WorldWideScience

Sample records for luminescent greenhouse solar

  1. Luminescent solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Tosun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC is a device that has luminescent molecules embedding or topping polymeric or glass waveguide to generate electricity from sunlight with a photovoltaic cell attachment. LSCs can be employed both in small and large scale projects, independent on the direction or angle of the surface with respect to the sun, promising more freedom for integration in urban environments compared to the traditional PV systems. The aim of the SEB&C PDEng project is to investigate the applicability of this innovative technology in the built environment and to bridge the gap of knowledge linking societal, design and technological aspects. The final goal is to exhibit potential application concepts of LSC developed by co-creative methods at SPARK campus which is a hub for open innovation in built environment. Necessity of a paradigm shift towards sustainable and smart cities came into being due to the significant increase in energy demand of the buildings. The challenge is to increase renewable sources in the energy mix while designing aesthetic environments. Thus, building integrated renewable energy technologies represent a great opportunity to help overcome this current challenge. Smart energy, energy efficiency and use of renewable sources are key aspects to be considered nowadays and many innovative technologies need further exploitation to be commercially viable, such as luminescent solar concentrator.

  2. Solar greenhouse aquaculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toever, W V

    1979-01-01

    Rainbow and Speckled Trout have been successfully hatched and reared in a recirculating aquaculture system. The system is integrated into the Ark greenhouse providing thermal mass for temperature regulation and supplying nutrient-rich water for plants. The system incorporates bacterial, algal and hydroponic water filtration. Various vegetable crops have been raised in the hydroponic troughs. A scaled-down system suitable for domestic solar greenhouse application is also under development.

  3. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  4. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2018-01-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  5. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  6. Recent developments in luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency photovoltaic devices combine full solar spectrum absorption and effective generation and collection of charge carriers, while commercial success depends on cost effectiveness in manufacturing. Spectrum modification using down shifting has been demonstrated in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) since the 1970s, as a cheap alternative for standard c-Si technology. LSCs consist of a highly transparent plastic plate, in which luminescent species are dispersed, which absorb incident light and emit light at a red-shifted wavelength, with high quantum efficiency. Material issues have hampered efficiency improvements, in particular re-absorption of light emitted by luminescent species and stability of these species. In this contribution, approaches are reviewed on minimizing re-absorption, which should allow surpassing the 10% luminescent solar concentrator efficiency barrier.

  7. Optimal Control Design for a Solar Greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteghem, van R.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: An optimal climate control has been designed for a solar greenhouse to achieve optimal crop production with sustainable instead of fossil energy. The solar greenhouse extends a conventional greenhouse with an improved roof cover, ventilation with heat recovery, a heat pump, a heat

  8. Building and using the solar greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1983-01-01

    Thorough directions are given for planning, constructing and using a solar greenhouse attached to a house. Included is a method of calculating the savings accruing from the use of the greenhouse. (LEW)

  9. Optimal control design for a solar greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteghem, van R.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The research of this thesis was part of a larger project aiming at the design of a greenhouse and an associated climate control that achieves optimal crop production with sustainable instead of fossil energy. This so called solar greenhouse design extends a conventional greenhouse with an improved

  10. Multistate Luminescent Solar Concentrator "Smart" Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, Jeroen A.H.P.; Timmermans, Gilles H.; Breugel, van Abraham J.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Debije, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    A supertwist liquid crystalline luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) "smart" window is fabricated which can be switched electrically between three states: one designed for increased light absorption and electrical generation (the "dark" state), one for transparency (the "light" state), and one for

  11. Luminescent Solar Concentrators with Fibre Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbosch, O.Y.; Fisher, M.; Patrignani, L.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Chatten, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear

  12. Optimal control of a solar greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteghem, van R.J.C.; Stigter, J.D.; Willigenburg, van L.G.; Straten, van G.

    2003-01-01

    A solar greenhouse has been designed that maximizes solar energy use and minimizes fossil energy consumption. It is based on a conventional greenhouse extended with a heat pump, a heat exchanger, an aquifer and ventilation with heat recovery. The aim is to minimize fossil energy consumption, while

  13. Luminescent solar concentrators: Semiconductor solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debije, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    There are increasing public and private pressures for the adoption of renewable energy technologies, of which solar is anticipated to be a prime player1. As it becomes increasingly desirable to generate energy nearer the point of demand (such as within a city centre) it is also more apparent that

  14. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  15. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-06

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  16. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  17. Polymeric Luminescent Compositions Doped with Beta-Diketonates Boron Difluoride as Material for Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrebtov, A. A.; Fedorenko, E. V.; Reutov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we investigated polymeric luminescent compositions based on polystyrene doped with beta diketonates boron difluoride. Transparent films with effective absorption in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectrum were obtained. Polymeric luminescent compositions based on the mixture of dyes allow expanding the absorption region and increase the radiation shift. A luminescent solar concentrator consisting of a glass plate coated with such film can be used for photovoltaic window application.

  18. The solar greenhouse: a survey of energy saving methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saye, A.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Bot, G.P.A.; Zwart, de H.F.

    2000-01-01

    The solar greenhouse project is aimed at the development of a greenhouse concept for the Netherlands with zero-fossil energy consumption. The solar greenhouse is formulated as a combination of a low energy demand greenhouse, an energy recovery installation and an energy storage facility. In this

  19. Renewable energy : better luminescent solar panels in prospect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debije, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Devices known as luminescent solar concentrators could find use as renewable-energy generators, but have so far been plagued by a major light-reabsorption effect. A new study offers a promising route to tackling this problem

  20. Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipparone, L.

    1980-10-15

    The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

  1. Nonimaging optics in luminescent solar concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markman, B D; Ranade, R R; Giebink, N C

    2012-09-10

    Light trapped within luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) is naturally limited in angular extent by the total internal reflection critical angle, θcrit, and hence the principles of nonimaging optics can be leveraged to increase LSC concentration ratio by appropriately reshaping the edges. Here, we use rigorous ray-tracing simulations to explore the potential of this concept for realistic LSCs with compound parabolic concentrator (CPC)-tapered edges and show that, when applied to a single edge, the concentration ratio is increased by 23% while maintaining >90% of the original LSC optical efficiency. Importantly, we find that CPC-tapering all of the edges enables a significantly greater intensity enhancement up to 35% at >90% of the original optical efficiency, effectively enabling two-dimensional concentration through a cooperative, ray-recycling effect in which rays rejected by one CPC are accepted by another. These results open up a significant opportunity to improve LSC performance at virtually no added manufacturing cost by incorporating nonimaging optics into their design.

  2. A new design for luminescent solar concentrating PV roof tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doudart de la Gree, G.C.H.; Papadopoulos, A.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Krumer, Z.; Reinders, A.H.M.E.; Rosemann, A.L.P.

    2015-01-01

    In our paper we explore the opportunity of combining luminescent solar concentrating (LSC) materials and crystalline PV solar cells in a new design for a roof tile by design-driven research on the energy performance of various configurations of the LSC PV device and on the aesthetic appeal in a roof

  3. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  4. Polymethylmethacrylate-based luminescent solar concentrators with bottom-mounted solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yi; Sun, Song; Kang, Rui; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Ningning; Yan, Wenhao; Xie, Wei; Ding, Jianjun; Bao, Jun; Gao, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrators on dye-doped plates were studied. • The mechanism of transport process was proposed. • The fabricated luminescent solar concentrator achieved a gain of 1.38. • Power conversion efficiency of 5.03% was obtained with cell area coverage of 27%. • The lowest cost per watt of $1.89 was optimized with cell area coverage of 18%. - Abstract: Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to concentrate sunlight economically without tracking, but the narrow absorption band of luminescent materials hinders their further development. This paper describes bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrators on dye-doped polymethylmethacrylate plates that absorb not only the waveguided light but also the transmitted sunlight and partial fluorescent light in the escape cone. A series of bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrators with size of 78 mm × 78 mm × 7 mm were fabricated and their gain and power conversion efficiency were investigated. The transport process of the waveguided light and the relationship between the bottom-mounted cells were studied to optimize the performance of the device. The bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrator with cell area coverage of 9% displayed a cell gain of 1.38, to our best knowledge, which is the highest value for dye-doped polymethylmethacrylate plate luminescent solar concentrators. Power conversion efficiency as high as 5.03% was obtained with cell area coverage of 27%. Furthermore, the bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrator was found to have a lowest cost per watt of $1.89 with cell area coverage of 18%. These results suggested that the fabricated bottom-mounted luminescent solar concentrator may have a potential in low-cost building integrated photovoltaic application

  5. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  6. CFD analysis for greenhouse effect solar dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulandani, D.; Abdullah, K.; Hartulistiyoso, E.; Siswantara, I.

    2006-01-01

    Greenhouse Effect (GHE) solar dryer is a transparent wall structure, consists of absorber plate as solar heat collector, product holders (tray or batch) and fans to discharge moisture from the product. GHE solar dryer is one of the alternative dryer for the farmer and merchants to improve the quality of dried products. Direct sun drying is still popular choice by farmers because it is cheap and simple. However, the method is greatly dependent on the existence of solar irradiation and the product is contaminated very easily by pollution and dirt. The general constraint in designing artificial dryer is the problem of non-uniformity of final moisture content of product, especially for the cabinet of rack type dryer. This condition can be solved by providing uniform distribution of temperature, relative humidity (RH) and airflow velocity of the drying air. Therefore, in this study, such problem was approached by conducting flow simulation within the drying structure by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology to determine the proper position of drying air inlet and outlet, location and capacity of the heat exchanger unit, the position and the capacity of the fan, to produce uniform distribution of the drying air temperature, RH and airflow velocity within the drying chamber.(Author)

  7. Receding Horizon Optimal Control of a Solar Greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteghem, van R.J.C.; Willigenburg, van L.G.; Straten, van G.

    2005-01-01

    A solar greenhouse has been designed that maximizes solar energy use and minimizes fossil energy consumption. It is based on a conventional Venlo greenhouse extended with a heat pump, a heat exchanger, an aquifer and ventilation with heat recovery. The goal is to minimize fossil energy consumption,

  8. Organic wavelength selective mirrors for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbunt, P.P.C.; Debije, M.G.; Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Boer, de D.K.G.; Wehrspohn, R.; Gombert, A.

    2012-01-01

    Organic polymeric chiral nematic liquid crystalline (cholesteric) wavelength selective mirrors can increase the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) when they are illuminated with direct sunlight normal to the device. However, due to the angular dependence of the reflection band, at

  9. Leaf Roof – designing luminescent solar concentrating PV roof tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, A.H.M.E.; Doudart de la Grée, G.C.H.; Papadopoulos, A.; Rosemann, A.L.P.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.G.D.M.; Krumer, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The Leaf Roof project on the design features of PV roof tiles using Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) technology has resulted in a functional prototype . The results are presented in the context of industrial product design with a focus on the aesthetic aspects of LSCs. This paper outlines the

  10. Patterned dye structures limit reabsorption in luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoi, S.; Broer, D.J.; Bastiaansen, C.W.M.; Debije, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes a method for limiting internal losses of a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) due to reabsorption through patterning the fluorescent dye doped coating of the LSC. By engineering the dye coating into regular line patterns with fill factors ranging from 20 - 80%, the surface

  11. Leaf Roof - Designing Luminescent Solar Concentrating PV Roof Tiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Doudart de la Gree, G.; Papadopoulos, A..; Rosemann, A.; Debije, M.G.; Cox, M.; Krumer, Zachar

    2016-01-01

    The Leaf Roof project on the design features of PV roof tiles using Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) technology [1] has resulted in a functional prototype. The results are presented in the context of industrial product design with a focus on the aesthetic aspects of LSCs [2]. This paper outlines

  12. Monocrystalline silicon photovoltaic luminescent solar concentrator with 4.2% power conversion efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desmet, L.; Ras, A.J.M.; Boer, de D.K.G.; Debije, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    We report conversion efficiencies of experimental single and dual light guide luminescent solar concentrators. We have built several 5¿¿cm×5¿¿cm and 10¿¿cm×10¿¿cm luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) demonstrators consisting of c-Si photovoltaic cells attached to luminescent light guides of Lumogen

  13. Solar Energy Delivering Greenhouse with an Integrated NIR filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Holterman, H.J.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    The scope of this investigation is the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for rejecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system. Cooled greenhouses are an important issue to cope with the combination of high global radiation and high

  14. Off-season cultivation of capsicums in a solar greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosal, M.K.; Tiwari, G.N. [Indian Inst. of Technology, New Delhi (India). Centre for Energy Studies

    2001-10-01

    The use of solar energy for growing capsicums in pots and in the ground has been studied both under a controlled environment in a solar greenhouse (IIT model) and in an open field during August 2000 to March 2001. Cooling arrangements (natural, forced convection, shading, evaporative cooling) and heating methods (ground air collector, movable insulation during the night) have been employed during the pre-winter and winter periods respectively to maintain the protected environment in the greenhouse. The effects of a north brick wall and the use of movable insulation during the night in the winter months to reduce heat loss from the greenhouse have been incorporated to study the efficacy of the greenhouse. The average height, weight and yield per plant of the greenhouse crop were higher than those of the open field. (author)

  15. Application of Quantum Dot nanocrystal in Luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Khalaji Assadi, Morteza; Ahmadi Kandjani, Sohrab; Kayiem, Hussain H. Al; Hussain Bhat, Aamir

    2018-03-01

    The basic design of luminescent solar concentrator is a transparent plate doped with an appropriate luminescent material (organic dyes, quantum dots), which is able to absorb sunlight (direct and diffuse), and then guides photons produced by photoluminescence to its narrow edges where they are converted by photovoltaic cells. Unfortunately, LSCs have suffered from numerous efficiency losses. Therefore, new luminescent species and novel approaches are needed for its practical application. This paper deals with investigation of nonhazardous, environmental friendly luminescent species include CuInS2/ZnS core/shell QDs. The CuInS2/ZnS QDs possess advantages of Stocks shift as large as more than 130 nm and high photoluminescence quantum yield of 80%. The paper presents the effect of large stock shift CuInS2/ZnS QDs on reducing the reabsorption losses in LSC by using experimental investigation. The LSC sheets were fabricated by dispersing CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles in a polymethylmethacrylate waveguide. A series of LSCs (dimension 4.0 cm × 3.0 cm × 0.3cm) with different CuInS2/ZnS QDs particles concentration (0.015 and 0.03 wt.%) were fabricated and their optical properties (absorptions/emissions) were characterized. The results show that the CuInS2/ZnS QDs-LSC provides a promising way for the reduction of reabsorption losses in LSCs.

  16. Progress in luminescent solar concentrator research: solar energy for the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbunt, P.P.C.; Debije, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a concise review of recent research on the luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). The topics covered will include studies of novel luminophores and attempts to limit the losses in the devices, both surface and internal. These efforts include application of organic and

  17. Greenhouse heating with a fresh water floating collector solar pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbel, A.; Sokolov, M.

    1991-01-01

    The fresh water floating collector solar pond was investigated both experimentally and theoretically in a previous work, and it is now matched, by simulation, with the heat load requirements of a greenhouse. Results of the simulation indicate that such a pond is a potential energy source for greenhouse heating. This is especially true when the material properties are such that solar absorption and storage are enhanced. This paper reports that to demonstrate this point, three sets of collectors constructed with materials of different physical (radiation) properties were tested. One set is constructed of common materials which are readily available and are normally used as covers for greenhouses. The second set made of improved materials which are also available but have a smaller long-wave transmittance. The last set made of ideal material which additionally possesses selective radiation absorption properties. Collectors made of ideal materials make a superior solar pond; thus, manufacturing films with improved properties should become a worthwhile challenge for the agricultural polyethylene-films industry. Preliminary economic studies indicate that even with the low oil (<$20/Bbl) prices which exist between 1986-1989, the fresh water floating collectors solar pond provides an economically attractive alternative to the conventional oil-burning heating system. This is especially true in mild climate areas and when the large initial investment is justified by long-term greenhouse utilization planning

  18. The solar greenhouse : a highly insulated greenhouse design with an inflated roof system with PVDF or ETFE membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Waaijenberg, D.; Hemming, S.; Campen, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a co-operation project of Wageningen University (Wageningen UR), Agrotechnology & Food Innovations B.V. (A&F), Priva Hortimation B.V. and Hyplast N.V. (Belgium) a greenhouse for the future has been developed. The project has four lines, namely 1. lowering the energy demand, 2. using solar energy for heating (greenhouse as solar collector), 3. modifying climate control and dehumidification and 4. developing of the highly insulated greenhouse. This paper deals with the development of...

  19. Big data system for disaster warning of solar greenhouse vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Li, M; Zhao, L; Chen, M; Wen, D; Liu, R; Yang, X

    2017-01-01

    Background: Solar greenhouses are very popular in the north of China as a way of meeting the demand for fresh local winter vegetables. Nonetheless, they are more susceptible to biological and meteorological disasters, such as diseases, pests, fog, haze and cold temperatures. Although we have deployed many record keeping equipment and weather stations, we have lower efficiency of usage on data. Big data has great potential in the future. Thus, our aim is to investigate a big data system for di...

  20. Luminescent solar concentrators for building-integrated photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Francesco; Bruni, Francesco; Brovelli, Sergio

    2017-12-01

    The transition to fully energetically sustainable architecture through the realization of so-called net zero-energy buildings is currently in progress in areas with low population density. However, this is not yet true in cities, where the cost of land for the installation of ground photovoltaic (PV) is prohibitively high and the rooftop space is too scarce to accommodate the PV modules necessary for sustaining the electrical requirements of tall buildings. Thus, new technologies are being investigated to integrate solar-harvesting devices into building façades in the form of PV windows or envelope elements. Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are the most promising technology for semi-transparent, electrodeless PV glazing systems that can be integrated 'invisibly' into the built environment without detrimental effects to the aesthetics of the building or the quality of life of the inhabitants. After 40 years of research, recent breakthroughs in the realization of reabsorption-free emitters with broadband absorption have boosted the performance of LSCs to such a degree that they might be commercialized in the near future. In this Perspective, we explore the successful strategies that have allowed this change of pace, examining and comparing the different types of chromophores and waveguide materials, and discuss the issues that remain to be investigated for further progress.

  1. Photodegradation in multiple-dye luminescent solar concentrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mooney, Alex M.; Warner, Kathryn E.; Fontecchio, Paul J.; Zhang, Yu-Zhong; Wittmershaus, Bruce P.

    2013-01-01

    Combining multiple organic dyes to form a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) network is a useful strategy for extending the spectral range of sunlight absorbed by a luminescent solar concentrator (LSC). Excitation transfer out of the higher energy level dyes in the transfer series competes effectively with their photodegradation rates. Improvements in photostability up to a factor of 18 are observed for the first dye in the FRET series. FRET networks are shown to be a viable means of decreasing the rate of photodegradation of organic dyes used in LSCs. This comes at the expense of the final dye in the network; the depository of most of the excitations created by absorbing sunlight. The photostability and performance of an efficient FRET LSC rest heavily on the photostability and fluorescence quantum yield of the final dye. -- Highlights: • Photodegradation kinetics of multiple-dye FRET LSCs are reported. • The FRET network decreased the first dye's photodegradation rate by a factor of 18. • The final dye in the FRET LSC protects other dyes at its own expense. • The final dye must have excellent photostability and fluorescence quantum yield

  2. A comparison of performance of flat and bent photovoltaic luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vishwanathan, B.; Reinders, A. H.M.E.; de Boer, D.K.G.; Desmet, L.; Ras, A. J.M.; Zahn, F. H.; Debije, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    To employ new solar photovoltaic technologies in products and buildings, many systems need to be adapted. Inspired by the cylindrical shape, in this work we have evaluated the performance of luminescent solar concentrator photovoltaic (LSC-PV) elements with narrow PV cell strips that could be

  3. Towards Efficient Spectral Converters through Materials Design for Luminescent Solar Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Barry; Evans, Rachel C

    2017-07-01

    Single-junction photovoltaic devices exhibit a bottleneck in their efficiency due to incomplete or inefficient harvesting of photons in the low- or high-energy regions of the solar spectrum. Spectral converters can be used to convert solar photons into energies that are more effectively captured by the photovoltaic device through a photoluminescence process. Here, recent advances in the fields of luminescent solar concentration, luminescent downshifting, and upconversion are discussed. The focus is specifically on the role that materials science has to play in overcoming barriers in the optical performance in all spectral converters and on their successful integration with both established (e.g., c-Si, GaAs) and emerging (perovskite, organic, dye-sensitized) cell types. Current challenges and emerging research directions, which need to be addressed for the development of next-generation luminescent solar devices, are also discussed. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Two Modified Energy-Saving Constructions of Solar Greenhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermuratskii, V; Oleschuk, V.; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents outcomes of experimental evaluation of operation of two structures of sustainable greenhouse systems. Thermal performance of greenhouse with on-ground heat accumulator and movable internal heat reflectors, and of greenhouse with under-ground accumulator and movable heat (roof-b......-based) reflectors, has been analyzed. Metering of solar irradiation, and temperature and humidity inside greenhouses, has been executed for different seasons and regimes. Conclusions regarding basic peculiarities of operation of two topologies of greenhouses have been formulated....

  5. Improvement in greenhouse solar drying using inclined north wall reflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, V.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004, Punjab (India); Arora, Sadhna [Department of Processing and Food Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141004, Punjab (India)

    2009-09-15

    A conventional greenhouse solar dryer of 6 m{sup 2} x 4 m{sup 2} floor area (east-west orientation) was improved for faster drying using inclined north wall reflection (INWR) under natural as well as forced convection mode. To increase the solar radiation availability onto the product (to be dried) during extreme summer months, a temporary inclined wall covered with aluminized reflector sheet (of 50 {mu}m thickness and reflectance 0.93) was raised inside the greenhouse just in front of the vertical transparent north wall. By doing so, product fully received the reflected beam radiation (which otherwise leaves through the north wall) in addition to the direct total solar radiation available on the horizontal surface during different hours of drying. The increment in total solar radiation input enhanced the drying rate of the product by increasing the inside air and crop temperature of the dryer. Inclination angle of the reflective north wall with vertical ({beta}) was optimized for various selective widths of the tray W (1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3 m) and for different realistic heights of existing vertical north wall (h) at 25 N, 30 N and 35 N latitudes (hot climatic zones). Experimental performance of the improved dryer was tested during the month of May 2008 at Ludhiana (30.56 N) climatic conditions, India by drying bitter gourd (Momordica charantia Linn) slices. Results showed that by using INWR under natural convection mode of drying, greenhouse air and crop temperature increased by 1-6.7 C and 1-4 C, respectively, during different drying hours as compared to, when INWR was not used and saved 13.13% of the total drying time. By using INWR under forced convection mode of drying, greenhouse air and crop temperature increased by 1-4.5 C and 1-3 C, respectively, during different drying hours as compared to, when INWR was not used and saved 16.67% of the total drying time. (author)

  6. Chinese – Dutch cooperation on the Chinese Solar Greenhouse experiment in Shouguang

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, de H.F.

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese Solar Greenhouse is simple but has a low productivity. To improve this, the inner greenhouse climate will have to become more controllable. To contribute to this, but keeping the passive character of the greenhouse, meaning that it doesn’t need additional heating, the Chinese Academy of

  7. Optimization of a Solar Photovoltaic Applied to Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakoul, Z.; Bibi-Triki, N.; Kherrous, A.; Bessenouci, M. Z.; Khelladi, S.

    The global energy consumption and in our country is increasing. The bulk of world energy comes from fossil fuels, whose reserves are doomed to exhaustion and are the leading cause of pollution and global warming through the greenhouse effect. This is not the case of renewable energy that are inexhaustible and from natural phenomena. For years, unanimously, solar energy is in the first rank of renewable energies .The study of energetic aspect of a solar power plant is the best way to find the optimum of its performances. The study on land with real dimensions requires a long time and therefore is very costly, and more results are not always generalizable. To avoid these drawbacks we opted for a planned study on computer only, using the software 'Matlab' by modeling different components for a better sizing and simulating all energies to optimize profitability taking into account the cost. The result of our work applied to sites of Tlemcen and Bouzareah led us to conclude that the energy required is a determining factor in the choice of components of a PV solar power plant.

  8. Synergistically Enhanced Performance of Ultrathin Nanostructured Silicon Solar Cells Embedded in Plasmonically Assisted, Multispectral Luminescent Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Dhar, Purnim; Chen, Huandong; Montenegro, Angelo; Liaw, Lauren; Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Benderskii, Alexander V.; Yoon, Jongseung

    2017-04-12

    Ultrathin silicon solar cells fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of single-crystalline wafer materials represent an attractive materials platform that could provide many advantages for realizing high-performance, low-cost photovoltaics. However, their intrinsically limited photovoltaic performance arising from insufficient absorption of low-energy photons demands careful design of light management to maximize the efficiency and preserve the cost-effectiveness of solar cells. Herein we present an integrated flexible solar module of ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells capable of simultaneously exploiting spectral upconversion and downshifting in conjunction with multispectral luminescent waveguides and a nanostructured plasmonic reflector to compensate for their weak optical absorption and enhance their performance. The 8 μm-thick silicon solar cells incorporating a hexagonally periodic nanostructured surface relief are surface-embedded in layered multispectral luminescent media containing organic dyes and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocrystals as downshifting and upconverting luminophores, respectively, via printing-enabled deterministic materials assembly. The ultrathin nanostructured silicon microcells in the composite luminescent waveguide exhibit strongly augmented photocurrent (~40.1 mA/cm2) and energy conversion efficiency (~12.8%) than devices with only a single type of luminescent species, owing to the synergistic contributions from optical downshifting, plasmonically enhanced upconversion, and waveguided photon flux for optical concentration, where the short-circuit current density increased by ~13.6 mA/cm2 compared with microcells in a nonluminescent medium on a plain silver reflector under a confined illumination.

  9. Development of greenhouse solar systems for bulk tobacco curing and plant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, B.K.; Bowers, C.G. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    Among many farm crops, bright leaf tobacco is the most energy- and labor-intensive crop. The greenhouse solar system (solar bulk-curing/greenhouse system, or solar barn) was developed to provide multiple-use facilities for year-round solar energy utilization to save fossil fuels in tobacco curing and plant production and to facilitate the total mechanization of tobacco culture. Two types of full-size greenhouse solar systems, the load-supporting wall design and the shell design, both utilizing the thermal envelope concept, were designed and constructed for solar bulk-curing of tobacco, growing transplants and horticultural crops under controlled environment, and aiding automation of transplanting operations. Full-scale field tests of solar bulk curing showed that the fuel savings were consistantly improved from 37% in 1975 to 51% in 1978 for this solar bulk-curing system as compared with a conventional bulk-curing barn as a control. The feasibility of the system to save energy by using solar energy as a first priority source was significantly demonstrated. Three-year greenhouse and field tests showed that high germination rate of 95-97% with excellent emergence frequency was obtained for tobacco seeds under the controlled environment provided by the greenhouse solar system. In general, the containerized transplants from greenhouse solar system significantly exceeded the conventional bare-root transplants in growth, leaf-quality and yield. 9 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  10. Measured efficiency of a luminescent solar concentrator PV module called Leaf Roof

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Angèle H.M.E; Debije, Michael G.; Rosemann, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A functional prototype of a luminescent solar concentrator photovoltaic (LSC PV) module, called Leaf Roof, aims at demonstrating the design features of LSC PV technologies such as coloring, transparency, and flexibility in physical shape. In this paper, the prototype is presented and the first

  11. Compensation of self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators by increasing luminophore concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Zachar; van Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M.; Schropp, Ruud E.I.; de Mello Donegá, Celso

    2017-01-01

    Self-absorption in luminophores is considered a major obstacle on the way towards efficient luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). It is commonly expected that upon increasing luminophore concentration in an LSC the absorption of the luminophores increases as well and therefore self-absorption

  12. Every photon counts : understanding and optimizing photon paths in luminescent solar concentrator-based photomicroreactors (LSCPMs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambié, D.; Zhao, F.; Hessel, V.; Debije, M.G.; Noël, T.

    2017-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrator-based photomicroreactors (LSC-PMs) have been recently proposed for sustainable and energy-efficient photochemical reactions. Herein, a Monte Carlo ray tracing algorithm to simulate photon paths within LSC-PMs was developed and experimentally validated. The simulation

  13. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay

  14. Low-cost photovoltaics: Luminescent solar concentrators and colloidal quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Shin Woei

    Solar energy has long been lauded as an inexhaustible fuel source with more energy reaching the earth's surface in one hour than the global consumption for a year. Although capable of satisfying the world's energy requirements, solar energy remains an expensive technology that has yet to attain grid parity. Another drawback is that existing solar farms require large quantities of land in order to generate power at useful rates. In this work, we look to luminescent solar concentrator systems and quantum dot technology as viable solutions to lowering the cost of solar electricity production with the flexibility to integrate such technologies into buildings to achieve dual land use. Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) windows with front-facing photovoltaic (PV) cells were built and their gain and power efficiency were investigated. Conventional LSCs employ a photovoltaic (PV) cell that is placed on the edge of the LSC, facing inward. This work describes a new design with the PV cells on the front-face allowing them to receive both direct solar irradiation and wave-guided photons emitted from a dye embedded in an acrylic sheet, which is optically coupled to the PV cells. Parameters investigated include the thickness of the waveguide, edge treatment of the window, cell width, and cell placement. The data allowed us to make projections that aided in designing windows for maximized overall efficiency. A gain in power of 2.2x over the PV cells alone was obtained with PV cell coverage of 5%, and a power conversion efficiency as high as 6.8% was obtained with a PV cell coverage of 31%. Balancing the trade-offs between gain and efficiency, the design with the lowest cost per watt attained a power efficiency of 3.8% and a gain of 1.6x. With the viability of the LSC demonstrated, a weighted Monte-Carlo Ray Tracing program was developed to study the transport of photons and loss mechanisms in the LSC to aid in design optimization. The program imports measured absorption

  15. The solar greenhouse : a highly insulated greenhouse design with an inflated roof system with PVDF or ETFE membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijenberg, D.; Hemming, S.; Campen, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    In a co-operation project of Wageningen University (Wageningen UR), Agrotechnology & Food Innovations B.V. (A&F), Priva Hortimation B.V. and Hyplast N.V. (Belgium) a greenhouse for the future has been developed. The project has four lines, namely 1. lowering the energy demand, 2. using solar

  16. Structured luminescent solar energy concentrators : a new route towards inexpensive photovoltaic energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsoi, S.

    2012-01-01

    The solar energy market has grown considerably over the last decade due to increasing global awareness of environmental issues, the effects of greenhouse gases and fossil fuel shortages. More and more areas are now perceived as potential markets for solar energy conversion devices with the ultimate

  17. Design and realization of transparent solar modules based on luminescent solar concentrators integrating nanostructured photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez‐Solano, Alberto; Delgado‐Sánchez, José‐Maria; Calvo, Mauricio E.; Miranda‐Muñoz, José M.; Lozano, Gabriel; Sancho, Diego; Sánchez‐Cortezón, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Herein, we present a prototype of a photovoltaic module that combines a luminescent solar concentrator integrating one‐dimensional photonic crystals and in‐plane CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells. Highly uniform and wide‐area nanostructured multilayers with photonic crystal properties were deposited by a cost‐efficient and scalable liquid processing amenable to large‐scale fabrication. Their role is to both maximize light absorption in the targeted spectral range, determined by the fluorophore employed, and minimize losses caused by emission at angles within the escape cone of the planar concentrator. From a structural perspective, the porous nature of the layers facilitates the integration with the thermoplastic polymers typically used to encapsulate and seal these modules. Judicious design of the module geometry, as well as of the optical properties of the dielectric mirrors employed, allows optimizing light guiding and hence photovoltaic performance while preserving a great deal of transparency. Optimized in‐plane designs like the one herein proposed are of relevance for building integrated photovoltaics, as ease of fabrication, long‐term stability and improved performance are simultaneously achieved. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27656090

  18. Design and realization of transparent solar modules based on luminescent solar concentrators integrating nanostructured photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Solano, Alberto; Delgado-Sánchez, José-Maria; Calvo, Mauricio E; Miranda-Muñoz, José M; Lozano, Gabriel; Sancho, Diego; Sánchez-Cortezón, Emilio; Míguez, Hernán

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we present a prototype of a photovoltaic module that combines a luminescent solar concentrator integrating one-dimensional photonic crystals and in-plane CuInGaSe 2 (CIGS) solar cells. Highly uniform and wide-area nanostructured multilayers with photonic crystal properties were deposited by a cost-efficient and scalable liquid processing amenable to large-scale fabrication. Their role is to both maximize light absorption in the targeted spectral range, determined by the fluorophore employed, and minimize losses caused by emission at angles within the escape cone of the planar concentrator. From a structural perspective, the porous nature of the layers facilitates the integration with the thermoplastic polymers typically used to encapsulate and seal these modules. Judicious design of the module geometry, as well as of the optical properties of the dielectric mirrors employed, allows optimizing light guiding and hence photovoltaic performance while preserving a great deal of transparency. Optimized in-plane designs like the one herein proposed are of relevance for building integrated photovoltaics, as ease of fabrication, long-term stability and improved performance are simultaneously achieved. © 2015 The Authors. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Full-energy-chain analysis of greenhouse gas emissions for solar thermal electric power generation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norton, B.; Lawson, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Technical attributes and environmental impacts of solar thermal options for centralized electricity generation are discussed. In particular, the full-energy-chain, including embodied energy and energy production, is considered in relation to greenhouse gas emission arising from solar thermal electricity generation. Central receiver, parabolic dish, parabolic trough and solar pond systems are considered. (author)

  20. Thermophysical characteristics of plastic bottles as an element of water heat accumulators in solar greenhouses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalimov, A. G.; Khairiddinov, B. Eh.; Kim, V. D.; Khalimov, G. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the thermophysical and granulometric characteristics of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) plastic bottles filled with water. The given figures allow one to conduct calculations of thermal plastic bottles as heat storage elements for solar greenhouses. (author)

  1. Solar radiation transmissivity of a single-span greenhouse through measurements on scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papadakis, G.; Manolakos, D.; Kyritsis, S.

    1998-01-01

    The solar transmissivity of a single-span greenhouse has been investigated experimentally using a scale model, of dimensions 40 cm width and 80 cm length. The solar transmissivity was measured at 48 positions on the “ground” surface of the scale model using 48 small silicon solar cells. The greenhouse model was positioned horizontally on a specially made goniometric mechanism. In this way, the greenhouse azimuth could be changed so that typical days of the year could be simulated using different combinations of greenhouse azimuth and the position of the sun in the sky. The measured solar transmissivity distribution at the “ground” surface and the average greenhouse solar transmissivity are presented and analysed, for characteristic days of the year, for winter and summer for a latitude of 37°58′ (Athens, Greece). It is shown that for the latitude of 37°58′ N during winter, the E–W orientation is preferable to the N–S one. The side walls, and especially the East and West ones for the E–W orientation, reduce considerably the greenhouse transmissivity at areas close to the walls for long periods of the day when the angle of incidence of the solar rays to these walls is large. (author)

  2. Disinfecting greenhouse drainage with solar energy; Desinfeccion de drenaje de invernaderos con energia solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camara Zapata, J. M.; Puerto Molina, H. M.

    2004-07-01

    This work shows the results of three experiments made with a thermal solar collector for disinfecting greenhouse drainage water in Orihuela (SE of Spain). The aim was to evaluate the influence of water volume to be treated on the thermal efficiency of the collector. The results show a reduction of both, the collector's optic efficiency and the losses coefficient, with increasing volumes of the treated water. Both parameters have opposite effects on the thermal efficiency of the collector. In our experimental conditions, the optimum thermal efficiency was obtained for a water-to-air temperature difference of 16 degree Centigree independently of the treated water volume. (Author)

  3. Enhancing solar cell efficiency: the search for luminescent materials as spectral converters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyong; Han, Sanyang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xiaogang

    2013-01-07

    Photovoltaic (PV) technologies for solar energy conversion represent promising routes to green and renewable energy generation. Despite relevant PV technologies being available for more than half a century, the production of solar energy remains costly, largely owing to low power conversion efficiencies of solar cells. The main difficulty in improving the efficiency of PV energy conversion lies in the spectral mismatch between the energy distribution of photons in the incident solar spectrum and the bandgap of a semiconductor material. In recent years, luminescent materials, which are capable of converting a broad spectrum of light into photons of a particular wavelength, have been synthesized and used to minimize the losses in the solar-cell-based energy conversion process. In this review, we will survey recent progress in the development of spectral converters, with a particular emphasis on lanthanide-based upconversion, quantum-cutting and down-shifting materials, for PV applications. In addition, we will also present technical challenges that arise in developing cost-effective high-performance solar cells based on these luminescent materials.

  4. Modelling and simulation of a hybrid solar heating system for greenhouse applications using Matlab/Simulink

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kıyan, Metin; Bingöl, Ekin; Melikoğlu, Mehmet; Albostan, Ayhan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Matlab/Simulink modelling of a solar hybrid greenhouse. • Estimation of greenhouse gas emission reductions. • Feasibility and cost analysis of the system. - Abstract: Solar energy is a major renewable energy source and hybrid solar systems are gaining increased academic and industrial attention due to the unique advantages they offer. In this paper, a mathematical model has been developed to investigate the thermal behavior of a greenhouse heated by a hybrid solar collector system. This hybrid system contains an evacuated tube solar heat collector unit, an auxiliary fossil fuel heating unit, a hot water storage unit, control and piping units. A Matlab/Simulink based model and software has been developed to predict the storage water temperature, greenhouse indoor temperature and the amount of auxiliary fuel, as a function of various design parameters of the greenhouse such as location, dimensions, and meteorological data of the region. As a case study, a greenhouse located in Şanlıurfa/Turkey has been simulated based on recent meteorological data and aforementioned hybrid system. The results of simulations performed on an annual basis indicate that revising the existing fossil fuel system with the proposed hybrid system, is economically feasible for most cases, however it requires a slightly longer payback period than expected. On the other hand, by reducing the greenhouse gas emissions significantly, it has a considerable positive environmental impact. The developed dynamic simulation method can be further used for designing heating systems for various solar greenhouses and optimizing the solar collector and thermal storage sizes

  5. Solar radiation inside greenhouses covered with semitransparent photovoltaic film: first experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Marucci

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The southern Italian regions are characterized by climatic conditions with high values of solar radiation and air temperature. This has allowed the spread of protected structures both as a defense against critical winter conditions both for growing off-season. The major energy source for these greenhouses is given by solar energy and artificial energy is used rarely. So the problem in the use of greenhouses in these areas, if anything, is opposite to that of the northern areas. In these places you must try to mitigate often the solar radiation inside the greenhouses with suitable measures or abandon for a few months the cultivation inside these structures. The solar radiation intercepted by passive means can be used for other purposes through the uptake and transformation by the photovoltaic panels whose use however is problematic due to complete opacity of the cells. New photosensitive materials partially transparent to solar radiation onto flexible media, allow to glimpse the possibility of using them to greenhouses cover, getting the dual effect of partially screen the greenhouse and use the surplus to generate electricity. The research was carried out to evaluate the possibility of using a flexible photovoltaic film realized by the University of Rome Tor Vergata (research group of ECOFLECS project coordinated by prof. Andrea Reale for covering greenhouses. Two greenhouses in small scale were built: one covered with photovoltaic film and one covered with EVA film for test. In both greenhouses during the first research period it was grown a variety of dwarf tomato. The research was carried out comparing the solar radiation that enters into greenhouse in the summer (August 2012 and in winter conditions (December 2012 in both greenhouses. The result show that the average ratio between the daily global solar radiation under the photovoltaic film and outside radiation is about 37%, while between the radiation under EVA film and outside radiation

  6. Greenhouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PurposeThe greenhouse at ERDC’s Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) is used for germination and root-growth studies to support basic and field...

  7. Arkansas Solar Retrofit Guide. Greenhouses, Air Heaters and Water Heaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Albert; Rose, Mary Jo

    Solar retrofits are devices of structures designed to be attached to existing buildings to augment their existing heating sources with solar energy. An investigation of how solar retrofits should be designed to suit the climate and resources of Arkansas is the subject of this report. Following an introduction (section 1), section 2 focuses on…

  8. Evaluation of an earth heat storage system in a solar energy greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.; Langrell, J.; Boris, R. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Biosystems Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Greenhouses store solar energy in the walls and floors during the daytime and release the stored energy back to the greenhouse at night. In this study, an earth heat storage system was constructed and tested in a solar energy greenhouse in order to enhance energy storage. The system consisted of a network of perforated pipes buried in the soil at depths from 0.3 to 1 m. The warm air near the greenhouse ceiling was drawn to the buried pipes. Soil and air temperatures were recorded at various locations by a network of thermocouples. The energy balance was analyzed in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the earth heat storage system. The temperature profiles in the soil were used to determine the summer recharge and winter energy depletion behaviour of the system.

  9. Application of dynamic model to predict some inside environment variables in a semi-solar greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Mohammadi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Greenhouses are one of the most effective cultivation methods with a yield per cultivated area up to 10 times more than free land cultivation but the use of fossil fuels in this production field is very high. The greenhouse environment is an uncertain nonlinear system which classical modeling methods have some problems to solve it. There are many control methods, such as adaptive, feedback and intelligent control and they require a precise model. Therefore, many modeling methods have been proposed for this purpose; including physical, transfer function and black-box modeling. The objective of this paper is to modeling and experimental validation of some inside environment variables in an innovative greenhouse structure (semi-solar greenhouse. For this propose, a semi-solar greenhouse was designed and constructed at the North-West of Iran in Azerbaijan Province (38°10′N and 46°18′E with elevation of 1364 m above the sea level. The main inside environment factors include inside air temperature (Ta and inside soil temperature (Ts were collected as the experimental data samples. The dynamic heat transfer model used to estimate the temperature in two different points of semi-solar greenhouse with initial values. The results showed that dynamic model can predict the inside temperatures in two different points (Ta and Ts with RMSE, MAPE and EF about 5.3 °C, 10.2% and 0.78% and 3.45 °C, 7.7% and 0.86%, respectively. Keywords: Semi-solar greenhouse, Dynamic model, Commercial greenhouse

  10. Solar drying of sweet pepper and garlic using the tunnel greenhouse drier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condori, M.; Echazu, R.; Saravia, L. [Universidad Nacional de Salta, Inst. de Investigacion en Energia no Convencional, Salta (Argentina)

    2001-04-01

    A new low cost design for a forced convection greenhouse drier, the Tunnel Greenhouse Drier, has been built and tested. Its main parts are: a plastic greenhouse cover containing a drying tunnel made with transparent plastic walls; a line of carts with several stacked trays containing the product and moved manually inside the tunnel and an electrical fan that moves the hot air from the greenhouse into the tunnel. The trays receive solar radiation through the transparent walls, increasing the product temperature. Heat losses from the tunnel are low since the greenhouse temperatures are higher than ambient temperature. The main advantages of this drier are: (a) an almost continuous production since some carts with dried product come out of the tunnel every day, while the same amount of fresh product is introduced by the other tunnel extreme; (b) lower labor cost since the product handling is partly mechanized; (c) a conventional heater can be easily installed to keep a constant production rate; (d) the energy consumption is lower than in other drier types; (e) the installation can be used as a greenhouse for small production when it is not used as a drier. The prototype was built in the north of Argentina, and red sweet pepper and garlic were used as load. The drier thermal efficiency, considered as a solar collector, was calculated using the measured experimental data, and a linear relation between the drier temperature and the solar radiation was obtained. (Author)

  11. Exploration of parameters influencing the self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators with an experimentally validated combined ray-tracing/Monte-Carlo model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; de Mello Donegá, C.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Plesniak, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a photovoltaic solar energy converter by means of concentration. The device is comprised of a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species

  12. Thermal analysis of a hybrid solar energy saving system inside a greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ntinas, G.K.; Fragos, V.P.; Nikita-Martzopoulou, Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid solar system consisted of water filled polyethylene sleeves was examined. • The thermal behaviour of the system was studied based on the sleeves energy balance. • Water temperature and heat exchanges of the sleeves were dynamically estimated. • Experimental data used to validate the predictions of the mathematical model. • The use of the system led to an energy saving of 23% inside a heated greenhouse. - Abstract: The intensive greenhouse energy requirements are a major operational and economical problem for producers around the world. Energy conservation techniques and innovative applications of solar energy for heating are being employed in greenhouse operation to reduce heating costs during cold periods. The present study investigated the development of a mathematical model to predict the thermal efficiency of a novel hybrid solar energy saving system inside a heated greenhouse. The solar system consisted of a transparent water-filled polyethylene sleeve and two perforated air-filled polyethylene tubes on the top peripheral sides of it. Above the sleeve and between the two tubes, rockwool substrates were placed for hydroponic cultivation of tomato crop. In order to validate this model, experiments were carried out in two identical parts of a polyethylene arched-type greenhouse to obtain data during winter. By comparing the measured and the predicted values, a correlation of 95% was found, indicating that the model can simulate the water temperature inside the hybrid solar sleeves. Moreover, the additional energy provided by the hybrid solar system reached approximately 23% during the examined period, depending on solar radiation levels

  13. Receding Horizon Optimal Control of a Solar Greenhouse. GreenSys2004, Leuven, 2004 september 12-16

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooteghem, van R.J.C.; Stigter, J.D.; Willigenburg, van L.G.; Straten, van G.

    2004-01-01

    A solar greenhouse has been designed that maximizes solar energy use and minimizes fossil energy consumption. It is based on a conventional Venlo greenhouse extended with a heat pump, a heat exchanger, an aquifer and ventilation with heat recovery. The aim is to minimize fossil energy consumption,

  14. Temperature-Responsive Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Tuning Energy Transfer in a Liquid Crystalline Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jeroen A H P; Dehm, Volker; Hecht, Reinhard; Würthner, Frank; Schenning, Albertus P H J; Debije, Michael G

    2018-01-22

    Temperature-responsive luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) have been fabricated in which the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between a donor-acceptor pair in a liquid crystalline solvent can be tuned. At room temperatures, the perylene bisimide (PBI) acceptor is aggregated and FRET is inactive; while after heating to a temperature above the isotropic phase of the liquid crystal solvent, the acceptor PBI completely dissolves and FRET is activated. This unusual temperature control over FRET was used to design a color-tunable LSC. The device has been shown to be highly stable towards consecutive heating and cooling cycles, making it an appealing device for harvesting otherwise unused solar energy. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Luminescent Downshifting in Top Cell of Monolithic Tandem Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfoud Abderrezek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the conversion efficiency of monolithic tandem solar cells is limited by the short-circuit current density matching between the top and the bottom cells. Generally, the top cell presents the lowest current in the two subcells. In this paper, in order to increase the short-circuit current density in the top cell, we present a theoretical survey of the luminescence downshifting (LDS approach for the design of monolithic tandem solar cells. The photovoltaic (PV glass encapsulation material is replaced with a polymer material of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA type which is doped with diverse kinds of organic dyes. The performance of the n-p-p+ GaInP structure has been simulated as a function of the organic dyes. Gains achieved for the short-circuit current density and conversion efficiency are, respectively, 13.13% and 13.38%, under AM1.5G illumination spectra.

  16. Scale-up of a Luminescent Solar Concentrator-Based Photomicroreactor via Numbering-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Cambié, Dario; Janse, Jeroen; Wieland, Eric W; Kuijpers, Koen P L; Hessel, Volker; Debije, Michael G; Noël, Timothy

    2018-01-02

    The use of solar energy to power chemical reactions is a long-standing dream of the chemical community. Recently, visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis has been recognized as the ideal catalytic transformation to convert solar energy into chemical bonds. However, scaling photochemical transformations has been extremely challenging due to Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law. Recently, we have pioneered the development of luminescent solar concentrator photomicroreactors (LSC-PMs), which display an excellent energy efficiency. These devices harvest solar energy, convert the broad solar energy spectrum to a narrow-wavelength region, and subsequently waveguide the re-emitted photons to the reaction channels. Herein, we report on the scalability of such LSC-PMs via a numbering-up strategy. Paramount in our work was the use of molds that were fabricated via 3D printing. This allowed us to rapidly produce many different prototypes and to optimize experimentally key design aspects in a time-efficient fashion. Reactors up to 32 parallel channels have been fabricated that display an excellent flow distribution using a bifurcated flow distributor (standard deviations below 10%). This excellent flow distribution was crucial to scale up a model reaction efficiently, displaying yields comparable to those obtained in a single-channel device. We also found that interchannel spacing is an important and unique design parameter for numbered-up LSC-PMs, which influences greatly the photon flux experienced within the reaction channels.

  17. Program to monitor and evaluate a passive solar greenhouse/aquaculture system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    A temperature monitoring program of Amity's solar greenhouse demonstrated that air, soil, and water temperatures can be maintained at optimal levels without supplemental heat. A foil reflector placed in front of the greenhouse glazing at an angle of between 0 and 5/sup 0/ above horizontal enhanced direct light entering the greenhouse by as much as 22%. Aquaculture in the water heat storage of a solar greenhouse has been a success. Fish reached harvest size in about seven months. The two species that were received the best by the public were African perch (Tilapia mossambica) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Although carp (Cyprinus carpio) were the fastest growers they were not well received by the public. Linking hydroponics to greenhouse aquaculture shows a lot of promise. Different support medias were examined and tomatoes and European cucumbers were raised successfully. A savonius windmill was successfully linked to an aquaculture aeration system but because of the wind pattern in the Willamette valley the windmill system did not provide air in the evening when it was needed most. Alternate designs are discussed. Locally grown fish diets were evaluated for their ability to promote fish growth. Diets such as water hyacinth, duckweed, earthworms, beans, and comfrey were raised on the Amity site, pelleted with a hand grinder and solar dried. Duckweed and earthworms appear to hold promise for a nutritous, easy to grow and pelletize, food source. Amity's solar greenhouse, three coldframe designs and a PVC tunnel cloche were compared in a vegetable growing trial. Most impressive was the cloche design because it provided adequate protection, was inexpensive and very easy to build.

  18. Assessing the lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions from solar PV and wind energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nugent, Daniel; Sovacool, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This paper critically screens 153 lifecycle studies covering a broad range of wind and solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation technologies to identify 41 of the most relevant, recent, rigorous, original, and complete assessments so that the dynamics of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions...... profiles can be determined. When viewed in a holistic manner, including initial materials extraction, manufacturing, use and disposal/decommissioning, these 41 studies show that both wind and solar systems are directly tied to and responsible for GHG emissions. They are thus not actually emissions free......, this article uncovers best practices in wind and solar design and deployment that can better inform climate change mitigation efforts in the electricity sector...

  19. Performance Improvement of Roof Transparent Solar Still Coupled With Agriculture Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa H. Salah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In Egyptian desert, growing plants is difficult due to harsh climate (hot at the daytime and cold at the night, infertile  soil,  low  average  rainfall  and  lack  of  fresh  water  for  irrigation  purposes. A set of simple transparent solar stills are integrated with a new solar driven agriculture greenhouse (GH. The stills are placed at the GH roof to use the extra solar radiation (above that required for plant photosynthesis process for water desalination. In addition to water desalination concept the solar still units even reduce the cooling load during the daytime. A net of aluminum metal coated with black colour is placed on the base of the solar still units to raise the water temperature (enhance desalination process and provide partially shading for the GH. Using aluminum net decreases also the number of solar still units required to produce the required amount of GH  fresh water leading to a significant cost reduction.The main objectives of this work are sizing of the aluminum net, spacing between solar still units to obtain the threshold of plant requirements. Also fresh water production and greenhouse climatic conditions that plant needs (temperature, relative humidity, air velocity and amount of oxygen are simulated.Numerical simulation was carried out for the hottest day of Borg Elarab, Alexandria (Egypt. 

  20. On the Evaluation of Solar Greenhouse Efficiency in Building Simulation during the Heating Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Asdrubali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Among solar passive systems integrated in buildings, sunspaces or solar greenhouses represent a very interesting solution. A sunspace is a closed, southbound volume, constituted by transparent surfaces, adjacent to a building, which reduces winter energy demand thanks to the use of solar gains. The effect of a typical solar greenhouse on the energy balance of a building was evaluated during the heating period with two stationary procedures (Method 5000 and EN ISO 13790 and with a dynamic tool (TRNSYS. After the analysis of the greenhouse alone, the behavior of an entire house was simulated; a flat equipped with a sunspace, recently built thanks to public contributions provided by the Umbria Region in Italy to widespread bio-climatic architecture, was used as case-study. Simulations were carried out for the examined flat, both with a steady-state tool and with a dynamic one; the contribution of the sunspace was estimated thanks to the various methods previously mentioned. Finally, the simulated data were satisfactorily compared with the real energy consumptions (natural gas for heating of the flat; the sunspace allows a reduction of winter energy demand of the flat of about 20%.

  1. Greenhouse tomato production with electricity generation by roof-mounted flexible solar panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urena-Sanchez, Raul; Callejon-Ferre, Angel Jesus; Perez-Alonso, Jose; Carreno-Ortega, Angel [University of Almeria, Depto. de Ingenieia Rural, Almeria (Spain)], E-mail: acallejo@ual.es

    2012-07-15

    The integration of renewable energy sources into greenhouse crop production in southeastern Spain could provide extra income for growers. Wind energy could be captured by small to medium-sized wind turbines, gas could be produced from biomass, and solar energy could be gathered by solar panels. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of flexible solar panels, mounted on top of a greenhouse for electricity production, on yield and fruit quality of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L., cv Daniela). This study was undertaken in a commercial raspa y amagado greenhouse, typical of the Almeria region (Spain). Tomato plantlets were planted at a density of 0.75 plants m{sup -2}. The flexible solar panels were mounted on two parts of the roof in different arrangements (T1 and T2), each blacking out 9.8 % of its surface area. A control area (T0 arrangement) was fitted with no panels. No difference was found in terms of total or marketable production under these three arrangements, although fruit mean mass and maximum diameter of T0 were significantly greater than T1 and T2. Fruit in T0 matured earlier with more intense color compared with those in T1 and T2. However, these differences had no effect on price as the tomatoes produced under three conditions fell into the same commercial class (G class; diameter 67-81 mm). Solar panels covering 9.8 % roof area of the greenhouse did not affect yield and price of tomatoes despite of their negative effect on fruit size and color. (author)

  2. The solar noise barrier project : 2. The effect of street art on performance of a large scale luminescent solar concentrator prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debije, M.G.; Tzikas, C.; Rajkumar, V.A.; de Jong, M.

    2017-01-01

    Noise barriers have been used worldwide to reduce the impact of sound generated from traffic on nearby areas. A common feature to appear on these noise barriers are all manner of graffiti and street art. In this work we describe the relative performance of a large area luminescent solar concentrator

  3. The solar noise barrier project 3. The effects of seasonal spectral variation, cloud cover and heat distribution on the performance of full-scale luminescent solar concentrator panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Debije, M.G.; Tzikas, C.; de Jong, M.; Kanellis, M.; Slooff, L.H.

    We report on the relative performances of two large-scale luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) noise barriers placed in an outdoor environment monitored for over a year. Comparisons are made for the performances of a number of attached photovoltaic cells with changing spectral illumination, cloud

  4. The solar noise barrier project: 1. Effect of incident light orientation on the performance of a large-scale luminescent solar concentrator noise barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanellis, M.; de Jong, M.; Slooff, L.H.; Debije, M.G.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we describe the relative performance of the largest luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) constructed to date. Comparisons are made for performance of North/South and East/West facing panels during a sunny day. It is shown that the East/West panels display much more varied performance

  5. Luminescent solar concentrators with a bottom-mounted photovoltaic cell: performance optimization and power gain analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ningning Zhang; Yi Zhang; Jun Bao; Feng Zhang; Sen Yan; Song Sun; Chen Gao

    2017-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) plate luminescent solar concentrators with a bottom-mounted (BM-LSCs) photovoltaic (PV) cell are fabricated by using a mixture of Lumogen Red 305 and Yellow 083 fluorescent dyes and a commercial monocrystalline silicon cell.The fabricated LSC with dye concentrations of 40 ppm has the highest power gain of 1.50,which is the highest value reported for the dye-doped PMMA plate LSCs.The power gain of the LSC comes from three parts:the waveguide light,the transmitted light,and the reflected light from a white reflector,and their contributions are analyzed quantitatively.The results suggest that the BM-LSCs have great potential for future low-cost PV devices in building integrated PV applications.

  6. Utilizing Diffuse Reflection to Increase the Efficiency of Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser, Seth; Weible, Seth; Solomon, Joel; Schrecengost, Jonathan; Wittmershaus, Bruce

    A luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) consists of a high index solid plate containing a fluorescent material that converts sunlight into fluorescence. Utilizing total internal reflection, the LSC collects and concentrates the fluorescence at the plate's edges where it is converted into electricity via photovoltaic solar cells. The lower production costs of LSCs make them an attractive alternative to photovoltaic solar cells. To optimize an LSC's efficiency, a white diffusive surface (background) is positioned behind it. The background allows sunlight transmitted in the first pass to be reflected back through the LSC providing a second chance for absorption. Our research examines how the LSC's performance is affected by changing the distance between the white background and the LSC. An automated linear motion apparatus was engineered to precisely measure this distance and the LSC's electrical current, simultaneously. LSC plates, with and without the presence of fluorescent material and in an isolated environment, showed a maximum current at a distance greater than zero. Further experimentation has proved that the optimal distance results from the background's optical properties and how the reflected light enters the LSC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number NSF-ECCS-1306157.

  7. Potential for large-scale solar collector system to offset carbon-based heating in the Ontario greenhouse sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Lucas M.; Carriveau, Rupp; Ting, David S.-K.

    2018-04-01

    In the Ontario greenhouse sector the misalignment of available solar radiation during the summer months and large heating demand during the winter months makes solar thermal collector systems an unviable option without some form of seasonal energy storage. Information obtained from Ontario greenhouse operators has shown that over 20% of annual natural gas usage occurs during the summer months for greenhouse pre-heating prior to sunrise. A transient model of the greenhouse microclimate and indoor conditioning systems is carried out using TRNSYS software and validated with actual natural gas usage data. A large-scale solar thermal collector system is then incorporated and found to reduce the annual heating energy demand by approximately 35%. The inclusion of the collector system correlates to a reduction of about 120 tonnes of CO2 equivalent emissions per acre of greenhouse per year. System payback period is discussed considering the benefits of a future Ontario carbon tax.

  8. Experimental Investigation of a Solar Greenhouse Heating System Equipped with a Parabolic Trough Solar Concentrator and a Double-Purpose Flat Plate Solar Collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jafari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Greenhouses provide a suitable environment in which all the parameters required for growing the plants can be controlled throughout the year. Greenhouse heating is one of the most important issues in productivity of a greenhouse. In many countries, heating costs in the greenhouses are very high, having almost 60-80% of the total production costs. In recent years, several studies have attempted to reduce the heating costs of the greenhouses by applying more energy efficient equipment and using the renewable energy sources as alternatives or supplementary to the fossil fuels. In the present study a novel solar greenhouse heating system equipped with a parabolic trough solar concentrator (PTC and a flat-plate solar collector has been developed. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to investigate the performance of the proposed heating system at different working conditions. Materials and Methods The presented solar greenhouse heating system was comprised of a parabolic trough solar concentrator (PTC, a heat storage tank, a pump and a flat plate solar collector. The PTC was constructed from a polished stainless steel sheet (as the reflector and a vacuum tube receiver. The PTC was connected to the tank by using insulated tubes and a water pump was utilized to circulate the working fluid trough the PTC and the heat exchanger installed between walls of the tank. The uncovered solar collector was located inside the greenhouse. During the sunshine time, a fraction of the total solar radiation received inside the greenhouse is absorbed by the solar collector. This rises the temperature of the working fluid inside the collector which led to density reduction and natural flow of the fluid. In other words, the collector works as a natural flow flat plate solar collector during the sunshine time. At night, when the greenhouse temperature is lower than tank temperature, the fluid flows in a reverse direction through the solar collector and the

  9. THE USE OF SOLAR ENERGY IN THE DESALINATION SEA WATER IN AGRICULTURAL GREENHOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tahri

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The limited resources of fresh water in arid areas like the Middle East and North Africa MENA have led to the use of poor quality water in irrigation agriculture. These can reduce crop yield and environmental damage. Agriculture accounts for 70% of overall consumption in freshwater. Given the evaporation phenomena that occur in arid regions, this figure rises to 90%. This study focuses on the concept of combining the greenhouse with the desalination of seawater This concept is intended for small scale applications in remote areas where only saline water and solar energy are available.  The main objective of this research work is to analyze the production of fresh water using solar energy in the desalination of sea water in the greenhouse. This operating system is in need of thorough study of evaporators, condensers and design of the greenhouse. Desalination, combining the greenhouse to the use of sea water while exploiting the phenomenon of condensation of water vapor in the air, seems to respond positively to the needs of agricultural irrigation.

  10. Conversion of NIR-radiation to Electric Power in a Solar Greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneveld, P. J.; Swinkels, G. L. A. M.; Bot, G. P. A.; Flamand, G.

    2007-02-01

    The scope of this investigation is the development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for rejecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system. Cooled greenhouses are an important issue to cope with the combination of high global radiation and high outdoor temperatures. As a first measure, the spectral selective cover material, which prevents the entrance of NIR radiation, is investigated. The special spectral selective reflectivity of these materials has to block up to 50% of the solar energy outside the greenhouse, which will reduce the needed cooling capacity. The second measure is the integration of a solar energy system. When the NIR reflecting coating is designed as a parabolic or circular shaped reflector integrated in the greenhouse, the reflected solar energy of a PV cell in the focus point delivers electric energy. With a ray tracing computer program the geometry of the reflector was optimally designed with respect to the maximum power level. The PV or TPV cells mounted in the focal point require cooling due to the high heat load of the concentrated radiation (concentration factor of 40-80). The properties of different materials, Ge, GaSb, CIS and Si cells were investigated to find the optimal cell for this application. For the second option a tubular collector is placed in the focus of the reflector. The collector contains thermal oil, which is heated up to a temperature of 400°C. This hot oil can be used for heating a Stirling motor or an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). The typical efficiencies and economic achievement of these systems including the tube collector are compared with the efficiencies of the TPV cells.

  11. Solar radiation distribution inside a greenhouse with south-oriented photovoltaic roofs and effects on crop productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossu, Marco; Murgia, Lelia; Ledda, Luigi; Deligios, Paola A.; Sirigu, Antonella; Chessa, Francesco; Pazzona, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The solar radiation distribution inside photovoltaic greenhouses has been studied. • A greenhouse with 50% of the roof area covered with solar panels was considered. • The yearly solar light reduction was 64%, with a transversal north–south gradient. • The reduction was 82% under the solar panels and 46% under the plastic cover. • We provided suggestions for a better agronomic sustainability of PV greenhouses. - Abstract: This study assessed the climate conditions inside a greenhouse in which 50% of the roof area was replaced with photovoltaic (PV) modules, describing the solar radiation distribution and the variability of temperature and humidity. The effects of shading from the PV array on crop productivity were described on tomato, also integrating the natural radiation with supplementary lighting powered by PV energy. Experiments were performed inside an east–west oriented greenhouse (total area of 960 m 2 ), where the south-oriented roofs were completely covered with multi-crystalline silicon PV modules, with a total rated power of 68 kWp. The PV system reduced the availability of solar radiation inside the greenhouse by 64%, compared to the situation without PV system (2684 MJ m −2 on yearly basis). The solar radiation distribution followed a north–south gradient, with more solar energy on the sidewalls and decreasing towards the center of the span, except in winter, where it was similar in all plant rows. The reduction under the plastic and PV covers was respectively 46% and 82% on yearly basis. Only a 18% reduction was observed on the plant rows farthest from the PV cover of the span. The supplementary lighting, powered without exceeding the energy produced by the PV array, was not enough to affect the crop production, whose revenue was lower than the cost for heating and lighting. The distribution of the solar radiation observed is useful for choosing the most suitable crops and for designing PV greenhouses with the attitude

  12. Gain investigation of Perylene-Red-doped PMMA for stimulated luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; Argyros, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) utilizing stimulated emission by a seed laser are a promising approach to overcome the limitations of conventional LSCs, with a significant reduction of the photovoltaic material. In our previous work, we demonstrated the principle of a stimulated LSC (s-LSC) and correspondingly developed a model for quantifying the output power of such a system, taking into account different important physical parameters. The model suggested Perylene Red (PR) dye as a potential candidate for s-LSCs. Here, we experimentally investigate the gain of PR-doped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) required for s-LSCs using a single pump wavelength (instead of the solar spectrum) as a proof of principle. The results found from the experiment are well matched with the previously developed numerical model except for gain saturation, which occurs at a comparatively small seed laser signal power. To investigate the gain saturation, two approaches were taken: investigating (i) spectral hole burning and (ii) triplet state absorption. Experimental investigation of spectral hole burning with PR dyes showed a small effect on the gain saturation. We developed a general state model considering triplet state absorption of the PR dyes for the second approach. The state model suggests that the PR dyes suffer from significant triplet state absorption loss, which obstructs the normal operation of the PR-based s-LSC system.

  13. Improving photovoltaic performance of silicon solar cells using a combination of plasmonic and luminescent downshifting effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Feng, Sheng-Kai; Liu, Jheng-Jie; Yang, Yun-Chie; Ho, Chun-Hung

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports on efforts to improve the photovoltaic performance of crystalline silicon solar cells by combining the plasmonic scattering of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) with the luminescent downshifting (LDS) effects of Eu-doped phosphors. The surface morphology was examined using a scanning electron microscope in conjunction with ImageJ software. Raman scattering and absorbance measurements were used to examine the surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs of various dimensions in various dielectric environments. The fluorescence emission of the Eu-doped phosphors was characterized via photoluminescence measurements at room temperature. We examined the combination of plasmonic and LDS effects by measuring the optical reflectance and external quantum efficiency. Improvements in the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells were determined by photovoltaic current density-voltage under AM 1.5G illumination. A combination of plasmonic and LDS effects led to an impressive 26.17% improvement in efficiency, whereas plasmonic effects resulted in a 22.63% improvement compared to the cell with a SiO2 ARC of 17.33%.

  14. Numerical calculations of heat engineering parameters of a solar greenhouse dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhatov, Zh.S.; Khalimov, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation to determine the optimum volume of a thermal storage water heater in a solar greenhouse dryer are presented. A CAD (computer-aided design) model is created for the given installation by simulating the heat transfer processes with the aid of the Solid Works Flow Simulation software. The given CAD model consists of a concrete foundation and a steel frame in which translucent coatings made from two-layer polycarbonate sheets 6 mm in thickness with an air gap between the two layers are attached. The north wall is made of bricks with size and thickness of 2 x 4 m"2 and 0.4 m, respectively. The front surface has an angle of inclination 39.53 degree with respect to the horizontal surface for the maximum incidence of solar radiation to its surface. All the geometrical dimensions of the solar greenhouse dryer were selected on the basis of the allocated platform for the solar drying installation 3 x 4 m"2 in size. It is shown that the optimum volume of the heat storage tank for the present installation is 500 L. (authors)

  15. Spectral conversion for thin film solar cells and luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, van W.G.J.H.M.; Wild, de J.; Krumer, Z.; Mello Donegá, de C.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Nozik, A.J.; Beard, M.C.; Conibeer, G.

    2014-01-01

    Full spectrum absorption combined with effective generation and collection of charge carriers is a prerequisite for attaining high efficiency solar cells. Two examples of spectral conversion are treated in this chapter, i.e., up-conversion and down-shifting. Up-conversion is applied to thin film

  16. Effects of agrochemicals, ultra violet stabilisers and solar radiation on the radiometric properties of greenhouse films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Vox

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Agrochemicals, based on iron, sulphur and chlorine, generate by products that lead to a degradation of greenhouse films together with a decrease in their mechanical and physical properties. The degradation due to agrochemicals depends on their active principles, method and frequency of application, and greenhouse ventilation. The aim of the research was to evaluate how agrochemical contamination and solar radiation influence the radiometric properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer greenhouse films by means of laboratory and field tests. The films, manufactured on purpose with the addition of different light stabiliser systems, were exposed to natural outdoor weathering at the experimental farm of the University of Bari (Italy; 41° 05’ N in the period from 2006 to 2008. Each film was tested for two low tunnels: one low tunnel was sprayed from inside with the agrochemicals containing iron, chlorine and sulphur while the other one was not sprayed and served as control. Radiometric laboratory tests were carried out on the new films and on samples taken at the end of the trials. The experimental tests showed that both the natural weathering together with the agrochemicals did not modify significantly the radiometric properties of the films in the solar and in the photosynthetically active radiation wavelength range. Within six months of experimental field tests the variations in these radiometric characteristics were at most 10%. Significant variations, up to 70% of the initial value, were recorded for the stabilised films in the long-wave infrared radiation wavelength range.

  17. A solar cooling system for greenhouse food production in hot climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, P.A. [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2005-12-01

    This study is motivated by the difficulty of cultivating crops in very hot countries and by the tendency for some such countries to become dependent on imported food. Liquid desiccation with solar regeneration is considered as maintained at or above room temperature, and this was confirgreenhouses. Previous studies demonstrated the technical feasibility of the desiccation-evaporation process, but mainly in the context of human dwellings. In the proposed cycle, the air is dried prior to entering the evaporative cooler. This lowers the wet-bulb temperature of the air. The cooling is assisted by using the regenerator to partially shade the greenhouse. The heat of desiccation is transferred and rejected at the outlet of the greenhouse. The cycle is analysed and results given for the climate of the The Gulf, based on weather data from Abu Dhabi. Taking examples of a temperate crop (lettuce), a tropical crop (tomato) and a tropical crop resistant to high temperatures (cucumber) we estimate the extension in growing seasons relative to (i) a greenhouse with simple fan ventilation (ii) a greenhouse with conventional evaporative cooling. Compared to option (ii), the proposed system lowers summers maximum temperatures by 5{sup o}C. This will extend the optimum season for lettuce cultivation from 3 to 6 months of the year and, for tomato and cucumber, from 7 months to the whole year. (author)

  18. GREENHOUSE PLASTIC FILMS CAPABLE OF MODIFYING THE SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTION OF SOLAR RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelia Schettini

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the radiometric properties of innovative covering films for protected cultivation capable of modifying the spectral distribution of the transmitted radiation and thus the vegetative activity. Two photoselective films, three photoluminescent films and one low-density polyethylene film were used as greenhouse coverings for cherry trees and peach trees, grown in pots. The photoselective films were characterised by a reduction of the R/FR ratio in comparison to the natural solar radiation. Tree growth parameters, such as the apical shoot of cherry trees and the shoot of peach trees, were monitored. Different responses to vegetative activities were observed under the films, depending on the species, with a higher shoots growth rate in the peach with respect to the cherry. The photoselective film characterised by the lowest R/FR ratio significantly enhanced the growth of cherry and peach trees in comparison to the trees cultivated under the other greenhouse films

  19. Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emission Assessment of Conventional and Solar Assisted Air Conditioning Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption in the buildings is responsible for 26% of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions where cooling typically accounts for over 50% of the total building energy use. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential for reducing the cooling systems’ environmental footprint with applications of alternative renewable energy source. Three types of cooling systems, water cooled, air cooled and a hybrid solar-based air-conditioning system, with a total of six scenarios were designed in this work. The scenarios accounted for the types of power supply to the air-conditioning systems with electricity from the grid and with a solar power from highly integrated building photovoltaics (BIPV. Within and between these scenarios, systems’ energy performances were compared based on energy modelling while the harvesting potential of the renewable energy source was further predicted based on building’s detailed geometrical model. The results showed that renewable energy obtained via BIPV scenario could cover building’s annual electricity consumption for cooling and reduce 140 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions each year. The hybrid solar air-conditioning system has higher energy efficiency than the air cooled chiller system but lower than the water cooled system.

  20. Solar Radiation Distribution inside a Greenhouse Prototypal with Photovoltaic Mobile Plant and Effects on Flower Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Colantoni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion of renewable energy requires the search for new technologies useful for obtaining good energy and production efficiency. Even if the latter is not always easy to obtain, the integration of photovoltaic panels on the roof of greenhouses intended for floriculture can represent an alternative. The present paper evaluates climatic conditions inside a greenhouse, in which 20% of its roof surface has been replaced with mobile photovoltaic (PV panels. The PV system implemented in this study can vary the light energy collection surface in relation to the degree of insolation. The aim is to observe the shading effects of the PV system on the growth of several varieties of flowers (iberis, mini-cyclamens and petunias to ensure the use of solar energy as an income integration deriving from floricultural production. In fact, in agronomic terms, it has ensured: (i to be able to shade the underlying environment in most lighting conditions; and (ii to let through more light when it is required for the needs of crop plants or in cloudy weather. Results have described the distribution of solar radiation, variability of temperature and humidity and lighting in a solar year and the observed outcomes on floristic production.

  1. Highly efficient luminescent solar concentrators based on earth-abundant indirect-bandgap silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinardi, Francesco; Ehrenberg, Samantha; Dhamo, Lorena; Carulli, Francesco; Mauri, Michele; Bruni, Francesco; Simonutti, Roberto; Kortshagen, Uwe; Brovelli, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Building-integrated photovoltaics is gaining consensus as a renewable energy technology for producing electricity at the point of use. Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) could extend architectural integration to the urban environment by realizing electrode-less photovoltaic windows. Crucial for large-area LSCs is the suppression of reabsorption losses, which requires emitters with negligible overlap between their absorption and emission spectra. Here, we demonstrate the use of indirect-bandgap semiconductor nanostructures such as highly emissive silicon quantum dots. Silicon is non-toxic, low-cost and ultra-earth-abundant, which avoids the limitations to the industrial scaling of quantum dots composed of low-abundance elements. Suppressed reabsorption and scattering losses lead to nearly ideal LSCs with an optical efficiency of η = 2.85%, matching state-of-the-art semi-transparent LSCs. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that optimized silicon quantum dot LSCs have a clear path to η > 5% for 1 m2 devices. We are finally able to realize flexible LSCs with performances comparable to those of flat concentrators, which opens the way to a new design freedom for building-integrated photovoltaics elements.

  2. Practical considerations for solar energy thermally enhanced photo-luminescence (TEPL) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Nimrod; Manor, Assaf; Kurtulik, Matej; Sabapathy, Tamilarasan; Rotschild, Carmel

    2017-04-01

    While single-junction photovoltaics (PV's) are considered limited in conversion efficiency according to the Shockley-Queisser limit, concepts such as solar thermo-photovoltaics aim to harness lost heat and overcome this barrier. We claim the novel concept of Thermally Enhanced Photoluminescence (TEPL) as an easier route to achieve this goal. Here we present a practical TEPL device where a thermally insulated photo-luminescent (PL) absorber, acts as a mediator between a photovoltaic cell and the sun. This high temperature absorber emits blue-shifted PL at constant flux, then coupled to a high band gap PV cell. This scheme promotes PV conversion efficiencies, under ideal conditions, higher than 62% at temperatures lower than 1300K. Moreover, for a PV and absorber band-gaps of 1.45eV (GaAs PV's) and 1.1eV respectively, under practical conditions, solar concentration of 1000 suns, and moderate thermal insulation; the conversion efficiencies potentially exceed 46%. Some of these practical conditions belong to the realm of optical design; including high photon recycling (PR) and absorber external quantum efficiency (EQE). High EQE values, a product of the internal QE of the active PL materials and the extraction efficiency of each photon (determined by the absorber geometry and interfaces), have successfully been reached by experts in laser cooling technology. PR is the part of emitted low energy photons (in relation to the PV band-gap) that are reabsorbed and consequently reemitted with above band-gap energies. PV back-reflector reflectivity, also successfully achieved by those who design the cutting edge high efficiency PV cells, plays a major role here.

  3. How to prevent greenhouse gas emissions in electrical installations: lighting energy savings and solar energy approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, C.; Aksoy, C. [Sakarya University, Faculty of Engineering, Electrical and Electronics Engineering Department, Serdivan (Turkey)

    2012-07-01

    Day by day greenhouse gas emissions increase dramatically. A passive adaptive method of lighting energy savings, daylight responsive systems are considered one of the best solutions for energy efficiency, saving and prevent CO{sub 2} emissions. Results of an annual experiment which was held in Sakarya University proves the necessity of daylight responsive systems with a 41% energy saving and 942.5 kg of prevented CO{sub 2} emissions Thinking this prevention is realized just only in a 36 m{sup 2} room with the use of 8 luminaries spreading such systems to nationwide, a major amount of greenhouse gas emissions would be prohibited. On the other hand energy saving is not the only way to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Again in Sakarya University a project has started to investigate the possibility of illumination of a complete building by using solar energy. This paper evaluates these mentioned systems both in energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions prevention and economic point of views. (author)

  4. Northern Hemisphere Winter Climate Response to Greenhouse Gas, Ozone, Solar and Volcanic Forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Miller, Ron L.; Rind, David; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate/middle atmosphere model has been used to study the impacts of increasing greenhouse gases, polar ozone depletion, volcanic eruptions, and solar cycle variability. We focus on the projection of the induced responses onto Northern Hemisphere winter surface climate. Changes in the model's surface climate take place largely through enhancement of existing variability patterns, with greenhouse gases, polar ozone depletion and volcanic eruptions primarily affecting the Arctic Oscillation (AO) pattern. Perturbations descend from the stratosphere to the surface in the model by altering the propagation of planetary waves coming up from the surface, in accord with observational evidence. Models lacking realistic stratospheric dynamics fail to capture these wave flux changes. The results support the conclusion that the stratosphere plays a crucial role in recent AO trends. We show that in our climate model, while ozone depletion has a significant effect, greenhouse gas forcing is the only one capable of causing the large, sustained increase in the AO observed over recent decades. This suggests that the AO trend, and a concurrent strengthening of the stratospheric vortex over the Arctic, are very likely anthropogenic in origin.

  5. Heating systems of special solar-greenhouses; Calefaccion solar de invernaderos especiales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriarte, Adolfo; Bistoni, Silvia [Universidad Nacional de Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina); Saravia, Luis [INENCO, Universidad Nacional de Salta, Salta (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    A research project for producing plants by cuttings propagation is being carried out by the National Institute of Agrarian Technology (Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INTA)). The cuttings propagation technique consists of taking a part of a mother plant (cutting) and putting it in adequate conditions to induce the formation of roots. It is composed of two main stages: the first is conducted under controlled conditions and the second one is to rusticate and acclimatize rootstocks in a half-shadowed protected area. Because of the change of environment for the rootstocks, this technique has a problem of a low percentage of survival. In this paper the facilities and the working of a special greenhouse to rusticate is described in order to allow an appropriate acclimatization before the rootstocks be transferred to the second stage and to secure higher levels of survival. This greenhouse has a double plastic cover and below the second roof it has a aluminum half-shadowed folding curtain. The heating systems for both the greenhouse and hotbed is completed with plastic exchanger-collectors placed on northern and southern sides and an outdoor packed bed. The thermal behavior of the greenhouse, the different elements used and the routine of working are analyzed. The behaviour of the special greenhouse was between the foreseen levels, showing an important decrease of convective and radiative losses and the packed bed an exchangers - collectors gave an adequate amount of energy to the system. [Spanish] La Estacion Experimental Agropecuaria del Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria (INTA) en la Provincia de Catamarca en Argentina, esta llevando a cabo un proyecto para la produccion de plantas por la tecnica de propagacion agamica o asexual. La misma consiste en separar una parte de la planta (estaca o esqueje) y colocarla en condiciones favorables para que se induzca la formacion de raices. Consta de dos etapas fundamentales: la primera se realiza en un

  6. Solar greenhouse assisted biogas plant in hilly region - A field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinoth Kumar, K.; Kasturi Bai, R. [Department of Bio-Energy, School of Energy, Environment and Natural Resources, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2008-10-15

    The present study was undertaken with the objective of evaluating plastic as an alternative material for biogas plant on a par with conventional brick material. The field study was carried out for one year (October, 2005-September, 2006) in a small hamlet at Nilgiris incorporating solar energy to study its influence on biogas production. During summer (April-June) the temperature reaches to the maximum of 21-25 C and the minimum of 10-12 C. During winter (October-December), the temperature available is maximum of 16-21 C and minimum of 2 C. The solar insolation in the study area ranges from 250 to 600 W/m{sup 2}. This study involves the control conventional Deenabandhu model (Indian standard model prevailing in most part of India made of masonry structure only) and the experimental plastic tank with greenhouse canopy of similar capacity. Our previous work [Vinoth Kumar, K., Kasturi Bai, R., 2005. Plastic biodigesters - a systematic study. Energy for Sustainable Development 9 (4), 40-49] on lab scale digester made from plastic material was compared over other materials and the results gave us much confidence to carry out further study on pilot scale. In continuation, a semi-continuous study was conducted for one year with the retention time of 55 days. The gas generated from the biogas plants was utilized for cooking (burner) and lighting (lamp) purposes. The yearly average slurry temperatures recorded during the study period was 26.3 and 22.4 C in experimental and control biogas plants against ambient temperature of 17.0 C. The yearly average greenhouse chamber temperature recorded was 29.1 C in the experimental biogas plant. The yearly average gas yield from the experimental and control biogas plants were 39.1 and 34.6 l kg{sup -1}day{sup -1} respectively. Gas productions in the winter season registered lower than other months. It can be concluded that the solar greenhouse assisted plastic biogas plant can be efficiently adopted with minor modifications in hilly

  7. Transition to a Moist Greenhouse with CO2 and solar forcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Max; Schmidt, Hauke; Marotzke, Jochem

    2016-02-09

    Water-rich planets such as Earth are expected to become eventually uninhabitable, because liquid water turns unstable at the surface as temperatures increase with solar luminosity. Whether a large increase of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases such as CO2 could also destroy the habitability of water-rich planets has remained unclear. Here we show with three-dimensional aqua-planet simulations that CO2-induced forcing as readily destabilizes the climate as does solar forcing. The climate instability is caused by a positive cloud feedback and leads to a new steady state with global-mean sea-surface temperatures above 330 K. The upper atmosphere is considerably moister in this warm state than in the reference climate, implying that the planet would be subject to substantial loss of water to space. For some elevated CO2 or solar forcings, we find both cold and warm equilibrium states, implying that the climate transition cannot be reversed by removing the additional forcing.

  8. Production of organic fertilizer from olive mill wastewater by combining solar greenhouse drying and composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliou, F; Markakis, N; Fountoulakis, M S; Nikolaidis, N; Manios, T

    2018-05-01

    Olive mill wastewater (OMW) is generated during the production of olive oil. Its disposal is still a major environmental problem in Mediterranean countries, despite the fact that a large number of technologies have been proposed up to date. The present work examines for the first time a novel, simple and low-cost technology for OMW treatment combining solar drying and composting. In the first step, OMW was dried in a chamber inside a solar greenhouse using swine manure as a bulking agent. The mean evaporation rate was found to be 5.2 kg H 2 O/m 2 /d for a drying period of 6 months (February-August). High phenol (75%) and low nitrogen (15%) and carbon (15%) losses were recorded at the end of the solar drying process. The final product after solar drying was rich in nutrients (N: 27.8 g/kg, P: 7.3 g/kg, K: 81.6 g/kg) but still contained significant quantities of phenols (18.4 g/kg). In order to detoxify the final product, a composting process was applied as a second step with or without the use of grape marc as bulking agent. Results showed that the use of grape marc as a bulking agent at a volume ratio of 1:1 achieved a higher compost temperature profile (60 °C) than 2:1 (solar drying product: grape marc) or no use (solar drying product). The end product after the combination of solar drying and composting had the characteristics of an organic fertilizer (57% organic carbon) rich in nutrients (3.5% N, 1% P, 6.5% K) with quite low phenol content (2.9 g/kg). Finally, the use of this product for the cultivation of pepper plants approved its fertility which was found similar with commercial NPK fertilizers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of heat transfer mathematical models and multiple linear regression to predict the inside variables in semi-solar greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Taki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Controlling greenhouse microclimate not only influences the growth of plants, but also is critical in the spread of diseases inside the greenhouse. The microclimate parameters were inside air, greenhouse roof and soil temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation intensity. Predicting the microclimate conditions inside a greenhouse and enabling the use of automatic control systems are the two main objectives of greenhouse climate model. The microclimate inside a greenhouse can be predicted by conducting experiments or by using simulation. Static and dynamic models are used for this purpose as a function of the metrological conditions and the parameters of the greenhouse components. Some works were done in past to 2015 year to simulation and predict the inside variables in different greenhouse structures. Usually simulation has a lot of problems to predict the inside climate of greenhouse and the error of simulation is higher in literature. The main objective of this paper is comparison between heat transfer and regression models to evaluate them to predict inside air and roof temperature in a semi-solar greenhouse in Tabriz University. Materials and Methods In this study, a semi-solar greenhouse was designed and constructed at the North-West of Iran in Azerbaijan Province (geographical location of 38°10′ N and 46°18′ E with elevation of 1364 m above the sea level. In this research, shape and orientation of the greenhouse, selected between some greenhouses common shapes and according to receive maximum solar radiation whole the year. Also internal thermal screen and cement north wall was used to store and prevent of heat lost during the cold period of year. So we called this structure, ‘semi-solar’ greenhouse. It was covered with glass (4 mm thickness. It occupies a surface of approximately 15.36 m2 and 26.4 m3. The orientation of this greenhouse was East–West and perpendicular to the direction of the wind prevailing

  10. Exergoeconomic analysis of a solar assisted ground-source heat pump greenhouse heating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, Onder; Hepbasli, Arif

    2005-01-01

    EXCEM analysis may prove useful to investigators in engineering and other disciplines due to the methodology are being based on the quantities exergy, cost, energy and mass. The main objective of the present study is to investigate between capital costs and thermodynamic losses for devices in solar assisted ground-source heat pump greenhouse heating system (SAGSHPGHS) with a 50 m vertical 32 mm nominal diameter U-bend ground heat exchanger. This system was designed and installed at the Solar Energy Institute, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. Thermodynamic loss rate-to-capital cost ratios are used to show that, for components and the overall system, a systematic correlation appears to exist between capital cost and exergy loss (total or internal), but not between capital cost and energy loss or external exergy loss. This correlation may imply that devices in successful air conditioning are configured so as to achieve an overall optimal design, by appropriately balancing the thermodynamic (exergy-based) and economic characteristics of the overall system and its devices. The results may, (i) provide useful insights into the relations between thermodynamics and economics, both in general and for SAGSHPGHS (ii) help demonstrate the merits of second-law analysis. It is observed from the results that the maximum exergy destructions in the system particularly occur due to the electrical, mechanical and isentropic efficiencies and emphasize the need for paying close attention to the selection of this type of equipment, since components of inferior performance can considerably reduce the overall performance of the system. In conjunction with this, the total exergy losses values are obtained to be from 0.010 kW to 0.480 kW for the system. As expected, the largest energy and exergy losses occur in the greenhouse and compressor. The ratio of thermodynamic loss rate to capital cost values are obtained for a range from 0.035 to 1.125

  11. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Korečko, J.; Jirka, V.; Sourek, B.; Červený, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 10 (2010), s. 1794-1808 ISSN 0038-092X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : rasters made of glass * greenhouse * solar architecture * fresnel lens * mathematical simulation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.135, year: 2010

  12. Photovoltaic performance of textured silicon solar cells with MAPbBr3 perovskite nanophosphors to induce luminescent down-shifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Li, Guan-Yi; Liu, Jheng-Jie; Lin, Zong-Xian; You, Bang-Jin; Ho, Chun-Hung

    2018-04-01

    This study employed a two-step multi-cycle spin-coating method for the application of MAPbBr3 perovskite nanophosphors on textured silicon solar cells with the aim of enhancing photovoltaic performance through luminescent down-shifting (LDS). The surface morphology and dimensions of the MAPbBr3 perovskite nanophosphors were examined using scanning electron microscopy in conjunction with ImageJ software. The LDS effects of the nanophosphors were revealed by measuring photo-luminance, optical reflectance, and external quantum efficiency. The photovoltaic performance of cells with and without MAPbBr3 perovskite nanophosphors was evaluated according to photovoltaic current density-voltage (J-V) under AM 1.5 G solar illumination. Compared to uncoated cells, two-layer and one-layer coatings of MAPbBr3 perovskite nanophosphors were shown to enhance conversion efficiency by 4.56% and 3.38%, respectively.

  13. A new hybrid algorithm using thermodynamic and backward ray-tracing approaches for modeling luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Ch. K.; Lim, Y. S.; Tan, S. G.; Rahman, F. A. [Faculty of Engineering and Science, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Jalan Genting Klang, 53300, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-12-15

    A Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) is a transparent plate containing luminescent material with photovoltaic (PV) cells attached to its edges. Sunlight entering the plate is absorbed by the luminescent material, which in turn emits light. The emitted light propagates through the plate and arrives at the PV cells through total internal reflection. The ratio of the area of the relatively cheap polymer plate to that of the expensive PV cells is increased, and the cost per unit of solar electricity can be reduced by 75%. To improve the emission performance of LSCs, simulation modeling of LSCs becomes essential. Ray-tracing modeling is a popular approach for simulating LSCs due to its great ability of modeling various LSC structures under direct and diffuse sunlight. However, this approach requires substantial amount of measurement input data. Also, the simulation time is enormous because it is a forward-ray tracing method that traces all the rays propagating from the light source to the concentrator. On the other hand, the thermodynamic approach requires substantially less input parameters and simulation time, but it can only be used to model simple LSC designs with direct sunlight. Therefore, a new hybrid model was developed to perform various simulation studies effectively without facing the issues arisen from the existing ray-tracing and thermodynamic models. The simulation results show that at least 60% of the total output irradiance of a LSC is contributed by the light trapped and channeled by the LSC. The novelty of this hybrid model is the concept of integrating the thermodynamic model with a well-developed Radiance ray-tracing model, hence making this model as a fast, powerful and cost-effective tool for the design of LSCs. (authors)

  14. Efficiency enhancement calculations of state-of-the-art solar cells by luminescent layers with spectral shifting, quantum cutting, and quantum tripling function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Kate, O.M.; De Jong, M.; Hintzen, H.T.; Van der Kolk, E.

    2013-01-01

    Solar cells of which the efficiency is not limited by the Shockley-Queisser limit can be obtained by integrating a luminescent spectral conversion layer into the cell structure. We have calculated the maximum efficiency of state-of-the-art c-Si, pc-Si, a-Si, CdTe, GaAs, CIS, CIGS, CGS, GaSb, and Ge

  15. Agronomical and biological results of solar energy heating by the combination of the sunstock system with an outside captor on a muskmelon crop grown in polyethylene greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandevelde, R.

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available Six cultivars of muskmelon (Early Dew, "68-02", "Early Chaca", "Jivaro", "Super Sprint" and "Cantor" transplanted at two differents dates were cultivated under two PE greenhouses heated by solar energy recovery and compared to a control greenhouse. The greenhouses were covered with a double shield of normal PE of 100 microns. The first greenhouse was considered as the control. The second one was equipped with a sunstock solar energy collector distribution system, consisting in a covering of 37 % of the ground surface by flat black PVC tubes, used during the day as a solar energy captor for heating the water of a basin and during the night as a radiant mulch for heating the greenhouse by emission of radiation warmth. The third greenhouse was equipped also with the same sunstock System, but connected with a supplementary outdoor collector by means of flat PE tubes corresponding to about 28 % covering of the greenhouse, and resulting in a more important energy stock, available for heating during the night. Minimum air temperature was raised by about 1, 5 and 2, 5°C respectively in the second and the third greenhouse, while the minimum soil temperature was raised with about 1 and 2°C respectively. Evolution of the maximum temperatures was more irregular and was depending also from the incident energy. Plant growth under the solar heated greenhouse was more accelerated, and resulted in an earlier fruitset, an earlier production and a higher total yield.

  16. [An early warning method of cucumber downy mildew in solar greenhouse based on canopy temperature and humidity modeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Li, Mei-lan; Xu, Jian-ping; Chen, Mei-xiang; Li, Wen-yong; Li, Ming

    2015-10-01

    The greenhouse environmental parameters can be used to establish greenhouse nirco-climate model, which can combine with disease model for early warning, with aim of ecological controlling diseases to reduce pesticide usage, and protecting greenhouse ecological environment to ensure the agricultural product quality safety. Greenhouse canopy leaf temperature and air relative humidity, models were established using energy balance and moisture balance principle inside the greenhouse. The leaf temperature model considered radiation heat transfer between the greenhouse crops, wall, soil and cover, plus the heat exchange caused by indoor net radiation and crop transpiration. Furthermore, the water dynamic balance in the greenhouse including leaf transpiration, soil evaporation, cover and leaf water vapor condensation, was considered to develop a relative humidity model. The primary infection and latent period warning models for cucumber downy mildew (Pseudoperonospora cubensis) were validated using the results of the leaf temperature and relative humidity model, and then the estimated disease occurrence date of cucumber downy mildew was compared with actual disease occurrence date of field observation. Finally, the results were verified by the measured temperature and humidity data of September and October, 2014. The results showed that the root mean square deviations (RMSDs) of the measured and estimated leaf temperature were 0.016 and 0.024 °C, and the RMSDs of the measured and estimated air relative humidity were 0.15% and 0.13%, respectively. Combining the result of estimated temperature and humidity models, a cucumber disease early warning system was established to forecast the date of disease occurrence, which met with the real date. Thus, this work could provide the micro-environment data for the early warning system of cucumber diseases in solar greenhouses.

  17. FENCH-analysis of electricity generation greenhouse gas emissions from solar and wind power in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.

    1997-01-01

    The assessment of energy supply systems with regard to the influence on climate change requires not only the quantification of direct emissions caused by the operation of a power plant. It also has to take into account indirect emissions resulting from e.g. construction and dismounting of the power plant. Processes like manufacturing the materials for building the plant, the transportation of components and the construction and maintenance of the power plant are included. A tool to determine and assess the energy and mass flows is the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) which allows the assessment of environmental impacts related to a product or service. In this paper a FENCH (Full Energy Chain)-analysis based on a LCA of electricity production from wind and solar power plants under operation conditions typical for application its Germany is presented. The FENCH-analysis is based on two methods, Process Chain Analysis (PCA) and Input-Output-Analysis (IOA) which are illustrated by the example of an electricity generation from a wind power plant. The calculated results are shown for the cumulated (indirect and direct) Greenhouse-Gas (GHG)-emissions for an electricity production from wind and solar power plants. A comparison of the results to the electricity production from a coal fired power plant is performed. At last a comparison of 1 kWh electricity from renewable energy to 1 kWh from fossil energy carrier has to be done, because the benefits of 1 kWh electricity from various types of power plants are different. Electricity from wind energy depends on the meteorological conditions while electricity from a fossil fired power plant is able to follow the power requirements of the consumers nearly all the time. By considering the comparison of the different benefit provided the GHG-Emissions are presented. (author)

  18. A greenhouse type solar dryer for small-scale dried food industries: Development and dissemination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjai, Serm [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a greenhouse type solar dryer for small-scale dried food industries was developed and disseminated. The dryer consists of a parabolic roof structure covered with polycarbonate sheets on a concrete floor. The system is 8.0m in width, 20.0m in length and 3.5m in height, with a loading capacity about 1,000kg of fruits or vegetables. To ensure continuous drying operation, a 100kW-LPG gas burner was incorporated to supply hot air to the dryer during cloudy or rainy days. Nine 15-W DC fans powered by three 50-W PV modules were used to ventilate the dryer. This dryer was installed for a small-scale food industry at Nakhon Pathom in Thailand to produce osmotically dehydrated tomato. To investigate its performance, the dryer was used to dry 3 batches of osmotically dehydrated tomato. Results obtained from these experiments showed that drying air temperatures in the dryer varied from 35 C to 65 C. In addition, the drying time for these products was 2-3 days shorter than that of the natural sun drying and good quality dried products were obtained. A system of differential equations describing heat and moisture transfers during drying of osmotically dehydrated tomato was also developed. The simulated results agreed well with the experimental data. For dissemination purpose, other two units of this type of dryer were constructed and tested at two locations in Thailand and satisfactory results were obtained.

  19. Homeotropic alignment and Förster resonance energy transfer: The way to a brighter luminescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Taylor, Alaric; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis, E-mail: i.papakonstantinou@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-07

    We investigate homeotropically aligned fluorophores and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for luminescent solar concentrators using Monte-Carlo ray tracing. The homeotropic alignment strongly improves the trapping efficiency, while FRET circumvents the low absorption at homeotropic alignment by separating the absorption and emission processes. We predict that this design doped with two organic dye molecules can yield a 82.9% optical efficiency improvement compared to a single, arbitrarily oriented dye molecule. We also show that quantum dots are prime candidates for absorption/donor fluorophores due to their wide absorption band. The potentially strong re-absorption and low quantum yield of quantum dots is not a hindrance for this design.

  20. Transmissividade a radiação solar do polietileno de baixa densidade utilizado em estufas Solar radiation transmissivity through low density polyethylene used in greenhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galileo Adeli Buriol

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Determinou-se a transmissividade à radiação solar do polietileno de baixa densidade utilizado em estufas. O experimento foi conduzido em uma estufa tipo Capela com dimensões de 10m x 25m, coberta com polietileno transparente de baixa densidade, com espessura de 100µm e aditivado com anti-UV, instalada no Departamento de Fitotecnia da Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, RS - Brasil. A radiação solar global diária incidente no interior e exterior da estufa foi medida no período de julho de 1991 a janeiro de 1992 e também a fração difusa da radiação solar em dias com diferentes condições atmosféricas e de condensação no filme plástico durante o período de maio a julho de 1993. A transmissividade média da radiação solar global foi de 56,2% nas primeiras horas do dia e de 81,3% nas horas próximas ao meio-dia. A fração difusa da radiação solar global foi mais elevada no interior da estufa do que no exterior, evidenciando o efeito dispersante do plástico e da condensação do vapor d'água na superfície interna do filme.The transmissivity of the solar radiation by polyethylene cover used in plastic greenhouses was evaluated in the Central Region of the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. The study was carried out inside a 10m x 25m greenhouse covered with low density transparent polyethylene with 100µm thickness, located at Federal University of Santa Maria. Incoming global solar radiation inside and outside was measured daily dunng July, 1991 to January, 1992. The effect of polyethylene cover on diffuse solar radiation was determined dunng 1993 year. The average transmissivity of global solar radiation was 56.2% early in the moming and 81.3% at near noonday. Diffuse solar radiation proportion was higher inside than outside the greenhouse and enhanced when water condenses on the inner surface of the film.

  1. Metal-enhanced fluorescence of mixed coumarin dyes by silver and gold nanoparticles: Towards plasmonic thin-film luminescent solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Bashir, S.M., E-mail: elbashireg@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics Faculty of Science, Benha University (Egypt); Barakat, F.M.; AlSalhi, M.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Science College, King Saud University, Riyadh, KSA (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-11-15

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanocomposite films doped with mixed coumarin dyestuffs and noble metal nanoparticles (60 nm silver and 100 nm gold) were prepared by spin coating technique. The effect of silver and gold nanoparticles on the film properties was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. DSC measurements indicated the increase of the glass transition temperature of the films by increasing nanogold concentration, recommending their promising thermal stability towards hot climates. It was found that the fluorescence signals of the mixed coumarin dyes were amplified by 5.4 and 7.15 folds as a result of metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). The research outcomes offered a potential application of these films in solar energy conversion by plasmonic thin film luminescent solar concentrator (PTLSC). -- Graphical abstract: Plasmonic thin film luminescent solar concentrators. Highlights: • Metal enhanced fluorescence was achieved for mixed coumarin dyes doped in PMMA nanocomposite films. • The amplification of the fluorescence signals is dependent on the concentration of silver and gold nanoparticles. • These films is considered as potential candidates for plasmonic thin film luminescent solar concentrators (PTLSCs)

  2. High-Performance CuInS 2 Quantum Dot Laminated Glass Luminescent Solar Concentrators for Windows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergren, Matthew R. [UbiQD, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States; Makarov, Nikolay S. [UbiQD, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States; Ramasamy, Karthik [UbiQD, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States; Jackson, Aaron [UbiQD, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States; Guglielmetti, Rob [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; McDaniel, Hunter [UbiQD, Inc., Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, United States

    2018-01-30

    Building-integrated sunlight harvesting utilizing laminated glass luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) is proposed. By incorporating high quantum yield (>90%), NIR-emitting CuInS2/ZnS quantum dots into the polymer interlayer between two sheets of low-iron float glass, a record optical efficiency of 8.1% is demonstrated for a 10 cm x 10 cm device that transmits ~44% visible light. After completing prototypes by attaching silicon solar cells along the perimeter of the device, the electrical power conversion efficiency was certified at 2.2% with a black background and at 2.9% using a reflective substrate. This 'drop-in' LSC solution is particularly attractive because it fits within the existing glazing industry value chain with only modest changes to typical glazing products. Performance modeling predicts >1 GWh annual electricity production for a typical urban skyscraper in most major U.S. cities, enabling significant energy cost savings and potentially 'net-zero' buildings.

  3. Scale up of a luminescent solar concentrator based photomicroreactor via numbering-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Fang; Cambié, Dario; Janse, Jeroen; Wieland, Eric W.; Kuijpers, Koen P.L.; Hessel, Volker; Debije, Michael G.; Noël, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    The use of solar energy to power chemical reactions is a long-standing dream of the chemical community. Recently, visible-light-mediated photoredox catalysis has been recognized as the ideal catalytic transformation to convert solar energy into chemical bonds. However, scaling photochemical

  4. A leaf-inspired luminescent solar concentrator for energy-efficient continuous-flow photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cambié, D.; Zhao, F.; Hessel, V.; Debije, M.G.; Noël, T.

    2017-01-01

    The use of solar light to promote chemical reactions holds significant potential with regard to sustainable energy solutions. While the number of visible light-induced transformations has increased significantly, the use of abundant solar light has been extremely limited. We report a leaf-inspired

  5. Wavelength-Selective Solar Photovoltaic Systems: Powering Greenhouses for Plant Growth at the Food-Energy-Water Nexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loik, Michael E.; Carter, Sue A.; Alers, Glenn; Wade, Catherine E.; Shugar, David; Corrado, Carley; Jokerst, Devin; Kitayama, Carol

    2017-10-01

    Global renewable electricity generation capacity has rapidly increased in the past decade. Increasing the sustainability of electricity generation and the market share of solar photovoltaics (PV) will require continued cost reductions or higher efficiencies. Wavelength-Selective Photovoltaic Systems (WSPVs) combine luminescent solar cell technology with conventional silicon-based PV, thereby increasing efficiency and lowering the cost of electricity generation. WSPVs absorb some of the blue and green wavelengths of the solar spectrum but transmit the remaining wavelengths that can be utilized by photosynthesis for plants growing below. WSPVs are ideal for integrating electricity generation with glasshouse production, but it is not clear how they may affect plant development and physiological processes. The effects of tomato photosynthesis under WSPVs showed a small decrease in water use, whereas there were minimal effects on the number and fresh weight of fruit for a number of commercial species. Although more research is required on the impacts of WSPVs, they are a promising technology for greater integration of distributed electricity generation with food production operations, for reducing water loss in crops grown in controlled environments, as building-integrated solar facilities, or as alternatives to high-impact PV for energy generation over agricultural or natural ecosystems.

  6. Feasibility study for combining cooling and high grade energy production in a solar greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Bot, G.P.A.; Flamand, G.

    2010-01-01

    Throughout the world greenhouse horticulture is expanding and intensifying. The expansion is driven by the much higher production levels that are achieved in greenhouses compared to open fields. This provides increased income for farmers and a positive effect on rural development. Intensification is

  7. Luminescence of solar cells with a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigunov, D. M.; Il'in, A. S.; Forsh, P. A.; Bobyl', A. V.; Verbitskii, V. N.; Terukov, E. I.; Kashkarov, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    We have studied the electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) of solar cells containing a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions. It is established that both the EL and PL properties of these cells are determined by the radiative recombination of nonequilibrium carriers in crystalline silicon (c-Si). The external EL energy yield (efficiency) of solar cells with a-Si:H/c-Si heterojunctions at room temperature amounts to 2.1% and exceeds the value reached in silicon diode structures. This large EL efficiency can be explained by good passivation of the surface of crystalline silicon and the corresponding increase in lifetime of minority carrier s in these solar cells.

  8. Recent Advances of Rare-Earth Ion Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic-inorganic lead halide based perovskite solar cells have received broad interest due to their merits of low fabrication cost, a low temperature solution process, and high energy conversion efficiencies. Rare-earth (RE ion doped nanomaterials can be used in perovskite solar cells to expand the range of absorption spectra and improve the stability due to its upconversion and downconversion effect. This article reviews recent progress in using RE-ion-doped nanomaterials in mesoporous electrodes, perovskite active layers, and as an external function layer of perovskite solar cells. Finally, we discuss the challenges facing the effective use of RE-ion-doped nanomaterials in perovskite solar cells and present some prospects for future research.

  9. Solar/Geothermal Saves Energy in Heating and Cooling of Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Matthew; Thompson, Mark; Sikorski, Yuri

    2010-04-01

    The steady increase in world population and problems associated with conventional agricultural practices demand changes in food production methods and capabilities. Locally grown food minimizes the transportation costs and gas emissions responsible for Global Warming. Greenhouses have the potential to be extremely ecologically friendly by greatly increasing yields per year and facilitating reduced pesticide use. Globally, there are 2.5 million acres of greenhouse cover, including 30,640 acres in North America. In Europe, greenhouses consume 10% of the total energy in agriculture. Most of that energy is utilized for heating. Heating and cooling amount to 35% of greenhouse production costs. This high percentage value can be partially attributed to currently poor insulation values. In moderate-to-cold climate zones, it can take up to 2,500 gallons of propane, currently costing around 5,000, to keep a 2,000 sq. ft. greenhouse producing all winter. Around 350 tons of CO2 per acre per year are released from these structures, contributing to global climate change. Reducing the energy needs of a greenhouse is the first step in saving money and the environment. Therefore, an efficient and environmentally friendly heating and cooling system selection is also crucial. After selecting appropriate energy sources, the next major concern in a greenhouse would be heat loss. Consequently, it is critically important to understand factors contributing to heat loss.

  10. Residential greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-02-01

    The following report examines the technical and economic viability of residential greenhouse additions in Whitehorse, Yukon. The greenhouse was constructed using the south facing wall of an existing residence as a common wall. Total construction costs were $18,000, including labour. Annual fuel demand for the residence has been reduced by about 10 per cent for an annual saving of $425. In addition, produce to the value of $1,000 is grown annually in the greenhouse for domestic consumption and commercial resale. Typically the greenhouse operates for nine months each year. There is a net thermal loss during the months of November, December and January as a result of the large area of glazing. As well as supplementing the heating supply solar greenhouses can provide additional cash crops which can be used to offset the cost of construction. Humidity problems are minimal and can be dealt with by exhausting high humidity air. One system which has been considered for the greenhouse is to use a standard residential heat pump to remove excess moisture and to pump heat into the house. This would have a secondary benefit of excluding the need to circulate greenhouse air through the house. Thus any allergenic reactions to the greenhouse air would be prevented. 8 refs., 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  11. Comparison of the greenhouse gas emissions from the full energy chains of solar and wind power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Vate, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Fair comparison of the climate impacts from different energy sources can be made only by accounting for the emissions of all relevant greenhouse gases (GHGs) from the full energy chain (FENCH) of the energy sources. The scanty FENCH-GHG literature is reviewed. The literature data on FENCH material and energy use for renewable, solar and wind power technologies are discussed. Some calculations of FENCH-GHG emission factors are presented using basic literature data on the major energy and materials fluxes associated with each link of the FENCH. GHGs considered are CO 2 , CH 4 , N 2 O, and CF 4 . The FENCH CO 2 -equivalent emission factors of wind and solar power systems are in the range of 10-50 and 100-400 g CO 2 /kWh, resp. This is low compared to those of fossil fuels: 500-1200 g CO 2 /kWh. Compared to the international-consensus emission factors of nuclear and hydropower (5-20 g CO 2 /kWh), those of modern wind power and solar-thermal power are somewhat higher: 10-50 and 20-200 g CO 2 /kWh, resp. Solar PV has a ca. 10 times higher FENCH-GHG emission factor; however, advanced solar PV systems are expected to have 5-10 times lower emission factors. Important inconsistencies exist between literature data on FENCH-GHG emission factors which require explanation. Land-use associated (negative CO 2 sink) contributions due to low photosynthesis under solar systems have been estimated, amounting to ca. 20 and 11 g CO 2 /kWh for solar PV and solar thermal, resp. No information is available about contributions associated with backup supply or storage systems. (author)

  12. [Effects of CO2 fertilization on photosynthesis and growth of cut Anthurium andraeanum in solar greenhouse in winter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke Bin; Meng, Fan Zhi; Guo, Xian Feng

    2017-06-18

    Aiming at the problem of the acute shortage of CO 2 in winter production of cut Anthurium andraeanum in solar greenhouse, the effect of CO 2 fertilization on photosynthetic characteristics and growth performance of A. andraeanum 'Fire' was investigated. Three treatments with different concentrations of CO 2 were designed, i.e., 700, 1000 and 1300 Μmol·mol -1 , with receiving no extra CO 2 as the control. The results showed that for the CO 2 -fertilized plants, the photosynthetic rate, intercellular CO 2 concentration and water use efficiency were significantly greater than those in the control plants after CO 2 fertilization for 60 days, and the largest increase range was observed in the 1000 Μmol·mol -1 CO 2 treatment, whereas the stomata conductance was significantly reduced compared with the control. Meanwhile, the contents of soluble sugar, starch and soluble protein in CO 2 -fertilized plants were significantly higher than those in control plants. Moreover, the quality of cut flowers with CO 2 fertilization was remarkably superior to control flowers in term of the parameters including spathe size, spathe color, peduncle length, leaf growth performance and peduncle growth rate. The most superior improvement was observed in the 1000 Μmol·mol -1 CO 2 treatment. It was therefore concluded that CO 2 fertilization of 1000 Μmol·mol -1 could effectively improve the winter production of cut A. andraeanum in solar greenhouse.

  13. Assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from the full energy chain of solar and wind power and other energy sources. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    An international Advisory Group Meeting on Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emission from the Full Energy Chain of Solar and Wind Power was convened by the IAEA at its Headquarters in Vienna, 21-24 October, 1996. The meeting was attended by 12 experts from 9 countries and two international organizations, and including one consultant to the Agency. The objectives of the workshop were: to define and to analyze the solar and wind power chains in terms of emissions of greenhouse gases from the whole energy chain, i.e., during a plant's operation, and from the construction of the plant to the plant's decommissioning and waste storage; to evaluate existing assessments of full-energy-chain emissions of greenhouse gases from the wind and solar power chains and, where possible, compare these results with such emissions from nuclear power and other energy chains

  14. Assessment of greenhouse gas emissions from the full energy chain of solar and wind power and other energy sources. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    An international Advisory Group Meeting on Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emission from the Full Energy Chain of Solar and Wind Power was convened by the IAEA at its Headquarters in Vienna, 21-24 October, 1996. The meeting was attended by 12 experts from 9 countries and two international organizations, and including one consultant to the Agency. The objectives of the workshop were: to define and to analyze the solar and wind power chains in terms of emissions of greenhouse gases from the whole energy chain, i.e., during a plant`s operation, and from the construction of the plant to the plant`s decommissioning and waste storage; to evaluate existing assessments of full-energy-chain emissions of greenhouse gases from the wind and solar power chains and, where possible, compare these results with such emissions from nuclear power and other energy chains. Refs, figs, tabs.

  15. Exploration of parameters influencing the self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators with an experimentally validated combined ray-tracing/Monte-Carlo model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumer, Zachar; van Sark, Wilfried G. J. H. M.; de Mello Donegá, Celso; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2013-09-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are low cost photovoltaic devices, which reduce the amount of necessary semiconductor material per unit area of a photovoltaic solar energy converter by means of concentration. The device is comprised of a thin plastic plate in which luminescent species (fluorophores) have been incorporated.The fluorophores absorb the solar light and radiatively re-emit a part of the energy. Total internal reflection traps most of the emitted light inside the plate and wave-guides it to a narrow side facet with a solar cell attached, where conversion into electricity occurs. The eciency of such devices is as yet rather low, due to several loss mechanisms, of which self-absorption is of high importance. Combined ray-tracing and Monte-Carlosimulations is a widely used tool for efficiency estimations of LSC-devices prior to manufacturing. We have applied this method to a model experiment, in which we analysed the impact of self-absorption onto LSC-efficiency of fluorophores with different absorption/emission-spectral overlap (Stokes-shift): several organic dyes and semiconductor quantum dots (single compound and core/shell of type-II). These results are compared with the ones obtained experimentally demonstrating a good agreement. The validated model is used to investigate systematically the influence of spectral separation and luminescence quantum efficiency on the intensity loss inconsequence of increased self-absorption. The results are used to adopt a quantity called the self-absorption cross-section and establish it as reliable criterion for self-absorption properties of materials that can be obtained from fundamental data and has a more universal scope of application, than the currently used Stokes-shift.

  16. Measurements on a solar greenhouse combining cooling and electrical energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Tuijl; Piet Sonneveld; H. Janssen; J. van Campen; G. Bot; Gert-Jan Swinkels

    2010-01-01

    Performance results are given of a new type of greenhouse, which combines reflection of near infrared radiation (NIR) with electrical power generation using hybrid photovoltaic cell/thermal collector modules. Besides the generation of electrical and thermal energy, the reflection of the NIR will

  17. Performance results of a solar greenhouse combining electrical and thermal energy production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Campen, J.B.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2010-01-01

    Performance results are given of a new type of greenhouse, which combines reflection of near infrared radiation (NIR) with electrical power generation using hybrid photovoltaic cell/thermal collector modules. Besides the generation of electrical and thermal energy, the reflection of the NIR will

  18. Luminescent GdVO_4:Sm"3"+ quantum dots enhance power conversion efficiency of bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells by Förster resonance energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishnoi, Swati; Gupta, Vinay; Sharma, Gauri D.; Chand, Suresh; Sharma, Chhavi; Kumar, Mahesh; Haranath, D.; Naqvi, Sheerin

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) of bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from samarium-doped luminescent gadolinium orthovanadate (GdVO_4:Sm"3"+) quantum dots (QDs) to polythieno[3,4-b]-thiophene-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) polymer. The photoluminescence emission spectrum of GdVO_4:Sm"3"+ QDs overlaps with the absorption spectrum of PTB7, leading to FRET from GdVO_4:Sm"3"+ to PTB7, and significant enhancements in the charge-carrier density of excited and polaronic states of PTB7 are observed. This was confirmed by means of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The FRET from GdVO_4:Sm"3"+ QDs to PTB7 led to a remarkable increase in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of PTB7:GdVO_4:Sm"3"+:PC_7_1BM ([6,6]-phenyl-C_7_1-butyric acid methyl ester) polymer solar cells. The PCE in optimized ternary blend PTB7:GdVO_4:Sm"3"+:PC_7_1BM (1:0.1:1.5) is increased to 8.8% from 7.2% in PTB7:PC_7_1BM. This work demonstrates the potential of rare-earth based luminescent QDs in enhancing the PCE of polymer solar cells.

  19. Study on a groundwater source heat pump cooling system in solar greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Lilong; Ma, Chengwei [China Agricultural Univ., Beijing (China). Coll. of Water Conservancy and Civil Engineering. Dept. of Agricultural Structure and Bio-environmental Engineering], E-mail: macwbs@cau.edu.cn

    2008-07-01

    This study aims at exploiting the potential of ground source heat pump (GSHP) technology in cooling agricultural greenhouse, and advocating the use of renewable and clean energy in agriculture. GSHP has the multi-function of heating, cooling and dehumidifying, which is one of the fastest growing technologies of renewable energy air conditioning in recent years. The authors carried out experiment on the ground source heat pump system in cooling greenhouse in Beijing region during the summertime of 2007, and conducted analysis on the energy efficiency of the system by using coefficient of performance (COP). According to the data collected during Aug.13-18th, 2007, the coefficient of performance of GSHP system (COP{sub sys}) has reached 3.15 on average during the test. (author)

  20. Better lumber drying process with a non-greenhouse type solar kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, K C

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary study of using solar energy for lumber drying in NW Ontario is proven applicable and practical by the evidence of data collected. It was found that lumber seasoning using solar energy in the region is more favorable in the summer than in the winter. The most significant advantages of lumber drying with a solar kiln are: (1) low percentage of drying defect lumber produced; (2) higher strength properties of lumber produced; (3) unlimited sources of heat energy from the sun are available. The longer drying periods with a solar kiln as compared to a conventional steam kiln can be overcome by utilizing a supplemental heat system, e.g., wood residue burner to shorten the drying period. However, some improvements and modification of the existing kiln should be done in order to increase the efficiency of the lumber drying system.

  1. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with Energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation - Part 1 Optics and PV-cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gert-Jan Swinkels; Piet Sonneveld; G.P.A. Bot

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the

  2. Design of a Solar Greenhouse with energy Delivery by the Conversion of Near Infrared Radiation. Part 1. Optics and PV-Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the design and development of a new type of greenhouse with an integrated filter for reflecting near infrared radiation (NIR) and a solar energy delivery system is described. Especially the optical parts as the spectral selective film, the properties of the circular reflector and the

  3. The GEOSER project - short-term storage of solar heat in horticultural greenhouses; GEOSER Stockage solaire a court terme en serres horticoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmuller, P.; Lachal, P.; Gil, J. [University of Geneva, Centre Universitaire d' Etude des Problemes de l' Energie (CUEPE), Carouge (Switzerland); Jaboyedoff, P. [Sorane, Lausanne (Switzerland); Reist, A. [Centre des Fougeres, Station de recherches en production vegetale de Changins, Conthey (Switzerland); Danloy, L. [Danloy Luc, Meyrin (Switzerland)

    2002-07-01

    Today, horticultural greenhouses are significantly contributing to fresh victualling supply. In a temperate climate they have to be more or less permanently heated to make all-year round production possible. To reduce energy consumption, greenhouses were successively improved since the 70es, beginning with their envelope and heat distribution systems. The next step was the development of storage/heat-recovery systems for solar heat in greenhouses. Here, mainly two types are encountered: air/ground heat exchangers placed under the greenhouse ground; air/water heat exchangers in the greenhouse, connected to an underground water store. In the present report the two types are compared in a side-by-side experiment including a third greenhouse with a conventional gas heating and heat distribution system, as a reference. Comprehensive energy balances including parasitic energy consumption (electricity) are presented. In the three greenhouses the same agricultural programme was carried out. The comparative evaluation included this aspect as well. Computerized simulations supplemented the analysis, enabling a parametric study and the evaluation of potential improvements towards optimal systems.

  4. Enhanced performance of dye-sensitized solar cells based on TiO{sub 2} with NIR-absorption and visible upconversion luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Li [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yulin, Yang, E-mail: ylyang@hit.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Mi, Zhou; Ruiqing, Fan; LeLe, Qiu [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xin, Wang [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Department of Food and Environmental Engineering, Heilongjiang, East University, Harbin 150086 (China); Lingyun, Zhang [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Northeast Dianli University, Jilin 132012 (China); Xuesong, Zhou; Jianglong, He [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2013-02-15

    TiO{sub 2} with NIR-absorption and visible upconversion luminescence (UC-TiO{sub 2}) is prepared by a sol-gel method and calcined at 700 Degree-Sign C for 6 h. The material broadens the response region of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) from an ultraviolet-visible region to the whole region of the solar spectrum. It shifts NIR sunlight to visible light which matches the strong absorbing region of the dye (N719). DSSCs based on UC-TiO{sub 2} achieved higher conversion efficiency than that on raw TiO{sub 2}. UC-TiO{sub 2} was mixed with commercial raw TiO{sub 2} as additive, and the short-circuit current density, open-circuit voltage and conversion efficiency of the DSSC reached to the optimum values 13.38 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.78 V and 6.63% (AM1.5 global), comparing with the blank values: 7.99 mA/cm{sup 2}, 0.75 V and 4.07%, respectively. Also the mechanisms of upconversion by multiphoton absorption and energy transfer processes are interpreted in this paper. - Graphical abstract: By introducing TiO{sub 2} with NIR-absorption and visible up-conversion luminescence into DSSC, a signal reflection was explored from ultra-violet region to visible region, and to near-IR region. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TiO{sub 2} with NIR-absorption and visible up-conversion luminescence (UC-TiO{sub 2}) was prepared by a sol-gel method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A systematic characterization and analysis was carried out to discuss the mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significantly enhanced performance of DSSC was explored by using UC-TiO{sub 2} as an additive.

  5. Luminescence investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}solar cells with different Ga-contents grown in a three-stage-process on glass substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Kristin; Mueller, Mathias; Hempel, Thomas; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Juergen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Abou-Ras, Daniel; Rissom, Thorsten; Unold, Thomas; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    A fundamental advantage of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) alloys as absorber materials in thin-film solar cells is their direct band gap energies which can be varied between 1.04 eV (CuInSe{sub 2}) and 1.68 eV (CuGaSe{sub 2}). Photoluminescence (PL) spectra of complete CIGS solar cells with a systematic variation of the Ga-content in the absorber layer will be presented. The CIGS cells investigated were grown on a Mo back contact sputtered on soda lime glass and have a Ga-concentration ranging over the entire range from CuInSe{sub 2} to CuGaSe{sub 2}. Samples with Ga-contents between 100 % and 33 % show two broad luminescence bands. In contrast, CuInSe{sub 2} exhibits only one broad luminescence band. Each band is composed of two or three different transitions. Varying excitation density over four orders of magnitude results for samples with Ga-content of 0 % and 33 % in a blueshift of the main peak with increasing excitation density. For higher Ga-concentrations, first a blue- and then a redshift of the dominating peak with increasing excitation density is visible. The temperature dependence of the PL spectra is investigated going from 4 K to 300 K.

  6. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  7. Lower electricity prices and greenhouse gas emissions due to rooftop solar: empirical results for Massachusetts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, Robert K.; Vaid, Devina

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and hourly correlations among photovoltaic (PV) capacity utilization, electricity prices, electricity consumption, and the thermal efficiency of power plants in Massachusetts reduce electricity prices and carbon emissions beyond average calculations. PV utilization rates are highest when the thermal efficiencies of natural gas fired power plants are lowest, which reduces emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 by 0.3% relative to the annual average emission rate. There is a positive correlation between PV utilization rates and electricity prices, which raises the implied price of PV electricity by up to 10% relative to the annual average price, such that the average MWh reduces electricity prices by $0.26–$1.86 per MWh. These price reductions save Massachusetts rate-payers $184 million between 2010 and 2012. The current and net present values of these savings are greater than the cost of solar renewable energy credits which is the policy instrument that is used to accelerate the installation of PV capacity. Together, these results suggest that rooftop PV is an economically viable source of power in Massachusetts even though it has not reached socket parity. - Highlights: •Implied price of PV up to 10% greater than the annual average price. •PV saves Massachusetts rate-payers $184 million in 2010–2012. •Annual savings are greater than the cost of solar renewable energy credits. •Savings rise longer lifetime of PV systems and pay period for SREC's shortened. •PV reduces emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 by 0.3% relative to the annual average.

  8. Selection of groundwater sites in Egypt, using geographic information systems, for desalination by solar energy in order to reduce greenhouse gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam G. Salim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Egypt has already reached the water poverty limit, it possesses a high potential of brackish groundwater available from different aquifers. All Arab countries lie in the best sun-belt region in the world and Egypt has the highest number of sun hours all year round. Solar energy for groundwater desalination is an independent infinite energy resource; it has low running costs and reduces the contribution of greenhouse gases (GHG to global warming. Perfect meteorological conditions and land space are available in remote areas, where solar desalination could supply freshwater for drinking, industry, and for greenhouse agriculture. The present study uses Geographic Information System(s (GIS as a spatial decision support tool to select appropriate sites in Egypt for groundwater solar desalination. Solar radiation, aquifer depth, aquifer salinity, distance from the Delta and the Nile Valley, incidence of flash floods, sand dunes, rock faults, and seawater intrusion in the North Delta, are the criteria that have been taken into consideration in the process of analysis. A specific weight is given to each criterion according to its relative influence on the process of decision making. The results from the application of the presented methodology determine the relative suitability of sites for groundwater solar desalination. These sites are ranked in descending order to help decision-makers in Egypt. The results show that groundwater solar desalination is suitable in remote regions on the North Western Coast, on the North Sinai Coast, and at the Southern Oasis, for reducing greenhouse gases and that it is particularly useful for poor communities suffering from polluted water.

  9. Does the correlation between solar cycle lengths and Northern Hemisphere land temperatures rule out any significant global warming from greenhouse gases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Peter; Gundermann, Jesper

    1998-01-01

    Since the discovery of a striking correlation between solar cycle lengths and Northern Hemisphere land temperatures there have been widespread speculations as to whether these findings would rule out any significant contributions to global warming from the enhanced concentrations of greenhouse...... gases. The present analysis shows that a similar degree of correlation is obtained when testing the solar data against a couple of fictitious temperature series representing different global warming trends. Therefore, the correlation cannot be used to estimate the magnitude of a possible contribution...... to global warming from human activities, nor to rule out a sizable contribution from that source....

  10. Evaluation of a integral systems greenhouse - solar dryer for small growers; Evaluacion de un sistema integral invernadero - secadero solar para pequenos productores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Victor O; Iriarte, Adolfo A [INENCO, Universidad Nacional de Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina); Carabajal, Dante; Sabadzija, Gabriela; Tomalino, Luis [E.E.A. INTA, Catamarca, Catamarca (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Due to poor yielding capacity in the province of Catamarca, Argentina, it is necessary to improve solar drying systems in order to have a better quality final product. It is also essential to divide the costs of infrastructure with other complementary activities because of the need to make drying methods profitable. The system proposed in this work is a dryer-greenhouse with a double purposed macrotunnel greenhouse: during Winter it is used as a yielding system, and in Summer it is prepared to fulfill the functions of a solar dryer. The crops evaluated in winter were: small vegetable marrow (Curcubita maxima L), melon (Cucumis melo), ad cucumber (Cucuis sativus). Crop cycle, harvest time and tield in Kg/m were determined for each species. The assessment of the dryer was made using pepper for paprika observation of the thermal behavior of the product during drying and its final quality. The product obtained had a very good quality in color, taste and aroma with a classification of extra quality according to the Argentine Nutritional Code and the 7541 ISO Standard. Drying time decreased considerably compared to that observed in open air drying, 1995, 1996 and 1997 campaigns were economically assessed, and an evaluation of investments in five years was also conducted obtaining a positive VAN and a TIR above the cost of the best alternative for money expenditure. This integrated system is valid alternative in a sustainable production for small growers. [Spanish] Debido a las caracteristicas productivas de la Provincia de Catamarca Argentina, es necesario optimizar los procesos del secado solar teniendo en cuenta la calidad final del producto. Ademas, debido a la necesidad de rentabilizar los metodos de secado, imprescindible repartir los costos de infraestructura con otro tipo de actividad complementaria. El sistema propuesto en este trabajo es un invernadero secadero que utiliza un invernadero macrotunel que cumple una doble funcion, durante el invierno se usa como

  11. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  13. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  15. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Rational design of tetraphenylethylene-based luminescent down-shifting molecules: photophysical studies and photovoltaic applications in a CdTe solar cell from small to large units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Li, Zhipeng; Ablekim, Tursunjan; Ren, Tianhui; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2014-12-21

    A rational design strategy of novel fluorophores for luminescent down-shifting (LDS) application was proposed and tested in this paper. Three new fluorophores (1a-c) with specific intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics were synthesized as LDS molecules for increasing the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell. Photophysical studies of their solution and solid states, and photovoltaic measurements of their PMMA solid films applied on a CdTe solar cell suggested that the specific spectroscopic properties and Jsc enhancement effects of these molecules were highly related to their chemical structures. The Jsc enhancement effects of these fluorophores were measured on both a CdTe small cell and a large panel. An increase in the output Jsc by as high as 5.69% for a small cell and 8.88% for a large panel was observed. Compared to a traditional LDS molecule, Y083, these fluorophores exhibited more superior capabilities of LDS.

  17. Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Production of Hydrogen Use of Hydrogen Greenhouse Gases Basics | | Did you know? Without naturally occurring greenhouse gases, the earth would be too cold to support life as we know it. Without the greenhouse effect, ...

  18. Photovoltaic Performance Characterization of Textured Silicon Solar Cells Using Luminescent Down-Shifting Eu-Doped Phosphor Particles of Various Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Wen-Jeng; Deng, Yu-Jie; Liu, Jheng-Jie; Feng, Sheng-Kai; Lin, Jian-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on efforts to enhance the photovoltaic performance of textured silicon solar cells through the application of a layer of Eu-doped silicate phosphor with particles of various dimensions using the spin-on film technique. We examined the surface profile and dimensions of the Eu-doped phosphors in the silicate layer using optical microscopy with J-image software. Optical reflectance, photoluminescence, and external quantum efficiency were used to characterize the luminescent downshifting (LDS) and light scattering of the Eu-doped silicate phosphor layer. Current density-voltage curves under AM 1.5G simulation were used to confirm the contribution of LDS and light scattering produced by phosphor particles of various dimensions. Experiment results reveal that smaller phosphor particles have a more pronounced effect on LDS and a slight shading of incident light. The application of small Eu-doped phosphor particles increased the conversion efficiency by 9.2% (from 12.56% to 13.86%), far exceeding the 5.6% improvement (from 12.54% to 13.32%) achieved by applying a 250 nm layer of SiO₂ and the 4.5% improvement (from 12.37% to 12.98%) observed in cells with large Eu-doped phosphor particles.

  19. Distribution of absorbed heat in luminescent solar concentrator lightguides and effect of temperatures of mounted photovoltaic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajkumar, V.A.; Weijers, C.; Debije, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymer plates containing fluorescent dyes with photovoltaic cells attached to one or more edges have the potential to be used for solar light collection in the built environment. The heating of the polymer plates and the resulting effects this may have on the operating temperatures of the attached

  20. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Bozok University, Yozgat 66900, Turkey. 2Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Erciyes ... synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method, their crystal structures and luminescence properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) ...

  1. Advances on the semi-transparent modules based on micro solar cells: First integration in a greenhouse system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossu, Marco; Yano, Akira; Li, Zhi; Onoe, Mahiro; Nakamura, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Toshinori; Nakata, Josuke

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A semi-transparent photovoltaic module was developed for greenhouse applications. • Spherical micro-cells with 1.2 mm diameter were embedded in the module. • The module size matches the roof panel and the sunlight eclipsing level was 9.7%. • The module conversion efficiency was 0.2% over wide incident angles of sunlight. • The semi-transparent module allows the co-production of crops and energy. - Abstract: The spherical micro-cells are a semi-transparent photovoltaic (PV) technology which can contribute to improve the sustainability of greenhouse systems. Previous prototypes were tested in laboratory conditions, but the size was not suitable for the greenhouse roof application. In this work, a new prototype has been developed and tested on a real greenhouse roof. The semi-transparent PV module (STM) was composed by 4800 spherical silicon micro-cells (1.2 mm diameter) sandwiched between glass plates and integrated on a greenhouse roof with 26.5° slope. The STM was 910 mm long and 610 mm wide to match the size of the greenhouse framework. The percentage of the STM area covered with micro-cells was 2.3%, reaching 9.7% considering the metallic conductors. The cell density was 2 cells cm"−"2 and the measured perpendicular light transmissivity of the semi-transparent area was 73%. The characteristics of the prototype were compared with those of a conventional planar multi-crystalline silicon module (CPM). The module conversion efficiency was steadily around 0.2% over wide incident sunlight angle. The micro-cells never completely eclipse the incident sunlight when observed from more than 1 m distance from the roof, keeping the eclipsing level at 9.7%. The yield factor of the STM was slightly higher than the CPM because of the isotropic properties of the spherical cells, which are able to use both the sky-incident and the ground-reflected irradiation for energy production, irrespective of the module slope. The prototype STM is promising for

  2. Life cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, water and land use for concentrated solar power plants with different energy backup systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Sharon J.W.; Rubin, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Concentrated solar power (CSP) is unique among intermittent renewable energy options because for the past four years, utility-scale plants have been using an energy storage technology that could allow a CSP plant to operate as a baseload renewable energy generator in the future. No study to-date has directly compared the environmental implications of this technology with more conventional CSP backup energy options. This study compares the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, and direct, onsite land use associated with one MW h of electricity production from CSP plants with wet and dry cooling and with three energy backup systems: (1) minimal backup (MB), (2) molten salt thermal energy storage (TES), and (3) a natural gas-fired heat transfer fluid heater (NG). Plants with NG had 4–9 times more life cycle GHG emissions than plants with TES. Plants with TES generally had twice as many life cycle GHG emissions as the MB plants. Dry cooling reduced life cycle water consumption by 71–78% compared to wet cooling. Plants with larger backup capacities had greater life cycle water consumption than plants with smaller backup capacities, and plants with NG had lower direct, onsite life cycle land use than plants with MB or TES. - highlights: • We assess life cycle environmental effects of concentrated solar power (CSP). • We compare CSP with three energy backup technologies and two cooling technologies. • We selected solar field area to minimize energy cost for plants with minimal backup and salt storage. • Life cycle greenhouse gas emissions were 4–9 times lower with thermal energy storage than with fossil fuel backup. • Dry cooling reduced life cycle water use by 71–78% compared to wet cooling

  3. An experimental study of soil temperature regimes associated with solar disinfestation techniques under greenhouse conditions in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalakis, I; Tsiros, I; Frangoudakis, A; Chronopoulos, K; Flouri, F

    2006-01-01

    This paper deals with an experimental study of various techniques that have been applied for soil disinfestation purposes under greenhouse conditions. Various meteorological parameters and soil temperatures were measured for four different experimental soil segments (three associated with different disinfestation techniques and one as a reference) at depths varying between 0-1 m and with a time interval of 5 min in a greenhouse located in the Agricultural University of Athens Campus, Greece. Results showed that plastic polyethylene films such as covers, metallic conductors or a combination of both were able to enhance heat transfer and temperature increase in greenhouse soil. For typical disinfestation conditions, the depth-averaged temperature values for plastic covers, metallic conductors, and the combination of both were found to be higher than those for the reference of about 5 degrees C, 12 degrees C and 15 micro C, respectively. Moreover, the remained population percentages 50 days after the initiation of the experiment were found to be 19.3%, 25.3%, 37.3% Kcat 94% of the initial population, for the combination of metallic conductors and plastic covers, metallic conductors, plastic cover, and for the reference, respectively.

  4. Eco-friendly luminescent solar concentrators with low reabsorption losses and resistance to concentration quenching based on aqueous-solution-processed thiolate-gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H. Y.; Cai, K. B.; Chang, L. Y.; Chen, P. W.; Lin, T. N.; Lin, C. A. J.; Shen, J. L.; Talite, M. J.; Chou, W. C.; Yuan, C. T.

    2017-09-01

    Heavy-metal-containing quantum dots (QDs) with engineered electronic states have been served as luminophores in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) with impressive optical efficiency. Unfortunately, those QDs involve toxic elements and need to be synthesized in a hazardous solvent. Recently, biocompatible, eco-friendly gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), which can be directly synthesized in an aqueous solution, have gained much attention for promising applications in ‘green photonics’. Here, we explored the solid-state photophysical properties of aqueous-solution-processed, glutathione-stabilized gold nanoclusters (GSH-AuNCs) with a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) state for developing ‘green’ LSCs. We found that such GSH-AuNCs exhibit a large Stokes shift with almost no spectral overlap between the optical absorption and PL emission due to the LMCT states, thus, suppressing reabsorption losses. Compared with GSH-AuNCs in solution, the photoluminescence quantum yields (PL-QYs) of the LSCs can be enhanced, accompanied with a lengthened PL lifetime owing to the suppression of non-radiative recombination rates. In addition, the LSCs do not suffer from severe concentration-induced PL quenching, which is a common weakness for conventional luminophores. As a result, a common trade-off between light-harvesting efficiency and solid-state PL-QYs can be bypassed due to nearly-zero spectral overlap integral between the optical absorption and PL emission. We expect that GSH-AuNCs hold great promise for serving as luminophores for ‘green’ LSCs by further enhancing solid-state PL-QYs.

  5. Eco-friendly luminescent solar concentrators with low reabsorption losses and resistance to concentration quenching based on aqueous-solution-processed thiolate-gold nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H Y; Cai, K B; Chang, L Y; Chen, P W; Lin, T N; Lin, C A J; Shen, J L; Talite, M J; Chou, W C; Yuan, C T

    2017-09-15

    Heavy-metal-containing quantum dots (QDs) with engineered electronic states have been served as luminophores in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) with impressive optical efficiency. Unfortunately, those QDs involve toxic elements and need to be synthesized in a hazardous solvent. Recently, biocompatible, eco-friendly gold nanoclusters (AuNCs), which can be directly synthesized in an aqueous solution, have gained much attention for promising applications in 'green photonics'. Here, we explored the solid-state photophysical properties of aqueous-solution-processed, glutathione-stabilized gold nanoclusters (GSH-AuNCs) with a ligand-to-metal charge-transfer (LMCT) state for developing 'green' LSCs. We found that such GSH-AuNCs exhibit a large Stokes shift with almost no spectral overlap between the optical absorption and PL emission due to the LMCT states, thus, suppressing reabsorption losses. Compared with GSH-AuNCs in solution, the photoluminescence quantum yields (PL-QYs) of the LSCs can be enhanced, accompanied with a lengthened PL lifetime owing to the suppression of non-radiative recombination rates. In addition, the LSCs do not suffer from severe concentration-induced PL quenching, which is a common weakness for conventional luminophores. As a result, a common trade-off between light-harvesting efficiency and solid-state PL-QYs can be bypassed due to nearly-zero spectral overlap integral between the optical absorption and PL emission. We expect that GSH-AuNCs hold great promise for serving as luminophores for 'green' LSCs by further enhancing solid-state PL-QYs.

  6. Luminescent GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} quantum dots enhance power conversion efficiency of bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells by Förster resonance energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishnoi, Swati [CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, New Delhi 110001 (India); Luminescent Materials and Devices Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Gupta, Vinay, E-mail: drvinaygupta@netscape.net; Sharma, Gauri D.; Chand, Suresh [CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, New Delhi 110001 (India); Organic and Hybrid Solar Cells Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sharma, Chhavi; Kumar, Mahesh [Ultrafast Optoelectronics and Terahertz Photonics Lab, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Haranath, D. [CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, New Delhi 110001 (India); Luminescent Materials and Devices Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India); Naqvi, Sheerin [Luminescent Materials and Devices Group, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2016-07-11

    In this work, we report enhanced power conversion efficiency (PCE) of bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from samarium-doped luminescent gadolinium orthovanadate (GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+}) quantum dots (QDs) to polythieno[3,4-b]-thiophene-co-benzodithiophene (PTB7) polymer. The photoluminescence emission spectrum of GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} QDs overlaps with the absorption spectrum of PTB7, leading to FRET from GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} to PTB7, and significant enhancements in the charge-carrier density of excited and polaronic states of PTB7 are observed. This was confirmed by means of femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The FRET from GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} QDs to PTB7 led to a remarkable increase in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of PTB7:GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+}:PC{sub 71}BM ([6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 71}-butyric acid methyl ester) polymer solar cells. The PCE in optimized ternary blend PTB7:GdVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+}:PC{sub 71}BM (1:0.1:1.5) is increased to 8.8% from 7.2% in PTB7:PC{sub 71}BM. This work demonstrates the potential of rare-earth based luminescent QDs in enhancing the PCE of polymer solar cells.

  7. A large-scale solar greenhouse dryer using polycarbonate cover: Modeling and testing in a tropical environment of Lao People's Democratic Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjai, Serm; Intawee, Poolsak; Kaewkiew, Jinda; Sritus, Chanoke [Solar Energy Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Silpakorn University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Khamvongsa, Vathsana [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Science, National University of Laos, P O Box 7322, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic)

    2011-03-15

    A large-scale solar greenhouse dryer with a loading capacity of 1000 kg of fruits or vegetables has been developed and tested at field levels. The dryer has a parabolic shape and the dryer is covered with polycarbonate sheets. The base of the dryer is a black concrete floor with an area of 7.5 x 20.0 m{sup 2}. Nine DC fans powered by three 50-W solar cell modules are used to ventilate the dryer. The dryer was installed at Champasak (15.13 N, 105.79 E) in Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR). It is routinely used to dry chilli, banana and coffee. To assess the experimental performances of the dryer, air temperature, air relative humidity and product moisture contents were measured. One thousand kilograms of banana with the initial moisture content of 68% (wb) was dried within 5 days, compared to 7 days required for natural sun drying with the same weather conditions. Also three hundred kilograms of chilli with the initial moisture content of 75% (wb) was dried within 3 days while the natural sun drying needed 5 days. Two hundred kilograms of coffee with the initial moisture content of 52% (wb) was dried within 2 days as compared to 4 days required for natural sun drying. The chilli, coffee and banana dried in this dryer were completely protected from insects, animals and rain. Furthermore, good quality of dried products was obtained. The payback period of the dryer is estimated to be 2.5 years. A system of partial differential equations describing heat and moisture transfer during drying of chilli, coffee and banana in the greenhouse dryer was developed. These equations were solved by using the finite different method. The simulated results agree well with the experimental data. This model can be used to provide the design data for this type of dryer in other locations. (author)

  8. Predictive Control Applied to a Solar Desalination Plant Connected to a Greenhouse with Daily Variation of Irrigation Water Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Roca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The water deficit in the Mediterranean area is a known matter severely affecting agriculture. One way to avoid the aquifers’ exploitation is to supply water to crops by using thermal desalination processes. Moreover, in order to guarantee long-term sustainability, the required thermal energy for the desalination process can be provided by solar energy. This paper shows simulations for a case study in which a solar multi-effect distillation plant produces water for irrigation purposes. Detailed models of the involved systems are the base of a predictive controller to operate the desalination plant and fulfil the water demanded by the crops.

  9. Studies on improvement of tomato productivity in a large-scale greenhouse: Prediction of tomato yield based on integrated solar radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisaeda, K.; Nishina, H.

    2007-01-01

    As there are currently many large-scale production facilities that have contracts with the large retailing companies, accurate prediction of yield is necessary. The present study developed a method to predict tomato yield accurately using the data on the outside solar radiation. The present study was conducted in a Venlo-type greenhouse (29,568 square m) at Sera Farm Co., Ltd. in Sera-cho in Hiroshima prefecture. The cultivar used for this experiment was plum tomato. The sowing took place on July 18, the planting took place on August 30, and the harvesting started on October 9, 2002. The planting density was 2.5 plants msup(-2). As the results of the analysis of correlation between the weekly tomato yield and the integrated solar radiation for the period from October 7 to July 28 (43 weeks), the highest correlation (r = 0.518) between the weekly tomato yield and the solar radiation integrated from seven to one weeks before the harvesting was observed. Further investigation by the same correlation analysis was conducted for the 25 weeks period from December 8 to May 26, during which time the effect of growing stages and air temperature were considered to be relatively small. The results showed the highest correlation (r = 0.730) between the weekly tomato yield and the solar radiation integrated from eight to one weeks before the harvesting. The tomato yield occasionally needed to be adjusted at Sera Farm. Consequently, the correlation between the three-week moving average of tomato yield and the integrated solar radiation was calculated. The results showed the highest correlation was obtained for the period from eight to one weeks before the harvesting (r = 0.860). This study therefore showed that it was possible to predict the tomato yield (y: kg.msup(-2).weeksup(-1)) using the following equation on the solar radiation integrated from eight to one weeks before the harvesting(x: MJ.msup(-2)): y = 7.50 x 10 sup(-6)x + 0.148 (rsup(2) = 0.740)

  10. Practical use of the fertigation control based on cumulative solar radiation to decrease the nitrate concentration in spinach [Spinacia oleracea] grown in the greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Y.; Tsukagoshi, S.; Hayashi, N.; Maruo, T.; Hohjo, M.

    2007-01-01

    Spinach plants (Spinacia oleracea L.) were grown in a greenhouse using fertigation based on cumulative solar radiation, and effects on plant growth, nitrate concentration in the leaves, and nitrate utilization/application ratio were studied. The relation of water and NO3-N absorption to cumulative solar radiation was initially determined in hydroponically grown spinach, then the stepwise fertigation program was set to 1.0, 1.2 and 1.4 times the standard quantity. With 1.2 fertigation treatment, plant growth and leaf color did not differ from those of plants cultivated by conventional soil culture. Total nitrate supplied to the soil under fertigation treatment were about half of that at soil culture. The nitrate utilization/application ratio was increased from 44% in soil culture to 82% under fertigation treatment. The nitrate concentration in spinach leaves under fertigation treatments tended to be lower compared to those under soil culture. In addition, the production of spinach with lower nitrate and without effects on growth seemed to be feasible by the withdrawal of NO3-N in the drip solution for several days before harvest

  11. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  12. Solar radiation and energy balance in polyethylene covered greenhouse; Balancos de radiacao solar e de energia em estufa com cobertura de polietileno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisina, Valeria de Almeida; Escobedo, Joao Francisco [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas. Dept. de Ciencias Ambientais

    1998-07-01

    The objective of this paper is describe the radiation and energy balance, during the lettuce (Lactuca sativa, L, var Veronica) crop cycle inside a polyethylene greenhouse. The radiation and energy balance was made inside of a tunnel greenhouse with polyethylene cover (100 {mu} m) and in an external area, both area with 35 m{sup 2}. Global (R{sub G}), reflected (R{sub r}) and net radiation (SR), soil heat flux and air temperature (dry and humid) were measured during crop cycle, in this two environment. In the data acquisition it was utilized a DATALOGGER, which operated at 1 Hz frequency, storing 5 minutes averages. The global and reflected radiations (MJ/m{sup 2}) allowed the verification that the average transmission of global radiation (R-G{sub in}/R{sub Gex}) was almost constant, near 79,59% while the average ratio of reflected radiation (R{sub rin}/R{sub rex}) was 69,21% with 8,47% standard-deviation. The short-wave radiation average (SRoc) was bigger in the external area. The normalized relation (SR/R{sub G}) was bigger in the external area, about 12%, when the green culture covered (SRol) was bigger outside, about 50%. The energy balance, estimated in terms of vertical fluxes, showed that, for the external area, in average, 83,07% of total net radiation was converted in latent heat evaporation; 18% in soil heat flux and 9,96% in sensible heat, while, inside of the greenhouse, 58,71% of total net radiation was converted in latent heat evaporation:; 42,68% in sensible heat and 28,79% in soil heat flux. (author)

  13. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  14. Harnessing greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, F.; Rivet, P.; Terrier, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    This book considers the energy and greenhouse effect questions in a global way. It presents the different methods of fight against the increase of the greenhouse effect (energy saving, carbon sinks, cogeneration,..), describes the main alternative energy sources to fossil fuels (biomass, wind power, solar, nuclear,..), and shows that, even worrying, the future is not so dark as it seems to be and that technical solutions exist which will allow to answer the worldwide growing up energy needs and to slow down the climatic drift. (J.S.)

  15. Greener greenhouses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paksoy, Halime; Turgut, Bekir; Beyhan, Beyza; Dasgan, H. Yildiz; Evliya, Hunay; Abak, Kazim; Bozdag, Saziye

    2010-09-15

    Agricultural greenhouses are solution to the increased demand for higher production yields, facilitating off season cultivation and allowing the growth of certain varieties in areas where it was not possible earlier. Heating and/or cooling system, required to maintain the inside micro-climate in greenhouses mostly rely on fossil fuels and/or electricity. This paper aims to discuss the 'greener' solutions for heating and cooling systems of greenhouses based on different thermal energy storage concepts. Results from a greenhouse Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) application in Turkey producing tomatoes with zero fossil fuels and up to 40% higher yield are presented.

  16. 主动蓄放热-热泵联合加温系统在日光温室的应用%Application of heating system with active heat storage-release and heat pump in solar greenhouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙维拓; 杨其长; 方慧; 张义; 管道平; 卢威

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese solar greenhouse has a unique greenhouse structure that regards solar energy as the main energy source, and has characteristics such as high efficiency, energy saving, and low cost. During a cold winter night, air temperature inside a solar greenhouse is low for crop growth, which would affect crop yield and quality, due to the heat-transfer characteristics and heat capacity limit of the north wall. In recent years, in trying to promote the heat storage capacity of the solar greenhouse, the thought of active heat storage-release came forward. Solar energy is a kind of clean renewable energy, but has intermittent and unstable performance when used for greenhouse heating. Meanwhile, the heat collecting efficiency of the solar thermal collector decreases with an increase in operating temperature. Thus, an active heat storage-release system (AHSRS) is difficult to use to ensure an appropriate temperature for a solar greenhouse in a frigid region or when it encounters weather conditions with weak solar radiation. As an efficient means of raising low-grade energy, the heat pump has been more and more applied to greenhouse heating which can reduce the operating temperature of the AHSRS when used in combination. In order to promote heating performance and stability of the AHSRS and improve air temperature inside a solar greenhouse at night, based on the concept of active heat storage-release, an active heat storage-release associated with heat pump heating system (AHSRHPS) applicable to solar greenhouse heating was designed in the present study. During the day, the solar energy reaching the north wall surface was absorbed by the circulating water and stored in reservoirs when the AHSRS was running. Running the heat pump unit was intended to promote low-grade heat energy and reduce the circulating water temperature which contributes to increasing the heat collecting efficiency of the AHSRS and maximum water temperature of the reservoir. When air temperature

  17. Development and integration of a solar powered unmanned aerial vehicle and a wireless sensor network to monitor greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaver, Alexander; Motta, Nunzio; Corke, Peter; Gonzalez, Felipe

    2015-02-11

    Measuring gases for environmental monitoring is a demanding task that requires long periods of observation and large numbers of sensors. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) currently represent the best alternative to monitor large, remote, and difficult access areas, as these technologies have the possibility of carrying specialized gas sensing systems. This paper presents the development and integration of a WSN and an UAV powered by solar energy in order to enhance their functionality and broader their applications. A gas sensing system implementing nanostructured metal oxide (MOX) and non-dispersive infrared sensors was developed to measure concentrations of CH4 and CO2. Laboratory, bench and field testing results demonstrate the capability of UAV to capture, analyze and geo-locate a gas sample during flight operations. The field testing integrated ground sensor nodes and the UAV to measure CO2 concentration at ground and low aerial altitudes, simultaneously. Data collected during the mission was transmitted in real time to a central node for analysis and 3D mapping of the target gas. The results highlights the accomplishment of the first flight mission of a solar powered UAV equipped with a CO2 sensing system integrated with a WSN. The system provides an effective 3D monitoring and can be used in a wide range of environmental applications such as agriculture, bushfires, mining studies, zoology and botanical studies using a ubiquitous low cost technology.

  18. Development and Integration of a Solar Powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Wireless Sensor Network to Monitor Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaver, Alexander; Motta, Nunzio; Corke, Peter; Gonzalez, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Measuring gases for environmental monitoring is a demanding task that requires long periods of observation and large numbers of sensors. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) currently represent the best alternative to monitor large, remote, and difficult access areas, as these technologies have the possibility of carrying specialized gas sensing systems. This paper presents the development and integration of a WSN and an UAV powered by solar energy in order to enhance their functionality and broader their applications. A gas sensing system implementing nanostructured metal oxide (MOX) and non-dispersive infrared sensors was developed to measure concentrations of CH4 and CO2. Laboratory, bench and field testing results demonstrate the capability of UAV to capture, analyze and geo-locate a gas sample during flight operations. The field testing integrated ground sensor nodes and the UAV to measure CO2 concentration at ground and low aerial altitudes, simultaneously. Data collected during the mission was transmitted in real time to a central node for analysis and 3D mapping of the target gas. The results highlights the accomplishment of the first flight mission of a solar powered UAV equipped with a CO2 sensing system integrated with a WSN. The system provides an effective 3D monitoring and can be used in a wide range of environmental applications such as agriculture, bushfires, mining studies, zoology and botanical studies using a ubiquitous low cost technology. PMID:25679312

  19. Development and Integration of a Solar Powered Unmanned Aerial Vehicle and a Wireless Sensor Network to Monitor Greenhouse Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Malaver

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Measuring gases for environmental monitoring is a demanding task that requires long periods of observation and large numbers of sensors. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs currently represent the best alternative to monitor large, remote, and difficult access areas, as these technologies have the possibility of carrying specialized gas sensing systems. This paper presents the development and integration of a WSN and an UAV powered by solar energy in order to enhance their functionality and broader their applications. A gas sensing system implementing nanostructured metal oxide (MOX and non-dispersive infrared sensors was developed to measure concentrations of CH4 and CO2. Laboratory, bench and field testing results demonstrate the capability of UAV to capture, analyze and geo-locate a gas sample during flight operations. The field testing integrated ground sensor nodes and the UAV to measure CO2 concentration at ground and low aerial altitudes, simultaneously. Data collected during the mission was transmitted in real time to a central node for analysis and 3D mapping of the target gas. The results highlights the accomplishment of the first flight mission of a solar powered UAV equipped with a CO2 sensing system integrated with a WSN. The system provides an effective 3D monitoring and can be used in a wide range of environmental applications such as agriculture, bushfires, mining studies, zoology and botanical studies using a ubiquitous low cost technology.

  20. Study on heat and mass transfer between a greenhouse considered as a solar air heater and a rock packed bed as ambient control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajona Maeztu, J.I.

    1990-01-01

    A general study on heat transfer in dry packed beds is made, with special emphasis in comparing different transient models and in identifying the required conditions by which the attained results are equivalent. The differences in thermal behaviour on packed beds, when simultaneous heat mass transfer occurs as wet air is used as heat transfer fluid and exchanges heat and water with the solid in the bed, is analyzed. We modelize wet packed beds considering them as one dimension adsorbents beds, with dispersive and non-dispersive models, where adsorption, condensation-evaporation and liquid water downward flow from condensate phenomena are present. Models were solved numerically and experiments with a rock bed with dry and wet air through it, were made to test assumptions and to further understand the behavior of the system, obtaining a pretty good agreement between expected and measured profiles of the temperature evolution within the packed bed. As a possible application of the wet rock bed for storage purposes, a forced ventilation greenhouse was characterized as a wet air solar heater and analyzed the energetic potential of storing the heat that has to be rejected during daytime to control the crop ambient conditions, in a rock bed for later use at night for heating. (author)

  1. Preparation and thermal properties of Glauber’s salt-based phase-change materials for Qinghai-Tibet Plateau solar greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zipeng; Tie, Shengnian

    2017-07-01

    This paper reports the preparation and characterization of eutectic Glauber’s salt-based composite, phase-change materials (G-PCMs). PCMs were prepared using industrial-grade sodium sulfate decahydrate (Na2SO4 ṡ 10H2O) as the basic material. Other salts were added to obtain the eutectic Glauber’s salt-based PCMs with phase-change temperatures of 25∘C, 15∘C and 10∘C. The modification of the G-PCMs was designed using the same experimental method to select the efficient nucleating, thickening and thermal conductive agents. The results show that borax can be an effective nucleating agent, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose is an excellent thickener and carbon powder is a good thermal conductive agent. The phase-change temperature, latent heat and thermal conductivity of the three different PCMs are 23.9∘C, 15.4∘C and 9.5∘C; 179.6, 129 and 116.2 J/g; and 1.02, 1.10 and 1.23 W/(m K), respectively. These PCMs possess suitable phase-change temperature, high latent heat and good thermal conductivity, and can be used in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau agricultural solar greenhouses.

  2. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  3. Greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This special issue is devoted to the greenhouse effect and reviews the possible climate change by mankind, paleoclimates, climate models, measurement of terrestrial temperature, CO 2 concentration and energy policy

  4. Enhancing the photovoltaic performance of CdTe/CdS solar cell via luminescent downshifting using K{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talewar, R. A., E-mail: talewarrupesh@gmail.com; Joshi, C. P. [Physics Department, Shri Ramdeobaba College of Engineering & Management, Katol Road, Nagpur 440013 (India); Moharil, S. V. [Department of Physics, Rashtrasant Tukadoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur 440010 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cell can be significantly improved by using luminescent down-shifting material on their front surface. Taking this into account a red emitting phosphor K{sub 2}Si{sub 1-x}F{sub 6}:xMn{sup 4+} (x=10 to 25 mol %) has been synthesized through wet chemical method. The as-synthesized materials were characterized by powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence (PL) techniques. The photoluminescence studies of K{sub 2}SiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} revealed enhancement in the emission intensity, when Mn{sup 4+} concentration was increased from 10 mol % to 25 mol %. This red emitting phosphor efficiently absorbs the photons typically in the region 300-500 nm and re-emits in the region where the photovoltaic device exhibits significantly better response. The results show the possibility of enhancing the photovoltaic conversion efficiency of CdTe thin film solar cell by modifying the absorption spectra and utilising the energy in the UV-blue part of the solar spectrum.

  5. 太阳能与地源热泵联合温室大棚系统的设计%System design of solar greenhouses combined with ground source heat pump

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏伟; 穆青; 董继先; 王彬权

    2015-01-01

    Greenhouse is an irreplaceable technology in modern agriculture, but it was easily affected by weather. The combination of solar energy-ground source heat pump system can make full use of the complementary advantages of both of them.It confirmed the stable operation of greenhouses all year round.Therefore, a solar greenhouse com-bined with ground source heat pump system and the PLC control circuit of the system were designed, and the brief a-nalysis on the feasibility was carried out.It also provides certain reference and suggestion about subsequent applica-tion of the greenhouses combined with solar energy and ground source heat pump system.%温室大棚是现代农业中不可替代的技术,但其受天气影响比较大,采用太阳能—地源热泵联合系统作业的方式,可充分利用二者的优势,使得温室大棚一年四季稳定运行。为此,设计了太阳能与地源热泵联合温室大棚系统及该系统的PLC控制回路,并对其可行性进行了简要分析,可为后续太阳能—地源热泵联合系统在温室大棚中的应用提供参考。

  6. Review of present trends in luminescence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.; Delaware Univ., Newark

    1981-01-01

    The difficulties of a comprehensive review of the broad and diverse branches of molecular and solid-state luminescence research are noted. This review is thus limited to selective topics. Some general concepts and trends are then introduced, including: luminescence excitation as a collective excitation of a many-body problem, encompassing in some cases the source and probe in its formulation; continuing trends towards extremal conditions of experiments and towards inhomogeneous and structured materials, from man-made superlattices to biological materials; and increased attention to applications of luminescence research to lamps, displays, solar devices and biological research. Representative recent and new specific research areas include: site selection spectroscopy and 'hole burning'; picosecond delayed coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering; computer simulation of dynamical processes in luminescence; electron-hole expansion from the Fermi pressure of e-h plasmas; and hot electron phenomena and hot luminescence. Finally some pending problems in luminescence research, such as reconciling the configuration coordinate model and the electronic band theory and clarifying multi-phonon non-radiative processes, are discussed. (orig.)

  7. Greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepetit, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    This book speaks about the growth of greenhouse gases content in the atmosphere and try to forecast the different scenarios which may happen. But, in spite of international cooperation and coordinated research programs, nobody owns the answer. So possible future climatic changes depend on the behavior of the concerned actors. A review of energy policy driven by USA, Japan, Sweden, United Kingdom and Federal Republic of Germany is given. Political management of this file and public opinion in front of greenhouse effect are also described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs

  8. Luminescence and energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasse, G; Bleijenberg, K C; Powell, R C

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the luminescence of uranate centres in solids. The luminescence properties are influenced by the coordination number of the hexavalent uranium ion and by the crystallographic surroundings of the uranate centre. Transitions playing a role in the luminescence processes within the octahedral UO/sub 6//sup 6 -/ group are discussed using the results from both theoretical and experimental studies on another octahedral uranium complex: UF/sub 6/. The luminescence of the octahedral uranate group in oxidic compounds is discussed. Attention is paid to the vibrational structure, which is observed in the luminescence spectra at low temperatures and to the temperature quenching of the luminescence. The temperature quenching of the uranate luminescence in uranium-doped tungstates with ordered perovskite structure can be described in terms of a three state single configurational coordinate diagram. The complicated luminescence spectra of uranium-activated sodium fluoride (NaF-U) crystals have been unraveled using chemical variation of the crystal compositions and using site selective laser excitation techniques. Four different luminescent uranate centres have been observed in NaF-U. A model for the configurations of the luminescent centres has been deduced using the results from ionic conductivity experiments.

  9. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  10. Polarization memory of white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in glass host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A S; Tikhomirov, V K; Moshchalkov, V V

    2012-09-10

    A mechanism for white luminescence of Ag nanoclusters dispersed in oxyfluoride glass host has been revealed by studying a temperature dependence of its polarization memory. The spectral dependence of the polarization memory indicates the presence of a variety of Ag nanoclusters, particularly emitting in the blue, green and red. Temperature activated intercluster energy transfer has been found responsible for white luminescence. The means for increasing luminescence quantum yield have been suggested. This efficient white luminescence may be used in highly demanded devices, such as luminescent lamps, displays, color phosphors for LEDs, photovoltaic devices based on down shifting of solar spectrum.

  11. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  12. Luminescence detection of shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Carmichael, L.A.; Spencer, J.Q.; Naylor, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) has been active in the development and application of luminescence techniques in the detection of irradiated foods, in support of UK legislation. Thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and photo-transfer luminescence (PTTL) are radiation-specific phenomena which arise due to energy stored by trapped charge carriers following irradiation. The energy released following stimulation is accompanied by detectable luminescence. The TL method involves preparation of pure silicate extracts from the sample and subsequent TL analysis, whereas PSL uses stimulation by electromagnetic radiation (visible, or near visible wavelengths) thus avoiding heating the sample. (author)

  13. Synthesis and characterization of substituted Schiff-base ligands and their d(10) metal complexes: structure-induced luminescence tuning behaviors and applications in co-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Wei; Fan, Rui-Qing; Wang, Ping; Wei, Li-Guo; Wang, Xin-Ming; Zhang, Hui-Jie; Gao, Song; Yang, Yu-Lin; Wang, Yu-Lei

    2015-03-28

    Nine IIB group complexes, [ZnL1Cl2] (Zn1), [CdL1Cl2]2 (Cd1), [HgL1Cl2] (Hg1), [ZnL2Cl2] (Zn2), [CdL2Cl2] (Cd2), [HgL2Cl2] (Hg2), [ZnL3Cl2] (Zn3), [CdL3Cl2] (Cd3) and [HgL3Cl2] (Hg3), have been synthesized from the corresponding ortho-(6-methoxy-pyridyl)(CH[double bond, length as m-dash]NAr) (where Ar = 2,6-iPr2C6H3, L1; 4-MeC6H4, L2; 2-OMeC6H4, L3) Schiff base and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, (1)H NMR and X-ray single-crystal analysis. Crystallographic studies reveal that the center metal of the complexes adopts a distorted tetrahedron geometry (except for Cd1 and Cd3, which display square pyramidal geometry) and C-HCl hydrogen bonds and ππ stacking interactions contribute to three-dimensional supramolecular structures. The series of complexes exhibit tunable luminescence from blue, through green, to light yellow by varying the temperature (298 K and 77 K), both in solution and in the solid state. Moreover, the quantum yields range from 0.027 to 0.422, and decrease according to the order of the periodic table (Zn > Cd > Hg). These results indicate that the center atom of the complexes leads to the geometry differences and hence to the tunable luminescence properties. Because Zn1-Zn3 exhibited higher molar extinction coefficients and a distinct absorption region, they were employed as co-sensitizers in ruthenium dye N719-sensitized photoanodes to deliver light-electricity efficiency enhancement, being assembled with counter-electrodes and electrolyte to prepare ZnX/N719 (where ZnX = Zn1, Zn2, and Zn3) co-sensitized dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) devices. The prepared co-absorbent could overcome the deficiency of N719 absorption in the low-wavelength region of the visible spectrum, and offset competitive visible-light absorption of I3(-). Application of these prepared complexes in N719-sensitized solar cells enhanced their performance by 10-36%, which indicated a potential application of these types of complexes in DSSCs.

  14. The coal industry and its greenhouse challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, A.

    1998-01-01

    The Australian coal industry is actively involved in greenhouse gas emission management and abatement issues. An Australian Coal Association (ACA) position paper on greenhouse in November 1989, recommended a number of strategies to minimise the greenhouse effect, including the enhancement of energy utilisation efficiency, improved energy conversion efficiency at coal-fired power stations, expanded use of solar heating, and improved recycling. All of the strategies have been implemented to various degrees. The management and abatement of greenhouse gas emissions within the coal industry has been approached from an individual operational level, and a 'higher' industry level

  15. The Greenhouse and Anti-Greenhouse Effects on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, C. P.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Titan is the largest moon of Saturn and is the only moon in the solar system with a substantial atmosphere. Its atmosphere is mostly made of nitrogen, with a few percent CH4, 0.1% H2 and an uncertain level of Ar (less than 10%). The surface pressure is 1.5 atms and the surface temperature is 95 K, decreasing to 71 at the tropopause before rising to stratospheric temperatures of 180 K. In pressure and composition Titan's atmosphere is the closest twin to Earth's. The surface of Titan remains unknown, hidden by the thick smog layer, but it may be an ocean of liquid methane and ethane. Titan's atmosphere has a greenhouse effect which is much stronger than the Earth's - 92% of the surface warming is due to greenhouse radiation. However an organic smog layer in the upper atmosphere produces an anti-greenhouse effect that cuts the greenhouse warming in half - removing 35% of the incoming solar radiation. Models suggest that during its formation Titan's atmosphere was heated to high temperatures due to accretional energy. This was followed by a cold Triton-like period which gradually warmed to the present conditions. The coupled greenhouse and haze anti-greenhouse may be relevant to recent suggestions for haze shielding of a CH4 - NH3 early atmosphere on Earth or Mars. When the NASA/ESA mission to the Saturn System, Cassini, launches in a few years it will carry a probe that will be sent to the surface of Titan and show us this world that is strange and yet in many ways similar to our own.

  16. An investigation of down-conversion luminescence properties of rare earth doped CaMoO4 phosphors for solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Akta; Sharma, S. K.

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, we have synthesized a CaMoO4:(1%)Er3+,(1%)Yb3+ down-converting phosphor by hydrothermal method. The primary goal of studying down-conversion is to enhance the conversion efficiency of Si-solar cell by converting one high energy (UV) photon into two low energy (NIR) photons. The various characterization such as XRD, FESEM and Photoluminescence (PL) were carried out. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern exhibit tetragonal crystal structure and has a space group of I41a (88). The FESEM microphotograph shows surface morphology having a abundance of particles in spherical shape. The PL emission spectra were recorded both in Visible and NIR regions. There is hypertensive emission peak at 555 nm in the visible region due to 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 transition of Er3+ ions and an emission at 980 nm (2F5/2 → 2F7/2) due to Yb3+ ions. The result shows a demand of this down-converting material in the field of solar energy to improve the efficiency of Si-solar-cell.

  17. Positron-Induced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, E. V.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stoneking, M. R.; Pedersen, T. Sunn

    2018-04-01

    We report on the observation that low-energy positrons incident on a phosphor screen produce significantly more luminescence than electrons do. For two different wide-band-gap semiconductor phosphors (ZnS:Ag and ZnO:Zn), we compare the luminescent response to a positron beam with the response to an electron beam. For both phosphors, the positron response is significantly brighter than the electron response, by a factor that depends strongly on incident energy (0-5 keV). Positrons with just a few tens of electron-volts of energy (for ZnS:Ag) or less (for ZnO:Zn) produce as much luminescence as is produced by electrons with several kilo-electron-volts. We attribute this effect to valence band holes and excited electrons produced by positron annihilation and subsequent Auger processes. These results demonstrate a valuable approach for addressing long-standing questions about luminescent materials.

  18. About greenhouse effect origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrhenius, S.; Chamberlin, Th.; Croll, J.; Fourier, J.; Pouillet, C.; Tyndall, J.

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand and decipher the ecological crisis in progress, an historical prospect of its origins and evolution at the worldwide scale is necessary. This book gathers seven founder articles (including 4 original translations), harbingers of the present day climate change. Written during the 19. century by famous scientists like Joseph Fourier, Claude Pouillet, James Croll, John Tyndall, Svante Arrhenius and Thomas Chamberlin, they relate a century of major progress in the domain of Earth's sciences in praise of these scientists. This book allows to (re)discover these texts: discovery of the greenhouse effect principle (Fourier), determination of solar radiation absorption by the atmosphere (Pouillet), rivalry between the astronomical theory of glacial cycles (Croll) and the carbon dioxide climatic theory (Tyndall), influence of the CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere on the global warming (Arrhenius), and confirmation of the major role of CO 2 in the Earth's temperature regulation (Chamberlin). (J.S.)

  19. The greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1991-01-01

    The parallels between the atmospheric thermal structure of the Saturnian satellite Titan and the hypothesized terrestrial greenhouse effect can serve as bases for the evaluation of competing greenhouse theories. Attention is presently drawn to the similarity between the roles of H2 and CH4 on Titan and CO2 and H2O on earth. Titan also has an antigreenhouse effect due to a high-altitude haze layer which absorbs at solar wavelengths, while remaining transparent in the thermal IR; if this haze layer were removed, the antigreenhouse effect would be greatly reduced, exacerbating the greenhouse effect and raising surface temperature by over 20 K.

  20. Gardening with Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Rusty

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouses come in all shapes, sizes, and price ranges: from simple hand-built plastic-covered frames to dazzling geodesic domes. Some child care centers install greenhouses as a part of their outdoor garden space. Other centers have incorporated a greenhouse into the building itself. Greenhouses provide a great opportunity for children to grow…

  1. Influence of Nano sized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of Zn O Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shvalagin, V.; Grodziuk, G.; Kurmach, M.; Granchak, V.; Sarapulova, O.; Sherstiuk, V.

    2016-01-01

    For practical use of nano sized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of Zn O nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent Zn O/SiO 2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nano crystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of Zn O nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained Zn O/SiO 2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of Zn O nano crystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photo generated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of Zn O nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-Zn O luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  2. Influence of Nanosized Silicon Oxide on the Luminescent Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Shvalagin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical use of nanosized zinc oxide as the phosphor its luminescence quantum yields should be maximized. The aim of this work was to enhance luminescent properties of ZnO nanoparticles and obtain high-luminescent ZnO/SiO2 composites using simpler approaches to colloidal synthesis. The luminescence intensity of zinc oxide nanoparticles was increased about 3 times by addition of silica nanocrystals to the source solutions during the synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles. Then the quantum yield of luminescence of the obtained ZnO/SiO2 composites is more than 30%. Such an impact of silica is suggested to be caused by the distribution of ZnO nanocrystals on the surface of silica, which reduces the probability of separation of photogenerated charges between the zinc oxide nanoparticles of different sizes, and as a consequence, there is a significant increase of the luminescence intensity of ZnO nanoparticles. This way of increasing nano-ZnO luminescence intensity facilitates its use in a variety of devices, including optical ultraviolet and visible screens, luminescent markers, antibacterial coatings, luminescent solar concentrators, luminescent inks for security printing, and food packaging with abilities of informing consumers about the quality and safety of the packaged product.

  3. Bright Idea: Solar Energy Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Natural Resources, Jefferson City.

    This booklet is intended to address questions most frequently asked about solar energy. It provides basic information and a starting point for prospective solar energy users. Information includes discussion of solar space heating, solar water heating, and solar greenhouses. (Author/RE)

  4. GREENHOUSE BRITAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Haley

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We believe that the cultural landscape is largely formed by the dominant cultures of a place. “It is formed by a sometimes conflicted, sometimes consensual discourse or narrative from an array of stories, observations and intentions, first spoken by people of these dominant cultures and thereafter enacted on the ground. To our view, such a story has certain fluidity about it, and may change directions for any number of reasons. This work, Greenhouse Britain, is designed literally to express what the risingof waters would mean to the landscape of the island. It takes the 3 positions of defense, withdrawal and then defense, withdrawal to the high grounds. We suggest that the existing plans for greenhouse emissions control will be insufficient to keep temperature rise at 2° or less. In fact, we believe that the tipping point is past. In this context, the rising ocean becomes a form determinant. By “form determinant”, we mean, the rising ocean will determine many of the new forms that culture, industry and many other elements of civilization will have to take. There is another piece of this picture that we wish to give Voice to. That is up until this present rising of the world oceans, the creators of Western civilization have held and enacted the belief that all limitations in the physical world, particularly in the ecological world are there to be used and overcome. We think that the rising ocean is an opportunity for transformation, but it is exactly the reverse of a new frontier to overcome from civilization’s perspective. Now, from the ocean’s perspective, its boundary is perhaps a continuing, evolving transforming new frontier. Therefore, assuming a rapid rise of waters, even for a modest 5 meters in 100 years, there are apparently no models of precedence, no information, design, nor planning on the table, with the exception of ocean defenses and typical development models, albeit more energy efficient ones. It is the intention of

  5. Energy. Supermaterial for solar cells, membranes against the global warming, energy conservation in the greenhouse; Energie. Supermaterial fuer Solarzellen, Membranen gegen die globale Erwaermung, Energiesparen im Treibhaus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roegener, Wiebke; Frick, Frank; Tillemans, Axel; Stahl-Busse, Brigitte

    2010-07-01

    A kaleidoscope of pictures presents highlights from the research at the Forschungszentrum Juelich - from moving into a new computer era over the development of a detector for dangerous liquids up to a new method of treatment against tinnitus. The highlights of this brochure are: (a) An interview with he director of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory on the energy mix of the future; (b) Environment friendly power generation by means of fuel cells; (c) Transfer of knowledge from fusion experiments to greater plants using a supercomputer; (d) Development of powerful batteries for electrically powered cars by means of the know-how from fuel cell research; (e) Investigation of contacting used fuel elements with water; (f) Reduction if energy consumption in a greenhouse using a combination of glass and foils; (g) News on the energy research and environmental research.

  6. Luminescence study of spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Fujii, A.T.; Antonini, R.; Pontuschka, W.M.; Rabani, S.R.; Furtado, W.W.

    1990-02-01

    A comparative study is made of the luminescence of five kinds of spodumene from Minas Gerais, Brazil, studied previously by optical absorption spectroscopy. Natural gemstones are used which, in the course of the experiments, were irradiated with X-rays. (L.C.) [pt

  7. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  8. Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX). Selected data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lola M.; Warnock, Archibald, III

    1992-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains selected data sets compiled by the participants of the Greenhouse Effect Detection Experiment (GEDEX) workshop on atmospheric temperature. The data sets include surface, upper air, and/or satellite-derived measurements of temperature, solar irradiance, clouds, greenhouse gases, fluxes, albedo, aerosols, ozone, and water vapor, along with Southern Oscillation Indices and Quasi-Biennial Oscillation statistics.

  9. Up scaling and test results of an advanced Fresnel greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Zwart, de H.F.

    2012-01-01

    A greenhouse with Fresnel lenses in the south facing roof and a receiver for concentrated Photovoltaics with water cooling (CPVT system) will result in electrical and thermal energy output from the solar energy excess entering a greenhouse. The PV system converts about half of the direct radiation

  10. Agriculture: Nurseries and Greenhouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurseries and Greenhouses. Information about environmental requirements specifically relating to the production of many types of agricultural crops grown in nurseries and greenhouses, such as ornamental plants and specialty fruits and vegetables.

  11. The Greenhouse Effect and Climate Feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covey, C.; Haberle, R. M.; McKay, C. P.; Titov, D. V.

    This chapter reviews the theory of the greenhouse effect and climate feedback. It also compares the theory with observations, using examples taken from all four known terrestrial worlds with substantial atmospheres: Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan. The greenhouse effect traps infrared radiation in the atmosphere, thereby increasing surface temperature. It is one of many factors that affect a world's climate. (Others include solar luminosity and the atmospheric scattering and absorption of solar radiation.) A change in these factors — defined as climate forcing — may change the climate in a way that brings other processes — defined as feedbacks — into play. For example, when Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide increases, warming the surface, the water vapor content of the atmosphere increases. This is a positive feedback on global warming because water vapor is itself a potent greenhouse gas. Many positive and negative feedback processes are significant in determining Earth's climate, and probably the climates of our terrestrial neighbors.

  12. Low Simulated Radiation Limit for Runaway Greenhouse Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Robinson, Tyler D.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Crisp, David

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial planet atmospheres must be in long-term radiation balance, with solar radiation absorbed matched by thermal radiation emitted. For hot moist atmospheres, however, there is an upper limit on the thermal emission which is decoupled from the surface temperature. If net absorbed solar radiation exceeds this limit the planet will heat uncontrollably, the so-called \\runaway greenhouse". Here we show that a runaway greenhouse induced steam atmosphere may be a stable state for a planet with the same amount of incident solar radiation as Earth has today, contrary to previous results. We have calculated the clear-sky radiation limits at line-by-line spectral resolution for the first time. The thermal radiation limit is lower than previously reported (282 W/sq m rather than 310W/sq m) and much more solar radiation would be absorbed (294W/sq m rather than 222W/sq m). Avoiding a runaway greenhouse under the present solar constant requires that the atmosphere is subsaturated with water, and that cloud albedo forcing exceeds cloud greenhouse forcing. Greenhouse warming could in theory trigger a runaway greenhouse but palaeoclimate comparisons suggest that foreseeable increases in greenhouse gases will be insufficient to do this.

  13. Design, construction and maintenance of greenhouse structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijenberg, D.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a review is given about the effects of different parts of the solar radiation and its importance for plant growth in greenhouses. Besides the most important visible part of the light (PAR), ultraviolet (UV), near infrared (NIR) and far infrared (FIR) are discussed. The strength of the

  14. The Dynamic Greenhouse Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Greenhouses are marvelous devices, allowing one to enjoy the flower spectacle of summer all year round. At night, greenhouses use supplemental heat to keep the fragile plants warm. Over the last 30 years, greenhouse technology has undergone many changes, with the structures being automated and monitored and low-cost plastic structures emerging as…

  15. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  16. Solar Technician Program Blows Hot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Peg Moran

    1977-01-01

    A training program for solar heating technicians was initiated at Sonoma State College's School of Environmental Studies for CETA applicants. Among the projects designed and built were a solar alternative energy center, a solar hot water system, and a solar greenhouse. (MF)

  17. Maximizing and stabilizing luminescence from halide perovskites with potassium passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi-Jalebi, Mojtaba; Andaji-Garmaroudi, Zahra; Cacovich, Stefania; Stavrakas, Camille; Philippe, Bertrand; Richter, Johannes M.; Alsari, Mejd; Booker, Edward P.; Hutter, Eline M.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Lilliu, Samuele; Savenije, Tom J.; Rensmo, Håkan; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Friend, Richard H.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2018-03-01

    Metal halide perovskites are of great interest for various high-performance optoelectronic applications. The ability to tune the perovskite bandgap continuously by modifying the chemical composition opens up applications for perovskites as coloured emitters, in building-integrated photovoltaics, and as components of tandem photovoltaics to increase the power conversion efficiency. Nevertheless, performance is limited by non-radiative losses, with luminescence yields in state-of-the-art perovskite solar cells still far from 100 per cent under standard solar illumination conditions. Furthermore, in mixed halide perovskite systems designed for continuous bandgap tunability (bandgaps of approximately 1.7 to 1.9 electronvolts), photoinduced ion segregation leads to bandgap instabilities. Here we demonstrate substantial mitigation of both non-radiative losses and photoinduced ion migration in perovskite films and interfaces by decorating the surfaces and grain boundaries with passivating potassium halide layers. We demonstrate external photoluminescence quantum yields of 66 per cent, which translate to internal yields that exceed 95 per cent. The high luminescence yields are achieved while maintaining high mobilities of more than 40 square centimetres per volt per second, providing the elusive combination of both high luminescence and excellent charge transport. When interfaced with electrodes in a solar cell device stack, the external luminescence yield—a quantity that must be maximized to obtain high efficiency—remains as high as 15 per cent, indicating very clean interfaces. We also demonstrate the inhibition of transient photoinduced ion-migration processes across a wide range of mixed halide perovskite bandgaps in materials that exhibit bandgap instabilities when unpassivated. We validate these results in fully operating solar cells. Our work represents an important advance in the construction of tunable metal halide perovskite films and interfaces that can

  18. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  19. Chapter 14. Greenhouses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, Kevin D.

    1998-01-01

    Greenhouse heating is one of the most common uses of geothermal resources. Because of the significant heating requirements of greenhouses and their ability to use very low- temperature fluids, they are a natural application. The evaluation of a particular greenhouse project involves consideration of the structure heating requirements, and the system to meet those requirements. This chapter is intended to provide information on each of these areas.

  20. Static linear Fresnel lenses as LCPV system in a greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, P.J.; Swinkels, G.L.A.M.; Tuijl, van B.A.J.; Janssen, H.J.J.; Zwart, de H.F.

    2011-01-01

    A low concentrating PV system with water cooling (LCPVT system) will result in electrical and thermal energy output from the solar energy excess entering a building or greenhouse. All the direct radiation could be converted, which corresponds to 75% of the incoming solar energy. This will

  1. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1985-01-01

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  2. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  3. Greening the greenhouse grower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staats, Henk; Jansen, Lilian; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    Growing plants and flowers in greenhouses is a commercial activity that imposes a burden on the environment. Recently a system of registration, control, and licensing has been developed by the sector of greenhouse growers in the Netherlands, acknowledged by the state. The current study was executed...... to understand the achievements of the greenhouse growers within this system. We applied a social-cognitive model to understand intentions to reduce emissions and predict actual pesticide use. The social-cognitive concepts from the model were measured in a questionnaire that was completed by 743 greenhouse...

  4. LUMINESCENCE DETERMINATION OF ETODOLAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yegorova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, simple and rapid method for determination of non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug – etodolac (Et in washings from surfaces of pharmaceutical equipment have been proposed. The intensity of native luminescence of water-n-propanol solutions of etodolac (λex= 274 nm; λlum= 350 nm was used as the analytical signal. The calibration graph is linear in the concentration range 0.014-2.3 μg/ml, the limit of detection is 0.5 ng/ml.

  5. Luminescence dating in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is routinely applied to burnt lithic material. Simple fires are capable of enabling stones weighing a few hundred grams to reach 450 o C, thus zeroing the TL signal. TL dates have been obtained for Upper and Lower Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Near East. TL dating continues to be used for dating pottery and for authentification of ceramic works of art. Some recent studies report the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) (also know as photoluminescence) for dating very small samples of quartz, e.g. from small pieces of pottery or frm metallurgical slag The major recent advance has been in the development of a reliable laboratory procedure for using the OSL signal from quartz to obtain the past radiation exposure. The quartz OSL signal is extremely sensitive to light and is reduced to a negligible level on exposure to direct sunlight for radionuclides during burial, signal to date san.sized quartz grains extracted from sediments, The OSL signal is stimulated by 470 nm light from emitting diodes and the detected using flirters centred on 340 nm A similar signal can be obtained from feldspar grain when are exposed to infrared wavelengths around 880 nm. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals is also rapidly depleted by exposure to sunlight, and dating of colluvial deposits from archaeological sites has been reported

  6. Plant Physiology in Greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvelink, E.; Kierkels, T.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2004 Ep Heuvelink and Tijs Kierkels have been writing a continuing series of plant physiology articles for the Dutch horticultural journal Onder Glas and the international edition In Greenhouses. The book Plant Physiology in Greenhouses consists of 50 of their plant physiology articles. The

  7. Geothermal Greenhouse Information Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafferty, K. [P.E.; Boyd, T. [ed.

    1997-01-01

    This package of information is intended to provide a foundation of background information for developers of geothermal greenhouses. The material is divided into seven sections covering such issues as crop culture and prices, operating costs for greenhouses, heating system design, vendors and a list of other sources of information.

  8. The greenhouse effect gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the greenhouse effect gases. It presents the greenhouses effect as a key component of the climate system, the impacts of the human activity, the foreseeable consequences of global warming, the Kyoto protocol and Total commitment in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  9. Grappling with greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.D.

    1992-01-01

    A natural greenhouse effect keeps the Earth at a temperature suitable for life. Some of the gases responsible for the greenhouse effect are increasing at an unprecedented rate because of human activity. These increased levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere will strengthen the natural greenhouse effect, leading to an overall warming of the Earth's surface. Global warming resulting from the enhanced greenhouse effect is likely to be obscured by normal climatic fluctuations for another ten years or more. The extent of human-caused climate change will depend largely on future concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. In turn, the composition of the atmosphere depends on the release of greenhouse gases. Releases are hard to predict, because they require an understanding of future human activity. The composition of the atmosphere also depends on the processes which remove greenhouse gases from it. This booklet is summarizing the latest research results in the form of climate change scenarios. The present scenarios of change are based on climate models, together with an understanding of how present-day climate, with its inherent natural variability, affects human activities. These scenarios present a coherent range of future possibilities for climate; they are not predictions but they serve as a useful starting point. It is estimated that human-caused climate change will affect all aspects of life in Australia, including our cities, agriculture, pests and diseases, fisheries and natural ecosystems. 15 figs., ills

  10. The greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the sustainable development, this paper presents the greenhouse effect and its impact on the climatic change, the world interest from Rio to Buenos Aires, the human activities producing the carbon dioxide and responsible of the greenhouse effect, the carbon dioxide emission decrease possibilities and shows the necessity of the electric power producers contribution. (A.L.B.)

  11. Towards the semiclosed greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemming, S.

    2009-01-01

    What can we do right now to reduce the consumption of fossil fuels in the greenhouse sector? What technologies should we concentrate on in the future? Researchers, consultants and technology enterprises working with the greenhouse sector have tried to answer these questions in collaboration with the

  12. Greenhouse effect in double-skin facade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gratia, E.; Herde, A. de [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Architecture et Climat, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)

    2007-02-15

    In these last years, a great deal of interest has been devoted to double-skin facades due to the advantages claimed by this technology (in terms of energy saving in the cold season, high-tech image, protection from external noise and wind loads). One of the great characteristics of the double-skin facade is the greenhouse effect. We identify the factors that influence the greenhouse effect. The identified parameters are solar radiation level, orientation and shading devices use, opaque wall/window proportion of the interior facade, wind speed, colour of shading devices and of interior facade, depth of the cavity of the double-skin, glazing type in the interior facade and openings in the double-skin. We analyze the impact of these parameters on the mean air temperature evolution in the cavity. After that analyse, the article answers the question: is greenhouse effect favourable? The answer is moderate according to the double-skin orientation. (author)

  13. National Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Greenhouse Gas Emission Inventory contains information on direct emissions of greenhouse gases as well as indirect or potential emissions of greenhouse...

  14. Pemodelan Matematik Kinerja Pengering Surya Efek Rumah Kaca (ERK-Hibrid Menggunakan Rak Berputar secara Vertikal (Mathematical Modeling Performance of Greenhouse Effect (GHE-Hybrid Solar Dryer with a Vertical Rotating Rack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigit Triwahyudi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a performance test and mathematical modeling of greenhouse effect (GHE-Hybrid solar dryer with vertical rotating rack. The dryer consists of a greenhouse dryer (1100 × 860 × 1300 mm with eight rack and additional heating system consists of a flat plate collector (1,04 m2, a hot water storage tank (197 liters and a heat exchanger. To investigate the performance of solar greenhouse dryer, five experimental variation speed of rack were conducted (1, 4, 7, 10 rpm and without rotation. Materials used in the experiment are local cardamom (Amomum cardamomum Wild. Weight of each experiment  about  9 to 10 kg. The average temperature of the hot water storage tank varies from 50.0 to 55.0 °C, drying air  temperature between 38.9 to 45.9 °C, while the relative humidity (RH of drying chamber ranged from 32.1 to 47.4 %. Variation of rotational speed affects on the uniformity of product temperature and water content in each rack drying. At rotation 1 rpm  (experiment II, obtained  as the best conditions (temperature and moisture content are most uniform. Increasing rotational speed of rack causes increasing in standard deviation of  product temperature and moisture content. To simulate the performance of the dryer, mathematical modeling based on heat  and mass transfer and a thin layer drying  approaches were conducted. Equations solved numerically using the finite difference Euler with Visual Basic Application (VBA program on Excel. Validation was conducted by comparing the calculation results of mathematical modeling (data prediction with measurement data (data observation. Criterion validity was determined by  the value of the coefficient of determination (R2, the value of RMSD and MAPD. Mathematical models that have been developed can be described precisely the temperature of the hot water storage tank, temperature of the drying chamber, temperature of the product as well as a moisture content decrease.   ABSTRAK Makalah

  15. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M; Schorn, B; Schneider, E

    1981-01-01

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber. The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field.

  16. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  17. Reflection measurements for luminescent powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent materials are useful in applications varying from lighting and display technologies to document security features and medical research, amongst many others. Measurement of the excitation range is an important consideration, and absorption bands are often determined from a decrease in the measured diffuse reflectance of the material using a ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Such a system may provide questionable results when used to measure the reflectance of a luminescence material, which is demonstrated for a Tb doped silica phosphor, because the system cannot differentiate between the reflected light and luminescence. It is shown that more reliable results are achieved for this phosphor by measuring the reflectance using a synchronous zero-offset scan in a fluorescence spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. This method is therefore recommended instead of traditional reflectance measurements using a UV-vis spectrophotometer for luminescent powders.

  18. The greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, A.

    1991-01-01

    The greenhouse effect on earth can be defined as the long wave energy trapped in the atmosphere. Climate forcing and climate system response within which climate feedback mechanisms are contained are determined. Quantitative examples illustrate what could happen if the greenhouse effect is perturbed by human activities, in particular if CO2 atmospheric concentration would double in the future. Recent satellite measurements of the greenhouse effect are given. The net cooling effect of clouds and whether or not there will be less cooling by clouds as the planet warms are also discussed

  19. Through the greenhouse window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsley, M.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear power is being promoted as the only answer to the greenhouse effect. However, power station emissions (from fossil-fuel powered stations) account for only a fraction of the total carbon dioxide emissions. And carbon dioxide accounts for only about a half of the global warming effect -the other gases which create the greenhouse effect must also be limited. Nuclear energy is neither a practical nor economic alternative. Energy efficiency and conservation is a far better answer to the greenhouse effect. (U.K.)

  20. Climate, greenhouse effect, energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, Thormod; Kanestroem, Ingolf

    2001-01-01

    The book has sections on the sun as energy source, the earth climate and it's changes and factors influencing this, the greenhouse effect on earth and other planets, greenhouse gases and aerosols and their properties and importance, historic climate and paleoclimate, climatic models and their uses and limitations, future climate, consequences of climatic changes, uncertainties regarding the climate and measures for reducing the greenhouse effect. Finally there are sections on energy and energy resources, the use, sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear power, renewable resources, heat pumps, energy storage and environmental aspects and the earth magnetic field is briefly surveyed

  1. Titan's greenhouse and antigreenhouse effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckay, Christopher P.; Pollack, James B.; Courtin, Regis

    1992-01-01

    Thermal mechanisms active in Titan's atmosphere are discussed in a brief review of data obtained during the Voyager I flyby in 1980. Particular attention is given to the greenhouse effect (GHE) produced by atmospheric H2, N2, and CH4; this GHE is stronger than that on earth, with CH4 and H2 playing roles similar to those of H2O and CO2 on earth. Also active on Titan is an antigreenhouse effect, in which dark-brown and orange organic aerosols block incoming solar light while allowing IR radiation from the Titan surface to escape. The combination of GHE and anti-GHE leads to a surface temperature about 12 C higher than it would be if Titan had no atmosphere.

  2. Metal luminescence in a bright disintegrated prominence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovkin, N.A.; Zel'dina, M.Yu.; Rakhubovskij, A.S.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Glavnaya Astronomicheskaya Observatoriya)

    1975-01-01

    It is found that Na, Mg, Ca, Sc, Ti, Fe, Sr, and Ba contents in a protuberance relative to the hydrogen content is about the same as in photosphere and chromosphere (except for the Na abundance). The metals are in the state of single ionization with the exception of calcium [Ca ++ ] approximately [Ca + ], strontium [Sr ++ ] = 0.5 [Sr + ], and barium [Ba ++ ] = 6Ba + , whose secondary ionization occurs from metastable states by Lsub(α)-emission in the protuberance. The Lsub(α)-emission ionizes neutral iron as well. Primary ionization of remaining metals is performed by the solar near ultraviolet. Luminescence in metal lines is provided by the photosphere emission scattering, and only H and KCa + lines are excited by electron impacts

  3. Luminescence enhancement in irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.; Owen, G.P.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for the luminescence decay in polyethylene following irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature and its enhancement on application of an electric field. It is found that both the luminescence enhancement and its subsequent decay may be described by a model involving electron tunnelling from a monoenergetic trap distribution to the parent positive ion. The possible nature of the trap is briefly discussed. (author)

  4. GEOTHERMAL GREENHOUSING IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Karaman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Use of renewable energy resources should be brought forward to reduce heating costs of greenhouses and to minimize the use of ever-depleting fossil fuels. Geothermal energy not only provides the heat required throughout plant growth, but also allow a year-long production. Geothermal resources with several other benefits therefore play significant role in agricultural activities. With regard to geothermal potential and implementation, Turkey has the 7th place in the world and the 1st place in Europe. Majority of country geothermal resources is used in greenhouse heating. The size of geothermal greenhouses increased 5 folds during the last decade and reached to 2500 decare. In this study, current status of geothermal greenhousing of Turkey was presented; problems and possible solutions were discussed.

  5. Experimental study of an air conditioning system to control a greenhouse microclimate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attar, I.; Naili, N.; Khalifa, N.; Hazami, M.; Lazaar, M.; Farhat, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Contribution in the control of the greenhouse microclimate for pepper cultivation. • The energy storing in the ground and in the water ensure the greenhouse heating. • The circulation of the cold water in the exchangers ensures the greenhouse cooling. • The system makes the greenhouse appropriate for the pepper cultivation whole year. - Abstract: In this papper, a thermal model is developed to investigate the possibility to use the ground thermal energy for the greenhouse heating or cooling. A control system of the ground heat storing is integrated in a chapel greenhouse located in the premises of the Technology and Research Energy Center, Tunis, Tunisia. Polypropylene capillary heat exchangers, suspended in the air and buried into the ground of the greenhouse, are used to store or destore solar energy excess. During the day, the air-suspended exchangers recuperate the solar energy in excess. This recuperated energy is then stored into the ground through the buried exchangers. At night the stored thermal energy is brought back by the suspended exchangers to heat the greenhouse air. The purpose of this study is to contribute in the greenhouse microclimate control. In order to maintain the greenhouse air temperature at 20 °C, suitable for a defined agriculture, the solar energy and the cold water are respectively used for heating and cooling the greenhouse inside air. The design and construction of a chapel greenhouse equipped with the control system is carried out. The studied system is used, at the same time for; heating, cooling the greenhouse air and storing the solar energy in excess. Experiments were conducted during the years 2012–2013, to evaluate the effectiveness of the control system achieved. The measured values of the greenhouse air temperatures with and without the control system are discussed

  6. Regional greenhouse climate effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.; Rind, D.; Delgenio, A.; Lacis, A.; Lebedeff, S.; Prather, M.; Ruedy, R.; Karl, T.

    1990-01-01

    The authors discuss the impact of an increasing greenhouse effect on three aspects of regional climate: droughts, storms and temperature. A continuous of current growth rates of greenhouse gases causes an increase in the frequency and severity of droughts in their climate model simulations, with the greatest impacts in broad regions of the subtropics and middle latitudes. But the greenhouse effect enhances both ends of the hydrologic cycle in the model, that is, there is an increased frequency of extreme wet situations, as well as increased drought. Model results are shown to imply that increased greenhouse warming will lead to more intense thunderstorms, that is, deeper thunderstorms with greater rainfall. Emanual has shown that the model results also imply that the greenhouse warming leads to more destructive tropical cyclones. The authors present updated records of observed temperatures and show that the observations and model results, averaged over the globe and over the US, are generally consistent. The impacts of simulated climate changes on droughts, storms and temperature provide no evidence that there will be regional winners if greenhouse gases continue to increase rapidly

  7. Household appliances using solar energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gul, H.

    2000-01-01

    Many solar energy technologies are now sufficiently developed to make it possible to use these to replace some of our conventional energy sources, but still need improvement and reduction in cost. It is, therefore, necessary to focus attention on household uses of solar energy. This paper describes the recent developments and current position in respect of several such devices, which include; solar cooker, with curved concentrator, Panel Cooker, Solar Dryer, solar water heater, Solar Still, Solar Water Pump, Solar Water Disinfection, Solar space Heating and greenhouse solar Reflectors, Development and Extension activities on these should be taken up at various levels. (author)

  8. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  9. Energy performance of a concentrated photovoltaic energy system with static linear Fresnel lenses integrated in a greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A.J. van Tuijl; Piet Sonneveld; J. Campen; Gert-Jan Swinkels; H.J.J. Janssen; G.P.A Bot

    2011-01-01

    A new type of greenhouse with linear Fresnel lenses in the cover performing as a concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) system is presented. The CPV system retains all direct solar radiation, while diffuse solar radiation passes through and enters into the greenhouse cultivation system. The removal of all

  10. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  11. Luminescence in medical image science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandarakis, I.S., E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2016-01-15

    Radiation detection in Medical Imaging is mostly based on the use of luminescent materials (scintillators and phosphors) coupled to optical sensors. Materials are employed in the form of granular screens, structured (needle-like) crystals and single crystal transparent blocks. Storage phosphors are also incorporated in some x-ray imaging plates. Description of detector performance is currently based on quality metrics, such as the Luminescence efficiency, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) can be defined and evaluated. The aforementioned metrics are experimental evaluated for various materials in the form of screens. A software was designed (MINORE v1) to present image quality measurements in a graphical user interface (GUI) environment. Luminescence efficiency, signal and noise analysis are valuable tools for the evaluation of luminescent materials as candidates for medical imaging detectors. - Highlights: • Luminescence based medical imaging detectors. • Image science: MTF, NPS, DQE. • Phosphors screens light emission efficiency experimental evaluation. • Theoretical models for estimation of phosphor screen properties. • Software for medical image quality metrics.

  12. Characterization and luminescent properties of thermally annealed olivines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Garcia, Maria; Correcher, Virgilio; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Heredia-Barbero, Alejandro; Roman-Lopez, Jesus; Ortega-Gutierrez, Fernando; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Olivine is an iron-magnesium solid solution silicate (Mg,Fe) 2 SiO 4 and it is probably one of the most abundant mineral phase in the Solar System, it is present in the primitive carbonaceous meteorites (i.e Allende), and in ordinary chondritic meteorite, comets or terrestrial planets. The olivine grains in those bodies have been exposed to different radiation sources like UV, electrons, cosmic radiation, etc. Here, we explore the effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on the luminescence emission of the two well-characterised olivine samples from Mexico and Spain by means of cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence. The analyses by X-ray dispersive energies in the scanning electron microscopy show differences between the samples in the amount of iron and magnesium and also show traces of rare elements. Olivine exhibits spectral cathodoluminescence emissions of low intensity, explained for the quenching of the luminescence of the iron, and sharp signals assigned as impurities. Cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence glow curves of the natural, and UV induced olivine samples were obtained. Our results show that thermal treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral molecular structure and the luminescence properties of this mineral phase. These results confirm an active participation of physical factors influencing the luminescent properties of olivine. -- Highlights: ► Luminescent properties of two olivines samples (Mexican and Spanish) were explored. ► EDS show different iron and magnesium content and traces of rare elements on both. ► Olivine exhibits spectral CL emissions of low intensity due to the quenching of iron. ► Treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral structure and its response to UV radiation

  13. Buying greenhouse insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manne, A.S.; Richels, R.G.

    1992-01-01

    A growing concern that the increasing accumulation of greenhouse gases will lead to undesirable changes in global climate has resulted in proposals, both in the United States and internationally, to set physical targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. But what will these proposals cost? This book outlines a way to think about greenhouse-effect decisions under uncertainty. It describes an insightful model for determining the economic costs of limiting CO 2 emissions produced by burning fossil fuels and provides a solid analytical base for rethinking public policy on the far-reaching issue of global warming. It presents region-by-region estimates of the costs that would underlie an international agreement. Using a computer model known as Global 2100, they analyze the economic impacts of limiting CO 2 emissions under alternative supply and conservation scenarios. The results clearly indicate that a reduction in emissions is not the sole policy response to potential climate change. Following a summary of the greenhouse effect, its likely causes, and possible consequences, this book takes up issues that concern the public at large. They provide an overview of Global 2100, look at how the U.S. energy sector is likely to evolve under business-as-usual conditions and under carbon constraints, and describe the concept of greenhouse insurance. They consider possible global agreements, including an estimate of benefits that might result from trading in an international market in emission rights. They conclude with a technical description directed toward modeling specialists

  14. Luminescence dating on Mars: OSL characteristics of Martian analogue materials and GCR dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, M.; Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2006-01-01

    , and sedimentary precipitates such as sulphates and chlorides. We present here a preliminary investigation of the luminescence characteristics (sensitivity, dose response, fading) of some Martian analogue mineral and rock samples. These materials are likely to be zeroed by the solar UV light (200-300nm) under sub...

  15. Centennial- to millennial-scale hard rock erosion rates deduced from luminescence-depth profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Liu, Jinfeng; Jain, Mayank

    2018-01-01

    to quantify hard rock erosion rates at centennial to millennial timescales. Here we propose a novel technique, based on the solar bleaching of luminescence signals with depth into rock surfaces, to bridge this analytical gap. We apply our technique to glacial and landslide boulders in the Eastern Pamirs...

  16. Solarization soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Ghraibe, W.

    1995-01-01

    Solar energy could be used in pest control, in soil sterilization technology. The technique consists of covering humid soils by plastic films steadily fixed to the soil. Timing must be in summer during 4-8 weeks, where soil temperature increases to degrees high enough to control pests or to produce biological and chemical changes. The technique could be applied on many pests soil, mainly fungi, bacteria, nematods, weeds and pest insects. The technique could be used in greenhouses as well as in plastic film covers or in orchards where plastic films present double benefits: soil sterilization and production of black mulch. Mechanism of soil solarization is explained. Results show that soil solarization can be used in pest control after fruit crops cultivation and could be a method for an integrated pest control. 9 refs

  17. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  18. International Conference on Luminescence Held at Madison, Wisconsin on 13-17 August 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    Meucci , A. Scacco F. Somma (b) and M. Tonelli(c) (a) ENEA, TIB-FIS, Centro Ricerche Energia , 00044 Frascati, Italy (b) Dipartimento di Fisica...luminesce by solar ultraviolet and visible light. This instrument uses glass spacer Fabry-Perot filters of narrow bandwidth (ɘ.1 nm) to isolate a...central intensity of a Fraunhofer line to the solar continuum a few tenths of a nanometer distant; it then compares this ratio with a conjugate

  19. Greenhouse effects on Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Calculations that used Pioneer-Venus measurements of atmosphere composition, temperature profiles, and radiative heating predicted Venus' surface temperature ‘very precisely,’ says the Ames Research Center. The calculations predict not only Venus' surface temperature but agree with temperatures measured at various altitudes above the surface by the four Pioneer Venus atmosphere probe craft.Using Pioneer-Venus spacecraft data, a research team has virtually proved that the searing 482° C surface temperature of Venus is due to an atmospheric greenhouse effect. Until now the Venus greenhouse effect has been largely a theory.

  20. Greenhouse Warming Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent Erik

    2016-01-01

    The changing greenhouse effect caused by natural and anthropogenic causes is explained and efforts to model the behavior of the near-surface constituents of the Earth's land, ocean and atmosphere are discussed. Emissions of various substances and other aspects of human activity influence...... the greenhouse warming, and the impacts of the warming may again impact the wellbeing of human societies. Thus physical modeling of the near-surface ocean-soil-atmosphere system cannot be carried out without an idea of the development of human activities, which is done by scenario analysis. The interactive...

  1. On luminescence lifetimes in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Galloway, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present results of investigations concerning the time dependence of luminescence emission relative to the time of stimulation in quartz. Measurements of time-resolved spectra were performed on a new versatile pulsed light emitting diode system using 525 nm stimulation, an 11 μs duration pulse, a repetition rate of 11 kHz and a 64 μs dynamic range. Effects on luminescence lifetime resulting from sample treatments such as optical stimulation, irradiation, and preheating, are reported

  2. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  3. Advantages and disadvantages of luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olko, Pawel, E-mail: Pawel.Olko@ifj.edu.p [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Science (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Owing to their excellent dosimetric properties, luminescence detectors of ionizing radiation are now extensively applied in individual dosimetry services. The most frequently used personal dosemeters are based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), radiophotoluminescence (RPL) or thermoluminescence (TL). Luminescence detectors have also found several applications in clinical dosimetry, especially around new radiation modalities in radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) or ion beam radiotherapy. Requirements of luminescence detectors applied in individual and clinical dosimetry and some recent developments in luminescence of detectors and techniques leading to significant improvements of the functionality and accuracy of dosimetry systems are reviewed and discussed.

  4. Impact of firing temperature on multi-wavelength selective Stokes and anti-Stokes luminescent behavior by Gd2O2S:Er,Yb phosphor and its application in solar energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, V.; Mehta, D. S.

    2018-04-01

    Erbium (Er3+)-ytterbium (Yb3+) doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S) phosphor has been developed via a facile method of solid-state flux fusion, and offers two-fold spectrum modification with highly intense Stokes and anti-Stokes shift. The effect of the firing cycle on the photoluminescent response and morphology of Gd2O2S:Er,Yb is scrutinized, wherein the firing temperature was varied (1000 °C-1250 °C), keeping firing time and all other parameters constant. Interestingly, the nanostructures fired below 1150 °C showed nanorods of diameter ~200 nm and length ~1-2 µm, whereas firing at 1150 °C and above rendered nanospheres with small diameter, ~350 nm. Highly bright upconversion (UC) emission was achieved even under an extremely low excitation power density of 800 µW cm-2 from a 980 nm laser, and was comfortably visible to the naked eye. The incident power dependent studies disclosed increase in UC-emission intensity with increasing excitation power and a quasi-linear dependence on excitation power density. Intense characteristic UC-emission of Er3+ excited states at 525 nm, 556 nm and 668 nm were observed, and the green emission band was found to be dominant over the red band in intensity. Concurrently, downconversion (DC) emission at 556 nm and 669 nm was also exhibited under ultraviolet excitation (285 nm and 380 nm), with the red band being more powerful than the green, unlike UC-emission. Firing temperature dependent studies divulged the dependence of luminescence intensity on the firing cycle of the luminophore and formation of the respective luminescent phase. The UC-emission intensity was found to be maximum for samples fired at 1150 °C, whereas samples fired at 1000 °C showed the highest DC-emission intensity. The excitation and emission profile of single Gd2O2S:Er,Yb phosphor lying in the desired spectral region and as a dual spectral converter marks its possible application for enhanced harvesting of sunlight.

  5. Full Spectrum Diffused and Beamed Solar Energy Application Using Optical Fibre

    OpenAIRE

    Majumdar, M. R. Dutta; Das, Debasish

    2007-01-01

    Existing solar energy application systems use small fraction of full spectrum of solar energy. So attempts are made to show how full spectrum solar energy can be used for diffused and beamed form of incident solar energy. Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC) principle with optical fibre in diffused sun light and dielectric mirror separation technique with optical fibre in beamed form are discussed. Comparison of both the cases are done. Keywords: full spectrum, solar photonics, diffused solar...

  6. Effect of reflective surfaces on a greenhouse lettuce crop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warman, P.R.; Mayhew, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The Canadian greenhouse industry is an important segment of horticultural production, providing employment for thousands of people. Continuing increases in the costs of conventional fuel supplies, however, has placed the industry in some jeopardy since the cost of heating during the winter months is also escalating. In response to this problem the Brace Research Institute has developed a single roofed greenhouse designed to capture and store the sun's energy, and to increase the amount of downward solar radiation inside the greenhouse through the use of specularly-reflecting back and side walls. The research investigated the effect of a reflective surface on plant growth, development, and nutritional uptake during fall and the early months of winter. The inside walls of the greenhouse were lined with aluminized polyester to act as a reflective surface and flat black roofing felt paper to provide a non-reflecting surface. Grand Rapids Forcing lettuce was planted from seed into a peat-vermiculite bed and total solar radiation was monitored on the horizontal. Over the duration of the experiment, the reflective side of the greenhouse received more than twice as much solar radiation as the non-reflective side leading to significantly larger plant yields on the reflective side. There were no significant differences in the uptake of the plant macronutrients, N, P, K, Ca, and Mg.

  7. Smarter greenhouse climate control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhoff, E.M.; Houter, G.

    2011-01-01

    Greenhouse operators strive to be as economic as possible with energy. However, investing in fancy energy-saving equipment is often not cost-effective for smaller operations and in climate zones with mild winters. It is possible, though, for many growers to save energy without buying special

  8. Greenhouse cooling using a rainwater basin under the greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campen, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the technical and economical aspects of additional applications for a rainwater basin installed under a greenhouse. The installation for cooling the greenhouse can be placed under the greenhouse. Part of the installation consists of a short-term heat store

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions inventory for photovoltaic and wind systems in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dones, R.; Frischknecht, R.

    1997-01-01

    The paper provides a detailed comparative data on greenhouse gases emissions like methane and carbon dioxide from various energy sources including hydro power, wind power, solar power and fossil fuel power plants

  10. Simple model to study the effect of temperature on the greenhouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-08

    Jun 8, 2011 ... Accepted 16 February, 2011. Due to high solar intensity, the internal temperature of greenhouses in subtropical regions is so high ... useful technology for environmental control of a sub- ... transparent materials. This kind of ...

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of lanthanide-doped NaLaF 4 nanoparticles. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA SONIKA KHAJURIA ... Keywords. Citric acid; X-ray diffraction; down-conversion emission; energy transfer.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that nanoparticles have cylindrical shape and crystalline nature of nanoparticles was confirmed by SAED patterns. Down- conversion (DC) luminescent properties of doped NaLaF4 were also .... Figure 1 shows the XRPD patterns of undoped NaLaF4 and .... which can be assigned to the transitions from the 7F6 ground.

  13. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, M.H.; Murray, A.S.; Lapp, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8kg and is based around a 30mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340nm. Stimulation is by 470nm blue LEDs (24W in total) operating...

  14. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  15. Water balance and energy partitioning in a semi-closed greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teitel, M.; Zwart, de H.F.; Kempkes, F.L.K.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of a closed (or semi-closed) greenhouse that is used to harvest solar energy can be attractive to reduce the fossil fuel input or for an increment of water use efficiency. To examine the concept, a 550 m2 greenhouse was built in The Netherlands and experiments were carried out with a

  16. CPV system based on NIR reflecting lamellae integrated into a greenhouse: Optimizing of Optics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piet Sonneveld; Gert-Jan Swinkels

    2010-01-01

    In an previous research project a new type of greenhouse with an integrated concentrated photovoltaic system (CPV) was developed which has an integrated filter for reflecting the near infrared radiation (NIR) to the greenhouse and exploiting this radiation in a solar energy system. The performance

  17. Greenhouse production systems for people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giacomelli, G.A.; Sase, S.; Cramer, R.; Hoogeboom, J.; McKenzie, A.; Parbst, K.; Sacrascia-Mugnozza, G.; Selina, P.; Sharp, D.A.; Voogt, J.O.; Weel, van P.A.; Mears, D.

    2012-01-01

    Environmentally sound greenhouse production requires that: demand for market products is understood; greenhouse design addresses the climate circum-stances; input resources are available and consumed efficiently, and; there must be a reasonable balance of production products to the environmental

  18. Nuclear energy and greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strub, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The contribution of nuclear power plants against the greenhouse effects is evaluated, not only nuclear energy is unable to fight greenhouse effect increase but long life wastes endanger environment. 8 refs

  19. Greenhouse Gas Data Publication Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This tool to gives you access to greenhouse gas data reported to EPA by large facilities and suppliers in the United States through EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting...

  20. An Impact Triggered Runaway Greenhouse on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, T. L.; McKay, C. P.; Toon, O. B.

    2004-01-01

    When a planet is in radiative equilibrium, the incoming solar flux balances the outgoing longwave flux. If something were to perturb the system slightly, say the incoming solar flux increased, the planet would respond by radiating at a higher surface temperature. Since any radiation that comes in must go out, if the incoming is increased, the outgoing must also increase, and this increase manifests itself as a warmer equilibrium temperature. The increase in solar flux would correspond to an increase in temperature, which would increase the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere due to increased evaporation. Since water vapor is a greenhouse gas, it would absorb more radiation in the atmosphere leading to a yet warmer equilibrium temperature. The planet would reach radiative equilibrium at this new temperature. There exists a point, however, past which this positive feedback leads to a "runaway" situation. In this case, the planet does not simply evaporate a little more water and eventually come to a slightly higher equilibrium temperature. Instead, the planet keeps evaporating more and more water until all of the planet's available liquid and solid water is in the atmosphere. The reason for this is generally understood. If the planet's temperature increases, evaporation of water increases, and the absorption of radiation increases. This increases the temperature and the feedback continues until all water is in the atmosphere. The resulting equilibrium temperature is very high, much higher than the equilibrium temperature of a point with slightly lower solar flux. One can picture that as solar flux increases, planetary temperature also increases until the runaway point where temperature suddenly "jumps" to a higher value, in response to all the available water now residing in the atmosphere. This new equilibrium is called a "runaway greenhouse" and it has been theorized that this is what happened to the planet Venus, where the surface temperature is more than 700 K

  1. Localized climate control in greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, P.S.; Sijs, J.; Fransman, J.E.

    2012-01-01

    Strategies for controlling the indoor climate in greenhouses are based on a few sensors and actuators in combination with an assumption that climate variables, such as temperature, are uniform throughout the greenhouse. While this is already an improper assumption for conventional greenhouses, it

  2. The greenhouse challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrington, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    At Kyoto, Australia was successful in gaining acceptance for a differentiated response to climate change which takes account of our special circumstances and allows for an 8% rise in emissions above 1990 levels by 2008 - 2012. This outcome is both environmentally effective but also responsible from the perspective of Australia's economic and trade interests. While our target is achievable it will require significant efforts on the part of industry, all levels of government and the wider community to move towards best practice in managing our greenhouse gas emissions. At the same time, it will provide an incentive for industry and businesses to further improve their efficiency and perhaps even to capture new opportunities that may present themselves. An outline of the National Greenhouse Strategy is given and some of the many implications for the minerals and energy sector are discussed

  3. Pragmatics in the greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubb, M.J.; Victor, D.G.; Hope, C.W. (Royal Institute of International Affairs, London (UK))

    1991-12-05

    Negotiations towards a global framework convention on climate change are hampered by the range of greenhouse gases, sources and sinks. The US government promotes a comprehensive approach to climate change which provides flexibility but faces obstacles arising from the different characteristics of the sources and sinks involved, and uncertainties in attempting to estimate and compare the radiative impacts of different gases. Relying on approximations to enable a comprehensive approach is unrealistic for two reasons: monitoring and revision. The comprehensive approach is a worthwhile goal but is not yet fully practicable. Two lists are suggested - a quantified list for CFCs and CO{sub 2} and a transition list. Frequent renegotiation would be necessary. With this approach an overall goal for controlling the magnitude and rate of change in greenhouse forcing is possible. 12 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Greenhouse and Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaine, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The book is based on papers at the conference held at Macquarie University, Australia, in December 1989. The topics include energy aspects of the greenhouse effect, effects of reduction of carbon dioxide, methane emissions, sources of energy production, various aspects of electricity, liquid building, new technology, energy management and environmental and sociological aspects. Whilist the emphasis is on Australian conditions, the approaches are of relevance to other countries. Contains lists of referees and participants. Twenty-three papers have been separately indexed

  5. Greenhouse gas strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    Because the overall effects of climate change will likely be more pronounced in the North than in other parts of the country, the Government of the Northwest Territories considers it imperative to support global and local actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Government support is manifested through a coordinating role played by senior government representatives in the development of the NWT Greenhouse Gas Strategy, and by participation on a multi-party working committee to identify and coordinate northern actions and to contribute a northern perspective to Canada's National Climate Change Implementation Strategy. This document outlines the NWT Government's goals and objectives regarding greenhouse gas emission reduction actions. These will include efforts to enhance awareness and understanding; demonstrate leadership by putting the Government's own house in order; encouraging action across sectors; promote technology development and innovation; invest in knowledge and building the foundation for informed future decisions. The strategy also outlines the challenges peculiar to the NWT, such as the high per person carbon dioxide emissions compared to the national average (30 tonnes per person per year as opposed to the national average of 21 tonnes per person per year) and the increasing economic activity in the Territories, most of which are resource-based and therefore energy-intensive. Appendices which form part of the greenhouse gas strategy document, provide details of the potential climate change impact in the NWT, a detailed explanation of the proposed measures, an emission forecast to 2004 from industrial processes, fuel combustion and incineration, and a statement of the official position of the Government of the NWT on climate change

  6. Ozone: The secret greenhouse gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berntsen, Terje; Tjernshaugen, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric ozone not only protects against harmful ultraviolet radiation; it also contributes to the greenhouse effect. Ozone is one of the jokers to make it difficult to calculate the climatic effect of anthropogenic emissions. The greenhouse effect and the ozone layer should not be confused. The greenhouse effect creates problems when it becomes enhanced, so that the earth becomes warmer. The problem with the ozone layer, on the contrary, is that it becomes thinner and so more of the harmful ultraviolet radiation gets through to the earth. However, ozone is also a greenhouse gas and so the greenhouse effect and the ozone layer are connected

  7. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  8. Luminescence of LiH(D):Ru monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirzyanov, A.A.; Oparin, D.V.; Pilipenko, G.I.; Gavrilov, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Luminescence of lithium hydride (deuteride) activated by ruthenium is recorded for the first time. The features connected with the structure and oscillations of the basic lattice are detected in luminescence spectrum. The qualitative model of luminescence spectrum is suggested

  9. Luminescence centers in bismuth orthogermanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordun, O.M.

    2001-01-01

    The luminescence and photoexcitation spectra of single crystals,ceramics,and thin films of Bi 4 Ce 3 O 1 2 are studied.The decomposition of the luminescence spectra into elementary components by the Alentsev-Fock method showed that they consist of three bands with maxima at 2.7,2.4,and 2.05 eV.The bands with maxima at 2.7 and 2.4 eV are assigned to the emission of self-trapped Frenkel excitons describing the excited state of a (BiO 6 ) 9- molecular ion. Emission bands with maxima at 2.0 5 eV are assigned to recombination on traps caused by structural defects

  10. X-ray luminescent glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  11. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Sante Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  12. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  13. Electrostatic probes in luminescent discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da.

    1980-01-01

    A system to produce luminescent type plasma by continuos discharge and ionization by high frequency was constructed. The ionization was done in the air and in the argon under pressures from 3 to 10 mmHg. The parameters of a non magnetized collisional plasma and the parameters of a magnetized plasma such as, density, eletron temperature and potential, using a Langmuir probe with plane geometry, were determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  14. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, G.; Nomikos, C.; Bakas, A.; Proimos, B.

    1994-01-01

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors)

  15. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayiotakis, G; Nomikos, C; Bakas, A; Proimos, B [Medical Physics Department, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors). 12 refs, 3 figs.

  16. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  17. Methods of producing luminescent images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, P.; Newman, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for producing a luminescent image in a layer of a binding material in which is dispersed a thermoluminescent material. The layer is heated uniformly to a temperature of 80 to 300 0 C and is exposed to luminescence inducing radiation whilst so heated. The preferred exposing radiation is X-rays and preferably the thermoluminescent material is insensitive to electromagnetic radiation of wavelength longer than 300 mm. Information concerning preparation of the luminescent material is given in BP 1,347,672; this material has the advantage that at elevated temperatures it shows increased sensitivity compared with room temperature. At temperatures in the range 80 to 150 0 C the thermoluminescent material exhibits 'afterglow', allowing the image to persist for several seconds after the X-radiation has ceased, thus allowing the image to be retained for visual inspection in this temperature range. At higher temperatures, however, there is negligible 'afterglow'. The thermoluminescent layers so produced are particularly useful as fluoroscopic screens. The preferred method of heating the thermoluminescent material is described in BP 1,354,149. An example is given of the application of the method. (U.K.)

  18. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  19. Discuss on luminescence dose data analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinhua; Xiao Wuyun; Ai Xianyun; Shi Zhilan; Liu Ying

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology. General design planning of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology is put forward with the diverse demands. The emphasis is focused on dose data processing method, luminescence curve analysis method, using of network, mechanics of communication among computers, data base management system of individual dose in this paper. The main methods and skills used in this technology as well as their advantages are also discussed. And it offers general design references for development luminescence dose data processing software. (authors)

  20. GCR-Induced Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. T.; Wilson, T. L.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the Moon has a ubiquitous photon luminescence induced by Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), using the Monte Carlo particle-physics program FLUKA. Both the fluence and the flux of the radiation can be determined by this method, but only the fluence will be presented here. This is in addition to thermal radiation emitted due to the Moon s internal temperature and radioactivity. This study is a follow-up to an earlier discussion [1] that addressed several misconceptions regarding Moonshine in the Earth-Moon system (Figure 1) and predicted this effect. There also exists a related x-ray fluorescence induced by solar energetic particles (SEPs, <350 MeV) and solar photons at lower x-ray energies, although this latter fluorescence was studied on Apollo 15 and 16 [2- 5], Lunar Prospector [6], and even EGRET [7].

  1. Solar energy for Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkmann, Rainer

    1998-01-01

    The virtues of solar energy are extolled. The greenhouse gas aspect is mentioned but the main thrust of the paper is the technology and applications such as domestic water heating, combined water and space heating, swimming pools, industrial heating and air conditioning. Statistical data for the present European market, sales and installed collector area are given. (UK)

  2. Energy saving in greenhouses can be obtained by energy balance-controlled screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, N. E. (Univ. of Aarhus, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Horticulture, Aarslev (Denmark)), e-mail: niels.andersson@agrsci.dk

    2011-03-15

    The energy screens in two greenhouses, one clad with double acrylic and one with single glass, were controlled by an energy balance model. The parameters in the model were heat transmission coefficients, air temperature in the greenhouse and outdoors, irradiance and a single constant for the solar energy efficiency. The energy consumption, screen movements and daily light integral were compared with a glass greenhouse in which the energy screens were controlled by irradiance. In the greenhouse with light-controlled screens the set point for opening and closing of the screens was 5 Wm-2. The energy-saving screens controlled by the energy balance model opened later and closed earlier than in the greenhouse with light-controlled screens. When using the energy balance model the energy saving was 14% for the glass greenhouse and 41% for the double acrylic greenhouse compared with the glass greenhouse with light-controlled screens. The air temperature was on average similar in the three greenhouses, but when the screens were controlled by energy balance the daily light integral was approximately 10% lower and the number of hours the screens were closed was prolonged with 35% for the glass-covered greenhouse and 25% for the double acrylic-covered greenhouse compared with the greenhouse with light-controlled screens. Energy peaks in connection with operation of the screens were not reduced. During the experiment Begonia elatior, Dendranthema grandiflora (Chrysanthemum), Hedera helix, Helianthus annuus, Gerbera jamesonii and Kalanchoe blossfeldiana were grown in the greenhouses. There was a trend in prolongation of the production time when the plants were grown in the glass greenhouse with energy balance control of the screens. A lower number of flowers or inflorescences were observed for some of the plant species produced in the greenhouses with energy balance-controlled screens

  3. Efeito da solarização, adubação química e orgânica no controle de nematóides em alface sob cultivo protegido Effect of solarization, chemical and organic fertilization on the control of nematode on greenhouse lettuce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene G da Silva

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Os efeitos da solarização do solo associados à adubação no controle de nematóides e na produtividade da alface cultivar "Verônica" foram avaliados em solo naturalmente infestado. Dois experimentos foram conduzidos, um com e outro sem solarização, em casa de vegetação, ambos com cinco tratamentos: adubação orgânica; nitrogênio na forma amoniacal (NH4; adubação com NPK; adubação orgânica mais NPK; testemunha (sem adubação. No experimento solarizado, o solo foi coberto durante 132 dias com filme plástico transparente. A população de nematóides foi avaliada em duas camadas (0-10 cm e 10-20 cm, e as coletas de solo foram feitas em três épocas (antes da implantação do experimento; após a solarização; após a colheita. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com três repetições em parcelas sub-subdivididas, com medidas no espaço e no tempo (5 adubações x 2 camadas x 3 épocas, e a comparação entre experimentos foi feita pela análise conjunta. O efeito da solarização sobre o controle de nematóides dependeu da adubação e camada do solo. A solarização reduziu a população de nematóides na camada de 0-10 cm em todos os tratamentos de adubação. A solarização associada ao NH4 reduziu a diversidade na camada de 10-20 cm. A solarização combinada às adubações orgânica, N-NH4, NPK e orgânica mais NPK reduziu de maneira eficiente o número de galhas, o número de massas de ovos e a população de nematóides fitoparasitas nas raízes, em especial de Meloidogyne spp. Solarização combinada à adubação orgânica apresenta potencial para controle de nematóides e redução do uso de agrotóxicos.The effect of soil solarization and fertilization was evaluated for nematode control in 'Veronica' lettuce in naturally infested soil. The two greenhouse experiments consisted of five fertilization treatments: organic fertilization; ammoniacal nitrogen (ammonium sulphate; NPK fertilization; organic

  4. The Greenhouse effect within an analytic model of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnen, Heinz [Konstanz Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Physik

    2009-01-15

    Within a simplified atmospheric model the greenhouse effect is treated by analytical methods starting from physical first principles. The influence of solar radiation, absorption cross sections of the greenhouse molecules, and cloud formation on the earth's temperature is shown and discussed explicitly by mathematical formulae in contrast to the climate simulations. The application of our analytical results on the production of 20 .10{sup 9} t of CO{sub 2} per year yields an enlargement of the earth's surface temperature of 2.3 .10{sup -2} C per year in agreement with other estimations. (orig.)

  5. Harnessing greenhouse effect; Domestiquer l'effet de serre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meunier, F.; Rivet, P.; Terrier, M.F

    2005-07-01

    This book considers the energy and greenhouse effect questions in a global way. It presents the different methods of fight against the increase of the greenhouse effect (energy saving, carbon sinks, cogeneration,..), describes the main alternative energy sources to fossil fuels (biomass, wind power, solar, nuclear,..), and shows that, even worrying, the future is not so dark as it seems to be and that technical solutions exist which will allow to answer the worldwide growing up energy needs and to slow down the climatic drift. (J.S.)

  6. Solar cycles and climate variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakov, V.F.

    1990-01-01

    Climate oscillations with 100-, 200- and 300-year periods are positively correlated with solar activity oscillations: the higher is solar activity the warmer is climate. According to geological data (varved clays) it is determined, that length of cycles has decreased from 23.4 up to 11 years during latter 2.5 billion years. 12-year cycles occurred during the great glaciation periods, while 10-year cycles occurred during interglaciation periods. It is suggested, that these oscillations are related with variations of the solar activity and luminescence

  7. Selective optical contacting for solar spectrum management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianfeng; Chen, Weijian; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Zhilong; Huang, Shujuan; Shrestha, Santosh; Wen, Xiaoming; Patterson, Robert; Conibeer, Gavin

    2017-02-01

    Solar spectrum management using up/down conversion is an important method to improve the photovoltaic energy conversion efficiency. It asks for a monochromatic luminescence absorption at the band edge of the photovoltaic device to reduce both the sub-band-gap and over-band-gap energy losses. Here, we demonstrate an energy selective optical contacting concept to improve the luminescence transfer efficiency for spectrum management. By increasing both the luminescence emission and re-absorption ability through photonic resonance, an efficient photon transfer channel could be established between the luminescence emitter and the photovoltaic component in a near-field region. This concept is not only able to compensate the insufficient band edge absorption ability of the photovoltaic device, but also to break the far-field limitation of luminescence radiation. The energy selection on the optical spectrum naturally imposed by the mode resonance is also helpful to improve the monochromaticity of the luminescence yield. In this paper, a photonic crystal cavity is used to realize the optical contacting concept between a thin silicon film and spectrum converter. The optical power and photon flux transferred between different components are calculated analytically using the electromagnetic Green's function. The corresponding radiative dipole moment is estimated by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The example shows an over 80 times enhancement in the luminescence absorbance by the silicon layer, illustrating the great potential of this concept to be applied on nano-structured photovoltaic devices.

  8. Greenhouse effect: Myth or reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper debates on greenhouse effect controversy. Natural greenhouse effect is beneficent but additional greenhouse effect, in relation with human activities, can present a major risk for humanity. However an international agreement is difficult owing to the enormous costs which could not be endured by South economies. A tax on carbon dioxide emissions would have for consequence a wave of industrial delocalizations without precedent with important unemployment in Europe and no impact on additional greenhouse effect because it is a radiative effect and it is not a classic local chemical pollution. 11 refs., 10 figs

  9. OPIC Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Overseas Private Investment Corporation — Independent analysis details quantifying the greenhouse gas ("GHG") emissions directly attributable to projects to which the Overseas Private Investment Corporation...

  10. Luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Golab, S.

    1992-01-01

    The new luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation has been worked out. Activated inorganic compounds of ytterbium and erbium ions has been used as luminescent agent. The multi-component inorganic glass containing tellurium oxide as well as boron, sodium, magnesium and zinc oxides has been applied as a converter matrix

  11. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  12. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  13. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far ...

  14. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Bradley B. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McShane, Michael J., E-mail: mcshane@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described.

  15. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described

  16. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Aldea, Gabriela; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod) 3 ) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  17. Test and analysis of four solar cookers; Analise e teste de quatro fogoes solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Paulo Cesar da Costa [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: PauloCPinheiro@ufmg.br, e-mail: pinheiro@demec.ufmg.br

    2006-07-01

    Solar cookers are an alternative to cooking, milk pasteurization and water purification. This paper describes the assemblage and operational data of 4 solar cookers, two greenhouse type and two concentrator type. It is also propose a methodology for solar cookers tests. (author)

  18. Luminescence detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The need for forensic tests to identify irradiated foods has been widely recognised at a time of growing international trade in such products and impending changes in UK and EEC legislation to control the process. This paper outlines the requirements for and of such tests, and discusses recent developments in luminescence approaches aimed at meeting the needs of public analysts, retailers and consumers. Detecting whether or not food has been irradiated, and if so to what dose, is one of the challenges which food irradiation poses to the scientist. (author)

  19. Rupture luminescence from natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Haneman, D.

    1999-12-01

    Fibers of cotton and wool, and samples of paper, have been ruptured in tension in vacuum and in air, and give detectable luminescence in the visible range. All have a common emission peak at around 2.0 eV, which is ascribed to the deexcitation of states excited by the rupture of organic chain molecule bonds. Rubber bands give stronger emission in air, but no emission in vacuum, suggesting the material breaks only at weak interchain bonds. Mohair, cat, and horse hair also give emission in air. The phenomena reveal effects that would occur widely in nature.

  20. Greenhouse effect and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flohn, H.

    1987-01-01

    Model calculations with different marginal conditions and different physical processes do, on the basis of realistic assumptions, result in a temperature rise of 3 ± 1.5degC at doubling carbon dioxide concentrations. Temperatures are increasing even more due to the presence of trace gases contributing to the greenhouse effect. They are assumed to be having a share of 100% in the carbon dioxide effect (additive) in 30-40 years from now. According to the model calculations the CO 2 increase from about 280 ppm around 1850 to 345 ppm (1985) is equal to a globally averaged temperature rise of 0.5-0.7degC. As the data obtained before 1900 were incomplete and little representative climatic analyses cannot be considered to have been effective but after that time. However, considering the additional influence of other climatic effects such as vulcanism the temperature rise satisfactorily corresponds to the values obtained since 1900. (orig./HP) [de

  1. Holistic greenhouse gas management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, P. [Dept. of Applied and International Economics, Massey Univ. (New Zealand); Parshotam, A. [Inst. of Fundamental Sciences, Massey Univ. (New Zealand)

    2005-07-01

    A holistic greenhouse gas management strategy is described. The first stage is the growth of a large-scale global bio-energy market with world trade in bio-fuels and with a strategic stock of biomass raw material in new plantation forests. Later stages, more costly - as needs may be in response to possible future precursors of abrupt climate change - would involve linking CO2 capture and sequestration to bio-energy, yielding a negative emissions energy system. Illustrative calculations point to the feasibility of a return to pre-industrial CO{sub 2} levels before mid-century. This result is subject to significant caveats, but, prima facie, the first stage can provide several environmental and socio-economic side-benefits while yielding a positive financial return if oil prices remain above 35$/bbl. The vision is that the polluter pays principle can be turned to a greening of the earth. (orig.)

  2. Greenhouse gas trading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drazilov, P. [Natsource-Tullett Emissions Brokerage, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    Natsource-Tullett Emissions Brokerage is a market leader in natural gas, electricity, coal, and weather, emissions with a total of more than $2 billion by volume in emissions transactions in the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan, and Europe. This power point presentation addressed issues dealing with global warming, the Kyoto Protocol, and explained where we are in terms of reaching commitments for the first compliance period between 2008-2012. The paper focused on international emissions trading (IET), joint implementation (JI) and the clean development mechanism (CDM) and explained how greenhouse gases are traded. Emissions trading refers to the trade of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxides, perfluoro-carbons, hydrofluorocarbons, and sulphur hexafluorides. The motivational drivers for trading were outlined in terms of liability for buyers and assets for sellers. To date, trading activity is nearly 120 transactions with nearly 70 million tons of carbon dioxide equivalent. tabs., figs.

  3. Theory and validation of a liquid radiation filter greenhouse simulation for performance prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuermann, D.; Kopel, R.; Zeroni, M.; Levi, S.; Gale, J.

    1997-01-01

    A greenhouse is described which has a selectively absorbing liquid radiation filter (LRF) circulating in double layered cladding. The filter removes much of the near infrared wave band of solar radiation (700 nm) while transmitting most of the photosynthetic radiation (400-700 nm). This greatly reduces the heat input to the greenhouse and, by transferring heat from day to night, facilitates better temperature control. This is particularly important for CO2 fertilization, which requires that the greenhouse should remain closed during daylight hours. A computer simulation model was developed to study the relationship between design parameters of such a LRF greenhouse and its thermal performance under different climatic conditions. The model was based on a small number of governing equations describing the major physical phenomena responsible for the greenhouse climate. Validation of the simulation was performed with data from a 330 m2 LRF greenhouse, operating in the Negev (Israel) desert highlands. The predicted greenhouse temperatures were found to agree with measured values to within one to two degrees Celsius. Performances of a LRF and a conventional greenhouse were compared using the simulation and hourly meteorological data for central Israel. For the summer season of May to October, the number of daylight hours during which the LRF greenhouse could remain closed was larger by about two-thirds than that of the conventional greenhouse

  4. Energy conserving dehumidification of greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, de H.F.

    2014-01-01

    As greenhouses become better insulated and increasingly airtight, the humidity of the inside air rises easily and may become unfavourably high. Therefore, most greenhouses frequently open their vents to remove the moisture excess. When heated, opening the vents will increase the energy consumption.

  5. Has your greenhouse gone virtual?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtual Grower is a free decision-support software program available from USDA-ARS that allows growers to build a virtual greenhouse. It was initially designed to help greenhouse growers estimate heating costs and conduct simple simulations to figure out where heat savings could be achieved. Featu...

  6. Greenhouse gases and global warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    From previous articles we have learned about the complexities of our environment, its atmosphere and its climate system. we have also learned that climate change and, therefore global warm and cool periods are naturally occurring phenomena. Moreover, all scientific evidence suggests that global warming, are likely to occur again naturally in the future. However, we have not yet considered the role of the rates of climate change in affecting the biosphere. It appears that how quickly the climate changes may be more important than the change itself. In light of this concern, let us now consider the possibility that, is due to human activity. We may over the next century experience global warming at rates and magnitudes unparalleled in recent geologic history. The following questions are answered; What can we learn from past climates? What do we know about global climates over the past 100 years? What causes temperature change? What are the greenhouse gases? How much have concentration of greenhouse gases increased in recent years? Why are increases in concentrations of greenhouse of concern? What is the e nhanced greenhouse effect ? How can human activity impact the global climate? What are some reasons for increased concentrations of greenhouse gases? What are fossil fuel and how do they transform into greenhouse gases? Who are the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases? Why are canada per capita emissions of greenhouse gases relatively high? (Author)

  7. Cherry tomato yield in greenhouses with different plastic covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Holcman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different plastic covers on microclimate and cherry tomato yield in greenhouses. The experiments were carried out in Piracicaba, state of São Paulo (Brazil, during three growing periods (2008/2009/2010. A greenhouse was divided in: Environment I (EI - covered with plastic film anti-UV and thermo-reflective shading screen, and Environment II (EII - covered with diffusive plastic film; monitored with automatic weather sensors; and cultivated with cherry tomato (‘Sweet Grape’ and ‘Sweet Million’. Use of diffusive plastic in greenhouses provides a better inside distribution of solar energy without causing major changes in air temperature and relative humidity, resulting in higher yield (kg plant-1, fruits quantity (number plant-1 and fruits average weight than those obtained under thermo-reflective shading screen.

  8. Global warming description using Daisyworld model with greenhouse gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Susana L D; Savi, Marcelo A; Viola, Flavio M; Leiroz, Albino J K

    2014-11-01

    Daisyworld is an archetypal model of the earth that is able to describe the global regulation that can emerge from the interaction between life and environment. This article proposes a model based on the original Daisyworld considering greenhouse gases emission and absorption, allowing the description of the global warming phenomenon. Global and local analyses are discussed evaluating the influence of greenhouse gases in the planet dynamics. Numerical simulations are carried out showing the general qualitative behavior of the Daisyworld for different scenarios that includes solar luminosity variations and greenhouse gases effect. Nonlinear dynamics perspective is of concern discussing a way that helps the comprehension of the global warming phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A dynamic model and an experimental study for the internal air and soil temperatures in an innovative greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joudi, Khalid A.; Farhan, Ammar A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Simulation model for internal Greenhouse temperature including soil reflectance. • Greenhouse soil heat exchange affects internal temperature by approximately 12%. • Solar air heaters as greenhouse roof maintain better internal temperature year round. - Abstract: An innovative greenhouse which integrates a conventional greenhouse with roof mounted solar air heaters is used in this investigation. This design reduces the solar radiation incoming to the greenhouse in summer which reduced the load and cost of greenhouse cooling and provides a means of solar heating. Experimental measurements of the internal air and internal soil sub-layer temperatures in the greenhouse, without crops, were performed in Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq (33.3 °N, 44.4 °E). Measurements were recorded for clear and partly cloudy winter days. A dynamic model was developed to predict the all internal temperatures of the greenhouse. This model includes soil surface heat exchange with the greenhouse air which was found to give a more accurate prediction of the internal temperatures. Soil surface heat exchange has a positive contribution to the internal environment. The input parameters of the model were the measured meteorological conditions and the thermo-physical properties of the greenhouse components which include the cover, inside air, and soil. Comparisons between the predicted and measured results show good agreement. Also, results show that soil sub-layers inside the greenhouse at 50 cm depth are the best place for heat storage elements. The integrated system rendered maximum differences between ambient and internal air temperatures of 16 °C in February and 10 °C in June without operating any heating or cooling system

  10. Front Cover: Solar RRL 3-4∕2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Moraitis, P.; Aalberts, Carlo; Drent, M.; Grasso, Thom; L'Ortye, Yves; Visscher, Marc; Westra, Mattijs; Plas, Rob; Planje, Wilco

    Luminescent solar concentrators consist of coloured plastic plates that concentrate sunlight to their sides where solar cells are mounted. Since their conception in the 1970s, novel dyes and nanocrystals have being developed for these concentrators, and it is time to show their full spectrum of

  11. Luminescence of (Ca,Sr)3(VO4)2: Pr3+, Eu3+ phosphor for use in CuPc-based solar cells and white light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Han-Yu; Chang, Wei-Fu; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance the red emission intensity and expand the blue excitation band of a (Ca,Sr) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.12Eu 3+ phosphor for use in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based solar cells and white light-emitting diodes. It was found that substitution of 3% Sr 2+ replacing Ca 2+ enhanced red emission intensity of Ca 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.12Eu 3+ by 14% under 465-nm by excitation. The Pr 3+ co-doping effect was realized when blue excitation intensity of (Ca 0.97 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.12Eu 3+ , located in the weakest absorption of CuPc, was improved by 126% with the addition of 0.6 mol% Pr 3+ . The absorption spectrum of CuPc/optimized (Ca 0.9668 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.006Pr 3+ , 0.12Eu 3+ mixtures provided evidence that the (Ca 0.9668 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.006Pr 3+ , 0.12Eu 3+ phosphor could increase the efficiency of incident photons on CuPc-based solar cells. Moreover, the good temperature stability of emission intensity and chromaticity of (Ca 0.9668 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.006Pr 3+ , 0.12Eu 3+ indicated a potential for this phosphor to be applied on the white light-emitting diodes. - Highlights: ► Substitution of 3% Sr 2+ replacing Ca 2+ enhanced red emission intensity of Ca 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.12Eu 3+ by 14% under 465 nm by excitation. ► Addition of 0.6 mol% Pr 3+ enhanced blue excitation intensity of (Ca 0.97 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.12Eu 3+ , located in the weakest absorption of CuPc, by 126%. ► According to absorption measurements of CuPc/optimized (Ca 0.9668 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.006Pr 3+ , 0.12Eu 3+ mixtures for the first time, the feasibility of our phosphor to assist CuPc in converting blue-wavelength photons was proved. ► High temperature stability of emission intensity and chromaticity of (Ca 0.9668 Sr 0.03 ) 2.82 (VO 4 ) 2 :0.006Pr 3+ , 0.12Eu 3+ indicated our phosphor is acceptable for WLED applications.

  12. Correlation of heterojunction luminescence quenching and photocurrent in polymer-blend photovoltaic diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rabade, Astrid; Morteani, Arne C.; Friend, Richard H. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2009-10-19

    Charge generation in organic solar cells proceeds via photogeneration of excitons in the bulk that form geminate electron-hole pairs at the heterojunction formed between electron donor and acceptors. It is shown that an externally applied electric field increases the number of free charges formed from the geminate pair, and quenches the luminescence from the relaxed exciplex with one-to-one correspondence. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Turkish tomato greenhouse gets geothermal heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkema, A.; Maaswinkel, R.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Wageningen UR Greenhouse Horticulture will set up an ultramodern greenhouse in Turkey, together with Dutch greenhouse builders and contractors. Geothermal energy will be used there to provide heat and carbon dioxide for tomato cultivation.

  14. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  15. Modeling shoot-tip temperature in the greenhouse environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faust, J.E.; Heins, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    An energy-balance model is described that predicts vinca (Catharanthus roseus L.) shoot-tip temperature using four environmental measurements: solar radiation and dry bulb, wet bulb, and glazing material temperature. The time and magnitude of the differences between shoot-tip and air temperature were determined in greenhouses maintained at air temperatures of 15, 20, 25, 30, or 35 °C. At night, shoot-tip temperature was always below air temperature. Shoot-tip temperature decreased from 0.5 to 5 °C below air temperature as greenhouse glass temperature decreased from 2 to 15 °C below air temperature. During the photoperiod under low vapor-pressure deficit (VPD) and low air temperature, shoot-tip temperature increased ≈4 °C as solar radiation increased from 0 to 600 W·m -2 . Under high VPD and high air temperature, shoot-tip temperature initially decreased 1 to 2 °C at sunrise, then increased later in the morning as solar radiation increased. The model predicted shoot-tip temperatures within ±1 °C of 81% of the observed 1-hour average shoot-tip temperatures. The model was used to simulate shoot-tip temperatures under different VPD, solar radiation, and air temperatures. Since the rate of leaf and flower development are influenced by the temperature of the meristematic tissues, a model of shoot-tip temperature will be a valuable tool to predict plant development in greenhouses and to control the greenhouse environment based on a plant temperature setpoint. (author)

  16. Politics in the greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberthuer, S.

    1993-01-01

    Chapter 1 gives an introduction into the problems surrounding the man-made greenhouse effect, the emphasis being on those features that were significant for the course for the international talks. Chapter 2 describes the course of the talks, giving particular attention to the standpoints of the different protagonists. Further the outcome of the talks is presented. Factors that exerted on influence on the standpoints of the protagonists and on the course of the climate talks are examined in Chapter 3 with special consideration to the interests of the individual protagonists and the international constellation of interests, the values supported by the protagonists and the institutional conditions bearing on the course of the talks. Chapter 4 attempts to explain the process of coming to terms about the international climate convention and the results of this process. This is followed in Chapter 5 by a discussion of the room for manoeuvre and possible tendencies of development of the international alliance for climate protection created by the convention. (HSCH) [de

  17. Climate - Greenhouse effect - Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, Thormod; Kanestroem, Ingolf

    2001-01-01

    This book explains what is understood by climate systems and the concept of greenhouse effect. It also gives a survey of the world's energy consumption, energy reserves and renewable energy sources. Today, 75 - 80 per cent of the world's energy consumption involves fossil fuel. These are the sources that cause the CO 2 emissions. What are the possibilities of reducing the emissions? The world's population is increasing, and to provide food and a worthy life for everybody we have to use more energy. Where do we get this energy from without causing great climate changes and environmental changes? Should gas power plants be built in Norway? Should Swedish nuclear power plants be shut down, or is it advisable to concentrate on nuclear power, worldwide, this century, to reduce the CO 2 emissions until the renewable energy sources have been developed and can take over once the petroleum sources have been depleted? The book also discusses the global magnetic field, which protects against particle radiation from space and which gives rise to the aurora borealis. The book is aimed at students taking environmental courses in universities and colleges, but is also of interest for anybody concerned about climate questions, energy sources and living standard

  18. (Limiting the greenhouse effect)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rayner, S.

    1991-01-07

    Traveler attended the Dahlem Research Conference organized by the Freien Universitat, Berlin. The subject of the conference was Limiting the Greenhouse Effect: Options for Controlling Atmospheric CO{sub 2} Accumulation. Like all Dahlem workshops, this was a meeting of scientific experts, although the disciplines represented were broader than usual, ranging across anthropology, economics, international relations, forestry, engineering, and atmospheric chemistry. Participation by scientists from developing countries was limited. The conference was divided into four multidisciplinary working groups. Traveler acted as moderator for Group 3 which examined the question What knowledge is required to tackle the principal social and institutional barriers to reducing CO{sub 2} emissions'' The working rapporteur was Jesse Ausubel of Rockefeller University. Other working groups examined the economic costs, benefits, and technical feasibility of options to reduce emissions per unit of energy service; the options for reducing energy use per unit of GNP; and the significant of linkage between strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and other goals. Draft reports of the working groups are appended. Overall, the conference identified a number of important research needs in all four areas. It may prove particularly important in bringing the social and institutional research needs relevant to climate change closer to the forefront of the scientific and policy communities than hitherto.

  19. Greenhouse gas trading starts up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    While nations decide on whether to sign on to the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, some countries and private companies are moving forward with greenhouse gas emissions trading.A 19 March report, "The Emerging International Greenhouse Gas Market," by the Pew Center on Global Climate Change, reports that about 65 greenhouse gas emissions trades for quantities above 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxideequivalent already have occurred worldwide since 1996. Many of these trades have taken place under a voluntary, ad hoc framework, though the United Kingdom and Denmark have established their own domestic emissions trading programs.

  20. UNEP greenhouse gas abatement costing studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maya, R.S.; Nziramasanga, N.; Muguti, E.; Fenhann, J.

    1993-10-01

    The aim was to assess options and cost of reducing emissions of greenhouse gases (with emphasis on carbon dioxide) from human activity in Zimbabwe. A brief description of the country's economy and energy sector, policy and pricing and regulations is given and substantial data related to the country's economy, technology, energy consumption, emission and fuel prices are presented. The energy demand in households and for other sectors in Zimbabwe are assessed, and documented in the case of the former. The reference scenarios on energy demand and supply assess greenhouse gas emissions under conditions whereby the present economic growth trends predominate. Energy efficiency improvements are discussed. Abatement technology options are stated as afforestation for carbon sequestration, more efficient coal-fired industrial boilers, extended use of hydroelectricity, prepayment electric meters, minimum tillage, optimization of coal-fired tobacco barns, industrial power factor correction equipment, domestic biogas digesters, solar water heating systems, time switches in electric geysers, optimization of industrial furnaces, photovoltaic water pumps, production of ammonia from coal for fertilizing purposes, and recovery of coke oven gases for use in thermal power generation. (AB)

  1. Policy and Environmental Implications of Photovoltaic Systems in Farming in Southeast Spain: Can Greenhouses Reduce the Greenhouse Effect?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Carreño-Ortega

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Solar photovoltaic (PV systems have grown in popularity in the farming sector, primarily because land area and farm structures themselves, such as greenhouses, can be exploited for this purpose, and, moreover, because farms tend to be located in rural areas far from energy production plants. In Spain, despite being a country with enormous potential for this renewable energy source, little is being done to exploit it, and policies of recent years have even restricted its implementation. These factors constitute an obstacle, both for achieving environmental commitments and for socioeconomic development. This study proposes the installation of PV systems on greenhouses in southeast Spain, the location with the highest concentration of greenhouses in Europe. Following a sensitivity analysis, it is estimated that the utilization of this technology in the self-consumption scenario at farm level produces increased profitability for farms, which can range from 0.88% (worst scenario to 52.78% (most favorable scenario. Regarding the Spanish environmental policy, the results obtained demonstrate that the impact of applying this technology mounted on greenhouses would bring the country 38% closer to reaching the 2030 greenhouse gas (GHG target. Furthermore, it would make it possible to nearly achieve the official commitment of 20% renewable energies by 2020. Additionally, it would have considerable effects on the regional socioeconomy, with increases in job creation and contribution to gross domestic product (GDP/R&D (Research and Development, allowing greater profitability in agrifood activities throughout the entire region.

  2. Emission of carbon. A most important component for greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milaev, V.B.; Kopp, I.Z.; Yasenski, A.N. [Scientific Research Inst. of Atmospheric Air Protection, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Greenhouse effect is most often defined as the probabilities of atmospheric air quasiequilibrium temperature increase as a result of air pollution due to emission of anthropogenic gaseous substances which are usually called `greenhouse gases`. Among greenhouse gases are primarily considered several gaseous substances which contain carbon atoms: carbon oxide, carbon dioxide and methane (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons (freons) spectra of which are transparent to solar radiation, but absorb and reradiate longwave radiation causing disturbance of quasistationary thermal regieme of the atmosphere. Qualitative estimates of the income and relative roles of different substances in occurrence of greenhouse effect differ considerable. At the modern state of knowledge the problem of greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases is considered in several aspects. The most widespread and investigated is climatic or meteorological aspect, it is discussed in a number of international works. Rather pressing is thermal physics aspect of the problem of estimating greenhouse effect, which consists in correct construction of a calculation model and usage of the most representative experimental data, since analytical methods require many assumptions, introduction of which may lead to results which differ very much. Bearing these uncertainties in mind the UNEP/WMO/ICSU conference has included into the number of the most urgent tasks in the study of greenhouse effect, the problem of determining the priority of factors which cause greenhouse effect, which in its turn predetermines the necessity to substantiate the methods of selection and criterion of comparative evaluation of such factors. (author)

  3. Emission of carbon. A most important component for greenhouse effect in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milaev, V B; Kopp, I Z; Yasenski, A N [Scientific Research Inst. of Atmospheric Air Protection, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31

    Greenhouse effect is most often defined as the probabilities of atmospheric air quasiequilibrium temperature increase as a result of air pollution due to emission of anthropogenic gaseous substances which are usually called `greenhouse gases`. Among greenhouse gases are primarily considered several gaseous substances which contain carbon atoms: carbon oxide, carbon dioxide and methane (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), and chlorinated and fluorinated hydrocarbons (freons) spectra of which are transparent to solar radiation, but absorb and reradiate longwave radiation causing disturbance of quasistationary thermal regieme of the atmosphere. Qualitative estimates of the income and relative roles of different substances in occurrence of greenhouse effect differ considerable. At the modern state of knowledge the problem of greenhouse effect and greenhouse gases is considered in several aspects. The most widespread and investigated is climatic or meteorological aspect, it is discussed in a number of international works. Rather pressing is thermal physics aspect of the problem of estimating greenhouse effect, which consists in correct construction of a calculation model and usage of the most representative experimental data, since analytical methods require many assumptions, introduction of which may lead to results which differ very much. Bearing these uncertainties in mind the UNEP/WMO/ICSU conference has included into the number of the most urgent tasks in the study of greenhouse effect, the problem of determining the priority of factors which cause greenhouse effect, which in its turn predetermines the necessity to substantiate the methods of selection and criterion of comparative evaluation of such factors. (author)

  4. Effect of the plastic cover properties on the thermal efficiency of a greenhouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernaud, P. [Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Monastir (Tunisia); Champagne, J. Y.; Palec, G. Le; Bournot, P.; Muynck, B. de; Vandevelde, R.

    1984-07-01

    The greenhouse effect is due to the dependency of the transmission factor upon the wavelength of the incident radiation. Experiments have been done that confirm the theoretically admitted results on the thermal behaviour of greenhouses. It is also pointed out that the internal global solar irradiance is characteristic of the plastic cover. A model based on a static description of the system is proposed. A few results are given concerning this model. (author)

  5. GREENHOUSE-GROWN CAPE GOOSEBERRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    /2006 S 4,00. Printed in Uganda. All rights reserved O2006, African Crop Science Society. SHORT COMMINICATION. EFFECT OF GIBBERRELLIC ACID ON GROWTH AND FRUIT YIELD OF. GREENHOUSE-GROWN CAPE GOOSEBERRY.

  6. Transit Greenhouse Gas Management Compendium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    This Compendium provides a framework for identifying greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction opportunities while highlighting specific examples of effective GHG reduction practices. The GHG savings benefits of public transit are first described. GHG saving op...

  7. Quotation systems for greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trong, Maj Dang

    2000-01-01

    The article surveys recommendations from a Norwegian committee for implementing at a national level, the Kyoto protocol aims for reducing the total emissions of greenhouse gases from the industrial countries through quotation systems

  8. Luminescence properties of uranyl-acetate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Hannes; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) was applied to characterize uranium(VI)- acetate species based on their luminescence properties. In contrast to previous interpretations, no indications were detected for the existence of the 1: 3 complex.

  9. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  10. Towards Luminescence Dating Of Mosaic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibila, E.; Villa, I.

    The possibility of dating archaeological glass by means of luminescent techniques has been investigated in recent years, despite the difficulties of this application, mainly linked to the amorphous structure of the material. We focused in particular on mosaic glass, after the encouraging results obtained on byzantine and medieval samples. Further studies were devoted to the comprehension of the luminescent mechanisms in silica glasses, and to the investigation of the relationships between luminescence, colouring or opacifier ions and crystalline phase of the vitreous matrix. The results of a study on the dosimetric characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of a few medieval blue-green mosaic glasses from the San Lorenzo church (Milan) are presented, and the experimental protocols established to identify their suitability for dating are discussed.

  11. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  12. Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical study and luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, P. R. China. cChina-Australia Joint ... School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, P. R. China e-mail: ..... The title complex is luminescent.

  13. Development of Inorganic Solar Cells by Nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei Zhang; Huijuan Geng; Zhihua Zhou; Jiang Wu; Zhiming Wang; Yaozhong Zhang; Zhongli Li; Liying Zhang; Zhi Yang; Huey Liang Hwang

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic solar cells, as durable photovoltaic devices for harvesting electric energy from sun light,have received tremendous attention due to the fear of exhausting the earth’s energy resources and damaging the living environment due to greenhouse gases. Some recent developments in nanotechnology have opened up new avenues for more relevant inorganic solar cells produced by new photovoltaic conversion concepts and effective solar energy harvesting nanostructures. In this review, the multiple exciton generation effect solar cells, hot carrier solar cells, one dimensional material constructed asymmetrical schottky barrier arrays, noble nanoparticle induced plasmonic enhancement, and light trapping nanostructured semiconductor solar cells are highlighted.

  14. Applications of Fluorogens with Rotor Structures in Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kok-Haw; Liu, Bin

    2017-05-29

    Solar cells are devices that convert light energy into electricity. To drive greater adoption of solar cell technologies, higher cell efficiencies and reductions in manufacturing cost are necessary. Fluorogens containing rotor structures may be helpful in addressing some of these challenges due to their unique twisted structures and photophysics. In this review, we discuss the applications of rotor-containing molecules as dyes for luminescent down-shifting layers and luminescent solar concentrators, where their aggregation-induced emission properties and large Stokes shifts are highly desirable. We also discuss the applications of molecules containing rotors in third-generation solar cell technologies, namely dye-sensitized solar cells and organic photovoltaics, where the twisted 3-dimensional rotor structures are used primarily for aggregation control. Finally, we discuss perspectives on the future role of molecules containing rotor structures in solar cell technologies.

  15. Greenhouses and their humanizing synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Paterson, Carrie; Schubert, Daniel; Zabel, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Greenhouses in space will require advanced technical systems of automatic watering, soil-less cultivation, artificial lighting, and computerized observation of plants. Functions discussed for plants in space habitats include physical/health requirements and human psychology, social cohesion, as well as the complex sensorial benefits of plants for humans. The authors consider the role of plants in long-term space missions historically since 1971 (Salyut 1) and propose a set of priorities to be considered within the design requirements for greenhouses and constructed environments given a range of benefits associated with plant-human relationships. They cite recent research into the use of greenhouses in extreme environments to reveal the relative importance of greenhouses for people living in isolated locations. Additionally, they put forward hypotheses about where greenhouses might factor into several strata of human health. In a recent design-in-use study of astronauts' experiences in space habitats discussed in Architecture for Astronauts (Springer Press 2011) it was found that besides the basic advantages for life support there are clearly additional "side benefits" for habitability and physical wellbeing, and thus long-term mission success. The authors have composed several key theses regarding the need to promote plant-human relationships in space, including areas where synergy and symbiosis occur. They cite new comprehensive research into the early US Space Program to reveal where programmatic requirements could be added to space architecture to increase the less quantifiable benefits to astronauts of art, recreation, and poetic engagement with their existential condition of estrangement from the planet. Specifically in terms of the technological requirements, the authors propose the integration of a new greenhouse subsystem component into space greenhouses—the Mobile Plant Cultivation Subsystem—a portable, personal greenhouse that can be integrated

  16. The Greenhouse Effect Does Exist!

    OpenAIRE

    Ebel, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    In particular, without the greenhouse effect, essential features of the atmospheric temperature profile as a function of height cannot be described, i.e., the existence of the tropopause above which we see an almost isothermal temperature curve, whereas beneath it the temperature curve is nearly adiabatic. The relationship between the greenhouse effect and observed temperature curve is explained and the paper by Gerlich and Tscheuschner [arXiv:0707.1161] critically analyzed. Gerlich and Tsche...

  17. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  18. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses Based on Internet of Things Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Ying

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet of things is a hot topic in the field of research, get a lot of attention, On behalf of the future development trend of the network, Internet of Things has a wide range of applications, because of the efficient and reliable information transmission in modern agriculture. In the greenhouse, the conditions of the Greenhouse determine the quality of crops, high yield and many other aspects. Research on Intelligent Agriculture Greenhouses based on Internet of Things, mainly Research on how to control the conditions of the greenhouses, So that the indoor conditions suitable for crop growth. In the pater, we study of Zigbee technology, Designed the solar power supply module, greenhouse hardware and software part, And the system was tested by experiment, The analysis of the experimental data shows that the system can provide good conditions for the growth of crops to achieve the high yield and high quality of crops.

  19. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a ''demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a ''satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change

  20. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  1. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O.; Ramos, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  2. Silica nanoparticles with a substrate switchable luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkova, O D; Mustafina, A R; Fedorenko, S V; Konovalov, A I

    2011-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles with visible (Tb and Ru doped), near IR (Yb doped) and dual visible-near IR luminescence (Ru-Yb doped) were obtained by reverse w/o microemulsion procedure. Plenty of luminescent complexes (from 4900 to 10000) encapsulated into each nanoparticle ensures the intensive luminescence of nanoparticles and their applicability as biomarkers. The silica surface decoration by definite anchor groups is the required step for the gaining to these nanoparticles marking and sensing functions. Thus covalent and non-covalent surface modification of these nanoparticles was developed to provide the binding with biotargets and sensing of anions. The dicationic surfactant coating of negatively charged Tb(III)-TCAS doped silica nanoparticles was chosen as the basis for the anion responsible system. The reversible insertion of the quenching anions (namely phenol red) into the surfactant based layer at the surface of luminescent nanoparticles switches off the Tb-centered luminescence. In turn the reversible reestablishment of the luminescence results from the competitive insertion of the non-quenching anions into the surfactant layer at the silica/water interface. The hydrophobic anions exemplified by dodecylsulfates versus hydrophilic ones (hydrophosphates) are preferable in the competition with phenol red anions.

  3. A new mathematical approximation of sunlight attenuation in rocks for surface luminescence dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos, E-mail: nick.laskaris@gmail.com [University of the Aegean, Department of Mediterranean Studies, Laboratory of Archaeometry, 1 Demokratias Avenue, Rhodes 85100 (Greece); Liritzis, Ioannis, E-mail: liritzis@rhodes.aegean.gr [University of the Aegean, Department of Mediterranean Studies, Laboratory of Archaeometry, 1 Demokratias Avenue, Rhodes 85100 (Greece)

    2011-09-15

    The attenuation of sunlight through different rock surfaces and the thermoluminescence (TL) or Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals clock resetting derived from sunlight induced eviction of electrons from electron traps, is a prerequisite criterion for potential dating. The modeling of change of residual luminescence as a function of two variables, the solar radiation path length (or depth) and exposure time offers further insight into the dating concept. The double exponential function modeling based on the Lambert-Beer law, valid under certain assumptions, constructed by a quasi-manual equation fails to offer a general and statistically sound expression of the best fit for most rock types. A cumulative log-normal distribution fitting provides a most satisfactory mathematical approximation for marbles, marble schists and granites, where absorption coefficient and residual luminescence parameters are defined per each type of rock or marble quarry. The new model is applied on available data and age determination tests. - Highlights: > Study of aattenuation of sunlight through different rock surfaces. > Study of the thermoluminescence (TL) or Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals as a function of depth. > A Cumulative Log-Normal Distribution fitting provides the most satisfactory modeling for marbles, marble schists and granites. > The new model (Cummulative Log-Norm Fitting) is applied on available data and age determination tests.

  4. A new mathematical approximation of sunlight attenuation in rocks for surface luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskaris, Nikolaos; Liritzis, Ioannis

    2011-01-01

    The attenuation of sunlight through different rock surfaces and the thermoluminescence (TL) or Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals clock resetting derived from sunlight induced eviction of electrons from electron traps, is a prerequisite criterion for potential dating. The modeling of change of residual luminescence as a function of two variables, the solar radiation path length (or depth) and exposure time offers further insight into the dating concept. The double exponential function modeling based on the Lambert-Beer law, valid under certain assumptions, constructed by a quasi-manual equation fails to offer a general and statistically sound expression of the best fit for most rock types. A cumulative log-normal distribution fitting provides a most satisfactory mathematical approximation for marbles, marble schists and granites, where absorption coefficient and residual luminescence parameters are defined per each type of rock or marble quarry. The new model is applied on available data and age determination tests. - Highlights: → Study of aattenuation of sunlight through different rock surfaces. → Study of the thermoluminescence (TL) or Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) residuals as a function of depth. → A Cumulative Log-Normal Distribution fitting provides the most satisfactory modeling for marbles, marble schists and granites. → The new model (Cummulative Log-Norm Fitting) is applied on available data and age determination tests.

  5. Alternatives to Outdoor Daylight Illumination for Photodynamic Therapy—Use of Greenhouses and Artificial Light Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, Catharina; Heerfordt, Ida M; Heydenreich, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    to photobleach protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Furthermore, we measured the amount of PpIX activating daylight available in a glass greenhouse, which can be an alternative when it is uncomfortable for patients to be outdoors. The lamps investigated were: halogen lamps (overhead and slide projector), white light...... was suitable for daylight PDT since the effect of solar light is lowered only by 25%. In conclusion, we found four of the five light sources and the greenhouse usable for indoor daylight PDT. The greenhouse is beneficial when the weather outside is rainy or windy. Only insignificant ultraviolet B radiation...

  6. Biological processes for mitigation of greenhouse gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, John R. [California Univ., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Biological processes driven by photosynthesis cycle through the atmosphere well over an order of magnitude more CO{sub 2} than is currently emitted from the combustion of fossils fuels. Already human activities control and appropriate almost half the primary photosynthetic productivity of the planet. Better management of natural and man-made ecosystems affords many opportunities for mitigation of greenhouse gases, through sink enhancements, source reduction and substitution of fossil fuels with biofuels. Biofuels can be recovered from most organic wastes, from agricultural and forestry residues, and from biomass produced solely for energy use. However, the currently low costs of fossil fuels limits the market for biofuels. Accounting for the greenhouse mitigation value of biofuels would significantly increase their contribution to world fuel suppliers, estimated to be currently equivalent to about 15% of fossil fuel usage. Another limiting factor in expanding the use of biofuels is the relatively low solar energy conversion efficiencies of photosynthesis. Currently well below 1% of solar energy is converted into biomass energy even by intensive agricultural or forestry systems, with peak conversion efficiencies about 2 to 3% for sugar cane or microalgae cultures. One approach to increase photosynthetic efficiencies, being developed at the University of California Berkeley, is to reduce the amount of light-gathering chlorophyll in microalgae and higher plants. This would reduce mutual shading and also increase photosynthetic efficiencies under full sunlight intensities. Estimates of the potential of photosynthetic greenhouse mitigation processes vary widely. However, even conservative estimates for biofuels substituting for fossil fuels project the potential to reduce a large fraction of current increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels. Biofuels production will require integration with existing agronomic, forestry and animal husbandry systems, and improved

  7. Luminescence studies of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular materials have been widely studied for their potential uses in novel semiconductor devices. They occupy the intellectually interesting area between molecular and bulk descriptions of matter, and as such often have unique and useful characteristics. The design and engineering of these structures is inter-disciplinary in its nature, embracing the fields of physics, electrical engineering and both synthetic and physical chemistry. In this thesis luminescence studies of molecular materials will be presented that probe the nature of the excited states in two promising semiconductor systems. Luminescence techniques provide a powerful and sensitive tool in the investigation of kinetic pathways of radiative and non-radiative emission from these samples. This is particularly appropriate here, as the materials being studied are of potential use in electroluminescent devices. The suitability of photoluminescence techniques comes from both the electroluminescence and photoluminescence sharing the same emitting state. The first class of material studied here is an organic semiconducting polymer, cyano-substituted polyphenylenevinylene (CN-PPV). Conjugated polymers combine semiconducting electronic properties with favourable processing properties and offer the possibility of tuning their optical and electronic properties chemically. The cyanosubstitution increases the electron affinity of the polymer backbone, facilitating electron injection in light-emitting diodes. The polymers are soluble in solvents such as toluene and chloroform due the presence of alkoxy sidegroups. CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals are the other class of material characterised in this work. Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit interesting size-tunable optical properties due to the confinement of the electronic wave functions. Characterisation of samples produced by different synthetic routes has been carried out to demonstrate the advantages of a novel synthetic method in terms of physical and

  8. Deposition of luminescent thin films for solar energy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, M.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic devices are a widely available, long lasting means of generating sustainable energy. Unfortunately, the integration of such devices into society is to date still limited. This is in part due to the much less than optimal efficiency of conversion of sunlight to electricity, but also by

  9. Application of luminescent solar concentrators as noise barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanellis, M.

    2016-01-01

    The use and cost of energy affects people more and more by the day as the global energy problem becomes more and more severe. According to forecasts, the constantly increasing population will lead to triple primary energy consumption by 2050. This means that sustainable transformations are necessary

  10. On the selection of shape and orientation of a greenhouse. Thermal modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, V.P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana 141 004, Punjab (India)

    2009-01-15

    In this study, five most commonly used single span shapes of greenhouses viz. even-span, uneven-span, vinery, modified arch and quonset type have been selected for comparison. The length, width and height (at the center) are kept same for all the selected shapes. A mathematical model for computing transmitted total solar radiation (beam, diffused and ground reflected) at each hour, for each month and at any latitude for the selected geometry greenhouses (through each wall, inclined surfaces and roofs) is developed for both east-west and north-south orientation. Computed transmitted solar radiation is then introduced in a transient thermal model developed to compute hourly inside air temperature for each shape and orientation. Experimental validation of both the models is carried out for the measured total solar radiation and inside air temperature for an east-west orientation, even-span greenhouse (for a typical day in summer) at Ludhiana (31 N and 77 E) Punjab, India. During the experimentation, capsicum crop is grown inside the greenhouse. The predicted and measured values are in close agreement. Results show that uneven-span shape greenhouse receives the maximum and quonset shape receives the minimum solar radiation during each month of the year at all latitudes. East-west orientation is the best suited for year round greenhouse applications at all latitudes as this orientation receives greater total radiation in winter and less in summer except near the equator. Results also show that inside air temperature rise depends upon the shape of the greenhouse and this variation from uneven-span shape to quonset shape is 4.6 C (maximum) and 3.5 C (daily average) at 31 N latitude. (author)

  11. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  12. Sourcebook on the greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, E.; Devine, J.

    1990-01-01

    The Greenhouse Effect Sourcebook contains information for anyone interested in the environment and the present changes which are taking place. It can be used to trace organisations, technical literature or reports. Much of the information relates to the environment in general. The sourcebook contains:- A list of Greenhouse Effect Information useful sources of information under a variety of headings:-Abstracts and indexes, books, conferences, directories, journals, official publications, online databases, (produces and hosts) and organisations, -The Greenhouse Effect References contains over 250 abstracts and details of recently published material, on a variety of environmental subjects from acid rain and aerosols to weather forecasting and wildlife. There is an author index for the references and a keyword index. (author)

  13. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  14. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamchand, S.S.; Sony, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  15. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Guilherme F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC-ZL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C{sub 2}F{sub 4}) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C{sub 2}F{sub 4} after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  16. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Guilherme F.; Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C 2 F 4 ) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C 2 F 4 after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  17. Solar cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roaf, S.; Fuentes, M.; Gupta, R.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last decade, climate change has moved from being the concern of few to a widely recognized threat to humanity itself and the natural environment. The 1990s were the warmest decade on record, and ever-increasing atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/), could, if left unchecked lead to serious consequences globally, including increased risks of droughts, floods and storms, disruption to agriculture, rising sea levels and the spread of disease. The contribution of anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide has been recognized as the principal cause of the atmospheric changes that drive these climate trends. Globally, buildings are the largest source of indirect carbon emissions. In 2000, the UK Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution estimated that in order to stabilise carbon emissions at levels, which avoid catastrophic alterations in the climate, we would have to reduce emissions from the built environment by at least 60% by 2050 and 80% by 2100 relative to 1997 levels. Studies of the Oxford Ecohouse have demonstrated that it is not difficult to reduce carbon emissions from houses by 60% or more through energy efficiency measures, but it is only possible to reach the 90% level of reductions required by using renewable energy technologies. Solar energy technologies have been the most successfully applied of all renewable to date largely because they are the only systems that can be incorporated easily into the urban fabric. In addition, the short fossil fuel horizons that are predicted (c. 40 years left for oil and 65 years for gas) will drive the markets for solar technologies. For these reasons, the cities of the future will be powered by solar energy, to a greater or lesser extent, depending on the city form and location. In recognition of the need to move rapidly towards a renewable energy future, a group of international cities, including Oxford, have started the Solar City Network. In this paper we outline the

  18. Greenhouse effect: analysis, incertitudes, consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, A.

    1991-01-01

    A general presentation of climatic changes due to greenhouse effect with their consequences is analysed. After a schematic description of this effect a simplified atmospheric model (box model) is proposed. This model integrates the main feedback effects and quantifies them. The effects of astronomic and atmospheric factors on climatic changes are analyzed and compared with classical paleoclimatic results. This study shows the need of good global modelization to evaluate long term quantification of climatic greenhouse effects according to the main time lag of the several biospheric boxes. An overview of biologic and agronomic consequences is given to promote new research subjects and to orientate protecting and conservative biospheric actions [fr

  19. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satendra Kumar; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HCIO 4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO 2 (C 6 H 5 COO) 3 ) - having D 3 h symmetry. (author)

  20. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mircea; Stere, Oana; Haiduc, Maria; Caramete, Laurentiu

    2004-01-01

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  1. Cleavage Luminescence from Cleaved Indium Phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Guang, Li

    2008-01-01

    We outline the experiments performed to gain further information about the structure and properties of cleaved InP surfaces. The experiments involved detecting the luminescence produced after cleaving thin InP plates within a high vacuum, by a process of converting the luminescence to an electrical signal which could be amplified and measured accurately. The experimental results show that the detected luminescence durations from cleaved InP are usually only about 10μs. It is believed that this time represents the time of travel of the crack with the actual recombination time being much shorter. Strong signals could also be picked up from cleaved InP in air

  2. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  3. Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindi, R.; Robert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers, application to the production of devices provided with said layers and to the construction of photoscintillators. The process comprises projecting onto a support, by cathodic sputtering, the material of at least one target, each target including silica and at least one chemical compound able to give luminescent centers, such as a cerium oxide, so as to form at least one luminescent glass layer of the said support. The layer or layers formed preferably undergo a heat treatment such as annealing in order to increase the luminous efficiency thereof. It is in this way possible to form a scintillating glass layer on the previously frosted entrance window of a photomultiplier in order to obtain an integrated photoscintillator

  4. Cerium luminescence in nd0 perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlur, A.A.; Happek, U.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of Ce 3+ in perovskite (ABO 3 ) hosts with nd 0 B-site cations, specifically Ca(Hf,Zr)O 3 and (La,Gd)ScO 3 , is investigated in this report. The energy position of the Ce 3+ excitation and emission bands in these perovskites is compared to those of typical Al 3+ perovskites; we find a Ce 3+ 5d 1 centroid shift and Stokes shift that are larger versus the corresponding values for the Al 3+ perovskites. It is also shown that Ce 3+ luminescence quenching is due to Ce 3+ photoionization. The comparison between these perovskites shows reasonable correlations between Ce 3+ luminescence quenching, the energy position of the Ce 3+ 5d 1 excited state with respect to the host conduction band, and the host composition. - Graphical abstract: Ce 3+ decay times versus temperature for perovskites with nd 0 B-site cations.

  5. Aqueous greenhouse species in clouds, fogs, and aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marley, N.A.; Gaffney, J.S.; Cunningham, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Greenhouse effects from fossil fuel combustion leading to increased concentrations of primary and secondary greenhouse gases (e.g., CO-2, ozone, etc.) have received considerable attention. More recently, it has been suggested that clouds, aerosols, and fogs can play opposing roles in climate forcing by scattering or absorbing incoming solar radiation as well as by absorbing long-wave radiation as it escapes into space. The total effect on the radiation balance depends on the relative magnitude of these opposing forces, which in turn will depend on the composition of the aqueous phase. This work describes the measurement of water-soluble infrared absorbers which can contribute to the long-wave radiative forcing of clouds, fogs, and aerosols. Aqueous species which have been characterized include sulfate, nitrate, formate, acetate, oxalate, phenol, p-nitrophenol, ammonium, bicarbonate, formaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. Infrared absorption band positions and band strengths have been determined, and their relative effects on radiative forcing are discussed

  6. Solar Indices - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  7. Solar Indices - Solar Ultraviolet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  8. Solar Indices - Solar Corona

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  9. Solar Indices - Solar Irradiance

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Collection includes a variety of indices related to solar activity contributed by a number of national and private solar observatories located worldwide. This...

  10. Steps toward a cooler greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    In April a committee of the National Academies of Science and Engineering and the Institute of Medicine urged the Bush Administration and Congress to begin cutting emissions of greenhouse gases immediately. The risk of delay is great, and the cost of insurance against disastrous climate warming is cheap. Now the committee's panel on mitigation has issued a 500-page report describing just how cheap that hedge against a climate calamity could be. The panel found that it would not be unreasonable to expect that a 25% reduction in US greenhouse gas emissions might be achieved at a cost of less than $10 per ton of carbon dioxide or its equivalent in other greenhouse gases. In more familiar terms, that considerable reduction in greenhouse emissions would cost about $4.75 for each barrel of oil burned or $0.11 per gallon of gasoline. The most cost-effective measures for reducing emissions, are increasing the energy efficiency of residential and commercial buildings and activities, vehicles, and industrial processes that use electricity

  11. Irrigation management in organic greenhouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, W.; Balendonck, J.; Berkelmans, R.; Enthoven, N.

    2017-01-01

    Irrigation in protected cultivation is essential due to the absence of natural precipitation. High evapotranspiration, due to higher temperature and prolonged cropping period, requires ample an adequate supply of water. The water supply in a greenhouse is solely carried out by irrigation and thus

  12. The Living Rainforest Sustainable Greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, G.P.A.; Zwart, de H.F.; Hansen, K.; Logan, A.; Witte Groenholland, H.

    2008-01-01

    The Living Rainforest (www.livingrainforest.org) is an educational charity that uses rainforest ecology as a metaphor for communicating general sustainability issues to the public. Its greenhouses and office buildings are to be renovated using the most sustainable methods currently available. This

  13. A need for greenhouse geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaak, F

    1991-12-01

    As regards the greenhouse issue, research has reached the frontiers of present-day scientific knowledge and understanding. Earth scientists, especially geologists could provide extra input, for example from studies of the sun's energy activity; by providing data on CO{sub 2} storage in the oceans and coral reefs; and on the climatic effect of volcanic activity.

  14. The Peculiar Negative Greenhouse Effect Over Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sejas, S.; Taylor, P. C.; Cai, M.

    2017-12-01

    Greenhouse gases warm the climate system by reducing the energy loss to space through the greenhouse effect. Thus, a common way to measure the strength of the greenhouse effect is by taking the difference between the surface longwave (LW) emission and the outgoing LW radiation. Based on this definition, a paradoxical negative greenhouse effect is found over the Antarctic Plateau, which suprisingly indicates that greenhouse gases enhance energy loss to space. Using 13 years of NASA satellite observations, we verify the existence of the negative greenhouse effect and find that the magnitude and sign of the greenhouse effect varies seasonally and spectrally. A previous explanation attributes the negative greenhouse effect solely to stratospheric CO2 and warmer than surface stratospheric temperatures. However, we surprisingly find that the negative greenhouse effect is predominantly caused by tropospheric water vapor. A novel principle-based explanation provides the first complete account of the Antarctic Plateau's negative greenhouse effect indicating that it is controlled by the vertical variation of temperature and greenhouse gas absorption strength. Our findings indicate that the strong surface-based temperature inversion and scarcity of free tropospheric water vapor over the Antarctic Plateau cause the negative greenhouse effect. These are climatological features uniquely found in the Antarctic Plateau region, explaining why the greenhouse effect is positive everywhere else.

  15. Investigating the Effect of a North Wall on Energy Consumption of an East–West Oriented Single Span Greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Ghasemi Mobtaker

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Greenhouse is a structure which provides the best condition for the maximum plants growth during the cold seasons. In cold climate zones such as Tabriz province, Iran, the greenhouse heating is one of the most energy consumers. It has been estimated that the greenhouse heating cost is attributed up to 30% of the total operational costs of the greenhouses. Renewable energy resources are clean alternatives that can be used in greenhouse heating. Among the renewable energy resources, solar energy has the highest potential around the world. In this regard, application of solar energy in greenhouse heating during the cold months of a year could be considerable. The rate of thermal energy required inside the greenhouse depends on the solar radiation received inside the greenhouse. Using a north brick wall in an east-west oriented greenhouse can increase the absorption of solar radiation and consequently reduces the thermal and radiation losses. Therefore, the main objective of the present study is to investigate the effect of implementing of a north wall on the solar radiation absorption and energy consumption of an east-west oriented single span greenhouse in Tabriz. Materials and Methods This study was carried out in Tabriz and a steady state analysis was used to predict the energy consumption of a single span greenhouse. For this purpose, thermal energy balance equations for different components of the greenhouse including the soil layer, internal air and plants were presented. For investigating the effect of the north wall on the energy consumption, the Ft and Fn parameters were used to calculate the radiation loss from the walls of the greenhouses. These factors were determined using a 3D–shadow analysis by Auto–CAD software. An east-west oriented single span greenhouse which has a north brick wall and is covered with a single glass sheet with 4 mm thickness was applied to validate the developed models. The measurements were

  16. Thermal modeling of the forced convection Sandwich Greenhouse drying system for rubber sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanwanichkul, B.; Thepa, S.; Rordprapat, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Sandwich Greenhouse is designed for better quality and efficiency of rubber sheet drying. • Thermal models are developed to predict the convection heat transfer coefficient. • The models are validated and show good agreement with the actual experimental data. • The proposed greenhouse can maintain 40–60 °C, suitable for rubber sheet drying. • This greenhouse can bring down the moisture content to 2.8% in fewer than 2 days. - Abstract: In this paper, a novel “Sandwich Greenhouse” for rubber sheet drying is proposed. Using solar energy as the only heat source instead of traditional smoke house that requires firewood, it eliminates shortcomings such as skilled labor monitoring requirement, possible fire hazard, and darken-color rubber sheets due to soot particle contamination. Our greenhouse is specially designed to retain solar energy within, while minimizing the heat loss to the outside environment. The mathematical models are developed to predict the convection mass transfer coefficient and to study the thermal behavior during the drying of rubber sheets under our proposed greenhouse design. Validated with experimental observations, the models show good agreement with the actual experimental data. The experiment demonstrates an effectiveness of our proposed Sandwich Greenhouse, as the temperature of the rubber sheet is 15 °C and 5 °C higher than the ambient temperature during the daytime and nighttime, respectively. As a result, the moisture content of the rubber sheets can decrease from 36.4% to 2.8% in fewer than 2 days

  17. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    , which display very different behaviour. The first involves the internal transitions of common transition metal ions. The second is typical of centres not displaying excited states within the band gap that are likely to arise from direct recombination between the conduction band and the ground state......The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...

  18. Accounting for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nearly three decades of research has demonstrated that the impoundment of rivers and the flooding of terrestrial ecosystems behind dams can increase rates of greenhouse gas emission, particularly methane. The 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories includes ...

  19. The Greenhouse Effect: Science and Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses many of the scientific questions surrounding the greenhouse effect debate and the issue of plausible responses. Discussion includes topics concerning projecting emissions and greenhouse gas concentrations, estimating global climatic response, economic, social, and political impacts, and policy responses. (RT)

  20. London mobilizes against greenhouse effect; Londres se mobilise contre l'effet de serre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiret, M.

    2005-01-15

    Great Britain has taken up the bet of new technologies to fight against the greenhouse effect: a national energy research center will coordinate the research on fuel cells, carbon sequestration, wave power, solar energy, hydrogen storage, lithium batteries etc.. A study has been examined by the government. Short paper. (J.S.)

  1. Watergy: Infrastructure for Process Control in a Closed Greenhouse in Semi-arid Regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.J.J.; Gieling, T.H.; Speetjens, S.L.; Stigter, J.D.; Straten, van G.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A novel solar humid-air-collector system for combined water treatment, space-cooling and ¿heating has been designed in an EU framework-5 financed project called Watergy. The design consists of a construction of two prototypes for applications in architecture and greenhouse horticulture: a

  2. Greenhouse gas emissions increase global warming

    OpenAIRE

    Mohajan, Haradhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the greenhouse gas emissions which cause the global warming in the atmosphere. In the 20th century global climate change becomes more sever which is due to greenhouse gas emissions. According to International Energy Agency data, the USA and China are approximately tied and leading global emitters of greenhouse gas emissions. Together they emit approximately 40% of global CO2 emissions, and about 35% of total greenhouse gases. The developed and developing industrialized co...

  3. A 2nd generation static model of greenhouse energy requirements (horticern) : a comparison with dynamic models

    CERN Document Server

    Jolliet, O; Munday, G L

    1989-01-01

    Optimisation of a greenhouse and its components requires a suitable model permitting precise determination of its energy requirements. Existing static models are simple but lack precision; dynamic models though more precise, are unsuitable for use over long periods and difficult to handle in practice. A theoretical study and measurements from the CERN trial greenhouse have allowed the development of new static model named "HORTICERN", precise and easy to use for predicting energy consumption and which takes into account effects of solar energy, wind and radiative loss to the sky. This paper compares the HORTICERN model with the dynamic models of Bot, Takakura, Van Bavel and Gembloux, and demonstrates that its precision is comparable; differences on average being less than 5%, it is independent of type of greenhouse (e.g. single or double glazing, Hortiplus, etc.) and climate. The HORTICERN method has been developed for PC use and is proving to be a powerful tool for greenhouse optimisation by research work...

  4. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  5. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusswig, Philip D; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Bawendi, Moungi G; Baldo, Marc A; Rotschild, Carmel

    2015-10-05

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd(3+)-doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CW solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm(-2), or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns.

  6. A path to practical Solar Pumped Lasers via Radiative Energy Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusswig, Philip D.; Nechayev, Sergey; Scherer, Jennifer M.; Hwang, Gyu Weon; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Baldo, Marc. A.; Rotschild, Carmel

    2015-01-01

    The optical conversion of incoherent solar radiation into a bright, coherent laser beam enables the application of nonlinear optics to solar energy conversion and storage. Here, we present an architecture for solar pumped lasers that uses a luminescent solar concentrator to decouple the conventional trade-off between solar absorption efficiency and the mode volume of the optical gain material. We report a 750-μm-thick Nd3+-doped YAG planar waveguide sensitized by a luminescent CdSe/CdZnS (core/shell) colloidal nanocrystal, yielding a peak cascade energy transfer of 14%, a broad spectral response in the visible portion of the solar spectrum, and an equivalent quasi-CW solar lasing threshold of 23 W-cm−2, or approximately 230 suns. The efficient coupling of incoherent, spectrally broad sunlight in small gain volumes should allow the generation of coherent laser light from intensities of less than 100 suns. PMID:26434400

  7. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with lead chalcogenides molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobkova, E.V.; Kukushkin, D.S.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Shakhverdov, T.A.; Sidorov, A.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophosphate glasses containing lead, selenium, and sulfur exhibit an intense luminescence in the 400–620 nm spectral region when excited by the 240–420 nm radiation. This luminescence is due to the presence of (PbSe) n and/or (PbS) n molecular clusters in the glasses, which appear in the as-prepared glasses before quantum dots formation. The thermal treatment at temperatures less than the glass transition temperature results in the red-shift of the luminescence bands and in an increase in the luminescence intensity. Heating the thermally treated glass samples leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence. - Highlights: • Fluorophosphate glasses with Pb, Se, and S ions contain (PbSe) n or (PbS) n molecular clusters. • (PbSe) n and (PbS) n molecular clusters possess luminescence in the visible with UV excitation. • Heating the glass leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence

  8. The Greenhouse Effect and Built Environment Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenall Gough, Annette; Gough, Noel

    The greenhouse effect has always existed. Without the greenhouse effect, Earth could well have the oven-like environment of Venus or the deep-freeze environment of Mars. There is some debate about how much the Earth's surface temperature will rise given a certain amount of increase in the amount of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, nitrous…

  9. A validated physical model of greenhouse climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bot, G.P.A.

    1989-01-01

    In the greenhouse model the momentaneous environmental crop growth factors are calculated as output, together with the physical behaviour of the crop. The boundary conditions for this model are the outside weather conditions; other inputs are the physical characteristics of the crop, of the greenhouse and of the control system. The greenhouse model is based on the energy, water vapour and CO 2 balances of the crop-greenhouse system. While the emphasis is on the dynamic behaviour of the greenhouse for implementation in continuous optimization, the state variables temperature, water vapour pressure and carbondioxide concentration in the relevant greenhouse parts crop, air, soil and cover are calculated from the balances over these parts. To do this in a proper way, the physical exchange processes between the system parts have to be quantified first. Therefore the greenhouse model is constructed from submodels describing these processes: a. Radiation transmission model for the modification of the outside to the inside global radiation. b. Ventilation model to describe the ventilation exchange between greenhouse and outside air. c. The description of the exchange of energy and mass between the crop and the greenhouse air. d. Calculation of the thermal radiation exchange between the various greenhouse parts. e. Quantification of the convective exchange processes between the greenhouse air and respectively the cover, the heating pipes and the soil surface and between the cover and the outside air. f. Determination of the heat conduction in the soil. The various submodels are validated first and then the complete greenhouse model is verified

  10. Crossing the chasm in Dutch greenhouse horticulture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurma, J.S.; Smit, P.X.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch greenhouse horticulture has an innovation and development programme called 'Kas als Energiebron' (Greenhouse as Energy Producer). The objective of this programme is reducing the carbon footprint and improving the energy efficiency of greenhouse horticulture, and developing a climate neutral

  11. Using waste oil to heat a greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marla Schwartz

    2009-01-01

    During the winter of 1990, Northwoods Nursery (Elk River, ID) purchased a wood-burning system to heat the current greenhouses. This system burned slabs of wood to heat water that was then pumped into the greenhouses. The winter of 1990 was extremely harsh, requiring non-stop operation of the heating system. In order to keep seedlings in the greenhouse from freezing,...

  12. Recent advances in enhanced luminescence upconversion of lanthanide-doped NaYF4 phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Verma, Kartikey; Verma, Shefali; Chaudhary, Babulal; Som, Sudipta; Sharma, Vishal; Kumar, Vijay; Swart, Hendrik C.

    2018-04-01

    NaYF4 is regarded as the best upconversion (UC) matrix owing to its low phonon energy, more chemical stability, and a superior refractive index. This review reports on the various synthesis techniques of lanthanide-doped NaYF4 phosphors for UC application. The UC intensity depends on different properties of the matrix and those are discussed in detail. Plasmon-enhanced luminescence UC of the lanthanide-doped NaYF4 core-shells structure is discussed based on a literature survey. The present review provides the information about how the UC intensity can be enhanced. The idea about the UC is then deliberately used for versatile applications such as luminescent materials, display devices, biomedical imaging and different security appliances. In addition, the present review demonstrates the recent trends of NaYF4 UC materials in solar cell devices. The role of NaYF4 phosphor to eradicate the spectral variance among the incident solar spectrum, semiconductor as well as the sub-band gap nature of the semiconductor materials is also discussed in detail. Considering the fact that the research status on NaYF4 phosphor for photovoltaic application is now growing, the present review is therefore very important to the researchers. More importantly, this may promote more interesting research platforms to investigate the realistic use of UC nanophosphors as spectral converters for solar cells.

  13. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ramos, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films. (paper)

  14. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Researches of rare-earth-doped upconversion (UC) materials as fluorescent labels, temperature-sensing probes, solid-state lasers and new generation television screens have recently started to be considered1,2 due to their enhanced luminescent properties induced by the small size. UC process is the gener-.

  15. Holographic patterning of luminescent photopolymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhno, Oksana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana N.; Goldenberg, Leonid M.; Stumpe, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Volume phase gratings in the photopolymerisable composites, containing luminescent nanoparticles have been fabricated for the first time. Nanoparticles of LaPO 4 , doped by Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ ions (the trade name is REN-X-green) with high luminescence quantum yield were used as a luminescent inorganic additive. The holographic gratings in such materials are formed as a result of the diffusion distribution of the nanoparticles during exposure of photopolymerisable composites to interference pattern. The influence of the pre-polymer formulation and the holographic patterning parameters on the grating formation is comprehensively investigated. The use of the optimised pre-polymer syrup containing two monomers with sufficiently different polymerisation rates allows fabrication of gratings with diffraction efficiency up to 80% at low optical losses (< 5%) (20 μm film thickness). To obtain maximum diffraction efficiency the intensity and the period of the interference pattern were optimised for each formulation. In addition maximum diffraction efficiency was achieved with the nanocomposites containing 30-32 wt.% of nanoparticles. On the other hand the highest possible modulation of the nanoparticles' concentration was obtained for the concentration of about 20 wt.%. In this case maximum ordering of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix is achieved. The photoluminescence of the nanoparticles within the homogeneous polymer film and within the grating has been measured. The example application of the photopolymerisable composite containing luminescence inorganic nanoparticles in holographic security technology has been demonstrated

  16. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  17. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  18. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polycrystalline sample of LiBaPO4 : Tb3+ (LBPT) was successfully synthesized by solution combustion synthesis and studied for its luminescence characteristics. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of LBPT material consists of two peaks at 204.54 and 251.21°C. The optimum concentration was 0.005 mol to ...

  19. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [ 14 C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [ 14 C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [ 14 C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  20. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... light: strong green (539 nm), weak red (670 nm) and near-infrared (760 nm). The upconversion luminescence is based on two-photon absorption by the energy transfer from the donor (Yb3+) to the acceptor (Ho3+). All the results indicate that ZrO2:Yb3+-Ho3+ phosphors could be a promising biological labelling material.

  1. Luminescence of porous silicon doped by erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.P.; Vorozov, N.N.; Dolgij, L.N.; Dorofeev, A.M.; Kazyuchits, N.M.; Leshok, A.A.; Troyanova, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of the 1.54 μm intensive luminescence in the silicon dense porous layers, doped by erbium, with various structures is shown. Low-porous materials of both porous type on the p-type silicon and porous silicon with wood-like structure on the n + type silicon may be used for formation of light-emitting structures

  2. Effect of noble gases on an atmospheric greenhouse /Titan/.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, R.; Owen, T.

    1973-01-01

    Several models for the atmosphere of Titan have been investigated, taking into account various combinations of neon and argon. The investigation shows that the addition of large amounts of Ne and/or Ar will substantially reduce the hydrogen abundance required for a given greenhouse effect. The fact that a large amount of neon should be present if the atmosphere is a relic of the solar nebula is an especially attractive feature of the models, because it is hard to justify appropriate abundances of other enhancing agents.

  3. A space parasol as a countermeasure against the greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    It is suggested that the deployment of a 'space parasol' at the L1 Langrangian point of the earth-sun system would serve to intercept some desired fraction of the solar radiant energy, thereby lessening the impact of the greenhouse effect. The parasol satellites are described and possible orbit configurations are discussed. Orbital possibilities include Low Earth Orbit, Geosynchronous orbit, and L1 which appears to be the best option. Structural strength, control, and use of extraterrestrial material in the construction of the parasol are discussed.

  4. 75 FR 57669 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action amends the Final Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Rule to require reporters... Numbers GHG greenhouse gas GHGRP Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program HCFC hydrochlorofluorocarbon HFC...

  5. Organic fertigation for greenhouse crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pokhrel, Bhaniswor

    2017-01-01

    productivity is suboptimal nutrient management resulting from poor synchronization between crop nutrient demand and nutrient release from organic fertilizers, affecting the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the root zone environment, and thus plant growth and productivity. Compared to solid...... organic fertilizers, the application of liquid organic fertilizers potentially more accurately addresses the nutrient demand, because nutrients are readily available and different fertilizers are easily mixed. This PhD work explores the possibilities and challenges related to the application of liquid...... organic fertilizers in organic greenhouse crop production. Four greenhouse experiments were designed where different liquid organic fertilizers were prepared: acidic extraction or anaerobic digestion of red clover and white mustard silage, water extraction of composted chicken manure and flushing...

  6. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  7. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hong [Los Alamos, NM; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos, NM; Keller, Richard A [Los Alamos, NM; Nolan, Rhiannon L [Santa Fe, NM

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  8. Greenhouse effects of aircraft emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortuin, J.P.F.; Wauben, W.M.F.; Dorland, R. van; Kelder, H.

    1996-01-01

    Ranges for direct and indirect greenhouse effects due to present day aircraft emissions are quantified for northern midlatitudes, using the concept of fixed temperature (FT) radiative forcing as calculated with a radiative transfer model. The direct greenhouse effects considered here are from emissions of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrogen dioxide. To calculate the concentration increases of carbon dioxide and stratospheric water vapor, an analytical expression is developed based on a linear approximation of global fuel burn versus time. Unlike the expressions currently used in the literature, the authors' expression does not account for emission rates only, but also for a loss term--hence making it more suitable for shorter lived emittants. For midlatitude summer conditions, a total radiative forcing ranging from 0.04 to 0.09 Wm -2 is calculated for the direct greenhouse effects, whereas for midlatitude winter the range is 0.07 to 0.26 Wm -2 . The indirect greenhouse effects considered here are sulfate aerosol formation from sulfur dioxide emissions, contrail formation from emitted water vapor and condensation nuclei, and ozone formation from NO x emissions. The total radiative forcing coming from these indirect effects range from -0.67 to 0.25 Wm -2 in summer a/nd from -0.36 to 0.21 Wm -2 in winter. Further, the global distribution of NO x and ozone increases from aircraft emissions world-wide are simulated with a three-dimensional chemistry transport model for January and July. The geographical distribution of the radiative forcing associated with the simulated ozone increases is also calculated for these months

  9. Greenhouse effect: doubts and unknowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabarelli, D.

    1992-01-01

    There are few doubts today in the scientific world that atmospheric carbon dioxide traps in heat and therefore contributes to global warming; however, it is yet uncertain as to whether the presence of this gas in the upper atmosphere is the only cause of the greenhouse effect, and the scientific theories defining the effect and its causes present a few obvious and significant gaps. This paper cites the fact that most greenhouse effect models only marginally, if at all, consider the mechanisms governing the formation and absorption of carbon dioxide by the earth's oceans; yet oceanic CO 2 concentration levels are about 60 times greater than those found in the atmosphere, and they depend on complex interactions, in seawater, among such factors as currents, carbon oxygenation, and vegetative activity. Another area of weakness in greenhouse effect modelling stems from the complexity and uncertainty introduced by the fact that, in addition to trapping heat, clouds reflect it, thus giving rise to an opposite cooling effect. In addition, it is pointed out that the current models are limited to predicting global and not regional or local effects

  10. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  11. Conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of Alq3 prepared by gas-phase molecular layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räupke, André; Albrecht, Fabian; Maibach, Julia; Behrendt, Andreas; Polywka, Andreas; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Helzel, Jonatan; Rabe, Torsten; Johannes, Hans-Hermann; Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Mankel, Eric; Mayer, Thomas; Görrn, Patrick; Riedl, Thomas

    2014-01-22

    The gas-phase molecular layer deposition (MLD) of conformal and highly luminescent monolayers of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) is reported. The controlled formation of Alq3 monolayers is achieved for the first time by functionalization of the substrate with amino groups, which serve as initial docking sites for trimethyl aluminum (TMA) molecules binding datively to the amine. Thereby, upon exposure to 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ), the self-limiting formation of highly luminescent Alq3 monolayers is afforded. The growth process and monolayer formation were studied and verified by in situ quartz crystal monitoring, optical emission and absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The nature of the MLD process provides an avenue to coat arbitrarily shaped 3D surfaces and porous structures with high surface areas, as demonstrated in this work for silica aerogels. The concept presented here paves the way to highly sensitive luminescent sensors and dye-sensitized metal oxides for future applications (e.g., in photocatalysis and solar cells).

  12. Solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This chapter discusses the role solar energy may have in the energy future of the US. The topics discussed in the chapter include the solar resource, solar architecture including passive solar design and solar collectors, solar-thermal concentrating systems including parabolic troughs and dishes and central receivers, photovoltaic cells including photovoltaic systems for home use, and environmental, health and safety issues

  13. A 2nd generation static model for predicting greenhouse energy inputs, as an aid for production planning

    CERN Document Server

    Jolliet, O; Munday, G L

    1985-01-01

    A model which allows accurate prediction of energy consumption of a greenhouse is a useful tool for production planning and optimisation of greenhouse components. To date two types of model have been developed; some very simple models of low precision, others, precise dynamic models unsuitable for employment over long periods and too complex for use in practice. A theoretical study and measurements at the CERN trial greenhouse have allowed development of a new static model named "HORTICERN", easy to use and as precise as more complex dynamic models. This paper demonstrates the potential of this model for long-term production planning. The model gives precise predictions of energy consumption when given greenhouse conditions of use (inside temperatures, dehumidification by ventilation, …) and takes into account local climatic conditions (wind radiative losses to the sky and solar gains), type of greenhouse (cladding, thermal screen …). The HORTICERN method has been developed for PC use and requires less...

  14. Greenhouse Module for Space System: A Lunar Greenhouse Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeidler Conrad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the next 10 to 20 years humankind will return to the Moon and/or travel to Mars. It is likely that astronauts will eventually build permanent settlements there, as a base for long-term crew tended research tasks. It is obvious that the crew of such settlements will need food to survive. With current mission architectures the provision of food for longduration missions away from Earth requires a significant number of resupply flights. Furthermore, it would be infeasible to provide the crew with continuous access to fresh produce, specifically crops with high water content such as tomatoes and peppers, on account of their limited shelf life. A greenhouse as an integrated part of a planetary surface base would be one solution to solve this challenge for long-duration missions. Astronauts could grow their own fresh fruit and vegetables in-situ to be more independent from supply from Earth. This paper presents the results of the design project for such a greenhouse, which was carried out by DLR and its partners within the framework of the Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA program. The consortium performed an extensive system analysis followed by a definition of system and subsystem requirements for greenhouse modules. Over 270 requirements were defined in this process. Afterwards the consortium performed an in-depth analysis of illumination strategies, potential growth accommodations and shapes for the external structure. Five different options for the outer shape were investigated, each of them with a set of possible internal configurations. Using the Analytical Hierarchy Process, the different concept options were evaluated and ranked against each other. The design option with the highest ranking was an inflatable outer structure with a rigid inner core, in which the subsystems are mounted. The inflatable shell is wrapped around the core during launch and transit to the lunar surface. The paper provides an overview of the

  15. The runaway greenhouse: implications for future climate change, geoengineering and planetary atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldblatt, Colin; Watson, Andrew J

    2012-09-13

    The ultimate climate emergency is a 'runaway greenhouse': a hot and water-vapour-rich atmosphere limits the emission of thermal radiation to space, causing runaway warming. Warming ceases only after the surface reaches approximately 1400 K and emits radiation in the near-infrared, where water is not a good greenhouse gas. This would evaporate the entire ocean and exterminate all planetary life. Venus experienced a runaway greenhouse in the past, and we expect that the Earth will in around 2 billion years as solar luminosity increases. But could we bring on such a catastrophe prematurely, by our current climate-altering activities? Here, we review what is known about the runaway greenhouse to answer this question, describing the various limits on outgoing radiation and how climate will evolve between these. The good news is that almost all lines of evidence lead us to believe that is unlikely to be possible, even in principle, to trigger full a runaway greenhouse by addition of non-condensible greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. However, our understanding of the dynamics, thermodynamics, radiative transfer and cloud physics of hot and steamy atmospheres is weak. We cannot therefore completely rule out the possibility that human actions might cause a transition, if not to full runaway, then at least to a much warmer climate state than the present one. High climate sensitivity might provide a warning. If we, or more likely our remote descendants, are threatened with a runaway greenhouse, then geoengineering to reflect sunlight might be life's only hope. Injecting reflective aerosols into the stratosphere would be too short-lived, and even sunshades in space might require excessive maintenance. In the distant future, modifying Earth's orbit might provide a sustainable solution. The runaway greenhouse also remains relevant in planetary sciences and astrobiology: as extrasolar planets smaller and nearer to their stars are detected, some will be in

  16. Computer control of the greenhouse climate - an introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreasson, I; Stroem, K

    1983-01-01

    A typical greenhouse has, compared to other kinds of buildings, a rather low thermal mass, rather bad insulation and it acts as a solar collector during a hot day. The dynamical behaviour of the greenhouse, when it is heated, is influenced by that kind of heating system which is in use, i.e. hot air heating compared to water pipe heating. In the water pipe system a lot of heat is stored in the pipes. The ventilation rate is strongly dependent on the wind speed and the direction of the wind. This causes problems with regard to the control of the ventilation windows. The introduction of computers for controlling the greenhouse environment raises possibilities of a totally new development in this field. In the computer several functions, earlier separated, can be integrated, i.e. heating, ventilation, water, CO/sub 2/-enrichment, shading, light a.s.o. More complicated control algorithms can be used as the software is easy to modify. The capability of the computer to process information makes it possible, at least to some degree, to optimize the crop yield depending on how much resources that are consumed, i.e. energy. Intense research all over the world opens new areas, due to new sensor constructions. An interesting field is the hydropond growing of plants.

  17. Conference on energy-conserving, solar-heated greenhouses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, J.; Gillett, D. (eds.)

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five papers were included. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty and five were listed by title. Introductory and closing letters and the welcome and keynote addresses were not abstracted. (MHR)

  18. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Solar Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently led the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Harmonization Project, a study that helps to clarify inconsistent and conflicting life cycle GHG emission estimates in the published literature and provide more precise estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from PV systems.

  19. Design and Concept of an Energy System Based on Renewable Sources for Greenhouse Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Aschilean

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Bio-organic greenhouses that are based on alternative resources for producing heat and electricity stand out as an efficient option for the sustainable development of agriculture, thus ensuring good growth and development of plants in all seasons, especially during the cold season. Greenhouses can be used with maximum efficiency in various agricultural lands, providing ideal conditions of temperature and humidity for short-term plant growing, thereby increasing the local production of fruit and vegetables. This paper presents the development of a durable greenhouse concept that is based on complex energy system integrating fuel cells and solar panels. Approaching this innovative concept encountered a major problem in terms of local implementation of this type of greenhouses because of the difficulty in providing electrical and thermal energy from conventional sources to ensure an optimal climate for plant growing. The project result consists in the design and implementation of a sustainable greenhouse energy system that is based on fuel cells and solar panels.

  20. Development of Inorganic Solar Cells by Nano-technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei Zhang; HueyLiang Hwang; Huijuan Geng; Zhihua Zhou; Jiang Wu; Zhiming Wang; Yaozhong Zhang; Zhongli Li; Liying Zhang; Zhi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic solar cells, as durable photovoltaic devices for harvesting electric energy from sun light, have received tremendous attention due to the fear of exhausting the earth’s energy resources and damaging the living environment due to greenhouse gases. Some recent developments in nanotechnology have opened up new avenues for more relevant inorganic solar cells produced by new photovoltaic conversion concepts and effective solar energy harvesting nanostructures. In this review, the multiple exciton generation effect solar cells, hot carrier solar cells, one dimensional material constructed asymmetrical schottky barrier arrays, noble nanoparticle induced plasmonic enhancement, and light trapping nanostructured semiconductor solar cells are highlighted.

  1. Measuring the greenhouse effect and radiative forcing through the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipona, Rolf; Kräuchi, Andreas; Brocard, Emmanuel

    2013-04-01

    In spite of a large body of existing measurements of incoming shortwave solar radiation and outgoing longwave terrestrial radiation at the Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere, there are few observations documenting how radiation profiles change through the atmosphere - information that is necessary to fully quantify the greenhouse effect of the Earth's atmosphere. Using weather balloons and specific radiometer equipped radiosondes, we continuously measured shortwave and longwave radiation fluxes from the surface of the Earth up to altitudes of 35 kilometers in the upper stratosphere. Comparing radiation profiles from night measurements with different amounts of water vapor, we show evidence of large greenhouse forcing. We show, that under cloud free conditions, water vapor increases with Clausius-Clapeyron ( 7% / K), and longwave downward radiation at the surface increases by 8 Watts per square meter per Kelvin. The longwave net radiation however, shows a positive increase (downward) of 2.4 Watts per square meter and Kelvin at the surface, which decreases with height and shows a similar but negative increase (upward) at the tropopause. Hence, increased tropospheric water vapor increases longwave net radiation towards the ground and towards space, and produces a heating of 0.42 Kelvin per Watt per square meter at the surface. References: Philipona et al., 2012: Solar and thermal radiation profiles and radiative forcing measured through the atmosphere. Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L13806, doi: 10.1029/2012GL052087.

  2. The Contribution of Electricity Generation to Greenhouse Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, Erwansyah

    2008-01-01

    The development activities has successfully increasing the human kind, but also has increasing trend the planet changes radically, because of the greenhouse effect (GHE), decreasing ozone layer and acid rain, that all could treat the living of the species-species and including man inside. The electricity generation and transportation are the main contribution of greenhouse gas (GHG), reaching 1/3 of global emission. Base on the Kyoto protocol in 1997, that all countries, alone or together agree to reduce the emission of GG of 5.2 % under the emission of the 1990. The decreasing of GHG could be reached by implementing the technology generation that contain low carbon, such a natural gas, hydro power, wind, solar and nuclear power. Diversification of electricity generation has to take into a count of environmental capacity, so the supply stability and sustainable development could be reached. The IAEA results studies indicated that the emission factor of fossil fuel 2 times greater compare to the natural gas. The emission factor of wind and biomass lie between solar and nuclear power. In the electricity generation chain, nuclear power emit the 25 g of CO 2 /kWh compare to fossil fuel emit 250 - 1250 g CO 2 /kWh. (author)

  3. Luminescent amine sensor based on europium(III) chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochenkova, Nataliya V; Mirochnik, Anatolii G; Emelina, Tatyana B; Sergeev, Alexander A; Leonov, Andrei A; Voznesenskii, Sergey S

    2018-07-05

    The effect of methylamine vapor on luminescence of Eu(III) tris-benzoylacetonate (I) immobilized in thin-layer chromatography plates has been investigated. It has been revealed that interaction of I with analyte vapor results in increase of the intensity of Eu(III) luminescence. The mechanism of the effect of methylamine vapors on intensification of the Eu(III) luminescence has been suggested using the data of IR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. The mechanism of luminescence sensitization consists in bonding of an analyte molecule with a water molecule into the coordination sphere of Eu(III). As a result, the bond of a water molecule with the luminescence centre weakens, rigid structural fragment including europium ion, water and methylamine molecules forms. The presence of such fragment must naturally promote decrease of influence of OH-vibrations on luminescence of the complex I. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Microclimatic changes caused by different plastic coverings in greenhouses cultivated with cherry tomato in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Holcman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In regions with intense solar radiation it is common the use of aluminated covers in greenhouses, with the aim of reducing the inside temperature. However, the use of these covers reduces photosynthetic active radiation (PAR transmitted into the greenhouse. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different covers on microclimate in greenhouses cultivated with cherry tomato during three growing seasons. The environment I was covered with plastic film anti-UV and with thermo-reflective screen (40% disposed internally. The environment II was covered with diffusive plastic film (55%. The transmitted solar radiation to the interior of covered environments was, on average, 5.5 MJ m-2 day-1 in the environment I and 8.2 MJ m-2 day-1 in environment II. The air temperature in environment II was, on average, 1°C higher than external conditions. The highest difference for the relative humidity (RH was also observed between environment II and the outside conditions, with 10.7% for the minimum RH during the first growing period. Considering all growing periods, the diffusive plastic film provided higher solar energy availability inside the greenhouse than the plastic film with thermo-reflective screen, without causing major changes in air temperature and relative humidity, and promoting greater productivity of tomato grown under this environment for the three periods evaluated.

  5. The Semitransparent Photovoltaic Films for Mediterranean Greenhouse: A New Sustainable Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Marucci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean countries offer very favorable climatic conditions for growing plants in a protected environment: as a matter of fact, the high solar radiation allows the use of greenhouses with simple structures, covered with plastic film and without fixed installations for winter heating. They are called “Mediterranean greenhouses” and are totally different from those in Central and Northern Europe. In the photovoltaic greenhouses, the cover on the pitch facing south is usually replaced by very opaque panels. However, this solution compromises the possibility to grow plants in covered and protected environments since solar radiation availability is limited and strongly nonuniform. In order to overcome this problem, semitransparent photovoltaic materials can be used to let the solar energy, necessary for plant growth, pass into the green house. The aim of this research is to analyze the radiometric properties of innovative semitransparent flexible photovoltaic materials in order to evaluate their performances in comparison with materials commonly used in the coverage of the greenhouses. Particular attention is paid to the transmittance of these materials in the visible range and in the long wave infrared for the achievement of greenhouse effect.

  6. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron-induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well-known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years at Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one-year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix. 4 refs., 10 figs

  7. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    ), this facility has been used to measure natural doses in feldspar using the decaying NIR RL signal.Secondly, we present a method for mapping radiation field of the built-in 90Sr/90Y β-source and estimating grain-location specific dose-rates. This is important for the accuracy of single grain results, when......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non...... radiation field is spatially non-uniform across the sample area. We document the effect of this correction method and further investigate on the effect of lifting the source to achieve a better dose-rate uniformity.Finally we summarise two recently-developed novel facilities to help investigate (i) the time...

  9. The double luminescence of Color Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An experiment on the luminescence of Color Centers (CCs) carried out in 1987 at the ENEA Laboratories in Frascati had a negative result, but subsequent investigations showed that it was not a failure but rather a discovery of a new phenomenon. Since the coming of lasers, CCs in alkali halides have been successfully used as optically active materials, in particular FA Centers. One of these centers, well known for its medium infrared laser emission at 77 K, cooled further to 2 K emitted in the near infrared and without laser effect. Further investigations showed that the double luminescence was a fundamental property unknown until that time. This important discovery was achieved in Frascati because of the existence since 1973 of a solid and extensive expertise in the field of CCs, which continued over time and later on applied to the modern miniaturized photonic devices [it

  10. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  11. Upconversion in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Modification of the spectrum requires down- and/or upconversion or downshifting of the spectrum, meaning that the energy of photons is modified to either lower (down) or higher (up) energy. Nanostructures such as quantum dots, luminescent dye molecules, and lanthanide-doped glasses are capable of absorbing photons at a certain wavelength and emitting photons at a different (shorter or longer) wavelength. We will discuss upconversion by lanthanide compounds in various host materials and will further demonstrate upconversion to work for thin-film silicon solar cells. PMID:23413889

  12. Greenhouse Gases and Animal Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, J. (ed.) [Department of Animal Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido (Japan); Young, B.A. (ed.) [The University of Queensland, Gatton, Queensland 4343 (Australia)

    2002-07-01

    Reports from interdisciplinary areas including microbiology, biochemistry, animal nutrition, agricultural engineering and economics are integrated in this proceedings. The major theme of this book is environmental preservation by controlling release of undesirable greenhouse gases to realize the sustainable development of animal agriculture. Technology exists for the effective collection of methane generated from anaerobic fermentation of animal effluent and its use as a biomass energy source. Fossil fuel consumption can be reduced and there can be increased use of locally available energy sources. In addition, promoting environmentally-conscious agriculture which does not rely on the chemical fertilizer can be realized by effective use of animal manure and compost products.

  13. Greenhouse effect: there are solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    A review of solutions that may be undertaken in order to reduce the greenhouse effect gas emissions is presented: clean energy generation through municipal, agricultural and industrial waste processing, reducing energy consumption through public transportation promotion, clean fuel buses and vehicles, or using energy efficient boilers, reduction of carbon dioxide emission from industry through process optimization, waste recycling, energy substitution and conservation, diminution of CO 2 emissions in commercial and residential sectors through space heating and air conditioning retrofitting, lighting substitution. Pollution abatement potentials are evaluated in each case, notably in France

  14. False advertising in the greenhouse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banse, K.

    1991-12-01

    Most scientists are convinced of the importance of their own research subjects. Broecker [1991] has deplored the temptation, if not the tendency, to go overboard and exaggerate this importance once funding enters the mind. In particular, he alleges inflated or even false claims by biological (and other) oceanographers regarding the relevance of their research to the "greenhouse effect," caused by the anthropogenic enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 content. He writes [Broecker, 1991, p. 191]: "In my estimation, on any list of subjects requiring intense study with regard to the prediction of the consequences of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, I would place marine biological cycles near the bottom."

  15. Greenhouse effect: the right questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This paper gives the point of view of the National Council of French engineers and scientists (CNSIF) after the recent publication of a report about the greenhouse effect by the French Academy of Sciences. The CNSIF agrees with the conclusions of this report and gives to non-specialists additional informations about the definition, causes, divergences of opinions about long-term consequences of this effect, and also about the remedial solutions proposed, their delay of efficiency and the socio-economical and political difficulties encountered for their application. (J.S.)

  16. Solar vision 2025 : beyond market competitiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-12-01

    Canada's reputation as an energy superpower is based on its abundant traditional energy resources. The Canadian Solar Industries Association (CanSIA) has presented a vision of Canada's future solar energy industry. Rising demands for energy, along with the high cost of replacing Canada's aging generation facilities may provide an opportunity for the development of renewable energy sources and a more diversified energy system. The vision focused on creating high quality energy solutions while reducing the high cost of solar energy equipment. Studies have suggested that the solar photovoltaic energy will be market competitive by 2020. By 2025, it is hoped that the solar industry will support more than 35,000 jobs in the economy, and displace 15 to 31 million tonnes of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per year. The economic benefits of solar energy were outlined, and new technologies were presented. The export potential of solar energy was discussed. 26 refs., 4 tabs., 40 figs.

  17. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  18. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Santa Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  19. Cooling of a polyethylene tunnel type greenhouse by means of a rock bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurklu, Ahmet; Bilgin, Sefai [Akdeniz Univ., Dept. of Agricultural Mechanisation, Antalya (Turkey)

    2004-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to cool a 15 m{sup 2} ground area plastic-tunnel-type greenhouse by the use of a rock bed. An identical greenhouse with no rock bed was also erected for control purposes. Two rock-bed canals, each with the dimensions of 3 x l.25 x 0.75 m, were dug in the soil of the experimental greenhouse. After the canals were filled with the rocks and insulated, the top surface was covered by a soil layer of thickness enough for the root development depth of the plants. Air was pushed through the rock bed by a centrifugal fan with a 1100 m{sup 3}/h flow rate. Energy stored in the rock bed during the day was dumped outside the greenhouse at night using the cooler outside air. The results of the measurements showed that the rock-bed system maintained air temperature 14 deg C lower at maximum in the experimental greenhouse than the control one. The temperature difference seemed to increase with increasing solar radiation and outside air temperature. Relative humidity during the day remained at about 40% in the experimental greenhouse and was always higher than that in the control one. The coefficient of performance (COP) of the rock-bed system was higher than 3 in general, and it was observed that this value increased with decreasing rock-bed temperature. The average solar collection efficiency was 38%. The rock-bed system seems to have a significant potential for cooling applications in greenhouses. (Author)

  20. Ab initio calculations of cross luminescence materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanchana, V.

    2016-01-01

    Abintio calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic, and optical properties of ABX 3 (A=alkali, B=alkaline-earth, and X=halide) compounds. The ground state properties are calculated using the pseudopotential method with the inclusion of van der Waals interaction, which we find inevitable in reproducing the experimental structure properties in alkali iodides because of its layered structure. All calculations were performed using the Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave method. The band structures are plotted with various functionals and we find the newly developed Tran and Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential to improve the band gap significantly. The optical properties such as complex dielectric function, refractive index, and absorption spectra are calculated which clearly reveal the optically isotropic nature of these materials though being structurally anisotropic, which is the key requirement for ceramic scintillators. Cross luminescence materials are very interesting because of its fast decay. One of the major criteria for the cross luminescence to happen is the energy difference between valence band and next deeper core valence band being lesser when compared to energy gap of the compound, so that radiative electronic transition may occur between valence band and core valence band. We found this criteria to be satisfied in all the studied compounds leading to cross luminescence except for KSrI 3 , RbSrI 3 . The present study suggest that among the six compounds studied, CsSrI 3 , CsMgCl 3 , CsCaCl 3 , and CsSrCl 3 compounds are cross luminescence materials, which is well explained from the band structure, optical properties calculations. Chlorides are better scintillators that iodides and CsMgCl 3 is found to be promising one among the studied compounds. Apart from these materials we have also discussed electronic structure and optical properties of other scintillator compounds. (author)

  1. Thermally stimulated luminescence of KDP activated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaeva, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of recombination luminescence pure and doped by the ions Tl, Se, Pb and Cu of crystals double potassium phosphates (KDP) at irradiation by X-rays. It is established that in the given crystals mechanisms for under-threshold defect formation are realize. The impurity ions results the basic crystal light sum redistribution in the TL peaks. Explanations for some phenomena are given. (author)

  2. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    the size and shape of bacterial or viral agents and dispersed in a burst vessel . After the test, luminescence from the microparticles is measured to...platinum resistor sputtered on 1 nm adhesion layer of chrome, in turn on a 200nm LPCVD nitride; silicon wet -etching makes this a platform suspended...increased to 500°C until combustion occurred (- 7 min). The remaining powder was collected, crushed in a agate mortar, and annealed (typically at 900

  3. Process for producing a self luminescent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, E

    1962-01-28

    A self luminescent material is produced by a process comprising applying a hydroxide or fluoride of promethium-147 suspended in a medium of paraffinic acid to the surface of a fluorescent body. Promethium-147 decays with a half-life of 2.6 years and emits beta-rays but not alpha- and gamma-rays so that it is suitable for manufacturing self luminescent materials. A chloride of promethium-147 cannot be employed because its structure is destroyed by acids. Although fluorides and hydroxides of promethium-147 are difficult to mix with the fluorescent body material, they become mixable when paraffinic acids containing from 12 to 20 carbon atoms, (for example, steric acid, palmitic acid and margaric acid) are used as a medium. In embodiments, the self luminescent materials are prepared by either neutralization of a promethium-147 chloride solution having a specific radioactivity of 1.2 c/cc. with an ammonium hydroxide solution to form gelatinous hydroxide, or the reaction of a promethium-147 chloride solution with H/sub 2/SiF/sub 6/ by heating at 80/sup 0/C to form a fluoride of promethium-147. The products have a specific radioactivity of 8 to 12 mc/g. These products are suspended in vehicles of polystyrene and methacrylic resin to produce the self luminescent coating materials. Tests show that the initical brightness is comparatively high, the decreasing rate of brightness is small, no blackening effects by alpha-rays occur and costs are low. The brightness of the coating containing promethium-147 is 82-85 after 5 days, 100-105 after 100 days and 82-92 after 180 days. With respect to the coating containing radium the values are 31-70 after 5 days, 28-49 after 100 days and 19-31 after 180 days.

  4. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  5. Applied machine learning in greenhouse simulation; new application and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Taki

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction the inside environment variables in greenhouses is very important because they play a vital role in greenhouse cultivation and energy lost especially in cold and hot regions. The greenhouse environment is an uncertain nonlinear system which classical modeling methods have some problems to solve it. So the main goal of this study is to select the best method between Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Support Vector Machine (SVM to estimate three different variables include inside air, soil and plant temperatures (Ta, Ts, Tp and also energy exchange in a polyethylene greenhouse in Shahreza city, Isfahan province, Iran. The environmental factors which influencing all the inside temperatures such as outside air temperature, wind speed and outside solar radiation were collected as data samples. In this research, 13 different training algorithms were used for ANN models (MLP-RBF. Based on K-fold cross validation and Randomized Complete Block (RCB methodology, the best model was selected. The results showed that the type of training algorithm and kernel function are very important factors in ANN (RBF and MLP and SVM models performance, respectively. Comparing RBF, MLP and SVM models showed that the performance of RBF to predict Ta, Tp and Ts variables is better according to small values of RMSE and MAPE and large value of R2 indices. The range of RMSE and MAPE factors for RBF model to predict Ta, Tp and Ts were between 0.07 and 0.12 °C and 0.28–0.50%, respectively. Generalizability and stability of the RBF model with 5-fold cross validation analysis showed that this method can use with small size of data groups. The performance of best model (RBF to estimate the energy lost and exchange in the greenhouse with heat transfer models showed that this method can estimate the real data in greenhouse and then predict the energy lost and exchange with high accuracy. Keywords: Black box method, Energy lost, Environmental situation, Energy

  6. The Runaway Greenhouse Effect on Earth and other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbette, Maura; Pilewskie, Peter; McKay, Christopher; Young, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Water vapor is an efficient absorber of outgoing longwave infrared radiation on Earth and is the primary greenhouse gas. Since evaporation increases with increasing sea surface temperature, and the increase in water vapor further increases greenhouse warming, there is a positive feedback. The runaway greenhouse effect occurs if this feedback continues unchecked until all the water has left the surface and enters the atmosphere. For Mars and the Earth the runaway greenhouse was halted when water vapor became saturated with respect to ice or liquid water respectively. However, Venus is considered to be an example of a planet where the runaway greenhouse effect did occur, and it has been speculated that if the solar luminosity were to increase above a certain limit, it would also occur on the Earth. Satellite data acquired during the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) under clear sky conditions shows that as the sea surface temperature (SST) increases, the rate of outgoing infrared radiation at the top of the atmosphere also increases, as expected. Over the pacific warm pool where the SST exceeds 300 K the outgoing radiation emitted to space actually decreases with increasing SST, leading to a potentially unstable system. This behavior is a signature of the runaway greenhouse effect on Earth. However, the SST never exceeds 303K, thus the system has a natural cap which stops the runaway. According to Stefan-Boltzmann's law the amount of heat energy radiated by the Earth's surface is proportional to (T(sup 4)). However, if the planet has a substantial atmosphere, it can absorb all infrared radiation from the lower surface before the radiation penetrates into outer space. Thus, an instrument in space looking at the planet does not detect radiation from the surface. The radiation it sees comes from some level higher up. For the earth#s atmosphere the effective temperature (T(sub e)) has a value of 255 K corresponding to the middle troposphere, above most of the

  7. Telluride School, Telluride, Colorado solar-energy-system performance evaluation, February 1982-April 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Telluride School solar site is an elementary/junior-senior high school in Colorado with a passive/active hybrid solar energy system designed to supply 40% of the heating load. It is equipped with a 1428 square foot, double glazed Trombe wall, a 1392 square foot greenhouse with collection tube, and an auxiliary oil-fired boiler. Monthly performance data are tabulated for the overall system and for the Trombe wall, greenhouse, and greenhouse storage. System operation is illustrated by graphs of typical Trombe wall insolation and temperatures and typical greenhouse insolation and temperatures. (LEW)

  8. Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthaiah Shellaiah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH, and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs.

  9. Design of a monitoring system for the cultivation of garden tomato in greenhouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Elizabeth Minda Gilces

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly discusses the design and implementation of a prototype that monitors temperature, humidity and ultraviolet solar radiation levels in a greenhouse set for the cultivation of garden tomato. The Scrum agile methodology was applied through the deployment of the prototype. The monitoring system is composed by low cost, commercially available sensors, a database and a computer program developed in JAVA. It provides charts, audible and visual alerts, as well as daily, monthly and yearly statistical reports of sensed data. Implementation in the greenhouse aids farmers in the decision- making process regarding crop exposure to the sun, water and ambient temperature, thus enhancing quality of the cultivation process.

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and some other luminescence images from granite slices exposed with radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Notoya, S.; Ojima, T.; Hoteida, M.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) images of some X- and γ-irradiated granite slices were obtained using photon detection through a 570 nm bandpass filter with diode-laser excitation of 910 nm. Alternative photo-induced phosphorescence (PIP) images, which were colour photographed immediately after the sunlight exposure of slice samples, were also found to be helpful in the observation of the luminescence properties and to filter selection for OSL measurements. These OSL and PIP images were compared with some other colour luminescence images, including thermoluminescence images (TLCI) and after-glow images (AGCI). It was obvious that there exists a variety of coloured emissions derived mainly from feldspar constituents and these were found to be dependent on the geological history or metamorphism of the granites. (Author)

  11. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called ?near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)?, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy ...

  12. Converting sunlight into red light in fluorosilicate glass for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Chengguo, E-mail: mingchengguo1978@163.com [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Song, Feng [Photonics Center, College of Physical Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ren, Xiaobin [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Yuan, Fengying; Qin, Yueting [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China); Photonics Center, College of Physical Science, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); An, Liqun; Cai, Yuanxue [Physics Department, School of Sciences, Tianjin University of Science & Technology, Tianjin 300457 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Fluorosilicate glass was prepared by high-temperature melting method to explore highly efficient luminescence materials for amorphous silicon solar cells. Absorption, excitation and emission spectra of the glass were measured. The optical characters of the glass were discussed in details. The glass can efficiently convert sunlight into red light. Our glass can be applied to amorphous silicon solar cells as a converter of solar spectrum.

  13. Cooling performance assessment of horizontal earth tube system and effect on planting in tropical greenhouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongkon, S.; Thepa, S.; Namprakai, P.; Pratinthong, N.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The cooling ability of HETS is studied for planting in tropical greenhouse. • The effective of system was moderate with COP more than 2.0. • Increasing diameter and air velocity increase COP more than other parameters. • The plant growth with HETS was significantly better than no-HETS plant. - Abstract: The benefit of geothermal energy is used by the horizontal earth tube system (HETS); which is not prevalent in tropical climate. This study evaluated geothermal cooling ability and parameters studied in Thailand by mathematical model. The measurement of the effect on plant cultivation was carried out in two identical greenhouses with 30 m 2 of greenhouse volume. The HETS supplied cooled air to the model greenhouse (MGH), and the plant growth results were compared to the growth results of a conventional greenhouse (CGH). The prediction demonstrated that the coefficient of performance (COP) in clear sky day would be more than 2.0 while in the experiment it was found to be moderately lower. The parameters study could be useful for implementation of a system for maximum performance. Two plants Dahlias and head lettuce were grown satisfactory. The qualities of the plants with the HETS were better than the non-cooled plants. In addition, the quality of production was affected by variations of microclimate in the greenhouses and solar intensity throughout the cultivation period

  14. Modeling GHG emission and energy consumption in selected greenhouses in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousefi, M.; Omid, M.; Rafiee, SH.; Khoshnevisan, B. [Department of Agricultural Machinery Engineering, Faculty of Agricultural Engineering and Technology, University of Tehran, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    It is crucial to determine energy efficiency and environmental effects of greenhouse productions. Such study can be a viable solution in probing challenges and existing defects. The aims of this study were to analyze energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for pepper production using biological method inside greenhouses which used natural gas (NG) heating system in Esfahan province. Data were collected from 22 greenhouse holders using a face to face questionnaire method, in 2010-2011. Also, functional area was selected 1000 m2. Total energy input, total energy output, energy ratio, energy productivity, specific energy, net energy gain and total GHG emissions were calculated as 297799.9 MJ area-1, 3851.84 MJ area-1, 0.013, 0.016 kg MJ-1, 61.85 MJ kg-1, -293948 MJ area-1 and 14390.85 kg CO2 equivalent area-1, respectively. Result revealed that replacing diesel fuel with NG will not be an effective way of reducing energy consumption for greenhouse production. However, it is crucial to focus on energy management in order to enhance the energy and environmental indices. One way to supply adequate input energy and a reduction in GHG emissions is the utilization of renewable and clean energy sources instead of NG and diesel fuel. Also, it is suggested to adopt solar greenhouses in the region and to supply electricity from non-fossil sources seriously.

  15. Relations between radiation fluxes of a greenhouse in semi-arid conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Riahi, M.; Al-Karaghouli, A.; Hasson, A.M.; Al-Kayssi, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of global radiation, reflected radiation and net total radiation inside and outside the greenhouse were conducted in Fudhiliyah Agrometeorological Research Station during the period from 1 January to 30 April, 1987. From these measurements, several relationships were established. Linear regressions of hourly values of global radiation inside the greenhouse on hourly global radiation outside the greenhouse were fitted for each month of the recording period. The degree of fit was generally good (r > 0.95). Net short-wave radiation inside the greenhouse showed strong dependence on the global inside radiation (r = 0.998), also the net total radiation and global radiation inside the greenhouse correlate very strongly. From the above-mentioned relationships, it was found that the global, net short-wave and net total radiation could be successfully predicted when only global outside radiation is available. Using the linear regression equations correlating the above radiation parameters, albedo and heating coefficient were derived. Albedo showed strong dependence on solar altitude angle and period of day (forenoon and afternoon). Heating coefficients were consistently positive and their values varied between 0.10 and 0.393. Monthly average values of mean hourly night-time net long-wave radiation inside the greenhouse were −31, −32, −38 and −42 W m −2 for the months of January, February, March and April, respectively

  16. Economic approaches to greenhouse warming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordhaus, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    Global environmental problems raise a host of major policy questions. They are all scientifically complex and controversial, and no scientific consensus is likely to emerge until irreversible decisions have been made. The costs and benefits of these changes transcend national boundaries, and nations, which cannot appropriate the global costs and benefits of such changes, are unlikely to be able or willing to make efficient decisions on how to combat these global externalities. In addition, these concerns sometimes have impacts over hundreds of years and thereby strain political decision making, which often functions effectively only when the crisis is at hand. This chapter considers some of the economic issues involved in deciding how to react to the threat of global warming. The author first reviews the theory and evidence on the greenhouse effect. He then presents evidence on the impacts of greenhouse warming, the costs of stabilizing climate, and the kinds of adaptations that might be available. In the final section, he reviews the policy initiatives that nations might follow in the near term

  17. Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podkówka Zbigniew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cattle produce greenhouse gases (GHG which lead to changes in the chemical composition of the atmosphere. These gases which cause greenhouse effect include: methane (CH4, nitrous oxide (N2O, nitrogen oxides (NOx, sulphur dioxide (SO2, ammonia (NH3, dust particles and non-methane volatile organic compounds, commonly described as other than methane hydrocarbons. Fermentation processes taking place in the digestive tract produce ‘digestive gases’, distinguished from gases which are emitted during the decomposition of manure. Among these digestive gases methane and non-methane volatile organic compounds are of particular relevance importance. The amount of gases produced by cows can be reduced by choosing to rear animals with an improved genetically based performance. A dairy cow with higher production efficiency, producing milk with higher protein content and at the same time reduced fat content emits less GHG into the environment. Increasing the ratio of feed mixtures in a feed ration also reduces GHG emissions, especially of methane. By selection of dairy cows with higher production efficiency and appropriate nutrition, the farm's expected milk production target can be achieved while at the same time, the size of the herd is reduced, leading to a reduction of GHG emissions.

  18. Greenhouse gases and emissions trading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, A.; Dudek, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Global cooperation is essential in cutting greenhouse-gas emissions, say Alice LeBlanc and Daniel J. Dudek of the Environmental Defense in New York City. The first step, they continue, is agreement among nations on an overall global limit for all greenhouse gases, followed by an allocation of the global limit among nations. The agreements must contain effective reporting and monitoring systems and enforcement provisions, they add. The Framework Convention on Climate Change, signed by most nations of the world in Brazil in 1992, provides the foundation for such an agreement, LeBlanc and Dudek note. open-quotes International emissions trading is a way to lower costs and expand reduction options for the benefit of all,close quotes they contend. Under such an arrangement, an international agency would assign allowances, stated in tons of carbon dioxide. Countries would be free to buy and sell allowances, but no country could exceed, in a given year, the total allowances it holds. By emitting less than its allowed amount, a country would accumulate more allowances, which it could sell. The authors claim such a system would offer benefits to the world economy by saving billions of dollars in pollution-reduction costs while still achieving emission limits established in an international agreement

  19. A Note on Fourier and the Greenhouse Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Postma, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Joseph Fourier's discovery of the greenhouse effect is discussed and is compared to the modern conception of the greenhouse effect. It is confirmed that what Fourier discovered is analogous to the modern concept of the greenhouse effect. However, the modern concept of the greenhouse effect is found to be based on a paradoxical analogy to Fourier's greenhouse work and so either Fourier's greenhouse work, the modern conception of the greenhouse effect, or the modern definition of heat is incorr...

  20. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollmann Anna Obertacke

    2017-01-01

    We present analysis techniques to use luminescence in neutrino telescopes and discuss experimental setups to measure the light yield of luminescence for the particular conditions in neutrino detectors.

  1. Observational determination of the greenhouse effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, A.; Ramanathan, V.

    1989-01-01

    Satellite measurements are used to quantify the atmospheric greenhouse effect, defined here as the infrared radiation energy trapped by atmospheric gases and clouds. The greenhouse effect is found to increase significantly with sea surface temperature. The rate of increase gives compelling evidence for the positive feedback between surface temperature, water vapor and the greenhouse effect; the magnitude of the feedback is consistent with that predicted by climate models. This study demonstrates an effective method for directly monitoring, from space, future changes in the greenhouse effect.

  2. OPIC Greenhouse Gas Emissions Analysis Details

    Data.gov (United States)

    Overseas Private Investment Corporation — Summary project inventory with independent analysis to quantify the greenhouse gas ("GHG") emissions directly attributable to projects to which the Overseas Private...

  3. The greenhouse advantage of natural gas appliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coombe, N.

    2000-01-01

    The life cycle report prepared recently by Energetics for the AGA, Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Natural Gas, demonstrates clearly the greenhouse advantage natural gas has over coal in generating electricity. This study also goes one step further in applying this life cycle approach to the use of space and water heating within the home. The study shows the significant green-house advantage that natural gas appliances have over electric appliances. Findings from other studies also support this claim. The natural gas suppliers are encouraged to take advantage of the marketing opportunity that these studies provide, offering the householders the fuel that will significantly reduce their contribution to greenhouse emission

  4. Solar Thermal AIR Collector Based on New Type Selective Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musiy, R.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the best for optical performance and selective coating solar thermal air collector, which operates by solar power on the principle of simultaneous ventilation and heating facilities, is designed. It can be used for vacation homes, museums, wooden churches, warehouses, garages, houses, greenhouses etc.

  5. Integrated solar energy system optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S. K.

    1982-11-01

    The computer program SYSOPT, intended as a tool for optimizing the subsystem sizing, performance, and economics of integrated wind and solar energy systems, is presented. The modular structure of the methodology additionally allows simulations when the solar subsystems are combined with conventional technologies, e.g., a utility grid. Hourly energy/mass flow balances are computed for interconnection points, yielding optimized sizing and time-dependent operation of various subsystems. The program requires meteorological data, such as insolation, diurnal and seasonal variations, and wind speed at the hub height of a wind turbine, all of which can be taken from simulations like the TRNSYS program. Examples are provided for optimization of a solar-powered (wind turbine and parabolic trough-Rankine generator) desalinization plant, and a design analysis for a solar powered greenhouse.

  6. Performance analysis of greenhouse dryer by using insulated north-wall under natural convection mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Singh Chauhan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A prototype north wall insulated greenhouse dryer has been fabricated and tested in no-load conditions under natural convection mode. Experimentation has been conducted in two different cases. Case-I is when solar collector placed inside the dryer and Case-II is North wall insulated greenhouse dryer without solar collector. Coefficient of performance, heat utilisation factor, convective heat transfer coefficient and coefficient of diffusivity have been evaluated in thermal performance analysis. The difference of the highest convective heat transfer coefficient of both cases is 29.094W/m2°C which is showing the effectiveness of insulated north wall and solar collector. The maximum coefficient of diffusivity (0.0827 was achieved during the third day of experiment in Case-II. The inside room temperature of wall insulated greenhouse dryer for Case-I is 4.11%, 5.08 % and 11.61 % higher than the Case-II during the day 1, day 2 and day 3 respectively. This result is also showing the effectiveness of solar collector and insulated north wall. The highest heat utilisation factor (0.616 is obtained during the second day for Case-I while for Case-II it is 0.769 during the third day of experimentation. Maximum coefficient of performance achieved is 0.892 during the third day of the experiment for Case-I whereas 0.953 is obtained on the first day of experimentation for Case-II.

  7. Solar thermal aided power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Eric; Yang, YongPing; Nishimura, Akira; Yilmaz, Ferdi; Kouzani, Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Fossil fuel based power generation is and will still be the back bone of our world economy, albeit such form of power generation significantly contributes to global CO 2 emissions. Solar energy is a clean, environmental friendly energy source for power generation, however solar photovoltaic electricity generation is not practical for large commercial scales due to its cost and high-tech nature. Solar thermal is another way to use solar energy to generate power. Many attempts to establish solar (solo) thermal power stations have been practiced all over the world. Although there are some advantages in solo solar thermal power systems, the efficiencies and costs of these systems are not so attractive. Alternately by modifying, if possible, the existing coal-fired power stations to generate green sustainable power, a much more efficient means of power generation can be reached. This paper presents the concept of solar aided power generation in conventional coal-fired power stations, i.e., integrating solar (thermal) energy into conventional fossil fuelled power generation cycles (termed as solar aided thermal power). The solar aided power generation (SAPG) concept has technically been derived to use the strong points of the two technologies (traditional regenerative Rankine cycle with relatively higher efficiency and solar heating at relatively low temperature range). The SAPG does not only contribute to increase the efficiencies of the conventional power station and reduce its emission of the greenhouse gases, but also provides a better way to use solar heat to generate the power. This paper presents the advantages of the SAPG at conceptual level.

  8. Analysis of materials used for Greenhouse roof covering - structure using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subin, M. C.; Savio Lourence, Jason; Karthikeyan, Ram; Periasamy, C.

    2018-04-01

    Greenhouse is widely used to create a suitable environment for the growth of plant. During summer, high temperatures cause harm to the plant. This work calculates characteristics required to optimize the above-mentioned parameters using different roof structure covering materials for the greenhouse. Moreover, this work also presents a simulation of the cooling and heating system. In addition, a computer model based on Ansys Fluent has been using to predict the temperature profiles inside the greenhouse. Greenhouse roof structure shading may have a time-dependent effect the production, water and nutrient uptake in plants. An experiment was conducted in the emirate of Dubai in United Arab Emirates to discover the impact of different materials in order to have an optimal plant growth zone and yield production. These structures were poly ethylene and poly carbonate sheets of 2 different configurations. Results showed that poly carbonate sheets configuration of optimal thickness has given a high result in terms of yield production. Therefore, there is a need for appropriate material selection of greenhouse roof structure in this area of UAE. Major parameters and properties need to be considered while selecting a greenhouse roof structure are the resistance to solar radiation, weathering, thermal as well as mechanical properties and good abrasion resistance. In the present study, an experiment has been conducted to find out the material suitability of the greenhouse roof structure in terms of developing proper ambient conditions especially to minimize the energy lose by reducing the HVAC and lighting expenses. The configuration verified using the CFD, so it has been concluded that polycarbonate can be safely used in the greenhouse than other roof structure material having white or green colour.

  9. Solar Features - Solar Flares

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A solar flare is a short-lived sudden increase in the intensity of radiation emitted in the neighborhood of sunspots. For many years it was best monitored in the...

  10. Solar storms; Tormentas solares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: Pereira Cuesta, S.; Pereira Pagan, B.

    2016-08-01

    Solar storms begin with an explosion, or solar flare, on the surface of the sun. The X-rays and extreme ultraviolet radiation from the flare reach the Earths orbit minutes later-travelling at light speed. The ionization of upper layers of our atmosphere could cause radio blackouts and satellite navigation errors (GPS). Soon after, a wave of energetic particles, electrons and protons accelerated by the explosion crosses the orbit of the Earth, and can cause real and significant damage. (Author)

  11. Strategic planning and greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corderoy, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    During former years of high load growth in New South Wales and elsewhere, the challenge for generation planners was to develop power station sites and associated transmission infrasture at a rage rapid enough to meet escalating community requirements for electricity. This challenge was met. The planners of today face a situation of far less certainty - load growth is fragile and at a lower level while the community expects that measures adopted will maintain accepted standards of reliability, be at a minimum level of financial risk and increasingly be environmentally benign. One particular environmental challenge is that posed by the greenhouse effect for which there is a further need to develop a much wider range of strategies. This involves better performance for existing plant, looking at different types of generating systems but also looking to the other side of the energy equation, demand site energy efficiency programs. These issues are briefly discussed

  12. Synthetic greenhouse gases under control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horisberger, B.; Karlaganis, G.

    2003-01-01

    This article discusses new Swiss regulations on the use of synthetic materials that posses a considerable greenhouse-warming potential. Synthetic materials such as hydro-chlorofluorocarbons HCFCs, perfluoride-hydrocarbons and sulphur hexafluoride have, in recent years, replaced chlorofluorocarbons CFCs, which were banned on account of their ozone depletion characteristics. The use of these persistent substances is now being limited to applications where more environment-friendly alternatives are not available. The measures decreed in the legislation, which include a general ban on HCFCs as of 2004 and a ban on the export of installations and equipment that use ozone-depleting refrigerants are described. Details on the legislation's effects on the Swiss refrigeration industry are listed and discussed

  13. Energy efficiency and greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamburg, A.; Martins, A.; Pesur, A.; Roos, I.

    1996-01-01

    Estonia's energy balance for 1990 - 1994 is characterized by the dramatic changes in the economy after regaining independence in 1991. In 1990 - 1993, primary energy supply decreased about 1.9 times. The reasons were a sharp decrease in exports of electric energy and industrial products, a steep increase in fuel prices and the transition from the planned to a market-oriented economy. Over the same period, the total amount of emitted greenhouse gases decreased about 45%. In 1993, the decrease in energy production and consumption stopped, and in 1994, a moderate increase occurred (about 6%), which is a proof stabilizing economy. Oil shale power engineering will remain the prevailing energy resource for the next 20 - 25 years. After stabilization, the use of oil shale will rise in Estonia's economy. Oil shale combustion in power plants will be the greatest source of greenhouse gases emissions in near future. The main problem is to decrease the share of CO 2 emissions from the decomposition of carbonate part of oil shale. This can be done by separating limestone particles from oil shale before its burning by use of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology. Higher efficiency of oil shale power plants facilitates the reduction of CO 2 emissions per generated MWh electricity considerably. The prognoses for the future development of power engineering depend essentially on the environmental requirements. Under the highly restricted development scenario, which includes strict limitations to emissions (CO 2 , SO 2 , thermal waste) and a severe penalty system, the competitiveness of nuclear power will increase. The conceptual steps taken by the Estonian energy management should be in compliance with those of neighboring countries, including the development programs of the other Baltic states

  14. Analysis of politics about greenhouse effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetouani, L.; Tournier, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report deals with the greenhouse effect which brings about increasing temperatures. It is based upon documents such as interviews, conferences, political speeches, newspaper articles and so on. After the problem of the greenhouse effect has been exposed, a lexicometric study is carried out. The analysis of all the texts that have been studied finally leads to semiologic interpretations. (TEC). 2 tabs

  15. A Hiatus of the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinjie; Wang, Yuan; Tang, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The rate at which the global average surface temperature is increasing has slowed down since the end of the last century. This study investigates whether this warming hiatus results from a change in the well-known greenhouse effect. Using long-term, reliable, and consistent observational data from the Earth’s surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA), two monthly gridded atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect parameters (Ga and Gs) are estimated to represent the radiative warming effects of the atmosphere and the surface in the infrared range from 1979 to 2014. The atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect over the tropical monsoon-prone regions is found to contribute substantially to the global total. Furthermore, the downward tendency of cloud activity leads to a greenhouse effect hiatus after the early 1990 s, prior to the warming pause. Additionally, this pause in the greenhouse effect is mostly caused by the high number of La Niña events between 1991 and 2014. A strong La Niña indicates suppressed convection in the tropical central Pacific that reduces atmospheric water vapor content and cloud volume. This significantly weakened regional greenhouse effect offsets the enhanced warming influence in other places and decelerates the rising global greenhouse effect. This work suggests that the greenhouse effect hiatus can be served as an additional factor to cause the recent global warming slowdown.

  16. Greenhouse engineering: New technologies and approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montero, J.I.; Henten, van E.J.; Son, J.E.; Castilla, N.

    2011-01-01

    Firstly, this article discusses the greenhouse engineering situation in three geographic areas which are relevant in the field of protected cultivation: Northern Asia, The Netherlands and the Mediterranean. For each area, the prevailing greenhouse type and equipment is briefly described. Secondly,

  17. Greenhouse Gases Concentrations in the Atmosphere Along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated effect of vehicular emission on greenhouse gases concentrations along selected roads of different traffic densities in Abeokuta, Ogun State, Nigeria. Nine roads comprised highway, commercial and residential were selected. Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) were determined from both sides of the roads by ...

  18. Seasonal variation of heat consumption in greenhouses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.F.; Amsen, M.G.; Strøm, J.S.

    The concept of dynamic variation is introduced as a method to visualize the dynamic fluctuations of heat consumption and thermal climate in greenhouses. The feasibility of the concept is illustrated by describing effects of different greenhouse designs. Engineering data on design heat consumption...

  19. A Hiatus of the Greenhouse Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinjie; Wang, Yuan; Tang, Jianping

    2016-09-12

    The rate at which the global average surface temperature is increasing has slowed down since the end of the last century. This study investigates whether this warming hiatus results from a change in the well-known greenhouse effect. Using long-term, reliable, and consistent observational data from the Earth's surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA), two monthly gridded atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect parameters (Ga and Gs) are estimated to represent the radiative warming effects of the atmosphere and the surface in the infrared range from 1979 to 2014. The atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect over the tropical monsoon-prone regions is found to contribute substantially to the global total. Furthermore, the downward tendency of cloud activity leads to a greenhouse effect hiatus after the early 1990 s, prior to the warming pause. Additionally, this pause in the greenhouse effect is mostly caused by the high number of La Niña events between 1991 and 2014. A strong La Niña indicates suppressed convection in the tropical central Pacific that reduces atmospheric water vapor content and cloud volume. This significantly weakened regional greenhouse effect offsets the enhanced warming influence in other places and decelerates the rising global greenhouse effect. This work suggests that the greenhouse effect hiatus can be served as an additional factor to cause the recent global warming slowdown.

  20. A Hiatus of the Greenhouse Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jinjie; Wang, Yuan; Tang, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which the global average surface temperature is increasing has slowed down since the end of the last century. This study investigates whether this warming hiatus results from a change in the well-known greenhouse effect. Using long-term, reliable, and consistent observational data from the Earth’s surface and the top of the atmosphere (TOA), two monthly gridded atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect parameters (Ga and Gs) are estimated to represent the radiative warming effects of the atmosphere and the surface in the infrared range from 1979 to 2014. The atmospheric and surface greenhouse effect over the tropical monsoon-prone regions is found to contribute substantially to the global total. Furthermore, the downward tendency of cloud activity leads to a greenhouse effect hiatus after the early 1990 s, prior to the warming pause. Additionally, this pause in the greenhouse effect is mostly caused by the high number of La Niña events between 1991 and 2014. A strong La Niña indicates suppressed convection in the tropical central Pacific that reduces atmospheric water vapor content and cloud volume. This significantly weakened regional greenhouse effect offsets the enhanced warming influence in other places and decelerates the rising global greenhouse effect. This work suggests that the greenhouse effect hiatus can be served as an additional factor to cause the recent global warming slowdown. PMID:27616203