degrees of asphericity is investigated temporally, spatially, and spectrally. The degree of asphericity is controlled with an adjustable rigid boundary near the bubble. Temporally, single and multiple light emission events ha

  10. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  11. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rico, Cyren M. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Medina-Velo, Illya A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, Jose R. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L., E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210 days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO{sub 2}, CA + nCeO{sub 2}) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO{sub 2}), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500 mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA + nCeO{sub 2} increased shoot length by ~ 9 and ~ 13%, respectively, while bCeO{sub 2} and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~ 48 and ~ 26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p ≤ 0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA + nCeO{sub 2} at 250 mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500 mg/kg, nCeO{sub 2} increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA + nCeO{sub 2}, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO{sub 2} nor CA + nCeO{sub 2} affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500 mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO{sub 2} on tomato plants. - Highlights: • At 500 mg/kg, coated and bare NPs increased stem length by 13 and 9

  12. Bioelectric and Morphological Response of Liquid-Covered Human Airway Epithelial Calu-3 Cell Monolayer to Periodic Deposition of Colloidal 3-Mercaptopropionic-Acid Coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS Core-Multishell Quantum Dots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizat Turdalieva

    Full Text Available Lung epithelial cells are extensively exposed to nanoparticles present in the modern urban environment. Nanoparticles, including colloidal quantum dots (QDs, are also considered to be potentially useful carriers for the delivery of drugs into the body. It is therefore important to understand the ways of distribution and the effects of the various types of nanoparticles in the lung epithelium. We use a model system of liquid-covered human airway epithelial Calu-3 cell cultures to study the immediate and long-term effects of repeated deposition of colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic-acid coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell QDs on the lung epithelial cell surface. By live confocal microscope imaging and by QD fluorescence measurements we show that the QD permeation through the mature epithelial monolayers is very limited. At the time of QD deposition, the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER of the epithelial monolayers transiently decreased, with the decrement being proportional to the QD dose. Repeated QD deposition, once every six days for two months, lead to accumulation of only small amounts of the QDs in the cell monolayer. However, it did not induce any noticeable changes in the long-term TEER and the molecular morphology of the cells. The colloidal 3-mercaptopropionic-acid coated CdSe-CdS/ZnS core-multishell QDs could therefore be potentially used for the delivery of drugs intended for the surface of the lung epithelia during limited treatment periods.

  13. 具有中国特色的腐植酸涂层缓释肥的作用机理与应用研究%The Mechanism and Application Research of Humic Acid Coating SRFs with Chinese Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈绍荣; 熊思健

    2014-01-01

    我国现有的主流缓/控释肥产品主要是参考国外技术,具有中国特色和拥有自主知识产权的缓/控释肥产品主要有钙镁磷肥包裹碳铵、Luxacote(枸溶磷包裹尿素)和腐植酸涂层缓释肥等品种。本文重点介绍了腐植酸涂层缓释肥的作用机理及其应用研究成果。%The slow/controlled release fertilizer products in China are mainly using technology of abord. This kind of products with independent intellectual property rights and Chinese characteristics include Calcium-magnesia phosphate package, Ammonium bicarbonate/Luxacote (citric acid soluble phosphorus package ure ) and humic acid coated slow release fertilizer. In this paper, the studies of mechanism and application of humic acid coated slow release fertilizer are introduced .

  14. Luminescence chronology of a second millenium BCE settlement near Porbandar on the Gujarat coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Thomas, P.J.; Vora, K.H.; Sundaresh

    ) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of two potshards. The obtained luminescence ages are found to be in agreement with other archaeological findings. The implications of the luminescence ages on the maritime history of the area and the cultural...

  15. Luminescence of Au(I)-thiolate complex affected by solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Cao, Yuanjie; Chen, Juan; Sun, Zhihu; Yao, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a study on the correlation between luminescence property of Au(I)-SR (SR: thiolate) complexes and solvent polarity. Luminescent [Au15(SR)14-16]+ complexes were synthesized in the weakly polar solvent of toluene, while the non-luminescent [Au7(SR)6]+ species were obtained by the same synthesis method in the polar solvent of ethanol. The dependence of luminescence intensity on the mixed solvent with various toluene/ethanol ratios was also explored. It is proposed that the luminescence of Au(I)-SR complexes originates from the aggregation of the bilayer supramolecular structures induced by the weakly polar solvent. This aggregation strengthens the intra and intercomplex aurophilic Au(I)···Au(I) interactions and subsequently enhances the luminescence intensity of the complexes.

  16. Recent progress in biomedical applications of persistent luminescence nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yingqian; Shen, Haijing; Yuan, Quan

    2017-05-18

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are an emerging group of promising luminescent materials that can remain luminescent after the excitation ceases. In the past decade, PLNPs with intriguing optical properties have been developed and their applications in biomedicine have been widely studied. Due to the ultra-long decay time of persistent luminescence, autofluorescence interference in biosensing and bioimaging can be efficiently eliminated. Moreover, PLNPs can remain luminescent for hours, making them valuable in bio-tracing. Also, persistent luminescence imaging can guide cancer therapy with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and superior sensitivity. Briefly, PLNPs are demonstrated to be a newly-emerging class of functional materials with unprecedented advantages in biomedicine. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the preparation of PLNPs and the applications of PLNPs in biosensing, bioimaging and cancer therapy.

  17. Luminescence studies on europium-strontium phthalate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Limin; Zhao, Ying; Su, Yunlan; Wu, Jinguang

    2002-11-01

    New lanthanide luminescence materials were prepared. The main component lanthanide chelates generally need a relatively high content of rare earth. Inorganic luminescence materials only need low rare earth concentration using doped method. Similarly, lanthanide chelates can be added to complex matrix by doped method. In this way, low rare earth concentration emission was successful in the lanthanide chelates system as well. The influence of europium ion concentration on luminescence intensities was discussed. When the europium ion weight in the complex is only about 0.6%, the sample exhibits good luminescence properties. The fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectra, micro-Raman and electron spin resonance spectra of the samples were measured. And a possible luminescence mechanism was suggested by the inorganic doped mechanism and the luminescence of lanthanide complexes together.

  18. Phosphate modulated luminescence in lanthanum vanadate nanorods- Catechin, polyphenolic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilmani, Vairapperumal; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth orthovanadates and phosphates offer a very high opportunity for fabrication of nanoscale devices that exploit their luminescence properties. Optimization of luminescence by way of modulation of size, shape, structure, and morphology has been an area of study for several researchers. There has been a debate as to whether doped orthophosphate or orthovanadate is better luminescent material as both are chemically similar. It has been reported earlier that catechin hydrate can play the role of a structure director and thus influence the luminescence properties of orthovanadates. In this work, a catechin modulated the synthesis of Eu-doped lanthanum orthophosphate by phosphate substitution into vanadate host lattice is reported. A mechanistic understanding of the luminescence changes in LaMO4 has been proposed. During the substitution of V with P, catechin modulates the structure between 1D nanorods and nanowires. The host crystal structure, shape, and size influence the luminescence properties in doped LaMO4.

  19. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    thermoelectrically cooled NIR sensitive PMT (detection window peak at 855 nm, FWHM 27 nm). Software and electronics have been modified to allow standard TL and OSL measurements in the same sequence as RL measurements. Together with a new bleaching source based on a high-power UV LED (395 nm; 700 mW/cm2......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non......-uniformity.We first describe improvements to the existing RL option to allow near infra-red detection (NIR) during irradiation by the built-in 90Sr/90Y beta source. The RL optical signal is collected by a liquid light guide through an F34-901 interference filter and detection is based on a dedicated...

  20. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... determined the depositional age of a wide variety of fine-grained sediments, from several years to several hundred thousands of years. However, there is no routine OSL dating method applicable to larger clasts such as cobbles, boulders and other rock surfaces. Here the application of quartz OSL to the dating...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can...

  2. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  3. Materials for luminescent greenhouse solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, J A; Weber, W H

    1977-10-01

    Luminescent greenhouse solar collectors are potentially useful for concentrating sunlight onto photovoltaic power cells. Measurements of the performance of small-scale collectors made of two commercially available materials (Owens-Illinois ED2 neodymium-doped laser glass and rhodamine 6G-doped plastic) are presented. The results are encouraging, but they indicate a need for further spectral sensitization and for reduced matrix loss coefficient. The measurements with monochromatic illumination agree with the predictions of a mathematical model developed to take account of reemission following the absorption of luminescence. Under solar illumination, the model predicts photon flux concentrations of about 15 for optimized full-scale collectors made of the materials studied and concentrations of 110 for reasonably improved glass.

  4. Modeling and simulation of luminescence detection platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Khaled; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Hassibi, Arjang; El-Gamal, Abbas

    2004-06-15

    Motivated by the design of an integrated CMOS-based detection platform, a simulation model for CCD and CMOS imager-based luminescence detection systems is developed. The model comprises four parts. The first portion models the process of photon flux generation from luminescence probes using ATP-based and luciferase label-based assay kinetics. An optics simulator is then used to compute the incident photon flux on the imaging plane for a given photon flux and system geometry. Subsequently, the output image is computed using a detailed imaging sensor model that accounts for photodetector spectral response, dark current, conversion gain, and various noise sources. Finally, signal processing algorithms are applied to the image to enhance detection reliability and hence increase the overall system throughput. To validate the model, simulation results are compared to experimental results obtained from a CCD-based system that was built to emulate the integrated CMOS-based platform.

  5. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  6. Luminescence from Tube-Arrest Bubbles in Pure Glycerin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岐岱; 王龙

    2004-01-01

    Single transient cavitation bubble with luminescence has been generated in pure glycerin by using the ‘tube arrest'method. The analyses of high-speed photograph and light emission data suggest that the light emission would be a single bubble sonoluminescence. The luminescence pulse width is observed to wry from sub-nanosecond to about 30 ns. The width and intensity of luminescence pulses increases with the height of the liquid column height and decreases with the liquid temperature.

  7. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  8. Luminescence spectra and kinetics of disordered solid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, A.; Reznitsky, A.; Permogorov, S.;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied both theoretically and experimentally the luminescence spectra and kinetics of crystalline, disordered solid solutions after pulsed excitation. First, we present the model calculations of the steady-state luminescence band shape caused by recombination of excitons localized in the......-time limit at excitation below the exciton mobility edge. At excitation by photons with higher energies the diffusion of electrons can account for the observed behavior of the luminescence. [S0163-1829(99)11419-X]....

  9. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  10. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordun, O.; Drobchak, O.

    2008-05-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of normal and pathological urine was studied. The presence of pathological salts leads to extinguishing of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional stripes with maxima nearly 118 and 205K, except of characteristic stripes with the maxima nearly 173 and 260K. TSL stripes depend on urine constituents. The comparison of TSL intensity of normal and pathological urine is carried out and energies of thermal activation are determined for most intensive TSL stripes.

  11. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  12. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice,

  13. Liquid Contact Luminescence from Semiconductor Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-09

    Luminescence - Diagnostic As a diagnostic tool, LCL can provide much useful information about the quality of the epitaxial wafer prior to laser fabrication . In...diagnostic tool, LCL can provide a variety of useful information about the quality of the epitaxial wafer prior to laser fabrication . Temporal...the quality of the epitaxial laser wafer prior to laser fabrication . It is a quick, inexpensive, and non- destructive process that measures a variety

  14. Exciton luminescence in BaFCl crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzhabov, E

    1998-05-01

    The luminescence spectra and decay characteristics of both 5.45 and 3.4 eV bands in BaFCl oxygen-free crystals were investigated at 5-300 K temperature range using vacuum ultraviolet excitation as well as X-ray excitation. The similarities with excitons in alkali halides allow us to consider both excitons in BaFCl as on-center excitons and strong off-center excitons.

  15. Spectral converters and luminescent solar concentrators

    CERN Document Server

    Scudo, Petra F; Fusco, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive theoretical description of molecular spectral converters in the specific context of Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). The theoretical model is an extension to a three-level system interacting with a solar radiation bath of the standard quantum theory of atomic radiative processes. We derive the equilibrium equations of the conversion process and provide specific examples of application of this principle to the development of solar concentration devices.

  16. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, relat

  17. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V., E-mail: budruev@gmail.com

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  18. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies.

  19. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  20. Ion beam induced luminescence of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R

    2001-01-01

    luminescence dead zone at the domain walls. Neodymium-yttrium-aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) was examined and the spectra measured as a function of temperature to show the evolution of intensity of the narrow line emission from the Nd rare earth. Shifts and changes in the intrinsic UV band in the YAG material were also apparent. Thin films of alumina grown on silica on a silicon substrate, along with some that contained copper nanoclusters were also examined. TRIM software was used to model the rate of excitation within the different layers of the material for the various implant energies and to identify the source of the luminescence profile observed in each case. Evidence of thin film interference fringes was apparent in the spectra by fringe patterns modulated onto the luminescence signal as a function of wavelength and film thickness. Analysis of an alkali feldspar material using IBL, and combined with work done using RL and CL experiments, showed a shift towards lower wavelengths of the main red/IR band with ...

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er core@shell monodisperse nanoparticles and their subsequent ligand exchange in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhenli; Du, Sinan; Luo, Yang; Liao, Zhijian; Zuo, Fang; Luo, Jianbin; Liu, Dong

    2016-08-01

    We report the use of an efficient hydrothermal method to synthesize superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er nanoparticles (NPs) with core@shell structures via a seed-growth procedure. Oleic acid coated Fe3O4 (OA-Fe3O4) NPs were initially synthesized using a coprecipitation method. The as-synthesized OA-Fe3O4 NPs were then used as seeds, on which the red upconversion luminescent shell (Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er) was formed. Furthermore, hydrophobic to hydrophilic surface modification of the Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs was achieved via a ligand exchange method where oleic acid was displaced by a PEG phosphate ligand [PEG = poly(ethylene glycol)]. These materials were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The Fe3O4 cores were uniformly coated with a Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er shell, and the bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs were monodispersed. Furthermore, the Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs exhibited a saturated magnetization value of 6.2 emu/g and emitted red luminescence under a 980 nm laser. The obtained bifunctional Fe3O4@Mn2+-doped NaYF4:Yb/Er NPs may find potential applications in drug targeting, bioseparation, and diagnostic analysis. The synthetic method may be employed for the preparation of other bifunctional nanomaterials.

  2. Radiation induced luminescence processes in c-BN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Berzina, B.; Benabdesselam, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral properties of cubic boron nitride have been studied using methods of photoluminescence (PL), X-ray excited luminescence (XL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that emission of cubic boron nitride is presented by 4 subbands, their relative yield...

  3. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-09-02

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  4. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  5. Anomalous propagation of luminescence through bulk n-InP

    CERN Document Server

    Luryi, Serge; Subashiev, Arsen; Chen, Zhichao

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of a semiconductor as a scintillator with a lattice-matched surface photo-diode for radiation detection requires efficient luminescence collection. Low and heavily doped bulk n-InP has been studied to optimize luminescence transmission via photon recycling.

  6. Effects of Preparation on Luminescent Characterization of Porous Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Porous silicon samples are prepared by pulse electrochemical-etching and DC electrochemical-etching. The effects of different preparation methods on luminescent characterization of porous silicon are investigated. Compared with DC electrochemical-etching, pulse electrochemical-etching produces the porous silicon characterized by a more even surface, a stronger luminescence and a PL blue shift to a certain degree.

  7. Polarization-independent filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Lin, C.W.; Giesbers, M.P.; Cornelissen, H.J.; Debije, M.G.; Verbunt, P.P.C.; Broer, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of Luminescent Solar Concentrators could be greatly enhanced by the use of wavelength-selective filters, since they reduce the amount of luminescent light lost. To accomplish this, polarization-independent filters have been made by combining layers of cholesteric liquid crystals,

  8. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  9. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  10. Photostimulated luminescence properties of Eu2+ -doped barium aluminate phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanlong; Qiu, Guangyu; Xu, Xuhui; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2015-03-01

    An intense green photostimulated luminescence in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor was prepared. The thermoluminescence results indicate that there are at least three types of traps (T1 , T2 , T3 ) with different trap depths in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor according to the bands located at 327, 361 and 555 K, respectively, which are closely associated with the phosphor's long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties. In addition, as a novel optical read-out form, a photostimulated persistent luminescence signal can be repeatedly obtained in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor. This shows that re-trapping of the electron released from a deep trap plays an important role in photostimulated persistent luminescence.

  11. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...... more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar...... groups. The results are compared with properties of the excitation spectra dose-dependent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in order to compare the chemical environment of the OSL donor defect, and the isolated Fe3+ centres....

  12. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2011-08-01

    Visible luminescence of Dy 3+ ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to 4F 9/2 → 6H 15/2 (blue) and 4F 9/2 → 6H 13/2 (yellow) transitions of Dy 3+. Luminescence decays from 4F 9/2 state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX 2 (X = F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX 2 to the borate glass results in the increasing of 4F 9/2 lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy 3+ and O 2-/X - ions.

  13. Spectroscopic characteristic of conical bubble luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qi-Dai; Fu Li-Min; Ai Xi-Cheng; Zhang Jian-Ping; Wang Long

    2005-01-01

    The conical bubble sonoluminescence (CBSL) from the collapse of the bubble was observed in an improved Utube apparatus. The emitted light energy of a single CBSL flash was measured to be ~ 1.4mJ. The pulse width was about 100μs. The spectra of luminescence were continuum superimposed with the spectral bands from the excitedstate C2, CN and CH. The CBSL provides a link between the light emission of the single-bubble and the multi-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL and MBSL).

  14. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  15. Polyethylene terephthalate thin films; a luminescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Téllez, S.; Alarcón-Flores, G.; Meza-Rocha, A.; Zaleta-Alejandre, E.; Aguilar-Futis, M.; Murrieta S, H.; Falcony, C.

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films doped with Rare Earths (RE3+) have been deposited on glass by spray pyrolysis technique at 240 °C, using recycled PET and (RE3+) chlorides as precursors. Cerium, terbium, dysprosium and europium were used as dopants materials, these dopants normally produce luminescent emissions at 450, 545, 573 and 612 nm respectively; the doped films also have light emissions at blue, green, yellow and red respectively. All RE3+ characteristic emissions were observed at naked eyes. Every deposited films show a high transmission in the visible range (close 80% T), films surfaces are pretty soft and homogeneous. Films thickness is around 3 μm.

  16. Near-Field Enhanced Negative Luminescent Refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-08-01

    We consider a near-field enhanced negative luminescent refrigeration system made of a polar material supporting surface-phonon polariton resonances and a narrow-band-gap semiconductor under a reverse bias. We show that in the near-field regime, such a device yields significant cooling power density and a high efficiency close to the Carnot limit. In addition, the performance of our system still persists even in the presence of strong nonidealities such as Auger recombination and sub-band-gap thermal radiation from free carriers.

  17. Eu(2+) luminescence in strontium aluminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutczak, D; Jüstel, T; Ronda, C; Meijerink, A

    2015-06-21

    The luminescence properties of Eu(2+) doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu(2+) ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence properties of the investigated aluminates. The emission of Eu(2+) ions varies over a wide spectral range, from ultraviolet (UV) to red, for the series of aluminates. The variation in emission color can be related to the crystal-field splitting of the 5d levels and the covalent interaction with the surrounding oxygen anions. In the least covalent material, viz. SrAl12O19:Eu(2+), narrow line emission due to the (6)P7/2-(8)S7/2 transition occurs at 4 K, indicating that the 4f(6)5d excited state is situated above the (6)P7/2(4f(7)) excited state around 360 nm. The most alkaline material, viz. Sr3Al2O6:Eu(2+) is the most covalent host and exhibits several d-f emission bands in the yellow to red spectral range due to the Eu(2+) ions located on different crystallographic Sr(2+) sites. The Eu(2+) emission spectra in the other aluminates confirm the trend that with increasing Sr/Al ratio the Eu(2+) emission shifts to longer wavelengths. Interesting differences are observed for the Eu(2+) from different crystallographic sites which cannot always be related with apparent differences in the first oxygen coordination sphere. The discussion gives insight into how in a similar class of materials, strontium aluminates, the emission color of Eu(2+) can be tuned over a wide spectral region.

  18. Chemically engineered persistent luminescence nanoprobes for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécuyer, Thomas; Teston, Eliott; Ramirez-Garcia, Gonzalo; Maldiney, Thomas; Viana, Bruno; Seguin, Johanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Imaging nanoprobes are a group of nanosized agents developed for providing improved contrast for bioimaging. Among various imaging probes, optical sensors capable of following biological events or progresses at the cellular and molecular levels are actually actively developed for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and monitoring of the treatment of diseases. The optical activities of nanoprobes can be tuned on demand by chemists by engineering their composition, size and surface nature. This review will focus on researches devoted to the conception of nanoprobes with particular optical properties, called persistent luminescence, and their use as new powerful bioimaging agents in preclinical assays. PMID:27877248

  19. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  20. Ion beam luminescence of Nd:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanlary, M. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hole, D.E. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Townsend, P.D. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.d.townsend@sussex.ac.uk

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence recorded during ion beam implantation of Nd:YAG has proved valuable in sensing structural and local crystal field changes caused by waveguide fabrication in this laser material. The relative line intensities from Nd are sensitive to excitation rate and so the spectra differ strongly between H{sup +} and H2+ excitation, with further changes in the examples using He{sup +} and N{sup +} ions. The overall intensities are reduced at lower temperatures, as well as showing variations in relative line patterns. Some suggestions of component lines and weak broad bands are offered in terms of trace rare earth and other impurities.

  1. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKeever, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The book discusses advanced modern applications of optically stimulated luminescence including the appropriate fundamentals of the process. It features major chapters on the use of OSL in space radiation dosimetry, medical physics, personnel dosimetry, security, solid-state physics and other related applications. In each case, the underlying theory is discussed on an as-needed basis for a complete understanding of the phenomena, but with an emphasis of the practical applications of the technique. After an introductory chapter, Chapters 2 to 6 cover basic theory and practical aspects, personal

  2. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  3. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  4. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  5. Novel luminescent nanoparticles for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ling; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Yanyu; Wang, Lun; Wang, Leyu

    2010-05-01

    Highly luminescent LaF 3:Ce 3+/Tb 3+ nanocrystals were successfully prepared and surface functionalized via Layer-by-Layer technology. These as-prepared nanocrystals are highly resistant to photobleaching and pretty dispersible in aqueous solution. Due to the efficient luminescence quenching of the nanocrystals by nucleic acids, a facile fluorescence quenching method was developed for the detection of trace amount of nucleic acids. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the DNA concentration over the range of 0.60-25.0 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.60-30.0 μg mL -1 for herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limit is 0.21 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.31 μg mL -1 for hs-DNA, respectively. The results indicated that the reported method is simple and rapid with wide linear range. Also, the recovery and relative standard deviation of this method are reasonable and satisfactory.

  6. Biological Activities of a Thai Luminescent Mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn BURAKORN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wild fruit bodies of luminescent mushrooms were collected from wood stumps over a period covering August to October 2011 in the Kosumpisai forest, Mahasarakham province, in the Northeast of Thailand. A study of the morphological and genetic characteristics of the luminescent mushroom suggested that it was Neonothopanus nimbi KS. The fruiting bodies and mycelium of Neonothopanus nimbi KS were assayed for their antimicrobial activities, antifungal activity, inhibitory activity against avian influenza H5N1 neuraminidase (NA, and anticancer activity, using organic solvent extracts. The results showed that only the methanol extract of mycelia was effective against Bacillus sphaericus, with the widest inhibition zone of 11.66±2.71 mm, but this was not effective against the other 3 bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, all of the fruit body extracts were inactive against all four bacteria. The ethylacetate extract of mycelia inhibited the NCI-H187 small lung cancer cell line, KB oral cavity cancer cell line, and the MCF7 breast cancer cell line, including Magnaporthe grisea and Curvularia lunata. The methanol extract of mycelia inhibited the KB oral cavity cell cancer cell line, Magnaporthe grisea, and Curvularia lunata at 96.66, 95.32 and 95.41 %, respectively. The results imply that polar extracts of mycelia are a resource of bioactive compounds, whereas extracts of fruit bodies have less inhibitory activity against cancer, phytopathogenic-fungi and H5N1 neuraminidase.

  7. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  8. Effect of oxygen concentration on singlet oxygen luminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Longchao; Lin, Lisheng; Li, Yirong; Lin, Huiyun; Qiu, Zhihai [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gu, Ying [Department of Laser Medicine, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Buhong, E-mail: bhli@fjnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) is a major phototoxic component in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and its generation is dependent on the availability of tissue oxygen. To examine the effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} detection, two hydrophilic photosensitizer (PS), rose bengal (RB) and meso-metra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMPyP) were used as model PS. Irradiation was carried out using 523 nm under hypoxic (2%, 13%), normoxic (21%) and hyperoxic (65%) conditions. The spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence was measured by near-infrared (NIR) photomultiplier tube (PMT) and camera, respectively. Upon the irradiation, the emission signal mainly consisted of background scattering light, PS fluorescence and phosphorescence, and {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. The PS phosphorescence was evidently dependent on the oxygen concentration and PS type, which resulted in the change of emission profile of {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. This change was further demonstrated on {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence image. The present study suggests that the low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection. - Highlights: • Both spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence measurements were performed. • Effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation was quantitatively evaluated. • Low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection.

  9. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  10. Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter in infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank;

    2013-01-01

    on geological origin and erosion history, but the dosimetry of K-rich feldspar grains extracted from rocks is complicated because the internal dose rate is very dependent on the original feldspar grain size. The in situ grain size information is lost during the crushing process used to separate the grains...... are in agreement with the expected age control, raising the possibility that this signal originates mainly from K-rich feldspar contamination in our Na-rich fractions, and thus is not so useful in the luminescence dating of rock surfaces. On the other hand, the pIRIR290 fading-corrected ages based on the yellow......One of the challenges in dating rock surfaces is the choice of the luminescence mineral. Although quartz is the preferred dosimeter in sediment dating, it is often not sufficiently sensitive when extracted from solid rocks. The intensity of signals from feldspars tends to be much less dependent...

  11. Fast Diagnosis of Gonorrhea Witth Enhanced Luminescence Enzyme Immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Heyi(郑和义); CAO Jingjiang(曹经江); SHAO Yanglin(邵燕玲)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the value of enhanced luminescence enzyme immunoassay in the diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhea(NG) infection.Methods: Anti-catalase antibody for Neisseria gonorrheae combined with enhanced luminescence enzyme immunoassay were used to test for N. Gonorrhea.Results: A minimum of 1x104/CFU of GC in genital tract secretions or urine could be detected with the technique of luminescence enzyme immunoassay.Conclusion : The enhanced luninescence enzyme immunoassay has the advantage of high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing NG from genitourinary tract secretion and urine.

  12. Luminescent Solar Concentrators--a review of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Barnham, Keith W J; Slooff, Lenneke H; Chatten, Amanda J; Büchtemann, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; McCormack, Sarah J; Koole, Rolf; Farrell, Daniel J; Bose, Rahul; Bende, Evert E; Burgers, Antonius R; Budel, Tristram; Quilitz, Jana; Kennedy, Manus; Meyer, Toby; Donegá, C De Mello; Meijerink, Andries; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2008-12-22

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Full-spectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  13. Luminescent Solar Concentrators. A review of recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barnham, K.W.J.; Chatten, A.J.; Farrell, D.J.; Bose, R. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E.; Burgers, A.R.; Budel, T. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Buechtemann, A.; Quilitz, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP, Geiselbergstrasse 69, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Meyer, A.; Meyer, T. [Solaronix SA, Rue de l' Ouriette 129, 1170 Aubonne (Switzerland); McCormack, S.J.; Kennedy, M. [Focas Institute, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Koole, R.; De Mello Donega, C.; Meijerink, C.; Vanmaekelbergh, D. [Chemistry of Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Fullspectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  14. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...... to 560 nm. Two conclusions are drawn: firstly it is suggested that the majority of the trapped charge responsible for the infrared stimulated luminescence signal does not give rise to a thermoluminescence signal, and secondly that a large traction of the two optically stimulated luminescence signals...

  15. Yellow luminescence of gallium nitride generated by carbon defect complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, D O; Diallo, I C; Reshchikov, M A

    2013-02-22

    We demonstrate that yellow luminescence often observed in both carbon-doped and pristine GaN is the result of electronic transitions via the C(N)-O(N) complex. In contrast to common isolated defects, the C(N)-O(N) complex is energetically favorable, and its calculated optical properties, such as absorption and emission energies, a zero phonon line, and the thermodynamic transition level, all show excellent agreement with measured luminescence data. Thus, by combining hybrid density functional theory and experimental measurements, we propose a solution to a long-standing problem of the GaN yellow luminescence.

  16. Luminescence of Speleothems in Italian Gypsum Caves: Preliminary Report

    CERN Document Server

    Shopov, Yavor Y; Forti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence of 3 speleothem samples from the Acquafredda karst system and 1 from the Novella Cave (Gessi Bolognesi Natural Park, Italy) has been recorded using excitation by impulse Xe- lamp. All these carbonate speleothems are believed to be formed only from active CO2 from the air, because the bedrock of the cave consist of gypsum and does not contain carbonates. The obtained photos of luminescence record the climate changes during the speleothem growth. U/Th and 14C dating proved that studied speleothems started to grow since about 5,000 years ago. The detailed analyses of the luminescence records is still in progress.

  17. Control of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2011-05-01

    The velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) is a common deep-sea shark that has been used, in the recent years, as a model for experimental studies on physiological control of shark luminescence. These studies demonstrated that, unlike any other luminous organism, the luminescence of this shark was under a dual control of hormones and neurotransmitters (or neuromodulators). This paper, by making a short review of histological and pharmacological results from these studies, aims to propose a first model of luminescence control in E. spinax.

  18. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  20. Luminescence and the light emitting diode the basics and technology of leds and the luminescence properties of the materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, E W; Pamplin, BR

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence and the Light Emitting Diode: The Basics and Technology of LEDS and the Luminescence Properties of the Materials focuses on the basic physics and technology of light emitting diodes (LEDS) and pn junction lasers as well as their luminescence properties. Optical processes in semiconductors and the useful devices which can be made are discussed. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the crystal structure and growth, as well as the optical and electrical properties of LED materials. The detailed fabrication of the LED is then considered, along with the lu

  1. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  2. Luminescent solar concentrator improvement by stimulated emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Argyros, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) offer the prospect of reducing the cost of solar energy, and are a promising candidate for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, the realization of commercially viable efficiency of LSCs is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. In this work, a method is introduced for reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire length of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption, and directed by the seed laser towards a small target PV cell. A mathematical model of such a system is presented which identifies different physical parameters responsible for the power conversion efficiency and gives the net effective output power.

  3. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  4. Luminescence in crosslinked polyethylene at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamji, S. S.; Bulinski, A. T.; Suzuki, H.; Matsuki, M.; Iwata, Z.

    1993-10-01

    Electrical treeing is often responsible for the breakdown of insulating materials used in power apparatus such as high-voltage transformers, cables, and capacitors. Insulation, such as crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), used in underground high-voltage cables usually operates at temperatures above ambient. This paper describes the characteristics of luminescence, emitted prior to electrical tree inception, at a crosslinked polyethylene-semiconducting material (XLPE-semicon) interface held above room temperature. Use of a sensitive light detection system showed that XLPE subjected to elevated temperatures emits luminescence even without voltage application. This light was attributed to thermoluminescence which decreased with the decrease in the concentration of the crosslinking by-products present in the polymer. The spectra of thermoluminescence were only in the visible range. On the other hand, electroluminescence occurred when the XLPE-semicon interface was held above room temperature and subjected to high electric stress. This light did not depend on the concentration of the crosslinking by-products and the spectra of electroluminescence were in the visible and the ultraviolet ranges. It is proposed that XLPE-semicon interface held at elevated temperature and subjected to long-term voltage application initially emits both thermoluminescence and electroluminescence. As the crosslinking by-products exude out of the polymer, thermoluminescence decreases with time and ultimately ceases, but electroluminescence occurs as long as the voltage is applied to the polymer. Although the intensity of electroluminescence emitted at high temperature was lower than that emitted at ambient, sufficient ultraviolet radiation was emitted. The ultraviolet radiation could photodegrade the polymer and lead to electrical tree inception.

  5. Detection of biological aerosols by luminescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Peter J.; Tieman, Darlene; Coon, Phillip A.; Paterno, Dorothea A.; Milton, Maurice M.

    1999-12-01

    Luciferin-Luciferase (L-L) luminescence techniques were used to successfully measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (pg/ml) in concentrated aerosol samples containing either vegetative bacterial cells or spores. Aerosols were collected with wet and dry sampling devices. Evaluation for the presence of total bio-mass from bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP was achieved by suspending the collected aerosol samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pipeting a 50-(mu) l aliquot of the PBS suspension into a FiltravetteTM, and then adding bacterial releasing agent (BRA). The sample was then reacted with L-L, and the resulting Relative Luminescence Units (RLU's), indicative of ATP from all sources, were measured. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the additional application of a wash with somatic cell releasing agent (SRA) to remove any interferences and non-bacterial sources of ATP prior to BRA application. This step removes interfering substances and non-bacterial sources of ATP. For spore analysis, an equi-volume sample of the PBS suspension was added to an equi-volume of trypticase soy broth (TSB), incubated at 37 C for 15 minutes, and processed using methods identical to bacterial cell analysis. Using these technique we were able to detect Bacillus subtilin variation niger, formerly known as Bacillus globigii (BG), in aerosol samples at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Results of field and chamber trials show that one can detect the presence of bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP. One can also differentiate spore and vegetative bacterial cells. These techniques may be appropriate to situations where the measurement of bacterial aerosols is needed.

  6. Evaluation of defects in cuprous oxide through exciton luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Laszlo, E-mail: jl@laszlofrazer.com [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lenferink, Erik J. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chang, Kelvin B. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The various decay mechanisms of excitons in cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are highly sensitive to defects which can relax selection rules. Here we report cryogenic hyperspectral imaging of exciton luminescence from cuprous oxide crystals grown via the floating zone method showing that the samples have few defects. Some locations, however, show strain splitting of the 1s orthoexciton triplet polariton luminescence. Strain is reduced by annealing. In addition, annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies, which leads to a negative correlation between luminescence of unlike vacancies. - Highlights: • We use luminescence to observe defects in high quality cuprous oxide crystals. • Strain is reduced by annealing. • Annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies.

  7. Luminescence imaging of polymer solar cells: visualization of progressing degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeland, Marco; Roesch, Roland; Hoppe, Harald [Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We apply luminescence imaging as tool for the non-destructive visualization of degradation processes within bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. The imaging technique is based on luminescence detection with a highly sensitive silicon-ccd camera and is able to visualize the with time advancing degradation patterns of polymer solar cells. The devices investigated have been aged under defined conditions and were characterized periodically with current-voltage-sweeps. This allows determining the time evolution of the photovoltaic parameters and - in combination with the luminescence images - understanding differences in the observed degradation behaviour. The versatile usability of the method is demonstrated in a correlation between local reduction of lateral luminescence and a fast decrease of the short-circuit-current due to the loss of active area. Differences in the degradation of photovoltaic parameters under varied aging conditions are discussed.

  8. Thermo-optical properties of optically stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence processes in feldspars are subject to competing thermal enhancement and quenching processes: this article describes the thermal enhancement effects for orthoclase, albite and plagioclase feldspars. It is demonstrated that certain lattice vibrational modes can...

  9. Household and workplace chemicals as retrospective luminescence dosemeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    , there are Other potential unheated crystalline materials found in the domestic and industrial environment which may also act as retrospective dosemeters, and may be considerably more sensitive. We have Surveyed the thermoluminescent and optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) characteristics of several...

  10. Luminescence method for the determination of lorazepam in tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anelchyk, Ganna; Aleksandrova, Darya; Malzev, Georgii; Leonenko, Inna; Yegorova, Alla

    2010-01-01

    New terbium complex of 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H- 1,4-benzdiazepin-2-one (lorazepam, L), which is highly luminescent and do not require luminescence enhancers, is reported. The luminescence intensity of the Tb-L complex was enhanced by the addition of Tergitol 7 in water solution. The Tb-L-Tergitol 7 complex with a components ratio 1:1:2 was proposed to be used as the analytical form for the luminescence determination of drug--lorazepam. The calibration curve is linear in the 0.05-20.0 pg/mL range of lorazepam (LOD is 0.016 microg/mL). This method was applied for the determination of lorazepam in dosage form--tablets "Apo-lorazepam"--2.5 mg.

  11. Optically stimulated luminescence dating at Rose Cottage Cave

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pienaar, M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates are compared with stratigraphically associated C-14 dates from Rose Cottage Cave. The OSL dates overlap the accepted C-14 chronology except for one sample that overestimates the expected age...

  12. The luminescence of titanite (CaTiSiO5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; Dirksen, G.J.; Tanaka, I.; Kojima, H.

    1988-01-01

    The luminescence of CaTiSiO5 crystals is reported. The emission band has its maximum at 520 nm. The results are discussed in connection with titanium compounds containing comparable titanate polyhedra.

  13. NIR emitting ytterbium chelates for colourless luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Alessandro; Monguzzi, Angelo; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Meinardi, Franco; Ronchi, Elisabetta; Moret, Massimo; Cosentino, Ugo; Moro, Giorgio; Simonutti, Roberto; Mauri, Michele; Tubino, Riccardo; Beverina, Luca

    2012-05-14

    A new oxyiminopyrazole-based ytterbium chelate enables NIR emission upon UV excitation in colorless single layer luminescent solar concentrators for building integrated photovoltaics. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  14. Enhancing the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, M. Khalaji; Hanaei, H.; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Saidur, R.; Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Bashiri, Robabeh; Moayedfar, M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in the endeavor to enhance the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented in this paper along with an analysis of LSC devices. In recent years, several experimental and numerical research works have been carried out to improve the performance of LSCs in different ways. LSCs date back to the 1970s and comprise an extremely interesting notion of solar cells for various reasons. First, LSCs are cost-competitive and function in diffuse light, and as such, it is not necessary to use expensive solar tracking devices. Second, luminescence facilitates the cells to gather only cold light, which results in higher PV efficiency. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. The luminescent species absorb incident sunlight and emit it with high quantum efficiency, such that the emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where the solar cells can collect it.

  15. Terbium-doped heavy metal glasses for green luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Zur; J. Pisarska; W.A. Pisarski

    2011-01-01

    Compositional-dependent heavy metal lead borate glasses doped with Tb3+ ior were investigated.Green luminescence related to main 5D4→7F5 (543 nm) transition was registered under excitation of 5D3 state of Tb3+ ions.Based on excitation and luminescence measurements,several spectroscopic parameters for Tb3+ ions were examined as a function of heavy metal PbO content.Luminescence decay analysis indicated that the 5D4 luminescence lifetime of Tb3+ reduced from 2.83 to 1.42 ms,when PbO:B2O3 ratio was changed from 1:1 to 4:1.

  16. Bioactive luminescent transition-metal complexes for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-07-22

    The serendipitous discovery of the anticancer drug cisplatin cemented medicinal inorganic chemistry as an independent discipline in the 1960s. Luminescent metal complexes have subsequently been widely applied for sensing, bio-imaging, and in organic light-emitting diode applications. Transition-metal complexes possess a variety of advantages that make them suitable as therapeutics and as luminescent probes for biomolecules. It is thus highly desirable to develop new luminescent metal complexes that either interact with DNA through different binding modes or target alternative cellular machinery such as proteins as well as to provide a more effective means of monitoring disease progression. In this Review, we highlight recent examples of biologically active luminescent metal complexes that can target and probe a specific biomolecule, and offer insights into the future potential of these compounds for the investigation and treatment of human diseases.

  17. Renewable energy: Better luminescent solar panels in prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debije, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Devices known as luminescent solar concentrators could find use as renewable-energy generators, but have so far been plagued by a major light-reabsorption effect. A new study offers a promising route to tackling this problem.

  18. Introducing an R package for luminescence dating analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Schmidt, Christoph; Fuchs, Margret C.; Dietze, Michael; Fischer, Manfred; Fuchs, Markus

    2012-01-01

    For routine luminescence dating applications the commonly used Risø readers are bundled with analysis software, such as Viewer or Analyst. These software solutions are appropriate for most of the regular dating and publication jobs, and enable assessment of luminescence characteristics and provide basic statistical data treatment. However, for further statistical analysis and data treatments, this software may reach its limits. In such cases, open programmi...

  19. Environmental analysis based on luminescence in organized supramolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Rodriguez, J.J.; Betancort Rodriguez, J.R. [University of Las Palmas de G.C., Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Las Palmas (Spain); Halko, R. [Comenius University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Aaron, J.J. [Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, ITODYS, Paris (France)

    2006-06-15

    The use of organized supramolecular systems - including micellar media and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes - combined with luminescence techniques in the study and determination of compounds and elements of environmental interest from 1990 to 2005 is reviewed. Analyses of environmental samples performed using fluorescence, photochemically induced fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy as well as liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and flow injection with luminescence detection in the presence of these organized media are described in detail. (orig.)

  20. A luminescence enhancement approach through Si/O nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    An Si/O patterned shell array was fabricated by a technique utilizing nanosphere self assembly and reactive pressure pulsed laser deposition.The nanostructure produced by this technique enhanced the luminescence intensity by a factor of three compared with that of a flat film.The amount of enhance-ment observed coincided well with the expected enhancement by simulation.The technique in this paper provided a flexible,designable and compatible approach to luminescence enhancement.

  1. Non-self-absorbing materials for Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraidarov, T.; Levchenko, V.; Grabowska, A.; Borowicz, P.; Reisfeld, R.

    2010-05-01

    The diheptyl-bipyridyl-diol, as a non-self-absorbing fluorescent compound characterized by a large separation between absorption and fluorescence bands, has been incorporated in polyvinyl-butyral film. Steady state luminescence and lifetime were measured. An increase of luminescence intensity by about 34% in the presence of silver nanoparticles was observed. No appreciable changes were found in the corresponding lifetimes. The system is proposed as a potential candidate for increasing the LSC efficiency.

  2. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  3. Luminescence from cavitation bubbles deformed in uniform pressure gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Presented here are observations that demonstrate how the deformation of millimetric cavitation bubbles by a uniform pressure gradient quenches single collapse luminescence. Our innovative measurement system captures a broad luminescence spectrum (wavelength range 300-900 nm) from the individual collapses of laser-induced bubbles in water. By varying the bubble size, driving pressure and the perceived gravity level aboard parabolic flights, we probed the limit from aspherical to highly spheric...

  4. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  5. Luminescence from cavitation bubbles deformed in uniform pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Presented here are observations that demonstrate how the deformation of millimetric cavitation bubbles by a uniform pressure gradient quenches single-collapse luminescence. Our innovative measurement system captures a broad luminescence spectrum (wavelength range, 300-900 nm) from the individual collapses of laser-induced bubbles in water. By varying the bubble size, driving pressure, and perceived gravity level aboard parabolic flights, we probed the limit from aspherical to highly spherical bubble collapses. Luminescence was detected for bubbles of maximum radii within the previously uncovered range, R0=1.5 -6 mm, for laser-induced bubbles. The relative luminescence energy was found to rapidly decrease as a function of the bubble asymmetry quantified by the anisotropy parameter ζ , which is the dimensionless equivalent of the Kelvin impulse. As established previously, ζ also dictates the characteristic parameters of bubble-driven microjets. The threshold of ζ beyond which no luminescence is observed in our experiment closely coincides with the threshold where the microjets visibly pierce the bubble and drive a vapor jet during the rebound. The individual fitted blackbody temperatures range between Tlum=7000 and Tlum=11 500 K but do not show any clear trend as a function of ζ . Time-resolved measurements using a high-speed photodetector disclose multiple luminescence events at each bubble collapse. The averaged full width at half-maximum of the pulse is found to scale with R0 and to range between 10 and 20 ns.

  6. Delayed luminescence of luminol initiated by a membrane-bound peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikariyama, Y; Suzuki, S; Aizawa, M

    1981-09-01

    The luminescense of the luminol-H2O2 system was initiated by either free or membrane-bound horseradish peroxideae (HRP). The instantaneous luminescene decayed rapidly and was followed by the delayed luminescence in the presence of excess luminol. The delayed luminescence was characterized by a chain reaction, in which luminescence intensity increased exponentially. Membrane-bound HRP demonstrated that the delayed luminescence took place even in the absence of HRP if the instantaneous luminescence was initiated by HRP. A mechanism for the nonenzymatic luminescence is proposed and discussed.

  7. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    . Thus, age control on existing 14C ages from this site is limited, chronological interpretation based on the 14C ages is still incomplete in Hodon outcrop sediments. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) is an alternative method for dating to overcome the problems associated with 14C methods. OSL has been extensively used for dating arctic sediments (Thomas et al., 2006; more). Previous optical ages on Darhad paleolake sediments obtained using IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) on feldspars (Gillespie et al., 2008; Batbaatar et al., 2009). Feldspar has much brighter luminescence than quartz, while the OSL signal of feldspars bleaches at least one order of magnitude slower than the OSL signal of quartz (Godfrey-Smith et al., 1988; Huntly and Lamothe, 2001; Mauz and Bungenstock, 2007; Kim et al., 2012). In glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine environments, inadequate bleaching of the OSL signal is known to be a potential problem of burial ages (Thomas et al., 2006). OSL dating of permafrost deposits may also involve uncertainty about the inhomogeneous radiation field surrounding the dosimeter and the absorption of ionizing energy alternately by water and ice in a not-constant pore volume (Haeberli et al., 2003). In this study, we test the applicability of quartz OSL dating for the uppermost paleolake sediments in the Hodon outcrop of the Darhad basin. The OSL results were systematically compared with additional radiocarbon ages from wood fragments to conclude the reliability of the OSL dates and to construct intensive chronology for Late-Pleistocene Darhad paleolake. To evaluate the time of recent expansion of the paleolake, the northern piedmont (Talyn outcrop) of the basin was dated by OSL.

  8. Control of luminescence from pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    The smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) is a dwarf pelagic shark from the Dalatiidae family that harbours thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we studied the organisation and physiological control of these photogenic organs. Results show that they are mainly situated on the ventral side of the shark, forming a homogeneous ventral photogenic area that appears well suited for counterillumination, a well-known camouflage technique of pelagic organisms. Isolated ventral skin patches containing photophores did not respond to classical neurotransmitters and nitric oxide but produced light after melatonin (MT) application. Prolactin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited this hormonally induced luminescence as well as the spontaneous luminescence from the photogenic tissue. The action of MT seems to be mediated by binding to the MT(2) receptor subtype, as the MT(2) receptor agonist 4P-PDOT inhibited the luminescence induced by this hormone. Binding to this receptor probably decreases the intracellular cAMP concentration because forskolin inhibited spontaneous and MT-induced luminescence. In addition, a GABA inhibitory tonus seems to be present in the photogenic tissue as well, as GABA inhibited MT-induced luminescence and the application of bicuculline provoked luminescence from S. aliae photophores. Similarly to what has been found in Etmopteridae, the other luminous shark family, the main target of the luminescence control appears to be the melanophores covering the photocytes. Results suggest that bioluminescence first appeared in Dalatiidae when they adopted a pelagic style at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, and was modified by Etmopteridae when they started to colonize deep-water niches and rely on this light for intraspecific behaviours.

  9. Roles of Eu2+, Dy3+ Ions in Persistent Luminescence of Strontium Aluminates Phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Xingdong; ZHONG Minjuan; WANG Renqin

    2008-01-01

    The polycrystalline Eu2+ and Dy3+ co-doped strontium aluminates SrAl2O4: Eu2+,Dy3+ with different compositions were prepared by solid state reactions. The UV-excited photoluminescence, persistent luminescence and thermo-luminescence were studied and compared. Results show that the doped Eu2+ ion in SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+phosphors works as not only the UV-excited luminescent center but also the persistent luminescent center. The doped Dy3+ ion can hardly yield any luminescence under UV-excitation, but effectively enhance the persistent luminescence and thermo-luminescence of SrAl2O4: Eu2+. Dy3+ co-doping can help form electron traps with appropriate depth due to its suitable electro-negativity, and increase the density and depth of electron traps. Based on above observations, a persistent luminescence mechanism, electron transfer model, is proposed and illustrated.

  10. A REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS OF LUMINESCENCE TO MONITORING OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent analytical literature on the application of luminescence techniques to the measurement of various classes of environmentally significant chemicals has been reviewed. Luminescent spectroscopy based methods are compared to other current techniques. Also, examples of rece...

  11. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  12. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  13. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  14. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  15. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  16. Study of the luminescence properties of a natural amazonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Most gemstones, being natural materials (silicates, carbonates, phosphates, etc.), exhibit luminescence emission. This property could be potentially employed for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism where conventional monitoring has not been established. We, herein, report on the thermoluminescence (TL), radioluminescence (RL) and infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) response of a well-characterised natural amazonite (KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that, due to its bright blue-green colour when polished, is used as a gemstone. The luminescence emission wavelengths, intensities and thermal kinetics of the amazonite luminescence curves reveal that the ultraviolet band measured on amazonite aliquots is similar to other common K-rich feldspars. On this basis, one can conclude (i) association between twinning and the UV-blue TL emission can be related to structural defects located in the twin-domain boundaries where ionic alkali-self-diffusion, irreversible water losses and irreversible dehydroxylation processes can be involved. (ii) Amazonite exhibits a complex structure with several planar defects (twinning and exsolution interphases which can hold hydroxyl groups, water molecules, etc.) and point defects (impurities, Na, Pb, Mn, etc.) that can act as luminescence centres, and in fact, green and red emissions are respectively associated with the presence of Mn and Fe impurities. Finally, (iv) the thermal stability tests performed on the TL emission of the amazonite confirm a continuum in the trap distribution, i.e. progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak.

  17. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Sark W.G.J.H.M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs are being developed as a potentially low cost-per-Wp photovoltaic device, suited for applications especially in the built environment. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species, either organic dye molecules or semiconductor nanocrystals. Direct and diffuse incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted at redshifted wavelengths with high quantum efficiency. Optimum design ensures that a large fraction of emitted light is trapped in the sheet, which travels to the edges where it can be collected by one or more mono- or bifacial solar cells, with minimum losses due to absorption in the sheet and re-absorption by the luminescent species. Today’s record efficieny is 7%, however, 10-15% is within reach. Optimized luminescent solar concentrators potentially offer lower cost per unit of power compared to conventional solar cells. Moreover, LSCs have an increased conversion efficiency for overcast and cloudy sky conditions, having a large fraction of diffuse irradiation, which is blueshifted compared to clear sky conditions. As diffuse irradiation conditions are omnipresent throughout mid- and northern-European countries, annual performance of LSCs is expected to be better in terms of kWh/Wp compared to conventional PV.

  18. Occurrence and Expression of Luminescence in Vibrio cholerae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Christopher J.; Taviani, Elisa; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    Several species of the genus Vibrio, including Vibrio cholerae, are bioluminescent or contain bioluminescent strains. Previous studies have reported that only 10% of V. cholerae strains are luminescent. Analysis of 224 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae collected from Chesapeake Bay, MD, revealed that 52% (116/224) were luminescent when an improved assay method was employed and 58% (130/224) of isolates harbored the luxA gene. In contrast, 334 non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from two rural provinces in Bangladesh yielded only 21 (6.3%) luminescent and 35 (10.5%) luxA+ isolates. An additional 270 clinical and environmental isolates of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 were tested, and none were luminescent or harbored luxA. These results indicate that bioluminescence may be a trait specific for non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains that frequently occur in certain environments. Luminescence expression patterns of V. cholerae were also investigated, and isolates could be grouped based on expression level. Several strains with defective expression of the lux operon, including natural K variants, were identified. PMID:18065611

  19. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  20. Controlling the visible luminescence in hydrothermal ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lem, Laurent L.C.; Phillips, Matthew R.; Ton-That, Cuong, E-mail: Cuong.Ton-That@uts.edu.au

    2014-10-15

    Cathodoluminescence spectra have been measured in hydrothermal and hydrogen-doped ZnO at different excitation densities and temperatures to investigate the emission efficiencies of near-band-edge (NBE), green and yellow luminescence bands. The NBE intensity depends linearly on the electron beam excitation as expected for excitonic recombination character. The intensities of the green and yellow bands are highly dependent not only on the excitation density but also on temperature. At high excitation densities ZnO exhibits dominant green emission at room temperature; the intensity of the green band can be further controlled by doping ZnO with hydrogen, which passivates green luminescence centers. Conversely at small excitation densities (< 0.1 nA) and low temperatures the visible luminescence from ZnO is predominantly yellow due to the abundance of Li in hydrothermal ZnO. The results are explained by differences in the recombination kinetics and the relative concentrations of the green and yellow centers, and illustrate that single-color emission can be achieved in ZnO by adjusting the excitation power and temperature. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal ZnO crystals are analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. • Intensities of luminescence bands are highly dependent on excitation density. • Visible luminescence is influenced by temperature and hydrogen dopants. • Emission efficiencies are explained by recombination kinetics of defects.

  1. Mechanoresponsive Luminescent Molecular Assemblies: An Emerging Class of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Yamane, Shogo; Mitani, Masato; Weder, Christoph; Kato, Takashi

    2016-02-10

    The possibility to change the molecular assembled structures of organic and organometallic materials through mechanical stimulation is emerging as a general and powerful concept for the design of functional materials. In particular, the photophysical properties such as photoluminescence color, quantum yield, and emission lifetime of organic and organometallic fluorophores can significantly depend on the molecular packing, enabling the development of molecular materials with mechanoresponsive luminescence characteristics. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have shown in recent years that mechanical force can be utilized to change the molecular arrangement, and thereby the optical response, of luminescent molecular assemblies of π-conjugated organic or organometallic molecules. Here, the development of such mechanoresponsive luminescent (MRL) molecular assemblies consisting of organic or organometallic molecules is reviewed and emerging trends in this research field are summarized. After a brief introduction of mechanoresponsive luminescence observed in molecular assemblies, the concept of "luminescent molecular domino" is introduced, before molecular materials that show turn-on/off of photoluminescence in response to mechanical stimulation are reviewed. Mechanically stimulated multicolor changes and water-soluble MRL materials are also highlighted and approaches that combine the concept of MRL molecular assemblies with other materials types are presented in the last part of this progress report.

  2. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  3. Water-Triggered Luminescent "Nano-bombs" Based on Supra-(Carbon Nanodots)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, Q.; Qu, S.; Jing, P.; Ji, W.; Li, D.; Cao, J.; Zhang, H.; Liu, L.; Zhao, J.; Shen, D.

    2015-01-01

    Novel luminescent "nano-bombs" based on a self-assembled system of carbon-nanodots, termed supra-CDs, are developed. The luminescence of these luminescent "nano-bombs" depends strongly on water contact; they show weak emission in toluene and decompose in contact with water, resulting in strong

  4. Modelling of optically stimulated luminescence of zircon : assessment of the suitability for dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A.A.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    2006-01-01

    The mineral zircon, ZrSiO4, is a candidate material for optical dating because it exhibits luminescence after exposure to natural radioactivity. The kinetic model of zircon thermally stimulated luminescence proposed before has been modified and used to investigate optically Stimulated luminescence (

  5. Violet stimulated luminescence dating of quartz from Luochuan (Chinese loess plateau)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankjærgaard, C.; Guralnik, B.; Buylaert, J.P.; Reimann, T.; Yi, S.W.; Wallinga, J.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence dating at the Luochuan loess type (China) section is at present limited to ∼0.1 Ma using quartz blue light stimulated luminescence (BLSL), but can be extended back in time to ∼0.5 Ma by resorting to the more developmental post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (post-IR IRSL)

  6. ENERGY-TRANSFER PROCESSES INVOLVING DIFFERENT LUMINESCENCE-CENTERS IN BAF2CE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, R; DORENBOS, P; VANEIJK, CWE; MEIJERINK, A; BLASSE, G; DENHARTOG, HW

    1993-01-01

    The luminescence of cerium-doped barium fluoride crystals has been investigated as a function of wavelength and time. For excitation uv light, x-rays and gamma rays were used. The well known cross luminescence (CL) near 200 nm and self-trapped exciton luminescence (STE) near 300 nm, which are due to

  7. Development of a novel europium complex-based luminescent probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of hypochlorous acid in living samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangli; Guo, Lianying; Song, Bo; Tang, Zhixin; Yuan, Jingli

    2017-03-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes are key reagents used in the time-gated luminescence bioassay technique, but functional lanthanide complexes that can act as luminescent probes for specifically responding to analytes are very limited. In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel Eu3+ complex-based luminescence probe for hypochlorous acid (HOCl), NPPTTA-Eu3+, by using terpyridine polyacid-Eu3+, dinitrophenyl, and hydrazine as luminophore, quencher and HOCl-recognizer moieties, respectively. In the absence of HOCl, the probe is non-luminescent due to the strong luminescence quenching of the dinitrophenyl group in the complex. However, upon reaction with HOCl, the dinitrophenyl moiety is rapidly cleaved from the probe, which affords a strongly luminescent Eu3+ complex CPTTA-Eu3+, accompanied by a ∼900-fold luminescence enhancement with a long luminescence lifetime of 1.41 ms. This unique luminescence response of NPPTTA-Eu3+ to HOCl allowed NPPTTA-Eu3+ to be conveniently used as a probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of HOCl under the time-gated luminescence mode. In addition, by loading NPPTTA-Eu3+ into RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and Daphnia magna, the generation of endogenous HOCl in RAW 264.7 cells and the uptake of exogenous HOCl by Daphnia magna were successfully imaged on a true-color time-gated luminescence microscope. The results demonstrated the practical applicability of NPPTTA-Eu3+ as an efficient probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of HOCl in living cells and organisms.

  8. Activatable Multifunctional Persistent Luminescence Nanoparticle/Copper Sulfide Nanoprobe for in Vivo Luminescence Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jian; Sun, Shao-Kai; Wang, Yong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Wu, Shu-Qi; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2016-12-07

    Multifunctional nanoprobes that provide diagnosis and treatment features have attracted great interest in precision medicine. Near-infrared (NIR) persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are optimal materials due to no in situ excitation needed, deep tissue penetration, and high signal-to-noise ratio, while activatable optical probes can further enhance signal-to-noise ratio for the signal turn-on nature. Here, we show the design of an activatable multifunctional PLNP/copper sulfide (CuS)-based nanoprobe for luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy in vivo. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-specific peptide substrate (H2N-GPLGVRGC-SH) was used to connect PLNP and CuS to build a MMP activatable system. The nanoprobe not only possesses ultralow-background for in vivo luminescence imaging due to the absence of autofluorescence and optical activatable nature but also offers effective photothermal therapy from CuS nanoparticles. Further bioconjugation of c(RGDyK) enables the nanoprobe for cancer-targeted luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy. The good biocompatibility and the multiple functions of highly sensitive tumor-targeting luminescence imaging and effective photothermal therapy make the nanoprobe promising for theranostic application.

  9. Enhanced luminescence in Er-doped Si nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the effect of Er ions on the luminescence of the 1-nm and 2.9-nm Si particles in solution. Under UV illumination, the 1-nm and 2.9-nm Si particles are known to have broadband luminescence in the blue and red region, respectively. We observed an enhancement in the luminescence of the particles with increasing concentration of Er ions. We discuss the result in terms of doping of the nanoparticles with Er ions. Preliminary DFT calculation shows that the ion can form a stable state just inside the particle. In this state, the electric field of the Er ion changes the bond length of the dimers, which are believed to be responsible for the optical activity of the particles.

  10. Applications of quantum dots with upconverting luminescence in bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunyun; Liang, Hong

    2014-06-05

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted great attention in recent years due to their promising applications in bioimaging. Compared with traditional ultraviolet excitation of QDs, near-infrared laser (NIR) excitation has many advantages, such as being less harmful, little blinking effects, zero autofluorescence and deep penetration in tissue. Composing QDs with upconverting properties is promising to enable NIR excitation. This article provides a review of QDs with upconverting luminescence and their applications in bioimaging. Based on the mechanisms of luminescence, discussion will be divided into four groups: nanoheterostructures/mixtures of QDs and upconverting nanoparticles, graphene quantum dots, lanthanide-doped QDs, and double QDs. The content includes synthetic routes, upconverting luminescence properties, and their applications in bioimaging.

  11. Stimulated luminescence emission from localized recombination in randomly distributed defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Guralnik, Benny; Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer

    2012-01-01

    We present a new kinetic model describing localized electronic recombination through the excited state of the donor (d) to an acceptor (a) centre in luminescent materials. In contrast to the existing models based on the localized transition model (LTM) of Halperin and Braner (1960 Phys. Rev. 117...... that evolves only in the temporal domain. An excellent agreement is observed between thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) results produced from the two models. In comparison to the first-order kinetic behaviour of the LTM of Halperin and Braner (1960 Phys. Rev. 117 408–15), our model...... results in a highly asymmetric TL peak; this peak can be understood to derive from a continuum of several first-order TL peaks. Our model also shows an extended power law behaviour for OSL (or prompt luminescence), which is expected from localized recombination mechanisms in materials with random...

  12. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz as a result of annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Mejdahl, V.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders of magni......Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders...... of magnitude less per unit radiation than that for heated material. The reason these temperature-induced sensitivity changes occur in quartz is presently not well understood. This phenomenon is also seen in the related area of luminescence dating in which sedimentary quartz and quartz from heated...

  13. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it; Salomon, J. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.C. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Tonezzer, M. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Della Mea, G. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  14. Electric Field Oriented Nanostructured Organic Thin Films with Polarized Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbovnyk, I D; Olenych, I; Kukhta, I N; Lugovskii, A; Sasnouski, G; Chutora, T; Luchechko, A P; Khalakhan, I; Kukhta, A

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the external electric field of 10(5) V/m on the ordering of two luminescent liquid crystalline molecules (1-pentyl-2(/),3(/)-difluoro-3(///)-methyl-4(////)-octyl-p-quinguephenyl and 9,10-Bis (4-pentylphenylethynyl)antracene) during thermal vacuum deposition is studied. The morphology, electrical conductivity, optical absorption, luminescence spectra, and polarization are presented and analyzed. All data show the formation of ordered films. The polarization degree is 60% for 1-pentyl-2(/),3(/)-difluoro-3(///)-methyl-4(////)-octyl-p-quinguephenyl oriented films and 28% for 9,10-Bis (4-pentylphenylethynyl)antracene. The lower value of M2 luminescence polarization can be explained by the absence of dipole moment in this molecule.

  15. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  16. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Lipatova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been found to be dependent on the registration wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm. Obtained fluorophosphate glasses with CdS quantum dots can find their application as fluorescent materials with intensive luminescence band and long excited-state natural lifetime.

  17. Nanophosphor aluminum oxide: Luminescence response of a potential dosimetric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Michael W., E-mail: mblair@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jacobsohn, Luiz G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, and the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); Tornga, Stephanie C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ugurlu, Ozan [Characterization Facility, Institute of Technology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bennett, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yukihara, Eduardo G. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-05-15

    This work reports on the investigation of the radiation dosimetry properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders. Samples were produced by solution combustion synthesis using three different organic fuels to check for the effect of synthesis conditions on the properties of interest. Luminescence characteristics were studied by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques. We found that samples produced using urea have characteristics similar to bulk Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and may be suitable for personal dosimetry, while samples produced using glycine and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) may be more suitable for applications where fast OSL decay is advantageous. While these results are promising and warrant further investigation, much has to be done to overcome the greatly decreased luminescence intensity of the nanomaterials as compared to bulk Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  18. Luminescence from wide band gap materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, S. L.; Senapati, S.; Nanda, K. K.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ZnO and In2O3 microcrystals as an optical probe for wide range thermometry. Both ZnO and In2O3 microcrystals exhibit a monotonic decrease in luminescence intensities with increase in temperature. The variation has been explored to develop a thermometer in a wide temperature range. We also demonstrate enhanced brightness from broad-luminescent-wide band gap materials when sensitized with low band gap CdTe quantum dots. Wide band gap materials act as acceptors, while CdTe act as donors. One of the major implications is the designing of weak-luminescent-wide-band gap materials as bright white light emitting phosphors that can convert the ultraviolet into visible light. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November, 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  19. Enhancement of quantum dot luminescence in all-dielectric metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Khardikov, Vyacheslav V

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple design of all-dielectric silicon-based planar metamaterial manifested an extremely sharp resonant reflection and transmission in the wavelength of about 1550 nm due to both low dissipative losses and involving a trapped mode operating method. The quality factor of the resonance exceeds in tens times the quality factor of resonances in known plasmonic structures. The designed metamaterial is envisioned for aggregating with a pumped active medium to achieve an enhancement of luminescence and to produce an all-dielectric analog of a "lasing spaser". We report that an essential enhancement (more than 500 times) of luminescence of layer contained pumped quantum dots may be achieved by using the designed metamaterial. This value exceeds manyfold the known luminescence enhancement by plasmonic planar metamaterials.

  20. Defect luminescence in CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonyak, O.T., E-mail: o.antonyak@gmail.com [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8 Kyryla i Mefodiya Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Vistovskyy, V.V.; Zhyshkovych, A.V. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8 Kyryla i Mefodiya Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Kravchuk, I.M. [Lviv Politechnic National University, 12 S. Bandery Street, 79000 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-11-15

    The stationary X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) spectra at 80 and 294 K as well as the thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) in the 80–320 K range of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles with various grain sizes (20–60 nm) were studied. Similarly to the earlier studied single CaF{sub 2} crystals, specific bands were revealed both for XEL and for TSL of the radiation defects. XEL spectra of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles contain emission bands in the 240–500 nm region caused by excitonic-like excitations localized at the radiation defects of the CaF{sub 2} lattice as well as recombination luminescence band at 560 nm. TSL integral curves of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles contain peaks that correspond to the delocalization of the hole centers and to their recombination with F-centers and with electronic centers of the cationic sublattice. Activation energies of delocalization processes of the hole centers were determined. It was established that the light output of both XEL and TSL of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles increases with an increase of size of nanoparticles in the region of 20–50 nm. - Highlights: • X-ray excited and the thermo stimulated luminescence of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles were studied. • The specific luminescence bands of the radiation defects were revealed. • Activation energies of delocalization processes of the hole centers were determined. • The dependence of the luminescence output on nanoparticle grain size were established.

  1. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Cherry, Simon R; Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C J; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S; Kinahan, Paul E

    2015-12-01

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10-13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector's dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could be

  2. Ion irradiation effect of alumina and its luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; My, N.T.

    1997-03-01

    The luminescence spectra of single crystalline alpha-alumina and ruby which has 0.02% of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a impurity, induced by 200 keV He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation were measured at room temperature as a function of irradiation dose. The analysis of the measured spectra showed the existence of three main luminescence features in the wavelength region of 250 to 350 nm, namely anionic color centers, F-center at 411 nm and F{sup +}-center at 330 nm and a band observed around 315 nm. As alpha-alumina was irradiated with He{sup +}, F-center and F{sup +}-center luminescence grew and decayed, but the behaviors of those were different from each other. It seems that a concentration quenching occurred on the F-center luminescence in the dose range above 1x10{sup 14} He/cm{sup 2}. Furthermore, F-center luminescence was strongly suppressed in ruby, compared with that in alumina. On the other hand, the luminescence band around 315 nm appeared only in the early stage of irradiation and did not show its growth part. The dose dependent behavior was similar to that of Cr{sup 3+} emission at 695 nm (R-line) in ruby in both cases of He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation. Based on the experimental results mentioned above, the processes of defect formation and excitation in alumina in the early stage of ion irradiation will be discussed. (author)

  3. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  4. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [MNCN-CSIC, c/ J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Rivera, T. [CICATA-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or{sub 1}Ab{sub 99}. Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na{sup +} ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti{sup 4+}. The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  5. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, N. A.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Shtel`makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-01

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  6. Luminescence dating of Late Quaternary sediments from East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, V.; Funder, Svend Visby

    1994-01-01

    Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow-marine/coastal-fluvial and ......Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow...

  7. Defect luminescence of ordered perovskites A2BWO6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, J.H.G.; Oosterhout, A.B. van

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes luminescence spectra of ordered perovskites of the type A2BWO6. The compounds A2MgWO6 show two different emission bands. From the Raman spectra of Ba2MgWO6 and Ba2CaWO6 and from luminescence experiments on Ba2Na0.8W1.2O6 and Ba2Ca0.95Na0.04W1.01 it is concluded that there is a s

  8. Recent Progress on Nanoscale Rare Earth Luminescent Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The size of nanoscale rare earth luminescent materials is often smaller than that of the excitement or emission wavelength,and it has amazing surface state density. Therefore,it shows a lot of new luminescent phenomena such as the shift of CTS,the broadening of emission peaks,the variation of fluorescent lifetimes and quantum efficiency,and the increase of quenching concentration.It is not only of academic interest but also of technological importance for advanced phosphor applications to rese...

  9. Visible luminescence from triethanolamine-modified zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, N.; Barik, P.; Kundu, T. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report sol-gel synthesis of ZnO NPs in support of Triethanolamine (TEA) molecules. The particle sizes lie in the range of 23 nm - 43 nm. The blue-shift in absorption spectra for all powders is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. ZnO nanopowder annealed at higher temperature shows an enhanced visible luminescence. In comparison, ZnO specimens having large grain size which are prepared without using TEA do not show any emission with significant intensity. An energy band diagram of nanostructured ZnO specimens explains the luminescence results.

  10. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg, Russia and Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shtel' makh, K. F. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg, Russia and St. Petersburg State Technical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V. I. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China)

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  11. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with molecular cadmium selenide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobkova, E. V.; Kukushkin, D. S.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Shakhverdov, T. A.

    2015-02-01

    It is experimentally shown that, prior to the formation of CdSe quantum dots in fluorophosphate glasses with cadmium and selenium ions in the process of synthesis, subnanosized molecular clusters (CdSe) n are formed, which exhibit luminescence in the visible spectral region upon UV excitation. Heat treatment of the glasses increases the size of molecular clusters and makes their optical properties closer to the optical properties of CdSe semiconductor quantum dots. An increase in the sample temperature from 20 to 250°C leads to reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence.

  12. Luminescence dating of Late Quaternary sediments from East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, V.; Funder, Svend Visby

    1994-01-01

    Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow-marine/coastal-fluvial and ......Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow...

  13. Defect luminescence of ordered perovskites A2BWO6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, J.H.G.; Oosterhout, A.B. van

    This paper describes luminescence spectra of ordered perovskites of the type A2BWO6. The compounds A2MgWO6 show two different emission bands. From the Raman spectra of Ba2MgWO6 and Ba2CaWO6 and from luminescence experiments on Ba2Na0.8W1.2O6 and Ba2Ca0.95Na0.04W1.01 it is concluded that there is a

  14. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE GLASSES WITH CERIUM IONS AND ANTIMONY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Klykova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the results of an experimental study of luminescence excitation spectra and luminescence of silicate glasses containing cerium ions and antimony. The aim of this work was to study the features of the luminescence and the effect of UV irradiation and heat treatment on luminescence and the state of cerium ions and antimony in glass. We investigated glass system Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2-NaF-NaBr with additives CeO2 and Sb2O3. Synthesis was carried out in platinum crucibles in the air at 14500C. The samples were polished glass plates with a thickness of 0.5-1 mm. UV irradiation was carried out with a mercury lamp having a wide range of radiation in the spectral range 240-390 nm. It was conducted in a Nabertherm muffle furnaces. Luminescence spectra and excitation spectra were measured using a spectrofluorimeter MPF-44A (PerkinElmer at the room temperature. Measured luminescence spectra were corrected in view of the spectral sensitivity of the photodetector for spectrofluorimeter. Adjustment of the excitation spectra for the spectral dependence of the intensity of the excitation source was not carried out. During the experiments it was found that in silicate glasses Sb3+ ions can exist in two energy states, which corresponds to a different environment with oxygen ions. Heat treatment of these glasses in an oxidizing atmosphere leads to an increase in ion concentration of Sb3+ ions with a greater amount of oxygen in the environment. In glasses containing antimony and cerium ions, ultraviolet irradiation causes a change in the valence of cerium ions and antimony, which is accompanied by luminescence quenching. Subsequent heat treatment of glass leads to the inverse processes and restore luminescence excitation spectra. The study of fluorescent properties of silicate glasses with cerium and antimony ions led to the conclusion of the practical significance of this work. Promising multifunctional materials can be created on the basis of

  15. Luminescent properties of diamond single crystals of pyramidal shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, A. M.; Tuyakova, F. T.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Korostylev, E. V.; Klinov, D. V.; Prusakov, K. A.; Malykhin, S. A.; Ismagilov, R. R.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    The luminescence properties of needle-like crystals of diamond, obtained by selective oxidation of textured polycrystalline diamond films, are studied. Diamond films were grown by chemical vapor deposition from a methane-hydrogen mixture activated by a DC discharge. The spectra of photo- and cathodoluminescence and the spatial distribution of the intensity of radiation at different wavelengths are obtained for individual needle-like crystals. Based on the spectral characteristics, conclusions are made about the presence of optically active defects containing nitrogen and silicon impurities in their structure, as well as the significant effect of structural defects on their luminescence spectra.

  16. Luminescence behavior of Dy 3+ ions in lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna

    2009-10-01

    Dy-doped lead borate glasses were studied. The luminescence spectra showed two characteristic bands at 480 and 573 nm due to 4F 9/2- 6H 15/2 (blue) and 4F 9/2- 6H 13/2 (yellow) transitions of Dy 3+. The yellow/blue luminescence of trivalent dysprosium was analyzed as a function of the B 2O 3/PbO ratios, the activator (Dy 3+) and the PbX 2 (X = F, Cl, Br) content.

  17. Physico-chemical characterizations of Cr doped persistent luminescence nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, T.; Teston, E.; Maldiney, T.; Scherman, D.; Richard, C.

    2016-03-01

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles have recently been proposed as innovative optical probes for small animal in vivo imaging. The main advantage of such probes is their ability to emit light for a long time after the end of their excitation, allowing in vivo imaging with low background. This work reports new information on the physico-chemical characterizations of Cr doped ZnGa2O4 nanoprobes in terms of synthetic procedure, luminescence properties as well as colloidal stabilities in different aqueous media and over the time.

  18. Investigation of defect luminescence from multicrystalline Si wafer solar cells using X-ray fluorescence and luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peloso, Matthew P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Palina, Natalie; Hidayat, Hidayat; Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka; Breese, Mark B.H. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells reveal performance- reducing defects by luminescence. X-ray fluorescence spectra are used to investigate the elemental constituents from regions of solar cells yielding reverse-bias or sub-bandgap luminescence from defects. It is found that a higher concentration of metals is present in regions yielding reverse-bias electroluminescence than in regions yielding sub-bandgap electroluminescence. This suggests, dislocations do not create strong breakdown currents in the absence of impurity precipitates. (a) Topographies of sub-bandgap (red) and reverse-bias (blue) luminescence from defects in a multicrystalline Si wafer solar cell. (b) Their distinct X-ray spectra indicate highest concentrations of metals in the blue regions. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er core@shell monodisperse nanoparticles and their subsequent ligand exchange in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhenli; Du, Sinan; Luo, Yang; Liao, Zhijian; Zuo, Fang, E-mail: polymerzf@swun.cn; Luo, Jianbin; Liu, Dong

    2016-08-15

    Graphical abstract: An efficient hydrothermal method was used to fabricate the superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Mn{sup 2(*)+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanoparticles (NPs) with core@shell structures through a seed-growth procedure. Then using PEG phosphate ligand to displace oleate from the as-synthesized NPs, hydrophilic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er NPs with good water solubility are obtained. - Highlights: • Homogeneous size distribution of magnetic-upconversion core@shell structured nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized. • The core@shell nanostructures were obtained by seed-growth method. • The oleic acid coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were used as seeds and cores. • The magnetic-upconversion NPs emitted red luminescence under a 980 nm laser. • Synthesized magnetic-upconversion NPs were phase transferred using ligand exchange process. - Abstract: We report the use of an efficient hydrothermal method to synthesize superparamagnetic and red luminescent bifunctional Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er nanoparticles (NPs) with core@shell structures via a seed-growth procedure. Oleic acid coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (OA-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) NPs were initially synthesized using a coprecipitation method. The as-synthesized OA-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs were then used as seeds, on which the red upconversion luminescent shell (Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er) was formed. Furthermore, hydrophobic to hydrophilic surface modification of the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb/Er NPs was achieved via a ligand exchange method where oleic acid was displaced by a PEG phosphate ligand [PEG = poly(ethylene glycol)]. These materials were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} cores were uniformly coated with a Mn{sup 2+}-doped NaYF{sub 4}:Yb

  20. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Near-Infrared and Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, Jogender; Wolfe, Doug E.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that TBC delamination can be monitored by incorporating a thin luminescent sublayer that produces greatly increased luminescence intensity from delaminated regions of the TBC. Initial efforts utilized visible-wavelength luminescence from either europium or erbium doped sublayers. This approach exhibited good sensitivity to delamination of electron-beam physical-vapor-deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs, but limited sensitivity to delamination of the more highly scattering plasma-sprayed TBCs due to stronger optical scattering and to interference by luminescence from rare-earth impurities. These difficulties have now been overcome by new strategies employing near-infrared (NIR) and upconversion luminescence imaging. NIR luminescence at 1550 nm was produced in an erbium plus ytterbium co-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent sublayer using 980-nm excitation. Compared to visible-wavelength luminescence, these NIR emission and excitation wavelengths are much more weakly scattered by the TBC and therefore show much improved depth-probing capabilities. In addition, two-photon upconversion luminescence excitation at 980 nm wavelength produces luminescence emission at 562 nm with near-zero fluorescence background and exceptional contrast for delamination indication. The ability to detect TBC delamination produced by Rockwell indentation and by furnace cycling is demonstrated for both EB-PVD and plasma-sprayed TBCs. The relative strengths of the NIR and upconversion luminescence methods for monitoring TBC delamination are discussed.

  1. Design and synthesis of a new terbium complex-based luminescent probe for time-resolved luminescence sensing of zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Yunna; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent probes/chemosensors based on lanthanide complexes have shown great potentials in various bioassays due to their unique long-lived luminescence property for eliminating short-lived autofluorescence with time-resolved detection mode. In this work, we designed and synthesized a new dual-chelating ligand {4'-[N,N-bis(2-picolyl)amino]methylene-2,2':6',2'-terpyridine-6,6'-diyl} bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (BPTTA), and investigated the performance of its Tb(3+) complex (BPTTA-Tb(3+)) for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of Zn(2+) ions in aqueous media. Weakly luminescent BPTTA-Tb(3+) can rapidly react with Zn(2+) ions to display remarkable luminescence enhancement with high sensitivity and selectivity, and such luminescence response can be realized repeatedly. Laudably, the dose-dependent luminescence enhancement shows a good linear response to the concentration of Zn(2+) ions with a detection limit of 4.1 nM. To examine the utility of the new probe for detecting intracellular Zn(2+) ions, the performance of BPTTA-Tb(3+) in the time-resolved luminescence imaging of Zn(2+) ions in living HeLa cells was investigated. The results demonstrated the applicability of BPTTA-Tb(3+) as a probe for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of intracellular Zn(2+) ions.

  2. Ytterbium-porphyrins as a new class of the luminescent labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvirko, M [Institute of Chemistry and Environmental Protection, Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 Armii Krajowej Av., Czestochowa (Poland); Korovin, Yu [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine); Rusakova, N [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine)

    2007-08-15

    New complexes of ytterbium with asymmetric porphyrins containing substituents in {beta}-positions and hydrophobic meso-(monophenyl-p-oxypropyl)triphenylporphyrin (OPP) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Electronic absorption, luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra of these complexes were studied at 295 K in DMF solutions and in the water-lecithin medium. The 4f-luminescence of ytterbium-porphyrins in the near infrared (IR) spectral region ({lambda}{sub max} = 980 nm) is observed under excitation in Soret band (400-430 nm). The effect of substituent in porphyrin macroring on the 4f-luminescent properties was also investigated. The conjugates of these compounds with protein molecules - bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated as well. These compounds are interesting at the initial stage of diagnostics of tumor tissues as IR-luminescent probes due to their spectral-luminescent characteristics and some biochemical properties.

  3. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  4. Towards multi-exponential analysis in optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Hansen, Per Christian

    2010-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data from quartz can follow different mathematical forms depending on the stimulation mode. These data can be described in terms of different multi-exponential models and can be numerically fitted using several well-known methods. Here we make a comparative...

  5. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...

  7. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub...

  8. Luminescence behavior and Raman characterization of jade from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer Arslanlar, Y. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Kibar, R.; Cetin, A.; Ayvacikli, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-09-15

    Results are presented for the cathodoluminescence (CL), radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) of jade from Turkey. Jade samples show broad band luminescence from green to red, which, using lifetime-resolved CL, reveals seven overlapping emissions, of which two are dominant. Green emission obtained using spatially resolved CL was associated with Mn{sup 2+} and emission bands centered near at 480 and 530 nm were attributed to {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 3}H{sub 4} and {sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}H{sub 4} transitions of Pr{sup 3+}, respectively. Different shifts of the peak-wavelengths for 326 and 565 nm were observed with varying jade compositions. The incorporation of the larger K ion causes non-linear variations of the cell dimensions and therefore changes in the Fe---O band distance. We suggest that stress of the jade structure can be linked to the luminescence emission at 326 nm. Raman spectra have also been recorded in order to provide an unequivocal identification of the type of jade. The mechanism for the luminescence of the jade is considered. - Highlights: >Jade spectrum displays numerous broad bands at room and low temperatures. >Different luminescence centers contribute to the overall signal. >The Raman spectra and associated vibrational assignments are reported for jadeite. >The TL sensitivity varies depending on the treatment of the samples.

  9. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  10. Characterization of UV written waveguides with luminescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Harpøth, Anders; Rosbirk, Tue

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence microscopy is used to measure the refractive index profile and molecular defect distribution of UV written waveguides with a spatial resolution of ~0.4 mm and high signal-to-noise ratio. The measurements reveal comlex waveguide formation dynamics with significant topological changes...

  11. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  12. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. From fundamentals to bioapplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao; Liu, Yongsheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China). Fujian Inst. of Research on the Structure of Matter

    2014-07-01

    Covers the frontiers in chemistry, physics and bioapplications of lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. Presents new insights into the optical behaviors of lanthanide in nanomaterials. Systematically reviews in-vitro biodetection and bioimaging based on lanthanide-doped inorganic nanocrystals. Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the subject.

  13. Luminescence properties of porcelain ceramics relevant to restrospective radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1996-01-01

    . This appears to arise from the fact that OSL is potentially stimulated in a variety of component phases of the ceramic, and these phases vary from sample to sample. This article reports an initial attempt at characterising the luminescence properties of widely available porcelain wares manufactured under...

  14. Progress on Study of Luminescence of Rare Earth Organic Chelates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕生; 安保礼; 龚孟濂; 史华红; 雷衡毅; 孟建新

    2002-01-01

    Based on the investigation of the luminescence of a series of rare earth organic chelates, some relationships between luminescence and the structure of the chelates were proposed: the intensity of sensitized luminescence of central lanthanide ions(Ln3+) in a rare earth organic chelate depends on (1)the suitability of the energy gap between the excited triplet energy level of the ligands and the lowest excited energy level of Ln3+ ions; (2)the rigidity and planarity of the structure of the chelate molecule; (3)the existence of a suitable secondary ligand which may increase rigidity and the stability of the chelate molecule; and (4) the existence of a suitable π-conjugated system in the chelate molecule. According to the above relationships, 25 novel organic ligands were designed and synthesized, and their lanthanide chelates were prepared. Investigation of the photoluminescence for the new chelates shows that some of the chelates are strongly luminescent, and are applied to fluoroimmunoassay for determination of human immunoglobulin(IgG), to preparation of fluorescent plastics, and to determination of growth hormone for plants. Two novel spectroscopy-probe techniques for structure of coordination compounds and biological molecules were proposed and developed based on vibronic spectroscopy of Tb3+ complexes and fluorescence of Ce3+.

  15. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay measurement

  16. The luminescence properties of MgUO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Krol, D.M.; Blasse, G.

    1979-01-01

    The luminescence of MgUO4 has been investigated. Emission and excitation spectra as well as the decay time and the quantum efficiency of the emission were measured at 4.2 K. The temperature dependence of the emission spectrum and the emission intensity was studied. The results show that in MgUO4 the

  17. On the luminescence of bis (triphenylphosphine) phenanthroline copper (I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; McMillin, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The luminescence spectra and decay tunes of the emission of the [Cu(PPh3)2(phen)]+ ion have been measured down to liquid helium temperature. The long decay time at low temperatures is interpreted in terms of the triplet level of the charge- transfer state.

  18. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety...

  19. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Multilayered crystalline nanofibers are exemplary model system for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. The multi-layered nanofibers are composed of alternating layers of two...

  20. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution...

  1. Polyphenylene Dendrimers with Perylene Diimide as a Luminescent Core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Andreas; Weil, Tanja; Sinigersky, Veselin; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Vosch, Tom; Hofkens, Johan; Schryver, Frans C. De; Müllen, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    A novel synthesis is presented of a fourfold ethynyl-substituted perylene diimide dye 4, which acts as a core molecule for the buildup of polyphenylene dendrimers. Around the luminescent core 4, a first-generation (5), a second-generation (6), and a third-generation (7) polyphenylene dendritic envir

  2. Luminescent 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone chelates of lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide; Moore, Evan G.; Werner, Eric J.

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides luminescent complexes between a lanthanide ion and an organic ligand which contains 1,2-hydroxypyridinone units. The complexes of the invention are stable in aqueous solutions and are useful as molecular probes, for example in medical diagnostics and bioanalytical assay systems. The invention also provides methods of using the complexes of the invention.

  3. Static and dynamic quenching of luminescent species in polymer media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, P; Leiner, M J; Lippitsch, M E

    1994-12-01

    A method developed for quantitative determination of static and dynamic contributions to luminescence quenching is applied to Ru(II) complexes in polymer matrices (silica gel and polystyrene), quenched by oxygen. This method is based on both intensity and lifetime quenching experiments. The curvature of intensity Stern-Volmer plots is related to the results.

  4. Luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.; Wuister, S.F.; Kelly, J.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn^(2+) prepared via an inorganic chemical synthesis are described. Photoluminescence spectra show distinct ZnSe and Mn^(2+) related emissions, both of which are excited via the ZnSe host lattice. The Mn^(2+) emission wavelength and the

  5. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay

  6. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  7. Oxygen Luminescence Centers in LiF-MeO Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsyna, L. A.; Suleimen, R. N.

    2017-08-01

    Spectral-kinetic parameters of luminescence of LiF crystals doped with various polyvalent metal oxides (Li, Ti, Fe, W, U) were studied in the temperature range of 100-300 K and the absorbed doses range of 0-105 Gy. A model for describing polyvalent activation cation role in the processes of radiation energy dissipation in the crystal volume is suggested.

  8. Progress in chemical luminescence-based biosensors: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Di Fusco, Massimo; Zangheri, Martina; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Barbara; Simoni, Patrizia

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors are a very active research field. They have the potential to lead to low-cost, rapid, sensitive, reproducible, and miniaturized bioanalytical devices, which exploit the high binding avidity and selectivity of biospecific binding molecules together with highly sensitive detection principles. Of the optical biosensors, those based on chemical luminescence detection (including chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and thermochemiluminescence) are particularly attractive, due to their high-to-signal ratio and the simplicity of the required measurement equipment. Several biosensors based on chemical luminescence have been described for quantitative, and in some cases multiplex, analysis of organic molecules (such as hormones, drugs, pollutants), proteins, and nucleic acids. These exploit a variety of miniaturized analytical formats, such as microfluidics, microarrays, paper-based analytical devices, and whole-cell biosensors. Nevertheless, despite the high analytical performances described in the literature, the field of chemical luminescence biosensors has yet to demonstrate commercial success. This review presents the main recent advances in the field and discusses the approaches, challenges, and open issues, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing chemical luminescence biosensors and improving their commercial exploitation.

  9. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety of n......, and unseparated materials such as bricks and porcelain items....

  10. Quantifying self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Kate, Otmar M; Hooning, Koen M; van der Kolk, Erik

    2014-08-10

    Analytical equations quantifying self-absorption losses in circular luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented that can easily be solved numerically by commercial math software packages. With the quantum efficiency, the absorption and emission spectra of a luminescent material, the LSC dimensions, and the refractive index as the only input parameters, the model gives an accurate account of the decrease of LSC efficiency due to self-absorption as a function of LSC radius, thickness, and luminescence quantum efficiency. Results give insight into how many times light is reabsorbed and reemitted, the red shift of the emission spectrum, and on how multiple reabsorptions and reemissions are distributed over the LSC. As an example case the equations were solved for a circular LSC containing a Lumogen F Red 305 dye with 80% luminescence quantum efficiency, and it follows that for an LSC with a 50 cm radius the self-absorption reduces the number of photons reaching the LSC edge by a factor of four compared to the case when there would be no self-absorption. The equations can just as well be solved for any material for which the optical properties are known like type I and type II quantum dots.

  11. High Stokes shift perylene dyes for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Alessandro; Sassi, Mauro; Turrisi, Riccardo; Ruffo, Riccardo; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Meinardi, Francesco; Beverina, Luca

    2013-02-25

    Highly efficient plastic based single layer Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) require the design of luminophores having complete spectral separation between absorption and emission spectra (large Stokes shift). We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a new perylene dye possessing Stokes shift as high as 300 meV, fluorescent quantum yield in the LSC slab of 70% and high chemical and photochemical stability.

  12. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  13. Luminescent 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone chelates of lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide; Moore, Evan G.; Werner, Eric J.

    2013-10-15

    The present invention provides luminescent complexes between a lanthanide ion and an organic ligand which contains 1,2-hydroxypyridinone units. The complexes of the invention are stable in aqueous solutions and are useful as molecular probes, for example in medical diagnostics and bioanalytical assay systems. The invention also provides methods of using the complexes of the invention.

  14. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  15. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  16. Phthalamide lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  17. Systematic development of new thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G., E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Milliken, E.D.; Oliveira, L.C. [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Orante-Barron, V.R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico (Mexico); Jacobsohn, L.G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Blair, M.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of a systematic study to develop new thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials using solution combustion synthesis (SCS) for applications such as personal OSL dosimetry, 2D dose mapping, and temperature sensing. A discussion on the material requirements for these applications is included. We present X-ray diffraction (XRD) data on single phase materials obtained with SCS, as well as radioluminescence (RL), TL and OSL data of lanthanide-doped materials. The results demonstrate the possibility of producing TL and OSL materials with sensitivity similar to or approaching those of commercial TL and OSL materials used in dosimetry (e.g., LiF:Mg,Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) using SCS. The results also show that the luminescence properties can be improved by Li co-doping and annealing. The presence of an atypical TL background and anomalous fading are discussed and deserve attention in future investigations. We hope that these preliminary results on the use of SCS for production of TL and OSL materials are helpful to guide future efforts towards the development of new luminescence materials for different applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL and OSL material produced with sensitivity similar to commercial materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence properties improved by Li co-doping and annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of atypical TL background and anomalous fading observed.

  18. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  19. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  20. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  1. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  2. The multiphoton ultraviolet and visible upconversion luminescence of ZBLAN material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Song, Zengfu; Wang, Yafei; Xiong, Jun; Yang, Guojiian; Li, Song; Zhou, Jing; Peng, Fanglin; Zhou, Gu

    2008-03-01

    The multiphoton ultraviolet and visible upconversion luminescence of Tm 3+Yb 3+ codoped ZBLAN fluoride glass as excited by a 975nm diode laser was studied. Two typical ultraviolet 290.6nm 1I 6 -> 3H 6 and 362.0nm 1D II -> 3H 6 upconversion luminescence lines were found. The careful measurement of the variation of upconversion luminescence intensity F as a function of the 975nm pumping laser power P has proven that the 290.6nm 1I 6 -> 3H 6 and 362.0nm 1D II -> 3H 6 upconversion luminescences are a six-photon and a five-photon upconversion luminescence respectively. Several visible upconversion luminescence lines at 450.5nm, 473.9nm, 648.5nm, (687.3nm, 696.2nm) and (793.5nm, 800.7nm) were found also, which result from the fluorescence transitions of 1D II -> 3F 4, 1G 4 -> 3H6, 1G 4 -> 3F 4, 3F 3 -> 3H 6 and 3H 4 -> 3H 6 of Tm 3+ ion respectively. It has been proved that the upconversion luminescence of 1G 4 state is a three-photon upconversion process, while that of 3F 3 or 3H 4 state is a two-photon upconversion process. The theoretical analysis suggests that the upconversion mechanism of the 362.0nm 1D II -> Tm 3+ upconversion luminescence is the cross energy transfer of { 3H 4(Tm 3+) -> 3F 4(Tm 3+), 1G 4(Tm 3+) -> 1D II(Tm 3+)} and {1G 4(Tm 3+) -> 3F 4(Tm 3+), 3H 4(Tm 3+) -> 1D II(Tm 3+)} between Tm 3+ ions, whereas the mechanism of the 290.6nm 1I 6 -> 3H 6 upconversion luminescence is the sequential energy transfer of {2F 5/2(Yb 3+) -> 2F 7/2(Yb 3+), 1D II(Tm 3+) -> 3P I(Tm 3+)} and {2F 5/2(Yb3+) -> 2F 7/2(Yb 3+), 1D II(Tm 3+) -> 3P II(Tm 3+)} from Yb 3+ ions to Tm 3+ ions. In addition, the upconversion luminescence of G 4 and 3H 4 state also results from the sequential energy transfer {2F 5/2(Yb 3+) -> 2F 7/2(Yb 3+), 3H 4(Tm 3+) -> 1G 4(Tm 3+)} and {2F 5/2(Yb 3+) -> 2F 7/2(Yb 3+), 3F 4(Tm 3+) -> 3F II(Tm 3+)} from Yb 3+ ions to Tm 3+ ions respectively.

  3. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  4. Luminescence and Luminescence Quenching in Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 Scintillators Doped with Ce3+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogiegło, J.M.; Katelnikovas, A.; Zych, A.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31407564X; Jüstel, T.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Ronda, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet, Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12, doped with Ce3+ are investigated as a function of the Ga/Al ratio, aimed at an improved understanding of the energy flow and luminescence quenching in these materials. A decrease of both the crystal field strength and band

  5. Luminescence and Luminescence Quenching in Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12 Scintillators Doped with Ce3+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogiegło, J.M.; Katelnikovas, A.; Zych, A.K.; Jüstel, T.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    The optical properties of gadolinium gallium aluminum garnet, Gd3(Ga,Al)5O12, doped with Ce3+ are investigated as a function of the Ga/Al ratio, aimed at an improved understanding of the energy flow and luminescence quenching in these materials. A decrease of both the crystal field strength and band

  6. Influence of Nanosized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Shvalagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical use of nanosized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of ZnO nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent ZnO/SiO2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nanocrystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained ZnO/SiO2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photogenerated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of ZnO nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-ZnO luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  7. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); INFN, section of Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cherry, Simon R. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C. J.; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S.; Kinahan, Paul E. [Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-11-16

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10–13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector’s dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could

  8. Deconvolution of the luminescence and magnetic circularly polarized luminescence spectra of the lowest excited states of Ru(bpy)2 + 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausz, Elmars; Moran, Grainne

    1989-01-01

    The luminescence and magnetic circular polarized luminescence (MCPL) spectra of Ru(bpy)2+3 in poly-(vinyl-alcohol) solid solutions are analyzed in terms of a three level model of the lowest excited states. The individual luminescence and MCPL profiles of the three states are obtained, for the first time, by careful deconvolution of the temperature dependent spectra. The temperature dependence of the MCPL spectra in the 1.5-60 K range can be quite accurately accounted for by the superposition of strong (temperature independent) B terms from each of the states of relative magnitudes ≈4:1:-0.1. A comparison of the very different luminescence and MCPL spectral profiles of the transitions arising from the three individual states provides insights into the unusual and apparently vibronically induced processes dominant in Ru(bpy)2+3 luminescence for all three electronic states.

  9. Lanthanide doped ultrafine hybrid nanostructures: multicolour luminescence, upconversion based energy transfer and luminescent solar collector applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyam; Shahi, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Singh, Manish Kumar; Prakash, Rajiv; Rai, Shyam Bahadur

    2017-01-05

    We herein demonstrate novel inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) composed of inorganic NPs, NaY0.78Er0.02Yb0.2F4, and an organic β-diketonate complex, Eu(TTA)3Phen, for energy harvesting applications. Both the systems maintain their core integrity and remain entangled through weak interacting forces. HNPs incorporate the characteristic optical behaviour of both the systems i.e. they give an intense red emission under UV excitation, due to Eu(3+) in organic complexes, and efficient green upconversion emission of Er(3+) in inorganic NPs for NIR (980 nm) excitation. However, (i) an energy transfer from Er(3+) (inorganic NPs) to Eu(3+) (organic complex) under NIR excitation, and (ii) an increase in the decay time of (5)D0 → (7)F2 transition of Eu(3+) for HNPs as compared to the Eu(TTA)3Phen complex, under different excitation wavelengths, are added optical characteristics which point to an important role of the interface between both the systems. Herein, the ultra-small size (6-9 nm) and spherical shape of the inorganic NPs offer a large surface area, which improves the weak interaction force between both the systems. Furthermore, the HNPs dispersed in the PMMA polymer have been successfully utilized for luminescent solar collector (LSC) applications.

  10. Synthesis and luminescence properties of lanthanide complexes with a new tripodal ligands featuring salicylamide arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xue-Qin; Dong, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Liu, Wei-Sheng

    2010-01-01

    A series of luminescent lanthanide complexes with a new tripodal ligand featuring salicylamide arms, 2,2',2''-nitrilotris(2-furfurylaminoformylphenoxy)triethylamine (L), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and molar conductivity measurements. Photophysical properties of the complexes were studied by means of UV-vis absorption and steady-state luminescence spectroscopy. Excited-state luminescence lifetimes and quantum yield of the complexes were determined. Luminescence studies demonstrated that the tripodal ligand featuring salicylamide arms exhibits a good antennae effect with respect to the Tb(III) and Dy(III) ion due to efficient intersystem crossing and ligand to metal energy transfer. From a more general perspective, this work offers interesting perspectives for the development of efficient luminescent stains and enlarges the arsenal for developing novel luminescent lanthanide complexes of salicylamide derivatives.

  11. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic ray detectors use air as a radiator for luminescence. In water and ice, Cherenkov light is the dominant light producing mechanism when the particle's velocity exceeds the Cherenkov threshold, approximately three quarters of the speed of light in vacuum. Luminescence is produced by highly ionizing particles passing through matter due to the electronic excitation of the surrounding molecules. The observables of luminescence, such as the wavelength spectrum and decay times, are highly dependent on the properties of the medium, in particular, temperature and purity. The results for the light yield of luminescence of previous measurements vary by two orders of magnitude. It will be shown that even for the lowest measured light yield, luminescence is an important signature of highly ionizing particles below the Cherenkov threshold. These could be magnetic monopoles or other massive and highly ionizing exotic particles. With the highest observed efficiencies, luminescence may even contribute significantly to ...

  12. The influence of silver ion exchange on the luminescence properties of Er-Yb silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek, S.; Nekvindova, P.; Svecova, B.; Vytykacova, S.; Mika, M.; Oswald, J.; Barkman, O.; Spirkova, J.

    2017-10-01

    A set of zinc-silicate glasses with different ratios of Er-Yb as well amount of Zn was fabricated. The preparation of silver doped glasses was carried out using the Ag-Na ion-exchange method to enhance Er-Yb luminescence properties of the material. The samples were also annealed for 1-5 h to further support the creation of silver nanoparticles. Intensive absorption at 980 nm was observed in absorption spectra after ion exchange and annealing as well. Also luminescence spectra in the near-infrared range were measured and results showed positive effect of ion exchange process on luminescence properties. Luminescence intensity at 1530 nm was increased almost three times. Possible mechanisms responsible for the increase of the luminescence intensity are also discussed in this paper. We suggest that the enhancement of erbium luminescence intensity is caused by the energy transfer from isolated Ag+ ions to Er.

  13. X-ray excited luminescence of polystyrene composites loaded with SrF2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demkiv, T. M.; Halyatkin, O. O.; Vistovskyy, V. V.; Hevyk, V. B.; Yakibchuk, P. M.; Gektin, A. V.; Voloshinovskii, A. S.

    2017-03-01

    The polystyrene film nanocomposites of 0.3 mm thickness with embedded SrF2 nanoparticles up to 40 wt% have been synthesized. The luminescent and kinetic properties of the polystyrene composites with embedded SrF2 nanoparticles upon the pulse X-ray excitation have been investigated. The luminescence intensity of the pure polystyrene scintillator film significantly increases when it is loaded with the inorganic SrF2 nanoparticles. The film nanocomposites show fast (∼2.8 ns) and slow (∼700 ns) luminescence decay components typical for a luminescence of polystyrene activators (p-Terphenyl and POPOP) and SrF2 nanoparticles, respectively. It is revealed that the fast decay luminescence component of the polystyrene composites is caused by the excitation of polystyrene by the photoelectrons escaped from the nanoparticles due to photoeffect, and the slow component is caused by reabsorption of the self-trapped exciton luminescence of SrF2 nanoparticles by polystyrene.

  14. Radiation on luminescent properties of quartz glasses and fiber light pipes

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurakhmanov, B S; Gulamova, R R; Alimov, R; Yuldashev, B S; Ashurov, M K; Rustamov, I R

    2002-01-01

    Paper contains the results of investigation into X-ray luminescence of KI and KU-1 quartz glasses and of various composition and size quartz fiber light pipes (FLP) gamma-irradiated within 10 sup 2 -10 sup 7 Gy dose range. On the basis of analysis of X-ray luminescence spectra of glasses and FLP and comparison of the experimental data one detected in spectra two luminescence bands within 410, 450-470 nm range. One determined dose dependences of X-ray luminescence intensity of every of these bands of luminescence and hypothesized about the nature of the relevant centers. The protective role of OH-groups in the process of radiation-induced generation of luminescence centres under gamma-irradiation of quartz glasses and FLP was confirmed experimentally

  15. Luminescence characteristics of dental ceramics for retrospective dosimetry: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Correcher, V.; Delgado, A.; Goksu, Y.; Huebner, S

    2002-07-01

    Ceramic materials that are widely employed in dental prosthetics and repairs exhibit luminescent properties. Because of their use in the body, these materials are potentially of interest in situations where retrospective dosimetry for individuals is required but where monitoring was not planned. The luminescent properties of dental ceramics obtained in Germany, Spain and the UK were examined. Linear dose-response characteristics were obtained in the range <100 mGy to 10 Gy using thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence and infrared-stimulated luminescence measurement techniques. Measurements of time-resolved luminescence were also performed to examine the nature of the luminescence recombination under visible (470 nm) and IR (855 nm) stimulation. The results obtained by TL and optically stimulated techniques suggest that there may be deeper traps than previously observed in certain types of dental ceramic. Such traps may be less susceptible to optical and athermal fading than was reported in earlier studies. (author)

  16. Luminescence quartz dating of lime mortars. A first research approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, N; Mauz, B; Michael, C T

    2002-01-01

    Lime mortars mixed with sand are well suited for connecting structural materials, like stones and bricks, due to the mechanical properties this material exhibits. Their extensive use in architectural and decorative works during the last 4000 years motivated the introduction of the 'Luminescence clock' for age determination of mortars. The same principles as for quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of sediments were applied for age estimation of a mortar fragment removed from a Byzantine church monument dated by archaeological means to 1050-1100 years ago (the first half of the 10th century). The OSL from the quartz was monitored under blue light stimulation and UV detection, using a single-aliquot-regenerative-dose protocol. The quartz-OSL dating of the mortar resulted in 870 +/- 230 a. TL polymineral fine grain dating was also performed on a brick fragment which was connected to the mortar, resulting in a TL age of 1095 +/- 190 a.

  17. Method of detecting luminescent target ions with modified magnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkrob, Ilya A; Kaminski, Michael D

    2014-05-13

    This invention provides methods of using modified magnetic microspheres to extract target ions from a sample in order to detect their presence in a microfluidic environment. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules on the surface that allow the target ions in the sample to form complexes with specific ligand molecules on the microsphere surface. In one or more embodiments, the microspheres are modified with molecules that sequester the target ions from the sample, but specific ligand molecules in solution subsequently re-extract the target ions from the microspheres into the solution, where the complexes form independent of the microsphere surface. Once the complexes form, they are exposed to an excitation wavelength light source suitable for exciting the target ion to emit a luminescent signal pattern. Detection of the luminescent signal pattern allows for determination of the presence of the target ions in the sample.

  18. Supramolecular Luminescence from Oligofluorenol-Based Supramolecular Polymer Semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Wei Zhang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular luminescence stems from non-covalent exciton behaviors of active π-segments in supramolecular entities or aggregates via intermolecular forces. Herein, a π-conjugated oligofluorenol, containing self-complementary double hydrogen bonds, was synthesized using Suzuki coupling as a supramolecular semiconductor. Terfluorenol-based random supramolecular polymers were confirmed via concentration-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and dynamic light scattering (DLS. The photoluminescent spectra of the TFOH-1 solution exhibit a green emission band (g-band at approximately ~520 nm with reversible features, as confirmed through titration experiments. Supramolecular luminescence of TFOH-1 thin films serves as robust evidence for the aggregates of g-band. Our results suggest that the presence of polyfluorene ketone defects is a sufficient condition, rather than a sufficient-necessary condition for the g-band. Supramolecular electroluminescence will push organic devices into the fields of supramolecular optoelectronics, spintronics, and mechatronics.

  19. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hou, P.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  20. High-Efficient Excitation-Independent Blue Luminescent Carbon Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhen; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yunpeng; Guo, Liang; Mei, Jingjing; Tian, Cancan; Yang, Xiaotian; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-06-01

    Blue luminescent carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized by the hydrothermal method. Blue-shifts of the maximum emission wavelength from 480 to 443 nm were observed when the concentration of CD solution decreased. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CDs at low concentration showed an excitation-independent behaviour, which is very different from the previous reports. Two different emitting mechanisms might work: the intrinsic luminescence from sp2-carbon networks can be responsible for the shorter wavelength part of emission (excitation-independent) at low concentration and the high polarity of nanosized clusters led to the excitation-dependent behaviour of the longer wavelength part at high concentration of CD solution. The photophysical property and concentration-dependent behaviour of the CDs offered new insights into CDs from the viewpoints of both experiments and mechanisms, which will promote diverse potential applications of CDs in the near future.

  1. Luminescence response of synthetic opal under femtosecond laser pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasnetsov, M.V., E-mail: vasnet@hotmail.com [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Bazhenov, V.Yu.; Dmitruk, I.N. [Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kiev 03680 (Ukraine); Kudryavtseva, A.D.; Tcherniega, N.V. [P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    Synthetic opal is an artificial photonic metamaterial composed from spherical globules of amorphous silica (SiO{sub 2}) about 300 nm in diameter. We report, for the first time to our knowledge, the origin of a narrow luminescence spectral peak (4 nm HWHM) and optical second and third harmonic generation in synthetic opal samples under femtosecond laser excitation (800 nm) at liquid-nitrogen temperature. Stimulated-emission effects are discussed related to the possibility of nanocavity lasing at the condition of the first Mie resonance in a dielectric sphere. - Highlights: • Second harmonic generation in a synthetic opal (amorphous material composed from spherical SiO{sub 2} globules) was observed. • Narrow luminescence peak which we assign to a Mie resonance in a globule was detected at liquid-nitrogen temperature.

  2. Involvement of crystallinity in various luminescent bands in yttrium aluminate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Takaaki, E-mail: takaaki.morimoto@akane.waseda.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Harima, Masayuki; Horii, Yosuke [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Ohki, Yoshimichi, E-mail: yohki@waseda.jp [Department of Electrical Engineering and Bioscience, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Research Institute for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    When single crystal YAlO{sub 3} was implanted with P{sup +} or B{sup +} ions, optical absorption increases significantly at energies slightly lower than the band gap energy, indicating that localized electronic states were induced. Furthermore, the ion implantation decreases the intensity of an X-ray diffraction peak and changes its position randomly, which indicates that the crystalline structure of the sample was deformed. The intensities of photoluminescence (PL) bands due to impurities of Cr{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} and those originating in self-trapped excitons and antisites become smaller or disappear after the ion implantation. On the other hand, the intensity of the PL due to oxygen vacancies does not change. Such contrasting effects of the sample’s crystallinity on the luminescence intensity are explained by the different manners of involvement of the crystal structure in the luminescence mechanism among these PLs in YAlO{sub 3}.

  3. Luminescent lanthanide cryptates: from the bench to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwier, Jurriaan M; Bazin, Hervé; Lamarque, Laurent; Mathis, Gérard

    2014-02-17

    The design and application of luminescent lanthanide cryptates for sensing biological interactions is highlighted through the review of the work performed in our laboratory and with academic collaborations. The path from the initial applications probing biochemical interaction in vitro to "state-of-the-art" cellular assays toward clinical applications using homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence technology is described. An overview of the luminescent lanthanide macrocyclic compounds developed at Cisbio in the recent past is given with an emphasis on specific constraints required by specific applications. Recent assays for drug-discovery and diagnostic purposes using both antibody-based and suicide-enzyme-based technology are illustrated. New perspectives in the field of molecular medicine and time-resolved microscopy are discussed.

  4. Thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence properties of natural barytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitis, G; Kiyak, N G; Polymeris, G S

    2010-12-01

    Heavy, baryte-loaded, concrete is commonly used as radiation shielding material around high energy particle accelerators. Concrete samples received from a shielding block located at CERN cite contain many crystalline inclusions which were identified as barytes by X-ray diffraction analysis and separated by their color, classified as white, orange and green. Basic properties of thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signals of these barytes samples such as thermal and optical stability, repeatability and mainly the linearity of both their luminescence responses were investigated as a function of beta dose. These results are also discussed regarding detailed investigation on the correlation between TL and OSL signals and their implications for retrospective dosimetry.

  5. Thumb Imprint Based Detection of Hyperbilirubinemia Using Luminescent Gold Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Srestha; Sahoo, Amaresh Kumar; Paul, Anumita; Chattopadhyay, Arun

    2016-12-01

    Early and easy detection of diseases, using point-of-care and inexpensive devices, not only provides option for early treatment but also reduces the risk of propagation. Herein we report the fabrication of a robust film based luminescence indicator of bilirubin, which can indicate hyperbilirubinemia through the thumb imprint of the patient. The UV-light induced luminescence intensity of the film, made out of chitosan stabilised gold (Au) nanoclusters, which was effectively quenched in the presence of Cu2+ ions, recovered in the presence of bilirubin from skin or blood serum. Moreover, the sensitivity of detection of bilirubin was tuneable with the amount of Cu2+ added, thereby facilitating the detection of the desired concentration range of bilirubin.

  6. Luminescence studies of Eu-doped YBO3 host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ramya G.; Nigam, Sandeep; Sudarsan, V.; Dhabekar, B. S.; Vatsa, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Highly crystalline phase of YBO3:Eu3+ phosphors were prepared by solid state reaction. The phosphor shows characteristic 5D0→7F1 (J = 1, 2, 3, 4) transition for Eu3+. Phase purity, and emission intensity increases with increase in the annealing temperature and corresponding Eu-O charge transfer band shows blue shift in excitation spectrum. Color purity, determined in terms of R/O ratio, was found to be 1.42 (CIE color coordinates x = 0.62, y = 0.36). According to the luminescence decay analysis the 5D0 level of Eu3+ lifetime is around 5ms and quantum efficiency is 72%. Thermo-luminescence (TL) spectra of the sample reveal three broad peaks between 80 and 240°C.

  7. Supramolecular luminescence from oligofluorenol-based supramolecular polymer semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wang, Long; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Supramolecular luminescence stems from non-covalent exciton behaviors of active π-segments in supramolecular entities or aggregates via intermolecular forces. Herein, a π-conjugated oligofluorenol, containing self-complementary double hydrogen bonds, was synthesized using Suzuki coupling as a supramolecular semiconductor. Terfluorenol-based random supramolecular polymers were confirmed via concentration-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photoluminescent spectra of the TFOH-1 solution exhibit a green emission band (g-band) at approximately ~520 nm with reversible features, as confirmed through titration experiments. Supramolecular luminescence of TFOH-1 thin films serves as robust evidence for the aggregates of g-band. Our results suggest that the presence of polyfluorene ketone defects is a sufficient condition, rather than a sufficient-necessary condition for the g-band. Supramolecular electroluminescence will push organic devices into the fields of supramolecular optoelectronics, spintronics, and mechatronics.

  8. Synthesis of biocompatible multicolor luminescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaprasad Puvvada, B N Prashanth Kumar, Suraj Konar, Himani Kalita, Mahitosh Mandal and Amita Pathak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots were prepared through microwave-assisted pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of dextrin in the presence of sulfuric acid. The C-dots produced showed multicolor luminescence in the entire visible range, without adding any surface-passivating agent. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed the graphitic nature of the carbon and the presence of hydrophilic groups on the surface, respectively. The formation of uniformly distributed C-dots and their luminescent properties were, respectively, revealed from transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on MDA-MB-468 cells and their cellular uptake was assessed through a localization study.

  9. Luminescence of Terbium Complexes Incorporated into Silica Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫冰; 游佳勇

    2002-01-01

    Binary and ternary terbium complexes were synthesized: Tb(N-PA)3*4H2O and Tb(N-PA)3(phen*2H2O (N-HPA = N-phenyl-2-aminobenzoic acid and phen = 1,10-phenanthroline). These complexes were introduced into inorganic polymeric porous silica matrix by the sol-gel method. The luminescence behavior of the complexes in silica gels was compared with the corresponding solid state complexes by means of emission, excitation spectra and luminescence lifetimes. The result indicates that the terbium ions show fewer emission lines and lower emission intensities in the silica gel than those in pure terbium complexes. The lifetimes of terbium ions in silica gel doped with terbium complexes become longer than those of terbium complexes.

  10. UV-Activated Luminescence/Colourimetric O2 Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mills

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An oxygen indicator is described, comprising nanoparticles of titania dispersed in hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC polymer film containing a sacrificial electron donor, glycerol, and the redox indicator, indigo-tetrasulfonate (ITS. The indicator is blue- coloured in the absence of UV light, however upon exposure to UV light it not only loses its colour but also luminesces, unless and until it is exposed to oxygen, whereupon its original colour is restored. The initial photobleaching spectral (absorbance and luminescence response characteristics in air and in vacuum are described and discussed in terms of a simple reaction scheme involving UV activation of the titania photocatalyst particles, which are used to reduce the redox dye, ITS, to its leuco form, whilst simultaneously oxidising the glycerol to glyceraldehye. The response characteristics of the activated, that is, UV photobleached, form of the indicator to oxygen are also reported and the possible uses of such an indicator to measure ambient O2 levels are discussed.

  11. A Smart pH-Responsive Three Components Luminescent Hydrogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yibao; Liu, Wei; Cheng, Linxiu; Huang, Ping; Peng, Yu; Wu, Yongquan; Li, Xun; Li, Xiaokang; Fan, Xiaolin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we report a novel three-component luminescent hydrogel, which is composed of amino acid derivatives (N,N′-di valine-3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic acid, NVPD), riboflavin (RF), and melamine (MM). The three-component hydrogel is attributed to multiple hydrogen bonds and the strong π-π stacking interaction between these molecules. Based on the strong hydrogen bonding of the gelator, when the reversible process between the gel and the solution take places it changes the pH of the system from 6.1 to 10.6. In addition, green fluorescence could be the emissive of the hydrogel under 498 nm and the conversion process of the aggregation state repeated reversibly by altering the value of ambient pH. This pH-responsive luminescent gel may display potential for use in nano pH sensors. PMID:27626452

  12. Development of multidye UV filters for OPVs using luminescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignoto Fernandes, Ricardo; Bristow, Noel; Stoichkov, Vasil; Scapin Anizelli, Helder; Leonil Duarte, José; Laureto, Edson; Kettle, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    Luminescence down-shifting (LDS) is used in several photovoltaic technologies aiming to improve the photon conversion efficiency (PCE) of the devices through the increase of the light harvesting in the regions of the electromagnetic spectrum where the EQE of the solar cells is poor. The aim of this work was to produce films of mixtures (blends) of two luminescent materials, dispersed in a poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) matrix, hoping to improve their properties both as LDS layer and as UV filter when applied on the clear, external surface of P3HT:PC61BM photovoltaic devices. The best results led to an increment of 7.4% in the PCE of the devices, and a six fold enhancement in their half-life (T 50%). This study indicates that multidye LDS layers with optimized optical properties can lead to an effective improvement in the performance and operational stability of OPVs.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of La-Doped Luminescent Multilayer Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we have successfully designed ordered luminescent multilayer films based on La-doped nonmagnetic or magnetic inorganic nanostructure with electronic microenvironment (EM. The inorganic nanosheets with opposite charge can assemble EM between the interlayers. At the same time, their elements on nanosheets of layer double hydroxides (LDHs are facile to be replaced so that we can introduce transition metal or lanthanide elements. Besides, ferromagnetic effect (FE can be formed in this microenvironment due to introducing transition metal on LDHs nanosheets. As a result, we confirm that EM, FE, and doping La element in the LDHs can affect the vibration of backbone of chromophores and then prolong the luminescent lifetime, which suggests a new pathway for developing the novel light-emitting thin films.

  14. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Plasmonic Enhancement of Luminescence of Fluorscein Isothiocyanate and Human Immunoglobulin Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanenka, A. A.; Vaschenko, S. V.; Stankevich, V. V.; Lunevich, A. Ya.; Glukhov, Yu. F.; Gaponenko, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    Plasmonic enhancement of the luminescence of fl uorescein isothiocyanate and human immunoglobulin conjugates near silver nanoparticles was investigated as functions of the nanoparticle-conjugate distance and the excitation polarization. The maximum luminescence enhancement of 7.4 was achieved for p-polarized excitation and nanoparticle-conjugate distance 3.3 nm. The luminescence enhancement factor increased experimentally for p-polarized excitation and decreased for s-polarized excitation as compared with unpolarized excitation.

  16. Ultraweak luminescence from germinating resting spores of Entomophthora virulenta Hall et Dunn

    OpenAIRE

    Janusz Sławiński; Irena Majchrowicz; Edward Grabikowski

    2014-01-01

    Germinating resting spores of Entomophthora virulenta Hall et Dunn emit ultraweak luminescence with the intensity of the order 100 photons • s-1 • cm-2 in the spectral region 200-750 nm. The emission kinetics and intensity depend on vitality and incubation temperature of the spores. The higher the ability of resting spores to germinate, the more intense the luminescence. Elevation of the incubation temperature to 50°C enhances ultraweak luminescence. The activation energy was found to be abou...

  17. Spontaneous luminescence of Eu3+ ions in porous Y2O3 nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, S. V.; Ermolaeva, Yu. V.; Matveevskaya, N. A.; Zver'kova, I. I.; Tolmachev, A. V.

    2017-06-01

    A study of the luminescence of Eu3+ ions in Y2O3 nanospheres indicates a significant influence of the porous structure of nanoparticles on the luminescence of dopant ions. It is shown that filling the nanopores of initially porous Y2O3 nanospheres shortens the decay time of the spontaneous luminescence of doping europium ions. The change in the decay time is associated with the change in the effective refractive index of the porous nanospheres.

  18. Investigations on luminescence of rare earths doped CaTiO_3:Pr~(3+) phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.; Suriyamurthy; B.S.; Panigrahi

    2010-01-01

    Calcium titanate doped with praseodymium was prepared through solid state reaction and it exhibited intense red emission at 612 nm. Phosphors were characterized for photoluminescence, thermo-luminescence and afterglow emissions. Study of effects of rare earths on photoluminescence as well as afterglow intensity was reported. Presence of gadolinium enhanced luminescence. Presence of some monovalent ions enhanced both afterglow and photoluminescence emission. Thermo-luminescence glow curves were analyzed and ...

  19. V Centers and Hole-Photostimulated Luminescence of BaFCl Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈伟; 苏勉曾

    1994-01-01

    V centers (hole centers) and hole-photostimulated luminescence of BaFCl crystal are reported for the first time. The absorption bands of V1, V2 and V3 centers are peaking at 205, 238 and 355 nm respectively. V2 center creation by X-irradiation and decay during photostimulated luminescence process are synchronousl with that of F center. This indicates that V centers play the same roles as F centers in X-ray storage and photostimulated luminescence processes.

  20. X-ray luminescence of BaF 2:Ce 3+ powders

    OpenAIRE

    BATYGOV S. KH.; MAYAKOVA M.N.; S. V. Kuznetsov; FEDOROV P.P.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the mechanism for the formation of ceriumactivated barium fluoride scintillation ceramics and especially X-ray luminescence of its powdered precursors, prepared by coprecipitation of barium and cerium fluorides from aqueous solutions. We have found that the Ce 3+ luminescence, which is typical for cerium (III)-containing ceramics and single crystals, was not observed for such polycrystalline precursors, and the intensity of barium fluoride’s own luminescence decreases with increasi...

  1. Nanomatériaux luminescent pour des applications en diagnostics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The work of this thesis titled “Luminescent Nanomaterials for diagnostic applications” is synthesis, characterization and bioimaging applications of nanomaterials. Silicon nanoparticles were synthesized and modified with different functional groups such as amino, carboxylate, sugar and platinum(II) complex on the surface, and applies for cellular imaging at HeLa. Moreover, the assembly platinum(II) complexes modified silicon nanoparticles exhibit an interesting aggregation induced emission (A...

  2. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  3. The Voltage Boost Enabled by Luminescence Extraction in Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganapati, Vidya; Steiner, Myles A.; Yablonovitch, Eli

    2016-11-21

    A new physical principle has emerged to produce record voltages and efficiencies in photovoltaic cells, 'luminescence extraction.' This is exemplified by the mantra 'a good solar cell should also be a good LED.' Luminescence extraction is the escape of internal photons out of the front surface of a solar cell. Basic thermodynamics says that the voltage boost should be related to concentration ratio, C, of a resource by ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{C}. In light trapping, (i.e. when the solar cell is textured and has a perfect back mirror) the concentration ratio of photons C={4n2}, so one would expect a voltage boost of ..delta..V=kT ln{4n2} over a solar cell with no texture and zero back reflectivity, where n is the refractive index. Nevertheless, there has been ambiguity over the voltage benefit to be expected from perfect luminescence extraction. Do we gain an open circuit voltage boost of ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{n2}, ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{2n2}, or ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4n2}? What is responsible for this voltage ambiguity ..delta..V=(kT/q)ln{4}=36mVolts? We show that different results come about, depending on whether the photovoltaic cell is optically thin or thick to its internal luminescence. In realistic intermediate cases of optical thickness the voltage boost falls in between; ln{n2}q..delta..V/kT)<;ln{4n2}.

  4. A fast multiple shutter for luminescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Reinhard

    2017-09-01

    A new fast readout mode for off-the-shelf CCD image sensors is presented. It provides the capability to record two consecutive frames of short exposure time with multiple exposure cycles in fast succession. This is advantageous for measurements of recurrent low light events. A main application is the lifetime measurement of luminescence emissions such as those used for temperature- or pressure-sensitive paint measurements.

  5. Luminescence of lead-containing tungstates with perovskite structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenberg, K.C.; Blasse, G.

    1975-01-01

    The luminescence of perovskites with formula Sr1-xPbxLaLiWO6 and Ba2-xPbxMgWO6 is reported. The lower-energy emission in the lead-containing compounds is ascribed to a transition within a centre consisting of a tungstate octahedron with lead-ion neighbours. The presence of Bi3+ is SrLaLiWO6 causes a

  6. Luminescence associated with stacking faults in GaN

    OpenAIRE

    Lähnemann, Jonas; Jahn, Uwe; Brandt, Oliver; Flissikowski, Timur; Dogan, Pinar; Grahn, Holger T.

    2014-01-01

    Basal-plane stacking faults are an important class of optically active structural defects in wurtzite semiconductors. The local deviation from the 2H stacking of the wurtzite matrix to a 3C zinc-blende stacking induces a bound state in the gap of the host crystal, resulting in the localization of excitons. Due to the two-dimensional nature of these planar defects, stacking faults act as quantum wells, giving rise to radiative transitions of excitons with characteristic energies. Luminescence ...

  7. The Luminescence of Chlorophyll-Containing Plant Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollin, Gordon; Calvin, Melvin

    1957-07-01

    The luminescence of various chlorophyll-containing plant materials has been investigated under a variety of conditions. The results have been shown to be consistent with a mechanism involving the recombination of electrons and holes trapped in a quasi-crystalline lattice. Some details of such a mechanism have been proposed which suggest the mode of entry of the light energy into the photosynthetic pathway.

  8. Samarium(III) as luminescent probe for copper(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez, José A., E-mail: jose.jimenez@unf.edu

    2015-05-15

    Lanthanide-based luminescent sensing of copper(II) is currently an active area of research given the need for determining trace amounts of the analyte in environmental and biological matrices. Moreover, the increasing interest of Cu-doped materials for a variety of applications (e.g. luminescent and plasmonic) calls for appropriate measures for the assessment of residual Cu{sup 2+} in the solid state. In this work, Sm{sup 3+} ions are investigated as luminescent probes for Cu{sup 2+} within a glass matrix as model system based on Sm{sup 3+}→Cu{sup 2+} energy transfer. The Cu{sup 2+} concentration dependence of the Sm{sup 3+} emission quenching and decay rates of the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} excited state allow for establishing calibration curves useful for determining Cu{sup 2+}. The luminescence-based approaches are employed for estimating residual Cu{sup 2+} in a Cu{sup +}/Sm{sup 3+} co-doped glass as ‘unknown’, the results being compared with the spectrophotometric method based on Cu{sup 2+} absorption in the visible. Remarkably, the approaches appeared in good agreement. Thus, the present work demonstrates the potential of Sm{sup 3+} ions for optical sensing of copper(II), opening research avenues extending from materials to liquid phase systems with relevance to biological and environmental sciences. - Highlights: • Sm{sup 3+}→Cu{sup 2+} energy transfer investigated in glass as model matrix in context of analytical applications. • Sm{sup 3+} photoluminescence and emission decay dynamics correlated with Cu{sup 2+} concentration. • Potential of Sm{sup 3+} ions for optical sensing of Cu{sup 2+} demonstrated.

  9. A model for luminescence of localized state ensemble

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Q.; Xu, S. J.; Xie, M H; Tong, S. Y.

    2004-01-01

    A distribution function for localized carriers, $f(E,T)=\\frac{1}{e^{(E-E_a)/k_BT}+\\tau_{tr}/\\tau_r}$, is proposed by solving a rate equation, in which, electrical carriers' generation, thermal escape, recapture and radiative recombination are taken into account. Based on this distribution function, a model is developed for luminescence from localized state ensemble with a Gaussian-type density of states. The model reproduces quantitatively all the anomalous temperature behaviors of localized ...

  10. Dosimetry based on thermally and optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agersnap Larsen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    Thermally Stimulated Luminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) properties of quartz and {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} have been investigated. Anneling-induced OSL and TL sensitivity changes in quartz has been investigated by experiments and modelling. This study does not support a pre-dose effect to account for the observed annealing-induced sensitivity change. The experimental data indicates a more simple mechanism that involves alteration of the concentration of the defect centers. Results from modelling of removal or creation of defect centers comparing well with experimentally obtained data. Thermal quenching of luminescence for the main emission center, the F-center, in {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C has been investigated by analysing TL curves obtained at different heating rates. The thermal quenching dependence of luminescence is found to follow the classical Mott-Seitz expression. Basic investigations of OSL properties of {alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, including: the thermal depth of the OSL traps, the temperature dependence of OSL, and the OSL stimulation spectra. Simultaneous measurements of TL and thermally stimulated conductivity (TSC) are presented for {gamma}-irradiated {alpha}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C. Activation energy analysis of the data reveals a superposition of several first-order TL and TSC peaks caused by release of charge carriers from a distribution of trapping states. Furthermore a description of an experimental method developed to determine the sign of the thermally released charge carriers has been presented. (au) 8 tabs., 59 ills., 90 refs.

  11. Using luminescent materials as the active element for radiation sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, William A.; Fontenot, Ross S.; Williams, Stephen; Miller, John

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge for Earth-based defense applications as well as human and/or robotic space missions. Practical sensors based on luminescence will depend heavily upon research investigating the resistance of these materials to ionizing radiation and the ability to anneal or self-heal from damage caused by such radiation. In 1951, Birks and Black showed experimentally that the luminescent efficiency of anthracene bombarded by alphas varies with total fluence (N) as (I/I0) = 1/(1 + AN), where I is the luminescence yield, I0 is the initial yield, and A is a constant. The half brightness (N1/2) is defined as the fluence that reduce the emission light yield to half and is equal to is the inverse of A. Broser and Kallmann developed a similar relationship to the Birks and Black equation for inorganic phosphors irradiated using alpha particles. From 1990 to the present, we found that the Birks and Black relation describes the reduction in light emission yield for every tested luminescent material except lead phosphate glass due to proton irradiation. These results indicate that radiation produced quenching centers compete with emission for absorbed energy. The purpose of this paper is to present results from research completed in this area over the last few years. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent measurements made on new materials such as europium tetrakis dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA). Results have shown that EuD4TEA with its relatively small N1/2 might be a good candidate for use as a personal proton fluence sensor.

  12. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength of around 1138 nm; and, a photovoltaic device for converting at least part of said infrared solar radiation into electrical power.

  13. Luminescence dosimetry: recent developments in theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeever, S.W.S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-3072 (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Thermally and optically stimulated luminescence have been used in applications in solid state physics, radiation dosimetry and geological dating for several decades. This paper gives a generalized description of these methods in terms of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and in doing so highlights similarities and differences between the methods. Recent advances in both the theory and application of the techniques are highlighted with numerous specific examples. (Author)

  14. Modelling the thermal quenching mechanism in quartz based on time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, V.; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Murray, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    . As the temperature of the sample is increased, more electrons are removed from the excited state via the non-radiative pathway. This reduction in the number of available electrons leads to both a decrease of the intensity of the luminescence signal and to a simultaneous decrease of the luminescence lifetime. Several...... simulations are carried out of time-resolved optically stimulated luminescence (TR-OSL) experiments, in which the temperature dependence of luminescence lifetimes in quartz is studied as a function of the stimulation temperature. Good quantitative agreement is found between the simulation results and new...

  15. Luminescence in germania-silica fibers in a 1-2 μm region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borshchevskaia, N. A.; Katamadze, K. G.; Kulik, S. P.; Klyamkin, S. N.; Chuvikov, S. V.; Sysolyatin, A. A.; Tsvetkov, S. V.; Fedorov, M. V.

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the origins of the luminescence in germania-silica fibers with high germanium concentration (about 30 mol. % GeO2) in the region 1-2 {\\mu}m with a laser pump at the wavelength 532 nm. We show that such fibers demonstrate the high level of luminescence which unlikely allows the observation of photon triplets, generated in a third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion process in such fibers. The only efficient approach to the luminescence reduction is the hydrogen saturation of fiber samples, however, even in this case the level of residual luminescence is still too high for three-photon registration.

  16. Device structure for OLED light device having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadis; Homer , Krummacher; Benjamin Claus

    2008-01-22

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  17. Luminescence of a ZnO:Ga Crystal upon Excitation in Vacuum UV Region

    OpenAIRE

    Rodnyi, P. A.; Stryganyuk, G. B.; Khodyuk, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    The spectral--kinetic characteristics of a ZnO:Ga single crystal upon excitation in the vacuum UV region have been studied. At a temperature of 8 K, the exciton luminescence line peaking at 3.356 eV has an extremely small half-width (7.2 meV) and a short decay time (360 ps). In the visible range, a wide luminescence band peaking at ~2.1 eV with a long luminescence time at 8 K and a decay time in the nanosecond range at 300 K is observed. The luminescence excitation spectra of ZnO:Ga have been...

  18. OLED lighting devices having multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Antoniadis, Homer

    2010-11-16

    An apparatus such as a light source has a multi element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer disposed over a transparent layer of the light source and on the exterior of said light source. The multi-element light extraction and luminescence conversion layer includes a plurality of light extraction elements and a plurality of luminescence conversion elements. The light extraction elements diffuses the light from the light source while luminescence conversion elements absorbs a first spectrum of light from said light source and emits a second spectrum of light.

  19. Luminescence-based Imaging Approaches in the Field of Interventional Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; Hardwick, James C H; van Erkel, Arian R

    2015-07-01

    Luminescence imaging-based guidance technologies are increasingly gaining interest within surgical and radiologic disciplines. Their promise to help visualize molecular features of disease in real time and with microscopic detail is considered desirable. Integrating luminescence imaging with three-dimensional radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based preinterventional imaging may overcome limitations such as the limited tissue penetration of luminescence signals. At the same time, the beneficial features of luminescence imaging may be used to complement the routinely used radiologic- and nuclear medicine-based modalities. To fully exploit this integrated concept, and to relate the largely experimental luminesce-based guidance approaches into perspective with routine imaging approaches, it is essential to understand the advantages and limitations of this relatively new modality. By providing an overview of the available luminescence technologies and the various clinically evaluated exogenous luminescent tracers (fluorescent, hybrid, and theranostic tracers), this review attempts to place luminescence-based interventional molecular imaging technologies into perspective to the available radiologic- and/or nuclear medicine-based imaging technologies. At the same time, the transition from anatomic to physiologic and even molecular interventional luminescence imaging is illustrated.

  20. Luminescent solar concentration with semiconductor nanorods and transfer-printed micro-silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronstein, Noah D; Li, Lanfang; Xu, Lu; Yao, Yuan; Ferry, Vivian E; Alivisatos, A Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G

    2014-01-28

    We utilize CdSe/CdS seeded nanorods as a tunable lumophore for luminescent concentration. Transfer-printed, ultrathin crystalline Si solar cells are embedded directly into the luminescent concentrator, allowing the study of luminescent concentrators with an area over 5000 times the area of the solar cell. By increasing the size of the CdS rod with respect to the luminescent CdSe seed, the reabsorption of propagating photons is dramatically reduced. At long luminescence propagation distances, this reduced reabsorption can overcome the diminished quantum yield inherent to the larger semiconductor structures, which is studied with lifetime spectroscopy. A Monte Carlo ray tracing model is developed to explain the performance of the luminescent concentrator and is then used as a design tool to determine the effect of luminescence trapping on the concentration of light using both CdSe/CdS nanorods and a model organic dye. We design an efficient luminescence trapping structure that should allow the luminescent concentrator based on CdSe/CdS nanorods to operate in the high-concentration regime.

  1. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  2. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagonis, Vasilis; Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank;

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR......-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed...

  3. Emerging blue-UV luminescence in cerium doped YAG nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirmane, Liana [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Lithuania); Pankratov, Vladimir [Research Center of Molecular Materials, University of Oulu (Finland)

    2016-06-15

    Time-resolved luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+} doped Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) nanocrystals have been studied by means of vacuum-ultraviolet excitation spectroscopy. It was discovered that additionally to the regular Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green emission which is well-known luminescence in YAG, new emission covering a broad spectral range from 2.7 eV to 3.5 eV was revealed in the luminescence spectra for all YAG:Ce nanocrystals studied. This blue-UV emission has fast decay time about 7 ns as well as intensive well-resolved excitation band peaking at 5.9 eV and, in contrast to green Ce{sup 3+} emission, practically is not excited at higher energies. The origin of the blue-UV emission is tentatively suggested and discussed. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Measurement of luminescence decays: High performance at low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkes, Mark; Sulkes, Zoe

    2011-11-01

    The availability of inexpensive ultra bright LEDs spanning the visible and near-ultraviolet combined with the availability of inexpensive electronics equipment makes it possible to construct a high performance luminescence lifetime apparatus (˜5 ns instrumental response or better) at low cost. A central need for time domain measurement systems is the ability to obtain short (˜1 ns or less) excitation light pulses from the LEDs. It is possible to build the necessary LED driver using a simple avalanche transistor circuit. We describe first a circuit to test for small signal NPN transistors that can avalanche. We then describe a final optimized avalanche mode circuit that we developed on a prototyping board by measuring driven light pulse duration as a function of the circuit on the board and passive component values. We demonstrate that the combination of the LED pulser and a 1P28 photomultiplier tube used in decay waveform acquisition has a time response that allows for detection and lifetime determination of luminescence decays down to ˜5 ns. The time response and data quality afforded with the same components in time-correlated single photon counting are even better. For time-correlated single photon counting an even simpler NAND-gate based LED driver circuit is also applicable. We also demonstrate the possible utility of a simple frequency domain method for luminescence lifetime determinations.

  5. Resonantly Enhanced Emission from a Luminescent Nanostructured Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yasuhisa; Hashiya, Akira; Nitta, Mitsuru; Tomita, Shogo; Tsujimoto, Akira; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Yamaki, Takeyuki; Hirasawa, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the characteristics of photon emission represents a significant challenge for both fundamental science and device technologies. Research on microcavities, photonic crystals, and plasmonic nanocavities has focused on controlling spontaneous emission by way of designing a resonant structure around the emitter to modify the local density of photonic states. In this work, we demonstrate resonantly enhanced emission using luminescent nanostructured waveguide resonance (LUNAR). Our concept is based on coupling between emitters in the luminescent waveguide and a resonant waveguide mode that interacts with a periodic nanostructure and hence outcouples via diffraction. We show that the enhancement of resonance emission can be controlled by tuning the design parameters. We also demonstrate that the enhanced emission is attributable to the accelerated spontaneous emission rate that increases the probability of photon emission in the resonant mode, accompanied by enhanced the local density of photonic states. This study demonstrates that nanostructured luminescent materials can be designed to exhibit functional and enhanced emission. We anticipate that our concept will be used to improve the performance of a variety of photonic and optical applications ranging from bio/chemical sensors to lighting, displays and projectors. PMID:27682993

  6. Ce doped hafniate scintillating glasses thermally stimulated luminescence and photoluminescence

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, M; Vedda, A; Dafinei, I; Lecoq, P; Nikl, M

    1995-01-01

    Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and time resolved luminescence studies have been performed on undoped, and Ce3+ and Mn2+ doped fluoro-hafniate glasses (HFG). The X-ray induced TSL glow curve above room temperature features different broad structures extending up to 350 degree C; wavelength resolved measurements put in evidence the existence of two distinct emission peaks around 300 nm and 550 nm, attributed to Ce3+ and Mn2+ ions respectively. The role of Ce3+ and Mn2+ dopant ions in the trapping-recombination TSL processes was investigated, on the basis of the analysis of the spectral distribution of the emitted light at different dopant ions concentrations, and of the dose dependencies of the signals. Time resolved luminescence measurements allowed a detailed characterization of both Ce3+ and Mn2+ emissions. Their decay times were found to be 19.2 ns and 27 ms, respectively; the excitation spectrum of the 550 nm emission revealed the existence of a radiative energy transfer between Ce3+ and Mn2+ cent...

  7. Visible luminescence in polyaniline/(gold nanoparticle) composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Renata F. S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais (Brazil); Andrade, Cesar A. S. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Bioquimica (Brazil); Santos, Clecio G. dos [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (Brazil); Melo, Celso P. de, E-mail: celso@df.ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia de Materiais (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    We describe the use of solution chemistry methods to prepare polyaniline/(gold nanoparticles)-PANI/AuNPs-composites as colloidal particles that exhibit an intense green fluorescence after excitation in the ultraviolet region. Measurements of the relative fluorescence quantum yield indicate that the intensity of the observed luminescence of these nanocomposites is a few orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding fluorescence of either the isolated polymer or the pure AuNPs. Hence, cooperative effects between the conducting polymer chains and the metallic particles must dominate the emission behavior of these materials. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the existence of metal nanoparticle aggregates with sizes in the 2-3 nm range dispersed in the polymer matrix. By implementing an experimental planning, we have been able to change the preparation parameters so as to vary in a controlled manner the intensity and the profile of the luminescence spectrum as well as the size and aggregation characteristics of the colloidal particles. We also show that when the pH of the medium is varied, the dielectric properties (such as the degree of conductivity) of the PANI/AuNPs colloidal solutions and the intensity of their luminescence change in a consistent manner. Due to the polycation nature of the doped PANI chains, we suggest that these composites may find interesting applications as fluorescent markers of biologic molecules.

  8. Resonantly Enhanced Emission from a Luminescent Nanostructured Waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Yasuhisa; Hashiya, Akira; Nitta, Mitsuru; Tomita, Shogo; Tsujimoto, Akira; Suzuki, Masa-Aki; Yamaki, Takeyuki; Hirasawa, Taku

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the characteristics of photon emission represents a significant challenge for both fundamental science and device technologies. Research on microcavities, photonic crystals, and plasmonic nanocavities has focused on controlling spontaneous emission by way of designing a resonant structure around the emitter to modify the local density of photonic states. In this work, we demonstrate resonantly enhanced emission using luminescent nanostructured waveguide resonance (LUNAR). Our concept is based on coupling between emitters in the luminescent waveguide and a resonant waveguide mode that interacts with a periodic nanostructure and hence outcouples via diffraction. We show that the enhancement of resonance emission can be controlled by tuning the design parameters. We also demonstrate that the enhanced emission is attributable to the accelerated spontaneous emission rate that increases the probability of photon emission in the resonant mode, accompanied by enhanced the local density of photonic states. This study demonstrates that nanostructured luminescent materials can be designed to exhibit functional and enhanced emission. We anticipate that our concept will be used to improve the performance of a variety of photonic and optical applications ranging from bio/chemical sensors to lighting, displays and projectors.

  9. Luminescence and radiation resistance of undoped NaI crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiran, N., E-mail: shiran@isc.kharkov.com; Boiaryntseva, I.; Gektin, A.; Gridin, S.; Shlyakhturov, V.; Vasuykov, S.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The performance of NaI scintillators depends on luminescence properties. • A criterion of crystals’ purity level is radiation colorability at room temperature. • The traces of the most dangerous impurities were detected. • Crucial role in efficiency of pure NaI scintillator play the crystal perfection. - Abstract: Undoped NaI single crystal is an excellent scintillator at low temperature. However, scintillation parameters of different quality crystals vary in a wide range, significantly exceeding measurement error. Experimental data demonstrate the features of luminescence, radiation induced coloration, and afterglow dependence on the quality of nominally pure crystals. It is found that defects level that allows to elucidate artefacts introduced by traces of harmful impurities corresponds to 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} that significantly overhead accuracy of chemical and absorption analysis. It is shown that special raw material treatment before and during the single crystal growth allows to reach NaI purity level that avoids impurities influence to the basic luminescence data.

  10. High pressure luminescence studies of europium doped GaN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.Wisniewski; W.Jadwisie(n)czak; T.Thomas; M.Spencer

    2009-01-01

    We reported on the high pressure luminescence spectra of polycrystalline Eu-doped GaN material synthesized in the reaction tween alloys of gallium,bismuth and europium in ammonia atmosphere.The integrated luminescence intensity of the dominant Eu3+ ion transition (5D0→7F2) at 622 nm increased approximately one order of magnitude whereas its spectral position and line width did not change significantly between ambient and 6.8 GPa pressure,respectively.Moreover,material was characterized with photo- and cathodo-luminescence,and photoluminescence excitation spectra at different temperatures.It was found that the Eu3+ ions occupying substitutional Ga site created different centers which could be effectively excited with above band gap excitation and from excitons resonantly photoexcited at the I2 bound exciton energy.Furthermore,the less efficient Eu3+ ions excitation path existed through intrinsic impurities and defects generating shallow energy levels in the forbidden gap.It was proposed that reduction of the thermal quenching and consequent enhancement of Eu3+ ion emission intensity resulted from stronger localization of bound exciton on RESI trap induced by applied pressure.

  11. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples.

  12. Synchrotron UV-visible multispectral luminescence microimaging of historical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoury, Mathieu; Echard, Jean-Philippe; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Berrie, Barbara; Nevin, Austin; Jamme, Frédéric; Bertrand, Loïc

    2011-03-01

    UV-visible luminescence techniques are fre-quently used for the study of cultural heritage materials, despite their limitations for identification and discrimination in the case of complex heterogeneous materials. In contrast to tabletop setups, two methods based on the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)-UV-visible emission generated at a bending magnet of a synchrotron source are described. The main advantages of the source are the extended wavelength range attained, the continuous tunability of the source, and its brightness, leading to a submicrometer lateral resolution. Raster-scanning microspectroscopy and full-field microimaging were implemented and tested at the DISCO beamline (synchrotron SOLEIL, France). Investigative measurements were performed on a sample from a varnished musical instrument and a paint sample containing the pigment zinc white (ZnO) in order to illustrate some of the challenges analyzing heterogeneous cultural heritage cross-section samples with the novel imaging approach. The data sets obtained proved useful for mapping organic materials at the submicrometer scale and visualizing heterogeneities of the semiconductor pigment material. We propose and discuss the combined use of raster-scanning microspectroscopy and full-field microimaging in an integrated analytical methodology. Synchrotron UV luminescence appears as a novel tool for identification of craftsmen's and artists' materials and techniques and to assess the condition of artifacts, from the precise identification and localization of luminescent materials.

  13. Temperature influence on luminescent coupling efficiency in concentrator MJ SCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvarts, Maxim, E-mail: shvarts@scell.ioffe.ru; Emelyanov, Viktor; Mintairov, Mikhail; Evstropov, Valery; Timoshina, Nailya [Ioffe Institute, 26 Politekhnicheskaya str., St.-Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    In the work, presented are the results of investigation of temperature dependencies of the luminescent coupling effectiveness in lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/GaAs/Ge and metamorphic (MM) GaInP/GaInAs/Ge solar cells. The “ordinary” luminescent coupling effectiveness rise has been observed with temperature decrease for GaAs-Ge, GaInP-GaInAs and GaInAs-Ge pairs of subcells, and its limiting values have been defined. A “reverse” behavior of the luminescent coupling effectiveness for the GaInP-GaAs pair has been found, determined emittance potential drop of wideband GaInP p-n junction. It is shown that the established “unusual” behavior of the LC efficiency may be determined by the presence of thermalized centers of non-radiative recombination of charge carriers for the GaInP subcell in GaInP/GaAs/Ge LM structure. Estimation of characteristic parameters for the nonradiative recombination processes in wideband GaInP p-n junction has been carried out, and values for the energy of the nonradiative center thermalization (E{sub nrad2} =79.42meV) and for the activation energy of nonradiative band-to-band recombination (E{sub A}=33.4meV) have been obtained.

  14. GABA inhibition of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Krönström, Jenny; Holmgren, Susanne; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2011-03-01

    Photogenic organs (photophores) of the velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) are under hormonal control, since melatonin (MT) and prolactin (PRL) trigger luminescence while α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) prevents this light to be emitted. A recent study supported, however, the presence of numerous nerve fibres in the photogenic tissue of this shark. Immunohistochemical and pharmacological results collected in this work support these nerve fibres to be inhibitory GABAergic nerves since (i) GABA immunoreactivity was detected inside the photogenic tissue, where previous labelling detected the nerve fibre structures and (ii) GABA was able to inhibit MT and PRL-induced luminescence, which was on the other hand increased by the GABA(A) antagonist bicuculline (BICU). In addition, we also demonstrated that BICU can induce light per se by provoking pigment retraction in the pigmented cells composing the iris-like structure of the photophore, attaining, however, only about 10% of hormonally induced luminescence intensity at 10(-3)mol L(-1). This strongly supports that a GABA inhibitory tonus controls photophore "aperture" in the photogenic tissue of E. spinax but also that MT and PRL have more than one target cell type in the photophores.

  15. Two porous luminescent metal-organic frameworks: quantifiable evaluation of dynamic and static luminescent sensing mechanisms towards Fe(3.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun-Cheng; Pang, Ling-Yan; Yang, Guo-Ping; Hou, Lei; Wang, Yao-Yu

    2015-10-21

    Two novel porous luminescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, 1 and 2) have been constructed using 3,4-di(3,5-dicarboxyphenyl)phthalic acid using a hydrothermal method. Both MOFs can work as highly sensitive sensors to Fe(3+) by luminescent quenching. Analyses of the structures indicate a higher quenching efficiency of 2 because of the existence of active -COOH groups. Based on this consideration, the quenching mechanisms are studied and the processes are controlled by multiple mechanisms in which dynamic and static mechanisms of MOFs are discussed. Besides, the corresponding dynamic and static quenching constants are calculated, achieving the quantification evaluation of the quenching process. As expected, experimental data show that compound 2 possesses an overall quenching efficiency 6.9 times that of compound 1. Additionally, time-dependent intensity measurements, the shifts of the excitation spectrum and the appearance of a new emission peak all give visual proofs of the distinct mechanisms between the two MOFs.

  16. Increasing the luminescence of lanthanide(III) macrocyclic complexes by the use of polymers and lanthanide enhanced luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C.; Becker, Margie C.; Bromm, Alfred J., Jr.; Vallarino, Lidia M.; Williams, Steven A.; Yang, Sean

    2001-05-01

    A Eu (III)-macrocycle-isothiocyanate, Quantum DyeTM, has been reacted with lysine homo- and hetero-peptides to give polymers with multiple luminescent side chains. Contrary to the concentration quenching that occurs with conventional organic fluorophores, the attachment of multiple Quantum Dyes to a polymer results in a concomitant increase in luminescence. The emission intensity of the peptide-bound Quantum Dye units is approximately linearly related to their number. The attachment of peptides containing multiple lanthanide (III) macrocycles to analyte-binding species is facilitated by employing solid-phase technology. Bead-bound peptides are first labeled with multiple Quantum Dye units, then conjugated to an antibody, and finally released from the bead by specific cleavage with Proteinase K unedr physiological conditions. Since the luminescence of lanthanide(III) macrocycles is enhanced by the presence of GD(III) or Y(III) ions in a micellar system, a significant increase in signal can be achieved by attaching a polymer labeled with multiple Quantum Dye units to an analyte- binding species, such as a monoclonal antibody, or by taking advantage of the luminescence enhancing effects of Gd(III) or Y(III), or by both approaches concomitantly. A comparison between the integrated intensity and lifetime measurements of the Eu(III)-macrocycle under a variety of conditions show that the signal increase caused by Gd(III) can not be explained solely by the increase in lifetime, and must result in significant part from an energy transfer process invloving donors not directly bound to the Eu(III).

  17. On the spectra luminescence properties of charoite silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Geology, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2 Madrid 28006 (Spain)], E-mail: guinea@mncn.csic.es; Townsend, P.D. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH, E Sussex (United Kingdom); Can, N. [Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey); Correcher, V.; Sanchez-Munoz, L. [CIEMAT, Department of Radiation Dosimetry, Avenue Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Finch, A.A. [Centre for Advanced Materials, University of St Andrews, Irvine Building, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); Hole, D. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH, E Sussex (United Kingdom); Avella, M.; Jimenez, J. [Department of Fisica Materia Condensada, ETSI Industriales, University of Valladolid, Valladolid 47011 (Spain); Khanlary, M. [School of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH, E Sussex (United Kingdom); Physics Department, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Charoite is a hydrous alkali calcium silicate mineral [K{sub 4}NaCa{sub 7}Ba{sub 0.75}Mn{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.05}(Si{sub 6}O{sub 15}){sub 2}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})Si{sub 4}O{sub 9}(OH).3(H{sub 2}O)] exhibiting an intense lilac colour related to Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} colour centres. These ions also contribute to a strong luminescence at {approx}585 and 705 nm. This work studies the thermal dependence of these luminescent centres by (i) thermoluminescence (TL) of pre-heated and pre-irradiated charoite aliquots, (ii) by time-resolved cathodoluminescence (TRS-CL) at room and cryogenic temperatures (RT and CT), (iii) by spatially resolved spectra CL under scanning electron microscopy (SRS-CL-SEM) and (iv) by ion beam spectra luminescence (IBL) with H{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} ions at RT and LT. The main peak, {approx}585 nm, is linked to a transition {sup 4}T{sub 1,2} (G){yields}{sup 6}A{sub 7}(S) in Mn{sup 2+} ions in distorted six-fold coordination and the emission at {approx}705 nm with Fe{sup 2+}{yields}Fe{sup 3+} oxidation in Si{sup 4+} lattice sites. Less intense UV-blue emissions at 340 and 390 nm show multi-order kinetic TL glow curves involving continuous processes of electron trapping and de-trapping along with an irreversible phase transition of charoite by de-hydroxylation and lattice shortening of {delta}a=0.219 A, {delta}b=0.182 A; {delta}c=0.739 A. The Si-O stressed lattice of charoite has non-bridging oxygen or silicon vacancy-hole centres, and Si-O bonding defects which seem to be responsible for the 340 nm emission. Extrinsic defects such as the alkali (or hydrogen)-compensated [AlO{sub 4}/M{sup +}] centres could be linked with the 390 nm emission. Large variations in 585 and 705 nm intensities are strongly temperature dependent, modifying local Fe-O and Mn-O bond distances, short-range-order luminescence centres being very resistant under the action of the heavy ion beam of {sup 4}He{sup +}. The SRS-CL demonstrates strong spatial

  18. Luminescence properties of the Sm-doped borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kindrat, I.I. [University of Zielona Góra, Institute of Physics, Division of Spectroscopy of Functional Materials, 4a Szafrana Street, 65-516 Zielona Góra (Poland); Padlyak, B.V., E-mail: B.Padlyak@if.uz.zgora.pl [University of Zielona Góra, Institute of Physics, Division of Spectroscopy of Functional Materials, 4a Szafrana Street, 65-516 Zielona Góra (Poland); Vlokh Institute of Physical Optics, 23 Dragomanov Street, 79-005 Lviv (Ukraine); Drzewiecki, A. [University of Zielona Góra, Institute of Physics, Division of Spectroscopy of Functional Materials, 4a Szafrana Street, 65-516 Zielona Góra (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    The optical absorption and photoluminescence (emission and excitation) spectra as well as decay kinetics of a series of the Sm-doped glasses with Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, LiKB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, CaB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, and LiCaBO{sub 3} compositions were investigated and analysed. The Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm, LiKB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm, CaB{sub 4}O{sub 7}:Sm, and LiCaBO{sub 3}:Sm glasses of high optical quality have been obtained from the corresponding polycrystalline compounds in the air atmosphere, using a standard glass technology. On the basis of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical spectra analysis it was shown that the samarium impurity is incorporated into the glass network as Sm{sup 3+} (4f{sup 5}, {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}) ions, exclusively. All observed 4f – 4f transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} centres in the optical absorption and luminescence spectra of the investigated glasses are identified. Most intense emission band of the Sm{sup 3+} ions peaked about 598 nm ({sup 4}G{sub 5/2} → {sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transition) is characterised by a single exponential decay with typical lifetime values, which depend on the basic glass composition as well as concentration and local structure of the Sm{sup 3+} luminescence centres. The quantum efficiency has been evaluated for observed transitions of the Sm{sup 3+} centres using obtained experimental lifetimes and radiative lifetimes calculated by Judd–Ofelt theory. The calculated high quantum efficiencies and measured quantum yields of luminescence show that the investigated borate glasses are perspective luminescence materials. Energy transfer from the Ce{sup 3+} non-controlled impurity and intrinsic luminescence centres to the Sm{sup 3+} centres has been observed. Peculiarities of the Sm{sup 3+} local structure in the network of investigated glasses have been discussed based on the obtained spectroscopic results and structural data. - Highlights: • The Sm-doped Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}, LiKB{sub 4}O{sub 7}, Ca

  19. Luminescence Dating of Sediments: An Increasingly Diverse Family of Methods and Range of Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, the term 'luminescence dating' has expanded its meaning such that today it encompasses a range of luminescence dating methods and materials. Whilst the fundamental principles that underlie these different dating methods are essentially the same, namely that the event typically being recorded is the last exposure of the material to light or to heat, the various luminescence dating techniques do differ in their suitability in different situations. Today, in the field of luminescence dating of sediments, there are a number of minerals that can be used for dating (quartz and feldspar being the most commonly used), and for each mineral it is possible to obtain a number of different luminescence signals (some obtained using optical stimulation, and some obtained by heating). These different luminescence signals may build-up and deplete in the natural environment at different rates from each other, and can span quite different time ranges. Additionally, the scale of analysis used in luminescence dating can now be varied (ranging from single sand-sized grains to multiple grains), as can the size range of the materials used for dating (ranging from fine-silt, coarse-silt, and sand-sized grains, through to large clasts and rock surfaces). Having such flexibility in the range of minerals, luminescence signals, grain sizes, and the scales of analysis available for dating, means that it is now possible to optimise the materials and methods selected for dating in any particular study in response to the precise scientific question to be addressed, the time-range of interest, and the likely mechanisms of re-setting of the luminescence signal in the context that is to be dated. In this paper, the flexibility offered by the growing family of luminescence techniques will be outlined by considering some of the different minerals, luminescence signals, and dramatically different timescales (tens of years to millions of years) potentially available for sediment dating

  20. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  1. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz: An overview of contemporary developments and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chithambo, M.L., E-mail: m.chithambo@ru.ac.za [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Ankjærgaard, C. [Soil Geography and Landscape Group, Wageningen University Netherlands Centre for Luminescence Dating, Droevendaalsesteeg 3, 6708 PB Wageningen, The Netherlands (Netherlands); Pagonis, V. [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separate in time the stimulation and emission of luminescence. The luminescence is stimulated from a sample using a brief light pulse and the emission monitored during stimulation in the presence of scattered stimulating light or after pulsing, over photomultiplier noise only. Although the use of the method in retrospective dosimetry has been somewhat limited, the technique has been successfully applied to study mechanisms in the processes leading up to luminescence emission. The main means for this has been the temperature dependence of the luminescence intensity as well as the luminescence lifetimes determined from time-resolved luminescence spectra. In this paper we review some key developments in theory and applications to quartz including methods of evaluating lifetimes, techniques of evaluating kinetic parameters using both the dependence of luminescence intensity and lifetime on measurement temperature, and of lifetimes on annealing temperature. We then provide an overview of some notable applications such as separation of quartz signals from a quartz–feldspar admixture and the utility of the dynamic throughput, a measure of luminescence measured as a function of the pulse width. The paper concludes with some suggestions of areas where further exploration would advance understanding of dynamics of luminescence in quartz and help address some outstanding problems in its application.

  2. Infrared stimulated luminescence dating of an Eemian (MIS 5e) site in Denmark using K-feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Huot, Sebastian; Murray, Andrew S.

    2011-01-01

    Infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating of K-feldspars may be an alternative to quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating when the quartz OSL signal is too close to saturation or when the quartz luminescence characteristics are unsuitable. In this paper, Eemian (MIS 5e) coastal...

  3. High coating of Ru(II) complexes on gold nanoparticles for single particle luminescence imaging in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Nicola J; Claire, Sunil; Harris, Robert M; Farabi, Shiva; Zikeli, Gerald; Styles, Iain B; Hodges, Nikolas J; Pikramenou, Zoe

    2014-01-18

    Gold nanoparticles are efficiently labelled with a luminescent ruthenium complex, producing 13 and 100 nm diameter, monodisperse red-emissive imaging probes with luminescence lifetimes prolonged over the molecular unit. Single, 100 nm particles are observed in whole cell luminescence imaging which reveals their biomolecular association with chromatin in the nucleus of cancer cells.

  4. Phosphorescence quantum yield determination with time-gated fluorimeter and Tb(III)-acetylacetonate as luminescence reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Procedure for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield measurement is described. ► Experimental setup for absolute luminescence quantum yield standard calibration. ► Tb(acac){sub 3} proposed as phosphorescence quantum yield reference standard. ► Luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. ► Luminescence lifetime of Tb(acac){sub 3} in cyclohexane measured. - Abstract: Phosphorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent and phosphorescent samples require the use of time-gated fluorimeters in order to discriminate against the fluorescence contribution. As reference standard a non-fluorescent luminescent compound is needed for absolute phosphorescence quantum yield determination. For this purpose the luminescence behavior of the rare earth chelate terbium(III)-acetylacetonate (Tb(acac){sub 3}) was studied (determination of luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime). The luminescence quantum yield of Tb(acac){sub 3} was determined by using an external light source and operating the fluorimeter in chemo/bioluminescence mode with a fluorescent dye (rhodamine 6G in methanol) as reference standard. A procedure is developed for absolute luminescence (phosphorescence) quantum yield determination of samples under investigation with a time-gated fluorimeter using a non-fluorescent luminescent compound of known luminescence quantum yield and luminescence lifetime.

  5. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence.

  6. A cooperation of two pigment systems and respiration in photosynthetic luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedheer, J.C.

    1963-01-01

    Luminescence kinetics of photosynthesizing cells were investigated. This was done by measuring afterglow as a function of intensity and wavelength of actinic light as well as of temperature. In order to explain the chromatic transients, induction effects, and various other aspects of luminescence,

  7. Luminescence evolution of porous GaN thin films prepared via UV-assisted electrochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheah, S.F., E-mail: sookfongcheah@yahoo.com [Nano-Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Lee, S.C. [Nano-Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ng, S.S.; Yam, F.K.; Abu Hassan, H.; Hassan, Z. [Nano-Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-03-15

    Porous gallium nitride (GaN) thin films with different surface morphologies and free carriers properties were fabricated from Si-doped GaN thin films using ultra-violet assisted electrochemical etching approach under various etching voltages. Fluctuation of luminescence signals was observed in the photoluminescence spectra of porous GaN thin films. Taking advantage of the spectral sensitivity of infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy on semiconductor materials, roles of free carriers and porous structure in controlling luminescence properties of GaN were investigated thoroughly. The results revealed that enhancement in luminescence signal is not always attained upon porosification. Although porosification is correlated to the luminescence enhancement, however, free carrier is the primary factor to enhance luminescence intensity. Due to unavoidable significant reduction of free carriers from Si-doped GaN in the porosification process, control of etching depth (i.e., thickness of porous layer formed from the Si-doped layer) is critical in fabricating porous GaN thin film with enhanced luminescence response. - Highlights: • Various pore morphologies with free carrier properties are produced by Si-doped GaN. • Free carriers are important to control the luminescence signal of porous GaN. • Enhancement of luminescence signal relies on the pore depth of Si-doped layer.

  8. Luminescence of Ce doped oxygen crystalline compounds based on Hf and Ba

    CERN Document Server

    Borisevich, A E; Lecoq, P

    2003-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the Ce-doped hafnium and barium compounds have been investigated to determine their potential as heavy scintillation materials. Compounds have been prepared by solid state synthesis. All of them have shown a bright luminescence attributed to trivalent cerium. Emission bands are peaked in the 425-475nm spectral region at room temperature.

  9. Testing the application of quartz and feldspar luminescence dating to MIS 5 Japanese marine deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, Christine; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Tokuyasu, Kayoko

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of both quartz and feldspar luminescence dating was tested on twenty-five samples from a marine succession now forming a coastal cliff at Oga Peninsula, Honshu Island, Japan. The quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) signal shows thermal instability and linear modulated...

  10. Influence of hot-carrier luminescence from avalanche photodiodes on time-correlated photon detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulu, G; Sergienko, A V; Unlü, M S

    2000-05-15

    We present the results of our time-resolved measurements of hot-carrier luminescence from passively quenched Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes. In time-correlated photon-counting (TCPC) experiments, hot-carrier luminescence interferes overwhelmingly with the coincidence spectrum, which results in artifacts. This potential problem should be taken into account in setting up TCPC experiments.

  11. A luminescent nanocrystal marker for the selective and ultrasensitive detection of explosives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkar, Shyam; Grana Suarez, Laura; Verboom, Willem; Mahalingam, V.; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2016-01-01

    We developed a luminescent probe for the selective and sensitive detection of an explosive, i.e., picric acid (PA), based on the luminescence quenching of CeIII and TbIII co-doped Sr2GdF7 nanocrystals. A new colloidal synthesis route at low temperature (80 °C) was developed to synthesize the

  12. Tackling self-absorption in Luminescent Solar Concentrators with type-II colloidal quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.; Pera, S.J.; Dijk-Moes, R.J.A. van; Zhao, Y.; Brouwer, A.F.P. de; Groeneveld, E.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Schropp, R.E.I.; Mello-Donega, C. de

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a solar collector by means of concentration. The device is comprised a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been incorporated

  13. Luminescence dating on Mars: OSL characteristics of Martian analogue materials and GCR dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, M.; Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence chronology may be the key to understanding climatically and tectonically driven changes on Mars. However, the success of Martian luminescence dating will depend upon our understanding of the luminescence properties of silicates such as olivine, pyroxenes and plagioclases, and sedimen......), and the effect of radiation damage due to cosmic ray exposure are presented and implications discussed for Martian luminescence dating. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......Luminescence chronology may be the key to understanding climatically and tectonically driven changes on Mars. However, the success of Martian luminescence dating will depend upon our understanding of the luminescence properties of silicates such as olivine, pyroxenes and plagioclases......-aerial transport; this may allow possibility of using deep traps for extending the age range on Mars. Dose rates on Mars are largely due to charged particles present in the galactic cosmic rays. Some new results on proton dosimetry with Al2O3:C (Bragg curve and luminescence efficiency as a function of LET...

  14. Homogeneous broadening effect on temperature dependence of green upconversion luminescence in erbium doped fibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egatz-Gomez, A.; Calderon, Oscar G.; Melle, Sonia; Carreno, F.; Anton, M. A.; Gort, Elske M.

    We study the green upconversion luminescence of Er3+ ions in an aluminosilicate optical fiber upon near infrared excitation at 787 nm. The dependence of the upconversion luminescence on temperature has been determined. As temperature drops from room to cryogenic temperatures, the upconversion green

  15. Tackling self-absorption in Luminescent Solar Concentrators with type-II colloidal quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.; Pera, S.J.; Dijk-Moes, R.J.A. van; Zhao, Y.; Brouwer, A.F.P. de; Groeneveld, E.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Schropp, R.E.I.; Mello-Donega, C. de

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a solar collector by means of concentration. The device is comprised a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been

  16. Sensitization of Tb3+ Luminescence in NaGdSiO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiliaan, H.S.; Herwijnen, S.P. van; Blasse, G.

    1987-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the system Na(Gd,S,Tb)SiO4 (S = Ce3+ or Bi3+) are reported, for the orthorhombic olivine modification as well as for the tetragonal NaF-stabilized modification. The Tb3+ luminescence can be sensitized by Ce3+, Gd3+ or Bi3+. The efficiencies of the several processes are

  17. Luminescent solar concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics solution for the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are being developed as a potentially low cost-per-Wp photovoltaic device, suited for applications especially in the built environment. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species, either organic dye molecules or

  18. Tackling self-absorption in Luminescent Solar Concentrators with type-II colloidal quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.; Pera, S.J.; Dijk-Moes, R.J.A. van; Zhao, Y.; Brouwer, A.F.P. de; Groeneveld, E.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Schropp, R.E.I.; Mello-Donega, C. de

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a solar collector by means of concentration. The device is comprised a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been incorporated

  19. Pottery versus sediment: Optically stimulated luminescence dating of the Neolithic Vinča culture, Serbia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bate, Stephen; Stevens, Thomas; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter

    2017-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating was applied to the Neolithic Vinča culture's type-site, Vinča Belo-Brdo, to establish best protocols for routine luminescence dating of similar Holocene sites, critical in understanding Neolithic to Chalcolithic cultural development. Equivalent dose ...

  20. Monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic luminescent solar concentratorr with 4.2% power conversion efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, L.; Ras, A.J.M.; De Boer, D.K.G.; Debije, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We report conversion efficiencies of experimental single and dual lightguide luminescent solar concentrators. We have built several 5x5cm2 and 10x10 cm2 LSC demonstrators, consisting of c-Si photovoltaiccells attached to luminescent lightguides of Lumogen F Red 305 dyeand perylene perinone dye. The

  1. Luminescence properties of Si-containing porous matrix–PbS nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarasov, S. A., E-mail: satarasov@mail.ru; Aleksandrova, O. A.; Lamkin, I. A.; Maksimov, A. I.; Maraeva, E. V.; Mikhailov, I. I.; Moshnikov, V. A. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation); Musikhin, S. F. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Nalimova, S. S.; Permyakov, N. V.; Spivak, Yu. M.; Travkin, P. G. [St. Petersburg State Electrotechnical University “LETI” (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The luminescence properties of systems that contain lead-sulfide nanoparticles deposited onto substrates fabricated from porous silicon, oxidized porous silicon, and porous (tin-oxide)–(silicon-oxide) layers are studied. It is shown that the structure and composition of the matrix induce a strong effect on the luminescence spectra of colloidal quantum dots, defining their emission wavelength.

  2. SiO{sub {ital x}} luminescence from light-emitting porous silicon: Support for the quantum confinement/luminescence center model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Farnum, E.H.; Hults, W.L.; Sickafus, K.E.; Smith, J.F.; Smith, J.L.; Taylor, T.N.; Tiwari, P. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Portis, A.M. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Measurements of hydrogen loss and luminescence as a function of annealing temperature in porous silicon suggest that luminescence is attributable to electron-hole recombination in SiO{sub {ital x}} surface layers with an intensity that is dependent upon the surface hydrogen content. The luminescence is composed of three Gaussian bands similar to those found in amorphous SiO{sub 2}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy show porous silicon has SiO{sub {ital x}} on the surface, which is comprised of many particles of about 10 nm size. Collectively, the data strongly support the previously proposed quantum confinement/luminescence center model. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Infrared spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry of luminescent, nonluminescent, and metal quenched porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, J.; Andsager, D.; Abu Hassan, L.; Nayfeh, H.M.; Nayfeh, M.H. (Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 W. Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States))

    1994-08-15

    Porous silicon with varying optical properties (luminescent, nonluminescent, and metal quenched) is investigated by transmission infrared (IR) spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). SIMS and transmission IR data are presented which show a lack of correlation between the optical properties of similarly prepared luminescent and nonluminescent porous silicon samples and the concentrations of the chemical elements and bonds detected therein. Similar results are obtained for a comparison of IR spectra before and after dissolving the topmost layers ([similar to]2000 A) of a luminescent sample in a KOH solution, exposing the nonluminescent porous material below. Finally, IR and SIMS results for luminescent porous silicon quenched by metal ion solutions show a large increase in oxygen after quenching, but it is argued that the increased oxygen is unlikely to be directly responsible for the quenching of luminescence.

  4. A robust feldspar luminescence dating method for Middle and Late Pleistocene sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Jain, Mayank; Murray, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescence dating is used extensively to provide absolute chronologies for Late Pleistocene sediments. Nowadays, most optical dates are based on quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). However, the application of this signal is usually limited to the last ~100 ka because of saturation...... of the quartz luminescence signal with dose. In contrast, the feldspar infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dose–response curve grows to much higher doses; this has the potential to extend the datable age range by a factor of 4–5 compared with quartz OSL. However, it has been known for several decades...... is widely applicable (feldspar of appropriate luminescence behaviour is even more ubiquitous than quartz). These characteristics make this a method of great importance for the dating of Middle and Late Pleistocene deposits....

  5. Novel Mechano-Luminescent Sensors Based on Piezoelectric/Electroluminescent Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhang Fang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A high-sensitivity mechano-luminescent sensor was fabricated on the basis of piezoelectric/electroluminescent composites. The working principle of this mechano-luminescent sensor was elucidated by analyzing the relationship between the piezoelectric-induced charges and the electroluminescent effects. When a stress is applied on the piezoelectric layer, electrical charges will be induced at both the top and bottom sides of the piezoelectric layer. The induced electrical charges will lead to a light output from the electroluminescent layer, thus producing a mechano-luminescence effect. By increasing the vibration strength or frequency applied, the mechano-luminescence output can be obviously enhanced. Mechano-luminescence sensors have potential in smart stress-to-light devices, such as foot-stress-distribution-diagnosis systems and dynamic-load-monitors for bridge hanging cables.

  6. Luminescence properties of Eu3+-doped Lanthanum gadolinium hafnates transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjuan; Zhou, Guohong; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Xianpeng; Wang, Shiwei

    2017-09-01

    Eu3+-doped Lanthanum gadolinium hafnates (La0.8Gd1.2Hf2O7) transparent ceramics with different Eu3+ concentration were fabricated by vacuum sintering. XRD results showed all the ceramics are cubic pyrochlore structure. The effects of annealing process on in-line transmittance and luminescence behavior of the Eu3+-doped La0.8Gd1.2Hf2O7 transparent ceramics were investigated. Before annealing, the in-line transmittance of the ceramics was low and the luminescence intensity was weak. As Eu3+ doping content increased, the transmittance as well as the luminescence intensity decreased. This was ascribed to oxygen vacancy and other defects in the ceramics resulted from the vacuum sintering. After annealing, the transmittance and luminescence intensity were raised, indicating the elimination of oxygen vacancy. Moreover, with the increase of Eu3+ doping content from 1 at% to 10 at%, the luminescence intensity increased without concentration quenching.

  7. Optimising the separation of quartz and feldspar optically stimulated luminescence using pulsed excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov;

    2010-01-01

    In luminescence dating, the two most commonly used natural minerals, quartz and feldspar, are exposed to different dose rates in the natural environment, and so record different doses. The luminescence signals also have different stabilities. For accurate dosimetry, the signals from these two...... minerals must be separated, either by physical separation of the mineral grains, or by instrumental separation of the luminescence signals. The luminescence signals from quartz and feldspar have different luminescence lifetimes under pulsed optical stimulation. This difference in lifetime can be used...... to discriminate between the two signals from a mixed quartz-feldspar sample. The purpose of this study is to identify optimum measurement conditions for the best separation of quartz OSL from that of feldspar in a mixed sample using pulsed stimulation and time-resolved OSL. We integrate the signal from 5 μs after...

  8. Guide to luminescence dating techniques and their application for paleoseismic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Harrison J.; Mahan, Shannon; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Nelson, Michelle Summa; Lund, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, luminescence dating has become a key tool for dating sediments of interest in paleoseismic research. The data obtained from luminescence dating has been used to determine timing of fault displacement, calculate slip rates, and estimate earthquake recurrence intervals. The flexibility of luminescence is a key complement to other chronometers such as radiocarbon or cosmogenic nuclides. Careful sampling and correct selection of sample sites exert two of the strongest controls on obtaining an accurate luminescence age. Factors such as partial bleaching and post-depositional mixing should be avoided during sampling and special measures may be needed to help correct for associated problems. Like all geochronologic techniques, context is necessary for interpreting and calculating luminescence results and this can be achieved by supplying participating labs with associated trench logs, photos, and stratigraphic locations of sample sites.

  9. Preparation and characterization of keratin and chicken egg white-templated luminescent Au cluster composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yao; Liu, Hongling; Yu, Weidong

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of keratin-chicken egg white-templated luminescent Au cluster composite films were studied using fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to demonstrate and quantify the secondary transformation of composite films. The results showed that the secondary structure of treated films was transformed from disordered structure to ordered conformation including α-helix conformation and β-pleated-sheet conformation due to the increase of protein-templated luminescent Au cluster. The absorption features of treated films were exhibited by the UV-vis spectra. The bule-shift and decreased intensity indicated the change of microenvironment due to the concentration of protein-templated luminescent Au cluster. The transmission electron microscopy images of composite films supported the aggregation resulting from microenvironment. The effect of protein-templated luminescent Au cluster was characterized by the laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) images which showed the gradually intensive luminescence with increasing Au cluster and the transformation from the whiskers to nanoparticle.

  10. Brilliant Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy chiral lanthanide complexes withstrong circularly polarized luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petoud, Stephane; Muller, Gilles; Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Sokolnicki, Jurek; Riehl, James P.; Le, Uyen; Cohen, Seth M.; Raymond,Kenneth N.

    2006-07-10

    The synthesis, characterization and luminescent behavior of trivalent Sm, Eu, Dy and Tb complexes of two enantiomeric, octadentate, chiral, 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands are reported. These complexes are highly luminescent in solution. Functionalization of the achiral parent ligand with a chiral 1-phenylethylamine substituent on the open face of the complex in close proximity to the metal center yields complexes with strong circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) activity. This appears to be the first example of a system utilizing the same ligand architecture to sensitize four different lanthanide cations and display CPL activity. The luminescence dissymmetry factor, g{sub lum}, recorded for the Eu(III) complex is one of the highest values reported, and this is the first time the CPL effect has been demonstrated for a Sm(III) complex with a chiral ligand. The combination of high luminescence intensity with CPL activity should enable new bioanalytical applications of macromolecules in chiral environments.

  11. Quantitative analysis of time-resolved infrared stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, Vasilis, E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Ankjærgaard, Christina [Soil Geography and Landscape Group & Netherlands Centre for Luminescence dating, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Jain, Mayank [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Risø Campus, Roskilde (Denmark); Chithambo, Makaiko L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa)

    2016-09-15

    Time-resolved infrared-stimulated luminescence (TR-IRSL) from feldspar samples is of importance in the field of luminescence dating, since it provides information on the luminescence mechanism in these materials. In this paper we present new analytical equations which can be used to analyze TR-IRSL signals, both during and after short infrared stimulation pulses. The equations are developed using a recently proposed kinetic model, which describes localized electronic recombination via tunneling between trapped electrons and recombination centers in luminescent materials. Recombination is assumed to take place from the excited state of the trapped electron to the nearest-neighbor center within a random distribution of luminescence recombination centers. Different possibilities are examined within the model, depending on the relative importance of electron de-excitation and recombination. The equations are applied to experimental TR-IRSL data of natural feldspars, and good agreement is found between experimental and modeling results.

  12. [Broad excitation band alkaline-earth silicate luminescent materials activated by rare earth and its applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wei; Lei, Ming-Kai; Luo, Xi-Xian; Xiao, Zhi-Guo

    2008-01-01

    Series of novel broad excitation band phosphors M2 MgSis O7 : Eu, Dy(M = Ca, Sr) were prepared by a high temperature solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure of compound was characterized. And the effects of part substitution of alkaline-earth on crystal structure, photoluminescence spectra and luminescence properties were also investigated. It is found that the excitation band of silicate luminescent materials extend to visible region and they exhibit yellow, green and blue long after-glow luminescence after excited by ultraviolet or visible light. Ca MgSi O7 : Eu, Dy luminescent materials can be excited effectively under the 450-480 nm range and exhibit a strong emission at 536 nm, nicely combining with blue light emitted by InGaN chips to produce white light. This promises the silicate luminescent materials a potential yellow phosphor for white LED.

  13. Isotopic fingerprints of Pt-containing luminescence centers in highly enriched Si-28

    CERN Document Server

    Steger, M; Godisov, O N; Alves, E; Kaliteevskii, A K; Saeedi, K; Abrosimov, N V; Churbanov, M F; Gusev, A V; Johnston, K; Thewalt, M L W; Sekiguchi, T; Yang, A; Riemann, H; Henry, M O; Pohl, H -J; Wahl, U

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the reduction in the photoluminescence linewidth of many deep luminescence centers in highly enriched Si-28 results in well-resolved isotopic fingerprints. This allows for a better characterization of a defect center, as not only the involvement of a specific element but also the number of atoms of that element within the complex can be determined. Surprisingly, we have found that many well-known luminescence centers have a different composition than originally supposed. In addition, we have found a large number of four- and five-atom luminescence centers involving the elements Cu, Au, and Li. Here we introduce series of four- and five-atom deep luminescence centers involving a single Pt atom together with Cu and Li, similar to what has been seen previously for Au-containing luminescence centers.

  14. Note: Near infrared spectral and transient measurements of PbS quantum dots luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, P. S.; Litvin, A. P.; Ushakova, E. V.; Fedorov, A. V.; Baranov, A. V.; Berwick, K.

    2013-11-01

    We describe an experimental setup for the characterization of luminescence from nanostructures. The setup is intended for steady-state and time-resolved luminescence measurements in the near-infrared region. The setup allows us to study spectral luminescence properties in the spectral range of 0.8-2.0 μm with high spectral resolution and kinetic luminescence properties between 0.8 and 1.7 μm with a time resolution of 3 ns. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by taking luminescence measurements from PbS quantum dots. We established the size dependencies of the optical properties of the PbS quantum dots over a wide spectral range. Finally, the energy transfer process was studied with a high temporal and spectral resolution.

  15. An efficient ionoluminescence analysis of turquoise gemstone as a weakly luminescent mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, T; Kakuee, O; Lamehi-Rachti, M

    2017-02-21

    The unique ionization pattern of MeV-energy ion beam is applied for efficient luminescence analysis of a collection of natural turquoise samples. The considerable penetration depth of tens of micrometer and enhancement of energy deposition with depth, suggests ionoluminescence as an appropriate technique for studying weakly luminescent minerals. Herein, the luminescence induced in deeper parts of turquoise samples is extracted through their relatively transparent adjacent host stones. The resulting intense spectra reveal the vibrational structure of the broad green luminescence band of turquoise which probably originates from O2(-) centers. Moreover, owing to the applied ionoluminescence approach, red and blue luminescence bands of turquoise were observed which can be ascribed to Fe(3+) ions and UO2(2+) centers respectively. The elemental information of the samples is provided using micro-PIXE analysis technique.

  16. Light-mimicking cockroaches indicate Tertiary origin of recent terrestrial luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršanský, Peter; Chorvát, Dušan; Fritzsche, Ingo; Hain, Miroslav; Ševčík, Robert

    2012-09-01

    Bioluminescence is a common feature of the communication and defence of marine organisms, but this phenomenon is highly restricted in the terrestrial biota. Here, we present a geographical distribution of only the third order of luminescent insects—luminescent cockroaches, with all 13 known and/or herein reported new living species (based on deposited specimens). We show that, for the first time, photo-characteristics of three examined species are nearly identical with those of toxic luminescent click beetles, which they mimic. These observations are the evidence for the mimicry by light—a new type of defensive, Batesian and interordinal mimicry. Our analysis surprisingly reveals an evolutionary novelty of all living luminescent insects, while in the sea (and possibly in the soil) luminescence is present also phylogenetically in very primitive organisms.

  17. Semiconducting Polymer Nanoparticles with Persistent Near-Infrared Luminescence for In Vivo Optical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palner, Mikael; Pu, Kanyi; Shao, Shirley; Rao, Jianghong

    2015-09-21

    Materials with persistent luminescence are attractive for in vivo optical imaging since they have a long lifetime that allows the separation of excitation of fluorophores and image acquisition for time-delay imaging, thus eliminating tissue autofluorescence associated with fluorescence imaging. Persistently luminescent nanoparticles have previously been fabricated from toxic rare-earth metals. This work reports that nanoparticles made of the conjugated polymer MEH-PPV can generate luminescence persisting for an hour upon single excitation. A near-infrared dye was encapsulated in the conjugated polymer nanoparticle to successfully generate persistent near-infrared luminescence through resonance energy transfer. This new persistent luminescence nanoparticles have been demonstrated for optical imaging applications in living mice.

  18. Characterization of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic coatings by luminescence measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, T., E-mail: teru@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yoshino, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Hishinuma, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Zhang, D. [School of Physical Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kada, W. [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki-shi, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Sato, F.; Iida, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagasaki, T. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Muroga, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence and ion beam induced luminescence measurements were performed on Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings fabricated by the Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD), Metal Organic Decomposition (MOD) and RF sputtering methods to examine relations between luminescence spectra and their crystallinities. In luminescence spectra of all the measurements, peaks were observed in three bands of 380-420 nm, 530-580 nm and 640-690 nm. Cathodoluminescence intensities in the band of 640-690 nm increased with substrate temperatures in the fabrication processes and are considered to be significantly sensitive to the crystallinity. Change in luminescence spectra under ion beam irradiations also supported the relation. By using the relations between the spectra and crystallinities, luminescence measurements would be effective for nondestructive inspection and analysis of Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} coatings with a high spatial resolution.

  19. Testing a luminescence surface-exposure dating technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliganic, Luke A.; Meyer, Michael; Gehring, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Recent work has shown that the relationship between the luminescence signal (optically stimulated [OSL] and infra-red stimulated [IRSL]) and depth into a rock surface can be used to estimate the length of time since that rock surface has been exposed to sunlight (Sohbati et al., 2012), thus serving as a means for surface-exposure dating. Despite the potential of this new dating tool, few published studies have tested or used this technique. Here, we present the results of two tests of the method. First, we perform laboratory bleaching experiments using two unexposed bedrock samples of different lithologies (granite and quartzite). Sub-samples were bleached for various durations (0 to 100,000 s) in a solar simulator, and IRSL/OSL-depth profiles were measured and fitted using the model of Sohbati et al. (2012). Results of fitting for each sub-sample were then compared. Second, we used a granite boulder from a known age moraine (1850 CE) to test the reproducibility of bleaching depth curves. Multiple cores were collected from the same ~5 cm2 surface area of the boulder, and IRSL-depth profiles were measured and modelled. While our systematic tests confirm the general physical basis of luminescence surface-exposure dating method, we found unexpected scatter in both adjacent bleaching depth curves and the fitting parameters of isochronous rock surfaces for some of our samples. Potential sources of error, including small-scale lithological variabilities and implications for accuracy and precision of the method are discussed. Sohbati, R., Murray, A.S., Chapot, M.S., Jain, M., Pederson, J. (2012) Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) as a chronometer for surface exposure dating. Journal of Geophysical Research 117 (B9), B09202. doi.org/10.1029/2012JB009383.

  20. Non-contact luminescence lifetime cryothermometry for macromolecular crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhaylyk, V B; Wagner, A; Kraus, H

    2017-05-01

    Temperature is a very important parameter when aiming to minimize radiation damage to biological samples during experiments that utilize intense ionizing radiation. A novel technique for remote, non-contact, in situ monitoring of the protein crystal temperature has been developed for the new I23 beamline at the Diamond Light Source, a facility dedicated to macromolecular crystallography (MX) with long-wavelength X-rays. The temperature is derived from the temperature-dependent decay time constant of luminescence from a minuscule scintillation sensor (luminescence lifetime thermometry is presented, the features of the detection method and the choice of temperature sensor are discussed, and it is demonstrated how the temperature monitoring system was integrated within the viewing system of the endstation used for the visualization of protein crystals. The thermometry system was characterized using a Bi4Ge3O12 crystal scintillator that exhibits good responsivity of the decay time constant as a function of temperature over a wide range (8-270 K). The scintillation sensor was calibrated and the uncertainty of the temperature measurements over the primary operation temperature range of the beamline (30-150 K) was assessed to be ±1.6 K. It has been shown that the temperature of the sample holder, measured using the luminescence sensor, agrees well with the expected value. The technique was applied to characterize the thermal performance of different sample mounts that have been used in MX experiments at the I23 beamline. The thickness of the mount is shown to have the greatest impact upon the temperature distribution across the sample mount. Altogether, these tests and findings demonstrate the usefulness of the thermometry system in highlighting the challenges that remain to be addressed for the in-vacuum MX experiment to become a reliable and indispensable tool for structural biology.

  1. An intrinsic luminescence in binary lead silicate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepin, А. F.; Zhidkov, I. S.; Kukharenko, A. I.; Zatsepin, D. А.; Andronov, М. P.; Cholakh, S. О.

    2012-03-01

    The low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) of xPbO · (1 - x)SiO2 glasses (x = 0.20-0.75) was studied at Т = 10 K. The recorded PL-spectra are a superposition of three spectral components with maxima located at 1.8 eV (identified as Pb 6p → metal-bridging O2p radiative electron transition, the "R"-band), 2.0 eV (Pb 6p → non-bridging O2p, the "O"-band) and 2.55 eV (Pb 6p → Pb 6s, the "B"-band), respectively. It was found the essential link for "R", "O" and "B" PL-bands with chemical composition x of the glasses under study. These concentration dependences are expressed as mutual PL-intensity variations for each recorded luminescence band that allowed to determine their origin. The shape of established dependences well coincides with numerical data on NBO- and MBO-density of chemical bonding, reported previously. The overall PL-manner within the temperature range of 10-295 K is described by an empirical Street's law. It was shown that experimental photoluminescence quenching curves may be precisely approximated as a superposition of Mott relationships for nonequivalent luminescence centers. The obtained distribution of PL-centers on the activation energy for luminescence quenching reflects the essential donation of the low-energy states into the overall PL-process. The width of this energy distribution affects by the type of PL-emission band and the disordering degree in the arrangement of local PL-centers of a certain kind.

  2. Fabrication of CdSe quantum dots/permutite luminescent materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meihua Yu; Yilin Wang

    2015-09-01

    Permutite incorporating CdSe in mesopores has been prepared with a simple route. Firstly, mercaptosuccinic acid-capped CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were prepared in aqueous solution by using SeO2 as selenium source and NaBH4 as reductant. Secondly, the commercial permutite was treated with acetic acid to induce a partial dealumnization, which can introduce a large number of intracrystal mesopores, and the CdSe QDs were successfully incorporated in the mesopores with the wet impregnation method. Photoluminescence spectra, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of samples. The spectra analyses results showed that the illuminant colour of QDs/permutite powder was similar to the corresponding QDs colloid. X-ray diffraction measurements indicated that the (1 0 1) diffraction peak at 2 = 27° for QDs/permutite powder was the same as the raw permutite, and the energy-dispersive X-ray spectra demonstrated that Cd and Se elements existed in the CdSe QDs/permutite powder.

  3. The nature of unusual luminescence in natural calcite, CaCO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaft, M.; Nagli, L.; Panczer, G.; Waychunas, G.; Porat, N.

    2008-11-01

    The unusual luminescence of particular varieties of natural pink calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) samples was studied by laser-induced time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy at different temperatures. The luminescence is characterized by intense blue emission under short-wave UV lamp excitation with an extremely long decay time, accompanied by pink-orange luminescence under long wave UV excitation. Our investigation included optical absorption, natural thermostimulated luminescence (NTL) and Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) studies. Two luminescence centers were detected: a narrow violet band, with {lambda}{sub max} = 412 nm, {Delta} = 45 nm, two decay components of {tau}{sub 1} = 5 ns and {tau}{sub 2} = 7.2 ms, accompanied by very long afterglow, and an orange emission band with {lambda}{sub max} = 595 nm, {Delta} = 90 nm and {tau} = 5 ns. Both luminescence centers are thermally unstable with the blue emission disappearing after heating at 500 C, and the orange emission disappearing after heating at different temperatures starting from 230 C, although sometimes it is stable up to 500 C in different samples. Both centers have spectral-kinetic properties very unusual for mineral luminescence, which in combination with extremely low impurity concentrations, prevent their identification with specific impurity related emission. The most likely explanation of these observations may be the presence of radiation-induced luminescence centers. The long violet afterglow is evidently connected with trapped charge carrier liberation, with their subsequent migration through the valence band and ultimate recombination with a radiation-induced center responsible for the unusual violet luminescence.

  4. Applications of micelle enhancement in luminescence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarfaj, Nawal A; El-Tohamy, Maha F

    2015-02-01

    Micelles are self-assembled aggregates that arrange themselves into spheres in aqueous media. When the surfactant concentration reaches the critical micelle concentration, extensive aggregation of the surfactant monomers occurs to form micelles. A micelle has both a hydrophilic and a hydrophobic part. This allows them to form a spherical shape and for their glycolipid and phospholipid components to form lipid bilayers. The importance of micelles is increasing because of their wide analytical applications. Recently, colloidal carrier systems have received much attention in the field of analytical chemistry, especially in luminescence enhancement applications.

  5. Fabrication of Luminescent Nanostructures by Dip-Pen Nanolithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noy, A; Miller, A E; Klare, J E; Weeks, B L; Woods, B W; DeYoreo, J J

    2002-06-25

    We used a combination of dip-pen nanolithography and scanning optical confocal microscopy to fabricate and visualize luminescent nanoscale patterns of various materials on glass substrates. We show that this method can be used successfully to push the limits of dip-pen nanolithography down to controlled deposition of single molecules. We also demonstrate that this method is able to create and visualize protein patterns on surfaces. Finally, we show that our method can be used to fabricate polymer nanowires of controlled size using conductive polymers. We also present a kinetic model that accurately describes the deposition process.

  6. Preparation and characterization of nontoxic magnetic-luminescent nanoprobe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Nai-Qiang; Liu Ling; Lei Jie-Mei; Liu Yan-Song; Gong Mao-Gang; Wu Yi-Zhi; Zhu Li-Xin; Xu Xiao-Liang

    2012-01-01

    A novel nontoxic,magnetic,and luminescent nanoprobe is prepared by using complex nanoparticles,which are composed of Fe304 nanoparticles and Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs).The nanocomposite probe can provide visible optical and magnetic resonance images simultaneously.Compared with the previously toxic cadmium and mercury based QDs,the superiority of the Mn-doped ZnS QDs is little virulence.The structure and the properties of the particles are characterized by energy dispersive X-ray analysis spectroscopy,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,transmission electron microscopy,photoluminescence spectroscopy,and vibrating sample magnetometer.

  7. Household and workplace chemicals as retrospective luminescence dosemeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    In the development of techniques for the retrospective assessment of the close absorbed by communities living and working adjacent to the site of a nuclear accident, attention has concentrated on the use Of natural minerals such as quartz and feldspar as dosemeters. These minerals are widely found......, there are Other potential unheated crystalline materials found in the domestic and industrial environment which may also act as retrospective dosemeters, and may be considerably more sensitive. We have Surveyed the thermoluminescent and optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) characteristics of several...

  8. The Luminescence Profile Monitor of the CERN SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Burtin, G; Ferioli, G; Jung, R; Koopman, J; Perret, R; Variola, A; Vouillot, J M

    2000-01-01

    The SPS luminescence monitor is the first device of this type to be used in a high energy accelerator, from 14 to 450 GeV, where up till now the light production was considered to be insufficient. It uses Nitrogen at pressures as low as 4 10-6 Pa as the scintillation medium. Light production, spectrum and decay times have been measured and compared with theory and existing low energy data. They are important factors for the design of such monitors for other machines, for example LHC.

  9. Luminescence properties of glaciofluvial sediments from the Bavarian Alpine Foreland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasen, N. [Department of Geography, University of Cologne, Albertus Magnus Platz, 50923 Cologne (Germany)]. E-mail: nicole.klasen@uni-koeln.de; Fiebig, M. [Institute of Applied Geology, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Peter- Jordan-Strasse 70, 1190 Vienna (Austria); Preusser, F. [Institute of Geology, University of Bern, Balzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Radtke, U. [Department of Geography, University of Cologne, Albertus Magnus Platz, 50923 Cologne (Germany)

    2006-08-15

    Dose recovery tests highlight the variation of luminescence properties for samples from different sites and sediment sources within a region. It is hence necessary to adjust parameters of the single-aliquot regenerative dose protocol for different samples to ensure complete dose recovery. Bleaching experiments demonstrate an initially faster bleaching of the quartz optical signal compared to feldspar. However, complete resetting of the optical signal of both quartz and feldspar minerals occurred within approximately the same time. Moreover, samples from different sites show significant differences in bleaching characteristics. Investigations on thermal transfer point out that potential age overestimation due to charge transfer can apparently be neglected for the samples under consideration.

  10. Holmium doped Lead Tungsten Tellurite glasses for green luminescent applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswarlu, M.; Mahamuda, Sk.; Swapna, K.; Prasad, M.V.V.K.S. [Department of Physics, KL University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram 522502, Guntur (Dt.), AP (India); Srinivasa Rao, A., E-mail: drsrallam@gmail.com [Department of Physics, KL University, Green Fields, Vaddeswaram 522502, Guntur (Dt.), AP (India); Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological University, Bawana Road, New Delhi 110042 (India); Shakya, Suman [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Mohan Babu, A. [Department of Physics, C.R. Engineering College, Renigunta Road, Tirupati-517 502, AP (India); Vijaya Prakash, G. [Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Lead Tungsten Tellurite (LTT) glasses doped with different concentrations of Ho{sup 3+} ions have been synthesized using the melt quenching method and characterized to understand their visible emission characteristic features using optical absorption and photoluminescence spectral studies. The Judd–Ofelt (JO) parameters measured from the absorption spectral features were used to evaluate radiative properties such as transition probability (A{sub R}), branching ratio (β{sub R}) and radiative lifetimes (τ{sub R}) for the prominent fluorescent levels of Ho{sup 3+} ions in LTT glasses. The photoluminescence spectra recorded for all the Ho{sup 3+} doped LTT glasses at an excitation wavelength 452 nm gives three prominent emission transitions {sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8}, {sup 5}F{sub 5}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} and {sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 7}, of which {sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} observed in visible green region (546 nm) is relatively more intense than the other two transitions. The intensity of {sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} emission transition in these glasses increases up to 1 mol% of Ho{sup 3+} ions and beyond concentration quenching is observed. Branching ratios (β{sub R}) and emission cross-sections (σ{sub se}) were evaluated for the intense emission transition {sup 5}F{sub 4}→{sup 5}I{sub 8} in these glasses to understand the luminescence efficiency in visible green region (546 nm). The CIE chromaticity coordinates were also evaluated in order to understand the suitability of these glasses for visible luminescence. From the measured emission cross-sections and CIE coordinates, it was found that 1 mol% of Ho{sup 3+} ions in LTT glasses are most suitable for visible green luminescence in principle. - Highlights: • Ho{sup 3+} doped LTT glasses have been synthesized using melt quenching technique. • From the absorption spectra, JO parameters have been evaluated using JO theory. • Branching ratios & Emission cross-sections were evaluated for

  11. PbSe quantum dot based luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Dennis L.; Preske, Amanda; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Krauss, Todd D.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2017-03-01

    The results are presented for luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) fabricated with poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (P(LMA-co-EGDMA)) and Angstrom Bond, Inc. AB9093 acrylic epoxy matrix, high quantum yield (> 70%) PbSe quantum dots (QDs) and silicon photovoltaic (Si PV) cells. LSCs were tested under a lamp with broadband illumination, photon flux-matched to a standard solar spectrum and verified under a calibrated solar lamp source. The P(LMA-co-EGDMA) sample demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiency of any known LSC fabricated with either QDs or Si PV cells, 4.74%. Additionally, increased temperature was shown to reduce efficiency.

  12. Probing Luminescence Dating Of Archaeologically Significant Carved Rock Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liritzis, Ioannis; Kitis, George; Galloway, Robert B.; Vafiadou, Asimina; Tsirliganis, Nestoras C.; Polymeris, George S.

    The thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of crystalline materials, first applied to calcites (limestone buildings), has been extended to carved megalithic monuments made of granites, basalt and sandstones derived from archaeological sites. Various applied criteria for potential dating included pulsed blue light stimulation, different preheating and solar simulator bleaching, while the single (and multiple) aliquot regeneration and additive dose procedures were used for equivalent dose determination. The decay curves of signal loss follow a power law, n-p; for blue stimulation the signal loss of quartz and feldspar is better approached by an exponential law, 1-aln(n).

  13. Cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrators: performance boosts by geometric effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Jose J H; Bilotti, Emiliano; Chatten, Amanda J

    2016-07-11

    This paper presents an investigation of the geometric effects within a cylindrical array luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Photon concentration of a cylindrical LSC increases linearly with cylinder length up to 2 metres. Raytrace modelling on the shading effects of circles on their neighbours demonstrates effective incident light trapping in a cylindrical LSC array at angles of incidence between 60-70 degrees. Raytrace modelling with real-world lighting conditions shows optical efficiency boosts when the suns angle of incidence is within this angle range. On certain days, 2 separate times of peak optical efficiency can be attained over the course of sunrise-solar noon.

  14. Anisotropic light emissions in luminescent solar concentrators-isotropic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbunt, Paul P C; Sánchez-Somolinos, Carlos; Broer, Dirk J; Debije, Michael G

    2013-05-06

    In this paper we develop a model to describe the emission profile from randomly oriented dichroic dye molecules in a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) waveguide as a function of incoming light direction. The resulting emission is non-isotropic, in contradiction to what is used in almost all previous simulations on the performance of LSCs, and helps explain the large surface losses measured in these devices. To achieve more precise LSC performance simulations we suggest that the dichroic nature of the dyes must be included in the future modeling efforts.

  15. PbSe quantum dot based luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Dennis L; Preske, Amanda; Zawodny, Joseph M; Krauss, Todd D; Gupta, Mool C

    2017-03-03

    The results are presented for luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) fabricated with poly(lauryl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (P(LMA-co-EGDMA)) and Angstrom Bond, Inc. AB9093 acrylic epoxy matrix, high quantum yield (> 70%) PbSe quantum dots (QDs) and silicon photovoltaic (Si PV) cells. LSCs were tested under a lamp with broadband illumination, photon flux-matched to a standard solar spectrum and verified under a calibrated solar lamp source. The P(LMA-co-EGDMA) sample demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiency of any known LSC fabricated with either QDs or Si PV cells, 4.74%. Additionally, increased temperature was shown to reduce efficiency.

  16. Efficiency and loss mechanisms of plasmonic Luminescent Solar Concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Brown, Mark S; Taylor, Alaric; Kenyon, Anthony J; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis

    2013-09-09

    Using a hybrid nanoscale/macroscale model, we simulate the efficiency of a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) which employs silver nanoparticles to enhance the dye absorption and scatter the incoming light. We show that the normalized optical efficiency can be increased from 10.4% for a single dye LSC to 32.6% for a plasmonic LSC with silver spheres immersed inside a thin dye layer. Most of the efficiency enhancement is due to scattering of the particles and not due to dye absorption/re-emission.

  17. Emissive Molecular Aggregates and Energy Migration in Luminescent Solar Concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banal, James L; Zhang, Bolong; Jones, David J; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Wong, Wallace W H

    2017-01-17

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are light harvesting devices that are ideally suited to light collection in the urban environment where direct sunlight is often not available. LSCs consist of highly luminescent compounds embedded or coated on a transparent substrate that absorb diffuse or direct solar radiation over a large area. The resulting luminescence is trapped in the waveguide by total internal reflection to the thin edges of the substrate where the concentrated light can be used to improve the performance of photovoltaic devices. The concept of LSCs has been around for several decades, and yet the efficiencies of current devices are still below expectations for commercial viability. There are two primary challenges when designing new chromophores for LSC applications. Reabsorption of dye emission by chromophores within the waveguide is a significant loss mechanism attenuating the light output of LSCs. Concentration quenching, particularly in organic dye systems, restricts the quantity of chromophores that can be incorporated in the waveguide thus limiting the light absorbed by the LSC. Frequently, a compromise between increased light harvesting of the incident light and decreasing emission quantum yield is required for most organic chromophore-based systems due to concentration quenching. The low Stokes shift of common organic dyes used in current LSCs also imposes another optimization problem. Increasing light absorption of LSCs based on organic dyes to achieve efficient light harvesting also enhances reabsorption. Ideally, a design strategy to simultaneously optimize light harvesting, concentration quenching, and reabsorption of LSC chromophores is clearly needed to address the significant losses in LSCs. Over the past few years, research in our group has targeted novel dye structures that address these primary challenges. There is a common perception that dye aggregates are to be avoided in LSCs. It became apparent in our studies that aggregates

  18. Synthesis and luminescence of some rare earth metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, Mikhail N.; Pushkarev, Anatoly P.

    2016-12-01

    In the present paper the synthesis, photoand electroluminescent properties of new rare earth metal complexes prepared and studied at the Razuvaev Institute of Organometallic Chemistry during the last decade are reviewed. The obtained compounds give luminescence in UV, visible and NIR regions. The substituted phenolates, naphtholates, mercaptobenzothiazolate, 8-oxyquinolinolate, polyfluorinated alcoholates and chalcogenophosphinates were used as ligands. The synthesis and structure of unusual three-nuclear sulfidenitride clusters of Nd and Dy are described. The new excitation mechanism of ytterbium phenolates and naphtholates, which includes the stage of reversible reduction of Yb to divalent state and oxidation of the ligands in the excitation process, is discussed.

  19. [Photosensitized luminescence of singlet oxygen in aqueous solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnovskiĭ, A A

    1979-01-01

    The photoluminescence of singlet oxygen has been observed in air saturated solutions of riboflavin in D2O and mixtures of D2O and H2O. The excitation spectrum coincides with the absorption spectrum of the pigment, the emission maximum lies at 1275 nm. In D2O the quantum yield is approximately 1,2 x 10(-7). H2O quenches the luminescence. Analysis of quenching has shown that the quantum yield in H2O is less than in D2O by the factor of 20.

  20. Luminescence enhancement of rare earth ions by metal nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Denisenko

    2009-01-01

    Well-ordered metal structures,i.e.arrays of nanosized tips on silver surface for studies of the luminescence enhancement of absorbed media with rare earth ions were used.These arrays were prepared by the metal evaporation on track membranes.Calculations of resonance frequencies of tips regarded as semispheroids were done taking into account the interaction between dipoles of tips.They were used to discuss experimental results for media with Eu(NO3)3·6H2O salt basing on data for bulk silver dielectric function.

  1. Tritium beta-luminescence in ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B; Yan, F; Chen, K P [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Philipose, U; Ruda, H [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E4 (Canada); Kherani, N P [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3G4 (Canada); Shmayda, W, E-mail: kherani@ecf.utoronto.c, E-mail: kchen@engr.pitt.ed [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States)

    2010-10-20

    This paper reports on the observation of tritium-powered beta-luminescence (BL) in ZnO nanowires (NWs). The ZnO NWs, prepared using standard vapour-liquid-solid growth, were exposed to tritium betas emanating from a tritium gas source over a range of pressures and from a scandium tritide source. BL spectra were measured at room temperature, showing increasing signal strength with increasing tritium pressure and thus beta energy flux. Complementary photoluminescence studies with and without hydrogen impregnation indicate the quenching effect of hydrogen in ZnO NWs and thus reduced emission.

  2. A luminescence imaging system based on a CCD camera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.

    1997-01-01

    to photographic systems, in order to obtain spatially resolved data. However, the former option is extremely expensive and it is difficult to obtain quantitative data from the latter. This paper describes the use of a CCD camera for imaging both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The system...... described here has a maximum spatial resolution of 17 mu m; though this may be varied under software control to alter the signal-to-noise ratio. The camera has been mounted on a Riso automated TL/OSL reader, and both the reader and the CCD are under computer control. In the near u.v and blue part...

  3. Green luminescence from triphenylphosphine functionalized single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rima; Kumbhakar, P.; Mitra, A. K.

    2011-05-01

    In a simple wet chemical process, purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are treated with triphenylphosphine (Ph 3P) at room temperature. The functionalized material is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM micrograph clearly reveals that triphenylphosphine nanocrystals of nearly uniform size are attached to the surfaces of SWCNTs. The hybrid structure shows remarkable green luminescence with peak emission at around 500 nm, under UV excitation. The photoluminescence may be attributed to charge transfer from the electron-donating phosphorous atoms to the carbon nanotubes.

  4. Highly luminescent half-lantern cyclometalated platinum(II) complex: synthesis, structure, luminescence studies, and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia, Violeta; Forniés, Juan; Casas, José Ma; Martín, Antonio; López, José A; Larraz, Carmen; Borja, Pilar; Ovejero, Carmen; Tordera, Daniel; Bolink, Henk

    2012-03-19

    that 1 is a very efficient and stable (3)MMLCT emitter, even in solution. The high luminescence quantum yield of its red emission, added to its neutral character and the thermal stability of 1, make it a potential compound to be incorporated as phosphorescent dopant in multilayer organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs).

  5. Characterization and corrosion behavior of phytic acid coatings, obtained by chemical conversion on magnesium substrates in physiological solution; Caracterizacion y comportamiento frente a la corrosion de recubrimientos de acido fitico, obtenidos por conversion quimica, sobre substratos de magnesio en solucion fisiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Alvarado, L. A.; Lomeli, M. A.; Hernandez, L. S.; Miranda, J. M.; Narvaez, L.; Diaz, I.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.

    2014-10-01

    In order to improve the corrosion resistance of biodegradable magnesium and AZ31 magnesium alloy implants, a phytic acid coating has been applied on both substrates and their protective effect against corrosion has been assessed. The morphology and the chemical nature of the conversion coating were analyzed by SEM/EDX, XRD and FTIR. The spectra showed that the conversion coating was amorphous, and it was composed of Mg, O, and P on magnesium surface, along with Al, Zn and C on AZ31 alloy. The main coating components were chelate compounds formed by phytic acid and metallic ions. The corrosion resistance of bare and coated samples was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization technique in Hank's solution at 37 degree centigrade. The results indicate that phytic acid conversion coatings provided a very effective protection to the magnesium substrates studied. (Author)

  6. Quantifying the formation of chiral luminescent lanthanide assemblies in an aqueous medium through chiroptical spectroscopy and generation of luminescent hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Samuel J; Savyasachi, Aramballi Jayant; Peacock, Robert D; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2015-01-01

    Herein we present the synthesis and the photophysical evaluation of water-soluble chiral ligands (2·(R,R) and 2·(S,S)) and their application in the formation of lanthanide directed self-assembled structures. These pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic amide based ligands, possessing two naphthalene moieties as sensitising antennae, that can be used to populate the excited state of lanthanide ions, were structurally modified using 3-propanesultone and caesium carbonate, allowing for the incorporation of a water-solubilising sulfonate motif. We show, using microwave synthesis, that Eu(III) forms chiral complexes in 1 : 3 (M : L) stoichiometries (Eu·[2·(R,R)]3 and Eu·[2·(S,S)]3) with these ligands, and that the red Eu(III)-centred emission arising from these complexes has quantum yields (Φtot) of 12% in water. Both circular dichroism (CD) and circular polarised luminescence (CPL) analysis show that the complexes are chiral; giving rise to characteristic CD and CPL signatures for both the Λ and the Δ complexes, which both possess characteristic luminescence dissymmetry factors (g(lum)), describing the structure in solution. The self-assembly process was also monitored in situ by observing the changes in the ligand absorption and fluorescence emission, as well as in the Eu(III) luminescence. The change, fitted using non-linear regression analysis, demonstrated high binding affinity for Eu(III) which in part can be assigned to being driven by additional hydrophobic effects. Moreover, using CD spectroscopy, the changes in the chiroptical properties of both (2·(R,R) and 2·(S,S)) were monitored in real time. Fitting the changes in the CD spectra allowed for the step-wise binding constants to be determined for these assemblies; these matched well with those determined from both the ground and the excited state changes. Both the ligands and the Eu(III) complexes were then used in the formation of hydrogels; the Eu(III)-metallogels were luminescent to the naked-eye.

  7. Luminescence recognition of different organophosphorus pesticides by the luminescent Eu(III)-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azab, Hassan A., E-mail: azab2@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Duerkop, Axel [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Chemo and Biosensors, Regensburg University, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany); Anwar, Z.M.; Hussein, Belal H.M.; Rizk, Moustafa A.; Amin, Tarek [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt)

    2013-01-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Europium (III) luminescence quenching has been used for sensing organophosphorous pesticides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Four guest pesticides chlorfenvinphos, malathion, azinphos, and paraxon ethyl were used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sensitive rapid, cheap direct method for the determination of the pesticides has been developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method was applied to the determination of the OPs in tap, river, mineral, and waste waters. - Abstract: Luminescence quenching of a novel long lived Eu(III)-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid probe of 1:2 stoichiometric ratio has been studied in 0.10 volume fraction ethanol-water mixture at pH 7.5 (HEPES buffer) in the presence of the organophosphorus pesticides chlorfenvinphos (P1), malathion (P2), azinphos (P3), and paraxon ethyl (P4). The luminescence intensity of Eu(III)-(PDCA){sub 2} probe decreases as the concentration of the pesticide increases. It was observed that the quenching due to P3 and P4 proceeds via both diffusional and static quenching processes. Direct methods for the determination of the pesticides under investigation have been developed using the luminescence quenching of Eu(III)-pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid probe in solution. The linear range for determination of the selected pesticides is 1.0-35.0 {mu}M. The detection limits were 0.24-0.55 {mu}M for P3, P4, and P1 and 2.5 {mu}M for P2, respectively. The binding constants (K), and thermodynamic parameters of the OPs with Eu(III)-(PDCA){sub 2} were evaluated. Positive and negative values of entropy ({Delta}S) and enthalpy ({Delta}H) changes for Eu(III)-(PDCA){sub 2}-P1 ternary complex were calculated. As the waters in this study do not contain the above mentioned OPs over the limit detectable by the method, a recovery study was carried out after the addition of the adequate amounts of the organophosphorus pesticides under investigation.

  8. Combustion synthesis, characterization and luminescence properties of barium aluminate phosphor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AH Wako; FB Dejene; HC Swart

    2014-01-01

    The blue-green emitting Eu2+and Nd3+ doped polycrystalline barium aluminate (BaAl2O4:Eu2+,Nd3+) phosphor, was pre-pared by a solution-combustion method at 500 ºC without a post-annealing process. The characteristic variation in the structural and luminescence properties of the as-prepared samples was evaluated with regards to a change in the Ba/Al molar ratio from 0.1:1 to 1.4:1. The morphologies and the phase structures of the products were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while the optical properties were investigated using ultra-violet (UV) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, respectively. The XRD and TEM results revealed that the average crystallite size of the BaAl2O4:Eu2+,Nd3+ phosphor was about 70 nm. The broad-band UV-excited luminescence of the phosphors was observed atλmax=500 nm due to transitions from the 4f65d1 to the 4f7 configuration of the Eu2+ ion. The PL results indi-cated that the main peaks in the emission and excitation spectrum of phosphor particles slightly shifted to the short wavelength due to the changes in the crystal field due to the structure changes caused by the variation in the quantity of the Ba ions in the host lattice.

  9. Single Bubble SonoLuminescence of Particles model

    CERN Document Server

    Maiga, Mahamadou Adama

    2012-01-01

    The Single Bubble SonoLuminescence is a phenomenon where the vapor bubble trapped in a liquid collapse by emitting of a light. It is very known that the temperature inside the bubble depends on the radius, during the collapse, the temperature can reach thousands of Kelvins and that the light would be emitted by radiation of the ionized gas inside the bubble. So, studies show that in certain cases neither an imploding shock nor a plasma has been observed and the temperature is not high enough to explain the spectrum observed. The Single Bubble SonoLuminescence remains a subject of study. For this study we consider the bubble as a box where the free particles (particularly electrons) stemming from the molecules dissociation, are are trapped and confined within the bubble. The confinement allows the particles to acquire some energy during the collapse which they lose in the form of light and also to be considered to bind to the bubble as an electron is bound to the nucleus in an atom. So, with regard to the bubb...

  10. Development of luminescent bacteria as tracers for geological reservoir characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W.

    1991-10-01

    Bioluminescent cultures were acquired and tested for use as biological tracers for reservoir characterization by small independent oil companies. Initially these bacterial cultures were fastidious to work with, but when we finally determined their critical growth parameters simple test variations were developed that could be routinely accomplished. The intensity of their luminescence is easily distinguished by the human eye and requires no sophisticated technical knowledge or instrumentation. Cultures were received from culture banks and collected from marine environments. In our laboratory they were screened using the criteria of optimum growth and luminescence. Three stock cultures proved to grow profusely even when variations were made in nutrient additions, salts, and temperature. These three selected cultures were not inhibited when introduced to formations and formation waters and were not overgrown by other bacteria. Cultures isolated from the Gulf of Mexico were overgrown by indigenous bacteria and therefore, they were eliminated from further screening and adaption. Experiments were performed according to three major task descriptions: 1. Establish growth and luminescencing limitations of selected bacteria in various media, varying salt concentration and temperature. 2. Adapt cultures to formation waters. 3. Determine transport limitations of bioluminescent bacteria through representative reservoir cores. 19 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Agglomeration of Luminescent Porous Silicon Nanoparticles in Colloidal Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herynková, Kateřina; Šlechta, Miroslav; Šimáková, Petra; Fučíková, Anna; Cibulka, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We have prepared colloidal solutions of clusters composed from porous silicon nanoparticles in methanol, water and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Even if the size of the nanoclusters is between 60 and 500 nm, due to their highly porous "cauliflower"-like structure, the porous silicon nanoparticles are composed of interconnected nanocrystals having around 2.5 nm in size and showing strong visible luminescence in the orange-red spectral region (centred at 600-700 nm). Hydrophilic behaviour and good solubility of the nanoclusters in water and water-based solutions were obtained by adding hydrogen peroxide into the etching solution during preparation and 16 min long after-bath in hydrogen peroxide. By simple filtration of the solutions with syringe filters, we have extracted smaller nanoclusters with sizes of approx. 60-70 nm; however, these nanoclusters in water and PBS solution (pH neutral) are prone to agglomeration, as was confirmed by zeta potential measurements. When the samples were left at ambient conditions for several weeks, the typical nanocluster size increased to approx. 330-400 nm and then remained stable. However, both freshly filtered and aged samples (with agglomerated porous silicon nanoparticles) of porous silicon in water and PBS solutions can be further used for biological studies or as luminescent markers in living cells.

  12. Time-resolved spectral analysis of Radachlorin luminescence in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, V. P.; Gadzhiev, I. M.; Semenova, I. V.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2017-05-01

    We report results of spectral- and time-resolved study of Radachlorin photosensitizer luminescence in water in the spectral range of 950-1350nm and for determination of the photosensitizer triplet state and the singlet oxygen lifetimes responsible for singlet oxygen generation and degradation. At any wavelength within the explored spectral range the luminescence decay contained two major contributions: a fast decay at the ns time scale and a slow evolution at the μs time scale. The fast decay was attributed to electric dipole fluorescence transitions in photosensitizer molecules and the slow evolution to intercombination phosphorescence transitions in singlet oxygen and photosensitizer molecules. Relatively high-amplitude ns peak observed at all wavelengths suggests that singlet oxygen monitoring with spectral isolation methods alone, without additional temporal resolution can be controversial. In the applied experimental conditions the total phosphorescence signal at any wavelength contained a contribution from the photosensitizer triplet state decay, while at 1274nm the singlet oxygen phosphorescence dominated. The results obtained can be used for optimization of the methods of singlet oxygen monitoring and imaging.

  13. Characterization of a nondestructive beam profile monitor using luminescent emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Variola

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The LHC (large hadron collider [LHC study group: LHC. The large hadron collider conceptual design; CERN/AC/95-05] is the future p-p collider under construction at CERN, Geneva. Over a circumference of 26.7 km a set of cryogenic dipoles and rf cavities will store and accelerate proton and ion beams up to energies of the order of 7 TeV. Injection in LHC will be performed by the CERN complex of accelerators, starting from the source and passing through the linac, the four booster rings, the proton synchrotron (PS, and super proton synchrotron (SPS accelerators. One of the main constraints on LHC performance is emittance preservation along the whole chain of CERN accelerators. The accepted relative normalized emittance blowup after filamentation is ±7%. To monitor the beam and the emittance blowup process, a study of different prototypes of nonintercepting beam profile monitors has been performed. In this context a monitor using the luminescent emission of gases excited by ultrarelativistic protons (450 GeV was developed and tested in the SPS ring. The results of beam size measurements and their evolution as a function of the machine parameters are presented. The image quality and resolution attainable in the LHC case have been assessed. A first full characterization of the luminescence cross section, spectrum, decay time, and afterglow effect for an ultrarelativistic proton beam is provided. Some significant results are also provided for lead ion beams.

  14. Space-radiation-induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas; Lee, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    We report on the results of a study of the photon luminescence of the Moon induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and space radiation from the Sun, using the Monte Carlo program FLUKA. The model of the lunar surface is taken to be the chemical composition of soils found at various landing sites during the Apollo and Luna programs, averaged over all such sites to define a generic regolith for the present analysis. This then becomes the target that is bombarded by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) above 1 keV in FLUKA to determine the photon fluence albedo produced by the Moon's surface when there is no sunlight and Earthshine. This is to be distinguished from the gamma-ray spectrum produced by the radioactive decay of radiogenic constituents lying in the surface and interior of the Moon. From the photon fluence we derive the spectrum which can be utilized to examine existing lunar spectral data and to design orbiting instrumentation for measuring various components of the space-radiation-induced photon luminescence present on the Moon.

  15. Persistent Luminescence in Eu2+-Doped Compounds: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Van den Eeckhout

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In 1996, Matsuzawa et al. reported on the extremely long-lasting afterglow of SrAl2O4:Eu2+ codoped with Dy3+ ions, which was more than 10-times brighter than the previously widely used ZnS:Cu,Co. Since then, research for stable and efficient persistent phosphors has continuously gained popularity. However, even today - almost 15 years after the discovery of SrAl2O4:Eu2+, Dy3+ - the number of persistent luminescent materials is still relatively low. Furthermore, the mechanism behind this phenomenon is still unclear. Although most authors agree on the general features, such as the existence of long-lived trap levels, many details are still shrouded in mystery. In this review, we present an overview of the important classes of known persistent luminescent materials based on Eu2+-emission and how they were prepared, and we take a closer look at the models and mechanisms that have been suggested to explain bright afterglow in various compounds.

  16. UV luminescence of dendrimer-encapsulated gold nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hyeong Seop; Kim, Jun Myung; Sohn, So Hyeong; Han, Noh Soo; Park, Seung Min [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Size-dependent luminescence color is one of the interesting properties of metal nanocrystals, whose sizes are in the dimension of the Fermi wavelength of an electron. Despite the short Fermi wavelength of electrons in gold (-0.7 nm), luminescence of gold nanoclusters has been reported to range from the near-infrared to near-ultraviolet, depending on the number of atoms in the nanoclusters. The photoluminescence of G4-OH (Au) obtained by the excitation of 266 nm showed UV emission in addition to the well-known blue emission. The higher intensity and red-shifted emission of the gold nanoclusters was distinguished from the emission of dendrimers. The UV emission at 352 nm matched the emission energy of Au{sub 4} in the spherical jellium model, rather than the planar Au{sub 8}, which supported the emission of Au{sub 4} formed in G4-OH. Despite the change of [HAuCl{sub 4} ]/[G4-OH], the relative population between Au{sub 4} and Au{sub 8} was similar in G4-OH(Au), which indicated that the closed electronic and geometric structures stabilized the magic number of Au{sub 4}.

  17. Luminescence properties after X-ray irradiation for dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Duk-Geun; Kim, Myung-Jin

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the luminescence characteristics after exposure to X-ray radiation, we developed an independent, small X-ray irradiation system comprising a Varian VF-50J mini X-ray generator, a Pb collimator, a delay shutter, and an Al absorber. With this system, the apparent dose rate increased linearly to 0.8 Gy/s against the emission current for a 50 kV anode potential when the shutter was delayed for an initial 4 s and the Al absorber was 300 µm thick. In addition, an approximately 20 mm diameter sample area was irradiated homogeneously with X rays. Based on three-dimensional (3D) thermoluminescence (TL) spectra, the small X-ray irradiator was considered comparable to the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source even though the TL intensity from beta irradiation was higher than that from X-ray irradiation. The single aliquot regenerative (SAR) growth curve for the small X-ray irradiator was identical to that for the beta source. Therefore, we concluded that the characteristics of the small X-ray irradiator and the conventional 90Sr/90Y beta source were similar and that X ray irradiation had the potential for being suitable for use in luminescence dosimetry.

  18. Complex of heavy magnetic ions and luminescent silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan

    We study the optical properties of luminescent silicon nanoparticles in the presence of magnetic ions of iron or erbium in solution and electric biasing. Upon the introduction of the ions under zero biasing, the luminescence is enhanced to by 50%. The peak position of the nanoparticle's spectrum shifts by 10 nm. The enhancement remains stable even outside of the solvent, and under exposure to an ionizing environment, with electric eld as high as 8 MV/m exceeding the breakdown eld value of solution. We attribute the enhancement and spectral change to the formation of complex between the silicon nanoparticles and the ions. We compare these results with the computational study that was done in our group using density functional theory. The calculations yield two stable con gurations that such ion-particle complex could form, with binding energy of 0:49 eV between the ion and the nanoparticle. The complexes promise diverse applications in magnetic/optical imaging, spatially programmable deposition, spin-based memories and transistors, infrared communications, ltration, as well as interplanetary and interstellar observation and modeling.

  19. Lanthanide NIR luminescence for telecommunications, bioanalyses and solar energy conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Claude; G.; Bünzli; V.

    2010-01-01

    Present-day advanced technologies heavily rely on the exciting magnetic and spectroscopic properties of lanthanide ions. In particular, their ability to generate well-characterized and intense near-infrared (NIR) luminescence is exploited in any modern fiber-optic telecommunication network. In this feature article, we first summarize the whereabouts underlying the design of highly luminescent NIR molecular edifices and materials. We then focus on describing the main trends in three applications related to this spectral range: telecommunications, biosciences, and solar energy conversion. In telecommunications, efforts concentrate presently on getting easily processable polymer-based waveguide amplifiers. Upconversion nanophosphors emitting in the visible after NIR excitation are now ubiquitous in many bioanalyses while their application to bio-imaging is still in its early stages; however, highly sensitive NIR-NIR systems start to be at hand for both in vitro and in vivo imaging, as well as dual probes combining magnetic resonance and optical imaging. Finally, both silicon-based and dye-sensitized solar cells benefit from the downconversion and upconversion capabilities of lanthanide ions to harvest UV and NIR solar light and to boost the overall quantum efficiency of these next-generation devices.

  20. Luminescence and recombine centre in ZnO/Si films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cihui LIU; Ran YAO; Jianfeng SU; Zeyu MA; Zhuxi FU

    2009-01-01

    The D0h luminescence of ZnO films deposited on p-type Si substrates is produced by metal-organic chem-ical vapor deposition (MOCVD).After annealing in the air at 700℃ for an hour,the photoluminescence (PL) spectra,the Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristics and the deep level transient spectro-scopy (DLTS) of the samples are measured.All the samples have a rectification characteristic.DLTS signals show two deep levels of E1 and E2.The Gaussian fit curves of the PL spectra at room temperature show three luminescence lines b,c and d,of which b is attributed to the exciton emission.The donor level E1 measured by DLTS and the location state donor ionization energy Ed of the closely neighboring emission lines c and d are correlated.E1 is judged as neutral donor bound to hole emission (D0h).Moreover,the inten-sity of the PL spectra decreases while the relative density of E2 increases,showing that E2 has the property of a non-radiative center.