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Sample records for lumbosacral plexus

  1. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

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    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  2. Occult radiological effects of lipomatosis of the lumbosacral plexus

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    Mahan, Mark A. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Howe, B.M.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN) is a condition of massive peripheral nerve enlargement frequently associated with hypertrophy within the distribution of the nerve, and most commonly affecting the distal limbs. We sought to understand if LN of the lumbosacral plexus would be associated with the trophic effects of LN on surrounding tissue within the pelvis, which may be clinically occult, but present on MRI. Fifty-one cases of LN, confirmed by pathology or pathognomonic appearance on MRI, were reviewed. Patients with LN of the sciatic nerve were investigated for radiological signs suggestive of overgrowth. Five patients had involvement of the sciatic nerve, 4 of whom had MR imaging of the pelvis. Three patients had LN involving the lumbosacral plexus, and one patient had isolated involvement of the sciatic nerve. All patients with involvement of the lumbosacral plexus demonstrated previously unrecognized evidence of nerve territory overgrowth in the pelvis, including: LN, profound adipose proliferation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, and bone hypertrophy and ankylosis. The patient with LN involving the intrapelvic sciatic nerve, but not the lumbosacral plexus did not demonstrate any radiological evidence of pelvic overgrowth. LN is broader in anatomical reach than previously understood. Proximal plexal innervation may be involved, with a consequent effect on axial skeleton and intrapelvic structures. (orig.)

  3. Is lumbosacral plexus blockade effective and safe for surgical anesthesia in total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    Background and Aims Patients scheduled for total hip replacement often presents cardiovascular comorbidity, which increases perioperative risk of complications. This pilot study aimed to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous and single-dose spinal anesthesia for surgical anesthesia...... had lumbosacral plexus blockade (lumbar plexus block, sacral plexus block and fascia transversalis plane block) with ropivacaine. Group 2 had continuous spinal anesthesia with repeated bupivacaine-doses. Group 3 had single-dose spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine. Hemodynamic data were recorded during...... vascular resistance, and arterial and central venous pressures. (table 1) No patients in group 1 achieved complete surgical anesthesia due to lack of anesthesia of the cranial part of the surgical incision. Conclusions Neither lumbosacral plexus block nor continuous spinal anesthesia affected any...

  4. The lumbosacral plexus of the red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina Linnaeus, 1758 (Rodentia: Caviidae

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    Gleidson Benevides de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The red-rumped agouti is a small-sized wild rodent, belonging to the Dasyproctidae family, with great zootechnical potential, and it adapts well to captivity. In order to contribute to the species biology, this study describes the origin of the nerves forming the lumbosacral plexus. Twelve animals (six males and six females were used, from previous experiments. The animals were fixed in a 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution and eviscerated after 72 hours. Then, the major and minor psoas muscles were retracted, exposing the nerves forming the plexus. Cotton soaked with 20-volume hydrogen peroxide was placed on these nerves, remaining for 12 hours straight for bleaching and subsequent dissection. The topographical relations of the lumbosacral plexus were grouped into tables and arranged in terms of simple percentage. In 7 cases (58.34%, the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti stemmed from the ventral roots of the last 4 lumbar nerves and the first 3 sacral nerves (Type I – L4-S3, in 4 animals (33.33% it stemmed from L5-S3 (Type II, and in 1 case (8.33% it stemmed from L5-S4 (Type III. The nerves participating of the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti were: lateral femoral cutaneous, genitofemoral, femoral, obturator, sciatic, cranial gluteal, caudal gluteal, and pudendal nerve. The origin of the lumbosacral plexus and the spinal nerves making up this plexus in red-rumped agoutis were similar to that described in other rodents, such as rock cavy, lowland paca and spix's yellow-toothed cavy.

  5. Is Lumbosacral Plexus Block an Effective and Safe Alternative as Surgical Anesthesia for Total Hip Replacement?

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    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    BACKGROUND An increasing number of patients for total hip replacement presents with cardiovascular comorbidities, that render them fragile to traditional methods of anesthesia. The aim of this intended study is to compare lumbosacral plexus blockade with continuous spinal anesthesia for surgical ...

  6. Quantitative evaluation of normal lumbosacral plexus nerve by using diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yin; Wang Chuanbing; Liu Wei; Zong Min; Sa Rina; Shi Haibin; Wang Dehang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe the lumbosacral plexus nerves by diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and quantitatively evaluate them by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in healthy volunteers. Methods: A total of 60 healthy volunteers (30 males and 30 females) underwent DTI scanning. Mean FA values of the lumbosacral plexus nerves (both sides of lumbar roots L3 to S1, proximal and distal to the lumbar foraminal zone) were quantified. Differences among various segments of lumbar nerve roots were compared with ANOVA test and SNK test. Differences between two sides of the lumbar nerve roots at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. Differences between the proximal and the distal nerve to the the lumbar foraminal zone at the same lumbar segment were compared with paired-samples t test. The lumbosacral plexus nerve was visualized with tractography. Results: (1) The lumbosacral plexus nerve was clearly visualized with tractography. (2) Mean FA values of the lumbar nerve roots L3 to S1 were as followings: proximal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.202 ± 0.021, 0.201 ± 0.026, 0.201 ± 0.027, 0.191 ±0.016, distal to the left lumbar foraminal zone 0.222 ± 0.034, 0.250 ± 0.028, 0.203 ± 0.026, 0.183 ± 0.020, proximal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.200 ± 0.023, 0.202 ± 0.023, 0.205 ± 0.027, 0.191 ± 0.017, distal to the right lumbar foraminal zone 0.225 ± 0.032, 0.247 ± 0.027, 0.205 ± 0.033, 0.183 ± 0.021. Mean FA values were significantly different between the proximal nerve to the distal nerve in lumbar nerve roots L3, L4, S1 (t=-9.114-2.366, P<0.05), but not significantly different in L5 (P>0.05). Differences were not found between the right and left side nerves at the same lumbar segment (P>0.05). (3) The whole length of the lumbar roots nerve L3 to S1 can be visualized clearly by using DTT. Conclusions: Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography can show and provide quantitative information of human lumbosacral plexus nerves. DTI

  7. Lumbosacral plexus delineation, dose distribution, and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer patients

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    Tunio M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutahir Tunio,1 Mushabbab Al Asiri,1 Yasser Bayoumi,2 Ali Abdullah O Balbaid,1 Majed AlHameed,3 Stanciu Laura Gabriela,1 Ahmad Amir O Ali1 1Radiation Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Neurology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: To evaluate the dose distribution to the lumbosacral plexus (LSP and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP in patients with cervical cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy.Materials and methods: After meeting eligibility criteria, 50 patients with cervical cancer were selected who were treated with IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and the LSP was contoured. Mean volume; percentages of LSP volume absorbing 40, 50, 55, and 60 Gy (V30, V40, V50, V55, and V60 and point doses (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, and P10; and RILSP incidence were calculated.Results: At 60 months of follow-up, four patients (8% were found to have grade 2/3 RILSP. The mean maximal LSP dose in patients with RILSP was 59.6 Gy compared with 53.9 Gy in patients without RILSP (control; P=0.04. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 in patients with RILSP versus control were 61.8% versus 52.8%, 44.4% versus 27.7%, 8.0% versus 0.3% and 1.8% versus 0%, respectively (P=0.01, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively.Conclusion: The delineation of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce the risk for RILSP. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 for LSP should be less than 55%, 30%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively; however, further studies are warranted.Keywords: cervical cancer, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, lumbosacral plexus delineation, radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy, dosimetric analysis

  8. Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Image Fusion Guided Lumbosacral Plexus Block – A Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, JM; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial with crossover design. MR datasets will be acquired and uploaded in an advanced US system (Epiq7, Phillips, Amsterdam, Netherlands). All volunteers will receive SSPS blocks with lidocaine added gadolinium contrast guided by US/MR image fusion and by US one week......Background and aims Ultrasound (US) guided lumbosacral plexus block (Supra Sacral Parallel Shift [SSPS]) offers an alternative to general anaesthesia and perioperative analgesia for hip surgery.1 The complex anatomy of the lumbosacral region hampers the accuracy of the block, but it may be improved...... by guidance of US and magnetic resonance (MR) image fusion and real-time 3D electronic needle tip tracking.2 We aim to estimate the effect and the distribution of lidocaine after SSPS guided by US/MR image fusion compared to SSPS guided by ultrasound. Methods Twenty-four healthy volunteers will be included...

  9. Morphology of the lumbosacral plexus of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis

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    Jessica Albuquerque Lopes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Popularly known as the ocelot, Leopardus pardalis occurs throughout Brazil in all ecosystems, but prefers riparian regions and forests. The objective of this study was to learn more about the macroscopic, anatomical aspects of the plexus lumbossacral of this species. Three specimens were studied, two males and one female, from the region near the Bauxite Mine in Paragominas, PA. The specimens were donated to the Laboratório de Pesquisa Morfológica Animal (LaPMA at UFRA after being run over (authorization numbers 485/2009 and 522/2009. The animals were fixed in an aqueous solution of 10% formaldehyde and then the hind limb was dissected by removing some muscles to expose the nerves. In two animals, the femoral nerve originated in the fourth lumbar nerve (L4 and transformed into the saphenous nerve. The obturator nerve and sciatic nerve originated in the last lumbar nerve (L5, and the latter was divided into branches that formed the tibial and common peroneal nerves, which dorsally formed the cranial gluteal and caudal gluteal nerves.

  10. Imaging of the lumbosacral plexus. Diagnostics and treatment planning with high-resolution procedures; Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis. Diagnostik und Therapieplanung mithilfe hochaufgeloester Verfahren

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    Jengojan, S.; Schellen, C.; Bodner, G.; Kasprian, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    Technical advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound-based neurography nowadays facilitate the radiological assessment of the lumbosacral plexus. Anatomy and imaging of the lumbosacral plexus and diagnostics of the most common pathologies. Description of the clinically feasible combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound diagnostics, case-based illustration of imaging techniques and individual advantages of MRI and ultrasound-based diagnostics for various pathologies of the lumbosacral plexus and its peripheral nerves. High-resolution ultrasound-based neurography (HRUS) is particularly valuable for the assessment of superficial structures of the lumbosacral plexus. Depending on the examiner's experience, anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve (e. g. relevant in piriformis syndrome) as well as more subtle variations, for example as seen in neuritis, can be sonographically depicted and assessed. The use of MRI enables the diagnostic evaluation of more deeply located nerve structures, such as the pudendal and the femoral nerves. Modern MRI techniques, such as peripheral nerve tractography allow three-dimensional depiction of the spatial relationship between nerves and local tumors or traumatic alterations. This can be beneficial for further therapy planning. The anatomy and pathology of the lumbosacral plexus can be reliably imaged by the meaningful combination of MRI and ultrasound-based high resolution neurography. (orig.) [German] Durch technische Fortschritte im Bereich der magnetresonanz- (MR-) und ultraschallbasierten Neurographie ist der Plexus lumbosacralis heute der radiologischen Abklaerung zugaenglich. Anatomie und Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis, Abklaerung der haeufigsten Pathologien. Erlaeuterung der klinisch sinnvollen Kombination von MR- und Ultraschalldiagnostik, Darstellung der Untersuchungstechniken und der jeweiligen Vorteile von MRT und Ultraschall anhand fallbasierter Praesentation unterschiedlicher

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

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    Mürtz, P., E-mail: petra.muertz@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Kaschner, M., E-mail: Marius.Kaschner@med.uni-duesseldorf.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Lakghomi, A., E-mail: Asadeh.Lakghomi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Gieseke, J., E-mail: juergen.gieseke@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Philips Healthcare, Lübeckertordamm 5, 20099 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, W.A., E-mail: winfried.willinek@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Schild, H.H., E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany); Thomas, D., E-mail: daniel.thomas@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Straße 25, 53105 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus: 3.0 T versus 1.5 T imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mürtz, P.; Kaschner, M.; Lakghomi, A.; Gieseke, J.; Willinek, W.A.; Schild, H.H.; Thomas, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •DW MRN of brachial and lumbosacral plexus at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T was compared. •For lumbosacral plexus, nerve conspicuity on MIP images was superior at 3.0 T, also visible length and mean sharpness of the nerves. •For brachial plexus, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T was rather inferior, nerve length was not significantly different, mean sharpness was superior at 3.0 T. -- Abstract: Purpose: To compare intraindividually the nerve conspicuity of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus on diffusion-weighted (DW) MR neurography (MRN) at two different field strengths. Materials and methods: 16 healthy volunteers were investigated at 3.0 T and 1.5 T applying optimized variants of a DW spin-echo echo-planar imaging sequence with short TI inversion recovery fat suppression. Full-volume (FV) and curved sub-volume (CSV) maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were reconstructed and nerve conspicuity was visually assessed. Moreover, visible length and sharpness of the nerves were quantitatively analyzed. Results: On FV MIP images, nerve conspicuity at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T was worse for brachial plexus (P = 0.00228), but better for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00666). On CSV MIP images, nerve conspicuity did not differ significantly for brachial plexus, but was better at 3.0 T for lumbosacral plexus (P = 0.00091). The visible length of the analyzed nerves did not differ significantly with the exception of some lumbosacral nerves, which were significantly longer at 3.0 T. The sharpness of all investigated nerves was significantly higher at 3.0 T by about 40–60% for cervical and 97–169% for lumbosacral nerves. Conclusion: DW MRN imaging at 3.0 T compared to 1.5 T is superior for lumbosacral plexus, but not for brachial plexus

  13. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Stern, Steven E; Belzberg, Allan J; Fritz, Jan

    2017-07-01

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips.

  14. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan; Stern, Steven E.; Belzberg, Allan J.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  15. High-resolution metal artifact reduction MR imaging of the lumbosacral plexus in patients with metallic implants

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    Ahlawat, Shivani; Fritz, Jan [The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Stern, Steven E. [Bond University, Bond Business School, Gold Coast, QLD (Australia); Belzberg, Allan J. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2017-07-15

    To assess the quality and accuracy of metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants in the pelvis. Twenty-two subjects with lumbosacral neuropathy following pelvic instrumentation underwent 1.5-T MARS MRI including optimized axial intermediate-weighted and STIR turbo spin echo sequences extending from L5 to the ischial tuberosity. Two readers graded the visibility of the lumbosacral trunk, sciatic, femoral, lateral femoral cutaneous, and obturator nerves and the nerve signal intensity of nerve, architecture, caliber, course, continuity, and skeletal muscle denervation. Clinical examination and electrodiagnostic studies were used as the standard of reference. Descriptive, agreement, and diagnostic performance statistics were applied. Lumbosacral plexus visibility on MARS MRI was good (4) or very good (3) in 92% of cases with 81% exact agreement and a Kendall's W coefficient of 0.811. The obturator nerve at the obturator foramen and the sciatic nerve posterior to the acetabulum had the lowest visibility, with good or very good ratings in only 61% and 77% of cases respectively. The reader agreement for nerve abnormalities on MARS MRI was excellent, ranging from 95.5 to 100%. MARS MRI achieved a sensitivity of 86%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 95%, and negative predictive value of 40%, and accuracy of 83% for the detection of neuropathy. MARS MRI yields high image quality and diagnostic accuracy for the assessment of lumbosacral neuropathies in patients with metallic implants of the pelvis and hips. (orig.)

  16. Causes of lumbosacral plexopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planner, A.C.; Donaghy, M.; Moore, N.R.

    2006-01-01

    The lumbosacral plexus represents the nerve supply to the lower back, pelvis and legs. This review will focus on diseases and disorders affecting the pathway as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). We stress the need to review the lumbosacral plexus in patients with non-specific symptoms such as back, hip, pelvic pain, and in those who present with sciatica unaccompanied by demonstrable intervertebral disc prolapse. We illustrate that the imaging appearances may be non-specific and re-inforce the importance of the clinical history and the use of tissue sampling to achieve an accurate diagnosis

  17. Causes of lumbosacral plexopathy

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    Planner, A.C.; Donaghy, M.; Moore, N.R

    2006-12-15

    The lumbosacral plexus represents the nerve supply to the lower back, pelvis and legs. This review will focus on diseases and disorders affecting the pathway as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). We stress the need to review the lumbosacral plexus in patients with non-specific symptoms such as back, hip, pelvic pain, and in those who present with sciatica unaccompanied by demonstrable intervertebral disc prolapse. We illustrate that the imaging appearances may be non-specific and re-inforce the importance of the clinical history and the use of tissue sampling to achieve an accurate diagnosis.

  18. Lumbosacral plexopathies associated with acetabular fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patpiya Sirasaporn

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral plexopathies are of considerably less epidemiologic common prevalence than brachial plexus. The most common form of trauma resulting in lesions affecting the lumbosacral plexus is injuries to sacroiliac region. The symptoms which are caused by compressing lumbosacral plexus are sensory disturbance and weakness in an affected leg. The author reports a case of a 65-year-old male with a history of right acetabular fracture status post open reduction and internal fixation by plate and screw who complained weakness and numbness in the right leg. Four months later, he still had difficulty in walking and felt paresthesia at the right lateral thigh and entire of the right foot. His further investigation which was electrodiagnostic study was diagnosed as right lumbosacral plexopathies.

  19. The suprasacral parallel shift vs lumbar plexus blockade with ultrasound guidance in healthy volunteers - a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, T F; Pedersen, E M; Haroutounian, S

    2014-01-01

    -guided blockade of the lumbar plexus. The objective was to investigate whether the suprasacral technique is equally effective for anaesthesia of the terminal lumbar plexus nerves compared with a lumbar plexus block, and more effective for anaesthesia of the lumbosacral trunk. Twenty volunteers were included...

  20. Symptomatic lumbosacral transitional vertebra

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    Holm, Emil Kongsted; Bünger, Cody; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2017-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome (BS) refers to the possible association between the congenital malformation lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV), and low back pain (LBP). Several treatments have been proposed including steroid injections, resections of the LSTV, laminectomy, and lumbar spinal fusion...

  1. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwankong, N.

    2007-01-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) is now recognized as a significant cause of caudal lumbar pain and pelvic limb lameness in dogs. The condition includes lumbosacral intervertebral disc degeneration and protrusion, spondylosis deformans, sclerosis of the vertebral end plates, osteoarthrosis of

  2. Lumbosacral agenesis in a cat

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    Gabrielle C Hybki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Case summary Lumbosacral agenesis is a rare congenital condition reported in children. We report a 17-week-old female domestic shorthair cat with lumbosacral agenesis on whole-body radiographs. The cat was euthanized shortly thereafter presentation. A necropsy was not permitted. Relevance and novel information This is the first reported feline case of lumbosacral agenesis.

  3. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  4. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brachial Plexus Injuries Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that conducts signals from the spine to the shoulder, arm, ...

  5. Lumbosacral myelocystocele: A Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittal R.S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Myelocystocele is a rare variety of spinal dysraphism that presents as a skin covered, midline, lumbosacral mass. Many a time it is associated with other congenital anomalies but isolated myelocystocele is rarely associated with neurological deficit. MRI is the modality of choice for preoperative diagnosis. A 3 years old female child presented with skin covered lumbosacral mass since birth. There was no associated neurological deficit. MRI revealed single cyst, which was continuous with central canal of spinal cord. Peroperatively, myelocystocele was found with tethering of cord. Untethering of cord and repair of myelocystocele was performed with uneventful recovery.

  6. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meij, Björn P; Bergknut, Niklas

    2010-09-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is the most common disorder of the caudal lumbar spine in dogs. This article reviews the management of this disorder and highlights the most important new findings of the last decade. Dogs with DLSS are typically neuro-orthopedic patients and can be presented with varying clinical signs, of which the most consistent is lumbosacral pain. Due to the availability of advanced imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging that allow visualization of intervertebral disc degeneration, cauda equina compression, and nerve root entrapment, tailor-made treatments can be adopted for the individual patient. Current therapies include conservative treatment, decompressive surgery, and fixation-fusion of the L7-S1 junction. New insight into the biomechanics and pathobiology of DLSS and developments in minimally invasive surgical techniques will influence treatment options in the near future. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-07-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas.

  8. Scalloping at the lumbosacral canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, R.

    1987-01-01

    Scalloping is an indentation of the dorsal side of the vertebral body (anterior wall of the lumbosacral or sacral canal) which typically involves several adjacent lumbal vertebral body segments and the anterior wall of the canalis sacralis. Occurrence without underlying disease is rare; it occurs most frequently with chondrodystrophy, neurofibromatosis, Morquio's syndrome, Hurler's syndrome, acromegaly, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan's syndrome, cysts, tumors and in peridural lipomas. (orig.) [de

  9. Quantitative survey radiographic evaluation of the lumbosacral spine of normal dogs and dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattoon, J.S.; Koblik, P.D.

    1993-01-01

    Survey radiographic studies of the lumbosacral region for 93 normal dogs and for 26 dogs with confirmed degenerative lumbosacral stenosis were reviewed. Normal dogs were divided into 9 groups based on age and body weight. For normal dogs, increasing age and body weight were associated with a decreased ability to extend the lumbosacral joint and with increased incidence and severity of spondylosis. Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and evidence of lumbosacral disc space collapse were very infrequent findings, and the pivot point for lumbosacral motion was consistently centered over the lumbosacral disc space. Relative to an age/weight matched sub-population of normal dogs, dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis had similar mean normalized lumbosacral vertebral canal height, larger mean neutral lumbosacral angle, decreased extension of the lumbosacral joint, increased flexion of the lumbosacral joint, reduced lumbosacral range of motion, increased lumbosacral dynamic malalignment, higher incidence and severity of spondylosis, higher incidence of transitional vertebrae, and higher incidence of lumbosacral disc space collapse. A logistic model based strictly on radiographic parameters was able to discriminate normal from affected dogs with an overall accuracy rate of 86%

  10. Computed tomographic anatomy of the canine lumbosacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.C.; Cartee, R.E.; Bartels, J.E.

    1995-01-01

    The lumbosacral spine (L5–S3) was examined by high resolution computed tomography (CT) in five canine cadaver specimens and one anesthetized dog using 5mm thick transverse slices at 5mm intervals. In each dog, anatomic features observed on CT images were confirmed by comparison with corresponding 5 mm thick anatomic transverse sections and section radiographs. CT anatomic features visualized in all dogs included the vertebral bodies, pedicles, laminae, articular processes, spinous processes, transverse processes, mammillary processes, basivertebral venous canals, vertebral foramina, intervertebral foramina, sacral wings, median sacral crest, intermediate sacral crests, lateral sacral crests, articular process joints, sacroiliac joints, internal vertebral venous plexus, epidural fat, thecal sac, L5–S3 nerve roots, and spinal nerves. Spinal ganglia, yellow ligaments, and portions of the intervertebral discs were visible in some dogs. The spinal cord, intrathecal nerve roots, dorsal and ventral longitudinal ligaments, spinal arteries, and radicular vessels were not distinguishable. Accessory processes were identified on the caudal L5 pedicles in most dogs, an observation that differed from descriptions in standard anatomy texts. Previously undescribed osseous grooves, termed “lateral recesses,” were identified in the caudal L7 vertebral foramen of all dogs

  11. Brachial Plexus Blocker Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphanie Coelho Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    Although the area of surgical simulation has been the subject of study in recent years, it is still necessary to develop artificial experimental models with a perspective to dismiss the use of biological models. Since this makes the simulators more real, transferring the environment of the health professional to a physical or virtual reality, an anesthetic prototype has been developed, where the motor response is replicated when the brachial plexus is subjected to a proximal nervous stimulus....

  12. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  13. Anatomy of the psoas muscle and lumbar plexus with respect to the surgical approach for lateral transpsoas interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, Christopher K; Bogner, Eric A; Herzog, Richard J; Huang, Russel C

    2011-04-01

    Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique that permits interbody fusion utilizing cages placed via a direct lateral retroperitoneal approach. We sought to describe the locations of relevant neurovascular structures based on MRI with respect to this novel surgical approach. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive lumbosacral spine MRI scans in 43 skeletally mature adults. MRI scans were independently reviewed by two readers to identify the location of the psoas muscle, lumbar plexus, femoral nerve, inferior vena cava and right iliac vein. Structures potentially at risk for injury were identified by: a distance from the anterior aspect of the adjacent vertebral bodies of muscle and lumbar plexus is described which allows use of the psoas position as a proxy for lumbar plexus position to identify patients who may be at risk, particularly at the L4-5 level. Further study will establish the clinical relevance of these measurements and the ability of neurovascular structures to be retracted without significant injury.

  14. MR imaging of brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, A.; Ciccotosto, C.; Dragani, M.; Manes, L.; Bonomo, L.

    1991-01-01

    The brachial plexus is a difficult region to evaluate with radiological techniques. MR imaging has great potentials for the depiction of the various anatomical structures of the branchial plexus - i.e., spinal ganglion, ventral nerve rami root exit of the neural foramina, trunks an cordes. Moreover, MR imaging, thanks to its direct multiplanarity, to its excellent soft-tissue contrast, and to its lack of motion artifacts, allows good evaluation of pathologic conditions in the branchial plexus, especially traumas and cancers. On the contrary CT, in spite of its high spatial resolution and good contrast, cannot demonstrate the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus. US detects superficials structures, and conventional radiographs depict only indirect changes in the adjacent lung apex and skeletal structures. From November 1989 to May 1990, 20 normal volunteers (15 males and 5 females; average age: 35 years) were studied with MR imaging. Multisection technique was employed with a dedicated coil and a primary coil. The anatomical structures of the brachial plexus were clearly demonstrated by T1-weighted sequences on the sagittal and axial planes. T2-weighted pulse sequences on the coronal plane were useful for the anatomical definition of the brachial plexus and for eventual tissue characterization. The correct representation of the anatomical structures of the brachial plexus allowed by MR imaging with author's standard technique makes MR imaging the most appropriate exam for the diagnosis of pathologic conditions in the brachial plexus, although its use must be suggested by specific clinical questions

  15. Adult traumatic brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rankine, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    Injury to the brachial plexus in the adult is usually a closed injury and the result of considerable traction to the shoulder. Brachial plexus injury in the adult is an increasingly common clinical problem. Recent advances in neurosurgical techniques have improved the outlook for patients with brachial plexus injuries. The choice of surgical procedure depends on the level of the injury and the radiologist has an important role in guiding the surgeon to the site of injury. This article will describe the anatomy and pathophysiology of traction brachial plexus injury in the adult. The neurosurgical options available will be described with emphasis on the information that the surgeon wants from imaging studies of the brachial plexus. The relative merits of MRI and CT myelography are discussed

  16. Extraosseous Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the sacral nerve plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narula, MK; Gupta, Nishant; Anand, Rama; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2009-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Ewing's sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of the sacral nerve plexus in a 9-year-old boy who presented with a soft tissue swelling and severe piercing pain in the lower back region. MRI of the lumbosacral spine showed a lobulated soft tissue mass with clubbed finger-like projections along the path of the sacral nerves, which had caused widening of the spinal canal and the sacral foramina (S2–S4 level). There was presacral extension and posterior scalloping of the sacral vertebrae. Histopathology of the lesion confirmed Ewing's sarcoma / PNET of the sacral spinal nerve plexus. The patient responded favorably to chemotherapy and radiotherapy, showing clinical and radiological improvement

  17. Thyroxine transport in choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, P.W.; Aldred, A.R.; Menting, J.G.; Marley, P.D.; Sawyer, W.H.; Schreiber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The role of the choroid plexus in thyroid hormone transport between body and brain, suggested by strong synthesis and secretion of transthyretin in this tissue, was investigated in in vitro and in vivo systems. Rat choroid plexus pieces incubated in vitro were found to accumulate thyroid hormones from surrounding medium in a non-saturable process. At equilibrium, the ratio of thyroid hormone concentration in choroid plexus pieces to that in medium decreased upon increasing the concentration of transthyretin in the medium. Fluorescence quenching of fluorophores located at different depths in liposome membranes showed maximal hormone accumulation in the middle of the phospholipid bilayer. Partition coefficients of thyroxine and triiodothyronine between lipid and aqueous phase were about 20,000. After intravenous injection of 125 I-labeled thyroid hormones, choroid plexus and parts of the brain steadily accumulated 125 I-thyroxine, but not [ 125 I]triiodothyronine, for many hours. The accumulation of 125 I-thyroxine in choroid plexus preceded that in brain. The amount of 125 I-thyroxine in non-brain tissues and the [ 125 I]triiodothyronine content of all tissues decreased steadily beginning immediately after injection. A model is proposed for thyroxine transport from the bloodstream into cerebrospinal fluid based on partitioning of thyroxine between choroid plexus and surrounding fluids and binding of thyroxine to transthyretin newly synthesized and secreted by choroid plexus

  18. Computertomographic examinations of the canine lumbosacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, G.

    2000-06-01

    The objectives of this study were: 1) documentation of cross-sectional anatomy of the lumbosacral area, 2) to obtain and describe abnormalities and finally 3)to develop a CT technique for the diagnosis of a L7/S1 spondylolisthesis. In a 3 year retrospective study 61 large breed dogs with history of suspected cauda equina-syndrome were examined using flexion-extension radiography and flexion-extension computed tomography. 25 out of 60 dogs were German shepherd dogs, 3 shepherd-cross, 7 mongrels, 4 Rottweilers and 22 other breeds. 27 dogs of the flexion/extension group were also morphometrically examined. CT studies regarding morphology of the lumbosacral joint showed differences between flexed and extended position: The intervertebral foramina enlarged in flexed position, the intervertebral disc, segmental spinal nerves and contrast enhanced blood vessels were more easily to evaluate. In flexion the lumbosacral foramen was 'open' in all cases, while it was 'closed' in most of the extension slices. The cranial articular processes of the sacrum appeared earlier in extension, they seemed to 'slip' beneath the caudal articular processes of the last lumbar vertebra, the articular surfaces got incongruent, and therefore the intervertebral foramina were narrowed. The most common pathologic findings were disk protrusion (28 dogs) and spondylosis (24 dogs). Rare diagnoses were neoplasia (1 case), transitional vertebra (1 case), shortened L7 (2 cases) and osteochondrosis dissecans of the L7 or sacral endplate (5 cases). Morphometrical examinations showed that the intervertebral foramina enlarged in flexed positions, not only in length (craniocaudal dimension) but also in their dorsoventral diameter. There was no difference in the dorsoventral diameter of the spinal canal between flexion and extension CT. This study showed that computed tomography is superior to common ways of imaging of the lumbosacral spine like radiography or myelography. It was possible to identify

  19. Magnetic Resonance Neurography in Chronic Lumbosacral and Pelvic Pain: Diagnostic and Management Impact-Institutional Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessouky, Riham; Xi, Yin; Scott, Kelly M; Khaleel, Mohammed; Gill, Kevin; Jones, Stephanie; Khalifa, Dalia N; Tantawy, Hazim I; Aidaros, Magdy A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2018-06-01

    Low back and pelvic pain are among the most prevalent conditions worldwide, with major social and economic costs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of lumbosacral plexus in the management and outcomes of these patients with chronic pain. Consecutive patients with chronic lumbosacral and pelvic pain referred for MRN over a year were included. Preimaging and postimaging clinical diagnosis and treatment, pain levels, and location were recorded. Pain-free survival was compared between treatments using a Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 202 patients with mean age 53.7 ± 14.8 years and a male/female ratio of 1:1.53 were included. Of these patients, 115 presented with radiculopathy (57%), 56 with pelvic pain (28%), and 31 with groin pain (15%). Mean initial pain level was 6.9 ± 1.9. Mean symptom duration was 4.21 ± 5.86 years. Of these patients, 143 (71%) had a change in management because of MRN. After MRN, reduction in pain levels was observed in 21 of 32 patients receiving conservative treatment (66%), 42 of 67 receiving injections (63%), and 27 of 33 receiving surgery (82%). Follow-ups were available in 131 patients. Median pain-free survival was 12 months. Patients treated with surgery had significantly lower pain recurrence than patients receiving other treatments in the same time frame (hazard ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-9.2; P = 0.0061). MRN use in chronic lumbosacral and pelvic pain led to a meaningful change in diagnosis and treatment. After MRN, conservative treatment and injections provided pain relief; however, patients benefited more from surgery than from any other treatment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Brachial Plexus Blocker Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Coelho Monteiro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the area of surgical simulation has been the subject of study in recent years, it is still necessary to develop artificial experimental models with a perspective to dismiss the use of biological models. Since this makes the simulators more real, transferring the environment of the health professional to a physical or virtual reality, an anesthetic prototype has been developed, where the motor response is replicated when the brachial plexus is subjected to a proximal nervous stimulus. Using action-research techniques, with this simulator it was possible to validate that the human nerve response can be replicated, which will aid the training of health professionals, reducing possible risks in a surgical environment.

  1. Radiologic study on measurement of lumbosacral angel in backache patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Chung, Jin Heung; Kwon, Oh Chung; Rhee, Byung Chull

    1982-01-01

    The radiologic findings of lumbosacral spline and measurement of lumbosacral angle were analysed in 238 with backache and 102 without backache which were visited Chung Nam University from Mach 1980 to July 1981. The measurement of lumbosacral angle was based on a method of Fergson. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The age group of 18 to 29 years was most common in backache group and the male was affected more frequently than the female with the ratio of 1.9 : 1. 2. The patients with backache, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were 44.2 ±2.6 .deg. in male and 35.8 ± 2.0.deg. in female. In patients without backache, in control group, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were 32.6 ± 0.7 .deg. in male and 33.4 ± 1.4 .deg. in female. 3. In control group, difference of means between male and female was about 1 .deg. in patients with backache, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were increased about 12 .deg. in male and 2 .deg. in female than control group. In patients with and without backache, no significant difference of lumbosacral angle between the 4 age groups was present. 4. In backache group, increased lordosis was more common and increased lumbosacral angle than the decreased lordosis. 5. In backache group, lumbosacral angle of abnormal radiologic findings in lumbosacral spline was significantly increased than control group. 6. In patients with backache, radiologic findings and its lumbosacral angles were a lumbosacral anomaly 56 cases (23.5%): 46.9 .deg., increased lumbar lordosis 46 cases (19.2%): 48.1 .deg., osteoarthritis 44 cases (18.5%): 40.8 .deg., decreased lumbar lordosis 30 cases (12.6%): 29.9 .deg., in order, and these radiologic findings were similar with many other authors

  2. Radiologic study on measurement of lumbosacral angel in backache patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Woo; Chung, Jin Heung; Kwon, Oh Chung; Rhee, Byung Chull [Chung Nam National University College of Medicine, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-06-15

    The radiologic findings of lumbosacral spline and measurement of lumbosacral angle were analysed in 238 with backache and 102 without backache which were visited Chung Nam University from Mach 1980 to July 1981. The measurement of lumbosacral angle was based on a method of Fergson. The results obtained were as follows: 1. The age group of 18 to 29 years was most common in backache group and the male was affected more frequently than the female with the ratio of 1.9 : 1. 2. The patients with backache, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were 44.2 {+-}2.6 .deg. in male and 35.8 {+-} 2.0.deg. in female. In patients without backache, in control group, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were 32.6 {+-} 0.7 .deg. in male and 33.4 {+-} 1.4 .deg. in female. 3. In control group, difference of means between male and female was about 1 .deg. in patients with backache, the overall mean lumbosacral angles were increased about 12 .deg. in male and 2 .deg. in female than control group. In patients with and without backache, no significant difference of lumbosacral angle between the 4 age groups was present. 4. In backache group, increased lordosis was more common and increased lumbosacral angle than the decreased lordosis. 5. In backache group, lumbosacral angle of abnormal radiologic findings in lumbosacral spline was significantly increased than control group. 6. In patients with backache, radiologic findings and its lumbosacral angles were a lumbosacral anomaly 56 cases (23.5%): 46.9 .deg., increased lumbar lordosis 46 cases (19.2%): 48.1 .deg., osteoarthritis 44 cases (18.5%): 40.8 .deg., decreased lumbar lordosis 30 cases (12.6%): 29.9 .deg., in order, and these radiologic findings were similar with many other authors.

  3. CT diagnosis of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, P.; Martinelli, C.; Spina, V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the observations derived from CT evaluation of 19 cases of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots; 11 of these have been confirmed by lumbar myelography and/or at surgery. They conclude that CT without intrathecal metrizamide allows the recognition in most cases the presence of conjoined nerve roots and to differentiate them from a herniated disk fragment; this is especially usefull avoid surgical damage of anomalous roots. (orig.)

  4. The transition zone above a lumbosacral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, M F; Wiltse, L L; Raghavan, N; Schneiderman, G; Koenig, C

    1998-08-15

    The clinical and radiographic effect of a lumbar or lumbosacral fusion was studied in 42 patients who had undergone a posterolateral fusion with an average follow-up of 22.6 years. To examine the long-term effects of posterolateral lumbar or lumbosacral fusion on the cephalad two motion segments (transition zone). It is commonly held that accelerated degeneration occurs in the motion segments adjacent to a fusion. Most studies are of short-term, anecdotal, uncontrolled reports that pay particular attention only to the first motion segment immediately cephalad to the fusion. Forty-two patients who had previously undergone a posterolateral lumbar or lumbosacral fusion underwent radiographic and clinical evaluation. Rate of fusion, range of motion, osteophytes, degenerative spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis, facet arthrosis, disc ossification, dynamic instability, and disc space height were all studied and statistically compared with an age- and gender-matched control group. The patient's self-reported clinical outcome was also recorded. Degenerative changes occurred at the second level above the fused levels with a frequency equal to those occurring in the first level. There was no statistical difference between the study group and the cohort group in the presence of radiographic changes within the transition zone. In those patients undergoing fusion for degenerative processes, 75% reported a good to excellent outcome, whereas 84% of those undergoing fusion for spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis reported a good to excellent outcome. Radiographic changes occur within the transition zone cephalad to a lumbar or lumbosacral fusion. However, these changes are also seen in control subjects who have had no surgery.

  5. Surgical techniques for lumbo-sacral fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropiano, P; Giorgi, H; Faure, A; Blondel, B

    2017-02-01

    Lumbo-sacral (L5-S1) fusion is a widely performed procedure that has become the reference standard treatment for refractory low back pain. L5-S1 is a complex transition zone between the mobile lordotic distal lumbar spine and the fixed sacral region. The goal is to immobilise the lumbo-sacral junction in order to relieve pain originating from this site. Apart from achieving inter-vertebral fusion, the main challenge lies in the preoperative determination of the fixed L5-S1 position that will be optimal for the patient. Many lumbo-sacral fusion techniques are available. Stabilisation can be achieved using various methods. An anterior, posterior, or combined approach may be used. Recently developed minimally invasive techniques are gaining in popularity based on their good clinical outcomes and high fusion rates. The objective of this conference is to resolve the main issues faced by spinal surgeons in their everyday practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Lumbosacral Corsets Improve the Outcome of Patients with Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    extreme trunk motion and offering tactile biofeedback. (5). There is paucity of data on the use of lumbosacral corset for acute low back pain. Existing literature on the use of lumbosacral corset is deficient of high quality randomized trials assessing the importance of this modality of treatment on acute low back pain with regard ...

  7. Phenotyping of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Meenakshi; Jones, Jeryl C; Holásková, Ida; Raylman, Raymond; Meade, Jean

    2017-09-01

    Deep phenotyping tools for characterizing preclinical morphological conditions are important for supporting genetic research studies. Objectives of this retrospective, cross-sectional, methods comparison study were to describe and compare qualitative and quantitative deep phenotypic characteristics of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers using computed tomography (CT). Lumbosacral CT scans and medical records were retrieved from data archives at three veterinary hospitals. Using previously published qualitative CT diagnostic criteria, a board-certified veterinary radiologist assigned dogs as either lumbosacral stenosis positive or lumbosacral stenosis negative at six vertebral locations. A second observer independently measured vertebral canal area, vertebral fat area, and vertebral body area; and calculated ratios of vertebral canal area/vertebral body area and vertebral fat area/vertebral body area (fat area ratio) at all six locations. Twenty-five dogs were sampled (lumbosacral stenosis negative, 11 dogs; lumbosacral stenosis positive, 14 dogs). Of the six locations, cranial L6 was the most affected by lumbosacral stenosis (33%). Five of six dogs (83%) with clinical signs of lumbosacral pain were lumbosacral stenosis positive at two or more levels. All four quantitative variables were significantly smaller at the cranial aspects of the L6 and L7 vertebral foramina than at the caudal aspects (P stenosis positive status at all six locations with cranial L6 having the greatest predictive value (R 2 = 0.43) and range of predictive probability (25-90%). Findings from the current study supported the use of CT as a deep phenotyping tool for future research studies of lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  8. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H.; Meier, R.

    2015-01-01

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [de

  9. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    RESEARCH. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - November 2003 ... Cervical plexus block has also been found useful for thy- .... lar, transverse cervical and supraclavicular nerves. ... administration of midazolam and pentazocine as required. ... find out if there were postoperative complications specific to.

  10. Prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in Korean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyun Chang; Bae, Geum Dong; Lee, Yong Chul; Kim, Kun Sang

    1990-01-01

    Controversy exists about the lumbosacral transitional vertebrae(LSTV) causing low back pain and lumbar disk abnormalities such as herniated nucleus pulposus(HNP), early disk degeneration or annulus bulging. The prevalence of the lumbosacral transitional vertebrae were evaluated. The classification of LSTV is presented based upon the radiomorphological changes of transverse process of the last presacral vertebra. The type I is dysplastic transverse process, type II is incomplete lumbarization/ sacralization, type III is complete lumbarization/ sacralization, and type IV is mixed is mixed (type II and type III). Simple radiographic findings of (804 patients including) 300 patients without low back pain. 400 patients with low back pain and 104 patients with disk abnormalities on CT scan have been analyzed. The prevalence of LSTV were 51.5% in normal control group, 40.8% in low back pain group and 46.2% in disk abnormality group. The type I is regarded as the forerunner of a true transitional vertebra and the prevalence of the true LSTB (type II, III, IV) were 11.6%, 18.3% and 13.5% on each groups. The type II and III in low back pain group and type II in disk abnormality group were relatively increased in incidence of LSTV than in normal control group. A patient with the type II or III of the LSTV may show low back pain more frequently than a patient without such a LSTV. The type II of LSTV may cause lumbar disk abnormalities more frequently

  11. Vascular entrapment of the sciatic plexus causing catamenial sciatica and urinary symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Ploger, Christine; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic congestion syndrome is a well-known cause of cyclic pelvic pain (Ganeshan et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 30(6):1105-11, 2007). What is much less well known is that dilated or malformed branches of the internal or external iliac vessels can entrap the nerves of the sacral plexus against the pelvic sidewalls, producing symptoms that are not commonly seen in gynecological practice, such as sciatica, or refractory urinary and anorectal dysfunction (Possover et al., Fertil Steril 95(2):756-8. 2011). The objective of this video is to explain and describe the symptoms suggestive of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus, as well as the technique for the laparoscopic decompression of these nerves. Two anecdotal cases of intrapelvic vascular entrapment are used to review the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus and demonstrate the laparoscopic surgical technique for decompression at two different sites, one on the sciatic nerve and one on the sacral nerve roots. After surgery, the patient with the sciatic entrapment showed full recovery of the sciatica and partial recovery of the myofascial pain. The patient with sacral nerve root entrapment showed full recovery with resolution of symptoms. The symptoms suggestive of intrapelvic nerve entrapment are: perineal pain or pain irradiating to the lower limbs in the absence of a spinal disorder, and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of prolapse of a bladder lesion. In the presence of such symptoms, the radiologist should provide specific MRI sequences of the intrapelvic portion of the sacral plexus and a team and equipment to expose and decompress the sacral nerves should be prepared.

  12. Vertical foramina in the lumbosacral region: CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beers, G.J.; Carter, A.P.; McNary, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    Several computed tomographic (CT) examples of vertically oriented foramina in the neural arches of the lumbosacral vertebrae are presented. The literature is reviewed briefly, and the possible clincal and embryologic significance of these foramina is discussed

  13. Lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arachnoid cysts are cerebrospinal fluid collections in the spine that can present with neurological symptoms or be discovered accidentally. Intradural location of such cysts especially in the lumbosacral region is relatively rare. The association of such cysts with other congenital anomalies such as tethered cord lends evidence to the developmental origin of arachnoid cysts. We report a case of lumbosacral arachnoid cyst with tethered cord in a 6-year-old male child and discuss the etiopathogenesis and management options.

  14. Transport across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle Hasager

    2017-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a secretory epithelium par excellence. However, this is perhaps not the most prominent reason for the massive interest in this modest-sized tissue residing inside the brain ventricles. Most likely, the dominant reason for extensive studies of the choroid plexus is the identification of this epithelium as the source of the majority of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid. This finding has direct relevance for studies of diseases and conditions with deranged central fluid volume or ionic balance. While the concept is supported by the vast majority of the literature, the implication of the choroid plexus in secretion of the cerebrospinal fluid was recently challenged once again. Three newer and promising areas of current choroid plexus-related investigations are as follows: 1 ) the choroid plexus epithelium as the source of mediators necessary for central nervous system development, 2 ) the choroid plexus as a route for microorganisms and immune cells into the central nervous system, and 3 ) the choroid plexus as a potential route for drug delivery into the central nervous system, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the purpose of this review is to highlight current active areas of research in the choroid plexus physiology and a few matters of continuous controversy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Transport across the choroid plexus epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle Hasager

    2017-01-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a secretory epithelium par excellence. However, this is perhaps not the most prominent reason for the massive interest in this modest-sized tissue residing inside the brain ventricles. Most likely, the dominant reason for extensive studies of the choroid plexus...... is the identification of this epithelium as the source of the majority of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid. This finding has direct relevance for studies of diseases and conditions with deranged central fluid volume or ionic balance. While the concept is supported by the vast majority of the literature......, the implication of the choroid plexus in secretion of the cerebrospinal fluid was recently challenged once again. Three newer and promising areas of current choroid plexus-related investigations are as follows: 1) the choroid plexus epithelium as the source of mediators necessary for central nervous system...

  16. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Mi Sook

    2006-01-01

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections

  17. Epidural steroid injection for lumbosacral radiculopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook [The Catholic University of Korea, Pucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Low back pain combined with radicular pain remains as one of the most challenging musculoskeletal problems for its therapeutic management. This malady results from nerve root impingement and/or inflammation that causes neurologic symptoms in the distribution of the affected nerve root(s) Conservative treatment, percutaneous spine interventions and surgery have all been used as treatment; and the particular treatment that's chosen depends on the severity of the clinical and neurologic presentation. In 1930, Evans reported that sciatica could treated by epidural injection. The use of epidural corticosteroid injections for the treatment of axial and radicular back pain was first reported in 1953. Epidural steroid injections are currently used by many medical professionals for the treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Performing 'blind' epidural steroid injection lacks target specificity that often results in incorrect delivery of medication to the lesion. Imaging-guided steroid injections are now becoming more popular despite the controversy regarding their efficacy. Many reports, including a few randomized controlled trials, have documented the clinical utility of epidural steroid injections.

  18. Osseous anatomy of the lumbosacral spine in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, P D; Ahn, N U; Ahn, U M; Nallamshetty, L; Rose, P S; Kuszyk, B S; Fishman, E K

    2000-11-01

    This study examines pedicle widths, laminar thicknesses, and scalloping values for lumbosacral spine elements in Marfan volunteers. Comparisons were made between these measurements and norms as well as measurements between Marfan patients with and without dural ectasia. To determine if the lumbosacral vertebral elements are altered in the patient with Marfan syndrome. Several abnormalities have been noted in Marfan lumbar spine, including pedicular attenuation and widened interpediculate distances. This may be due to abnormalities of growth or presence of dural ectasia. Given the large numbers of Marfan patients requiring spinal surgery and the high postoperative failure rate, better understanding of the bony anatomy of Marfan lumbar spine is necessary, especially if use of instrumentation is anticipated. Thirty-two volunteers with Marfan syndrome based on the Ghent criteria underwent spiral computed tomography of the lumbosacral spine. Images were evaluated for dural ectasia, and measurements of pedicle width, laminar thickness, and vertebral scalloping were made. Pedicle widths and laminar thicknesses were significantly smaller in Marfan patients at all levels (Plaminar thickness from L5-S2 and pedicle widths at all lumbar levels were significantly reduced (Plaminar thickness are significantly reduced in Marfan individuals. Those with dural ectasia demonstrate increased bony erosion of anterior and posterior elements of lumbosacral spine. Preoperative planning and routine computed tomography scans are recommended when operating on Marfan lumbosacral spine.

  19. Surgical treatment of lumbosacral foraminal stenosis using a lateral approach in twenty dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödde, Thomas; Steffen, Frank

    2007-10-01

    To describe clinical signs, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and surgical findings using a lateral approach to the lumbosacral intervertebral foramen and to evaluate clinical outcomes in dogs with or without concurrent dorsal decompression and annulectomy. Retrospective study. Dogs (n=20) with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS). Medical records (2002-2006) of dogs that had lumbosacral lateral foraminotomy alone or in combination with dorsal decompression were reviewed. Degree of dysfunction was assessed separately for each pelvic limb; dogs with unilateral signs were included in group A, those with bilateral signs in group B. Retrieved data were: signalment, history, neurologic status on admission, 3 days, 6 weeks, and 6 months postoperatively, duration of clinical signs, results of MRI, surgical site(s), intraoperative findings, and outcome. Based on the clinical and MRI findings unilateral foraminotomy was performed in 8 dogs, bilateral foraminotomy in 1 dog, unilateral foraminotomy with concurrent dorsal decompression in 7 dogs, and bilateral foraminotomy with concomitant dorsal decompression in 4 dogs. Surgery confirmed the presence of foraminal stenosis in all dogs, with osteophyte formation and soft tissue proliferations being the most common lesions. Outcome was good to excellent in 19 dogs and poor in 1 dog. Mean follow-up was 15.2 months (range, 6-42 months). Lateral foraminotomy addresses compressive lesions within exit and middle zones of the lumbosacral foramen. Successful surgical management of DLSS is dependent on recognition and correction of each of the compressive lesions within the lumbosacral junction.

  20. Prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Fialová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral transitional vertebra is a common congenital anomaly of the spine in dogs. It is a predisposing factor for degeneration of the lumbosacral spine and development of cauda equina syndrome or hip dysplasia in affected dogs. The aim of the study was to determine breed predisposition, types, and prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in the canine population in the Czech Republic. The value of laterolateral radiographs of the lumbosacral junction in the diagnosis of LTV was also evaluated. Prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae was determined by reviewing ventrodorsal radiographs of pelvis with an extended hip of 1,878 dogs. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae were detected in 188 dogs (10%. German Shepherd, Alaskan Malamute and Bohemian Shepherd were found to be highly predisposed breeds. The most common type of lumbosacral transitional vertebra was type II with separation of the first sacral vertebra from sacrum and presence of rudimentary intervertebral space between S1 and the sacral median crest (37.8% of the lumbosacral transitional vertebrae. Type I was detected in 29.2% and the asymmetric type of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra (type III in 33%. Laterolateral radiograph of the lumbosacral spine was evaluated in 126 dogs from 188 with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae. Rudimentary intervertebral disc space between S1 and S2 in laterolateral radiographs was detected in 100% of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae with type II and III, and was not detected in type I. The findings on lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in the Czech Republic will extend knowledge about the disease. Both ventrodorsal hip-extended and laterolateral radiographs should be recommended for routine screening and reliable differentiation among the three different types of lumbosacral transitional vertebra.

  1. Do neurosurgeons subscribe to the guideline lumbosacral radicular syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Braak (Sigrid); C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBackground: This study presents a survey of the opinion of neurosurgeons on the multidisciplinary clinical guideline 'lumbosacral radicular syndrome'. The aim was to describe to what extent neurosurgeons in the Netherlands endorse the content of this guideline. The guideline was issued

  2. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains | de Beer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results demonstrated that both groups responded favourably to their specific treatment over time. However, the group that received lumbosacral manipulations proved to show a quicker response to treatment; and the poststudy follow-up of this same group showed markedly more positive feedback than the group that ...

  3. Assessment of dose received by organ in lumbosacral examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltyeib, Nashwa Kheirallah

    2014-11-01

    The biological damage produced by radiation is closely related to the amount of energy absorbed in the case x- rays. Measurement of produced ionizing provides a useful assessment of the total energy absorbed. This study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital in period of January to June 2014. This study was performed to assess the effective dose (ED) received in lumbosacral radiography examination and to analyze effective dose distributions among radiological department under study. The study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, covering two x-ray units and a sample of 50 patients. The following parameters were recorded: age weight, height, body mass index (BMI) derived from mass (kg) and (height. (m)) and exposure factors. The dose was measured for lumbosacral x- rays examination. For effective dose calculation, the entrance surface dose (ESD) values were estimated from the x-ray tube output parameters for lumbosacral spine A P and lateral examinations. The ED values were then calculated from the obtained ESD values using IAEA calculation methods. Effective doses were than calculated from energy imported using ED conversion factors by IAEA. The results of ED values calculated showed that patient exposures were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were (2.49 ±0.03) mGy and (5.5.60 ± 0.0.22) mGy for Lumbosacral spine A P and lateral examinations, respectively. Further studies are recommended with more number of patients and using more modalities for comparison.(Author)

  4. Partial lumbosacral transitional vertebra resection for contralateral facetogenic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brault, J S; Smith, J; Currier, B L

    2001-01-15

    Case report of surgically treated mechanical low back pain from the facet joint contralateral to a unilateral anomalous lumbosacral articulation (Bertolotti's syndrome). To describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and management of facet-related low back pain in a 17-year-old cheerleader and its successful surgical treatment with resection of a contralateral anomalous articulation. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae are common in the general population. Bertolotti's syndrome is mechanical low back pain associated with these transitional segments. Little is known about the pathophysiology and mechanics of these vertebral segments and their propensity to be pain generators. Treatment of this syndrome is controversial, and surgical intervention has been infrequently reported. A retrospective chart analysis and radiographic review were performed. Repeated fluoroscopically guided injections implicated a symptomatic L6-S1 facet joint contralateral to an anomalous lumbosacral articulation. Eventually, a successful surgical outcome was achieved with resection of the anomalous articulation. Clinicians should consider the possibility that mechanical low back pain may occur from a facet contralateral to a unilateral anomalous lumbosacral articulation, even in a young patient. Although reports of surgical treatment of Bertolotti's syndrome are infrequent, resection of the anomalous articulation provided excellent results in this patient, presumably because of reduced stresses on the symptomatic facet.

  5. Dermatoglyphs and brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovina, Svetislav; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Milicić, Jasna; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2006-09-01

    Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a handicap quite commonly encountered in daily routine. Although birth trauma is considered to be the major cause of the defect, it has been observed that PBPP occurs only in some infants born under identical or nearly identical conditions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis of genetic predisposition for PBPP. It is well known that digito-palmar dermatoglyphs can be used to determine hereditary roots of some diseases. Thus, we found it meaningful to do a study analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs in this disease as well, conducting it on 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP. The control group was composed of fingerprints obtained from 400 adult and phenotypically healthy subjects (200 males and 200 females) from the Zagreb area. The results of multivariate and univariate analysis of variance have shown statistically significant differences between the groups observed. In spite of lower percentage of accurately classified female subjects by discriminant analysis, the results of quantitative analysis of digito-palmar dermatoglyphs appeared to suggest a genetic predisposition for the occurrence of PBPP.

  6. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-jun Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L 3 to S 1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49% and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%. Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  7. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yong; Fan, Zi-Wen; Li, Xin-Chun; Cao, Bing-Yi

    2015-11-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbosacral stenosis. T2WI showed that the residual dural sac area was less than two-thirds that of the corresponding normal area in patients from L3 to S1 stenosis. On T1WI and T2WI, 74 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots from 31 patients showed compression changes. DTI showed thinning and distortion in 36 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (49%) and abruption in 17 lumbosacral spinal nerve roots (23%). Moreover, fractional anisotropy values were reduced in the lumbosacral spinal nerve roots of patients with lumbosacral stenosis. These findings suggest that DTI can objectively and quantitatively evaluate the severity of lumbosacral spinal nerve root compression.

  8. Role of dexamethasone in brachial plexus block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, M.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to (lignocaine) on the onset and duration of axillary brachial plexus block. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, from September 2009 to March 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 100 patients, who were scheduled for elective hand and forearm surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were randomly allocated to group A in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of isotonic saline (0.9%) and group B in which patients received 40 ml 1.5% lidocaine with 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg). Nerve stimulator with insulated needle for multiple stimulations technique was used to locate the brachial plexus nerves. After the injection onset of action and duration of sensory blockade of brachial plexus were recorded at 5 minutes and 15 minutes interval. Results: Group A showed the onset of action of 21.64 ± 2.30 min and in group B it was 15.42 ± 1.44 min (p< 0.001). Duration of nerve block was 115.08 ± 10.92 min in group A and 265.42 ± 16.56 min in group B (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lignocaine solution in axillary brachial plexus block prolongs the duration of sensory blockade significantly. (author)

  9. Functional and Genetic Analysis of Choroid Plexus Development in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Elizabeth Henson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFPsj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFPsj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease.

  10. Severe brachial plexus injuries in rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altaf, F; Mannan, K; Bharania, P; Sewell, M D; Di Mascio, L; Sinisi, M

    2012-03-01

    We describe the mechanisms, pattern of injuries, management and outcomes of severe injuries to the brachial plexus sustained during the play of rugby. Thirteen cases of severe injury to the brachial plexus caused by tackles in rugby had detailed clinical assessment, and operative exploration of the brachial plexus. Seventeen spinal nerves were avulsed, two were ruptured and there were traction lesions in continuity of 24 spinal nerves. The pattern of nerve lesion was related to the posture of the neck and the forequarter at the moment of impact. Early repair by nerve transfer enabled some functional recovery, and decompression of lesions in continuity was followed by recovery of nerve function and relief of pain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Choroid plexus carcinoma. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strojan, P.; Jereb, B.; Popovic, M.; Surlan, K.

    2004-01-01

    Background. The opinions on the value of adjuvant therapy in choroid plexus carcinomas vary. The aim of present report is to present a case of successful therapy of this rare tumor. Result. A fourteen-year-old girl with third ventricle tumor had non-radical surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy and irradiation. She is alive with no evidence of disease 8.5 years after diagnosis. The role of adjuvant therapy in the context of literature data is discussed. Conclusion. For choroids plexus carcinomas, adjuvant multiagent chemotherapy and craniospinal radiotherapy following surgery should be considered. (author)

  12. Changes in lumbosacral spinal nerve roots on diffusion tensor imaging in spinal stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong-jun Hou; Yong Huang; Zi-wen Fan; Xin-chun Li; Bing-yi Cao

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral degenerative disc disease is a common cause of lower back and leg pain. Conventional T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) scans are commonly used to image spinal cord degeneration. However, these modalities are unable to image the entire lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Thus, in the present study, we assessed the potential of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative assessment of compressed lumbosacral spinal nerve roots. Subjects were 20 young healthy v...

  13. Dural ectasia and conventional radiography in the Marfan lumbosacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, N.U.; Nallamshetty, L.; Ahn, U.M.; Buchowski, J.M.; Kebaish, K.M.; Sponseller, P.D.; Rose, P.S.; Garrett, E.S.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To determine how well conventional radiographic findings can predict the presence of dural ectasia in Marfan patients.Design and patients. Twelve Marfan patients without dural ectasia and 21 Marfan patients with dural ectasia were included in the study. Five radiographic measurements were made of the lumbosacral spine: interpediculate distance, scalloping value, sagittal canal diameter, vertebral body width, and transverse process width.Results. The following measurements were significantly larger in patients with dural ectasia: interpediculate distances at L3-L4 levels (P 38.0 mm, sagittal diameter at S1 >18.0 mm, or scalloping value at L5 >5.5 mm.Conclusion. Dural ectasia in Marfan syndrome is commonly associated with several osseous changes that are observable on conventional radiographs of the lumbosacral spine. Conventional radiography can detect dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome with a very high specificity (91.7%) but a low sensitivity (57.1%). (orig.)

  14. Lumbosacral pain in ballet school students. Pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drężewska, Marlena; Śliwiński, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    The unique biomechanical demands placed on ballet students predispose to injury and pain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of lumbosacral pain in ballet school students and to identify possible risk factors for the pain. The study group comprised 71 ballet school students, including 45 females and 26 males, aged 15-18 years (mean 16.5 years). In order to identify possible risk factors for pain, a survey was conducted, the angle of sacral bone inclination was measured using a mechanical inclinometer and the BMI was calculated. A VAS scale was used for a subjective assessment of pain intensity. Low back pain was reported by 44 patients (62%). A comparison of sacral inclination angles in a position with the feet placed parallel and in the turnout position showed statistically significant changes in the angle among respondents reporting pain (p ballet school stu dents can increase the risk of lumbosacral pain.

  15. Comparison of Lumbosacral Alignment in Geriatric and Non-Geriatric patients suffering low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocyigit, Burhan Fatih; Berk, Ejder

    2018-01-01

    Lumbosacral alignment is a crucial factor for an appropriate spinal function. Changes in spinal alignment lead to diminished body biomechanics. Additionally, lumbosacral alignment may affect quality of life, sagittal balance and fall risk in elderly. In this study, we aimed to compare lumbosacral alignment in geriatric and non-geriatric patients suffering from low back pain. A total of 202 (120 male and 82 female) patients who visited to physical medicine and rehabilitation clinic with low back pain between January 2017 and August 2017 were enrolled in this study. Standing lateral lumbar radiographs were obtained from the electronic hospital database. Lumbar lordosis angle, sacral tilt, lumbosacral angle and lumbosacral disc angle were calculated on lateral standing lumbar radiographs. The mean age of the non-geriatric group was 43.02 ± 13.20 years, the geriatric group was 71.61 ± 6.42 years. In geriatric patients, lumbar lordosis angle, sacral tilt and lumbosacral disc angle were significantly smaller (p = 0.042, p = 0.017 and p = 0.017). No significant differences were observed in lumbosacral angle between the groups (p = 0.508). Our study indicates the specific changes in lumbosacral alignment with aging. Identifying these changes in lumbosacral alignment in the geriatric population will enable to create proper rehabilitation strategies.

  16. Developmental feature of the lumbosacral vertebral arch in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Morota, Nobuhito; Ihara, Satoshi

    2007-01-01

    We investigated a developmental feature of the lumbosacral vertebral arch in childhood that has rarely been reported previously. Sixty-seven patients underwent functional posterior rhizotomy from September 2000 to June 2006 at National Center for Child Health and Development. Sixty of these patients, who had no deformity in their lumbosacral spine, were included in this study and their Computed Tomography (CT) images were analyzed retrospectively. There were 36 boys and 24 girls, aged from 2-12 years. The rate and mean number of non-union vertebral arches between L1 and S3 were 78.3% (95% CI, 65.8-87.9%) and 1.7 (standard deviation (SD), 1.3). The non-union arch was most frequently found at the S1 level, and was more significantly observed in the younger age group (2-5 years of age). The S4 and S5 arches, which often remained open as the sacral hiatus, were constantly open in childhood. This study demonstrates that the vertebral arches of the lumbosacral spine in normal development are often not fused during childhood. It is important to differentiate normal non-union arches from pathological spina bifida. (author)

  17. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doppler assessment of vessels was performed at fixed time intervals. ... plexus analgesia group versus local infiltration group at all observation points up to and including six weeks post fistula ... has a negligible effect on vessel diameter and blood flow. .... Normality of data was checked by measures of Kolmogorov–.

  18. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K.; Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K.

    1989-01-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.)

  19. [Usefullness of intrasacral fixation in an extremely unstable lumbosacral spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, Tsukasa; Nishiguchi, Mitsuhisa; Kusaka, Noboru; Takayama, Kazuhiro; Maeda, Yasuhiko; Ogihara, Kotaro; Nakagawa, Minoru

    2007-04-01

    Intrasacral fixation technique devised by Jackson is said to provide rigid lumbosacral fixation. We treated 3 cases of lumbosacral lesions using this technique in which lumbosacral segment had become extremely unstable during surgical intervention adding to the effect of original lesions. In all cases, surgeries were performed in 2 stages, intrasacral fixation and anterior stabilization. Case 1: A 52-year-old male was diagnosed fungal discitis and spondylitis at L4 and L5. X-ray showed destruction of the vertebral bodies. L2, L3 and sacrum were fixed posteriorly using the intrasacral fixation technique. One week after the first operation, L4 and L5 vertebral bodies were replaced by long fibula grafts through the extraperitoneal approach. Case 2: A 25-year-old female with cauda equina syndrome and abnormal body form diagnosed as having spondyloptosis in which the entire vertebral body of L5 had descended below the endplate of S1. MR imaging revealed marked canal stenosis at the S1 level. In the first surgery, L5 vertebral body was resected through the transperitoneal approach. After 1 week of bed rest, posterior segments of L5 were resected, L4 was affixed to the sacrum and anterior stabilization was achieved with 2 mesh cages and lumbosacral spine was fixed using the intrasacral fixation technique. Case 3: A 64-year-old female was diagnosed as having pyogenic discitis and osteomyelitis at the L5-S1 level. In spite of successful medical treatment for infection, low back pain continued. Radiologically, L5 vertebral body was shown to have collapsed and slipped anteriorly over the sacrum. L3, L4 and sacrum were fixed by intrasacral fixation. One week after the first operation, the L5/S1 disc and the suppurtive vertebral bodies were resected through the extraperitoneal approach and anterior stabilization was performed with iliac bone grafts. At follow-up for a minimum of 6 months, initial fixation was maintained in all 3 cases and bony fusion was obtained. The

  20. Nucleus retroambiguous projections to lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the male cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderhorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    Recently, in the female cat, nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) projections have been described as distinct motoneuronal cell groups in the lumbar enlargement, possibly involved in lordosis behavior. The present study deals with the NRA-lumbosacral pathway in the male cat, Lumbosacral injections of wheat

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in four dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haan, J.J. de; Shelton, S.B.; Ackerman, N.

    1993-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging was used to diagnose degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in four dogs that had physical and neurologic signs consistent with a cauda equina lesion. Nerve root displacement by protruding disc material and loss of epidural fat were identified. In all dogs, the diagnosis was confirmed by dorsal laminectomy of the lumbosacral area

  2. Pedicle screw-rod fixation : a feasible treatment for dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tellegen, Anna R; Willems, Nicole; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis is a common problem in large breed dogs. For severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, conservative treatment is often not effective and surgical intervention remains as the last treatment option. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess

  3. Retrospective review of lumbosacral dissociations in blast injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Melvin D; Lehman, Ronald A; Cooper, Patrick; Frisch, Michael; Andersen, Romney C; Bellabarba, Carlo

    2011-04-01

    Retrospective review of medical records and radiographs. We assessed the clinical outcomes of lumbosacral dissociation (LSD) after traumatic, combat-related injuries, and to review our management of these distinct injuries and report our preliminary follow-up. LSD injuries are an anatomic separation of the pelvis from the spinal column, and are the result of high-energy trauma. A relative increase in these injuries has been seen in young healthy combat casualties subjected to high-energy blast trauma. We performed a retrospective review of inpatient/outpatient medical records and radiographs for all patients treated at our institution with combat-related lumbosacral dissociations. Twenty-three patients met inclusion criteria of combat-related lumbosacral dissociations with one-year follow-up. Patients were treated as follows: no fixation (9), sacroiliac screw fixation (8), posterior spinal fusion (5) and sacral plate (1). All patients with radiographic evidence of a zone III sacral fracture, in addition to associated lumbar fractures indicating loss of the iliolumbar ligamentous complex integrity were included. In 15 patients, the sacral fracture were an H or U type zone III fracture, whereas in the remaining nine, the sacral fracture was severely comminuted and unable to classify (six open fractures). There was no difference in visual analog scale (VAS) between treatment modalities. Two open injuries had residual infections. One patient treated with an L4-ilium posterior spinal fusion with instrumentation required instrumentation removal for infection. At a mean follow-up of 1.71 years (range, 1-4.5), 11 patients (48%) still reported residual pain and the mean VAS at latest follow-up was 1.7 (range, 0-7). Operative stabilization promoted healing and earlier mobilization, but carries a high-postoperative risk of infection. Nonoperative management should be considered in patients whose comorbidities prevent safe stabilization.

  4. The effect of lumbosacral manipulation on growing pains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid de Beer

    2015-10-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether lumbosacral manipulations have an effect on growing pain symptoms. Methods: Thirty participants with growing pains between the ages of 4 and 12 years were recruited. The participants were placed into two groups of 15 participants each. Group 1 received lumbosacral manipulations to restricted joints as determined by motion palpation, while Group 2 never received any professional intervention. Often parent(s/guardian(s of children who suffer from growing pains will rub the child's legs and offer verbal reassurance in an attempt to console their children. Parent(s/guardian(s of both groups were encouraged to continue to do this throughout the duration of the trial. Instructions were given to the parents so that the same rubbing technique and rubbing cream (aqueous cream were used. Subjective changes were tracked using a pain diary that the parent(s/guardian(s were asked to complete, a six-week post-study follow-up question regarding children's growing pains and the Oucher self-report pain scale. Objective measures consisted of pressure algometer readings of the tibialis anterior muscle belly. Results: The statistical data was analysed using the Friedman test, Manne—Whitney test and the Wilcoxon Signed-Rank test. The results demonstrated that both groups responded favourably to their specific treatment over time. However, the group that received lumbosacral manipulations proved to show a quicker response to treatment; and the post study follow-up of this same group showed markedly more positive feedback than the group that did not receive the treatment. These results highlighted the positive effects of chiropractic manipulation on growing pain symptoms. Conclusion: The results from this study, specifically the feedback from parent(s/guardians(s and the pain diaries, indicated that spinal manipulation is beneficial in the treatment of growing pains. The results also showed that other methods of treating growing

  5. Anomalous rostral lumbosacral root emergence from the thecal sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Parghi, A.; Siegal, T.; Hershey, B.L.; Yablon, J.; Jaffe, S.

    1989-01-01

    Anomalous rostral lumbosacral root emergence (AARE) has important clinical implications and has received little attention. The authors have studied the occurrence of this anomaly and presentation of cases in which it was paramount in causing radiculopathy. AARE was noted with the following occurrence rates in 500 cases: L3, 0%; L4, 1%; L5, 9%, and S1, 16%. In ARRE, the roots lie laterally between the superior facet and the annulus and are subject to compression by minimal disk bulging or facet hypertrophy. One must track the individual nerve roots on lumbar CT and MR imaging to detect this subtle condition

  6. Neurotization of elements of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, A H

    1991-01-01

    Satisfactory therapy for an avulsion injury of the brachial plexus has yet to be described. Dorsal root entry zone lesions will usually mitigate the searing pain which is so disabling in some of these patients. Neurotization procedures are effective in restoring limited function to these patients. The most useful isolated movement of the upper extremity is elbow flexion, which is thus the primary target of neurotization procedures. Intercostal nerves and elements of the cervical plexus are the most commonly used donor nerves for neurotization procedures. From our experience and from a review of the literature, it appears that these procedures will be successful in approximately 50% of cases. It must be stressed that before performing a nerve transfer, the surgeon must be certain that the patient is not a candidate for a simple nerve graft.

  7. Choroid plexus transport: gene deletion studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keep Richard F

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review examines the use of transporter knockout (KO animals to evaluate transporter function at the choroid plexus (the blood-CSF barrier; BCSFB. Compared to the blood-brain barrier, there have been few such studies on choroid plexus (CP function. These have primarily focused on Pept2 (an oligopeptide transporter, ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters, Oat3 (an organic anion transporter, Svct2 (an ascorbic acid transporter, transthyretin, ion transporters, and ion and water channels. This review focuses on the knowledge gained from such studies, both with respect to specific transporters and in general to the role of the CP and its impact on brain parenchyma. It also discusses the pros and cons of using KO animals in such studies and the technical approaches that can be used.

  8. Lesions in nerves and plexus after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vees, W.

    1978-01-01

    Apart from the typical, radiation-induced changes in the skin, common secondary findings were oedemas, radiation-induced ulceration, fibroses of the mediastinum and lungs, pleura adhesions, and osteoradionecroses. In one patient with radiogenic paresis of the plexus brachialis, irradiation of the spinal cord because of epidural metastases of a mammary carcinoma resulted in radiation myelopathy which was verified by laminectomy. Observations of radiogenic lesions of the plexus brachialis show that the usual site of the lesion in the vasomotoric nerve bundle is the axilla. The lesion is assumed to be caused mainly by an overlapping of the axillary, infraclavicular and supraclavicular fields of irradiation which results in a dose peak in the axilla. (orig./AJ) 891 AJ/orig.- 892 MKO [de

  9. Symptomatic bilateral xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Tural Emon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomas (XGRs of the choroid plexus are rare, asymptomatic, and benign lesions usually found incidentally. Here, we present a case of a 47-year-old male with bilateral XGR of the choroid plexus with periventricular edema and discuss our case in relation to a review of existing literature pertaining to the radiology of XGRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral trigonal XGR causing brain edema without ventricular dilatation. Despite the fact that they can cause hydrocephalus, XGRs are silent and benign lesions. Although the etiopathology of XGRs remains poorly understood, enhanced imaging analyses may provide additional information regarding edema and focal white matter signal changes.

  10. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  11. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L.; Shah, Apurva S.

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically req...

  12. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Neurolytic celiac plexus block, Cytokine, Nuclear translocation, Partial hepatectomy, Stress, ... International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index ... inflammatory reactions, leading to over-activation.

  13. Dural ectasia and conventional radiography in the Marfan lumbosacral spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, N U [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Nallamshetty, L; Ahn, U M; Buchowski, J M; Kebaish, K M; Sponseller, P D [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); Rose, P S [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Garrett, E S [Dept. of Oncology, Division of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To determine how well conventional radiographic findings can predict the presence of dural ectasia in Marfan patients.Design and patients. Twelve Marfan patients without dural ectasia and 21 Marfan patients with dural ectasia were included in the study. Five radiographic measurements were made of the lumbosacral spine: interpediculate distance, scalloping value, sagittal canal diameter, vertebral body width, and transverse process width.Results. The following measurements were significantly larger in patients with dural ectasia: interpediculate distances at L3-L4 levels (P<0.03); scalloping values at the L1 and L5 levels (P<0.05); sagittal diameters of the vertebral canal at L5-S1 (P<0.03); transverse process to width ratios at L2 (P<0.03). Criteria were developed for diagnosis of dural ectasia in Marfan patients. These included presence of one of the following: interpediculate distance at L4 >38.0 mm, sagittal diameter at S1 >18.0 mm, or scalloping value at L5 >5.5 mm.Conclusion. Dural ectasia in Marfan syndrome is commonly associated with several osseous changes that are observable on conventional radiographs of the lumbosacral spine. Conventional radiography can detect dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome with a very high specificity (91.7%) but a low sensitivity (57.1%). (orig.)

  14. HISTOMORPHOLOGICAL STUDY OF THORACOLUMBAR FASCIA IN PATIENTS WITH LUMBOSACRAL DISCOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z BEHDADIPOOR

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Thoracolumbar fascia has neural ends in normal positions. It has sensory role and by inhibitory and or excitatory reflexes helps to protect vertebral column. In this research, it has been studied neural ends in thoracolumbar fascia in 42 cases. Our aim was to compare the presence of neural ends in normal individuals and those with lumbosacral discopathy. Methods. The samples were taken from one centimeter of midline at the level of L4-L5 vertebrae, since in this region the posterior layer of thoracolumbar fascia is thicker. Seven of the cases were normal and 35 were patients with lumbosacral discopathy. The samples were processed and serial sections were prepared. Six hundred and thirty sections from the serial sections were selected and 90 percent of these were stained with H&E and the rest of them were stained with Bielschowsky method. The sections were studied by light microscopy. Findings. Unlike the normal individuals, nerve corpuscles were not seen in none of our patients with lumbosacraldiscopathy.UsingBielschowsky,nerveendingswerepresentin normal individuals but they were not visible in patients with discopathy. Conclusion. It is concluded that thoracolumbar fascia in patients with discopathy had insufficient neural ends. Loss of these neural ends may be cause of decreasing proprioceptive information to nervous system and can be an initiating factor to damage the bones, ligaments and muscles.

  15. Complete Cranial Iliac Osteotomy to Approach the Lumbosacral Foramen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dyall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An approach using a complete cranial iliac osteotomy (CCIO to access the lumbosacral (LS foramen in dogs from lateral was developed using cadavers and applied in a clinical patient with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS. The foraminal enlargement in the cadavers and the patient was documented on postoperative CT scans. The preoperative CT scan of the patient showed moderate cranial telescoping of the sacral roof and a moderate central disk protrusion, leading to moderate to severe compression of the cauda equina. In addition, there was lateral spondylosis with consequential stenosis of the right LS foramen. The right L7 nerve had lost its fat attenuation and appeared thickened. After a routine L7S1 dorsal laminectomy with a partial discectomy, a CCIO was performed, providing good access to the LS foramen and the adhesions around the proximal L7 nerve caudoventral to the foramen. The osteotomy was stabilized with a locking plate and a cerclage wire. The dog recovered well from the procedures and after 36 h, the dog walked normally and was discharged from the hospital. Eight and 16 weeks later, the signs of the DLSS had markedly improved. From these data, it can be concluded that the CCIO is a useful approach to the LS foramen and intervertebral disk in selected patients with DLSS, giving good access to the structures around the LS foramen.

  16. [An adult case of intradural lumbo-sacral lipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatayama, T; Sakoda, K; Tokuda, Y; Uozumi, T

    1992-10-01

    A rare case of lumbo-sacral lipoma in an adult case is reported. A 55-year-old male was admitted to the Department of Neurosurgery, Mazda Hospital, after a history of one year of urinary incontinence. Neurologically, no motor or sensory disturbance of the lower extremities was found in this patient. MRI showed a mass with high signal intensity on T2-weighted image, located between L3 to S2 vertebral segments. Metrizamide-CT scan demonstrated the outline of this hypodense mass at the same location as shown on MRI image. A L3 through L5 laminectomy was performed and the tumor was subtotally removed. Microscopic examination revealed that the tumor mass was made up of mature lipoma cells. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. The urinary incontinence was improved slightly. No motor or sensory deficit was found. We thought that MRI was useful for the correct diagnosis of lumbosacral lipoma. And it is best managed by operative removal of the tumor as early as possible after it is diagnosed.

  17. Pedicle screw-rod fixation: a feasible treatment for dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellegen, Anna R; Willems, Nicole; Tryfonidou, Marianna A; Meij, Björn P

    2015-12-07

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis is a common problem in large breed dogs. For severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis, conservative treatment is often not effective and surgical intervention remains as the last treatment option. The objective of this retrospective study was to assess the middle to long term outcome of treatment of severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with pedicle screw-rod fixation with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis. Twelve client-owned dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis underwent pedicle screw-rod fixation of the lumbosacral junction. During long term follow-up, dogs were monitored by clinical evaluation, diagnostic imaging, force plate analysis, and by using questionnaires to owners. Clinical evaluation, force plate data, and responses to questionnaires completed by the owners showed resolution (n = 8) or improvement (n = 4) of clinical signs after pedicle screw-rod fixation in 12 dogs. There were no implant failures, however, no interbody vertebral bone fusion of the lumbosacral junction was observed in the follow-up period. Four dogs developed mild recurrent low back pain that could easily be controlled by pain medication and an altered exercise regime. Pedicle screw-rod fixation offers a surgical treatment option for large breed dogs with severe degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with or without evidence of radiological discospondylitis in which no other treatment is available. Pedicle screw-rod fixation alone does not result in interbody vertebral bone fusion between L7 and S1.

  18. Enhancement of the intrinsic defecation reflex by mosapride, a 5-HT4 agonist, in chronically lumbosacral denervated guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yu; Fujii, Hisao; Katsui, Renta; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki; Takaki, Miyako

    2006-10-01

    The defecation reflex is composed of rectal distension-evoked rectal (R-R) reflex contractions and synchronous internal anal sphincter (R-IAS) reflex relaxations in guinea pigs. These R-R and R-IAS reflexes are controlled via extrinsic sacral excitatory nerve pathway (pelvic nerves), lumbar inhibitory nerve pathways (colonic nerves) and by intrinsic cholinergic excitatory and nitrergic inhibitory nerve pathways. The effect of mosapride (a prokinetic benzamide) on the intrinsic reflexes, mediated via enteric 5-HT(4) receptors, was evaluated by measuring the mechanical activity of the rectum and IAS in anesthetized guinea pigs using an intrinsic R-R and R-IAS reflex model resulting from chronic (two to nine days) lumbosacral denervation (PITH). In this model, the myenteric plexus remains undamaged and the distribution of myenteric and intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal is unchanged. Although R-R and R-IAS reflex patterns markedly changed, the reflex indices (reflex pressure or force curve-time integral) of both the R-R contractions and the synchronous R-IAS relaxations were unchanged. The frequency of the spontaneous R and IAS motility was also unchanged. Mosapride (0.1-1.0 mg/kg) dose-dependently increased both intrinsic R-R (maximum: 1.82) and R-IAS reflex indices (maximum: 2.76) from that of the control (1.0) 6-9 days following chronic PITH. The dose-response curve was similar to that in the intact guinea pig, and had shifted to the left from that in the guinea pig after acute PITH. A specific 5-HT(4) receptor antagonist, GR 113808 (1.0 mg/kg), decreased both reflex indices by approximately 50% and antagonized the effect of mosapride 1.0 mg/kg. This was quite different from the result in the intact guinea pig where GR 113808 (1.0 mg/kg) did not affect either of the reflex indices. The present results indicate that mosapride enhanced the intrinsic R-R and R-IAS reflexes and functionally compensated for the deprivation of extrinsic innervation. The actions of

  19. Lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retriever military working dogs - an exomic exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Meenakshi; Jones, Jeryl C; Yao, Jianbo

    2017-01-01

    Canine lumbosacral stenosis is defined as narrowing of the caudal lumbar and/or sacral vertebral canal. A risk factor for neurologic problems in many large sized breeds, lumbosacral stenosis can also cause early retirement in Labrador retriever military working dogs. Though vital for conservative management of the condition, early detection is complicated by the ambiguous nature of clinical signs of lumbosacral stenosis in stoic and high-drive Labrador retriever military working dogs. Though clinical diagnoses of lumbosacral stenosis using CT imaging are standard, they are usually not performed unless dogs present with clinical symptoms. Understanding the underlying genomic mechanisms would be beneficial in developing early detection methods for lumbosacral stenosis, which could prevent premature retirement in working dogs. The exomes of 8 young Labrador retriever military working dogs (4 affected and 4 unaffected by lumbosacral stenosis, phenotypically selected by CT image analyses from 40 dogs with no reported clinical signs of the condition) were sequenced to identify and annotate exonic variants between dogs negative and positive for lumbosacral stenosis. Two-hundred and fifty-two variants were detected to be homozygous for the wild allele and either homozygous or heterozygous for the variant allele. Seventeen non-disruptive variants were detected that could affect protein effectiveness in 7 annotated (SCN1B, RGS9BP, ASXL3, TTR, LRRC16B, PTPRO, ZBBX) and 3 predicted genes (EEF1A1, DNAJA1, ZFX). No exonic variants were detected in any of the canine orthologues for human lumbar spinal stenosis candidate genes. TTR (transthyretin) gene could be a possible candidate for lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retrievers based on previous human studies that have reported an association between human lumbar spinal stenosis and transthyretin protein amyloidosis. Other genes identified with exonic variants in this study but with no known published association with lumbosacral

  20. Muscle and joint sequelae in brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnisveld, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury is caused by traction on the brachial plexus during delivery or due to a high-energy road traffic accident in young adults. Muscle denervation and subsequent muscle degeneration results in functional limitations of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand including contractures

  1. Lumbosacral transitional anatomy types and disc degenerative changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabukovska-Radulovska Jasminka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: The relationship between presence of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV and disc degenerative changes is unclear. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between different types of LSTV and disc degenerative changes at the transitional and the adjacent cephalad segment. Material and methods: Sixty-three patients (mean age 51.48 ± 13.51 out of200 adults with low back pain who performed MRI examination of the lumbosacral spine, classified as positive for LSTV, were included in the study. Annular tears, disc degeneration according to Phirmann classification and disc herniations were evaluated and graded at transitional and adjacent cephalad level. Results: The severity of disc degeneration at the transitional level and the adjacent level correlated with the types of LSTV. Severe disc degenerative changes were most frequent in articulated connection LSTV types and in combined LSTV type at the transitional level and in osseus connection LSTV types at the adjacent cephalad level. These changes were more frequent in unilateral articulated connection LSTV subtype (64% vs 54%; and in unilateral osseus connection LSTV subtype (25% vs no patients at transitional level, and in bilateral osseus connection LSTV subtype (100% vs 50% at the level above. High prevalence of disc herniations was observed in articulated connection LSTV types as well as in unilateral osseus connection LSTV subtype at transitional and the adjacent cephalad level. At the transitional level higher prevalence of disc herniations was characteristic for unilateral articulated connection LSTV subtype (46%vs 41% and for unilateral osseus connection LSTV subtype (50% vs no patients. At the adjacent level higher prevalence of disc herniations was observed in bilateral articulated connection LSTV subtype (38% vs 27% and in bilateral osseus connection LSTV subtype (50% vs 25%. Conclusions: The compact osseus connection (osseus bridging vs articular

  2. Continuous celiac plexus block and spread of contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Tatsushi; Kawabata, Masahiro; Suda, Takayuki; Koshimizu, Kenji

    1987-01-01

    A continuous celiac plexus block has been developed and is available for use. With this method, the drug can be repeatedly applied and the reproducibility of imaged findings is secured. It is possible to accurately judge the effect by the use of a local anesthetics before the injection of the neurolytics. Imaged findings at the celiac plexus block were classified into 4 types according to the pattern of CT images. Paticularly interesting is a finding that the contrast media injected in the retrocrural space for retrocrural splanchnic nerve block (RSB) permeates through the aortic hiatus as far as the area surrounding the celiac plexus and so-called transcrural celiac plexus block (TCB) takes place. Thus, it was found that the celiac plexus block so far used was a complex of RSB and TCB. (author)

  3. MRI spectrum of findings in lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borre, Daniel G.; Borre, Guillermo E.; Palmieri, Gladys N.; Aude, Flavio A.; Lassalle, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    Lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis (LEL) has been defined as a disease produced by excessive fat deposition within the spinal canal. In the pre MRI-era, this entity has been commonly overlooked. While a mild (or moderate) epidural fat hypertrophy is basically asymptomatic, severe LEL represents the symptomatic end-stage of this disease, conducing in many cases to surgical fat debulking. Since LEL may be concurrent with other substantial spinal abnormalities (e.g. disk herniation) MRI exams may increase our awareness of this condition to avoid its underestimation. MRI enables a reliable LEL characterization and may show its eventual reversibility in obese or corticosteroid receiving patients. This pictorial essay illustrates the usefulness of MRI to demonstrate the ongoing process of epidural fat accumulation in mild, moderate and severe LEL. The different morphologic patterns of the thecal sac produced by advanced LEL are analyzed. LEL and concurrent spinal disorders with superimposed neurological symptoms and signs are illustrated. (author)

  4. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M; Spivak, Jeffrey M; Bendo, John A

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. A Pubmed search using the specific key words "LSTV," "lumbosacral transitional vertebrae," and "Bertolotti's Syndrome" was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a "false joint" susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential sources of low back pain. Further studies with larger

  5. Influence of Radiographic Positioning on Canine Sacroiliac and Lumbosacral Angle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Susan; Savage, Mason; Naughton, Brian; Singh, Susheela; Robertson, Ian; Roe, Simon C; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Mathews, Kyle G

    2018-01-01

     To evaluate the influence of radiographic malpositioning on canine sacroiliac and lumbosacral inclination angles.  Using canine cadavers, lateral pelvic radiographs were acquired with the radiographic beam in a neutral position and then rotated 5, 10 and 15° to mimic rotational malpositioning. The focal point of the beam was then focused over the abdomen and again over mid-diaphysis of the femur to mimic an abdominal or femoral radiographic study.  Five degrees of rotational malpositioning did not influence measurements of sacroiliac or lumbosacral inclination, but malpositioning by more than 5° led to a significant decrease in both sacroiliac and lumbosacral angles. Moving the focal point to the femur significantly decreased the measured lumbosacral angle. Abdominally centred radiographs had no effect on lumbosacral and sacroiliac angle measurements.  When evaluating canine lumbosacral and sacroiliac angles radiographically, pelvic rotation of more than 5° should be avoided as should the use of lateral radiographs centred over the femur. Schattauer GmbH Stuttgart.

  6. Lumbar paraspinal muscle transverse area and symmetry in dogs with and without degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, A L; Hecht, S; Millis, D L

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis have decreased lumbar paraspinal muscle transverse area and symmetry compared with control dogs. Retrospective cross-sectional study comparing muscles in transverse T2-weighted magnetic resonance images for nine dogs with and nine dogs without degenerative -lumbosacral stenosis. Mean transverse area was measured for the lumbar multifidus and sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis muscles bilaterally and the L7 vertebral body at the level of the caudal endplate. Transverse areas of both muscle groups relative to L7 and asymmetry indices were compared between study populations using independent t tests. Mean muscle-to-L7 transverse area ratios were significantly smaller in the degenerative lumbosacral stenosis group compared with those in the control group in both lumbar multifidus (0·84 ±0·26 versus 1·09 ±0·25; P=0·027) and sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis (0·5 ±0·15 versus 0·68 ±0·12; P=0·005) muscles. Mean asymmetry indices were higher for both muscles in the group with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis than in the control group, but highly variable and the difference was not statistically significant. These findings suggest that dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis have decreased lumbar paraspinal muscle mass that may be a cause or consequence of the -syndrome. Understanding altered paraspinal muscle characteristics may improve understanding of the -pathophysiology and management options for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. © 2015 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  7. Measurement of light penetration of near-infrared laser at the lumbosacral nerves in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Naoya; Shimoyama, Hiroshi; Kawase, Yuki; Motohara, Shosaku; Okayama, Takamitsu; Niwa, Daisuke; Koyama, Jun

    2018-02-01

    Photobiomodulation or low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been utilized in various areas of medical practice including pain relief, wound healing, and inflammation treatment. Some recent animal studies have reported that near-infrared laser irradiation to the lumbosacral nerves transcutateously relieves neuropathic pain by controlling activity of lumbosacral nerves. However, transcutaneous laser penetration to the nerves has not yet been fully elucidated. Our aim is to determine the light penetration to lumbosacral nerves when near-infrared laser was irradiated transcutateously to lumbosacral nerves. We implanted photodiodes near the lumbosacral nerves of rats and connected the photodiodes to an oscilloscope through an amplifier. Near-infrared lasers (wavelengths: 808 nm and 830 nm) were irradiated through the skin at 2, 5 and 10 W pulses (Duty 10%, 5 Hz) and outputs of photodiodes were collected. After irradiation, the depth of the photodiodes and the nerves from the skin surface were determined by micro-CT device. The result showed that the fluence rate at the lumbosacral nerves was 179+/-19.2 mW/cm2 and 232+/-20.7 mW/cm2 when the 808-nm and 830-nm laser was irradiated at 10 W respectively. These findings would be beneficial for following study of photobiomodulation.

  8. Psammoma bodies - friends or foes of the aging choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanović, Ivan; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Vasović, Ljiljana; Petrović, Dragan; Cekić, Sonja

    2010-06-01

    Psammoma bodies are structures classified in the group of dystrophic calcifications, which occur in some kind of tumors and in choroid plexus during the aging process. Despite early discovery of their presence in choroid plexus stroma, mechanisms responsible for their formation remained unclear. Their presence in some kind of tumors was even more extensively studied, but significant breakthrough in the field of their etiology was not attained, too. However, till today correlation between their presence in tumors and aging is not established. Also, there are not any data about structural differences between ones found in tumors and ones found in choroid plexus. This might points to the assumption that besides the aging, some other causes might be involved in their formation in choroid plexus. Furthermore, it is contradictory that forms, like psammoma bodies, present in such malignant formations as tumors, represent quite benign phenomenon in choroid plexus. Literature data and the results of our previous researches revealed that there might be connections between, these, on the first sight quite different processes. Firstly, psammoma bodies are present in stroma of tumors with predominantly papillomatous morphology, which is present in choroid plexus, too. Initial forms of psammoma bodies might be formed in fibrovascular core of choroid plexus villi, similarly like in tumors papillae of papillary thyroid cancer. Their further growth leads to the progressive destruction of both tumors papillae and choroidal villi. Choroid plexus stroma is characterized by the fenestrated blood vessels presence, which are similar to newly formed vessels in tumors. This makes it vulnerable to the noxious agents from circulation. It can contain lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and myofibroblasts in cases with psammoma bodies, similarly to tumors stroma which is in activated, proinflammatory state. So, all these facts can suggest that similar processes can lead to psammoma

  9. Telocytes in meninges and choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, B O; Gherghiceanu, M; Kostin, S; Ceafalan, L; Popescu, L M

    2012-05-16

    Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified type of interstitial cells present in a wide variety of organs in humans and mammals (www.telocytes.com). They are characterized by a small cell body, but extremely long cell processes - telopodes (Tp), and a specific phenotype. TCs establish close contacts with blood capillaries, nerve fibers and stem cells. We report here identification of TCs by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence in rat meninges and choroid plexus/subventricular zone, in the vicinity of putative stem cells. The presence of TCs in brain areas involved in adult neurogenesis might indicate that they have a role in modulation of neural stem cell fate. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  11. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a cervicomediastinal ... Her voice was hoarse but there was no eye signs suggestive of thyrotoxicosis. ... A presumptive diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with retrosternal extension was made.

  12. Nerve Transfers for Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: Advantages and Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hems, Tim

    2011-01-01

    In recent years nerve transfers have been increasingly used to broaden reconstructive options for brachial plexus reconstruction. Nerve transfer is a procedure where an expendable nerve is connected to a more important nerve in order to reinnervate that nerve. This article outlines the experience of the Scottish National Brachial Plexus Injury Service as our use of nerve transfers has increased. Outcomes have improved for reconstruction of the paralysed shoulder using transfer of the accessor...

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of presumptive lumbosacral discospondylitis in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.L.; Mussman, J.M.; Smith, T.; Biller, D.S.; Hoskinson, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    three-year-old male Boxer dog had hyperesthesia, symmetrical epaxial, gluteal and hind limb muscular atrophy and rear limb ataxia. Neurological deficits included decreased conscious proprioception of the left hind limb, decreased withdrawal and increased patellar reflexes of both hind limbs. The dog had a urinary tract infection with positive culture for Staphylococcus intermedius. On survey radiography of the lumbosacral spine there was active bone proliferation spanning the L7 S1 intervertebral disc space with an epidural filling defect at the ventral aspect of the vertebral canal on epidurography. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), findings were similar to those described for human diskospondylitis including altered signal intensity and nonuniform contrast enhancement of the L7-S1 intervertebral disc, adjacent vertebral end plates and epidural and sublumbar soft tissues. Although skeletal radiography is usually sufficient to reach a diagnosis of discospondylitis, MRI of this patient made it possible to reach a presumptive diagnosis of discospondylitis prior to development of definitive radiographic abnormalities

  14. Prevalence of extraforaminal nerve root compression below lumbosacral transitional vertebrae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Neil A; Lalam, Radhesh K; Tins, Bernhard J; Tyrrell, Prudencia N M; Singh, Jaspreet; Cassar-Pullicino, Victor N

    2014-01-01

    Although pathology at the first mobile segment above a lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) is a known source of spinal symptoms, nerve root compression below an LSTV, has only sporadically been reported. Our objective was to assess the prevalence of nerve root entrapment below an LSTV, review the causes of entrapment, and correlate with presenting symptoms. A retrospective review of MR and CT examinations of the lumbar spine was performed over a 5.5-year period in which the words "transitional vertebra" were mentioned in the report. Nerve root compression below an LSTV was assessed as well as the subtype of transitional vertebra. Correlation with clinical symptoms at referral was made. MR and CT examinations were also reviewed to exclude any other cause of symptoms above the LSTV. One hundred seventy-four patients were included in the study. Neural compression by new bone formation below an LSTV was demonstrated in 23 patients (13%). In all of these patients, there was a pseudarthrosis present on the side of compression due to partial sacralization with incomplete fusion. In three of these patients (13%), there was symptomatic correlation with no other cause of radiculopathy demonstrated. A further 13 patients (57%) had correlating symptoms that may in part be attributable to compression below an LSTV. Nerve root compression below an LSTV occurs with a prevalence of 13% and can be symptomatic in up to 70% of these patients. This region should therefore be carefully assessed in all symptomatic patients with an LSTV.

  15. Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in working dogs: current concepts and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, A J; Thompson, D J; Hartman, A C

    2009-12-01

    Degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) is characterised by intervertebral disc degeneration, with secondary bony and soft-tissue changes leading to compression of the cauda equina. Large-breed, active and working dogs are the most commonly affected by DLSS. Specific manipulative tests allow the clinician to form a high suspicion of DLSS, and initiate investigation. Changes seen using conventional radiography are unreliable, and although contrast radiography represents an improvement, advanced imaging is accepted as the diagnostic method of choice. Treatment involves decompression and/or stabilisation procedures in working dogs, although conservative management may be acceptable in pet dogs with mild signs. Prognosis for return to work is only fair, and there is a high rate of recurrence following conventional surgery. Stabilisation procedures are associated with the potential for failure of the implant, and their use has not gained universal acceptance. A new surgical procedure, dorsolateral foramenotomy, offers a potential advance in the management of DLSS. everal aspects of the pathogenesis, heritability and optimal treatment approach remain uncertain.

  16. Estrogen induces axonal outgrowth in the nucleus retroambiguus-lumbosacral motoneuronal pathway in the adult female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, VGJM; Holstege, G

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, we discovered a new pathway in the cat, which originates from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) and terminates in a distinct set of lumbosacral hindlimb, axial, and pelvic floor motoneuronal cell groups [VanderHorst VG.JM, Holstege G (1995) Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral

  17. Navigation-aided visualization of lumbosacral nerves for anterior sacroiliac plate fixation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Masaki; Nishii, Takashi; Sakai, Takashi; Sugano, Nobuhiko

    2014-06-01

    Anterior sacroiliac joint plate fixation for unstable pelvic ring fractures avoids soft tissue problems in the buttocks; however, the lumbosacral nerves lie in close proximity to the sacroiliac joint and may be injured during the procedure. A 49 year-old woman with a type C pelvic ring fracture was treated with an anterior sacroiliac plate using a computed tomography (CT)-three-dimensional (3D)-fluoroscopy matching navigation system, which visualized the lumbosacral nerves as well as the iliac and sacral bones. We used a flat panel detector 3D C-arm, which made it possible to superimpose our preoperative CT-based plan on the intra-operative 3D-fluoroscopic images. No postoperative complications were noted. Intra-operative lumbosacral nerve visualization using computer navigation was useful to recognize the 'at-risk' area for nerve injury during anterior sacroiliac plate fixation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gülşen, İsmail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  19. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  20. Feasibility For Measuring Transverse Area Ratios And Asymmetry Of Lumbosacral Region Paraspinal Muscles In Working Dogs Using Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany eCain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Describe computed tomographic (CT anatomy of canine lumbosacral paraspinal muscles, a method for measuring paraspinal muscle transverse area ratios and asymmetry using CT, and application of this method in a small sample of working dogs with versus without lumbosacral pain.Methods: Published anatomy references and atlases were reviewed and discrepancies resolved by examination of anatomic specimens and multi-planar reformatted images to describe transverse CT anatomy of lumbosacral region paraspinal muscles. Sixteen Belgian malinois military working dogs were retrospectively recruited and assigned to lumbosacral pain positive versus negative groups based on medical record entries. A single observer unaware of dog group measured CT transverse areas of paraspinal muscles and adjacent vertebral bodies, in triplicate, for L5-S1 vertebral locations. A statistician compared muscle transverse area ratios and asymmetry at each vertebral location between groups. Results: The relative co-efficient of variation for triplicate CT area measurements averaged 2.15% (N=16. Multifidus lumborum (L6-7, psoas/iliopsoas (L5-6, L6-7, and sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis (L6-7, L7-S1 transverse area ratios were significantly smaller in dogs with lumbosacral pain (n=11 vs. without lumbosacral pain (n=5 (p< 0.05. Muscle asymmetry values were not significantly greater in dogs with vs. without lumbosacral pain. Clinical relevance: Computed tomographic morphometry of lumbosacral region paraspinal muscles is a feasible objective method for use in future evidence-based research studies in working dogs. Potential future research applications include determining whether decreased paraspinal muscle area ratios and/or increased paraspinal muscle asymmetry could be used as markers for preclinical lumbosacral pain in stoic dogs or risk factors for other injuries in high performance canine athletes; or determining whether core muscle strengthening exercise prescriptions

  1. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, A.N.; Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 μg fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 μg fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases ≤5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients

  2. Transitional lumbosacral vertebral anomaly in the dog: a radiographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Transitional lumbosacral vertebral anomalies have for some time been suggested as a possible cause of cauda equina syndrome (especially in the German shepherd dog [GSD]), a condition recently thought to be inherited. The frequency of this condition within a large clinical population and the radiographic features used in its detection are reported. In a group of 143 patients, the sexes were similarly represented and the GSD was greatly over represented. The anomaly is characterised by separation of the first sacral segment that was identified on the lateral view by the presence of a radiolucent disc space between what are normally the first and second sacral segments. On the ventrodorsal view, the anomaly was characterised by separation of the spinous processes between what are normally the first and second sacral segments. In the presence of the transitional segment, the nature of the sacroiliac joint at the level of the anomalous segment varies from a strong ilial attachment, with the presence of a wing-like lateral process, to a weakened ilial attachment because of the presence of a lateral process, shaped as that seen on a lumbar segment. These patterns were present unilaterally or bilaterally and result in symmetrical or asymmetrical patterns. The effect of the weakening of the sacroiliac attachment was thought to result in premature disc degeneration, which, together with spinal canal stenosis, resulted in potential compression of the overlying spinal nerves and creation of a cauda equina syndrome. The condition is thought to have clinical significance and should be selected against in breeding, especially in the GSD

  3. Preliminary Report of Instrumentation in Tuberculous Lumbosacral Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Zin-Naing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aims of spinal tuberculosis treatment are to eradicate the disease, to prevent the development of paraplegia and kyphotic deformity, to manage the existing deformity and neurological deficit, to allow early ambulation and to return the patient back to daily life. Methods for the treatment of tuberculosis of vertebra are still controversial. Conservative treatment includes medical therapy as well as external supports and surgery is indicated for deformity of spine, severe pain, or neurological compromise conditions. Most cases in our country were late presentations with disc space already infected, and after débridement there was a large gap needing bone graft to enhance bony fusion and anterior column support. Although the spine was infected, instrumentation posed no additional hazard in terms of tuberculous discitis. Oga et al. reported that M. tuberculosis has low adhesion capability and forms only a few microcolonies surrounded by a biofilm. Moon et al. stated that interbody fusion performed with classical anterior radical surgery per se was ineffective in the correction of kyphosis and did not prevent the increase in kyphosis angle. The present study focuses on collected clinical and radiographic outcomes in ten patients who underwent Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (PLIF for tuberculous lumbosacral spine. All the cases had instability with kyphotic deformity or loss of lordosis. Clinical outcomes were measured by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, modified MacNab Criteria, and radiographic outcomes (segmental kyphotic angle and total lumbar lordotic, TLL, angle on follow-up to six months. The mean VAS back scores showed decrease, and kyphotic angles and lordotic angles improved. Three cases had excellent results, six good and one fair using the modified MacNab criteria.

  4. Risk Factors for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louden, Emily; Marcotte, Michael; Mehlman, Charles; Lippert, William; Huang, Bin; Paulson, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Over the course of decades, the incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) has increased despite advances in healthcare which would seem to assist in decreasing the rate. The aim of this study is to identify previously unknown risk factors for BPBI and the risk factors with potential to guide preventative measures. A case control study of 52 mothers who had delivered a child with a BPBI injury and 132 mothers who had delivered without BPBI injury was conducted. Univariate, multivariable and logistic regressions identified risk factors and their combinations. The odds of BPBI were 2.5 times higher when oxytocin was used and 3.7 times higher when tachysystole occurred. The odds of BPBI injury are increased when tachysystole and oxytocin occur during the mother’s labor. Logistic regression identified a higher risk for BPBI when more than three of the following variables (>30 lbs gained during the pregnancy, stage 2 labor >61.5 min, mother’s age >26.4 years, tachysystole, or fetal malpresentation) were present in any combination. PMID:29596309

  5. Risk Factors for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Louden

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of decades, the incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI has increased despite advances in healthcare which would seem to assist in decreasing the rate. The aim of this study is to identify previously unknown risk factors for BPBI and the risk factors with potential to guide preventative measures. A case control study of 52 mothers who had delivered a child with a BPBI injury and 132 mothers who had delivered without BPBI injury was conducted. Univariate, multivariable and logistic regressions identified risk factors and their combinations. The odds of BPBI were 2.5 times higher when oxytocin was used and 3.7 times higher when tachysystole occurred. The odds of BPBI injury are increased when tachysystole and oxytocin occur during the mother’s labor. Logistic regression identified a higher risk for BPBI when more than three of the following variables (>30 lbs gained during the pregnancy, stage 2 labor >61.5 min, mother’s age >26.4 years, tachysystole, or fetal malpresentation were present in any combination.

  6. Jogger's fracture and other stress fractures of the lumbo-sacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abel, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The posterior rings of the lower lumbo-sacral vertebrae are subject to stress fractures at any part - pedicle, pars, or lamina. The site of fracture is apparently determined by the axis of weight bearing. The three illustrative clinical examples cited include a jogger with a laminar fracture, a ballet dancer with pedicle fractures, and a nine-year-old boy with fractures of pars and lamina. Chronic low back pain is the typical complaint with stress fractures of the lower lumbo-sacral spine. Special imaging techniques are usually needed to demonstrate these lesions, including vertebral arch views, multi-directional tomography, and computed tomography (CT). (orig.)

  7. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  8. Effect of total lumbar disc replacement on lumbosacral lordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Manish K; Deutsch, Harel

    2012-10-01

    Original article : To study effect of lumbar disc replacement on lumbosacral lordosis. There has been a growing interest in total disc replacement (TDR) for back pain with the rising concern of adjacent segment degeneration. Lumbar fusion surgery has been shown to lead to decrease in lumbar lordosis, which may account for postfusion pain resulting in less acceptable clinical outcome after successful fusion. TDR has recently emerged as an alternative treatment for back pain. There have been very few studies reporting lumbar sagittal outcome after TDR. Retrospective study of radiographic data of 17 patients who underwent TDR for single level degenerative disc disease at the author's institution was carried out. Study included measurement of preoperative and postoperative segmental and global lumbar lordosis and angle of lordosis. Patients age varied from 19 to 54 (mean, 35) years. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 24 months. TDR was performed at L4-5 level in 3 patients and L5-S1 level in 14 patients. The average values for segmental lordosis, global lordosis, and angle of lordosis at the operated level before and after surgery were 17.3, 49.7, and 8.6 degrees and 21.6, 54, and 9.5 degrees, respectively. There was a trend toward significant (P=0.02) and near significant (P=0.057) increase in segmental and global lordosis, respectively after TDR. Although prosthesis increased angle of lordosis at the level implanted in majority of the patients, the difference in preoperative and postoperative angle of lordosis was not significant (P=0.438). In addition, there was no correlation between the angle of implant of chosen and postoperative angle of lordosis at the operated level. The effect of TDR on sagittal balance appears favorable with an increase in global and segmental lumbar lordosis after single level TDR for degenerative disc disease. The degree of postoperative angle of lordosis was not affected by the angle of implant chosen at the operated level and varied

  9. LUMBOSACRAL TRANSITIONAL ANATOMY TYPES AND DISC DEGENERATIVE CHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabukovska Radulovska Jasminka

    2014-07-01

    bridging of the lumbosacral transitional vertebra with the sacrum protects the disc at the transitional level and produces greater stress to adjacent cephalad segment. Bilateral osseus bridging seems to be most protective to the disc at the transitional level, but this type of LSTV produces great stress to the adjacent cephalad level.

  10. Neurosurgeons' management of lumbosacral radicular syndrome evaluated against a clinical guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.J. Luijsterburg (Pim); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Braak (Sigrid); A. Oemraw (Anushka); C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); B.W. Koes (Bart)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractTo establish to what extent neurosurgeons subscribe to the lumbosacral radicular syndrome (LRS) guideline, and to evaluate their current management of patients with LRS against the guideline. All active neurosurgeons in the Netherlands (n=92) were mailed a questionnaire about the

  11. Sirenomelia with an angiomatous lumbosacral myelocystocele in a full-term infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Marybeth; Fitchev, Philip; Adley, Brian; Crawford, Susan E

    2004-05-01

    Sirenomelia, also known as the mermaid syndrome, is a rare congenital malformation of uncertain etiology. It is characterized by fusion of the lower limbs and commonly associated with severe urogenital and gastrointestinal malformations. In this report, we describe the first case of an infant with sirenomelia and a massive angiomatous lumbosacral myelocystocele.

  12. Subjective assessment of the effectiveness of physiotherapeutic methods in lumbosacral discogenic pain syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Grzegorczyk

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging society, lack of habit shaping attitude to correct posture among children and youth and a lifestyle that often requires excessive effort make lumbosacral discogenic pain syndrome a social disease. It is essential that effective methods for the prevention and treatment of these changes go hand in hand with the frequently occurring pains of the lumbosacral spine. Aim of the study: Comparison of the subjective assessment of the patient's feelings related to the lumbosacral discogenic pain. Material and method: The research group included 60 people diagnosed with a lumbosacral discogenic pain. All patients were divided into three groups of 20 people. Each group was subjected to a different type of rehabilitation, depending on the method analyzed - PNF, manual therapy, and physical treatments. The questionnaire was used as the research tool, it was filled in by the respondents. Results: The patients, before and after the treatments, regardless of the type of rehabilitation to which they were subjected, declared that the most common pain is in the buttock, thigh and calf. Before the rehabilitation, the most frequent additional complaints of the examined patients were numbness and muscle weakness, after rehabilitation it was muscle weakness. After the rehabilitation, the number of painkillers taken by the respondents decreased. Only in the case of patients who underwent physiotherapeutic procedures, the number of people taking medication increased. Conclusions: The best results from the analyzed therapies were obtained after manual therapy. The second most effective was PNF therapy, while the weakest result was achieved by physiotherapeutic procedures.

  13. The lumbosacral radiographs in the initial screening of low back pain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Radiological imaging is mandatory, when investigating patients with low back pain (LBP). A minimum of three plain radiographic views of lumbosacral spine are routinely requested for by the attending clinicians. Objective: This study is therefore carried out to determine if only one view will be sufficient in the ...

  14. Agreement between computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankong, Niyada; Voorhout, George; Hazewinkel, Herman A W; Meij, Björn P

    2006-12-15

    To assess the extent of agreement between computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and surgical findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Observational study. 35 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Results of preoperative CT and MRI were compared with surgical findings with respect to degree and location of disk protrusion, position of the dural sac, amount of epidural fat, and swelling of spinal nerve roots. A lumbosacral step was seen on radiographic images from 22 of 32 (69%) dogs, on CT images from 23 of 35 (66%) dogs, and on MR images from 21 of 35 (60%) dogs. Most dogs had slight or moderate disk protrusion that was centrally located. There was substantial or near perfect agreement between CT and MRI findings in regard to degree of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.88), location of disk protrusion (0.63), position of the dural sac (0.89), amount of epidural fat (0.72), and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.60). The degree of agreement between CT and surgical findings and between MRI and surgical findings was moderate in regard to degree and location of disk protrusion (kappa, 0.44 to 0.56) and swelling of spinal nerve roots (0.40 and 0.50). Results indicate that there is a high degree of agreement between CT and MRI findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis but that the degree of agreement between diagnostic imaging findings and surgical findings is lower.

  15. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  16. Complete Brachial Plexus Injury - An Amputation Dilemma. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong CYL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries with intact yet flail limb presents with problems of persistent neuropathic pain and recurrent shoulder dislocations, that render the flail limb a damn nuisance. As treating surgeons, we are faced with the dilemma of offering treatment options, bearing in mind the patient’s functional status and expectations. We present a case of a 55-year old housewife with complete brachial plexus injury begging for surgical amputation of her flail limb, 6 years post-injury. Here we discuss the outcome of transhumeral amputation and the possibility of offering early rather than delayed amputations in this group of patients.

  17. Surgical treatment of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario G. Siqueira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries to the brachial plexus in adults are severely debilitating. They generally affect young individuals. A thorough understanding of the anatomy, clinical evaluation, imaging and electrodiagnostic assessments, treatment options and proper timing of surgical interventions will enable nerve surgeons to offer optimal care to patients. Advances in microsurgical technique have improved the outcome for many of these patients. The treatment options offer patients with brachial plexus injuries the possibility of achieving elbow flexion, shoulder stability with limited abduction and the hope of limited but potentially useful hand function.

  18. Long-term results of obstetric brachial plexus surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kirjavainen , Mikko

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) most often occurs as a result of foetal-maternal disproportion. The C5 and C6 nerve roots of the brachial plexus are most frequently affected. In contrast, roots from the C7 to Th1 that result in total injury together with C5 and C6 injury, are affected in fewer than half of the patients. BPBP was first described by Smellie in 1764. Erb published his classical description of the injury in 1874 and his name became linked with the paralysis that is...

  19. Luxación facetaria unilateral lumbosacra postraumática. [ Post-traumatic lumbosacral unilateral facet dislocation].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González Murillo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the literature have been reported around fifty cases of lumbosacral dislocations; treated most bilateral facet dislocations. We report the case of a female 42 year old with unilateral lumbosacral facet dislocation of one month duration after accident. Circumferential instrumented fusion L5-S1 with interbody cage and pedicle screws L5-S1 was performed.   The lumbosacral dislocation is a rare injury that occurs due to the combination of a high-energy mechanism predisposing anatomical factors. Recent publications advocate the surgical reduction and stabilization with instrumentation as standard treatment.

  20. Prevalence and clinical features of sports-related lumbosacral stress injuries in the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideto; Murakami, Mototsune; Nishizawa, Kazuya

    2017-05-01

    Stress injuries (stress fractures and stress reactions) of the lumbosacral region are one of the causes of sports-related lower back pain in young individuals. These injuries can be detected by bone marrow edema lesion on MRI. However, little is known about the prevalence and clinical features of early stage lumbosacral stress injuries. This study aimed to evaluate the epidemiology of lumbosacral stress injuries. A total of 312 patients (under 18 years of age) who complained of sports-related lower back pain that had lasted for ≥7 days underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. We reviewed patients' records retrospectively. MRI showed that 33.0% of the patients had lumbar stress injuries and 1.6% had sacral stress injuries. Lumbar stress injuries were more common in males than in females and were found in 30% of 13- to 18-year-old patients. About 50% of the patients that participated in soccer or track and field were diagnosed with lumbar stress injuries. No clinical patterns in the frequencies of sacral stress injuries were detected due to the low number of patients that suffered this type of injury. Plain radiography is rarely able to detect the early stage lesions associated with lumbosacral stress injuries, but such lesions can be detected in the caudal-ventral region of the pars interarticularis on sagittal computed tomography scans. Thirty-three percent of young patients that complained of sports-related lower back pain for ≥7 days had lumbar stress injuries, while 1.6% of them had sacral stress injuries. Clinicians should be aware of the existence of these injuries. MRI is useful for diagnosing lumbosacral stress injuries.

  1. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Transsacral Intervertebral Drainage for Pyogenic Spondylodiscitis at the Lumbosacral Junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: t-matsu@tokai-u.jp; Mine, Takahiko, E-mail: mine@tsc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Hayashi, Toshihiko, E-mail: t.hayashi@tokai.ac.jp [Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital (Japan); Kamono, Masahiro, E-mail: kamono@tsc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Taoda, Akiko, E-mail: acco@is.icc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Higaki, Megumu, E-mail: higaki@hachioji-hosp.tokai.ac.jp [Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of General Internal Medicine, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital (Japan); Hasebe, Terumitsu, E-mail: hasebe@tokai-u.jp [Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tokai University Hachioji Hospital (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeTo retrospectively describe the feasibility and efficacy of CT fluoroscopy-guided transsacral intervertebral drainage for pyogenic spondylodiscitis at the lumbosacral junction with a combination of two interventional radiological techniques—CT-guided bone biopsy and abscess drainage.Materials and methodsThree patients with pyogenic spondylodiscitis at the lumbosacral junction were enrolled in this study between July 2013 and December 2015. The procedure of CT fluoroscopy-guided transsacral intervertebral drainage for pyogenic spondylodiscitis at the lumbosacral junction was as follows: the sacrum at S1 pedicle was penetrated with an 11-gauge (G) bone biopsy needle to create a path for an 8-French (F) pigtail drainage catheter. The bone biopsy needle was withdrawn, and an 18-G needle was inserted into the intervertebral space of the lumbosacral junction. Then, a 0.038-inch guidewire was inserted into the intervertebral space. Finally, the 8-F pigtail drainage catheter was inserted over the guidewire until its tip reached the intervertebral space. All patients received six-week antibiotics treatment.ResultsSuccessful placement of the drainage catheter was achieved for each patient without procedural complications. The duration of drainage was 17–33 days. For two patients, specific organisms were isolated; thus, definitive medical therapy was possible. All patients responded well to the treatment.ConclusionsCT fluoroscopy-guided transsacral intervertebral drainage for pyogenic spondylodiscitis at the lumbosacral junction is feasible and can be effective with a combination of two interventional techniques—CT fluoroscopy-guided bone biopsy and abscess drainage.

  2. Surgical anesthesia with a combination of T12 paravertebral block and lumbar plexus, sacral plexus block for hip replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: CARE-compliant 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xijian; Li, Ji; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xi; Mei, Wei

    2017-06-26

    Anesthesia management for patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis scheduled for total hip arthroplasty is challenging due to a potential difficult airway and difficult neuraxial block. We report 4 cases with ankylosing spondylitis successfully managed with a combination of lumbar plexus, sacral plexus and T12 paravertebral block. Four patients were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. All of them were diagnosed as severe ankylosing spondylitis with rigidity and immobilization of cervical and lumbar spine and hip joints. A combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block was successfully used for the surgery without any additional intravenous anesthetic or local anesthetics infiltration to the incision, and none of the patients complained of discomfort during the operations. The combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block, which may block all nerves innervating the articular capsule, surrounding muscles and the skin involved in total hip arthroplasty, might be a promising alternative for total hip arthroplasty in ankylosing spondylitis.

  3. Child neurology: Brachial plexus birth injury: what every neurologist needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina B; Kratz, Johannes R; Jelin, Angie C; Gelfand, Amy A

    2011-08-16

    While most often transient, brachial plexus birth injury can cause permanent neurologic injury. The major risk factors for brachial plexus birth injury are fetal macrosomia and shoulder dystocia. The degree of injury to the brachial plexus should be determined in the neonatal nursery, as those infants with the most severe injury--root avulsion--should be referred early for surgical evaluation so that microsurgical repair of the plexus can occur by 3 months of life. Microsurgical repair options include nerve grafts and nerve transfers. All children with brachial plexus birth injury require ongoing physical and occupational therapy and close follow-up to monitor progress.

  4. Real-Time Ultrasound/MRI Fusion for Suprasacral Parallel Shift Approach to Lumbosacral Plexus Blockade and Analysis of Injectate Spread

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, Jennie Maria Christin; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Al-Karradi, Sinan Naseer Hussain

    2017-01-01

    Fused real-time ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be used to improve the accuracy of advanced image guided procedures. However, its use in regional anesthesia is practically nonexistent. In this randomized controlled crossover trial, we aim to explore effectiveness, procedure-re...

  5. Use of ropivacain and lidocaine for axillary plexus blockade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of ropivacain and lidocaine for axillary plexus blockade. ... of the juvenile anatomy, psychological barriers, time constraints on block ... children in the age group of 2 to 10 years and undergoing short upper limb surgery. ... Browse By Category · Browse Alphabetically · Browse By Country · List All Titles · Free To Read ...

  6. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  7. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...

  8. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyse, J.M. (Jonathan M.); Battat, R. (Robert); Sun, S. (Siyu); A. Saftoiu (Adrian); Siddiqui, A.A. (Ali A.); Leong, A.T. (Ang Tiing); Arias, B.L.A. (Brenda Lucia Arturo); Fabbri, C. (Carlo); Adler, D.G. (Douglas G.); Santo, E. (Erwin); Kalaitzakis, E. (Evangelos); Artifon, E. (Everson); Mishra, G. (Girish); Okasha, H.H. (Hussein Hassan); J.-W. Poley (Jan-Werner); Guo, J. (Jintao); Vila, J.J. (Juan J.); Lee, L.S. (Linda S.); Sharma, M. (Malay); Bhutani, M.S. (Manoop S.); M. Giovannini (Marcello); Kitano, M. (Masayuki); Eloubeidi, M.A. (Mohamad Ali); Khashab, M.A. (Mouen A.); Nguyen, N.Q. (Nam Q.); Saxena, P. (Payal); Vilmann, P. (Peter); Fusaroli, P. (Pietro); Garg, P.K. (Pramod Kumar); Ho, S. (Sammy); Mukai, S. (Shuntaro); Carrara, S. (Silvia); Sridhar, S. (Subbaramiah); S. Lakhtakia (S.); Rana, S.S. (Surinder S.); Dhir, V. (Vinay); Sahai, A.V. (Anand V.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). Methods: Six important

  9. Coeliac Plexus Neurolysis for Upper Abdominal Malignancies Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The use of various imaging modalities in an anterior approach has improved the technical accuracy in reaching the coeliac plexus, thereby avoiding the needle piercing crucial structures and avoiding deposition of drug in the retrocrural space, thereby reducing the risk of neurological complications. Coeliac ...

  10. Ganglion Plexus Ablation in Advanced Atrial Fibrillation: The AFACT Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Antoine H. G.; Berger, Wouter R.; Krul, Sébastien P. J.; van den Berg, Nicoline W. E.; Neefs, Jolien; Piersma, Femke R.; Chan Pin Yin, Dean R. P. P.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; van Boven, WimJan P.; de Groot, Joris R.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with long duration of atrial fibrillation (AF), enlarged atria, or failed catheter ablation have advanced AF and may require more extensive treatment than pulmonary vein isolation. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of additional ganglion plexus (GP) ablation

  11. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and a...

  12. Brachial plexus injury in anterior dislocation of shoulder -case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brachial plexus injury in anterior dislocation of shoulder -case report and literature review. D Dhar. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Orthopaedics and Trauma Vol. 6 () 2007: pp. 37-38. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  13. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on stress and inflammation in rats with partial hepatectomy (PH). Methods: A model of PH rat was established, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP); corticosterone (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); noradrenaline (NA); adrenalin (AD); aspartate ...

  14. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  15. Lumbosacral multiradiculopathy responsive to antibiotic therapy: description of four patients with lumbar spondylosis and a superimposed Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luigetti, Marco; Vollaro, Stefano; Corbetto, Marzia; Salomone, Gaetano; Dicuonzo, Giordano; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2014-12-01

    Lyme disease is a diffuse zoonosis caused by spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi species complex. Neurological manifestations of the disease, involving central or peripheral nervous system, are common. This study describes four consecutive patients with an MRI-proven lumbosacral spondylosis, who complained of progressive worsening of symptoms in the last months in which serological evaluation suggested a superimposed B. Burgdorferi infection. Four patients, all from the Lazio region, were admitted to the Department of Neurology. Extensive laboratory studies and clinical, anamnestic and neurophysiological evaluation were performed in all cases. In all cases, anamnesis revealed a previous diagnosis of lumbosacral foraminal stenosis. Clinical and neurophysiological findings were consistent with a lumbosacral multiradiculopathy. Considering serological evaluation suggestive of a superimposed B. burgdorferi infection a proper antibiotic therapy was started. All cases showed a marked improvement of symptoms. Clinicians should be aware that in all cases of lumbosacral multiradiculopathy, even if a mechanical cause is documented, B. burgdorferi may be a simply treatable condition.

  16. Clinical research of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating brachial plexus injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun-Ming; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Shen-Yu; Zhao, Xin

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injury is one of the difficult medical problems in the world. The aim of this study was to observe the clinical therapeutic effect of comprehensive rehabilitation in treating dysfunction after brachial plexus injury. Forty-three cases of dysfunction after brachial plexus injury were divided into two groups randomly. The treatment group, which totaled 21 patients (including 14 cases of total brachial plexus injury and seven cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with comprehensive rehabilitation including transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, mid-frequency electrotherapy, Tuina therapy, and occupational therapy. The control group, which totaled 22 patients (including 16 cases of total brachial plexus injury and six cases of branch brachial plexus injury), was treated with home-based electrical nerve stimulation and occupational therapy. Each course was of 30 days duration and the patients received four courses totally. After four courses, the rehabilitation effect was evaluated according to the brachial plexus function evaluation standard and electromyogram (EMG) assessment. In the treatment group, there was significant difference in the scores of brachial plexus function pre- and post-treatment (P injury. The scores of two "total injury" groups had statistical differences (P injury" groups had statistical differences (P brachial plexus injury than nonintegrated rehabilitation.

  17. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Iota testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Iota seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. CONCLUSION: Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  19. Electrophysiologic evaluation of lumbosacral single nerve roots using compound muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Taku; Shikata, Hideto; Hase, Hitoshi; Mori, Masaki; Hayashida, Taturo; Osawa, Toru; Mikami, Yasuo; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2003-10-01

    Transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied to the vertebral column produces compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) from the leg muscles. Using this method, we evaluated the efferent pathways of the lumbosacral nerve roots. The subjects were 26 healthy volunteers and 31 patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH). CMAP recordings were obtained from the bilateral vastus medialis, tibialis anterior, extensor digitorum brevis, and abductor hallucis muscles using low-output-impedance stimulation. In normal subjects, the CMAP latency increased linearly with the distance between the stimulating electrode and the recording electrode, with little difference in latency between the left and the right sides in each subject. The CMAP amplitude was significantly lower in the patients with LDH, and the latency was also prolonged when the stimulating electrode was placed above the lesion. This technique may thus be a useful noninvasive method for assessing lumbosacral nerve root function in patients with LDH.

  20. Postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy following seminoma treatment presenting as flaccid neuropathic bladder: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-04-14

    Abstract Introduction Postirradiation lumbosacral syndrome is a radiculopathy induced by radiation injury to the spinal cord. Its usual presentation is motor deficit and or sensory loss involving the lower limbs. Visceral involvement has not been reported previously. Case presentation We describe a case of severe hypotonic bladder caused by radiation-induced spinal cord injury following treatment of stage Ι testicular seminoma in a 38-year-old Caucasian man who had undergone radical orchidectomy and prophylactic paraaortic lymph node irradiation for stage Ι seminoma. Three years later he had clinical and urodynamic findings of hypotonic bladder. The magnetic resonance imaging results suggested a radiation-induced injury. Conclusion Such an unusual presentation of the syndrome of postirradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy can impose a clinical challenge to practicing clinicians. Future studies are required to further delineate the mechanism of injury and further management plans.

  1. Comparison between computed tomographic and surgical findings in nine large-breed dogs with lumbosacral stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.C.; Sorjonen, D.C.; Simpson, S.T.; Coates, J.R.; Lenz, S.D.; Hathcock, J.T.; Agee, M.W.; Bartels, J.E.

    1996-01-01

    In a three-year prospective study, computed tomographic (CT) and surgical findings were compared for nine large breed dogs with lumbosacral stenosis. Surgically-excised tissue was examined histologically in seven dogs and additional necropsy evaluation was performed in one dog. The CT abnormalities observed at sites of confirmed cauda equina compression were: loss of epidural fat, increased soft tissue opacity, bulging of the intervertebral disc margin, spondylosis, thecal sac displacement, narrowed intervertebral foramen, narrowed vertebral canal, thickened articular process, articular process subluxation, articular process osteophyte, and telescoped sacral lamina. The CT characteristics of lumbosacral degenerative disease and discospondylitis were similar to those described in humans. In three dogs, CT findings at the site of cauda equina compression were consistent with congenital or developmental spinal stenosis, but the method of surgical exposure precluded confirmation. Epidural fibrosis (eight dogs) and multi-level CT abnormalities (six dogs) were identified but the cause(s) and significance were unknown

  2. Evaluation of Outcome of Posterior Decompression and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar and Lumbosacral Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Akshay; Jain, Ravikant; Kiyawat, Vivek

    2016-09-01

    For surgical treatment of lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis, the anterior approach has been the most popular approach because it allows direct access to the infected tissue, thereby providing good decompression. However, anterior fixation is not strong, and graft failure and loss of correction are frequent complications. The posterior approach allows circumferential decompression of neural elements along with three-column fixation attained via pedicle screws by the same approach. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome (functional, neurological, and radiological) in patients with lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis operated through the posterior approach. Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis of the lumbar and lumbosacral region from August 2012 to August 2013. Of these, 13 patients had progressive neurological deterioration or increasing back pain despite conservative measures and underwent posterior decompression and pedicle screw fixation with posterolateral fusion. Antitubercular therapy was given till signs of radiological healing were evident (9 to 16 months). Functional outcome (visual analogue scale [VAS] score for back pain), neurological recovery (Frankel grading), and radiological improvement were evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. The mean VAS score for back pain improved from 7.89 (range, 9 to 7) preoperatively to 2.2 (range, 3 to 1) at 1-year follow-up. Frankel grading was grade B in 3, grade C in 7, and grade D in 3 patients preoperatively, which improved to grade D in 7 and grade E in 6 patients at the last follow-up. Radiological healing was evident in the form of reappearance of trabeculae formation, resolution of pus, fatty marrow replacement, and bony fusion in all patients. The mean correction of segmental kyphosis was 9.85° postoperatively. The mean loss of correction at final follow-up was 3.15°. Posterior decompression with instrumented

  3. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural...

  4. Review and retrospective analysis of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in 156 dogs treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwankong, N; Meij, B P; Voorhout, G; de Boer, A H; Hazewinkel, H A W

    2008-01-01

    The medical records of 156 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) that underwent decompressive surgery were reviewed for signalment, history, clinical signs, imaging and surgical findings. The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) was most commonly affected (40/156, 25.6%). Pelvic limb lameness, caudal lumbar pain and pain evoked by lumbosacral pressure were the most frequent clinical findings. Radiography showed lumbosacral step formation in 78.8% (93/118) of the dogs which was associated with elongation of the sacral lamina in 18.6% (22/118). Compression of the cauda equina was diagnosed by imaging (epidurography, CT, or MRI) in 94.2% (147/156) of the dogs. Loss of the bright nucleus pulposus signal of the L7-S1 disc was found on T2-weighted MR images in 73.5% (25/34) of the dogs. The facet joint angle at L7-S1 was significantly smaller, and the tropism greater in GSD than in the other dog breeds. The smaller facet joint angle and higher incidence of tropism seen in the GSD may predispose this breed to DLS. Epidurography, CT, and MRI allow adequate visualization of cauda equina compression. During surgery, disc protrusion was found in 70.5% (110/156) of the dogs. Overall improvement after surgery was recorded in the medical records in 79.0% (83/105) of the dogs. Of the 38 owners that responded to questionnaires up to five years after surgery, 29 (76%) perceived an improvement.

  5. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury:pathological and biomechanical analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Yang; Min Luo; Peng Li; Hai Jin

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Imme-diately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were signiifcantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treat-ment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies.

  6. Diffuse choroid plexus hyperplasia: an under-diagnosed cause of hydrocephalus in children?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Azian Abd.; Coleman, Lee [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Medical Imaging, Parkville, Victoria (Australia); Morokoff, Andrew; Maixner, Wirginia [Royal Children' s Hospital Melbourne, Department of Neurosurgery, Parkville (Australia)

    2005-08-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological disorder in children and the result of a variety of causes. However, with the advancement of imaging modalities, particularly MRI, previously reported rarer causes of hydrocephalus in children are now being more readily appreciated. We report an 11-year-old boy with diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. He had a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt in-situ and a prior diagnosis from infancy of congenital aqueduct stenosis as the cause of his hydrocephalus. His current presentation was with further shunt dysfunction. CT and MRI demonstrated enlarged choroid plexuses but did not confirm aqueduct stenosis. CSF overproduction was demonstrated from the externalized ventricular drain. The enlarged choroid plexuses were surgically resected and histology confirmed choroid plexus hyperplasia. Identification of choroid plexus hyperplasia is important since the neurosurgical management of hydrocephalus is not VP shunt insertion, but resection of the hyperplastic choroid plexus. (orig.)

  7. Diffuse choroid plexus hyperplasia: an under-diagnosed cause of hydrocephalus in children?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Azian Abd.; Coleman, Lee; Morokoff, Andrew; Maixner, Wirginia

    2005-01-01

    Hydrocephalus is a common neurological disorder in children and the result of a variety of causes. However, with the advancement of imaging modalities, particularly MRI, previously reported rarer causes of hydrocephalus in children are now being more readily appreciated. We report an 11-year-old boy with diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. He had a ventriculo-peritoneal (VP) shunt in-situ and a prior diagnosis from infancy of congenital aqueduct stenosis as the cause of his hydrocephalus. His current presentation was with further shunt dysfunction. CT and MRI demonstrated enlarged choroid plexuses but did not confirm aqueduct stenosis. CSF overproduction was demonstrated from the externalized ventricular drain. The enlarged choroid plexuses were surgically resected and histology confirmed choroid plexus hyperplasia. Identification of choroid plexus hyperplasia is important since the neurosurgical management of hydrocephalus is not VP shunt insertion, but resection of the hyperplastic choroid plexus. (orig.)

  8. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  9. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  10. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  11. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortney Ann Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus, the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD. Genes that are expressed in the choroid plexus (CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the choroid plexus at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p< 0.05 between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the choroid plexus in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier.

  12. Delayed radiation-induced damage to the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, R J

    1978-01-01

    Three patients are described who developed a brachial plexus neuropathy following radiation treatment for cancer of the breast. The clinical features consisted of a painless, slowly progressive sensory motor disturbance, affecting especially the hand. The latent period between the radiation therapy and the onset of the neuropathy was exceptionally long, being 8, 15 and 15 years respectively. Two patients were initially incorrectly diagnosed as having a carpal tunnel syndrome. The possible mechanisms of the insidious neuropathy are discussed.

  13. A STUDY ON THE RISK FACTORS FOR OBSTETRICAL BRACHIAL PLEXUS PALSY

    OpenAIRE

    Farah ASHRAFZADEH; Hasan BOSKABADI; Mohammad FARAJI RAD; Parisa SEYYED HOSSEINEE

    2011-01-01

    ObjectiveConsiderable medical and legal debates have surrounded the prognosis and outcome of obstetrical brachial plexus injuries and obstetricians are oftenconsidered responsible for the injury. In this study, we assessed the factors related to the outcome of brachial plexus palsy.Material & MethodsDuring 24 months, 21 neonates with obstetrical brachial plexus injuries were enrolled.Electrophysiology studies were done at the age of three weeks. They received physiotherapy and occupational th...

  14. DYSPHONIA AS AN UNCOMMON PRESENTATION OF PONTOCEREBELLAR CHOROID PLEXUS PAPILLOMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotim, Krešimir; Sajko, Tomislav; Zmajević, Marina; Šumonja, Ilijana; Grgić, Marko

    2015-06-01

    A case is presented of a patient with dysphonia, hearing loss and ataxia due to vestibulocochlear and vagal nerve compression by choroid plexus papilloma in the cerebellopontine angle. Choroid plexus papillomas are rare tumors usually arising in the lateral and fourth ventricle, and rarely found in the cerebellopontine angle, making the neuroimaging characteristics usually not sufficient for diagnosis. Patients usually present with headache and hydrocephalus but tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can cause vestibulocochlear dysfunction and cerebellar symptoms. Dysphonia along with hearing loss was a dominant symptom in the case presented. After complete surgical removal of the tumor, deterioration of dysphonia was noticed; it could be explained as peripheral vagal nerve neuropathy due to tumor compression and intraoperative manipulation. In this case report, we describe dysphonia as an uncommon presentation of a rare posterior fossa tumor. To our knowledge, a case of choroid plexus papilloma presenting with dysphonia has not been described before. Our case extends the differential diagnosis of dysphonia from the otorhinolaryngological to the neurosurgical field.

  15. Neurolysis and myocutaneous flap for radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirachi, Kazuhiko; Minami, Akio; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nishio, Yasuhiko; Ohnishi, Nobuki

    1998-01-01

    Surgical treatment for radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy is difficult. We followed 9 patients of radiation induced brachial plexus neuropathy who were surgically treated with neurolysis and myocutaneous flap coverage. Their ages ranged from 29 to 72 years old. Their diagnoses were breast cancer in 6 patients, lingual cancer in 1, thyroid cancer in 1 and malignant lymphoma in 1. Total dose of radiation ranged from 44 to 240 Gy. Interval from radiation therapy to our surgery ranged from 1 to 18 years (mean 6.7 years). Chief complaints were dysesthesia in 9 patients, motor weakness in 7 patients and dullach in scar formation of radiated skin in 7 patients. Preoperative neural functions were slight palsy in 1, moderate palsy in 5 and complete palsy in 3. In surgical treatment, neurolysis of the brachial plexus was done and it was covered by latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. We evaluated about dysesthesia and motor recovery after treatment for neuropathy. Follow up periods ranged from 1 to 11 years (average in 5 years). Dysesthesia improved in 6 patients and got worse in 3 patients. Motor weakness recovered in only 2 patients and got worse in 7 patients. From our results, intolerable dysesthesia which was first complaint of these patients improved. But motor function had not recovered. Our treatment was thought to be effective for extraneural factor like an compression neuropathy by scar formation and poor vascularity. But it was not effective for intraneural damage by radiation therapy. (author)

  16. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy--management and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lynda J-S

    2014-06-01

    Successful treatment of patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) begins with a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the brachial plexus and of the pathophysiology of nerve injury via which the brachial plexus nerves stretched in the perinatal period manifest as a weak or paralyzed upper extremity in the newborn. NBPP can be classified by systems that can guide the prognosis and the management as these systems are based on the extent and severity of nerve injury, anatomy of nerve injury, and clinical presentation. Serial physical examinations, supplemented by a thorough maternal and perinatal history, are critical to the formulation of the treatment plan that relies upon occupational/physical therapy and rehabilitation management but may include nerve reconstruction and secondary musculoskeletal surgeries. Adjunctive imaging and electrodiagnostic studies provide additional information to guide prognosis and treatment. As research improves not only the technical aspects of NBPP treatment but also the ability to assess the activity and participation as well as body structure and function of NBPP patients, the functional outcomes for affected infants have an overall optimistic prognosis, with the majority recovering adequate functional use of the affected arm. Of importance are (i) early referral to interdisciplinary specialty clinics that can provide up-to-date advances in clinical care and (ii) increasing research/awareness of the psychosocial and patient-reported quality-of-life issues that surround the chronic disablement of NBPP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  18. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  19. Functional interrelations between the lumbosacral, sacroiliac and coxofemoral complex in dogs as denoted by degenerative joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenzel, W.; Breit, S.; Knaus, I.

    2002-01-01

    Functional interrelations between coxofemoral joint, sacroiliac joint and the lumbosacral junction were investigated in Rottweilers, Golden Retriever and German Shepherd dogs. The study was based on sample of 120 ventrodorsal radiographs of the pelvis, which was assessed for evidence of hip dysplasia, alterations of the synovial and extrasynovial components of the sacroiliac joints, and osteophyte formation at the lumbosacral junction. Alteration of the extrasynovial component of the sacroiliac joint was the disease most commonly observed. Such degenerative alterations of the sacroiliac joint were noted to be associated with osteophyte formation at the lumbosacral junction. Both diseases were associated with age and German Shepherd dogs were most frequently affected. Results obtained by the additional evaluation of the coxofemoral joints suggest two mechanisms inducing degenerative alterations at the joint complex investigated. Based on changes in collagen composition, congenitally determined insufficiency of the supporting connective tissue may be responsible for the coincidence of alterations of all joint components of the lumbosacral - sacroilia - coxofemoral complex as noted in one group of dogs. In contrast, pre-dominant affection of the sacroiliac amphiarthosis and the lumbosacral intervertebral disc space is supposed to result from cumulative overloading. (author)

  20. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  1. Global Reconstruction for Extensive Destruction in Tuberculosis of the Lumbar Spine and Lumbosacral Junction: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uvaraj, Nalli R.; Bosco, Aju; Gopinath, Nalli R.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To analyze the surgical difficulties in restoring global spinal stability and to describe an effective surgical option for tuberculosis with extensive destruction of the lumbosacral spine. Advanced tuberculosis with destruction of the lumbosacral spine can result in a kyphosis or hypolordosis, leading to back pain, spinal instability, and neurological deficits. The conventional treatment goals of lumbosacral tuberculosis are to correct and prevent a lumbar kyphosis, treat or prevent a neurological deficit, and restore global spinal stability. Instrumentation at the lumbosacral junction is technically demanding due to the complex local anatomy, the unique biomechanics, and the difficult fixation in the surrounding diseased bone. Methods We report a 21-year-old woman with tuberculosis from L1 to S2 with back pain and spinal instability. The radiographs showed a kyphosis of the lumbar spine. The magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans revealed extensive destruction of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine. Spinopelvic stabilization combined with anterior debridement and reconstruction with free fibular strut graft was performed. Results The radiographs at follow-up showed a good correction of the kyphosis and excellent graft incorporation and fusion. Conclusions Anterior column reconstruction with a fibular strut graft helps restore and maintain the vertebral height. Posterior stabilization with spinopelvic fixation can be an effective surgical option for reconstructing the spine in extensive lumbosacral tuberculosis with sacral body destruction, requiring long fusions to the sacrum. It augments spinal stability, prevents graft-related complications, and accelerates the graft incorporation and fusion, thereby permitting early mobilization and rehabilitation. In spinal tuberculosis, antitubercular therapy may have to be prolonged in cases with large disease load, based on the clinicoradiographic and laboratory

  2. Comparison of histopathologic changes following X-irradiation of mid-thoracic and lumbosacral levels of neonatal rat spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, J.K.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    Light microscopic changes were studied in the dorsal funiculi of spinal cords from rats irradiated (4000 R) at 3 days of age and killed from 9-60 days postirradiation (P-I). The irradiated site was limited to a 5-mm length of mid-thoracic spinal cord (T only) in one group of rats, to a 5-mm length of lumbosacral spinal cord (L only) in a second group, and to 5-mm lengths of both mid-thoracic and lumbosacral spinal cord (T/L) in the third group. Changes in the lumbosacral regions were essentially the same in both L only and T/L irradiated groups. These changes included a decreased neuroglial population and a concurrent state of hypomyelination from 9-30 days P-I. In contrast, in the mid-thoracic regions of T only and T/L irradiated groups the decrease in the neuroglial population was obvious only through 13 days P-I, and by 30 days this population resembled that of the controls. The irradiated mid-thoracic areas were hypomyelinated, with the fasciculus gracilis showing a greater degree of hypomyelination than the fasciculus cuneatus. By 25 days P-I, myelination appeared to be normal in these areas. Scattered hemorrhages were noted in both lumbosacral and mid-thoracic regions, but necrotic areas occurred only at the lumbosacral level. In general, the mid-thoracic area appeared to be less sensitive to x-radiation at 3 days of age than the lumbosacral area. These data suggest that there may be marked differences in the developmental states of cells at these two levels at 3 days of age

  3. Lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture associated with acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jinkins, Randy J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate lumbosacral interspinous ligament rupture, with or without related acute intrinsic spinal muscle degeneration. This study consisted of a prospective imaging analysis of consecutive 100 MRI studies in adult patients (mean age 56 years) presenting with low back pain. Alterations from the normal in the inter- and perispinal structures of the spine and perispinal soft tissues (e.g., spinal ligaments, perispinal muscles) were sought based upon studies on young volunteers without low back pain (n=10; mean age 23 years). Compared with the group without low back pain, many index cases (n=71, 71%) demonstrated hyperintensity (i.e., sprain or frank ligamentous rupture) of the interspinous ligament(s) on T2-weighted, fat-suppressed MRI studies at one (20 of 71, 28%) or multiple (51 of 71, 72%) levels. Associated intrinsic spinal muscle (e.g., interspinalis, multifidus muscles) degeneration was observed in a minority of cases overall (n=7, 7%), but was only seen in association with cases also demonstrating interspinous ligament degeneration/rupture (7 of 71, 10%). Lumbosacral interspinous ligament sprain or frank rupture, as well as related acute-subacute autotraumatic intrinsic spinal muscle rupture/degeneration, may be overlooked by many observers if fat-suppressed, T2-weighted MRI is not acquired. These musculoligamentous alterations are on occasion the only abnormalities recognized on MRI of the lumbosacral spine and may theoretically be sources of low back morbidity that potentially may respond to specific therapy. Because this study was an observational one, based solely upon medical imaging, future research must focus upon the correlation of the relevance of these findings with an age-matched asymptomatic control group and longitudinal clinicoradiologic therapeutic trials. (orig.)

  4. [Ways to optimize the treatment of patients with discogenic-venous lumbosacral radiculomyeloischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoromets, А А; Bubnova, Е V; Endalceva, S М; Kapitonov, D S; Lalayan, Т V; Perfilev, S V; Smolko, D G; Skoromets, А P; Skoromets, Т А; Sukhatskaya, О V; Shmonin, А А

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of patients with neurological manifestations of degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the spine must be integrated and optimized from the perspective of pathogenesis. Antiedematous therapy is an important moment that takes into account the development of localized swelling affected the spinal structures. We studied the efficacy of L-lysine aescinat in the treatment of patients with discogenic-venous lumbosacral radiculomyelopathy. We analyzed the therapeutic efficacy of antitumor therapy with the drug L-lysine aescinat in 40 patients with discogenic-venous lumbosacral radiculomyelopathy in comparison with a control group of 40 patients treated with conventional therapy in a neurological hospital. The age of the patients ranged from 30 to 60 years. In total, there were 36 (45 %) women and 44 (55%) men. Herniated discs were visualized by MRI in all patients, attention was drawn to the condition of radicular veins of the cauda equina. We assessed muscle strength of lumbosacral myotomes, their trophicity and state of segmental-conductor apparatus sensitivity with the quantitative determination of the time of vibration of a tuning fork. The comparison of neurological status dynamics during treatment of inpatients has shown that neurological symptoms reduce more effectively in patients treated with L - lysine aescinat (by 75% during the first 3-5 days) and in a greater number of the patients (77.5% vs 55% in the control group). The authors' experience has shown that venous micro- and macro-circulation disorders play an important role in the pathogenesis of lower lumbar disk hernia. Clinical manifestations of these disorders are segmental and conductive spinal motor disorders in myotomes and sensitivity. Quantitative determination of vibration sensitivity (tuning fork test) is pathognomonic for radiculomyeloischemia. Vein tonics and antiedemics, including L - lysine aescinat as one of the most effective drugs, exert a pathogenetic effect on spondylic and discogenic

  5. [Study on the area of pain and numbness in cases with lumbosacral radiculopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraishi, Keita; Hanakita, Junya; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Minami, Manabu; Watanabe, Mizuki; Uesaka, Toshio; Honda, Fumiaki

    2012-10-01

    In the clinical diagnosis of lumbosacral radicular symptoms, dermatome maps are commonly used, by which the segmental location of the affected nerve can be determined. However, the diagnosis is often difficult because the pattern of sensory disturbance does not necessarily match the patterns of classical dermatomes, and there are many dermatome maps made by different methods. The author examined the area of pain and numbness in cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Clinical features of pain and numbness in consecutive seventy three cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy were investigated (L3: n=13, L4-S1: n=20). Patients of L3 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the upper buttock and ventral surface of the thighs, knees and upper ventral surface of the legs. Patients of L4 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the ventro-lateral surfaces of the thigh and leg. The distinctive region, defined as the region having 100% superimposition, of L4 radiculopathy was the lateral part of the shin. Patients of L5 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the lateral surfaces of the thigh and leg. The distinctive region was the upper buttock. Patients of S1 radiculopathy showed symptoms at the lower buttock, dorso-lateral part of the leg and lateral part of the foot. The distinctive region was the lateral part of the calf. It was found that the regions of pain and numbness formed a continuous band-like zone from thigh to leg in 8% of L3, 45% of L4 and L5, and 35% of S1 radiculopathy. Using a visual analogue scale, the degree of leg pain was more severe than low back pain in 68% of the patients, but in 5% of patients, low back pain was more severe.

  6. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  7. Anatomical study of prefixed versus postfixed brachial plexuses in adult human cadaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guday, Edengenet; Bekele, Asegedech; Muche, Abebe

    2017-05-01

    The brachial plexus is usually formed by the fusion of anterior primary rami of the fifth to eighth cervical and the first thoracic spinal nerves. Variations in the formation of the brachial plexus may occur. Variations in brachial plexus anatomy are important to radiologists, surgeons and anaesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. These variations may lead to deviation from the expected dermatome distribution as well as differences in the motor innervation of muscles of the upper limb. This study is aimed to describe the anatomical variations of brachial plexus in its formation among 20 Ethiopian cadavers. Observational based study was conducted by using 20 cadavers obtained from the Department of Human Anatomy at University of Gondar, Bahir Dar, Addis Ababa, Hawasa, Hayat Medical College and St Paul Hospital Millennium Medical College. Data analysis was conducted using thematic approaches. A total of 20 cadavers examined bilaterally for the formation of brachial plexus. Of the 40 sides, 30 sides (75%) were found normal, seven sides (17.5%) prefixed, three sides (7.5%) postfixed and one side of the cadaver lacks cord formation. The brachial plexus formation in most subjects is found to be normal. Among the variants, the numbers of the prefixed brachial plexuses are greater than the postfixed brachial plexuses. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  8. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

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    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  9. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

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    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  10. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

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    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  11. Analysis of radiological characteristics distribution in the vertebral bodies of the lumbosacral spine of competitive rowers

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    M.B. Ogurkowska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Unfavorable biomechanical situations, usually related to the performance of a profession and competitive sports practice, promote formation of overloads. This problem may be particularly perceptible among sportsmen that practice strength and stamina sports. The present study deals with rowing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the degree of degenerative changes of the lumbosacral spine in competitive rowers, on the basis of an analysis of changes in the cancellous structure of vertebral bodies. This has been achieved on the basis of radiological density acquired from a CT test.

  12. CT of the canine lumbosacral spine in extension - flexion rotation; part I: bony window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henninger, W.; Werner, G.

    2002-01-01

    The canine lumbosacral spine is examined radiographically in extended and flexed lateral position as well as ventrodorsally. Superimposition of bones hinders exact evaluation of the lumbosacral intervertebral foramen in case of cauda equina syndrome, especially when degenerative changes overlap. CT or MRI are more and more indicated to get reliable findings because myelography is not always of diagnostic value. For this study twelve dogs (7 German Shepherd dogs, 4 Cross-breds, and 1 Rottweiler) of different age and sex were taken which had been referred for CT examination of the lumbosacral area. Plain radiographs did not show abnormalities. The anaesthetized dogs were positioned in dorsal recumbency with the legs firstly extended and secondly flexed according to flexion-extension radiography. Slice thickness was 2 mm, the CT images were evaluated in both bony and soft tissue windows. Bony window easily showed vertebral bodies, vertebral canal, pedicles, vertebral laminae, and articular processes of L7 and S1. Median height of the vertebral canal did not change during extension or flexion at the level of L7 and the sacrum. Height and width of the intervertebral foramen and width of the interarcual foramen changed markedly from extension to flexion. Lateral recessus of the vertebral canal always could be observed as ventrolateral widening. In sagittal CT scans of the lumbosacral specimen of a normal German Shepherd dog cranial articular processes of the sacrum were detected to be responsible for maximum height or width of the intervertebral foramen. Evolving from the lateral recessus the intervertebral foramen was initially oval-shaped and got rounded and narrowed by the cranial articular process of the sacrum. Position and shape of the cranial articular processes of the sacrum were evaluated. Surface of the cranial articular processes of S1 were found even with articular spaces congruent, but some also appeared slightly concave or convex where incongruity of the

  13. Lumbosacral osteomyelitis after robot-assisted total laparoscopic hysterectomy and sacral colpopexy.

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    Muffly, Tyler M; Diwadkar, Gouri B; Paraiso, Marie Fidela R

    2010-12-01

    We report on the transabdominal resection of infected lumbosacral bone, synthetic mesh, and sinus tract following sacral colpopexy. A 45-year-old nulliparous patient who had undergone transvaginal mesh followed by robot-assisted sacral colpopexy presented with increasing back pain and foul-smelling vaginal drainage. An epidural abscess required surgical intervention, including diskectomy, sacral debridement, and mesh removal to drain the abscess and vaginal sinus tract. Recognized complications of open prolapse procedures also manifest following minimally invasive approaches. Osteomyelitis of the sacral promontory following sacral colpopexy may require gynecologic and neurosurgical management.

  14. The choroid plexus response to a repeated peripheral inflammatory stimulus

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    Palha Joana A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic systemic inflammation triggers alterations in the central nervous system that may relate to the underlying inflammatory component reported in neurodegenerative disorders such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. However, it is far from being understood whether and how peripheral inflammation contributes to induce brain inflammatory response in such illnesses. As part of the barriers that separate the blood from the brain, the choroid plexus conveys inflammatory immune signals into the brain, largely through alterations in the composition of the cerebrospinal fluid. Results In the present study we investigated the mouse choroid plexus gene expression profile, using microarray analyses, in response to a repeated inflammatory stimulus induced by the intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide every two weeks for a period of three months; mice were sacrificed 3 and 15 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection. The data show that the choroid plexus displays a sustained response to the repeated inflammatory stimuli by altering the expression profile of several genes. From a total of 24,000 probes, 369 are up-regulated and 167 are down-regulated 3 days after the last lipopolysaccharide injection, while at 15 days the number decreases to 98 and 128, respectively. The pathways displaying the most significant changes include those facilitating entry of cells into the cerebrospinal fluid, and those participating in the innate immune response to infection. Conclusion These observations contribute to a better understanding of the brain response to peripheral inflammation and pave the way to study their impact on the progression of several disorders of the central nervous system in which inflammation is known to be implicated.

  15. Studies on the human choroid plexus in vitro

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    Redzic Zoran B

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of human choroid plexus (CP epithelium in the transport of solutes between the blood and the cerebrospinal fluid and/or in secretion processes may be studied by employing several experimental approaches. There are a number of in vitro techniques for human CP epithelium (CPE and all have limitations that do not exclude them a priori, but that should be carefully taken into consideration. Developmental and morphological studies have been largely performed on human choroid plexus samples of either embryonic or post-mortem origin. Functional uptake studies may be performed on pathologically unaltered CP samples obtained during surgical removal of choroid plexus tumors. This approach can be used to explore transport processes mainly across the apical side of the CPE, but cannot be used to study vectorial transport across the CPE. Also, these samples have limited viability. A monolayer of CPE in culture, grown on permeable supports, provides the best available tool to study transport processes or polarized secretion by the CP, but thus far only limited attempts to culture these cells have been published and they mainly include data from neoplastic CPE. A study that used a human papilloma-derived cell line in culture showed that it forms a monolayer with barrier properties, although the cells express pleomorphic and neoplastic features and lack contact inhibition. Other cell cultures express some CPE markers but do not develop tight junctions/barrier properties. This article reviews the main characteristics and limitations of available in vitro methods to study human CPE, which could help researchers choose an appropriate experimental approach for a particular study.

  16. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

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    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  17. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Ding, Zi-hai; Xu, Xin Ming; Xu, Yong-qing

    2011-04-14

    Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D

  18. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of early nerve repair on experimental brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats.

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    Bourke, Gráinne; McGrath, Aleksandra M; Wiberg, Mikael; Novikov, Lev N

    2018-03-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury refers to injury observed at the time of delivery, which may lead to major functional impairment in the upper limb. In this study, the neuroprotective effect of early nerve repair following complete brachial plexus injury in neonatal rats was examined. Brachial plexus injury induced 90% loss of spinal motoneurons and 70% decrease in biceps muscle weight at 28 days after injury. Retrograde degeneration in spinal cord was associated with decreased density of dendritic branches and presynaptic boutons and increased density of astrocytes and macrophages/microglial cells. Early repair of the injured brachial plexus significantly delayed retrograde degeneration of spinal motoneurons and reduced the degree of macrophage/microglial reaction but had no effect on muscle atrophy. The results demonstrate that early nerve repair of neonatal brachial plexus injury could promote survival of injured motoneurons and attenuate neuroinflammation in spinal cord.

  20. Postirradiation lesions of the brachial plexus. Results of surgical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeQuang, C.

    1989-01-01

    In a series of 103 cases of postirradiation lesions of the brachial plexus operated on between 1978 and 1986--of which 60 patients have been reviewed with a follow up from 2 to 9 years--the surgical results are analyzed according to an anatomic classification, a clinical classification, and the surgical procedures. We conclude that the radiation plexitis should be treated surgically and at the earliest possible time after the onset of paresthesias. Also, the surgical procedure which gives the best results is neurolysis with pedicled omentoplasty

  1. Surgical options for lumbosacral fusion: biomechanical stability, advantage, disadvantage and affecting factors in selecting options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-01

    Numerous surgical procedures and instrumentation techniques for lumbosacral fusion (LSF) have been developed. This is probably because of its high mechanical demand and unique anatomy. Surgical options include anterior column support (ACS) and posterior stabilization procedures. Biomechanical studies have been performed to verify the stability of those options. The options have their own advantage but also disadvantage aspects. This review article reports the surgical options for lumbosacral fusion, their biomechanical stability, advantages/disadvantages, and affecting factors in option selection. Review of literature. LSF has lots of options both for ACS and posterior stabilization procedures. Combination of posterior stabilization procedures is an option. Furthermore, combinations of ACS and posterior stabilization procedures are other options. It is difficult to make a recommendation or treatment algorithm of LSF from the current literature. However, it is important to know all aspects of the options and decision-making of surgical options for LSF needs to be tailored for each patient, considering factors such as biomechanical stress and osteoporosis.

  2. Evaluation of Lumbosacral Angle (LSA and its Impact on Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

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    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: One of the most common causes of low back pain is lumbar disc herniation (LDH. One of the treatments for patients with LDH is a surgical operation. Changes in the lumbar lordosis angle have a negative impact on patients, clinically. The significance of changes in the lordosis-sacral inclination angle that are associated with muscle spasms and are seen after LDH surgery is known. In this study, we would like to examine the clinical impact on patients due to changes in the lumbosacral angle measured before and after surgical operations in patients with LDH. Material and Method: Between 2005%u20132007, preoperative and postoperative lumbosacral angles of 139 patients operated on for a diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation were measured. Patients were evaluated with the Oswestry Scale, Visual Analogue Scale, Narcotic Score, and Patient Satisfaction Evaluation. Lumbar lordosis angle, sacral inclination angle, and disc height were calculated by direct radiography. Statistical analysis was performed with GraphPad Prisma V.3 software package. Results: In this study, increases of lordosis angles and sacral inclination angles have been observed, postoperatively. It has been shown that these have a positive impact on the clinical course. Discussion: The clinical effects of the biomechanics of angles of patients with LDH are clear. Biomechanical parameters should be considered at preoperative treatment, postoperative treatment, and postoperative controls. The patient%u2019s lordosis angle, neighboring disc structure, and relationship with the sacrum must be carefully evaluated for surgical decision.

  3. Concurrent lumbosacral and sacrococcygeal fusion; a rare etiology of low back pain and coccygodynia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2017-09-21

    Sacrum is a triangular bone placed in the base of the spine and formed by the synostosis of five sacral vertebrae (S1-S5). Its upper part is connected with the inferior surface of the body of L5 vertebra forming the lumbosacral joint, while its lower part is connected with the base of the coccyx forming the sacrococcygeal symphysis, an amphiarthrodial joint. The existence of four pairs of sacral foramen in both anterior and posterior surface of the sacrum is the most common anatomy. Nevertheless, supernumerary sacral foramina are possible to be created by the synostosis of lumbosacral joint or sacrococcygeal symphysis. We present a case of an osseous cadaveric specimen of the sacrum belonging to a 79-year-old Caucasian woman. A rare variation of the anatomy of the sacrum is reported; in which, the simultaneous fusion of the sacrum with both the L5 vertebra and the coccyx has created six pairs of sacral foramen. This variation should be taken into serious consideration, especially in the domain of radiology, neurosurgery, orthopaedics and spine surgery, because low back pain, coccygodynia and other neurological symptoms may emerge due to mechanical compression.

  4. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-05-20

    Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t- test. There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P spondylolysis group. Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population.

  5. Transarticular facet screw stabilization and dorsal laminectomy in 26 dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis with instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Elyshia J; Jerram, Richard M; Walker, Alexander M; King, Michael D; Warman, Christopher G A

    2012-07-01

    To describe outcome after transarticular facet screw stabilization and dorsal laminectomy for treatment of dynamic degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) in 26 dogs. Retrospective case series. Dogs (n = 26) with dynamic DLS. Medical records (2004-2009) of dogs treated with transarticular facet screw stabilization and dorsal laminectomy were reviewed. Dogs (n = 26) were available for immediate postoperative follow-up, 21 dogs at 6 weeks, and 15 at greater than 6 months. Dogs were evaluated by radiographic assessment and owner questionnaire. Lumbosacral (LS) intervertebral disc (IVD) spaces were measured on pre and postoperative 6-week and 6-month radiographs. In 23 dogs, improvement in clinical signs occurred within 7 days of surgery. Overall postsurgical complication rate directly related to the surgical procedure was 15.4%. LS IVD space measurements taken immediately postoperatively, at 6 weeks, and ≥ 6 months were all significantly increased compared with preoperative measurements. All working dogs (4) returned to full work within 14 months. Most owners (85%) reported their dog was ambulating normally at 6 months with no perceptible lameness during normal activity. All owners perceived their dog's ability to walk, run, and jump after surgery to be improved. Transarticular facet screw stabilization and dorsal laminectomy maintains distraction of the LS IVD space for medium-to-large breed dogs with dynamic DLS with a high degree of owner satisfaction, and is comparable to other reported surgical techniques for DLS. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  6. Tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meij, Björn P; Suwankong, Niyada; van den Brom, Walter E; Venker-van Haagen, Anjop J; Hazewinkel, Herman A W

    2006-02-01

    To determine somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLS) and in healthy dogs. Clinical and experimental study. Dogs with DLS (n = 21) and 11 clinically normal dogs, age, and weight matched. Under anesthesia, the tibial nerve was stimulated at the caudolateral aspect of the stifle, and lumbar SEP (LSEP) were recorded percutaneously from S1 to T13 at each interspinous space. Cortical SEP (CSEP) were recorded from the scalp. LSEP were identified as the N1-P1 (latency 3-6 ms) and N2-P2 (latency 7-13 ms) wave complexes in the recordings of dogs with DLS and control dogs. Latency of N1-P1 increased and that of N2-P2 decreased as the active recording electrode was moved cranially from S1 to T13. Compared with controls, latencies were significantly delayed in DLS dogs: .8 ms for N1-P1 and 1.7 ms for the N2-P2 complex. CSEP were not different between groups. Surface needle recording of tibial nerve SEP can be used to monitor somatosensory nerve function of pelvic limbs in dogs. In dogs with DLS, the latency of LSEP, but not of CSEP, is prolonged compared with normal dogs. In dogs with lumbosacral pain from DLS, the cauda equina compression is sufficient to affect LSEP at the lumbar level.

  7. A case of post-irradiation lumbosacral radioculopathy successfully treated with corticosteroid and warfarin

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    Anezaki, Toshiharu; Harada, Takashi; Kawachi, Izumi; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Soma, Yoshiaki; Tsuji, Shoji [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Brain Research Inst

    1999-08-01

    A 33-year-old man underwent post-operative radiation therapy for the left testicular anaplastic seminoma. One year later, the patient developed muscle weakness and sensory disturbance in the left lower extremity, and muscle weakness in the right lower extremity. MRI demonstrated linear and focal gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the anterior portion of the lumbosacral roots within the cauda equina. The neurological symptoms improved after administration of corticosteroid and warfarin. Radiation myelopathy of this type was classified as ''selective anterior horn cell injury or amyotrophy'' by Reagan, and the site of the lesion was considered to be the lower motor neurons. However, based on the clinical and MRI findings, we proposed that the disease process was injury to the spinal nerve roots rather than the lower motor neurons. Recent neuropathological studies of this syndrome have demonstrated degeneration of the proximal spinal nerve roots. We consider that primary lesions of this syndrome occur in spinal nerve roots rather than in lower motor neurons, and ''lumbosacral radiculopathy'' is a more appropriate term for this condition. (author)

  8. A case of post-irradiation lumbosacral radioculopathy successfully treated with corticosteroid and warfarin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anezaki, Toshiharu; Harada, Takashi; Kawachi, Izumi; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Soma, Yoshiaki; Tsuji, Shoji

    1999-01-01

    A 33-year-old man underwent post-operative radiation therapy for the left testicular anaplastic seminoma. One year later, the patient developed muscle weakness and sensory disturbance in the left lower extremity, and muscle weakness in the right lower extremity. MRI demonstrated linear and focal gadolinium (Gd) enhancement of the anterior portion of the lumbosacral roots within the cauda equina. The neurological symptoms improved after administration of corticosteroid and warfarin. Radiation myelopathy of this type was classified as ''selective anterior horn cell injury or amyotrophy'' by Reagan, and the site of the lesion was considered to be the lower motor neurons. However, based on the clinical and MRI findings, we proposed that the disease process was injury to the spinal nerve roots rather than the lower motor neurons. Recent neuropathological studies of this syndrome have demonstrated degeneration of the proximal spinal nerve roots. We consider that primary lesions of this syndrome occur in spinal nerve roots rather than in lower motor neurons, and ''lumbosacral radiculopathy'' is a more appropriate term for this condition. (author)

  9. Single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulizi, Yakefu; Liang, Wei-Dong; Muheremu, Aikeremujiang; Maimaiti, Maierdan; Sheng, Wei-Bin

    2017-07-14

    Spinal brucellosis is a less commonly reported infectious spinal pathology. There are few reports regarding the surgical treatment of spinal brucellosis in existing literature. This retrospective study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of single-stage transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation for lumbosacral spinal brucellosis. From February 2012 to April 2015, 32 consecutive patients (19 males and 13 females, mean age 53.7 ± 8.7) with lumbosacral brucellosis treated by transforaminal decompression, debridement, interbody fusion, and posterior instrumentation were enrolled. Medical records, imaging studies, laboratory data were collected and summarized. Surgical outcomes were evaluated based on visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scale. The changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), clinical symptoms and complications were investigated. Graft fusion was evaluated using Bridwell grading criteria. The mean follow-up period was 24.9 ± 8.2 months. Back pain and radiating leg pain was relieved significantly in all patients after operation. No implant failures were observed in any patients. Wound infection was observed in two patients and sinus formation was observed in one patient. Solid bony fusion was achieved in 30 patients and the fusion rate was 93.8%. The levels of ESR and CRP were returned to normal by the end of three months' follow-up. VAS and ODI scores were significantly improved (P brucellosis.

  10. Postnatal development of the myenteric plexus in cat stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolova, I; Itsev, D

    1983-01-01

    The postnatal development of the myenteric plexus in cat stomach has been studied at birth, on the 14th, 30th, 45th and 180th postnatal days, using light- and electronmicroscopic methods. In newborn kittens the main network of the Auerbach plexus is well formed, but the myenteric ganglia are composed of nerve cells with different maturity and a scarce neuropile. During the first two postnatal weeks the dimensions of the ganglia increase owing to the increase of the nerve bodies and the rising number of glials cells and intercellular fibres. This is accompanied by a potentiation of the AChE-activity, mainly in the nerve cell bodies and to a lesser extent in the neuropile. Impregnation reveals different in calibre and form nerve fibres and terminals. Different ultrastructural types of neurones are identified on the 14th day. Later development is expressed in the formation of large compact ganglia and thick connecting strands. The number of AChE-positive fibres in the neuropile increases. Owing to the increase in the cell organelles and their more advanced maturity, it is possible to define the ultrastructural type of an ever increasing number of neurones.

  11. Rapid, automated mosaicking of the human corneal subbasal nerve plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnav, Yash J; Rucker, Stuart A; Saharia, Keshav; McNamara, Nancy A

    2017-11-27

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is an in vivo technique used to study corneal nerve morphology. The largest proportion of nerves innervating the cornea lie within the subbasal nerve plexus, where their morphology is altered by refractive surgery, diabetes and dry eye. The main limitations to clinical use of CCM as a diagnostic tool are the small field of view of CCM images and the lengthy time needed to quantify nerves in collected images. Here, we present a novel, rapid, fully automated technique to mosaic individual CCM images into wide-field maps of corneal nerves. We implemented an OpenCV image stitcher that accounts for corneal deformation and uses feature detection to stitch CCM images into a montage. The method takes 3-5 min to process and stitch 40-100 frames on an Amazon EC2 Micro instance. The speed, automation and ease of use conferred by this technique is the first step toward point of care evaluation of wide-field subbasal plexus (SBP) maps in a clinical setting.

  12. Involvement of pterygoid venous plexus in patulous eustachian tube symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Takeshi; Ogura, Masaki; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Hori, Yoko; Mugikura, Shunji; Higano, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoki; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Kobayashi, Toshimitsu

    2007-07-01

    The pterygoid venous plexus (PVP) is an important factor in the mechanism of eustachian tube (ET) closure under conditions that can cause increased venous pressure in the head, such as during neck compression and postural change from the sitting/standing to the recumbent position. The symptoms of patulous ET are usually improved by neck compression or postural change (from sitting/standing to recumbent position). Venous congestion around the ET and/or gravitational change may be involved in the changing degree of symptoms, but its mechanism is not understood. This study investigated whether the PVP is involved. The dimensions of soft tissues surrounding ET were measured on magnetic resonance images before and after neck compression. The lateral pterygoid muscle became enlarged after neck compression. Simultaneously, the volume of venous plexus observed between the medial pterygoid muscle and tensor veli palatini muscle was increased. Such enlargement was probably due to blood pooling in the PVP, resulting in protrusion of the ET anterior wall to the luminal side, and decreased ET patency.

  13. Abnormality of the spinal column in pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipoma with special reference to CT findings of the lamina defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshifuji, Kazuhisa; Ochi, Satoko; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2009-01-01

    Lumbosacral spinal lipomas are usually associated with occult spinal dysraphism at the lumbosacral spine. During childfood, posterior arch defects in the lumbosacral spine are considered normal computed tomography (CT) findings because of the presence of interlaminar synchondrosis. In this study, we investigated the CT findings of the lumbosacral spine in the pediatric patients with lumbosacral spinal lipomas. We aimed to characterize the radiological features of the abnormal spinal column in case of spinal lipomas. Twenty-one patients (age, 1 month to 3 years) were enrolled in this study: 11 patients had conus lipoma; 10 patients, filum lipoma. All patients showed lamina defects of the lumbosacral spine on 3D-CT. The number of the defective laminae was significantly larger in the patients with conus lipomas than in those with filum lipomas. Although the appearance of lamina defects in the patients with filum lipoma was similar to the reported findings of defective laminae in normal children, these patients were characterized by mild scoliosis and asymmetry of the posterior arches localized in the lower sacrum and coccyx. On the other hand, the patients with conus lipoma were characterized by wider lamina defects that extended rostrally, 'open-door like' deformity of lamina, vertebral dysgenesis, thoracolumber scoliosis and heterotopic ossification. Such CT characterization of the abnormality of the lumbosacral spine in lipoma patients will be useful to differentiate the pathological spina bifida from the normal open posterior arches in childhood. (author)

  14. Three-dimensional motion pattern of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Monika I; Seiler, Gabriela S; Robinson, Leanne E; Ferguson, Stephen J; Bonél, Harald M; Busato, André R; Lang, Johann

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the 3-dimensional motion pattern including main and coupled motions of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column of dogs. Vertebral columns of 9 German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) and 16 dogs of other breeds with similar body weights and body conditions. Main and coupled motions of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column (L4 to S1) were determined by use of a testing apparatus that permitted precise application of known pure moments to the vertebral column. Motion was compared between GSDs and dogs of other breeds. All specimens had a similar motion pattern consisting of main motion and a certain amount of coupled motion including translation. Vertebral columns of GSDs had significantly less main motion in all directions than that of dogs of other breeds. Translation was similar in GSDs and dogs of other breeds and was smallest at the lumbosacral motion segment. Results indicated that motion in the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column of dogs is complex and provided a basis for further studies evaluating abnormal vertebral columns.

  15. Estrogen receptor-immunoreactive neurons in the lumbosacral cord projecting to the periaqueductal gray in the ovariectomized female cat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, Veronique G.J.M.; Meijer, Ellie; Schasfoor, Fabienne C.; Leeuwen, Fred W. van; Holstege, Gert

    1997-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (FAG) plays a crucial role in reproductive behavior. The present study investigates whether lumbosacral FAG-projecting neurons contain estrogen receptors. In four ovariectomized adult female cats, injections with cholera toxin subunit (CTb) were made into the FAG to

  16. The efficacy and safety of pregabalin in the treatment of neuropathic pain associated with chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, R.; Freynhagen, R.; Tolle, T.R.; Cloutier, C.; Leon, T.; Murphy, T.K.; Phillips, K.; Vissers, K.C.P.; et al.,

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of pregabalin in patients with chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy. This randomized, controlled, withdrawal trial included five phases: screening (4-18 days); run-in (4-10 days) to screen out placebo responders; single-blind (28 days) to identify pregabalin responders;

  17. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  18. Development of the lateral ventricular choroid plexus in a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Vandeberg, John L; Saunders, Norman R

    2010-10-05

    Choroid plexus epithelial cells are the site of blood/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier and regulate molecular transfer between the two compartments. Their mitotic activity in the adult is low. During development, the pattern of growth and timing of acquisition of functional properties of plexus epithelium are not known. Numbers and size of choroid plexus epithelial cells and their nuclei were counted and measured in the lateral ventricular plexus from the first day of its appearance until adulthood. Newborn Monodelphis pups were injected with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) at postnatal day 3 (P3), P4 and P5. Additional animals were injected at P63, P64 and P65. BrdU-immunopositive nuclei were counted and their position mapped in the plexus structure at different ages after injections. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry with antibodies to plasma protein identified post-mitotic cells involved in protein transfer. Numbers of choroid plexus epithelial cells increased 10-fold between the time of birth and adulthood. In newborn pups each consecutive injection of BrdU labelled 20-40 of epithelial cells counted. After 3 injections, numbers of BrdU positive cells remained constant for at least 2 months. BrdU injections at an older age (P63, P64, P65) resulted in a smaller number of labelled plexus cells. Numbers of plexus cells immunopositive for both BrdU and plasma protein increased with age indicating that protein transferring properties are acquired post mitotically. Labelled nuclei were only detected on the dorsal arm of the plexus as it grows from the neuroependyma, moving along the structure in a 'conveyor belt' like fashion. The present study established that lateral ventricular choroid plexus epithelial cells are born on the dorsal side of the structure only. Cells born in the first few days after choroid plexus differentiation from the neuroependyma remain present even two months later. Protein-transferring properties are acquired post-mitotically and relatively

  19. Development of the lateral ventricular choroid plexus in a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandeBerg John L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choroid plexus epithelial cells are the site of blood/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier and regulate molecular transfer between the two compartments. Their mitotic activity in the adult is low. During development, the pattern of growth and timing of acquisition of functional properties of plexus epithelium are not known. Methods Numbers and size of choroid plexus epithelial cells and their nuclei were counted and measured in the lateral ventricular plexus from the first day of its appearance until adulthood. Newborn Monodelphis pups were injected with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU at postnatal day 3 (P3, P4 and P5. Additional animals were injected at P63, P64 and P65. BrdU-immunopositive nuclei were counted and their position mapped in the plexus structure at different ages after injections. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry with antibodies to plasma protein identified post-mitotic cells involved in protein transfer. Results Numbers of choroid plexus epithelial cells increased 10-fold between the time of birth and adulthood. In newborn pups each consecutive injection of BrdU labelled 20-40 of epithelial cells counted. After 3 injections, numbers of BrdU positive cells remained constant for at least 2 months. BrdU injections at an older age (P63, P64, P65 resulted in a smaller number of labelled plexus cells. Numbers of plexus cells immunopositive for both BrdU and plasma protein increased with age indicating that protein transferring properties are acquired post mitotically. Labelled nuclei were only detected on the dorsal arm of the plexus as it grows from the neuroependyma, moving along the structure in a 'conveyor belt' like fashion. Conclusions The present study established that lateral ventricular choroid plexus epithelial cells are born on the dorsal side of the structure only. Cells born in the first few days after choroid plexus differentiation from the neuroependyma remain present even two months later. Protein

  20. Basivertebral plexus enhancement at MR imaging after Gd-DTPA administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bronstein, A.D.; Cohen, W.A.; Maravilla, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a study to identify noncontrast versus post-Gd-DTPA MR images of the spine, we analyzed the basivertebral plexus. The authors postulate that there are consistent patterns of enhancement specific with Gd-DTPA. This is a retrospective examination of the normal appearance and enhancement patterns of the basivertebral plexus in 805 vertebrae of 30 patients who underwent pre- and post-Gd-DTPA T1-weighted sagittal MR imaging of the spine. All patients show enhancement of the basivertebral plexus in a significant number of vertebrae when pre-and postcontrast images are compared

  1. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  2. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  3. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  4. Femoral Nerve Injury Following a Lumbar Plexus Blockade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrfan Güngör

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar plexus blockade (LPB combined with sciatic nerve block (SNB is frequently used for lower extremity surgery. Perioperative nerve injury is a rarely encountered complication of peripheral nerve blocks (PNB. Case Report: Here we report a 44-year-old male patient who developed a partial femoral nerve injury (FNI following a LPB which was performed before the surgery of a patellar fracture. The clinical and electroneuromyographic findings of the patient were recovered almost completely within the following six months. Conclusion: The presented case demonstrated a FNI despite the absence of any pain or paresthesia sensation, with the disappearance of motor response under 0.3 mA of neurostimulation in the experienced hands.

  5. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  6. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result

  7. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  8. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of brachial plexus diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okinaga, Shuji; Korenaga, Tateo; Tekemura, Atsushi; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Kawano, Ken-Ichi

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion weighted image (DWI) can specifically give running of nerve fibers as they have diffusion anisotropic property and DW whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) procedure, which being capable of imaging cervical and lumber nerve roots, is thus suggested to be useful for diagnosis of diseases related to brachial plexus (BP). The purpose of the present study is to confirm the usefulness of DWIBS by comparison of its images of the normal and sick plexuses. Subjects are 5 normal healthy males (27-36 y), 29 patients (19 M/10 F, 7-73 y) with BP diseases (10 cases of external injury, 6 of obstetric palsy, 2 of paralysis by dysfunctional position, 6 by Schwannoma, 2 by metastasis of breast cancer and 3 by radiation) and, to see the diagnostic specificity, 9 patients (M 7/F 2, 15-64 y) with severely reduced hand force by nervous causes other than BP ones. MRI with Philips Gyroscan INTERA 1.5T machine is conducted for DWIBS by DWI with single shot EPI (echo planar imaging) with the coil of either sensitivity encoding (SENSE) Cardiac, Flex-M or -S. Images are reconstructed 3D by a radiological technician possessing no information concerning patient's conditions, with Philips software Soap-bubble tool on the workstation, and are then evaluated by a radiologist and an orthopedist separately. It is found that BP disorders by injury, obstetric palsy and tumors, of which diagnosis has been difficult hitherto, can be imaged either negatively or positively depending on their history. In radiation paralysis, only 1/3 cases give a reduced signal intensity in the whole BP. DWIBS will be a new diagnostic mean for systemic peripheral nerve diseases as well as BP ones. (T.T.)

  9. [The use of acupuncture in combined balneotherapy of erectile dysfunction in patients with lumbosacral osteochondrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, I E; Tereshin, A T

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate effects of therapeutic and preventive measures on restoration of compromised erectile function in patients with osteochondrosis of the lumbosacral spine segment (LSSS). The patients were treated using corporal and auricular acupuncture, Narzan mineral water baths, manual therapy, remedial gymnastics, and psychotherapeutic correction of sexual dysadaptation. This combined treatment resulted in the elimination of algic syndrome in 77.5% of the patients, restoration of sexual function in 62.5%, and normalization of hemodynamics in cavernous bodies in 65.2%. The functional activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis was normalized in 65% of the LSSS patients of strong and moderate sexual constitution. Introduction of acupuncture in the combined medicamentous therapy increased its efficiency by 15%. In 57.5% of the patients with strong and moderate sexual constitution, the restored sexual function persisted for at least 12 months.

  10. Role of Duloxetine in management of cervical or lumbosacral neuralgia of unknown etiology: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Digambar P Nawani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duloxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI used for treatment of neuropathic pain associated with diabetic neuropathy and fibromyalgia. Use of duloxetine for idiopathic neuropathic pain is not known. We present our experience for treatment of such painful conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients, either sex, aged 30-65 years presenting for cervical and lumbosacral pain were administered duloxetine 40 mg/day in two divided doses. They were followed for a total period of 20 weeks and pain was assessed periodically using Numerical scale and Facies scale. Results: Fifteen patients showed complete resolution of pain. No major side effects were seen. No patient showed less than 50% resolution of pain. Conclusion: Duloxetine 40 mg/day is effective for control of painful neuropathic condition in our Indian setup.

  11. MR imaging of the lumbosacral spine in asymptomatic pregnant and nonpregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreb, J.C.; Wolbarsht, L.B.; Brown, C.; Cohen, J.M.; Erdman, W.A.; Maravilla, K.R.

    1986-01-01

    Back discomfort is a common complaint during pregnancy. In the past, back discomfort was commonly attributed to exaggeration of the normal lumbar lordosis. Recently, however, claims have been made that there is an increased incidence of lumbar disk disease during pregnancy. To evaluate this claim and determine its significance, we compared MR images of the spines of pregnant and asymptomatic nonpregnant women. Sagittal MR images (0.35 T, spin-echo technique) of the lumbosacral spines of 50 pregnant and 50 nonpregnant women were evaluated for intervertebral disk desiccation, bulge, and herniation. The nonpregnant subjects were divided into two groups: nulliparous and parous. The authors found no statistically significant difference among the three groups. Thus, there is no evidence for an increased prevalence of disk disease in pregnant women

  12. Perianal pain as a presentation of lumbosacral neurofibroma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddasi, Mehdi; Aghaii, Mahboubeh; Mamarabadi, Mansoureh

    2014-12-01

    Rectal and perianal pain is a common problem. Most people have experienced it at least once in their lifetime. It usually manifests as mild discomfort, but sometimes the pain can be so severe that it is incapacitating. A 59-year-old woman admitted with a 2-year history of paroxysmal perianal pain underwent a full work-up including proctoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, full colonoscopy, and barium enema that were unremarkable. Lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging with and without gadolinium showed an intradural-extramedullary lesion at the level of L5. The pathologic diagnosis was a neurofibroma. She underwent surgery, and after a few weeks she felt well and medication was no longer needed for her paroxysmal pain. Although one should consider the usual causes of colorectal pain such as hemorrhoids, anal fissure, proctalgia fugax, and chronic perianal pain syndrome, we should keep in mind that some referral pain may mimic local pathologies and should be evaluated properly.

  13. [Modern treatments for degenerative disc diseases of the lumbosacral spine. A literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, N A; Nazarenko, A G; Asyutin, D S; Zelenkov, P V; Onoprienko, R A; Korolishin, V A; Cherkiev, I U; Martynova, M A; Zakirov, B A; Timonin, S Yu; Kosyr'kova, A V; Pimenova, L F; Pogosyan, A L; Batyrov, A A

    Many researchers consider degenerative diseases of the spine as a pandemic of the XXIst century. Herniated intervertebral discs of the lumbosacral spine occur in 61% of patients with degenerative spine diseases. Of these, 15% of patients have herniated discs at the LII-LIII level, 10% of patients at the LIII-LIV level, and 40% of patients at the LIV-LV and LV-SI levels. A high cost of conservative treatment of degenerative spine disease symptoms and its low efficacy in reducing the intensity and duration of pain necessitate the development of new methods of surgical treatment. In this paper, we analyze the literature data on minimally invasive spine surgery and demonstrate the main advantages of percutaneous endoscopic surgical techniques.

  14. Duplication of Inferior Gluteal Artery and Course of Superior Gluteal Artery Through the Lumbosacral Trunk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesha Nayak B

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Internal iliac artery (IIA shows great deal of variations in its branching pattern. The knowledge of its variant branches is required for successful surgical, orthopedic, plastic surgery and radiological procedures. We observed variations of some of the branches of right IIA in an adult male cadaver. The iliolumbar artery originated from the main trunk of the IIA. After this, IIA divided into anterior and posterior divisions. The posterior division gave lateral sacral and superior gluteal arteries. Superior gluteal artery pierced the lumbosacral trunk before leaving the pelvis. The anterior division further divided into anterior and posterior trunks. Anterior trunk gave rise to superior vesical, inferior vesical, middle rectal and obturator arteries. The posterior trunk gave two inferior gluteal arteries and an internal pudendal artery.

  15. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra causing Bertolotti’s syndrome: a case report and review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutras, Georgios; Natsis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Lumbosacral transitional vertebra is an anatomical variation of the fifth lumbar vertebra in which an enlarged transverse process can form a joint or fusion with the sacrum or ilium. The association of that variant with low back pain and the change in the biomechanical properties of the lumbar spine is called Bertolotti’s syndrome. Case presentation We report a case of a 40-year-old male patient with chronic low back pain extending to the left buttock, just above the ipsilateral sacroiliac joint. Radiographic investigation revealed an anomalous enlargement of the left transverse process of the fifth lumbar vertebra forming a pseudarthrosis with the infrajacent ala of the sacrum. Conclusion In young patients with back pain the possibility of Bertolotti’s syndrome should always be taken in account. PMID:19830065

  16. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra causing Bertolotti's syndrome: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevas, Georgios; Tzaveas, Alexandros; Koutras, Georgios; Natsis, Konstantinos

    2009-07-06

    Lumbosacral transitional vertebra is an anatomical variation of the fifth lumbar vertebra in which an enlarged transverse process can form a joint or fusion with the sacrum or ilium. The association of that variant with low back pain and the change in the biomechanical properties of the lumbar spine is called Bertolotti's syndrome. We report a case of a 40-year-old male patient with chronic low back pain extending to the left buttock, just above the ipsilateral sacroiliac joint. Radiographic investigation revealed an anomalous enlargement of the left transverse process of the fifth lumbar vertebra forming a pseudarthrosis with the infrajacent ala of the sacrum. In young patients with back pain the possibility of Bertolotti's syndrome should always be taken in account.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine in children with chronic constipation or non-retentive fecal incontinence: A prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkali, N.; Hagebreuk, E. E. O.; Bongers, E. M.; van Rijn, R. R.; van Wijk, M. P.; Benninga, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of lumbosacral spine (LSS) abnormalities in children with defecation disorders, intractable constipation, or non-retentive fecal incontinence (NRFI) and evaluate whether LSS abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are clinically detected by neurologic

  18. CAUDAL MEDULLARY PATHWAYS TO LUMBOSACRAL MOTONEURONAL CELL GROUPS IN THE CAT - EVIDENCE FOR DIRECT PROJECTIONS POSSIBLY REPRESENTING THE FINAL COMMON PATHWAY FOR LORDOSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHORST, VGJM; HOLSTEGE, G

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) projects to distinct brainstem and cervical and thoracic cord motoneuronal cell groups. The present paper describes NRA projections to distinct motoneuronal cell groups in the lumbar enlargement. Lumbosacral injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase

  19. Caudal Medullary Pathways To Lumbosacral Motoneuronal Cell Groups In The Cat; Evidence For Direct Projections Possibly Representing The Final Common Pathway For Lordosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderHorst, Veronique G.J.M.; Holstege, Gert

    1995-01-01

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) projects to distinct brainstem and cervical and thoracic cord motoneuronal cell groups. The present paper describes NRA projections to distinct motoneuronal cell groups in the lumbar enlargement. Lumbosacral injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase

  20. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group Pilot Study of Milnacipran for Chronic Radicular Pain (Sciatica) Associated With Lumbosacral Disc Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, David M.; Pae, Chi-Un; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current study investigates whether milnacipran, an equipotent serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is effective in reducing chronic radicular pain in patients (N = 11) with lumbosacral disc disease.

  1. A methodological reappraisal of non invasive high voltage electrical stimulation of lumbosacral nerve roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troni, Walter; Di Sapio, Alessia; Berra, Eliana; Duca, Sergio; Merola, Aristide; Sperli, Francesca; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2011-10-01

    To describe a neurophysiological method to locate the optimal stimulation site (OSS) over the vertebral column, customized to the individual subject, to achieve maximal activation of lumbosacral roots by means of non-invasive high voltage electrical stimulation (HVES). OSS was located in 30 volunteers by testing different stimulation points of a surface multi-electrode array placed over the dorso-lumbar junction of the vertebral column. The dorso-ventral stimulating montage was used (Troni et al., 1996). Motor responses to root stimulation (rCMAPs) were bilaterally recorded from Vastus Medialis (VM), Tibialis Anterior (TA), Soleus (SL) and Flexor Hallucis Brevis (FHB) muscles. The direct nature of rCMAPs was tested by delivering two maximal stimuli 50 ms apart. Except for a few subjects with large girth, maximal rCMAPs could be obtained from all muscles with a stimulating current intensity up to 550 V (1050 mA). Maximal double HVES excluded any reflex component in the recorded rCMAPs. The procedure was well tolerated and no side effects were observed. A single maximal electric shock delivered at the proper vertebral level by means of the dorso-ventral montage is able to safely achieve synchronous, bilateral maximal activation of several roots, from L3 to S1. Maximal activation of lumbosacral roots at their origin, unattainable with magnetic stimulation, is the essential requirement for direct detection of proximal nerve conduction slowing and block in lower limbs. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The natural history and management of patients with congenital deficits associated with lumbosacral lipomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Albert; Hengel, Ross; Cochrane, D Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Many patients with lumbosacral lipoma are asymptomatic; however, a significant proportion will have neurological deficits present at birth. Implication of these deficits with respect to natural history and management are not well understood. A retrospective review of all infants with lumbosacral lipoma seen at BCCH between 1997 and 2013 was carried out. The study population was stratified on the presence of a congenital, non-progressive deficit and subdivided on treatment approach. The subsequent developments of deficits resulting in untethering procedures were recorded. Of the 44 infants in this study, 24 patients had no neurologic deficit while 20 patients had a fixed, non-progressive deficit evident at birth. Ten of 24 patients without a neurological deficit at birth underwent a prophylactic untethering with 3 eventually requiring repeat untethering after, on average, 62.7 months. Eleven of 14 asymptomatic, monitored patients required untethering for clinical deterioration. Two required a second untethering procedure after 48.7 months. Ten of 20 infants with congenital deficits present at birth underwent prophylactic untethering, and 4 required further surgery after 124 months. Ten patients underwent observation with 8 eventually requiring surgery. Two required repeat untethered after 154 months. The complication rates and operative burden for patients are similar whether prophylactic or delayed surgery is performed. The presence of congenital neurologic deficit does not affect the likelihood of deterioration in patients managed expectantly; prophylactic detethering of these patients did not prevent delayed neurologic deterioration. Comparing the need for repeat surgery in prophylactically untethered patients with initial untethering of patients operated upon at the time of deterioration, prophylactic untethering may confer a benefit with respect to subsequent symptomatic tethering if complication rates are low. However, in a setting with multidisciplinary

  3. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  4. Diagnostic yield of lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging requested by paediatric urology consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ibieta, M; Rojas Ticona, J; Villamil, V; Guirao Piñera, M J; López García, A; Zambudio Carmona, G

    2017-11-01

    In the historical series, the diagnostic yield of lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging to rule out occult spinal dysraphism (or occult myelodysplasia), requested by paediatric urology, ranged from 2% to 15%. The aim of this study was to define our cost-effectiveness in children with urinary symptoms and to define endpoints that increase the possibility of finding occult spinal dysraphism. A screening was conducted on patients with urinary dysfunction for whom an magnetic resonance imaging was requested by the paediatric urology clinic, for persistent symptoms after treatment, voiding dysfunction or other clinical or urodynamic findings. We analysed clinical (UTI, daytime leaks, enuresis, voiding dysfunction, urgency, renal ultrasonography, lumbosacral radiography, history of acute urine retention, skin stigma and myalgia) and urodynamic endpoints (hyperactivity or areflexia, voiding dysfunction, interrupted pattern, accommodation value and maximum flow). A univariate analysis was conducted with SPSS 20.0. We analysed 21 patients during the period 2011-2015. The median age was 6 years (3-10). Three patients (14.3%) had occult spinal dysraphism: one spinal lipoma, one filum lipomatosus and one caudal regression syndrome with channel stenosis. The endpoints with statistically significant differences were the myalgias and the history of acute urine retention (66.7% vs. 5.6%, P=.04; OR= 34; 95%CI: 1.5-781 for both endpoints). The diagnostic yield of magnetic resonance imaging requested for children with urinary dysfunctions without skin stigma or neuro-orthopaedic abnormalities is low, although nonnegligible. In this group, the patients with a history of acute urine retention and muscle pain (pain, «cramps») can experience a greater diagnostic yield or positive predictive value. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  6. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shankar, Sridhar; Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication

  7. Critical analysis of extra peritoneal antero-lateral approach for lumbar plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Sérgio Martins

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of lumbar plexus are uncommon and descriptions of surgical access are derived from vertebral spine approaches. METHOD: The extraperitoneal anterolateral approach to the lumbar plexus was performed in six adult fresh cadavers. The difficulties on dissection were related. RESULTS: An exposure of all distal elements of lumbar plexus was possible, but a cranial extension of the incision was needed to reach the iliohypogastric nerve in all cases. Ligation of vessels derived from common iliac artery was necessary for genitofemoral and obturator nerves exposure in two cases. The most proximal part of the lumbar roots could be identified only after dissection and clipping of most lumbar vessels. CONCLUSION: The extraperitoneal anterolateral approach allows appropriate exposure of terminal nerves of lumbar plexus laterallly to psoas major muscle. Cranial extension of the cutaneous incision may be necessary for exposure of iliohypogastric nerve. Roots exposure increases the risk of vascular damage.

  8. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  9. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  10. Profile of children with new-born brachial plexus palsy managed in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Summary: New-born Brachial Plexus Palsy (NBPP) is birth injury resulting from ... NBPP located from the database of the Physiotherapy department were retrieved in order to assess .... child and maternal characteristics and this were noted.

  11. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Minko Minkov; Maria Vankova; Radoslav Minkov; Stefaniya Terzieva; Toni Dimitrov; Iskren Velikov

    2012-01-01

    A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the c...

  12. Assessment tools used by occupational therapists in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Thaianny Taís Dantas de Brito; Carolinne Linhares Pinheiro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP) is a result of brachial plexus injury at birth and may cause dysfunction of the affected upper limb, reflecting significantly in the child’s life. When evaluating a child with OBPP the occupational therapist can use evaluation tools, and has to have knowledge to choose and apply the most appropriate instrument. Objective: This review aimed to analyze the literature on the use of evaluation tools by occupational therapists in...

  13. Primary benign brachial plexus tumors: an experience of 115 operated cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Ketan I

    2012-01-01

    Primary benign brachial plexus tumors are rare. They pose a great challenge to the neurosurgeon, because the majority of patients present with minimal or no neurological deficits. Radical to complete excision of the tumor with preservation of neurological function of the involved nerve is an ideal surgical treatment option with benign primary brachial plexus tumor surgery. We present a review article of our 10-year experience with primary benign brachial plexus tumors surgically treated at King Edward Memorial Hospital and P.D. Hinduja National Hospital from 2000 to 2009. The clinical presentations, radiological features, surgical strategies, and the eventual outcome following surgery are analyzed, discussed, and compared with available series in the world literature. Various difficulties and problems faced in the management of primary benign brachial plexus tumors are analyzed. Irrespective of the tumor size, the indications for surgical intervention are also discussed. The goal of our study was to optimize the treatment of patients with benign brachial plexus tumors with minimal neurological deficits. It is of paramount importance that brachial plexus tumors be managed by a peripheral nerve surgeon with expertise and experience in this field to minimize the neurological insult following surgery.

  14. Radiofrequency sensory ablation as a treatment for symptomatic unilateral lumbosacral junction pseudarticulation (Bertolotti's syndrome): a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Robert

    2010-06-01

    Describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and successful treatment of a case of symptomatic unilateral lumbosacral junction pseudarticulation using a novel radiofrequency nerve ablation technique. A 56-year-old female patient who had suffered with low back and right upper buttock pain for 16 years experienced incomplete relief with L4/5 facet joint radiofrequency ablation. She was found to have an elongated right L5 transverse process that articulated with the sacral ala (Bertolotti's syndrome). Fluoroscopically guided local anesthetic/corticosteroid injection into the pseudarthrosis eliminated her residual right buttock pain for the duration of the local anesthetic only. Complete pain relief was achieved by injecting local anesthetic circumferentially around the posterior pseudarthrosis articular margin. Accordingly, bipolar radiofrequency strip thermal lesions were created at the same locations. Complete pain relief and full restoration of function was achieved for 16 months postprocedure. This case report describes a novel radiofrequency technique for treating symptomatic lumbosacral junction pseudarticulation that warrants further evaluation.

  15. Significant clinical improvement in radiation-induced lumbosacral poly-radiculopathy by a treatment combining pentoxifylline, tocopherol, and clodronate (Pentoclo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delanian, S. [Hop St Louis, Serv Oncol Radiotherapie, APHP, F-75010 Paris, (France); Lefaix, J.L. [CEA-LARIA, CIRIL-GANIL, Caen, (France); Maisonobe, T. [Hop La Pitie Salpetriere, Federat Neurophysiol Clin, APHP, Paris, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Radiation-induced (RI) peripheral neuropathy is a rare and severe delayed complication of radiotherapy that is spontaneously irreversible, with no standard of treatment. We previously developed a successful antioxidant treatment in RI fibrosis and necrosis. Two patients with progressive worsening RI lumbosacral poly-radiculopathy experienced over several years a significant clinical improvement in their neurological sensorimotor symptoms with long-term pentoxifylline-tocopherol-clodronate treatment, and good safety. (authors)

  16. Symptomatic lumbosacral transitional vertebra: a review of the current literature and clinical outcomes following steroid injection or surgical intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Holm Emil Kongsted; Bünger Cody; Foldager Casper Bindzus

    2017-01-01

    Bertolotti’s syndrome (BS) refers to the possible association between the congenital malformation lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV), and low back pain (LBP). Several treatments have been proposed including steroid injections, resections of the LSTV, laminectomy, and lumbar spinal fusion. The aim of this review was to compare the clinical outcomes in previous trials and case reports for these treatments in patients with LBP and LSTV. A PubMed search was conducted. We included English st...

  17. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  18. Conservative treatment in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome: design of a randomised clinical trial [ISRCTN68857256

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peul Wilco C

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective is to present the design of randomised clinical trial (RCT on the effectiveness of physical therapy added to general practitioners management compared to general practitioners management only in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome (also called sciatica. Methods/Design Patients in general practice diagnosed with an acute (less than 6 weeks lumbosacral radicular syndrome and an age above 18 years are eligible for participation. The general practitioners treatment follows their clinical guideline. The physical therapy treatment will consist of patient education and exercise therapy. The primary outcome measure is patients reported global perceived effect. Secondary outcome measures are severity of complaints, functional status, health status, fear of movement, medical consumption, sickness absence, costs and treatment preference. The follow-up is 52 weeks. Discussion Treatment by general practitioners and physical therapists in this study will be transparent and not a complete "black box". The results of this trial will contribute to the decision of the general practitioner regarding referral to physical therapy in patients with an acute lumbosacral radicular syndrome.

  19. Retrospective Cohort Study of the Prevalence of Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebra in a Wide and Well-Represented Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Uçar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV in a well-represented general population. Methods. For a retrospective cohort study, abdominal radiographs of adult subjects were queried with clear visibility of the vertebral body articulation of the last rib, all lumbar transverse processes, and complete sacral wings. Exclusion criteria included any radiologic evidence of previous lumbosacral surgery that would block our view. A total of 6200 abdominal films were reviewed, and 3607 were identified as being suitable for the measurement of the desired parameters. Results. A total of 3607 subjects were identified as eligible for the study, and 683 (18.9% were classified as positive for a lumbosacral transitional vertebra. The prevalence of sacralization and lumbarization was found as 17.2% and 1.7%, respectively. The average age at the time of the study was 39.5±15.2 years (18–86 years. Conclusions. As a result of different opinions, LSTV retains its controversial status. Our prevalence study of the general population will provide assistance for resolution of the controversy. Prevalence studies of the general population with a wide participation will shed light on comparative studies.

  20. Inflammation and neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, C; Dyck, P; Friedenberg, S; Burns, T; Windebank, A; Dyck, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of mechanical, infectious, and inflammatory factors inducing neuropathic attacks in hereditary brachial plexus neuropathy (HBPN), an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by attacks of pain and weakness, atrophy, and sensory alterations of the shoulder girdle and upper limb muscles. Methods: Four patients from separate kindreds with HBPN were evaluated. Upper extremity nerve biopsies were obtained during attacks from a person of each kindred. In situ hybridisation for common viruses in nerve tissue and genetic testing for a hereditary tendency to pressure palsies (HNPP; tomaculous neuropathy) were undertaken. Two patients treated with intravenous methyl prednisolone had serial clinical and electrophysiological examinations. One patient was followed prospectively through pregnancy and during the development of a stereotypic attack after elective caesarean delivery. Results: Upper extremity nerve biopsies in two patients showed prominent perivascular inflammatory infiltrates with vessel wall disruption. Nerve in situ hybridisation for viruses was negative. There were no tomaculous nerve changes. In two patients intravenous methyl prednisolone ameliorated symptoms (largely pain), but with tapering of steroid dose, signs and symptoms worsened. Elective caesarean delivery did not prevent a typical postpartum attack. Conclusions: Inflammation, probably immune, appears pathogenic for some if not all attacks of HBPN. Immune modulation may be useful in preventing or reducing the neuropathic attacks, although controlled trials are needed to establish efficacy, as correction of the mutant gene is still not possible. The genes involved in immune regulation may be candidates for causing HBPN disorders. PMID:12082044

  1. Proliferation of cultured mouse choroid plexus epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basam Z Barkho

    Full Text Available The choroid plexus (ChP epithelium is a multifunctional tissue found in the ventricles of the brain. The major function of the ChP epithelium is to produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF that bathes and nourishes the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to the CSF, ChP epithelial cells (CPECs produce and secrete numerous neurotrophic factors that support brain homeostasis, such as adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Accordingly, damage and dysfunction to CPECs are thought to accelerate and intensify multiple disease phenotypes, and CPEC regeneration would represent a potential therapeutic approach for these diseases. However, previous reports suggest that CPECs rarely divide, although this has not been extensively studied in response to extrinsic factors. Utilizing a cell-cycle reporter mouse line and live cell imaging, we identified scratch injury and the growth factors insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF as extrinsic cues that promote increased CPEC expansion in vitro. Furthermore, we found that IGF-1 and EGF treatment enhances scratch injury-induced proliferation. Finally, we established whole tissue explant cultures and observed that IGF-1 and EGF promote CPEC division within the intact ChP epithelium. We conclude that although CPECs normally have a slow turnover rate, they expand in response to external stimuli such as injury and/or growth factors, which provides a potential avenue for enhancing ChP function after brain injury or neurodegeneration.

  2. Plexus brachialis injury following surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorov, J; Kostov, N [Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya

    1980-01-01

    Five-year active follow-up of 236 breast cancer patients undergoing radical amputation with subsequent telegammatherapy showed in 21 (8.9%) of the cases development, on the lesion side, of brachial plexitis varying in severity and becoming manifest from 6 to 28 months following completion of complex treatment. The patients presented with the initial and leading symptom of progressively increasing diffuse causalgic pain spreading over the whole arm. Clinical findings corresponded to injury of nerve fiber interlacings in this zone, with distal parts of the extremity selectively affected and dominance of signs from damage to individual nerves. Evidence obtained by a variety of techniques (capillary microscopy, oscillography, skin and axillar thermometry, and the ''white spot'' symptom) indicated formation of a distinct trophovascular syndrome associated with the clinical pattern of plexitis. The complexity of causative factors in development of the pathologic process is pointed out: surgical intervention and postoperative period, direct radiation exposure of the brachial plexus, sympathetic ganglia and vascular bundle, as well as substantial fibrous changes in soft tissues. The treatment administered (pharmacotherapy, exercise therapy, physiotherapy) brought relief in a measure depending on the state of plexitis at the time of diagnosing.

  3. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

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    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  4. Selective plasticity of primary afferent innervation to the dorsal horn and autonomic nuclei following lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation in long term studies.

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    Wu, Lisa; Wu, Jun; Chang, Huiyi H; Havton, Leif A

    2012-02-01

    Previous studies involving injuries to the nerves of the cauda equina and the conus medullaris have shown that lumbosacral ventral root avulsion in rat models results in denervation and dysfunction of the lower urinary tract, retrograde and progressive cell death of the axotomized motor and parasympathetic neurons, as well as the emergence of neuropathic pain. Root reimplantation has also been shown to ameliorate several of these responses, but experiments thus far have been limited to studying the effects of lesion and reimplantation local to the lumbosacral region. Here, we have expanded the region of investigation after lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation to include the thoracolumbar sympathetic region of the spinal cord. Using a retrograde tracer injected into the major pelvic ganglion, we were able to define the levels of the spinal cord that contain sympathetic preganglionic neurons innervating the lower urinary tract. We have conducted studies on the effects of the lumbosacral ventral root avulsion and reimplantation models on the afferent innervation of the dorsal horn and autonomic nuclei at both thoracolumbar and lumbosacral levels through immunohistochemistry for the markers calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1). Surprisingly, our experiments reveal a selective and significant decrease of CGRP-positive innervation in the dorsal horn at thoracolumbar levels that is partially restored with root reimplantation. However, no similar changes were detected at the lumbosacral levels despite the injury and repair targeting efferent neurons, and being performed at the lumbosacral levels. Despite the changes evident in the thoracolumbar dorsal horn, we find no changes in afferent innervation of the autonomic nuclei at either sympathetic or parasympathetic segmental levels by CGRP or VGLUT1. We conclude that even remote, efferent root injuries and repair procedures can have an effect on remote and non

  5. Lumbosacral pain: Delivery of care to patients in the United Kingdom Podchufarova E.

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    E.V. Podchufarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal pain syndromes are one of the most common causes of disability and referral to a medical specialist. Seven million consultations for lumbosacral pain are annually carried out in the United Kingdom.Examination of patients with back pain. Three levels of health care delivered to patients with back pain in the United Kingdom may be arbitrarily identified. Level 1 is outpatient: a general practitioner jointly with a manipulative therapist, a physiotherapist, a rehabilitation specialist, and mid-level health workers render care to patients with insignificant and mild pain syndrome; Level 2 is also outpatient, which involves the participation of a hospital or multidisciplinary team consultant, for example, in a musculoskeletal pain service or a specialized pain center; Level 3 is to deliver care at neurosurgical or orthopedic hospital, by applying invasive interventions. Acute back pain is a benign condition in the vast majority of cases; there is no need for additional instrumental and laboratory studies; but spinal X-ray study, computed tomography (СT scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, general blood and urine tests are required when marked neurological and somatic disorders are present.Management of patients with acute lumbosacral pain is to inform a patient about the benign nature of the disease; to exclude bed rest; to explain the need to maintain normal activity; to train how to correctly lift weights and to maintain normal posture; to refer for manual and exercise therapy in order to return to normal motor activity; to use proven effective medication. In most cases, acute back pain goes away spontaneously for a short period of time; an active treatment approach is considered to be optimal. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and acetaminophen are used for analgesia if required. Patients who show no improvement after 4 weeks of treatment need rescreening for markers of potentially dangerous spinal diseases, as

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the lumbosacral sagittal alignment in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

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    Makirov, Serik K.; Jahaf, Mohammed T.; Nikulina, Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    Goal of the study This study intends to develop a method of quantitative sagittal balance parameters assessment, based on a geometrical model of lumbar spine and sacrum. Methods One hundred eight patients were divided into 2 groups. In the experimental group have been included 59 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis on L1-5 level. Forty-nine healthy volunteers without history of any lumbar spine pathlogy were included in the control group. All patients have been examined with supine MRI. Lumbar lordosis has been adopted as circular arc and described either anatomical (lumbar lordosis angle), or geometrical (chord length, circle segment height, the central angle, circle radius) parameters. Moreover, 2 sacral parameters have been assessed for all patients: sacral slope and sacral deviation angle. Both parameters characterize sacrum disposition in horizontal and vertical axis respectively. Results Significant correlation was observed between anatomical and geometrical lumbo-sacral parameters. Significant differences between stenosis group and control group were observed in the value of the “central angle” and “sacral deviation” parameters. We propose additional parameters: lumbar coefficient, as ratio of the lordosis angle to the segmental angle (Kl); sacral coefficient, as ratio of the sacral tilt (ST) to the sacral deviation (SD) angle (Ks); and assessment modulus of the mathematical difference between sacral and lumbar coefficients has been used for determining lumbosacral balance (LSB). Statistically significant differences between main and control group have been obtained for all described coefficients (p = 0.006, p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, accordingly). Median of LSB value of was 0.18 and 0.34 for stenosis and control groups, accordingly. Conclusion Based on these results we believe that that spinal stenosis is associated with an acquired deformity that is measureable by the described parameters. It's possible that spinal stenosis occurs in patients with an

  7. Types and severity of operated supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries caused by traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Radek; Waldauf, Petr; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injuries occur in up to 5% of polytrauma cases involving motorcycle accidents and in approximately 4% of severe winter sports injuries. One of the criteria for a successful operative therapy is the type of lesion. Upper plexus palsy has the best prognosis, whereas lower plexus palsy is surgically untreatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate a group of patients with brachial plexus injury caused by traffic accidents, categorize the injuries according to type of accident, and look for correlations between type of palsy (injury) and specific accidents. A total of 441 brachial plexus reconstruction patients from our department were evaluated retrospectively(1993 to 2011). Sex, age, neurological status, and the type and cause of injury were recorded for each case. Patients with BPI caused by a traffic accident were assessed in detail. Traffic accidents were the cause of brachial plexus injury in most cases (80.7%). The most common type of injury was avulsion of upper root(s) (45.7%) followed by rupture (28.2%), complete avulsion (16.9%) and avulsion of lower root(s) (9.2%). Of the patients, 73.9% had an upper,22.7% had a complete and only 3.4% had a lower brachial plexus palsy. The main cause was motorcycle accidents(63.2%) followed by car accidents (23.5%), bicycle accidents(10.7%) and pedestrian collisions (3.1%) (paccidents had a higher percentage of lower avulsion (22.7%) and a lower percentage of upper avulsion (29.3%), whereas cyclists had a higher percentage of upper avulsion (68.6%) based on the data from the entire group of patients (paccidents (9.3%,paccidents),significantly more upper and fewer lower palsies were present. In the bicycle accident group, upper palsy was the most common (89%). Study results indicate that the most common injury was an upper plexus palsy. It was characteristic of bicycle accidents, and significantly more common in car and motorcycle accidents. The results also indicate that it is important to consider the

  8. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, L.S.; Yaylali, Ilker; Zurakowski, David; Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R.; Grossman, John A.I.

    2006-01-01

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  9. The plexus chorioideus and its ultrastructural changes following prenatal X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzmann, U.

    1982-01-01

    Pregnant mice were exposed to 0.95 or 1.9 Gy whole body radiation on the 12th day of gestation. The offspring and control animals were narcotised, mounted, and the plexus choroid was examined. The first and most important precondition was to prepare a perfect image of the epithelial plexus. The second step was to compare the SEM results with the obtained TEM results, and these were again compared with the TEM results of other authors. The third step was to use exposed and control animals synchronously for SEM and TEM examination. This permitted a comparison of the morphological modifications of the choroid plexus. The morphological findings in control mice correspond largely to those of other species. As a result of the irradiation, the kinocilia of the plexus cells are shortened or disappear partly or completely. They are not only able to perform the normal ciliar movement but also react to noxae. Further experiments will also show the consequence of oedematous dilatation of the interstice, the dilated intercellular spaces in the epithelial plexus, the change of the apical microvilli and possible interrelationships with the radiation-induced hydrocephalus. (orig.) [de

  10. X-ray induced dysplasia in the developing telencephalic choroid plexus of mice exposed in utero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzmann, U.

    1982-01-01

    Pregnant NMRI-mice were X-irradiated with single doses of 0.95 Gy (100 R) and 1.9 Gy (200 R) on day of gestation (dg) 12. For sampling, anesthetized animals were perfused with buffered glutaraldehyde solution or fixed by immersion in Karnovsky solution. LM, SEM, and TEM studies were carried out on brains prenatally and up to the age of 20 months to follow the radiation effects on the developing lateral choroid plexus. Radiation-induced changes were found using all three methods and at all stages studied. The normally sickle-shaped and stretched choroid plexus is shortened and irregular, and the dome-shaped plexus cells are flattened. Their superficial fine structures, i.e., the microvilli and cilia, are altered. Three stages of severity can be distinguished and the internal hydromicrocephalus increases from stage I to III. Intercellular spaces of the treated plexus epithelium are often dilated, but the tight junctions at the ventricular surface seem to be intact. The interstitium shows large dilations in comparison with the controls. Thus, gross changes and alterations in the fine structure can be induced in the choroid plexus by doses of 0.95 Gy and 1.9 Gy, which persist throughout postnatal life

  11. Primary Culture of Choroid Plexuses from Neonate Rats Containing Progenitor Cells Capable of Differentiation

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    Sheng-Li Huang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The choroid plexuses, which could secrete a number of neurotrophins, have recently been used in transplantation in central nervous system diseases. Aims: To study the mechanism of nerve regeneration in the central nervous system by grafting choroid plexus tissues. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The choroid plexuses from the lateral ventricles of neonatal rats were cultured in adherent culture, and immunocytochemical methods were used to analyse the progenitor cells on days 2, 6, and 10 after seeding. Results: Expression of both nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein was observed in small cell aggregates on day 2 in primary culture. Most of the nestin-positive cells on day 6 were immunoreactive to glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody. No cells expressing nestin or glial fibrillary acidic protein were seen on day 10. Conclusion: These experimental results indicate that the choroid plexus contains a specific cell population – progenitor cells. Under in vitro experimental conditions, the progenitor cells differentiated into choroid plexus epithelial cells but did not form neurons or astrocytes.

  12. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

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    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  13. Simultaneous development of craniopharyngioma and choroid plexus carcinoma in the childhood -a clinical case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinova, L.; Georgiev, R.; Mihaylova, I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a clinical case of 9 years old girl with concomitant brain tumors - choroid plexus carcinoma and craniopharyngioma diagnosed in 2009. After three operations, cranio-spinal irradiation with boost for the remaining tumor located in left ventricular trigonum to a total dose of 55 Gy and 7 courses chemotherapy, local tumor control was achieved for the choroid plexus carcinoma. Four years following the achievement of local tumor control of the choroid plexus carcinoma, an increase of the tumor formation located in the left side of the pituitary was reported. The diagnosis cystic craniopharyngeoma was found during the surgical operation. With this clinical case we would like to stress on the achieved local tumor control following the complex treatment of carcinoma of the choroid plexus, as well as on the slow growth of simultaneously diagnosed craniopharyngeoma. This case report raises the question of the genetic predisposition of the brain tumors in children, as well as possibility of malignant transformation of craniopharyngeoma following radiotherapy. The differential diagnosis of neuroectodermal brain tumors requires immunohistochemical analysis and if necessary genetic analysis. Key words: Complex treatment. Choroid plexus carcinoma. Craniopharyngioma. Radiotherapy. Malignant transformation. Simultaneity

  14. Concepts of nerve regeneration and repair applied to brachial plexus reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is a serious condition that usually affects young adults. Progress in brachial plexus repair is intimately related to peripheral nerve surgery, and depends on clinical and experimental studies. We review the rat brachial plexus as an experimental model, together with its behavioral evaluation. Techniques to repair nerves, such as neurolysis, nerve coaptation, nerve grafting, nerve transfer, fascicular transfer, direct muscle neurotization, and end-to-side neurorraphy, are discussed in light of the authors' experimental studies. Intradural repair of the brachial plexus by graft implants into the spinal cord and motor rootlet transfer offer new possibilities in brachial plexus reconstruction. The clinical experience of intradural repair is presented. Surgical planning in root rupture or avulsion is proposed. In total avulsion, the authors are in favor of the reconstruction of thoraco-brachial and abdomino-antebrachial grasping, and on the transfer of the brachialis muscle to the wrist extensors if it is reinnervated. Surgical treatment of painful conditions and new drugs are also discussed.

  15. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-Cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-02-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering 'excellent' and 'good' muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  16. The prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Hidehiko

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of concurrent phrenic nerve palsy for predicting spontaneous motor recovery in neonatal brachial plexus palsy. We reviewed the records of 366 neonates with brachial plexus palsy. The clinical and follow-up data of patients with and without phrenic nerve palsy were compared. Of 366 newborn babies with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, 21 (6%) had concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Sixteen of these neonates had upper-type palsy and 5 had total-type palsy. Poor spontaneous motor recovery was observed in 13 neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (62%) and in 129 without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy (39%). Among neonates born via vertex delivery, poor motor recovery was observed in 7 of 9 (78%) neonates with concurrent phrenic nerve palsy and 115 of 296 (39%) without concurrent phrenic nerve palsy. Concurrent phrenic nerve palsy in neonates with brachial plexus palsy has prognostic value in predicting poor spontaneous motor recovery of the brachial plexus, particularly after vertex delivery. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Correspondence in relation to the case report "Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note." published in May issue of Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury

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    Bhakta Pradipta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Comment on 'Capnography as an aid in localizing the phrenic nerve in brachial plexus surgery. Technical note' Bhagat H, Agarwal A, Sharma MS Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury 2008, 3:14 (22 May 2008

  18. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs: classification, prevalence, and association with sacroiliac morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damur-Djuric, Natascha; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joe P; Flückiger, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LTV) was determined by reviewing the pelvic radiographs of 4000 medium- and large-breed dogs of 144 breeds routinely screened for canine hip dysplasia. An LTV was seen in 138 (3.5%) dogs. The prevalence was higher in German Shepherd dogs and Greater Swiss Mountain dogs than in the other breeds, suggesting a genetic predisposition. There was no gender predisposition. The transverse processes of the LTV were divided into three types based on their morphological characteristics: lumbar type or type 1; intermediate type or type 2; and sacral type or type 3. In a symmetric LTV, both transverse processes are of the same type, while in an asymmetric LTV they are not. The frequency of occurrence of symmetric and asymmetric LTV was similar. In symmetric LTV, intermediate-type transverse processes predominated. Most of the asymmetric LTV had an intermediate-type transverse process combined with a lumbar or sacral type, respectively. Highly asymmetric LTV were often angled relative to the adjacent vertebrae. We hypothesize that an LTV is not the result of transformation of a lumbar into a sacral vertebra or vice versa, but rather is an autonomous intermediate type of vertebra. It occurs when the point of contact of the pelvis with the vertebral column is slightly cranial or caudal to its normal position. The resulting formative stimulus on the vertebral ossification centers, sagittally still separated, causes the various morphologies seen in LTV including the asymmetric variations.

  19. Effect of modified lumbosacral orthoses on treatment of patients with spondylolysis

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    Mahmoud Bahramizadeh

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In this study, the effect of modified lumbo sacral orthoses on lordosis andlumbosacral angle and reliving pain and functional disability was investigated.Materials and Methods: 30 patients (19 females, 11 males with spondylolysis (aged between 22-57 years were sampled in a simple randomized manner. They had a history of low back pain for 30.7(in average months. Modified lumbo sacral orthoses was prescribed for 3 months (23 hours daily.The brace was unique, bridged between xyphoid process to pubic symphysis anteriorly and seventhlumbar vertebrae to gluteal prminency posteriorly.Results: Our results show that 3-months using the modified lumbo sacral orthoses resulted insignificant decrement in pain and improvement in functional ability of patients. Although lordosis andlumbosacral angles decreased to 2.21 and 0.92 degrees, respectively, but these changes were notsignificant. Finally, patients with the lower duration of low back pain showed better results.Conclusion: Our findings indicate that the modified lumbosacral orthoses, as a non-invasiveprocedure, can be used for conservative treatments in spondylolysis patients.

  20. [Combined lumbosacral and vaginal physiotherapy in the treatment of overactive bladder in postmenopausal women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neĭmark, B A; Neĭmark, A I; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tishchenko, G E; Gol'braĭkh, G E

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of combined application of physical factors including lumbosacral magnetotherapy and vaginal vibromagnetic impact is shown in 48 postmenopausal women (mean age 62.5 +/- 1.6 years) with overactive bladder (OAB). Choice of this combination is explained by a multifactorial OAB pathogenesis and degenerative spinal diseases often encountered in postmenopausal women (70.8% in this study). The exposures of the spine and the bladder (vaginal) were made one after the other with duration of the first stage 10-15 min, of the second--5-7 min, the course consisted of 10-12 procedures. The results of the treatment were assessed by urination rhythm, volume, number of incontinence episodes. Quality of life was evaluated according to special questionnaires. Trophic function of the spinal cord and innervation of the bladder were studied by n. tibialis conduction measured by electroneuromyography (ENMG). The following results were obtained: reduction of urinations for 24 hours by 36.9%, urgent episodes--by 44%, urgent incontinence--by 59.7%. Voiding volume significantly increased (by 26%). A total score of anxiety related to OAB fell by 51.3%. M-response amplitude in ENMG rose 1.5-fold, while velocity of the impulse conduction along the n. tibialis enhanced 1.2-fold. The technique was accomplished with AMUS-01-Intramag device and attachment to it Rectomassager made in Russia.

  1. Anatomic investigation of the lumbosacral nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Toru; Fuse, Kenzo; Mikawa, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Ryo

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of the lumbosacral nerve roots and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was examined by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 11 healthy male volunteers aged 20-40 years. One hundred and twenty-three nerve roots (15 at the L1 level, 22 each at the L2-L5 levels, and 20 at the S1 level) were examined in terms of the position and angle of the bifurcation of the nerve roots, length of the nerve root, and the position and width of DRG. The nerve roots at the lower levels showed more cephalad position and smaller angle of bifurcation on MRI. The distance from the bifurcation of nerve roots to the cephalad edge of DRG was significantly longer in the upper root levels and was significantly shorter in the L5 roots than the S1 roots. The positions of DRG at the S1 level tended to become cephalad. DRG that was positioned toward more caudal direction was larger and more elliptic. MRI provided useful information concerning morphology and anatomical position of nerve roots and DRG, thereby allowing accurate diagnosis and the determination of surgical indications. (N.K.)

  2. Continuous brachial plexus block at the cervical level using a posterior approach in the management of neuropathic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; van der Vegt, M. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; Pijl, A. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2001-01-01

    Neuropathic cancer pain due to tumor growth near the brachial plexus is often treated with a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and oral or transdermal opioids. We propose placement of a catheter along the brachial plexus using a

  3. Choroid plexus accumulates cadmium, lead, mercury and arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, W.; Perry, D.F.; Nelson, D.L.; Aposhian, H.V.

    1990-01-01

    The choroid plexus (CP) is the site of the formation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the major location of the blood-CSF barrier. The property of CP in sequestering heavy metals so as to prevent their entering CSF was studied in male rats and rabbits. The content of Cd, Pb and Hg in rat tissues was determined by AAS and radioactive isotopes 24 hours after a single exposure. Cd was 33 fold greater in CP than in brain cortex (BC) after 4 mg Cd/kg ip. No Cd was detected in CSF. In rats given 27 mg Pb/kg ip, Pb in CP was 57 fold greater than in BC and 12 fold greater in blood than CSF. Rats exposed to 1 mg Hg/kg ip showed a 13 fold greater Hg content in CP than in BC. Hg was 78 fold lower in CSF than in blood. Arsenic distribution in rabbits was determined 4 hours after iv injection of 1.7 mg As 5+ /kg. As in CP was 6 fold greater than in BC and in blood it was 26 fold more than in CSF. Total thiol content in BC was significantly higher than that in CP. In CP, 87% of total thiol was non-protein bound thiol. Results suggest that the CP accumulates toxic metals such as Cd, Pb, Hg and As and acts as a filter to limit these metals passing through the blood-CSF barrier. CdCl 2 , Pb acetate, HgCl 2 or Na arsenate was used for injection

  4. Transcriptome signature of the adult mouse choroid plexus

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    Marques Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the gene expression profile of several tissues in humans and in rodent animal models has been explored, analysis of the complete choroid plexus (CP transcriptome is still lacking. A better characterization of the CP transcriptome can provide key insights into its functions as one of the barriers that separate the brain from the periphery and in the production of cerebrospinal fluid. Methods This work extends further what is known about the mouse CP transcriptome through a microarray analysis of CP tissue from normal mice under physiological conditions. Results We found that the genes most highly expressed are those implicated in energy metabolism (oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis and in ribosomal function, which is in agreement with the secretory nature of the CP. On the other hand, genes encoding for immune mediators are among those with lower expression in basal conditions. In addition, we found genes known to be relevant during brain development, and not previously identified to be expressed in the CP, including those encoding for various axonal guidance and angiogenesis molecules and for growth factors. Some of these are known to influence the neural stem cell niche in the subventricular zone, highlighting the involvement of the CP as a likely modulator of neurogenesis. Interestingly, our observations confirm that the CP transcriptome is unique, displaying low homology with that of other tissues. Of note, we describe here that the closest similarity is with the transcriptome of the endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Conclusions Based on the data presented here, it will now be possible to further explore the function of particular proteins of the CP secretome in health and in disease.

  5. Brachial plexus endoscopic dissection and correlation with open dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafosse, T; Masmejean, E; Bihel, T; Lafosse, L

    2015-12-01

    Shoulder endoscopy is evolving and becoming extra-articular. More and more procedures are taking place in the area of the brachial plexus (BP). We carried out an anatomical study to describe the endoscopic anatomy of the BP and the technique used to dissect and expose the BP endoscopically. Thirteen fresh cadavers were dissected. We first performed an endoscopic dissection of the BP, using classical extra-articular shoulder arthroscopy portals. Through each portal, we dissected as many structures as possible and identified them. We then did an open dissection to corroborate the endoscopic findings and to look for damage to the neighboring structures. In the supraclavicular area, we were able to expose the C5, C6 and C7 roots, and the superior and middle trunks in 11 of 13 specimens through two transtrapezial portals by following the suprascapular nerve. The entire infraclavicular portion of the BP (except the medial cord and its branches) was exposed in 11 of 13 specimens. The approach to the infraclavicular portion of the BP led directly to the lateral and posterior cords, but the axillary artery hid the medial cord. The musculocutaneous nerve was the first nerve encountered when dissecting medially from the anterior aspect of the coracoid process. The axillary nerve was the first nerve encountered when following the anterior border of the subscapularis medially from the posterior aspect of the coracoid process. Knowledge of the endoscopic anatomy of the BP is mandatory to expose and protect this structure while performing advanced arthroscopic shoulder procedures. Copyright © 2015 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. [Prenatal diagnosis and treatment of fetal choroid plexus cysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei-Ying; Wang, Hong-Bin; Huang, Xin; Wei, Yan-Qiu

    2007-09-01

    To discuss the clinical management and significance of the prenatal diagnosis of Fetal Choroid Plexus Cysts (CPC). From May 2004 to March 2007, 55 cases of fetal CPC diagnosed by B-ultrasound during second trimester were prospectively studied. Each case was studied regarding fetal chromosome karyotype, disappearance weeks of the cyst, the clinical outcome and follow-up results respectively. The cases were diagnosed during 16 - 25 gestational weeks. The diameters of the cysts varied from 0.2 cm to 2.4 cm. There were 25 cases of bilateral cysts and 30 cases of unilateral or 50 cases of isolated CPC and 5 cases of complicated CPC. The cysts of all cases who continued pregnancy disappeared before 28 weeks. Fetal chromosome karyotypes were obtained in 50 cases. Among them, two cases were 18-trisomy, and one case was 21-trisomy. Five cases were terminated pregnancy because of abnormal chromosome karyotype or malformation during second trimester. One neonate was diagnosed as ventricular septal defect among 50 cases of follow up. Among these six cases, three were from advanced-age pregnant women, five cases were with abnormal fetal structure and five cases were with the diameter of bilateral or unilateral cysts more than 1.0 cm. (1) Fetal CPC can be diagnosed during second trimester, and the majority disappear before 28 gestational weeks. (2) High risk factors for fetal abnormal chromosome karyotype may be: advanced-age pregnant women, abnormal structure of fetus, and the diameter of bilateral or unilateral cyst more than 1.0 cm. It is suggested that fetal CPC with the high risks should receive fetal chromosome karyotype test during pregnancy.

  7. Canine Choroid Plexus Tumor with Intracranial Dissemination Presenting as Multiple Cystic Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trisha J. Oura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Miniature Pinscher developed acute blindness and behavioral changes. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, there were multiple small intra-axial cystic lesions, and primary differential diagnoses included primary or metastatic neoplasia and neurocysticercosis. These cystic lesions were subsequently diagnosed histopathologically as disseminated choroid plexus carcinoma. This is only the second documented description of this diagnosis in a dog, but both patients had very similar MRI findings. This patient adds to the literature about the MRI characteristics of choroid plexus tumors and indicates that choroid plexus tumor should be considered as a possible cause of small multifocal intra-axial cystic brain lesions in dogs, regardless of whether a primary intraventricular lesion is visible.

  8. Carcinomatous versus radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, F.H.; Walsh, J.W.; Cady, B.; Salzman, F.A.; Oberfield, R.A.; Pazianos, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 18 women in whom ipsilateral brachial plexus neuropathy developed after treatment for carcinoma of the breast. In the absence of metastatic tumor elsewhere, the only distinguishing feature between carcinomatous neuropathy and radiation-induced neuropathy was the symptom-free interval after mastectomy and radiation therapy. Women with an interval of less than a year have radiation-induced neuropathy. Brachial plexus exploration in difficult diagnostic situations will permit early treatment and avoid debilitating loss of function. Brachial plexus exploration for biopsy is safe and free of complications if performed carefully. Treatment of carcinomatous neuropathy is most likely to succeed if the tumor is hormonally sensitive, but radiotherapy may also be effective. Treatment of radiation-induced neuropathy remains largely ineffective

  9. Case of choroid plexus papilloma of the lateral ventricle presenting as a primary intracranial hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Gito, Yoji; Goto, Tsuneo; Ito, Yasunobu; Fujii, Satoshi

    1988-04-01

    A case of a choroid plexus papilloma of the lateral ventricle that was revealed by a massive intracranial hemorrhage in a 61-year-old man is presented. This patient had an intracranial hemorrhage at the onset. The presence of brain tumor was suspected after a radiologic evaluation using computerized tomography (CT) and angiography; the correctness of this histological diagnosis was confirmed by surgical specimens. Choroid plexus papillomas, rare tumors of neuroectodermal origin, account for 0.5 to 0.6 % of all intracranial tumors. They most frequently appear during the first 2 years of life. A case manifesting intracranial hemorrhage associated with choroid plexus papilloma in an adult is described, with a review of the literature. The importance of adequate radiological investigation is emphasized.

  10. A case of choroid plexus papilloma of the lateral ventricle presenting as a primary intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuchi, Kenji; Gito, Yoji; Goto, Tsuneo; Ito, Yasunobu; Fujii, Satoshi

    1988-01-01

    A case of a choroid plexus papilloma of the lateral ventricle that was revealed by a massive intracranial hemorrhage in a 61-year-old man is presented. This patient had an intracranial hemorrhage at the onset. The presence of brain tumor was suspected after a radiologic evaluation using computerized tomography (CT) and angiography; the correctness of this histological diagnosis was confirmed by surgical specimens. Choroid plexus papillomas, rare tumors of neuroectodermal origin, account for 0.5 to 0.6 % of all intracranial tumors. They most frequently appear during the first 2 years of life. A case manifesting intracranial hemorrhage associated with choroid plexus papilloma in an adult is described, with a review of the literature. The importance of adequate radiological investigation is emphasized. (author)

  11. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  12. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  13. Can bilateral bronchospasm be a sign of unilateral phrenic nerve palsy after supraclavicular brachial plexus block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blocks facilitate ambulatory anesthesia for upper limb surgeries. Unilateral phrenic nerve blockade is a common complication after interscalene brachial plexus block, rather than the supraclavicular block. We report a case of severe respiratory distress and bilateral bronchospasm following ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patient did not have clinical features of pneumothorax or drug allergy and was managed with oxygen therapy and salbutamol nebulization. Chest X-ray revealed elevated right hemidiaphragm confirming unilateral phrenic nerve paresis.

  14. Brachial plexus injury management through upper extremity amputation with immediate postoperative prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, J M; Leal, J M; Underwood, J; Childers, S J

    1982-02-01

    Management of patients with brachial plexus injuries requires a team approach so that all aspects of their care are addressed simultaneously. This report examines elective amputation and prosthetic rehabilitation in a patient with brachial plexus avulsion of the left arm. The best possibility for good prosthetic rehabilitation is the early application of prosthetic devices with intensive occupational therapy. Using this type of approach, we have achieved significant improvement in amputation rehabilitation of upper extremity amputees treated with immediate postoperative conventional electric and myoelectric prostheses.

  15. CT guided celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis : the modified anterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee

    1997-01-01

    Since it was first described by Kappis, celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) has been performed under fluoroscopic guidance by anesthetists or surgeons for the relief of intractable pain caused by upper abdominal malignancy. Recently, however, several groups have reported a computed tomography (CT)-guided technique that increased the safety of the blocking procedure and improved its results. The authors present a new technique CT-guided celiac plexus and splanchic nerve block, to be used simultaneously with a modified anterior approach. Using CT to guide needle tip placement, an anterior approach that permitted direct neurolysis of the celiac ganglia and splanchnic nerve was developed

  16. The choroid plexus in normal full-term neonate : a study of morphological variety on sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Seok; Kim, Ji Hye

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sonographic features of normal choroid plexus, thus helping avoid misinterpretations such as intraventricular hemorrhage or abnormality. Posterior coronal, parasagittal, and oblique sagittal scans of 400 choroid plexus in normal full-term neonates(100 girls, 100 boys) were reviewed with special attention to coronal configuration, glomus patterns, and the shape of anterior ends. Sonographic features were classified as follows ; tubular(type 1), posterior clubbing(type 2), mid-bulging(type 3), or double choroidal pattern(type 4), as seen on posterior coronal scans; crescent(type 1), superior notching(type 2), dorsal bulging(type 3), or inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and anterior tapering(type 1) and clubbing shape (type 2) on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan and the glomus on parasagittal scan were measured. All sonographic measurements of normal choroid plexus were statistically analysed according to gender and side. Four hundred normal choroid plexus were classified as 293 cases(73%) of tubular pattern(type 1), 50 cases(13%) of posterior bulging(type 2), 44 cases (11%) of mid-bulging(type 3) and 13 cases(3%) of double choroidal pattern (type 4) as seen on posterior coronal scans ; 263 cases(66%) of crescent shape(type 1), 70 cases(17%) of superior notching (type 2), 38 cases(9%) of dorsal bulging(type 3), and 29 cases(7%) of inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and 233 cases(58%) of anterior tapering(type 1) and 167 cases(42%) of anterior clubbing (type 2), as seen on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan were 7.17±0.12 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]) on the right side and 7.13±0.19 mm (95% CI) on the left side, and 8.13±0.24(95% CI) mm on the right and 8.57±0.29 mm on the left side glomus on parasagittal scan. There were no significant statistical

  17. The choroid plexus in normal full-term neonate : a study of morphological variety on sonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Seok [Dankook Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Chunganggil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sonographic features of normal choroid plexus, thus helping avoid misinterpretations such as intraventricular hemorrhage or abnormality. Posterior coronal, parasagittal, and oblique sagittal scans of 400 choroid plexus in normal full-term neonates(100 girls, 100 boys) were reviewed with special attention to coronal configuration, glomus patterns, and the shape of anterior ends. Sonographic features were classified as follows ; tubular(type 1), posterior clubbing(type 2), mid-bulging(type 3), or double choroidal pattern(type 4), as seen on posterior coronal scans; crescent(type 1), superior notching(type 2), dorsal bulging(type 3), or inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and anterior tapering(type 1) and clubbing shape (type 2) on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan and the glomus on parasagittal scan were measured. All sonographic measurements of normal choroid plexus were statistically analysed according to gender and side. Four hundred normal choroid plexus were classified as 293 cases(73%) of tubular pattern(type 1), 50 cases(13%) of posterior bulging(type 2), 44 cases (11%) of mid-bulging(type 3) and 13 cases(3%) of double choroidal pattern (type 4) as seen on posterior coronal scans ; 263 cases(66%) of crescent shape(type 1), 70 cases(17%) of superior notching (type 2), 38 cases(9%) of dorsal bulging(type 3), and 29 cases(7%) of inferior notching(type 4), as seen on parasagittal scans; and 233 cases(58%) of anterior tapering(type 1) and 167 cases(42%) of anterior clubbing (type 2), as seen on oblique parasagittal scans. Maximal diameters of the choroid plexus on posterior coronal scan were 7.17{+-}0.12 mm (95% confidence interval [CI]) on the right side and 7.13{+-}0.19 mm (95% CI) on the left side, and 8.13{+-}0.24(95% CI) mm on the right and 8.57{+-}0.29 mm on the left side glomus on parasagittal scan. There were no significant

  18. Diffusion tensor MRI and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... diffusivity values at S1-S3 were significantly lower in patients. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study showed for the first time sacral plexus asymmetry and disorganization in 10 patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography...

  19. What progress has been made in the understanding and treatment of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs during the past 30 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Nick D; Barker, Andrew; Harcourt-Brown, Tom

    2014-07-01

    An association between degenerative changes in the lumbosacral region of the vertebral column and clinical signs of pain and pelvic limb dysfunction has long been recognized in dogs and has become known as degenerative lumbosacral stenosis syndrome. Over the past two decades, methods of imaging this condition have advanced greatly, but definitive criteria for a reliable diagnosis using physical examination, imaging and electrodiagnostics remain elusive. Available treatment options have changed little over more than 30 years but, more importantly, there is a lack of comparative studies and little progress has been made in providing evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of affected dogs. This review provides an overview of the changes in diagnosis, understanding and treatment of lumbosacral disease in dogs over the past 30 years. Approaches to address the unanswered questions regarding treatment choice are also proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation Between Lumbopelvic and Sagittal Parameters and Health-Related Quality of Life in Adults With Lumbosacral Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussous, Yazeed; Theologis, Alexander A; Demb, Joshua B; Tangtiphaiboontana, Jennifer; Berven, Sigurd

    2018-02-01

    Secondary analysis of prospective, multicenter data. To evaluate impact of sagittal parameters on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis. Adults with unoperated lumbosacral spondylolisthesis were identified in the Spinal Deformity Study Group database. Pearson's correlations were calculated between SF-12 (Short Form-12)/Scoliosis Research Society-30 (SRS-30) scores and radiographic parameters (C7 sagittal vertical axis [SVA] deviation, T1 pelvic angle, pelvic tilt [PT], pelvic incidence, sacral slope, slip angle, Meyerding slip grade, Labelle classification). Main effects linear regression models measured association between individual health status measures and individual radiographic predictor variables. Forty-five patients were analyzed (male, 15; female, 30; average age 40.5 ± 18.7 years; 14 low-grade, 31 high-grade). For low-grade slips, SVA had strong negative correlations with SF-12 mental component score (MCS), SRS-30 appearance, mental, and satisfaction domains ( r = -0.57, r = -0.60, r = -0.58, r = -0.53, respectively; P grade slips, slip angle had a moderate negative correlation with SF-12 MCS ( r = -0.36; P = .05) and SVA had strong negative correlations with SF-12 physical component score (PCS), SRS-30 appearance and activity domains ( r = -0.48, r = -0.48, r = -0.45; P point decrease in SRS appearance, 0.05-point decrease in SRS activity, 0.06-point decrease in SRS satisfaction, and 0.04-point decrease in SRS total score ( P grade slips. Improvement of sagittal parameters is an important goal of surgery for adults with lumbosacral spondylolisthesis.

  1. Are spinal or paraspinal anatomic makers helpful for vertebral numbering and diagnosing lumbosacral transitional vertebrae?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokgoz, Nil; Ucar, Murat; Erdogan, Aylin Billur; Killic, Koray; Ozcan, Cahide [Dept. of Radiology, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate the value of spinal and paraspinal anatomic markers in both the diagnosis of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTVs) and identification of vertebral levels on lumbar MRI. Lumbar MRI from 1049 adult patients were studied. By comparing with the whole-spine localizer, the diagnostic errors in numbering vertebral segments on lumbar MRI were evaluated. The morphology of S1-2 disc, L5 and S1 body, and lumbar spinous processes (SPs) were evaluated by using sagittal MRI. The positions of right renal artery (RRA), superior mesenteric artery, aortic bifurcation (AB) and conus medullaris (CM) were described. The diagnostic error for evaluation of vertebral segmentation on lumbar MRI alone was 14.1%. In lumbarization, all patients revealed a well-formed S1-2 disc with squared S1 body. A rhombus-shaped L5 body in sacralization and a rectangular-shaped S1 body in lumbarization were found. The L3 had the longest SP. The most common sites of spinal and paraspinal structures were: RRA at L1 body (53.6%) and L1-2 disc (34.1%), superior mesenteric artery at L1 body (55.1%) and T12-L1 disc (31.6%), and AB at L4 body (71.1%). CM had variable locations, changing from the T12-L1 disc to L2 body. They were located at higher sacralization and lower lumbarization. The spinal morphologic features and locations of the spinal and paraspinal structures on lumbar MRI are not completely reliable for the diagnosis of LSTVs and identification on the vertebral levels.

  2. Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebra: Possible Role in the Pathogenesis of Adolescent Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bangke; Wang, Liang; Wang, Haibin; Guo, Qunfeng; Lu, Xuhua; Chen, Deyu

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the role of lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) in the pathogenesis of adolescent lumbar disc herniation (ALDH) and the association between LSTV type and the herniation level of ALDH. This study was a retrospective case-control analysis of roentgenographic images. All adolescent patients who received surgical treatment for L4/5 or L5/S1 single level lumbar disc herniation in our department from 2010 to 2015 were eligible for the ALDH group. All adolescent patients admitted to our hospital during the same period and who had ever undergone a plain anteroposterior radiologic examination of the abdomen and met the inclusion criteria that ensured the absence of any spinal disorders were selected into the control group. The anteroposterior lumbar or abdomen roentgenograms were collected to identify the LSTV. The incidence of LSTV in the ALDH group and the control group were compared. Among the ALDH group, the association between LSTV type (sacralization or lumbarization) and the herniation level of ALDH were evaluated. A total of 80 adolescent patients were included in the ALDH group and 92 asymptomatic adolescents were included in the control group. LSTV was found in 24 patients (30%) in ALDH group compared with 7 patients (7.6%) in the control group (P adolescent patients with sacralization, the L4/5 disc herniation was significantly more common than L5/S1 (81.3% vs. 18.7%; P = 0.019). The LSTV is associated with LDH in adolescents and the sacralization of L5 may contribute to the L4/5 disc herniation in adolescent patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dutch Multidisciplinary Guideline for Invasive Treatment of Pain Syndromes of the Lumbosacral Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itz, Coen J; Willems, Paul C; Zeilstra, Dick J; Huygen, Frank J

    2016-01-01

    When conservative therapies such as pain medication or exercise therapy fail, invasive treatment may be indicated for patients with lumbosacral spinal pain. The Dutch Society of Anesthesiologists, in collaboration with the Dutch Orthopedic Association and the Dutch Neurosurgical Society, has taken the initiative to develop the guideline "Spinal low back pain," which describes the evidence regarding diagnostics and invasive treatment of the most common spinal low back pain syndromes, that is, facet joint pain, sacroiliac joint pain, coccygodynia, pain originating from the intervertebral disk, and failed back surgery syndrome. The aim of the guideline is to determine which invasive treatment intervention is preferred for each included pain syndrome when conservative treatment has failed. Diagnostic studies were evaluated using the EBRO criteria, and studies on therapies were evaluated with the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. For the evaluation of invasive treatment options, the guideline committee decided that the outcome measures of pain, function, and quality of life were most important. The definition, epidemiology, pathophysiological mechanism, diagnostics, and recommendations for invasive therapy for each of the spinal back pain syndromes are reported. The guideline committee concluded that the categorization of low back pain into merely specific or nonspecific gives insufficient insight into the low back pain problem and does not adequately reflect which therapy is effective for the underlying disorder of a pain syndrome. Based on the guideline "Spinal low back pain," facet joint pain, pain of the sacroiliac joint, and disk pain will be part of a planned nationwide cost-effectiveness study. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  4. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots compromised by disk herniation: sagittal shoulder sign for the preoperative diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chang Ho [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Lee, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hee Kyung; Ryu, Jeong Ah [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Choon-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Sam Soo [Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Kangwon (Korea)

    2008-03-15

    The objective was to determine the importance of the ''sagittal shoulder sign'' on magnetic resonance (MR) images for the diagnosis of conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots (CLNR) that are compromised by herniated disks. Magnetic resonance images of 11 patients (6 men and 5 women; age range, 25-71 years; average age, 48.7 years) with surgically proven CLNR, which was compromised by herniated disks, were retrospectively evaluated by two musculoskeletal radiologists. MR images were evaluated for the presence or absence of the sagittal shoulder sign - a vertical structure connecting two consecutive nerve roots and overlying disk on the sagittal MR images. The radiologists noted the type of accompanying disk herniation and bony spinal canal changes, as well as other characteristic MR features of CLNR, the common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images. The sagittal shoulder sign was identified with a mean frequency of 90.9% by the two observers (in 10 of 11 patients). The common passage of two consecutive nerve roots through the neural foramen on axial MR images was identified with a mean frequency of 59.1% (in 7 and 6 out of 11 patients, by observers 1 and 2, respectively). Good interobserver agreement for the sagittal shoulder sign was present (k = 0.621, p < 0.05). Observation of the sagittal shoulder sign may prove helpful for diagnosing CLNR in patients with disk herniation. In particular, this sign appears to be useful when there is no evidence of CLNR on axial MR images. (orig.)

  5. Choroid plexus carcinomas in children: MRI features and patient outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Steven P. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Rochester, NY (United States); University of Rochester Medical Center, Department of Radiology, 601 Elmwood Avenue, P.O. Box 648, Rochester, NY (United States); Khademian, Zarir P.; Zimmerman, Robert A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Chuang, Sylvester H. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Pollack, Ian F. [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Department of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Korones, David N. [University of Rochester School of Medicine, Strong Memorial Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas (CPC) are rare malignant intracranial neoplasms usually occurring in young children. The objectives of this study were to characterize the preoperative MRI features of CPC, determine the frequency of disseminated disease in the CNS at diagnosis, and assess patient outcomes. The preoperative cranial MR images of 11 patients with CPC were retrospectively reviewed for lesion location, lesion size, un-enhanced and enhanced MRI signal characteristics, and presence of disseminated intracranial tumor. Postoperative cranial and spinal MRI images were reviewed for residual, recurrent, and/or disseminated tumor. The study group included six male and five female patients ranging in age from 5 months to 5.3 years (median=1.8 years). CPC were located in the lateral (n=8), fourth (n=1), and third (n=1) ventricles, and foramen of Luschka (n=1). Mean tumor size was 5.2cm x 4.9cm x 5.0 cm. On short-TR images, CPC had heterogeneous, predominantly intermediate signal with foci of high signal in 45% of lesions from areas of hemorrhage. On long-TR/long-TE images, solid portions of CPC typically had heterogeneous, intermediate-to-slightly-high signal. Small zones of low signal on long-TR/long-TE images were seen in 55% of the lesions secondary to areas of hemorrhage and/or calcifications. Tubular flow voids representing blood vessels were seen in 55% of the lesions. Zones of high signal comparable to CSF were seen in 64% of CPC secondary to cystic/necrotic zones. All CPC showed prominent contrast enhancement. Irregular enhancing margins suggesting subependymal invasion were seen in 73% of the lesions. Findings consistent with edema in the brain adjacent to the enhancing lesions were seen in 73% of CPC. CPC caused hydrocephalus in 82% of patients at diagnosis. Two patients died from hemorrhagic complications from surgical biopsies. Disseminated tumor in the leptomeninges was present in 45% of patients at diagnosis and was associated with a poor prognosis. The 1

  6. Stereotactic Radiosurgical Treatment of Brain Metastases to the Choroid Plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siomin, Vitaly; Lin, Jennifer L.; Marko, Nicholas F.; Barnett, Gene H.; Toms, Steven A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Navaratne, Kapila; Suh, John H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Choroid plexus metastases (CPM) are uncommon lesions. Consequently, optimal management of CPM is uncertain. We summarize our experience with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of CPM. Methods and Materials: Sixteen consecutive patients with presumed CPM treated with SRS between 1997 and 2007 were examined. Twelve were men with a median age at diagnosis of CPM of 61.9 ± 9.9 years; 14 had metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). All patients had controlled primary disease at the time of treatment for CPM. Four patients with RCC and 1 with non-small-cell lung cancer had undergone whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) previously and 2 had received SRS to other brain metastases. The disease-free interval from the primary diagnosis to CPM diagnosis averaged 39.3 ± 46.2 months (range, 1.0-156.3). Five patients were asymptomatic; of the remaining 11, none had symptoms related to CPM. All presented with a single CPM. Results: Average maximum diameter of the CPMs was 2.0 ± 1.0 cm (range, 0.9-4.1 cm); mean volume was 2.4 ± 2.6 cm 3 (range, 0.2-9.3). Median SRS dose was 24 Gy to the 53% isodose line (range, 14-24 Gy). Survival after SRS to the CPM was 25.3 ± 23.4 months (range, 3.2-101.6). Patients in Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA) class I (n = 10) had improved survival compared to those in class II (n = 6), as did those with better GPA scores. There were no local failures. After SRS, 1 patient underwent WBRT, 3 patients had one, and another had two subsequent SRS treatments to other brain lesions. Of the 14 patients who have died, 11 succumbed to systemic disease progression, 2 to progressive, multifocal central nervous system disease, and 1 to systemic disease with concurrent, stable central nervous system disease. There were no complications related to SRS. Conclusions: Most CPMs are associated with RCC. SRS represents a safe and viable treatment option as primary modality for these metastases, with excellent outcomes.

  7. Liquid plugs bouncing against a solid basis, comparison of SIMMER-III and PLEXUS results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maschek, W.; Arnecke, G.; Flad, M.

    1995-01-01

    The SIMMER III code is being tested by application to problems of reactor accidents. The fluid dynamics/thermohydraulics part of the code can be applied also to evaporation/condensation, melt, and freezing phenomena. For a liquid plug bouncing against a solid basis, the momentum transfer is calculated. PLEXUS results turn out to be in significant disagreement with the SIMMER calculations. (orig.)

  8. The pharmacokinetics of ropivacaine after four different techniques of brachial plexus blockade.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, H.C.; Lerou, J.G.C.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Boersma, E.; Burm, A.G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Arterial plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were measured after brachial plexus blockade using four different approaches: lateral interscalene (Winnie), posterior interscalene (Pippa), axillary and vertical infraclavicular. Four groups of 10 patients were given a single 3.75 mg.kg(-1) injection of

  9. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  10. Neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injuries: an historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2004-01-01

    An historical cohort study was conducted to investigate the rate and extent of neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) and to identify possible prognostic factors in a cohort of children with OBPI from birth to 7 years. All children (n=56; 31 females, 25 males) with OBPI

  11. Perineural versus intravenous clonidine as an adjuvant to Bupivacaine in supraclavicular Brachial plexus block

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    Vikram Bedi

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Addition of clonidine 2mcg/kg to 28 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in brachial plexus blocks results in a faster onset, increased duration of block and longer postoperative pain relief when compared to bupivacaine alone. These advantages are not observed when the same dose of clonidine is injected intravenously.

  12. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

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    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  13. Arrangement of the myenteric plexus throughout the gastrointestinal tract of the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, J; Rick, G A; Robison, B A; Stiles, M J; Wix, M A

    1983-10-01

    Silver impregnation of the myenteric plexus of the opossum gut was used to find differences among various regions. In the esophagus, the plexus was sparse and ganglia were spaced irregularly, many being parafascicular. Ganglia were sparse in the striated-muscle region, but more frequent in the smooth-muscle region. In the stomach, uniformly spaced ganglia were large and intrafascicular; ganglia were larger in the distal stomach than in the proximal stomach. The proximal stomach contained thick fascicles, called shunt fascicles, radiating from the lesser to the greater curvatures and bypassing ganglia. A thick nerve bundle encircled the pylorus. In the small intestine, the regularly spaced ganglia were large and intrafascicular. In the cecum, they were small and intrafascicular. In the colon, they were large and intrafascicular. Shunt fascicles, like those of the proximal stomach, extended from the rectum into the distal colon. In the rectum, the plexus was sparse, and ganglia were small and distributed irregularly. Many ganglia were parafascicular. Unique knots of tangled fascicles were frequent in the rectum; these were called labyrinthine nodes. The least densely innervated regions of the gut are the lower esophageal sphincter and the rectum. Major differences in the anatomy of the plexus characterize the different regions of the gut.

  14. Addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir

    2017-06-26

    Research is ongoing to determine the lowest dose of local anesthetics in brachial plexus block that provides adequate anesthesia and postoperative analgesia and reduces complications related to local anesthetics. Patients 18-65 years of age who underwent upper limb surgery and who received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block at the Erciyes University Faculty of Medicine Hospital between February 2014 and January 2015 were included in the study (n=50). Supraclavicular brachial plexus blocks were performed on Group B cases by adding 30 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and on Group BD cases by adding 15 ml 0.33% bupivacaine and 1 µg / kg dexmedetomidine. Block success was evaluated by the onset and block duration of motor and sensory block and the duration of analgesia. The block success of Group B and Group BD was 92.6% and 89.3%, respectively (P = 1.000). Onset time of sensory block, degree of sensory block, duration of sensory block, onset time of motor block, degree of motor block and duration of motor block were similar in both groups in the intergroup comparison (P > 0.05). Duration of analgesia and the operative conditions of groups were similar (P > 0.05). In the implementation of ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block, block success, sensory and motor block and analgesia duration were similar for patients anaesthetized with 30 ml of bupivacaine in comparison with dexmedetomidine+bupivacaine (when the bupivacaine dose was reduced by 50% by the addition of the adjuvant).

  15. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

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    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  16. Het plexus brachialis letsel. Een retrospectief onderzoek naar de functionele gevolgen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelot, Cornelis Hendrik

    1994-01-01

    The central issue of this study is accidental damage to the brachial plexus. In terms of medical rehabilitation, an understanding of the factors which determine the functional abilities is a prerequisite, since this understanding will eventually have an effect on therapeutic procedures. In a

  17. Medical Rehabilitation and Occupational Therapy in Patients with Lesion of Plexus Brachialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacheva D.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Causes for plexus brachialis damage are versatile, and in some cases remain unknown, but mostly result from degenerative and inflammatory processes. Treatment of brachial plexus dysfunction is often conservative and is subject to a team of specialists - neurologists, traumatologists, rehabilitation physicians, kinesitherapists and occupational therapists. The objective of the research is to report the recovery of patients with lesion of plexus brachialis after a complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatment program that includes electrostimulation, remedial massage, kinesitherapy, electrotherapy and occupational therapy. A total of 159 patients, treated at the Clinic of Physical Therapy, University Hospital of Pleven, were included in the study. Improvement of measured indexes: pain assessment, centimetry, assessment of upper limb muscle weakness, dynamometry and functional test of activities of daily living, was registered in all patients under observation. In order to achieve good results in the rehabilitation of patients with injured plexus brachialis, timely diagnosis, good medication therapy and early start of complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation are of crucial importance, so that performance of daily living activities improves. The good results come slowly and with difficulties, but the quality of life of patients and the quality of labor performed by them, improves significantly.

  18. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Paravertebral and Brachial plexus block for Abdominal flap to cover the upper limb wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra kumar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a case report where thoracic paravertebral block and brachial plexus block were used in a sick elderly patient with poor cardiopulmonary reserve, to cover a post traumatic raw area of the upper limb by raising flap from lateral abdominal wall. The residual raw area of abdomen was then covered with the split skin graft taken from thigh.

  20. Neurovascular plexus theory for "escape pain phenomenon" in lower third molar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururaj Arakeri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars which can occur despite adequate local anesthesia is termed as "escape pain phenomenon". Recently, it was described during elevation of a mesioangular impacted mandibular third molar and also while curetting an extracted third molar socket. This phenomenon has been overlooked, as it was previously considered secondary to pressure effect on the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IANB. However, it is unlikely that the pain impulses originate from direct pressure on the IANB, as the nerve is blocked more proximally at its entry into the mandible. The authors speculated that the occasional presence of a neurovascular plexus (NVP independent of the IANB causes the escape of a pain impulse upon stimulation by root pressure or instrumentation. To validate the presence of such a plexus, a meticulous literature search and review were performed. The search revealed evidence of the occasional presence of a NVP consisting of auriculotemporal and/or retromolar neural filaments. The plexus may be present around the inferior alveolar artery or embedded within the IANB, and does not innervate the tooth. This plexus likely propagates pain impulses only upon stimulation by compression or instrumentation in the apical area of the tooth socket. This theory explains the absence of pain during tooth sectioning and bone guttering in the presence of a complete inferior alveolar nerve block.

  1. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  2. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  3. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  4. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  5. Susceptibility of Primary Human Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells and Meningeal Cells to Infection by JC Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Bethany A; Gee, Gretchen V; Atwood, Walter J; Haley, Sheila A

    2018-04-15

    JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) establishes a lifelong persistence in roughly half the human population worldwide. The cells and tissues that harbor persistent virus in vivo are not known, but renal tubules and other urogenital epithelial cells are likely candidates as virus is shed in the urine of healthy individuals. In an immunosuppressed host, JCPyV can become reactivated and cause progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Recent observations indicate that JCPyV may productively interact with cells in the choroid plexus and leptomeninges. To further study JCPyV infection in these cells, primary human choroid plexus epithelial cells and meningeal cells were challenged with virus, and their susceptibility to infection was compared to the human glial cell line, SVG-A. We found that JCPyV productively infects both choroid plexus epithelial cells and meningeal cells in vitro Competition with the soluble receptor fragment LSTc reduced virus infection in these cells. Treatment of cells with neuraminidase also inhibited both viral infection and binding. Treatment with the serotonin receptor antagonist, ritanserin, reduced infection in SVG-A and meningeal cells. We also compared the ability of wild-type and sialic acid-binding mutant pseudoviruses to transduce these cells. Wild-type pseudovirus readily transduced all three cell types, but pseudoviruses harboring mutations in the sialic acid-binding pocket of the virus failed to transduce the cells. These data establish a novel role for choroid plexus and meninges in harboring virus that likely contributes not only to meningoencephalopathies but also to PML. IMPORTANCE JCPyV infects greater than half the human population worldwide and causes central nervous system disease in patients with weakened immune systems. Several recent reports have found JCPyV in the choroid plexus and leptomeninges of patients with encephalitis. Due to their role in forming the blood

  6. Reliability of CSF turbulence and choroid plexus visualization on fast-sequence MRI in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzelle, Curtis J; Madura, Casey; Reeder, Ron W

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of neonatal and infant hydrocephalus has gained popularity in the past decade. Identifying treatment failure is critically important. Results of a pilot study of 2 novel imaging markers seen on fast-sequence T2-weighted axial MRI showed potential clinical utility. However, the reliability of multiple raters detecting these markers must be established before a multicenter validation study can be performed. METHODS Two sets of de-identified single-shot T2-weighted turbo spin-echo axial images were prepared from scans of patients before and after they underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization between March 2013 and January 2016. The first set showed the lateral and third ventricles for visualization of turbulent CSF dynamics, and the second set showed the lateral ventricular atria for choroid plexus glomus detection. Three raters (Group 1) received written instructions before evaluating each image set once and then again 1 week later. Another 8 raters (Group 2) evaluated both image sets after oral instruction and group training on a pretest image set. Fleiss' kappa coefficients with 95% CIs were calculated for intrarater and interrater reliability in Group 1 and interrater reliability in Group 2. RESULTS Intrarater reliability kappa coefficients for Group 1 were ≥ 0.74 for turbulence and ≥ 0.80 for choroid plexus; their interrater kappa coefficients at the initial assessment were 0.50 (95% CI 0.37-0.62) and 0.56 (95% CI 0.43-0.69), respectively. The Group 2 interrater kappa scores were 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.86) for turbulence and 0.62 (95% CI 0.58-0.66) for choroid plexus. CONCLUSIONS With minimal training, intrarater reliability on visualization of turbulence and the choroid plexus was substantial, but interrater reliability was only moderate. After modestly increasing training, interrater reliability improved to near perfect and to

  7. Radiation-included brachial plexus injury; Follow-up of two different fractionation schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, S.; Cooke, J.; Parsons, C. (Royal Marsden Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-07-01

    All 449 breast cancer patients treated with post-operative radiotherapy to the breast and lymph nodes between 1982 and 1984 have been followed for 3-5.5 years. In this group two different fractionation schedules were used, one five times a fortnight and one daily, both over 6 weeks. The calculated dose to the brachial plexus was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 5e Gy in 30 fractions. These schedules are equivalent doses using the standard NSD formula. The diagnosis of a brachial plexus injury was made clinically and computed tomography from recurrent disease. The actuarial incidence of a radiation-induced brachial plexus injury for the whole group was 4.9% at 5.5 years. No cases were seen in the first 10 months following radiotherapy. The incidence rises between 1 and 4 years and then starts to plateau. When the large fraction size group is compared with the small fraction size group the incidence at 5.5 years is 5.9% and 1.0%, respectively (p 0.09). Two different treatment techniques were used in this group but were not found to contribute to the probability of developing a brachial plexud injury. It is suggested that radiation using large doses per fraction are less well tolerated by the brachial plexus than small doses per fraction; a commonly used fractionation schedule such as 45 Gy in 15 fractions may give unacceptably high brachial plexus morbidity; and the of small doses per fraction or avoiding lymphatic irradiation is advocated. (author). 13 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab.

  8. Relationship between transitional lumbosacral vertebrae and eight lumbar vertebrae in a breeding colony of Labrador Retrievers and Labrador Crosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeser, C F; Wade, C M

    2017-01-01

    Transitional lumbosacral vertebrae (TLSV) is a hereditary malformation of the spinal column diagnosed in various dog breeds. The aim of this study was to explore whether different lumbosacral phenotypes have an inherited basis. Radiographs of all dogs within a breeding colony were performed and assessed. A comparison of the incidence of TLSV, eight lumbar vertebrae (8LV), and fusion of the first caudal vertebrae to the sacrum or near fusion of this area was made between litters of normal parentage and litters where one or both of the parents had an anomaly. Of the 119 puppies included in the study, 69 had normal conformation, 9 had 8LV, 9 had TLSV and 32 had fusion of the first caudal vertebra (Ca1) to the caudal sacral segment or a reduced joint space in this area. Results indicated that all the abnormal types likely had common underlying genetic causes. Compared with the population as a whole, significantly more progeny were observed to have abnormalities of the sacral region when both parents were affected by either fusion of Ca1 to the third sacral vertebra (S3) and/or had 8LV. Significantly more progeny were normal compared with the entire study population when both parents were normal. Strong similarity between parental and progeny phenotypes suggested that the characteristics were heritable and likely influenced by major gene effects. When performing screening radiographs for TLSV, assessment for 8LV and fusion of Ca1 to S3 should be included. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  9. Surgical results of a one-stage combined anterior lumbosacral fusion and posterior percutaneous pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yuan Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lumbosacral fusion through either an anterior or a posterior approach to achieve good lordosis and stability is always a challenging surgical operation and is often accompanied by a higher rate of pseudarthrosis than when other lumbar segments are involved. This study evaluated the clinical and radiological results of lumbosacral fusions achieved through a combined anterior and posterior approach. Materials and Methods: From June 2008 to 2012, 20 patients who had L5–S1 instability and stenosis were consecutively treated, first by anterior interbody fusion using an allogenous strut bone graft through the pararectus approach and then by posterior pedicle screw fixation. A minimum of 1-year of clinical and radiological follow-up was conducted. Intraoperative blood loss, surgical time, and any surgery-related complications were recorded. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS and the patient's Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. After 1 year, radiological outcomes were assessed by analyzing pelvic incidence, lumbar lordosis, and segmental lordosis using static plain films, while fusion stability was assessed using dynamic plain films. Results: The mean operative time and blood loss were 215 min and 325 cc, respectively. After 1 year, the VAS and ODI scores had significantly improved, and stable fusion with good lordotic curvature was obtained in all cases. Conclusion: The surgical results of the combined procedure are satisfactory in terms of the functional and radiological outcomes. Our method offers advantages regarding both anterior fusion and posterior fixation.

  10. Clinical signs and outcome of dogs treated medically for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis: 98 cases (2004-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Decker, Steven; Wawrzenski, Lauren A; Volk, Holger A

    2014-08-15

    To compare clinical signs of dogs treated medically or surgically for degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) and assess outcome after medical treatment. Retrospective case series. Client-owned dogs treated medically (n = 49) or surgically (49) for DLSS. Medical records from 2004 to 2012 were reviewed. Dogs were included if they had clinical signs, clinical examination findings, and MRI abnormalities consistent with DLSS. Several variables were compared between surgically and medically treated dogs: age, sex, duration of clinical signs, presence or absence of neurologic deficits, urinary and fecal incontinence, concurrent medical conditions, and medical treatment before referral. Medical treatment after obtaining a final diagnosis of DLSS consisted of restricted exercise in combination with anti-inflammatory and analgesic drugs. Surgical treatment consisted of dorsal lumbosacral laminectomy. Outcome for medically treated dogs was obtained via a standardized questionnaire. Neurologic deficits were observed significantly more often in surgically treated dogs. Surgically treated dogs had unsuccessful medical treatment before referral significantly more often than did medically treated dogs. Thirty-one of 49 (63.3%) medically treated dogs were available for follow-up evaluation. Of these 31 dogs, 17 (55%) were managed successfully, 10 (32.3%) were managed unsuccessfully and underwent surgical treatment, 3 (9.7%) were euthanized because of progression of clinical signs, and 1 (3.2%) was alive but had an increase in severity of clinical signs after medical management. Clinical signs differed in dogs treated medically or surgically for DLSS. Medical treatment for dogs with DLSS was associated with a fair prognosis.

  11. Chronic low back pain after lumbosacral fracture due to sagittal and frontal vertebral imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyoud-Garnier, L; Boudissa, M; Ruatti, S; Kerschbaumer, G; Grobost, P; Tonetti, J

    2017-06-01

    Over time, some patients with unilateral or bilateral lumbosacral injuries experience chronic low back pain. We studied the sagittal and frontal balance in a population with these injuries to determine whether mismatch in the pelvic and lumbar angles are associated with chronic low back pain. Patients with posterior pelvic ring fractures (Tile C1, C2, C3 and A3.3) that had healed were included. Foreign patients and those with an associated spinal or acetabular fracture or nonunion were excluded. The review consisted of subjective questionnaires, a clinical examination, and standing A/P and lateral stereoradiographic views. The pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), pelvic incidence (PI), measured lumbar lordosis (LLm), T9 sagittal offset, leg discrepancy (LD) and lateral curvature (LC). The expected lumbar lordosis (LLe) was calculated using the formula LLe=PI+9°. We defined lumbopelvic mismatch (LPM) as the difference between LLm and LLe being equal or greater than 25% of LLe. Fifteen patients were reviewed after an average follow-up of 8.8 years [5.4-15]. There were four Tile C1, five Tile C2, five Tile C3 and one Tile A3.3 fracture. Ten of the 15 patients had low back pain. The mean angles were: LLm 49.6° and LLe 71.9° (P=0.002), PT 21.3°, SS 44.1°, PI 62.9° in patients with low back pain and LLm 57.4° and LLe 63.2° (P=0.55), PT 13°, SS 43.1°, PI 54.2° in those without. LPM was present in 9 patients, 8 of who had low back pain (P=0.02). Six patients, all of whom had low back pain, had a mean LC of 7.5° [4.5-23] (P=0.02). The mean LD was 0.77cm. The findings of this small study suggest that patients who experience low back pain after their posterior arch of the pelvic ring fracture has healed, have a lumbopelvic mismatch. Early treatment of these patients should aim to reestablish the anatomy of the pelvic base relative to the frontal and sagittal balance. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional anatomy of the caudal thoracolumbar and lumbosacral spine in the horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, N C; Hodges, P W; Jeffcott, L B; Cowin, G; Hodgson, D R; McGowan, C M

    2006-08-01

    Research in spinal biomechanics and functional anatomy has advanced back pain research in man. Yet, despite the performance limiting nature of back pain in horses, there are few data for the equine spine. To describe aspects of functional anatomy of the equine thoracolumbar and lumbosacral (LS) spine and potential effects on performance. The first study investigated variations in LS vertebral formula by post mortem examination of 120 horses. Midline vertebral transection was carried out on 65 Thoroughbred (TB), 24 Standardbred (SB) and 31 other breeds. The second study investigated morphology and biomechanics of the deep stabilising epaxial muscles of 13 horses using MRI (n = 3), anatomical dissection (n = 11) and biomechanical analysis (n = 6). The spinous process angular orientation relative to the vertebral body, was analysed at vertebrae T13, T18, L3, L5, L6 and S1. LS variations were found in 33.3% of the total group, 40.0% TB and 45.2% others, but 0% SB. Sacralisation of lumbar vertebra (L) 6 with LS motion between L5 and L6 occurred in 32.3% TB and 29.0% others. Five segmental multifidus fascicles were identified originating from spinous processes and vertebral laminae running craniocaudally onto the mammillary processes and lateral border of the sacrum, crossing between 1-5 intervertebral discs. Sacrocaudalis dorsalis (SCD) lateralis muscle was an extension of multifidus from L4, L5 and L6 depending on the vertebral formula whereas SCD medialis mm originated from S3. Both inserted on caudal vertebrae. Based on the location and direction of fibres, the principal action of the deep epaxial muscles was dorsoventral sagittal rotation. This action was dependent on vertebral spinous process/body orientation. We hypothesise that equine multifidus and SCD lateralis muscles act as caudal sagittal rotators of their vertebra of origin, as is the case in man, allowing dynamic stabilisation during dorsoventral motion. Equine multifidus anatomy and function are

  13. Outcomes of bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions and the importance of understanding potential coexisting lumbosacral pathology that might also require surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall, Bruce E; Eden, Sonia V

    2015-06-01

    Only one study in the literature describes performing a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion, and the results were poor. Many patients needing a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion frequently have had previous lumbosacral surgeries and present with lumbosacral pain as well. This study reviews our results in consecutive patients having had a bilateral sacroiliac joint fusion over a five-year period. Fifteen patients had bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions with 13 having concurrent lumbosacral fusions. The modified posterior midline fascial splitting approach, first described by Belanger was utilized. Patients were followed for an average of 30.3 months. There were no infections, neurovascular injuries, lasting morbidity or deaths. One non-union of a sacroiliac joint (7%) occurred, which after revision was satisfactory. There was a statistically significant drop in pain (p=0.01488) using the VAS, and patient satisfaction rates were 86%. With all those patients saying they would have the surgery again for the same result. There was no significant increase in functionality. Patients needing bilateral sacroiliac joint fusions frequently fall into the "failed back" category, and it is important to evaluate both the sacroiliac joints and the lumbosacral spine for potential pain generators. This study shows that by treating all the pain generators in both areas there were significant decreases in pain, low complications, low re-operation rates, and high patient satisfaction scores. Overall functionality, however, was not positively affected.

  14. Three cases of lumbo-sacral neuropathy due to radiation for uterine cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yoshikazu; Hokezu, Yoichi; Kanehisa, Yoshihide; Nagamatsu, Keiji; Onishi, Akio

    1985-01-01

    Case 1: The 61-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 50. Radiation therapy was initiated to the pelvic lumen from both anterior and posterior sides with a total dose of 21,000 rads. Radiation ulcerative enterocolitis and dermatitis revealed at the end of the therapy. At age 52 (2 years after radiation), she noticed muscle weakness and dysesthesia of the lower legs. These symptoms progressed and amyotrophy of the legs appeared. At age 54 (4 years after radiation), she became unable to walk. Case 2: The 51-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 40. Postoperative radiation was initiated by the same dose and the same way as in Case 1 and she suffered from radiation dermatitis. At age 49 (9 years after radiation), she noticed dysesthesia of the right toe, which gradually spread to another side. Ten years after radiation, she began to note weakness in dorsiflexion of feet. Case 3: The 69-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 67. Radiation (Linac 4,000 rads, Ralstron 2,000 rads) was performed for 3 months into the pelvic lumen. Two years later, she noted dysesthesia and weakness of her legs. These symptoms progressed gradually. In these 3 cases, EMG showed neurogenic changes, suggesting peripheral nerve lesions. Nerve conduction velocities were decreased. Nerve and muscle biopsies revealed neurogenic changes. No abnormal findings were detected by spinal X-rays and myelography. The neurological findings of these patients were compatible with the lumbo-sacrol plexus injuries apparently due to late radiation effect. (J.P.N.).

  15. Three cases of lumbo-sacral neuropathy due to radiation for uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yoshikazu; Hokezu, Yoichi; Kanehisa, Yoshihide; Nagamatsu, Keiji; Onishi, Akio.

    1985-01-01

    Case 1: The 61-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 50. Radiation therapy was initiated to the pelvic lumen from both anterior and posterior sides with a total dose of 21,000 rads. Radiation ulcerative neterocolitis and dermatitis revealed at the end of the therapy. At age 52 (2 years after radiation), she noticed muscle weakness and dysesthesia of the lower legs. These symptoms progressed and amyotrophy of the legs appeared. At age 54 (4 years after radiation), she became unable to walk. Case 2: The 51-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 40. Postoperative radiation was initiated by the same dose and the same way as in Case 1 and she suffered from radiation dermatitis. At age 49 (9 years after radiation), she noticed dysesthesia of the right toe, which gradually spread to another side. Ten years after radiation, she began to note weakness in dorsiflexion of feet. Case 3: The 69-year-old woman developed uterine cancer at age 67. Radiation (Linac 4,000 rads, Ralstron 2,000 rads) was performed for 3 months into the pelvic lumen. Two years later, she noted dysesthesia and weakness of her legs. These symptoms progressed gradually. In these 3 cases, EMG showed neurogenic changes, suggesting peripheral nerve lesions. Nerve conduction velocities were decreased. Nerve and muscle biopsies revealed neurogenic changes. No abnormal findings were detected by spinal X-rays and myelography. The neurological findings of these patients were compatible with the lumbo-sacrol plexus injuries apparently due to late radiation effect. (J.P.N.)

  16. Maximum acceptable weight of lift reflects peak lumbosacral extension moments in a functional capacity evaluation test using free style, stoop and squat lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijer, P P F M; van Oostrom, S H; Duijzer, K; van Dieën, J H

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear whether the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL), a common psychophysical method, reflects joint kinetics when different lifting techniques are employed. In a within-participants study (n = 12), participants performed three lifting techniques--free style, stoop and squat lifting from knee to waist level--using the same dynamic functional capacity evaluation lifting test to assess MAWL and to calculate low back and knee kinetics. We assessed which knee and back kinetic parameters increased with the load mass lifted, and whether the magnitudes of the kinetic parameters were consistent across techniques when lifting MAWL. MAWL was significantly different between techniques (p = 0.03). The peak lumbosacral extension moment met both criteria: it had the highest association with the load masses lifted (r > 0.9) and was most consistent between the three techniques when lifting MAWL (ICC = 0.87). In conclusion, MAWL reflects the lumbosacral extension moment across free style, stoop and squat lifting in healthy young males, but the relation between the load mass lifted and lumbosacral extension moment is different between techniques. Tests of maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) from knee to waist height are used to assess work capacity of individuals with low-back disorders. This article shows that the MAWL reflects the lumbosacral extension moment across free style, stoop and squat lifting in healthy young males, but the relation between the load mass lifted and lumbosacral extension moment is different between techniques. This suggests that standardisation of lifting technique used in tests of the MAWL would be indicated if the aim is to assess the capacity of the low back.

  17. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Conny; Beckerman, Heleen; Groot, Vincent de

    2015-01-01

    To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the VU University Medical Center in the past were invited to participate. Daily functioning was measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the SF36, pain with VAS Pain Scales and arm-hand function with the Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HP-test) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Scores of the affected arm were compared to those of the non-affected arm or norm values for healthy controls. Twenty-seven persons (mean age 22, SD 4.2 years), of whom 10 men, participated. The ARAT and 9-HP-test scores for the affected arm were significantly worse than those for the non-affected arm. Moderate to severe pain in the affected arm, the non-affected arm or the back was reported by 50% of the participants. The DASH general, sports/music and SF36 physical functioning scores were significantly worse than norm values. The ARAT/9-HP-test and daily functioning showed little association. Low to moderate associations were found between pain and daily functioning. Many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) is caused by traction to the brachial plexus during labour, resulting in denervation of the muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle. Adults with OBPL are hardly seen in rehabilitation medicine. This study shows that many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Fifty percent of the participants complained about moderate or severe pain, which was located in the affected arm, the back and the non

  18. The usefulness of MR myelography for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki; Miyauchi, Yukio; Niitsu, Mamoru

    2002-01-01

    Myelography has been the most popular and reliable method for evaluation of nerve root avulsion in brachial plexus injury. However, it is invasive because it requires the use of contrast medium, dural puncture and exposure to radiation. In addition, it has a fault. When a nerve rootlet is not filled with contrast medium, it is impossible to evaluate it. It has sometimes been a problem in the injury to upper roots. Recently, MRI also has been used for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. But it was not until recently that it has had a high resolution to detect affected nerve rootlets. We have used MR myelography with high resolution for diagnosis of brachial plexus injury. The purpose of this study is to investigate the usefulness of it. MR myelography was preoperatively performed in 14 cases, consisting of 13 traumatic brachial plexus injuries and an obstetrical palsy. In them, 12 cases had root avulsion injuries and 2 cases had infraclavicular injuries. A 1.5 Tesla MR system (Philips) and a cervical coil were used. Coronal sections with 2 mm-overcontiguous thickness were obtained by heavily T2-weighted sequence fast spin echo (TR/TE=3000/450). The fat signal was suppressed by a presaturation inversion-pulse. The scanning time was about five minutes. The three-dimensional image was reconstructed by using maximum intensity projection (MIP) method. MIP images and individual coronal images were used for evaluation for root avulsion. In evaluation the shape of a nerve sleeve and nerve rootlets was compared on both sides. The abnormal shape of a nerve sleeve or the defect of nerve rootlets was diagnosed as root avulsion. The brachial plexus lesions were exposed operatively and examined with electrophysiologic methods (SEP and/or ESCP) in all cases. Operative findings were compared with MR myelography. Twenty-four roots had been diagnosed as normal and 46 roots had been diagnosed as root avulsion with MR myelography preoperatively. In the former only one root was

  19. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  20. The phrenic nerve transfer in the treatment of a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ye; Lao, Jie

    2018-05-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer has been a well-established procedure for restoring elbow flexion function in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury. Concerning about probably detrimental respiratory effects brought by the operation, however, stirred up quite a bit of controversy. We present a case report of the successful application of phrenic nerve as donor to reinnervate the biceps in a septuagenarian with brachial plexus avulsion injury, not accompanied with significant clinical respiratory problem.

  1. A new application of stannic pyrophosphate in nuclear medicine: scintigraphy of choroid plexus, morphological and quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovar, G. de; Akerman, M.; Panneciere, C.; Perez, R.

    1975-01-01

    It was shown that the concentration of pertechnetate (Tc 99m) in the choroid plexus can be increased by previous injection of stannic pyrophosphate. This phenomenon affords an excellent morphological study of these structures, which trace most of the cerebral ventricles. An isotopic ventricle scintigraph is thus obtained by simple intraveinous injection. Furthermore a dynamic study supplies information on the functional activity of choroid plexus, of special interest in research on the pathology of the cerebrospinal fluid [fr

  2. Iodine 125-lysergic acid diethylamide binds to a novel serotonergic site on rat choroid plexus epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagaloff, K.A.; Hartig, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    125 I-Lysergic acid diethylamide ( 125 I-LSD) binds with high affinity to serotonergic sites on rat choroid plexus. These sites were localized to choroid plexus epithelial cells by use of a novel high resolution stripping film technique for light microscopic autoradiography. In membrane preparations from rat choroid plexus, the serotonergic site density was 3100 fmol/mg of protein, which is 10-fold higher than the density of any other serotonergic site in brain homogenates. The choroid plexus site exhibits a novel pharmacology that does not match the properties of 5-hydroxytryptamine-1a (5-HT1a), 5-HT1b, or 5-HT2 serotonergic sites. 125 I-LSD binding to the choroid plexus site is potently inhibited by mianserin, serotonin, and (+)-LSD. Other serotonergic, dopaminergic, and adrenergic agonists and antagonists exhibit moderate to weak affinities for this site. The rat choroid plexus 125 I-LSD binding site appears to represent a new type of serotonergic site which is located on non-neuronal cells in this tissue

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder in children with brachial plexus birth palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudinchet, F. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Maeder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Oberson, J.C. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland); Schnyder, P. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. Hospital (CHUV), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-11-01

    Five patients suffering from Erb-Duchenne brachial plexus birth palsy were prospectively studied with MRI. A group of 11 healthy children was used as a control to understand the MRI anatomy of the normal growing glenohumeral joint. A hypoplastic and flattened posterior part of the glenoid fossa and a blunt posterior labrum were found in all patients. Four patients had a blunt anterior labrum and a flattened humeral head. Three patients presented with a posterior subluxation of the humeral head. These results suggest that MRI provides a non-ionising and non-invasive method of demonstrating the early abnormalities of the shoulder associated with obstetrical brachial plexus paralysis, which may prompt orthopaedic correction. (orig.)

  4. A Case of Horner's Syndrome following Ultrasound-Guided Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walid, Trabelsi; Mondher, Belhaj Amor; Mohamed Anis, Lebbi; Mustapha, Ferjani

    2012-01-01

    Horner's syndrome results from paralysis of the ipsilateral sympathetic cervical chain (stellate ganglion) caused by surgery, drugs (mainly high concentrations of local anesthetics), local compression (hematoma or tumor), or inadequate perioperative positioning of the patient. It occurs in 100% of the patients with an interscalene block of the brachial plexus and can also occur in patients with other types of supraclavicular blocks.In this case report, we presented a case of Horner's syndrome after performing an ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block with 15 mL of bupivacaine 0.5%. It appeared 40 minutes after the block with specific triad (ptosis, miosis, and exophtalmia) and quickly disappears within 2 hours and a half without any sequelae. Horner's syndrome may be described as an unpleasant side effect because it has no clinical consequences in itself. For this reason anesthesiologists should be aware of this syndrome, and if it occurs patients should be reassured and monitored closely.

  5. Cellular Specificity of the Blood-CSF Barrier for Albumin Transfer across the Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements...... of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave...... positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only...

  6. Rehabilitation program for children with brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, L E; Zell, J P

    2000-03-01

    An aggressive and integrated physical and occupational therapy program is essential in the treatment of congenital brachial plexus injuries and other severe upper extremity nerve injuries. This article addresses the evaluation, identification of needs, establishment of goals, and the approaches to rehabilitation treatment for patients with brachial plexus palsy and other peripheral nerve injuries. Rehabilitative therapy can preserve and build on gains made possible by medical or surgical interventions; however, therapy is vital to these children regardless of whether surgery is indicated. The therapist uses a problem-solving approach to evaluate the patient and select appropriate occupational and physical therapy treatment modalities. Therapy is continually adjusted based on each child's unique needs. An understanding of the therapy principles aids in making appropriate referrals and prescriptions, and helps to coordinate care between the therapist, pediatrician, neurologist, and surgeon.

  7. Diagnosis and treatment of the hemiplegic patient with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, J; Taft, G; Kaplan, P

    1981-10-01

    Brachial plexus injury was observed as a complication in 5 of 12 hemiplegic patients admitted over a 5-week period to an inpatient unit of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago. These patients exhibited unusual patterns of muscle atrophy and return of function in the impaired upper extremity. Occupational therapists may play an important part in the diagnosis and treatment of this complication of hemiplegia by promptly recognizing its subtle clinical signs and instituting appropriate therapy. Electromyography may be recommended to confirm this diagnosis. The treatment of choice is to maintain correct positioning of the limb both day and night, to use facilitation techniques for specific muscles in order to prevent atrophy, and to maintain passive range of motion as much as possible. Prevention of brachial plexus injury depends largely on the education of patient, family, and staff as to the potential hazards to a frail extremity that has no protective responses.

  8. Effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Kurlowicz, Kirsty; Vladusic, Sharon; Grimmer, Karen

    2005-03-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, a complication of childbirth, occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births internationally. Traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus is thought to be the primary mechanism of injury and this may occur in utero, during the descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that vary in severity, extent of damage and functional use of the affected upper limb. Most infants receive treatment, such as conservative management (physiotherapy, occupational therapy) or surgery; however, there is controversy regarding the most appropriate form of management. To date, no synthesised evidence is available regarding the effectiveness of primary conservative management for obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess the literature and present the best available evidence that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 14 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, Australian Digital Thesis Program. Those studies that were reported in English and published over the last decade (July 1992 to June 2003) were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion in this review. This excluded studies that solely investigated the effect of primary surgery for these infants, management of secondary deformities and the investigation of the effects of pharmacological agents, such as botulinum toxin. Data collection and analysis

  9. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  10. Botulinum toxin for the treatment of motor imbalance in obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arad, Ehud; Stephens, Derek; Curtis, Christine G; Clarke, Howard M

    2013-06-01

    Residual muscle imbalance is a common problem affecting obstetrical brachial plexus palsy patients. The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) in improving this muscle imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed obstetrical brachial plexus palsy patients treated with Botox for muscle imbalance as an isolated procedure. Outcomes were the change in Active Movement Scale scores from pre-Botox scores to scores at 1 month after Botox and 1 year after Botox. Twenty-seven patients were included, 19 treated for shoulder imbalance and eight treated for elbow imbalance. Active Movement Scale scores (mean±SD) for shoulder external rotation improved from 0.6±1.0 before Botox to 2.6±2.14 (pimbalance produces improvement in external rotation that is not sufficiently sustained over time to be of clinical benefit. However, Botox for elbow movement imbalance produces a sustained and clinically useful improvement. Therapeutic, IV.

  11. Hoarseness of voice after supraclavicular ultrasound-guided subclavian perivascular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block is ideal for surgical procedures at or distal to the elbow. Ultrasound (USG continues to grow in popularity as a method of nerve localization, and for the supraclavicular block, it has the advantage of allowing real-time visualization of the plexus, pleura, and vessels along with the needle and local anesthetic spread, but it may conversely create a false sense of security. The incidence of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN block occurring with supraclavicular approach is 1.3% of patients.[10] Incidence of RLN block with USG-guided supraclavicular block is not known. In this case report, we discuss a rare complication of RLN block which occurred while performing a supraclavicular perivascular block performed under USG guidance.

  12. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... a continuous basal lamina, caveolae, intermediate filaments, dense bodies, dense bands, and a well-developed subsurface smooth endoplasmic reticulum), but the arrangement of organelles was clearly different, and cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum were abundant. Interstitial cells of Cajal were......, and only few gap junctions with other interstitial cells of Cajal or with the musculature were observed. Compared with interstitial cells of Cajal from other mammals, those associated with the deep muscular plexus in the human small intestine more closely resemble smooth muscle cells...

  13. Choroid-Plexus-Derived Otx2 Homeoprotein Constrains Adult Cortical Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Spatazza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity is often restricted to critical periods in early life. Here, we show that a key regulator of this process in the visual cortex, Otx2 homeoprotein, is synthesized and secreted globally from the choroid plexus. Consequently, Otx2 is maintained in selected GABA cells unexpectedly throughout the mature forebrain. Genetic disruption of choroid-expressed Otx2 impacts these distant circuits and in the primary visual cortex reopens binocular plasticity to restore vision in amblyopic mice. The potential to regulate adult cortical plasticity through the choroid plexus underscores the importance of this structure in brain physiology and offers therapeutic approaches to recovery from a broad range of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  14. Morphological pattern of intrinsic nerve plexus distributed on the rabbit heart and interatrial septum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburkina, Inga; Gukauskiene, Ligita; Rysevaite, Kristina; Brack, Kieran E; Pauza, Audrys G; Pauziene, Neringa; Pauza, Dainius H

    2014-01-01

    Although the rabbit is routinely used as the animal model of choice to investigate cardiac electrophysiology, the neuroanatomy of the rabbit heart is not well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the topography of the intrinsic nerve plexus located on the rabbit heart surface and interatrial septum stained histochemically for acetylcholinesterase using pressure-distended whole hearts and whole-mount preparations from 33 Californian rabbits. Mediastinal cardiac nerves entered the venous part of the heart along the root of the right cranial vein (superior caval vein) and at the bifurcation of the pulmonary trunk. The accessing nerves of the venous part of the heart passed into the nerve plexus of heart hilum at the heart base. Nerves approaching the heart extended epicardially and innervated the atria, interatrial septum and ventricles by five nerve subplexuses, i.e. left and middle dorsal, dorsal right atrial, ventral right and left atrial subplexuses. Numerous nerves accessed the arterial part of the arterial part of the heart hilum between the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and distributed onto ventricles by the left and right coronary subplexuses. Clusters of intrinsic cardiac neurons were concentrated at the heart base at the roots of pulmonary veins with some positioned on the infundibulum. The mean number of intrinsic neurons in the rabbit heart is not significantly affected by aging: 2200 ± 262 (range 1517–2788; aged) vs. 2118 ± 108 (range 1513–2822; juvenile). In conclusion, despite anatomic differences in the distribution of intrinsic cardiac neurons and the presence of well-developed nerve plexus within the heart hilum, the topography of all seven subplexuses of the intrinsic nerve plexus in rabbit heart corresponds rather well to other mammalian species, including humans. PMID:24527844

  15. The optimization of balanced turbo field echo sequence for depicting pelvic venous plexuses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatsu, Yasuo; Koyama, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Evaluating the relation between the developing range and the extent of invasion of a malignant tumor around the pelvic venous plexus is an important index for making strategic therapeutic decisions. In this study, we tried to depict a venous plexus in the pelvis using Balanced Turbo Field Echo (B-TFE). At first, we used an original phantom (derived from one layer of lard and another of agar (0.1%gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA), 0.9%NaCl), each 500 ml, and we changed the Start Up Echo (SUE); 0-30, spectral attenuated inversion recovery (SPAIR) inversion delay time (delay time); 0-200 ms, shot interval (SI); 1150, 1500 ms and evaluated the degree of fat suppression in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) (the air signal method). The fat suppression-effect was found to be high in delay time; 120 ms in SUE; 0, SI; 1150 ms and 160 ms in SUE; 0, SI; 1500 ms was different SUE>0 each delay time. As for the images of healthy volunteers (5 men and 5 women), after fixing optimum conditions, we evaluated the images visually, as assessed by two radiologists and two radiographers, comparing between SUE; 0-30 and SI; 1150 and 1500 ms. According to the visual evaluation, the fat suppression-effect was worse, more than with the delay time; 20. We judged the best image of the venous plexus in the pelvis as being at SUE; 10, SI; 1500 ms. We think that using the B-TFE can help distinguish pelvic venous plexuses, by setting an optimum sequence. (author)

  16. Ultrasound-guided approach for axillary brachial plexus, femoral nerve, and sciatic nerve blocks in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy, Luis; Bezuidenhout, Abraham J; Gleed, Robin D; Martin-Flores, Manuel; Raw, Robert M; Santare, Carrie L; Jay, Ariane R; Wang, Annie L

    2010-03-01

    To describe an ultrasound-guided technique and the anatomical basis for three clinically useful nerve blocks in dogs. Prospective experimental trial. Four hound-cross dogs aged 2 +/- 0 years (mean +/- SD) weighing 30 +/- 5 kg and four Beagles aged 2 +/- 0 years and weighing 8.5 +/- 0.5 kg. Axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic combined ultrasound/electrolocation-guided nerve blocks were performed sequentially and bilaterally using a lidocaine solution mixed with methylene blue. Sciatic nerve blocks were not performed in the hounds. After the blocks, the dogs were euthanatized and each relevant site dissected. Axillary brachial plexus block Landmark blood vessels and the roots of the brachial plexus were identified by ultrasound in all eight dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the four ventral nerve roots (C6, C7, C8, and T1) and the axillary vessels. Three roots (C7, C8, and T1) were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Femoral nerve block Landmark blood vessels (femoral artery and femoral vein), the femoral and saphenous nerves and the medial portion of the rectus femoris muscle were identified by ultrasound in all dogs. Anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the femoral vessels, femoral nerve, and the rectus femoris muscle. The femoral nerves were adequately stained bilaterally in all dogs. Sciatic nerve block. Ultrasound landmarks (semimembranosus muscle, the fascia of the biceps femoris muscle and the sciatic nerve) could be identified in all of the dogs. In the four Beagles, anatomical examination confirmed the relationship between the biceps femoris muscle, the semimembranosus muscle, and the sciatic nerve. In the Beagles, all but one of the sciatic nerves were stained adequately. Ultrasound-guided needle insertion is an accurate method for depositing local anesthetic for axillary brachial plexus, femoral, and sciatic nerve blocks.

  17. [Prophylactic plexus catheter treatment in operations following complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubrech, Florian; Pronk, Roderick Franciscus; Bigdeli, Amir Khosrow; Tapking, Christian; Kneser, Ulrich; Harhaus, Leila

    2017-08-01

    Background  This paper investigates and discusses the effect of perioperative plexus catheter treatment in former CRPS patients. Patients and Methods A retrospective matched-pair analysis was conducted on 10 CRPS patients with comparable injuries, who underwent surgery in the disease-free interval. In 10 cases, the procedure was performed with perioperative plexus catheter treatment (intervention group), whereas 10 patients did not receive perioperative plexus catheter treatment (control group). Results  In the intervention group, after a follow-up time of 105 (20-184) days after the last surgical procedure, pain intensity on the visual analogue scale (VAS; 0 to 10) was 6.4 (4-8), fingertip-to-palm distance averaged 3.2 (0-7.6) cm, active range of wrist motion was 47.5 (0-95), and grip strength was 9.2 (2.1-16.6) kg. In the control group, after a follow-up time of 129 (19-410) days since the last surgical procedure, pain intensity on the visual analogue scale was 6 (3-10), fingertip-to-palm distance averaged 2.7 (0-4.5) cm, active range of wrist-motion was 64 (0-125), and grip strength was 12.4 (0.8-23.8) kg. There was no significant difference between the groups. There was no recurrence of CRPS disease in either group after surgery. Conclusion  There is no evidence so far for perioperative plexus catheter treatment to prevent recurrence in former CRPS patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Microvascular injury of the peribiliary plexus associated with transarterial chemoembolization: a study of surgical specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Won Kyu; Bae, Young Kyung; Hwang, Tae Yoon; Cho, Jae Ho; Chang, Jay Chun; Kim, Jae Woon; Jang, Han Won [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-11-15

    We attempted to evaluate the relationship between transarteiral chemoembolization (TACE) and injury to the peribiliary plexus by evaluating the number of microvessels in peribiliary plexus of surgical specimen. Surgical specimens were obtained from 78 hepatocellular carcinoma patients and 22 patients with liver metastases. They were divided into 4 groups (Group 1; hepatocellular carcinoma without TACE [n=30], Group 2; hepatocellular carcinoma receiving preoperative TACE once [n=37], Group 3; hepatocellular carcinoma receiving preoperative TACE more than two times [n=11] and Group 4; metastatic carcinoma of the liver patients without a history of liver disease [n=22]). Immunohistochemical staining for factor VIII-related antigen was performed in all the specimens and the number of microvessels in the inner capillary layer and the outer venous layer of the bile duct (> 200 {mu} m in diameter) was counted. The mean numbers of microvessels in the inner capillary layer were 4.50, 4.08, 1.64 and 2.05, and those in the outer venous layer were 25.23, 20.00, 18.36 and 12.32 for the 4 groups, respectively. The number of microvessels in group 4 was statistically fewer than that of group 1 ({rho} < 0.01). In the hepatocellular carcinoma patients, the number of microvessels was decreased as the number of TACE sessions was increased. The number of microvessels in the peribiliary plexus is increased in chronic liver disease patients. It may be from the increased portal pressure and flow stagnation in the sinusoidal and portal venules. TACE can have an effect on microvascular injury of the peibiliary plexus, and this can be a cause of bile duct necrosis and biloma.

  19. Acute triventricular hydrocephalus caused by choroid plexus cysts: a diagnostic and neurosurgical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennato, Pietro; Chiaramonte, Carmela; Cicala, Domenico; Donofrio, Vittoria; Barbarisi, Manlio; Nastro, Anna; Mirone, Giuseppe; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraventricular choroid plexus cysts are unusual causes of acute hydrocephalus in children. Radiological diagnosis of intraventricular choroid plexus cysts is difficult because they have very thin walls and fluid contents similar to CSF and can go undetected on routine CT studies. METHODS This study reports the authors' experience with 5 patients affected by intraventricular cysts originating from the choroid plexus. All patients experienced acute presentation with rapid neurological deterioration, sometimes associated with hypothalamic dysfunction, and required urgent surgery. In 2 cases the symptoms were intermittent, with spontaneous remission and sudden clinical deteriorations, reflecting an intermittent obstruction of the CSF pathway. RESULTS Radiological diagnosis was difficult in these cases because a nonenhanced CT scan revealed only triventricular hydrocephalus, with slight lateral ventricle asymmetry in all cases. MRI with driven-equilibrium sequences and CT ventriculography (in 1 case) allowed the authors to accurately diagnose the intraventricular cysts that typically occupied the posterior part of the third ventricle, occluding the aqueduct and at least 1 foramen of Monro. The patients were managed by urgent implantation of an external ventricular drain in 1 case (followed by endoscopic surgery, after completing a diagnostic workup) and by urgent endoscopic surgery in 4 cases. Endoscopic surgery allowed the shrinkage and near-complete removal of the cysts in all cases. Use of neuronavigation and a laser were indispensable. All procedures were uneventful, resulting in restoration of normal neurological conditions. Long-term follow-up (> 2 years) was available for 2 patients, and no complications or recurrences occurred. CONCLUSIONS This case series emphasizes the necessity of an accurate and precise identification of the possible causes of triventricular hydrocephalus. Endoscopic surgery can be considered the ideal treatment of choroid plexus

  20. Synthetic smooth muscle in the outer blood plexus of the rhinarium skin of Lemur catta L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elofsson, Rolf; Kröger, Ronald H H

    2017-01-01

    The skin of the lemur nose tip (rhinarium) has arterioles in the outer vascular plexus that are endowed with an unusual coat of smooth muscle cells. Comparison with the arterioles of the same area in a number of unrelated mammalians shows that the lemur pattern is unique. The vascular smooth muscle cells belong to the synthetic type. The function of synthetic smooth muscles around the terminal vessels in the lemur rhinarium is unclear but may have additional functions beyond regulation of vessel diameter.

  1. Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system due to brachial plexus injury: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setogutti, Enio Tadashi; Cassuriaga, Jefferson; Valduga, Simone Gianella; Lorenzzoni, Pablo Longhi; Severgnini, Giancarlo Muraro; Feldman, Carlos Jader

    2005-01-01

    Superficial siderosis can be caused by hemosiderin deposition o the leptomeninges and subpial layers of the neuro-axis due to recurrent subarachnoid haemorrhage. Probable intrathecal bleeding sites must be investigated. In ut t 50% of the patients the bleeding source may be identified and the progression of the disease can be interrupted. In this study, the authors present a case of superficial siderosis of the central nervous system developed two decades after a traumatic lesion of the brachial plexus.(author)

  2. Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.

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    Shane A Liddelow

    Full Text Available To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse and exogenous (human albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA, and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub

  3. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus for the early rehabilitation of children with posttraumatic elbow contractures

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    D. V. Zabolotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Improvement of surgical treatment outcomes in children with post-traumatic elbow contractures. Materials and methods. The study is based on the diagnostic findings of 48 children with post-traumatic elbow contractures who were treated at the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children’s Orthopedics. All children underwent complex rehabilitation after reconstructive intra-articular surgery to work out passive motions in the elbow using ARTROMOT-E2 device. The patients of the study group started rehabilitation in the first days after reconstructive intra-articular surgery in the background of prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus. In the control group, the rehabilitation was carried out traditionally on the 6th day after surgery without regional anesthesia. The patients of the study group were supplied with Contiplex SU perinural catheters for prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus using ultrasound (Edge SonoSite and neurostimulation (Stimuplex® HNS12 before surgery. For perioperative blockade of the brachial plexus we used intermittent injection of 0.5% ropivacaine (2 mg / kg. The severity of pain at the stages of rehabilitation was assessed using 10-point grading scale (FPS-R. The range of active and passive motions in the joints was evaluated by measuring the range of motions with a fleximeter. Results. Intermittent injection of ropivacaine before rehabilitation allowed to correct post-traumatic elbow contractures in children in the first days after surgery associated with the minimum subjective pain level and stable hemodynamic parameteres, accompanied with a significant increase of the elbow motion range in comparison with the group of the patients who were not performed regional anesthesia . Conclusion. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus in rehabilitation treatment of children with post-traumatic contractures provides appropriate analgesic and myoneural block components from the 1st day after intra

  4. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  5. Unilateral cervical plexus block for prosthetic laryngoplasty in the standing horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy, L; Morris, T B; Ducharme, N G; Gleed, R D; Martin-Flores, M

    2018-04-20

    Locoregional anaesthetic techniques can facilitate certain surgeries being performed under standing procedural sedation. The second and third spinal cervical nerves (C2, C3) are part of the cervical plexus and provide sensory innervation to the peri-laryngeal structures in people; block of these nerves might permit laryngeal lateralisation surgery in horses. To describe the anatomical basis for an ultrasound-guided cervical plexus block in horses. To compare this block with conventional local anaesthetic tissue infiltration in horses undergoing standing prosthetic laryngoplasty. Cadaveric study followed by a double-blinded prospective clinical trial. A fresh equine cadaver was dissected to characterise the distribution of C2 and C3 to the perilaryngeal structures on the left side. A second cadaver was utilised to correlate ultrasound images with the previously identified structures; a tissue marker was injected to confirm the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided approach to the cervical plexus. In the clinical study, horses were assigned to two groups, CP (n = 17; cervical plexus block) and INF (n = 17; conventional tissue infiltration). Data collection and analyses included time to completion of surgical procedure, sedation time, surgical field conditions and surgeon's perception of block quality. We confirmed that C2 and C3 provided innervation to the perilaryngeal structures. The nerve root of C2 was identified ultrasonographically located between the longus capitis and the cleidomastoideus muscles, caudal to the parotid gland. The CP group was deemed to provide better (Pblock is a viable alternative to tissue infiltration and it improves the surgical field conditions. © 2018 EVJ Ltd.

  6. Current trends in pedicle screw stimulation techniques: lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isley, Michael R; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Balzer, Jeffrey R; Leppanen, Ronald E

    2012-06-01

    justification" of intraoperative neuromonitoring"... is the perception that the safety and efficacy of pedicle screw fixation are enhanced..." (Resnick et al. 2005b). However in summarizing a massive (over 1000 papers taken from the National Library of Medicine), contemporary, literature review spanning nearly a decade (1996 to 2003), this invited panel (Resnick et al. 2005b) recognized that the evidence-based documents contributing to the parts related to pedicle screw fixation and neuromonitoring were "... full of potential sources of error ..." and lacked appropriate, randomized, prospective studies for formulating rigid standards and guidelines. Nevertheless, current trends support the routine use and clinical utility of these neuromonitoring techniques. In particular free-run and triggered EMG have been well recognized in numerous publications for improving both the accuracy and safety of pedicle screw implantation. Currently, treatment with pedicle screw instrumentation routinely involves all levels of the spine - lumbosacral, thoracic, and cervical. Significant historical events, various neuromonitoring modalities, intraoperative alarm criteria, clinical efficacy, current trends, and caveats related to pedicle screw stimulation along the entire vertebral column will be reviewed.

  7. Intracranial Epidural Haematoma following Surgical Removal of a Giant Lumbosacral Schwannoma: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemir, Jakob; Peterković, Vjerislav; Trninić, Ines; Domazet, Ivan; Barić, Hrvoje; Vukić, Miroslav

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative intracranial epidural haematoma (EDH) is an extremely rare complication following spinal surgery, with only a handful of cases described in the literature. We report the case of a 16-year-old girl who underwent a successful subtotal resection of a giant lumbosacral schwannoma (L2-S2 level). Recovery from general anaesthesia was uneventful; however, her neurological status deteriorated rapidly within 24 h after surgery. A head computed tomography scan revealed a large right frontoparietal EDH with midline shift. An immediate frontotemporoparietal osteoplastic craniotomy and evacuation of the EDH were performed. At 1 year postoperatively, the patient regained full neurological recovery with no radiological signs of growth of the residual tumour. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Morphometry and acetylcholinesterase activity of the myenteric plexus of the wild mouse Calomys callosus

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    L.B.M. Maifrino

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The myenteric plexus of the digestive tract of the wild mouse Calomys callosus was examined using a histochemical method that selectively stains nerve cells, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE histochemical technique in whole-mount preparations. Neuronal density was 1,500 ± 116 neurons/cm2 (mean ± SEM in the esophagus, 8,900 ± 1,518 in the stomach, 9,000 ± 711 in the jejunum and 13,100 ± 2,089 in the colon. The difference in neuronal density between the esophagus and other regions was statistically significant. The neuron profile area ranged from 45 to 1,100 µm2. The difference in nerve cell size between the jejunum and other regions was statistically significant. AChE-positive nerve fibers were distributed within the myenteric plexus which is formed by a primary meshwork of large nerve bundles and a secondary meshwork of finer nerve bundles. Most of the nerve cells displayed AChE activity in the cytoplasm of different reaction intensities. These results are important in order to understand the changes occurring in the myenteric plexus in experimental Chagas' disease

  9. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

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    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  10. Comparison of calcification of pineal, habenular commissure and choroid plexus on plain films and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macpherson, P.; Matheson, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    Skull radiographs and CT scans of 1,000 consecutive patients were examined for evidence of calcification in the pineal gland, habenular commissure and choroid plexuses. Plain film results were in agreement with previous surveys suggesting that the CT scan results may be accepted as general findings. Pineal calcification was seen on films in 61% and on CT scans in 83% of those over 30. On both films and CT scans calcification was 10% higher in males. Only 1% had a pineal 12 mm or larger on films. In at least 5% it was impossible to separate the habenula from the pineal by CT: including these, 5% had pineals larger than the accepted upper limit of normal. Measurements from males were 0.4 mm larger than for females on films and 0.2 mm larger on CT scans. Habenular commissure calcification was seen on films in 13% and on CT in 15% of those over 30, being 10% higher in males. Bilateral choroid plexus calcification was seen on frontal films in 15% and on CT in 77% of those over 30. On skull films the frequency of calcification was 2%-3% higher for adult males than females and on CT 7% higher. Calcification was seen on the lateral but not the frontal film in 128 patients. One choroid plexus only was seen on 14/ frontal films and on 49 CT scans. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 MKO [de

  11. Morphometry of submucous and myenteric esophagic plexus of dogs experimentally reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Machado Evandro MM

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a morphometric study of the esophagus of cross-bred dogs experimentally infected or consecutively reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi 147 and SC-1 strains, in order to verify denervation and/or neuronal hypertrophy in the intramural plexus. The animals were sacrificed in the chronic stage, 38 months after the initial infection. Neither nests of amastigotes, nor myositis or ganglionitis, were observed in all third inferior portions of esophageal rings analyzed. No nerve cell was identified in the submucous of this organ. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 between the number, maximum diameter, perimeter, or area and volume of the nerve cells of the myenteric plexus of infected and/or reinfected dogs and of the non-infected ones. In view of these results we may conclude that the 147 and SC-1 strains have little neurotropism and do not determine denervation and/or hypertrophy in the intramural esophageal plexuses in the animals studied, independent of the reinfections.

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

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    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  13. Gross morphological features of plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera

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    A. Cevik-Demirkan

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This study documents the detailed features of the morphological structure and the innervation areas of the plexus brachialis in the chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera. The animals (5 female and 5 male were euthanased with ketamine hydrocloride and xylazine hydrocloride combination, 60 mg/kg and 6 mg/kg, respectively. Skin, muscles and nerves were dissected under a stereo-microscope. The brachial plexus of the chinchilla is formed by rami ventrales of C5-C8, T1 and T2, and possesses a single truncus. The subscapular nerve is formed by the rami of the spinal nerves originating from C6 (one thin ramus and C7 (one thick and 2 thin rami. These nerves innervate the subscapular and teres minor muscles. The long thoracic nerve, before joining with the brachial plexus, obtains branches from C6 and C7 in 5 cadavers (3 male, 2 female, from C7 in 4 cadavers (2 male, 2 female and from C6-C8 in only 1 female cadaver. These nerves disperse in variable combinations to form the extrinsic and intrinstic named, nerves of the thoracic limb. An undefined nerve branch originates from the rami ventrales of C7, C8 and T1 spinal nerves enter the coracobrachial muscle.

  14. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

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    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  15. Transport of cefodizime, a novel third generation cephalosporin antibiotic, in isolated rat choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nohjoh, T.; Suzuki, H.; Sawada, Y.; Sugiyama, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1989-01-01

    To characterize the transport system by which cephalosporin antibiotics are accumulated by the choroid plexus, kinetic analysis of cefodizime transport was performed. Accumulation of cefodizime was against an electrochemical potential gradient via a saturable process (Km = 470 microM, Vmax = 174 nmol/ml of tissue per min) that was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors (KCN and 2,4-dinitrophenol), hypothermia, a sulfhydryl reagent (p-hydroxymer-curibenzoic acid) and anion transport inhibitors (probenecid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene -2,2'-disulfonic acid). Accumulation of cefodizime was inhibited competitively by benzylpenicillin with an inhibition constant of aproximately 100 microM. Cefodizime inhibited competitively the accumulation of benzylpenicillin with an inhibition constant of approximately 500 microM. Kinetic analysis using 16 kinds of beta-lactam antibiotics also supported the view (1) that the transport system of cefodizime is shared by benzylpenicillin and (2) that these beta-lactam antibiotics are transported via a common transport system. These findings indicate that the major transport system of cephalosporin antibiotics in the rat choroid plexus is via a carrier-mediated active anion transport process. The affinity of beta-lactam antibiotics for this transport system in the choroid plexus may be a major factor in determining their pharmacokinetics in the cerebrospinal fluid

  16. Lesões expansivas do plexo coróide Choroid plexus mass lesions

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    Ernesto Lima Araújo Melo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available As lesões expansivas do plexo coróide constituem um grupo bastante amplo e heterogêneo de doenças e seus simuladores. Tumores, infecções, anomalias congênitas, hemorragias, cistos e fenômenos degenerativos são alguns dos exemplos de causas de lesões expansivas do plexo coróide. No presente trabalho fizemos revisão da literatura pertinente, descrevendo os achados de imagem e ilustrando-os com alguns casos do nosso serviço. Apesar de não existir na literatura descrição de sinais patognomônicos, a avaliação criteriosa e sistemática das características das lesões pode sugerir determinada etiologia.Choroid plexus mass lesions encompass a broad and heterogeneous group of diseases and their simulators. Tumors, infections, congenital anomalies, hemorrhage, cysts and degenerative diseases are some examples of mass lesions affecting the choroid plexus. In this article we review the current literature, describing the imaging findings and illustrating choroid plexus mass lesions with some cases diagnosed at our facility. Despite the inexistence of pathognomonic signs, a careful and systematic evaluation of the imaging characteristics may suggest many etiologies.

  17. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Timing of rehabilitation in children with obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Volkan; Umay, Ebru; Tezel, Nihal; Gundogdu, Ibrahim

    2018-06-01

    The initiation timing of rehabilitation in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy is controversial. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of rehabilitation timing to the functional outcomes of patients with obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy. Twenty-nine patients, who did not previously received any rehabilitation programme but attended our outpatient clinic, were included for the study. The electrophysiological findings, obstetric characteristics, and demographic features of the patients were recorded. The range of motion (ROM) of shoulders, elbows, and wrists and the strength of the muscles associated with these joints were evaluated. Modified Mallet Scale (MMS) was used for functional evaluation. A 4-week rehabilitation programme was performed twice at 2-month intervals. Patients were divided into three groups according to their ages as follows: 1-3 years old (group 1), 3-5 years old (group 2), and 5-7 years old (group 3). The ROMs, muscle strengths, and MMS scores of the patients were all evaluated. Two out of 29 patients were female (6.9%) and 27 were male (93.1%). All 29 patients had right upper extremity palsy (100%). The MMS scores, ROMs, and muscle strength of the upper extremities had improved in all the groups following the standardized rehabilitation programme. A rehabilitation programme is the best choice of treatment before surgical procedures in patients with mild to moderate obstetric upper trunk brachial plexus palsy regardless of age and the initiation time.

  19. GFAP and Fos immunoreactivity in lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata after chronic colonic inflammation in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Ning; Luo, Jin-Yan; Rao, Zhi-Ren; Lan, Li; Duan, Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the response of astrocytes and neurons in rat lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata induced by chronic colonic inflammation, and the relationship between them. METHODS: Thirty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 17), colonic inflammation was induced by intra-luminal administration of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS); control group (n = 16), saline was administered intra-luminally. After 3, 7, 14, and 28 d of administration, the lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata were removed and processed for anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Fos and GFAP/Fos immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Activated astrocytes positive for GFAP were mainly distributed in the superficial laminae (laminae I-II) of dorsal horn, intermediolateral nucleus (laminae V), posterior commissural nucleus (laminae X) and anterolateral nucleus (laminae IX). Fos-IR (Fos-immunoreactive) neurons were mainly distributed in the deeper laminae of the spinal cord (laminae III-IV, V-VI). In the medulla oblongata, both GFAP-IR astrocytes and Fos-IR neurons were mainly distributed in the medullary visceral zone (MVZ). The density of GFAP in the spinal cord of experimental rats was significantly higher after 3, 7, and 14 d of TNBS administration compared with the controls (50.4±16.8, 29.2±6.5, 24.1±5.6, P0.05). CONCLUSION: Astrocytes in spinal cord and medulla oblongata can be activated by colonic inflammation. The activated astrocytes are closely related to Fos-IR neurons. With the recovery of colonic inflammation, the activity of astrocytes in the spinal cord and medulla oblongata is reduced. PMID:16097052

  20. Evaluation of the rostral projection of the sacral lamina as a component of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in German shepherd dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Harvey; Worth, Andrew J; Bridges, Janis P; Hartman, Angela

    2018-05-20

    To determine the association between a greater rostral projection of the sacral lamina and clinical signs of cauda equina syndrome (CES) in German shepherd dogs (GSD) with presumptive degenerative lumbosacral disease (DLSS). Retrospective cohort study. One hundred forty-three GSD (125 police dogs and 18 pet dogs) presenting for either CES or prebreeding evaluation. Fifty-five were classified as affected by CES and diagnosed with DLSS, and 88 were classified as unaffected on the basis of clinical and imaging findings. The position of the rostral edge of the sacral lamina was measured from radiographs and/or computed tomography (CT) scans. This position was compared between affected and unaffected dogs. In dogs that underwent both radiography and CT scanning, the agreement between sacral lamina localization using each imaging modality was determined. Owners/handlers were contacted to determine whether dogs subsequently developed clinical signs compatible with CES at a mean of 29 months (unaffected). The sacral lamina did not extend as far rostrally in affected dogs, compared to unaffected dogs (P = .04). Among the 88 dogs unaffected by CES at initial evaluation, 2 developed clinical signs consistent with CES at follow-up. Rostral projection of the sacral lamina, previously proposed as a potential risk factor in dogs with CES due to lumbosacral degeneration, was not associated with a diagnosis of DLSS in this study; the opposite was true. Rostral projection of the sacral lamina may not be a predisposing factor in the development of CES due to DLSS in GSD. © 2018 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  1. Feasibility and limitation of constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) MR imaging in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Morioka, Takato; Yoshida, Fumiaki; Miyagi, Yasushi; Nagata, Shinji; Sasaki, Tomio [Kyushu University, Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Mihara, Futoshi; Yoshiura, Takashi [Kyushu University, Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2007-07-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate three-dimensional Fourier transformation-constructive interference in steady-state (CISS) imaging as a preoperative anatomical evaluation of the relationship between the placode, spinal nerve roots, CSF space, and the myelomeningocele sac in neonates with lumbosacral myeloschisis. Five consecutive patients with lumbosacral myeloschisis were included in this study. Magnetic resonance (MR) CISS, conventional T1-weighted (T1-W) and T2-weighted (T2-W) images were acquired on the day of birth to compare the anatomical findings with each sequence. We also performed curvilinear reconstruction of the CISS images, which can be reconstructed along the curved spinal cord and neural placode. Neural placodes were demonstrated in two patients on T1-W images and in three patients on T2-W images. T2-W images revealed a small number of nerve roots in two patients, while no nerve roots were demonstrated on T1-W images. In contrast, CISS images clearly demonstrated neural placodes and spinal nerve roots in four patients. These findings were in accordance with intraoperative findings. Curvilinear CISS images demonstrated the neuroanatomy around the myeloschisis in one slice. The resulting images were degraded by a band artifact that obstructed fine anatomical analysis of the nerve roots in the ventral CSF space. The placode and nerve roots could not be visualized in one patient in whom the CSF space was narrow due to the collapse of the myelomeningocele sac. MR CISS imaging is superior to T1-W and T2-W imaging for demonstrating the neural placode and nerve roots, although problems remain in terms of artifacts. (orig.)

  2. Biceps brachii long head overactivity associated with elbow flexion contracture in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A

    2012-02-15

    The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion contracture may not be associated with an elbow

  3. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  4. Does the risk of plexus brachialis lesion following therapeutic irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph vessels in breast cancer patients persist life-long?; Besteht das Risiko einer radiogenen Plexus brachialis-Laesion nach Strahlentherapie (RT) der supraklavikulaeren Lymphabflusswege bei Brustkrebs-Patientinnen lebeslang?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D; Bajrovic, A; Fehlauer, F; Tribius, S; Jung, H; Alberti, W [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The present analysis shows that the risk of radiogenic plexus brachialis lesion does not decrease but rather remains constant over time. Our series revealed a 2.9% annual rate of newly appearing plexus lesions (p{sub {alpha}}), which is in good agreement with literature data. No significant influence of chemotherapy or tamoxifen treatment on the rate of radiogenic plexus lesions was observed in our series. Within the first five years of radiotherapy (EQD2 59.8 Gy) 3.9% of our patients suffered a lesion of the plexus brachialis. This value is in good keeping with a TD5/5 (5% plexus lesions within 5 years) tolerance dose of 60 - 62 Gy. [German] Die vorliegende Analyse zeigt, dass das Risiko einer radiogenen Plexus-Laesion im Laufe der Zeit nicht abnimmt, sondern konstant bleibt. Die Rate neu aufgetretener Plexus-Laesionen pro Jahr (p{sub a}) von 2,9% in unserer Serie ist mit Daten aus der Literatur vereinbar. Ein signifikanter Einfluss einer Chemotherapie oder einer Tamoxifenbehandlung auf die Rate radiogener Plexus-Laesionen wurde in unserer Serie nicht beobachtet. In den ersten 5 Jahren nach Strahlentherapie (EQD2 59,8 Gy) kam es bei 3,9% unserer Patientinnen zu einer Laesion des Plexus brachialis. Dieser Wert ist gut mit der Toleranzdosis TD5/5 (5% Plexus-Laesionen binnen 5 Jahren) von 60-62 Gy vereinbar. (orig.)

  5. Post-irradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy associated with multiple cavernous malformations of the cauda equina: Case report and review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Drazin, Doniel; Kappel, Ari; Withrow, Stefan; Perry, Tiffany; Chu, Ray; Phuphanich, Surasak

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple radiation-induced cavernous malformations of the cauda equina are extremely rare. A review of the literature suggested that the post-irradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy in our patient was most likely associated with a diagnosis of multiple radiation-induced cavernous malformations of the cauda equina. Case Description: A 76-year-old man with a remote history of abdominal radiation therapy presented with a 6-month history of progressively worsening right foot drop and...

  6. Subscapularis slide correction of the shoulder internal rotation contracture after brachial plexus birth injury: technique and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Valencia, Herbert; DiTaranto, Patricia; DelSole, Edward M; Glait, Sergio; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2013-03-01

    Internal rotation contracture is the most common shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth injury. The purpose of this investigation is to describe the indications, technique, and results of the subscapularis slide procedure. The technique involves the release of the subscapularis muscle origin off the scapula, with preservation of anterior shoulder structures. A standard postoperative protocol is used in all patients and includes a modified shoulder spica with the shoulder held in 60 degrees of external rotation and 30 degrees of abduction, aggressive occupational and physical therapy, and subsequent shoulder manipulation under anesthesia with botulinum toxin injections as needed. Seventy-one patients at 2 institutions treated with subscapularis slide between 1997 and 2010, with minimum follow-up of 39.2 months, were identified. Patients were divided into 5 groups based on the index procedure performed: subscapularis slide alone (group 1); subscapularis slide with a simultaneous microsurgical reconstruction (group 2); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide (group 3); primary microsurgical brachial plexus reconstruction followed later by a subscapularis slide combined with tendon transfers for shoulder external rotation (group 4); and subscapularis slide with simultaneous tendon transfers, with no prior brachial plexus surgery (group 5). Full passive external rotation equivalent to the contralateral side was achieved in the operating room in all cases. No cases resulted in anterior instability or internal rotation deficit. Internal rotation contracture of the shoulder after brachial plexus birth injury can be effectively managed with the technique of subscapularis slide.

  7. Postoperative computed tomography and low-field magnetic resonance imaging findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis treated by dorsal laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Martin; Ley, Charles J; Hansson, Kerstin; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-03-20

    To describe postoperative computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy. Prospective clinical case study of dogs diagnosed with and treated for DLSS. Surgical and clinical findings were described. Computed tomography and low field MRI findings pre- and postoperatively were described and graded. Clinical, CT and MRI examinations were performed four to 18 months after surgery. Eleven of 13 dogs were clinically improved and two dogs had unchanged clinical status postoperatively despite imaging signs of neural compression. Vacuum phenomenon, spondylosis, sclerosis of the seventh lumbar (L7) and first sacral (S1) vertebrae endplates and lumbosacral intervertebral joint osteoarthritis became more frequent in postoperative CT images. Postoperative MRI showed mild disc extrusions in five cases, and in all cases contrast enhancing non-discal tissue was present. All cases showed contrast enhancement of the L7 spinal nerves both pre- and postoperatively and seven had contrast enhancement of the lumbosacral intervertebral joints and paraspinal tissue postoperatively. Articular process fractures or fissures were noted in four dogs. The study indicates that imaging signs of neural compression are common after DLSS surgery, even in dogs that have clinical improvement. Contrast enhancement of spinal nerves and soft tissues around the region of disc herniation is common both pre- and postoperatively and thus are unreliable criteria for identifying complications of the DLSS surgery.

  8. Reliability and Validity Measurement of Sagittal Lumbosacral Quiet Standing Posture with a Smartphone Application in a Mixed Population of 183 College Students and Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Koumantakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate recording of spinal posture with simple and accessible measurement devices in clinical practice may lead to spinal loading optimization in occupations related to prolonged sitting and standing postures. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the level of reliability of sagittal lumbosacral posture in quiet standing and the validity of the method in differentiating between male and female subjects, establishing in parallel a normative database. 183 participants (83 males and 100 females, with no current low back or pelvic pain, were assessed using the “iHandy Level” smartphone application. Intrarater reliability (3 same-day sequential measurements was high for both the lumbar curve (ICC2,1: 0.96, SEM: 2.13°, and MDC95%: 5.9° and the sacral slope (ICC2,1: 0.97, SEM: 1.61°, and MDC95%: 4.46° sagittal alignment. Data analysis for each gender separately confirmed equally high reliability for both male and female participants. Correlation between lumbar curve and sacral slope was high (Pearson’s r=0.86, p<0.001. Between-gender comparisons confirmed the validity of the method to differentiate between male and female lumbar curve and sacral slope angles, with females generally demonstrating greater lumbosacral values (p<0.001. The “iHandy Level” application is a reliable and valid tool in the measurement of lumbosacral quiet standing spinal posture in the sagittal plane.

  9. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion with Percutaneous Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation for Lumbosacral Spine Degenerative Diseases. A retrospective database of 40 consecutive treated cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millimaggi, Daniele Francesco; DI Norcia, Valerio; Luzzi, Sabino; Alfiero, Tommaso; Galzio, Renato Juan; Ricci, Alessandro

    2017-04-12

    To report our results about minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) with bilateral pedicle screw fixation, in patients with degenerative lumbosacral spine disease. To describe the indications, surgical technique and results of a consecutive series of 40 patients undergone MI-TLIF. Despite the limited number of clinical studies, published data suggest tremendous potential advantages of this technique. Forty patients with radiological findings of degenerative lumbosacral spine disease were undergone MI-TLIF between July 2012 and January 2015. Clinical outcomes were assessed by means of Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and Health Survey Scoring (SF36) before surgery and at first year follow-up. Furthermore, the following parameters were retrospectively reviewed: age, sex, working activity, body mass index (BMI), type of degenerative disease, number of levels of fusion, operative time, blood loss, length of hospital stay. Average operative time was of 230 minutes, mean estimated blood loss 170 mL, average length of hospital stay 5 days. The ODI improved from a score of 59, preoperatively, to post-operative score of 20 at first year follow-up. Average SF36 score increased from 36 to 54 (Physical Health) and from 29 to 50 (Mental Health) at first year outcome evaluation. MI-TLIF with bilateral pedicle screw fixation is an excellent choice for selected patients suffering from symptomatic degenerative lumbosacral spine disease, especially secondary to recurrent disk herniations.

  10. A follow-up study of neurologic and radiographic findings in working German Shepherd Dogs with and without degenerative lumbosacral stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Frank; Hunold, Katharina; Scharf, Gernot; Roos, Malgorzata; Flückiger, Mark

    2007-11-15

    To identify radiographic abnormalities associated with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) in German Shepherd Dogs (GSDs) and determine whether specific radiographic abnormalities could be used to identify dogs at risk of developing DLSS. Cohort study. 33 GSDs working as police dogs. Results of physical, neurologic, and orthopedic examinations were used to identify dogs with DLSS. Survey radiography of the lumbosacral junction was performed, and radiographs were compared with radiographs obtained 3 years earlier. DLSS was diagnosed in 15 of the 33 (45%) dogs. Thirteen of the 15 dogs with DLSS and 14 of the 18 dogs without DLSS had radiographic abnormalities of the lumbosacral junction. Twenty-two (67%) dogs were able to perform unrestricted duties, including 3 dogs with suspected DLSS. Six (18%) dogs had been excluded from active duty during the period of surveillance because of DLSS. Significant progression in specific clinical and radiographic signs was detected, but multiple logistic regression analysis did not identify any radiographic signs that could be used to predict the development of DLSS. Results suggested that survey radiography cannot be used to predict development of DLSS in working GSDs.

  11. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  12. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach. A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazin, Mojgan; Jensen, Kenneth; Hjort, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniq...

  13. Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: spontaneous resolution of diffuse leptomeningeal contrast enhancement after primary tumor removal in 2 pediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Marcello; Morana, Giovanni; Milanaccio, Claudia; Pavanello, Marco; Nozza, Paolo; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2017-09-01

    Atypical choroid plexus papillomas can metastasize in the form of leptomeningeal seeding. Postoperative chemotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment when gross-total removal is not achieved or in cases of disseminated disease. Here the authors report on 2 children with atypical choroid plexus papillomas and MRI findings of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at diagnosis, later presenting with spontaneous resolution of the leptomeningeal involvement after removal of the primary lesions. Observations in this report expand our knowledge about the natural history and biological behavior of these tumors and highlight the role of close neuroimaging surveillance in the management of atypical choroid plexus papillomas in cases with MRI evidence of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at presentation.

  14. Psoas compartment and sacral plexus block via electrostimulation for pelvic limb amputation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Jonathon M; Boscan, Pedro; Goh, Clara S S; Rezende, Marlis

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of psoas compartment and sacral plexus block for pelvic limb amputation in dogs. Prospective clinical study. A total of 16 dogs aged 8±3 years and weighing 35±14 kg (mean±standard deviation). Dogs were administered morphine (0.5 mg kg -1 ) and atropine (0.02 mg kg -1 ); anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Regional blocks were performed before surgery in eight dogs with bupivacaine (2.2 mg kg -1 ) and eight dogs were administered an equivalent volume of saline. The lumbar plexus within the psoas compartment was identified using electrolocation lateral to the lumbar vertebrae at the fourth-fifth, fifth-sixth and sixth-seventh vertebral interspaces. The sacral plexus, ventrolateral to the sacrum, was identified using electrolocation. Anesthesia was monitored using heart rate (HR), invasive blood pressure, electrocardiography, expired gases, respiratory frequency and esophageal temperature by an investigator unaware of the group allocation. Pelvic limb amputation by coxofemoral disarticulation was performed. Dogs that responded to surgical stimulation (>10% increase in HR or arterial pressure) were administered fentanyl (2 μg kg -1 ) intravenously for rescue analgesia. Postoperative pain was assessed at extubation; 30, 60 and 120 minutes; and the morning after surgery using a visual analog scale (VAS). The number of intraoperative fentanyl doses was fewer in the bupivacaine group (2.7±1.1 versus 6.0±2.2; pdogs at extubation (0.8±1.9 versus 3.8±2.5) and at 30 minutes (1.0±1.4 versus 4.3±2.1; pdogs. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: one hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. (author)

  16. 1.5 T augmented reality navigated interventional MRI: paravertebral sympathetic plexus injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, David R; U Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I; Carrino, John A; Fritz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The high contrast resolution and absent ionizing radiation of interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be advantageous for paravertebral sympathetic nerve plexus injections. We assessed the feasibility and technical performance of MRI-guided paravertebral sympathetic injections utilizing augmented reality navigation and 1.5 T MRI scanner. A total of 23 bilateral injections of the thoracic (8/23, 35%), lumbar (8/23, 35%), and hypogastric (7/23, 30%) paravertebral sympathetic plexus were prospectively planned in twelve human cadavers using a 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and augmented reality navigation system. MRI-conditional needles were used. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced saline was injected. Outcome variables included the number of control magnetic resonance images, target error of the needle tip, punctures of critical nontarget structures, distribution of the injected fluid, and procedure length. Augmented-reality navigated MRI guidance at 1.5 T provided detailed anatomical visualization for successful targeting of the paravertebral space, needle placement, and perineural paravertebral injections in 46 of 46 targets (100%). A mean of 2 images (range, 1-5 images) were required to control needle placement. Changes of the needle trajectory occurred in 9 of 46 targets (20%) and changes of needle advancement occurred in 6 of 46 targets (13%), which were statistically not related to spinal regions (P = 0.728 and P = 0.86, respectively) and cadaver sizes (P = 0.893 and P = 0.859, respectively). The mean error of the needle tip was 3.9±1.7 mm. There were no punctures of critical nontarget structures. The mean procedure length was 33±12 min. 1.5 T augmented reality-navigated interventional MRI can provide accurate imaging guidance for perineural injections of the thoracic, lumbar, and hypogastric sympathetic plexus.

  17. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, E-mail: pclopes@ulbra.br [Universidade Luterana do Brasil (Ulbra), Canoas, RS (Brazil); Pozzobon, Adriane [Centro Universitario Univates, Lajeado, RS (Brazil); Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Angela [Fundacao Serdil/Saint Pastous, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: to analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: one hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. (author)

  18. Phrenic nerve block caused by interscalene brachial plexus block: breathing effects of different sites of injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Lars; Martini, Stefan; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Armbruster, Wolf; Notheisen, Thomas; Adamzik, Michael; Eichholz, Rϋdiger

    2016-07-29

    Interscalene brachial plexus (ISB) block is often associated with phrenic nerve block and diaphragmatic paresis. The goal of our study was to test if the anterior or the posterior ultrasound guided approach of the ISB is associated with a lower incidence of phrenic nerve blocks and impaired lung function. This was a prospective, randomized and single-blinded study of 84 patients scheduled for elective shoulder surgery who fullfilled the inclusion and exclusion critereria. Patients were randomized in two groups to receive either the anterior (n = 42) or the posterior (n = 42) approach for ISB. Clinical data were recorded. In both groups patients received ISB with a total injection volume of 15 ml of ropivacaine 1 %. Spirometry was conducted at baseline (T0) and 30 min (T30) after accomplishing the block. Changes in spirometrical variables between T0 and T30 were investigated by Wilcoxon signed-rank test for each puncture approach. The temporal difference between the posterior and the anterior puncture approach groups were again analyzed by the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. The spirometric results showed a significant decrease in vital capacity, forced expiratory volume per second, and maximum nasal inspiratory breathing after the Interscalene brachial plexus block; indicating a phrenic nerve block (p Wilcoxon signed-rank). A significant difference in the development of the spirometric parameters between the anterior and the posterior group could not be identified (Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test). Despite the changes in spirometry, no cases of dyspnea were reported. A different site of injection (anterior or posterior) did not show an effect in reducing the cervical block spread of the local anesthetic and the incidence of phrenic nerve blocks during during ultrasound guided Interscalene brachial plexus block. Clinical breathing effects of phrenic nerve blocks are, however, usually well compensated, and subjective dyspnea did not occur in our patients. German

  19. [Efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided or neurostimulator-guided bilateral axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C S; Zhao, X L; Zhou, H B; Qu, Z J; Yang, Q G; Wang, H J; Wang, G

    2017-10-17

    Objective: To explore the efficacy and safety of bilateral axillary brachial plexus block under the guidance of ultrasound or neurostimulator. Methods: From February 2012 to April 2014, 120 patients undergoing bilateral hand/forearm surgery in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital were enrolled and anaesthetized with bilateral axillary brachial plexus block. All patients were divided into two groups randomly using random number table: the ultrasound-guided group (group U, n =60) and the neurostimulator-guidedgroup (group N, n =60). The block was performed with 0.5% ropivacaine. Patients' age, sex and operation duration were recorded. Moreover, success rate, performance time, onset of sensor and motor block, performance pain, patient satisfaction degree and the incidence of related complications were also documented. Venous samples were collected at selected time points and the total and the plasma concentrations of ropivacaine were analyzed with HPLC. Results: The performance time, the onset of sensor block and the onset of motor block of group U were (8.2±1.5), (14.2± 2.2)and (24.0±3.5)min respectively, which were markedly shorter than those in group N( (14.6±3.9), (19.9±3.8), (28.8±4.2)min, respectively), and the differences were statistically significant( t =11.74, 10.09, 6.73, respectively, all P 0.05). No analgesic was superadded and no other anesthesia methods were applied. No complications were detected perioperatively. Conclusions: The bilateral axillary brachial plexus block under the guidance of ultrasound or neurostimulator are both effective and safe for bilateral hand/forearm surgery. However, the ultrasound-guided block may be more clinically beneficial because of its shorter performance time, rapid onset and higher patient satisfaction degree.

  20. Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters in duodenum, collecting ducts and choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    Epithelia cover the internal and external surfaces of the organism and form barriers between the various compartments. Some of these epithelia are specialized for effective transmembrane or even transepithelial movement of acid-base equivalents. Certain epithelia with a high rate of HCO3- transport express a few potent Na+-coupled acid-base transporters to gain a net HCO3- movement across the epithelium. Examples of such epithelia are renal proximal tubules and pancreatic ducts. In contrast, multiple Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters are expressed in other HCO3- secreting epithelia, such as the duodenal mucosa or the choroid plexus, which maintain suitable intracellular pH despite a variable demand for secreting HCO3-. In the duodenum, the epithelial cells must secrete HCO3- for neutralization of the gastric acid, and at the same time prevent cellular acidification. During the neutralization, large quantities of CO2 are formed in the duodenal lumen, which enter the epithelial cells. This would tend to lower intracellular pH and require effective counteracting mechanisms to avoid cell death and to maintain HCO3- secretion. The choroid plexus secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and controls the pH of the otherwise poorly buffered CSF. The pCO2 of CSF fluctuates with plasma pCO2, and the choroid plexus must regulate the HCO3- secretion to minimize the effects of these fluctuations on CSF pH. This is done while maintaining pH neutrality in the epithelial cells. Thus, the Na+-HCO3- cotransporters appear to be involved in HCO3- import in more epithelia, where Na+/H+ exchangers were until recently thought to be sufficient for maintaining intracellular pH.

  1. Changes in galanin immunoreactivity in rat lumbosacral spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvarova, K; Murray, E; Vizzard, M A

    2004-08-02

    Alterations in the expression of the neuropeptide galanin were examined in micturition reflex pathways 6 weeks after complete spinal cord transection (T8). In control animals, galanin expression was present in specific regions of the gray matter in the rostral lumbar and caudal lumbosacral spinal cord, including: (1) the dorsal commissure; (2) the superficial dorsal horn; (3) the regions of the intermediolateral cell column (L1-L2) and the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (L6-S1); and (4) the lateral collateral pathway in lumbosacral spinal segments. Densitometry analysis demonstrated significant increases (P < or = 0.001) in galanin immunoreactivity (IR) in these regions of the S1 spinal cord after spinal cord injury (SCI). Changes in galanin-IR were not observed at the L4-L6 segments except for an increase in galanin-IR in the dorsal commissure in the L4 segment. In contrast, decreases in galanin-IR were observed in the L1 segment. The number of galanin-IR cells increased (P < or = 0.001) in the L1 and S1 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) after SCI. In all DRG examined (L1, L2, L6, and S1), the percentage of bladder afferent cells expressing galanin-IR significantly increased (4-19-fold) after chronic SCI. In contrast, galanin expression in nerve fibers in the urinary bladder detrusor and urothelium was decreased or eliminated after SCI. Expression of the neurotrophic factors nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) was altered in the spinal cord after SCI. A significant increase in BDNF expression was present in spinal cord segments after SCI. In contrast, NGF expression was only increased in the spinal segments adjacent and rostral to the transection site (T7-T8), whereas spinal segments (T13-L1; L6-S1), distal to the transection site exhibited decreased NGF expression. Changes in galanin expression in micturition pathways after SCI may be mediated by changing neurotrophic factor expression, particularly BDNF. These changes may contribute to

  2. Lack of effectiveness of primary conservative management for infants with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea Emmi; Vladusic, Sharon; Moore, Rosemary Patricia

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is the most common peripheral nerve injury in children (prevalence microsurgical repair of the brachial plexus, surgical management of secondary deformities or received other treatments traditionally delivered by surgeons, such as Botulinum toxin injections. The eligibility of each study identified from the database searches was evaluated against the inclusion criteria by two independent reviewers. These studies were then critically appraised for level of evidence using the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia Hierarchy of Evidence and methodological quality using the Critical Review Form - Quantitative Studies. Data pertaining to the demographic characteristics of study participants, treatments received, main results and outcome measures used were also extracted. Where any disagreement between reviewers occurred, consensus was reached by discussion. Data from the recently published studies were narratively synthesised and then combined with the data gained from our previous systematic review to create a body of evidence on primary conservative management for BPBP infants. Four publications, representing three studies (one comparative study, two case series), were sourced. Methodological quality scores of these studies ranged from 6 to 12 (maximum =16). The current body of evidence (publications from 1992 to 2008) therefore comprises 11 studies, four using a comparative design and seven using a case series design. Six of the 11 studies were classified as being of "poor" methodological quality (score <8). Conservative management mainly consisted of exercise therapy, although splinting, massage and dynamic traction were also used. All studies lacked a clear definition of conservative management sufficient to allow replication of the treatment in a clinical setting. A variety of outcome measures were used, limiting comparability of the studies. Data from the three case studies suggests that conservative

  3. Evidence for a non-opioid sigma binding site din the guinea-pig myenteric plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, F.; Pascaud, X.; Vauche, D.; Junien, J.

    1988-01-01

    The presence of a binding site to (+)-( 3 H)SKF 10,047 was demonstrated in a guinea-pig myenteric plexus (MYP) membrane preparation. Specific binding to this receptor was saturable, reversible, linear with protein concentration and consisted of two components, a high affinity site and a low affinity site. Morphine and naloxone 10 -4 M were unable to displace (+)-( 3 H)SKF 10,047 binding. Haloperidol, imipramine, ethylketocyclazocine and propranolol were among the most potent compounds to inhibit this specific binding. These results suggest the presence of a non-opioid haloperidol sensitive sigma receptor in the MYP of the guinea-pig

  4. Use of botulinum toxin type A in the management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Linda J; Louden, Emily J; Lippert, William C; Allgier, Allison J; Foad, Susan L; Mehlman, Charles T

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate functional outcomes and the impact on surgical interventions after the use of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) for muscle imbalance, cocontractions, or contractures with neonatal brachial plexus palsy. A retrospective cohort study. A brachial plexus center in a tertiary children's hospital. Fifty-nine patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (75 injection procedures, 91 muscles and/or muscle groups) received BoNT-A injections (mean age at injection, 36.2 months; range, 6-123 months; 31 boys; 30 right-sided injuries, 28 left-sided injuries, 1 bilateral injury). Data collected retrospectively from medical records, from procedure notes and clinic visits before BoNT-A use, at ≤6 months follow-up (BoNT-A active [BA]) and at ≥7 months follow-up (BoNT-A not active [BNA]) included demographics, injection indication, side, and site(s), previous surgical history, occupational therapy and/or physical therapy plan, and outcome measurements. Outcomes assessed before and after injections included active and passive range of motion, Mallet and Toronto scores, parent comments about arm function, preinjection surgical considerations, and postinjection surgical history. Injection procedures included 51 to shoulder internal rotators, 15 triceps, 15 pronator teres, 9 biceps, and 1 flexor carpi ulnaris. Active and passive shoulder external rotation (SER) range of motion improved after shoulder internal rotator injections (P = .0003 and P = .002, respectively), as did Mallet scores with BA; the latter were sustained with BNA. Surgical intervention was averted, modified, or deferred after BoNT-A in 45% (n = 20) under surgical consideration before BoNT-A. Active elbow flexion improved in 67% (P = .005), sustained BNA (P = .004) after triceps injections; 2 of 7 patients averted surgery. Active supination improved with BA (P = .002), with gains sustained BNA (P = .016). Passive elbow extension improved after biceps injections by an average 17° (P

  5. Quantitative study of the myenteric plexus of the stomach of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fregonesi Cristina Elena Prado Teles

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the morphological and quantitative alterations of the myenteric plexus neurons of the stomach of rats with streptozotocin-induced chronic diabetes and compare them to those of non-diabetic animals. Samples from the body of the stomach were used for whole-mount preparations stained with NADH-diaphorase and for histological sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin. It was observed that diabetes cause a significant decrease on the number of neurons.

  6. Vestibular syndrome due to a choroid plexus papilloma in a ferret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeeland, Yvonne; Schoemaker, Nico; Passon-Vastenburg, Maartje; Kik, Marja

    2009-01-01

    A 6-year-old, castrated male ferret (Mustela putorius furo) was presented with progressive neurological signs consisting of a right-sided head tilt and ataxia. Neurological examination revealed hemiparesis and absence of proprioception on the right side, consistent with central vestibular syndrome. Measurement of blood glucose excluded hypoglycemia due to insulinoma. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed the presence of an intracranial mass, consistent with either granuloma or neoplasia. Palliative treatment with prednisolone yielded no improvement. At postmortem examination, a final diagnosis of a choroid plexus papilloma originating from the fourth ventricle was made. This is the first report of such a tumor in a ferret.

  7. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  8. Reproductive cyst and operculum formation in the Cambrian-Ordovician galeate-plexus microfossils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agic, Heda; Moczydlowska, Malgorzata; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Unicellular organic-walled microfossils from the Cambrian-Ordovician transition in Estonia (ca. 490-480million years ago) exhibit rare characters reflecting their function as reproductive algal cysts. The studied assemblages record the evolutionary history of phytoplankton in the early Palaeozoic...... alga Acetabularia (Chlorophyta), which possesses an intrinsic lid-forming apparatus used during the organism's reproductive stage. Based on the observations on the fossil material and studies on the Acetabularia lid formation, we propose a model of operculum formation in the galeate plexus micro-organisms...

  9. Preoperative and early postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in two cases of childhood choroid plexus carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, S.E.J.; Jarosz, J.M. [Department of Neuroradiology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Chandler, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bodi, I.; Robinson, S. [Department of Neuropathology, King' s College Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-04-01

    We present and illustrate the MRI appearances of two children with choroid plexus carcinoma. The MRI characteristics of these rare tumours are reviewed. Since total surgical resection is a significant prognostic factor, early postoperative MRI was performed in both cases to ensure surgical clearance. In one case a complete resection was documented and this patient remains well at short-term follow-up. Residual tumour was noted in the second case, but despite ''second look'' surgery there was subsequent local relapse. (orig.)

  10. STUDY & EVALUATE THE COMPARISON OF PLAIN LIGNOCAINE AND LIGNACAINE WITH SODIUM BICARBONATE EFFECTS IN SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS : supraclavicular brachial plexus block is usually used to anaesthetize the upper limb for the purpose of upper limb surgeries. Drugs like Lignocaine , Bupiv a caine are used for this block and some additives are added to prolong the duration and quality of bl ockade. The present study is aimed to evaluate the comparison of plain lignocaine and lign o caine with sodium bicarbonate in supraclavicular brachial plexus block by means of the onset time of sensory and motor blockade, the quality of sensory and motor blo ckade , and the duration of blockade . METHODS : Sixty patients aged between 18 and 60 years of physical status ASA 1 and 2 undergoing upper limb surgeries lasting more than 30 minutes were included in the study. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block was performed after eliciting paraesthesia. The patients in Group I (n=30 received 25ml of 1% plain lignocaine (prepared by adding 12.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. The patients in th e Group II (study group received 25ml of 1% alkalinized lignocaine (prepared by adding 3ml of 7.5% sodium bicarbonate and 9.5ml of distilled water to 12.5ml of 2% plain lignocaine. RESULTS : The present study entitled Comparison of effects of plain lignoc aine and lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate on brachial plexus block concludes that, the onset time of sensory and motor blockade is lesser with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine (4.13, 11.1minutes when compared to plain lignocaine(9.73, 21.1minutes in supraclavicular brachial plexus block, the quality of sensory and motor blockade is better with sodium bicarbonate added lignocaine, the duration of motor and sensory blockade was significantly prolonged when lignocaine with sodium bicarbonate was used in supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  11. Effect of dexamethasone in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blinded randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar Alarasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: With the use of ultrasound, a minimal effective volume of 20 ml has been described for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. However achieving a long duration of analgesia with this minimal volume remains a challenge. We aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of analgesia in low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Material and Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group C received saline (2 ml + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine and Group D received dexamethasone (8 mg + 20 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Hemodynamic variables and visual analog scale (VAS score were noted at regular intervals until 450 min. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block were measured. The incidence of "Halo" around brachial plexus was observed. Student′s t-test and Chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The onset of sensory and motor block was significantly earlier in dexamethasone group (10.36 ± 1.99 and 12 ± 1.64 minutes compared to control group (12.9 ± 2.23 and 18.03 ± 2.41 minutes. The duration of sensory and motor block was significantly prolonged in dexamethasone group (366 ± 28.11 and 337.33 ± 28.75 minutes compared to control group (242.66 ± 26.38 and 213 ± 26.80 minutes. The VAS score was significantly lower in dexamethasone group after 210 min. "Halo" was present around the brachial plexus in all patients in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexamethasone addition significantly increases the duration of analgesia in patients receiving low volume supraclavicular brachial plexus block. No significant side-effects were seen in patients receiving dexamethasone as an adjunct.

  12. Effects of Botulinum Toxin on Reducing the Co-contraction of Antagonists in Birth Brachial Plexus Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong Beom; Chang, Jae Hyeok; Cha, Young Sun; Ko, Hyun-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Birth brachial plexus palsy (BBPP) is usually caused by plexus traction during difficult delivery. Although the possibility of complete recovery is relatively high, 5% to 25% of BBPP cases result in prolonged and persistent disability. In particular, muscle imbalance and co-contraction around the shoulder and elbow cause abnormal motor performance, osseous deformities, and joint contracture. Physical and occupational therapies have most commonly been used, but these conventional therapeutic strategies have often been inadequate, in managing the residual muscle imbalance and muscle co-contraction. Therefore, we attempted to improve the functional movements, by using botulinum toxin type A, to reduce the abnormal co-contraction of the antagonist muscles. PMID:24639937

  13. Ultrasound Guidance Versus Peripheral Neurostimulation for Brachial Plexus Block Anesthesia with Axillary Approach and Multiple Injection Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazar Alexandra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are several approaches for brachial plexus anesthesia: supraclavicular, infraclavicular, interscalenic and axillary. Out of these, the axillary approach is considered to be the safest because of the low risk of lesioning the adjacent structures, low risk of phrenic nerve blockade or of producing an iatrogenic pneumothorax. The block can be performed by one single injection at the site, by two injections or by several injection, among each nerve of the plexus. Ultrasound was introduced in regional anesthesia since 1978, being used initially as an auxiliary method to peripheral neurostimulator.

  14. Formulation of a new model of dynamic cracking in PLEXUS. First applications to a laboratory test specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, P.

    1986-07-01

    The problem of dynamic rupture is important for nuclear power plant safety analysis, more particularly in case of cold shock in a PWR vessel. Preliminary studies showed that PLEXUS is a numerical frame well adapted to the analysis of the problem. The aim of this report is to present a new model implemented in PLEXUS, for a better simulation of splitting. A first trial taking into account the variation of the dynamic toughness versus crack propagation rate has been done (samples of steel AISI 4340). The model has been applied to the dynamic cracking of a test specimen. The influence of wave reflections at the structure limits has been clearly pointed out [fr

  15. A specific, nonproliferative role for E2F-5 in choroid plexus function revealed by gene targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Geoffrey J.; Dagnino, Lina; Gaubatz, Stefan; Xu, Yuhui; Bronson, Roderick T.; Warren, Henry B.; Livingston, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Homozygous E2F-5 knockout embryos and mice have been generated. Although embryonic development appeared normal, newborn mice developed nonobstructive hydrocephalus, suggesting excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) production. Although the CSF-producing choroid plexus displayed normal cellular organization, it contained abundant electron-lucent epithelial cells, consistent with excessive CSF secretory activity. Moreover, E2F-5 CNS expression in normal animals was largely confined to the choroid plexus. Cell cycle kinetics were not perturbed in homozygous knockout embryo fibroblasts. Thus, E2F-5 is not essential for cell proliferation. Rather, it affects the secretory behavior of a differentiated neural tissue. PMID:9553039

  16. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... diffusivity values at S1-S3 were significantly lower in patients. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging study showed for the first time sacral plexus asymmetry and disorganization in 10 patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography...

  17. Transpedicular fixation and fusion-arthrodesis circumferential for the treatment of lumbosacral spondylolisthesis of high degree - Multi centric experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javier Matta Ibarra; Mauricio Rozo Franco; Francisco Restrepo Suarez

    2004-01-01

    The objective is to present the high-grade lumbosacral spondylolisthesis surgical experience. Spondylolisthesis causes chronic disabling pain, postural alteration and/or motor and sensory deficits in the lower extremities. Surgical stabilization is recommended in symptomatic adult and even in children or adolescents without symptoms because of the deformity progression potential. Stabilization can be done with or without reduction of the slippage; reduction implies neurological damage risk, bone (loosening) or implant (rupture) failure. Many authors recommended to do an in situ circumferential fusion arthrosis (inter body and inter transverse) associated with a transpedicular fixation in order to minimize the described risk. Eight patients were operated from 1993 to 2002. spondylolisthesis was analyzed according to clinical presentation, neurological dysfunction, postural alterations (slip angle, sacral inclination) complications and follow up. During follow up solid fusion was obtained with a better neurological function in all cases. One patient presented with a drop foot that reverted posteriorly; other patient had a superficial infection of the wound that was controlled. Slip angle improved between 8 - 42 and sacral inclination to 20 degrades. Present technique is recommended because it can be done a circumferential in situ arthrodesis in a single stage operation

  18. Determination of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in kidney urinary bladder x-ray films in the Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid G. Khashoggi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigated the rate of occurrence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV, spinal variant, in kidney urinary bladder (KUB plain radiographs in a Saudi population. Methods: Between January 2012 to January 2015, KUB plain films obtained from patients at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were reviewed, and the presence or absence of LSTV was documented and classified as incomplete or complete. Patients who had evidence of spinal surgery that would obscure the view were excluded. Results: A total of 2078 patients underwent KUB examinations during the study period; LSTV anomalies were detected in 158 of these. Sacralization was present in 153 (96.8% of this cohort, while lumbarization was present in 5 (3.2%. A total of 136 (86.1% of the sacralized segments were of the incomplete type, whereas 17 (10.7% were complete. Of the lumbarized vertebrae, 3 (1.8% were incomplete, and 2 (1.2% were complete. The most frequent type in men was type Ib (28.5% for sacralized segments, and type IIb for lumbarized segments (0.6%. In women, type Ia was the most common form of sacralized segments (11.3% and type IIb was the most common form of lumbarized segments (2.8%. Conclusion: The prevalence of LSTV in Saudi patients is 7.6%, with a higher incidence of sacralization than lumbarization. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up time are needed to demonstrate the clinical significance thereof.

  19. Extra-skeletal Ewing sarcoma of the lumbosacral region in an adult pregnant patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khawaja, Darweesh; Vescovi, Cristina; Dower, Ashraf; Thiruvilangam, Vallapan; Mahasneh, Tamadur

    2017-03-01

    Extra-skeletal Ewing sarcoma in pregnancy is rare. There is thus limited scientific evidence to guide clinicians in its complicated management, particularly within the context of early gestation. We therefore share our successful outcome in a 32-year-old pregnant patient, following a unique management strategy of complete aggressive surgical resection prior to neo-adjuvant therapy. The case involved a 2-month history of right-sided back and gluteal pain, with associated paraesthesia. Lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an approximate 40×50 mm indeterminate mass in the lower right paraspinal musculature. The mass extended into the first right sacral foramen and the central canal; and also impinged on the S2 exiting nerve. After considering the patients' rapid deterioration, pregnant status and other clinical factors, it was elected to proceed with complete surgical resection prior to any other therapeutic modality. Following surgery, the patient experienced immediate resolution of her pain and by 6 weeks was able to cease the use of all analgesics. At 32-weeks' gestation she underwent an uncomplicated vaginal delivery. At 9 months follow up, she remains disease free and has experienced complete resolution of her back pain and radiculopathy.

  20. Effect of lordosis angle change after lumbar/lumbosacral fusion on sacrum angular displacement: a finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ningfang; Shi, Jian; He, Dawei; Xie, Yang; Bai, Yushu; Wei, Xianzhao; Shi, Zhicai; Li, Ming

    2014-11-01

    To assess and characterize the sacrum angular displacements in response to lumbar lordosis after lumbar/lumbosacral fusion. A finite element model of the lower lumbar spine-pelvis was established and used to simulate the posterior fusion at L3-L5 and L4-S1. The lordosis angle in the fusion segments was set to five different conditions with respect to the intact model: 10° less than intact, 5° less than intact, same as intact, 5° more than intact, and 10° more than intact. Variations of the sacrum angular displacements with lordosis changes were analyzed under loading setting of axial compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Compared with the intact lordosis, both increased and decreased lumbar lordosis angles caused the sacrum angular displacements to be increased. The lordosis angle increased by 10° induced the most substantial increase in sacrum angular displacements. In addition, the sacrum angular displacements of the L4-S1 fusion model at different lordosis angles were higher than those of the L3-L5 fusion model. The sacrum angular displacements occur as a result of the fusion surgery (L4-S1) and the changes in lumbar lordosis.

  1. Real-time three-dimensional ultrasound-assisted axillary plexus block defines soft tissue planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenen, Steven R; Riutort, Kevin; Ladlie, Beth L; Robards, Christopher; Franco, Carlo D; Greengrass, Roy A

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) ultrasound is commonly used for regional block of the axillary brachial plexus. In this technical case report, we described a real-time three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound-guided axillary block. The difference between 2D and 3D ultrasound is similar to the difference between plain radiograph and computer tomography. Unlike 2D ultrasound that captures a planar image, 3D ultrasound technology acquires a 3D volume of information that enables multiple planes of view by manipulating the image without movement of the ultrasound probe. Observation of the brachial plexus in cross-section demonstrated distinct linear hyperechoic tissue structures (loose connective tissue) that initially inhibited the flow of the local anesthesia. After completion of the injection, we were able to visualize the influence of arterial pulsation on the spread of the local anesthesia. Possible advantages of this novel technology over current 2D methods are wider image volume and the capability to manipulate the planes of the image without moving the probe.

  2. Choroid plexus metastasis of renal-cell carcinoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigemori, Minoru; Shimamoto, Houtetsu; Noguchi, Shinji; Yoshitake, Yasuhiro; Sugita, Yasuo; Kuramoto, Shinken

    1987-10-01

    A rare case of the choroid plexus metastasis of renal-cell carcinoma is reported. A 58-year-old man was admitted on March 3, 1982, with complaints of mild headache and a transient attack of muscle weakness of the left upper extremity. He had undergone a left nephrectomy because of renal-cell carcinoma 2 years before this admission. A CT scan revealed a small mass in the right lateral ventricle that was markedly enhanced by the contrast medium. A carotid angiogram was normal, but a left vertebral angiogram showed a round tumor stain in the distal portion of the right posterior choroidal artery. To determine the nature of the tumor, it was successfully removed via the right frontal transventricular approach. The immediate recovery from the operation was uneventful, but the patient became semicomatose 6 hours later because of a large subdural hematoma over the left hemisphere. An emergency operation for clot removal and external decompression failed to improve the patient's status, and he died on the 3rd postoperative day. An histological examination of the tumor determined the diagnosis of clear-cell-type renal-cell carcinoma. The CT demonstration of choroid plexus metastasis is quite rare. To our knowledge, only two cases have been described.

  3. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong Jin; Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-01-01

    A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5min for 60min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6±12.9min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2±13.9min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Outcomes associated with a structured prenatal counseling program for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Mary Veronica; Bender, Christina; Townsend, Kathryn E; Hamilton, Emily F

    2012-08-01

    We examined outcomes that were associated with a novel program to identify patients who are at high risk for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. The program included a checklist of key risk factors and a multifactorial algorithm to estimate risk of shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. We examined rates of cesarean delivery and shoulder dystocia in 8767 deliveries by clinicians who were enrolled in the program and in 11,958 patients of clinicians with no access to the program. Key risk factors were identified in 1071 of 8767 mothers (12.2%), of whom 40 of 8767 women (0.46%) had results in the high-risk category. The rate of primary cesarean delivery rate was stable (21.2-20.8%; P = .57). Shoulder dystocia rates fell by 56.8% (1.74-0.75%; P = .002). The rates of shoulder dystocia and cesarean birth showed no changes in the group with no access to the program. With the introduction of this program, overall shoulder dystocia rates fell by more than one-half with no increase in the primary cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  6. Midazolam with Bupivacaine for Improving Analgesia Quality in Brachial Plexus Block for Upper Limb Surgeries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laiq, N.; Khan, M.N.; Khan, S.

    2008-01-01

    To compare the onset, duration and postoperative pain scores of supraclavicular block with bupivacaine alone and bupivacaine-midazolam combination. A randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 50 ASA-I or II adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 each. Patients in group A were administered 30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with midazolam 50 micro g kg/sup -1/. Hemodynamic variables (heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure, oxygen saturation), pain scores, rescue analgesic requirements and sedation score were recorded for 24 hours postoperatively, and compared using ANOVA with significance at p <0.05. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block was significantly faster and longer in group B compared to group A (p < 0.001). Pain scores were significantly lower in group B for 24 hours postoperatively (p < 0.001). Demand for rescue analgesic were significantly less in group B. Hemodynamics and sedation scores did not differ between the groups in the studied period. Bupivacaine (0.5%) in combination with Midazolam (50 micro g kg/sup -1/) quickened the onset as well as prolonged the duration of sensory and motor blockade of the brachial plexus for upper limb surgery. It improved postoperative analgesia without producing any adverse events compared to plain bupivacaine (0.5%) in equal volume. (author)

  7. VISUAL PERCEPTION OF THE CHILDREN WITH PLEXUS BRACHIALIS DAMAGE – ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana M. KLJAJIKJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal communication, psychosocial and mental development of personality and its all other functions take place through the motor control. The most common neurological syndrome is a type of peripheral paresis/paralysis of plexus bracialis, which in most cases occurs at birth and significantly compromises the growth and development of the upper extremities and affects the psychomotor performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of visual perception in children with lesion of plexus brachialis and the effect of the somatopedic treatment over the level of increase of the visual perception. The study sample was consisted of 60 preschool children accommodated at the Rehabilitation Centre “Dr. Miroslav Zotović” in Belgrade (experimental group and examiners that followed regular checkups and had discontinuity in their therapy (control group. For the research purposes, we used The Test for Visual Perception Assessment. By analyzing the results, we concluded that in both, in the first and the second measuring there was a statistically significant correlation between the experimental and the control groups (I measuring: p<0.001, r = 0.408; II measuring: p <0.001, r = 0.593.

  8. Recovery of brachial plexus lesions resulting from heavy backpack use: A follow-up case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pihlajamäki Harri K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachial plexus lesions as a consequence of carrying a heavy backpack have been reported, but the typical clinical course and long-term consequences are not clear. Here we evaluated the clinical course and pattern of recovery of backpack palsy (BPP in a large series of patients. Methods Thirty-eight consecutive patients with idiopathic BPP were identified from our population of 193,450 Finnish conscripts by means of computerised register. A physiotherapist provided instructions for proper hand use and rehabilitative exercises at disease onset. The patients were followed up for 2 to 8 years from the diagnosis. We also searched for genetic markers of hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to analyze continuous data. The Fischer's exact test was used to assess two-way tables. Results Eighty percent of the patients recovered totally within 9 months after the onset of weakness. Prolonged symptoms occurred in 15% of the patients, but daily activities were not affected. The weight of the carried load at the symptom onset significantly affected the severity of the muscle strength loss in the physiotherapeutic testing at the follow-up. The initial electromyography did not predict recovery. Genetic testing did not reveal de novo hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies. Conclusions The prognosis of BPP is favorable in the vast majority of cases. Electromyography is useful for diagnosis. To prevent brachial plexus lesions, backpack loads greater than 40 kg should be avoided.

  9. Importance of Considering the Middle Capillary Plexus on OCT Angiography in Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Alex C; Nesper, Peter L; Roberts, Philipp K; Moharram, Ganna A; Chai, Haitao; Liu, Lei; Jampol, Lee M; Fawzi, Amani A

    2018-04-01

    To quantify microvasculature changes in the superficial (SCP), middle (MCP), and deep capillary plexuses (DCP) in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Retrospective cross-sectional study at a tertiary academic referral center, in which 26 controls (44 eyes), 27 diabetic subjects without retinopathy (44 eyes), 32 subjects with nonproliferative retinopathy (52 eyes), and 27 subjects with proliferative retinopathy (40 eyes) were imaged with optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Outcome measures included parafoveal vessel density (VD), percentage area of nonperfusion (PAN), and adjusted flow index (AFI) at the different plexuses. MCP VD and MCP AFI decreased with worsening DR, while PAN increased, mirroring changes within the DCP. The fitted regression line for MCP and DCP AFI were significantly different than the SCP, while DCP PAN differed from SCP PAN with disease progression. Higher SCP AFI and PAN were different in eyes with diabetes without retinopathy compared with controls. Unexpectedly, sex was found to independently influence MCP VD and AFI with worsening disease. OCTA parameters in the MCP and DCP displayed parallel changes with DR progression, different from the SCP, emphasizing the importance of physiologic considerations in the retinal capillaries. Thus, segmentation protocols that include the MCP within the SCP may be confounded. A difference in DCP PAN with worsening DR was unmasked relative to a prior study that included the MCP with SCP. We confirm that SCP AFI and PAN may serve as early indicators of microvascular changes in DR and identify an interaction between sex and the MCP deserving further study.

  10. Comprehensive approach to newborns and infants with brachial plexus impairment – proposal of Slovenian guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Groleger Sršen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The impairment of brachial plexus (IBP in the neonate and infant remains an important problem. Risk factors for IBP are well known, but the mechanisms of impairment are not yet fully understood. It is important to identify early signs of IBP and to evaluate the hand function. In the guidelines we propose to use the Toronto scale for evaluation of hand function. The newborn with IBP should be referred to physiotherapy, and then regularly followed-up once a month. If the arm and hand function, especially flexion of the elbow, is not improving at the age of two months, the infant should be referred to the tertiary level rehabilitation centre and to department for plastic surgery at the University Medical Centre in Ljubljana. When necessary, the reconstructive procedure should be done by the age of three to six months. After reconstruction of brachial plexus, the child needs a comprehensive therapy program, which involves passive stretching, sensory stimulation, exercises to promote the development of active voluntary movements, bimanual activities, and symmetrical posture and movement patterns.

  11. Targeting choroid plexus epithelia and ventricular ependyma for drug delivery to the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopa Edward G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the choroid plexus (CP is uniquely suited to control the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, there may be therapeutic benefits to increasing the levels of biologically active proteins in CSF to modulate central nervous system (CNS functions. To this end, we sought to identify peptides capable of ligand-mediated targeting to CP epithelial cells reasoning that they could be exploited to deliver drugs, biotherapeutics and genes to the CNS. Methods A peptide library displayed on M13 bacteriophage was screened for ligands capable of internalizing into CP epithelial cells by incubating phage with CP explants for 2 hours at 37C and recovering particles with targeting capacity. Results Three peptides, identified after four rounds of screening, were analyzed for specific and dose dependant binding and internalization. Binding was deemed specific because internalization was prevented by co-incubation with cognate synthetic peptides. Furthermore, after i.c.v. injection into rat brains, each peptide was found to target phage to epithelial cells in CP and to ependyma lining the ventricles. Conclusion These data demonstrate that ligand-mediated targeting can be used as a strategy for drug delivery to the central nervous system and opens the possibility of using the choroid plexus as a portal of entry into the brain.

  12. Maturation of Rb+ and PAH accumulation by rabbit anterior uvea and choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupin, T.; Fritz, C.; Becker, B.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro accumulation of radioactive para-aminohippuric acid ( 3 H-PAH) and rubidium ( 86 Rb+) by the anterior uvea, ciliary processes, and the choroid plexus was evaluated in tissues from newborn and various aged rabbits. Accumulation of PAH was present in the anterior uvea at 1 day of age (tissue to media ratio, T/M, of 2.1 +/- 0.2) and remained at this level for the first 14 days of life. Accumulation did not rise to adult levels until 21 days of age (T/M 5.5 +/- 0.6). Rubidium accumulation in the anterior uvea, a measure of Na+, K+-pump activity, was higher than adult values 6 hr after birth (T/M25.2 +/- 0.9). Activity remained elevated through day 28 and did not fall to adult levels until day 60 (T/M 13.4 +/- 0.6). Accumulation studies on isolated ciliary processes were similar to those obtained from anterior uveal tissue. Daily subcutaneous injections of penicillin (300,000 units/kg/day) for 1 week had no effect on anterior uvea PAH accumulation (penicillin T/M was 1.7 +/- 0.1 and saline control T/M was 2.0 +/- 0.2). Accumulation of either 3 H-PAH or 86 Rb+ by the choroid plexus was present 1 day after birth in amounts that were similar to adult values and did not change during the 90 days of testing

  13. Experimental study of brachial plexus and vessel compression: evaluation of combined central and peripheral electrodiagnostic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaoqun; Xu, Jianguang; Chen, Jie; Li, Shulin; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Lei

    2017-08-01

    We sought to investigate the reliability of a new electrodiagnostic method for identifying Electrodiagnosis of Brachial Plexus & Vessel Compression Syndrome (BPVCS) in rats that involves the application of transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potentials (TES-MEPs) combined with peripheral nerve stimulation compound muscle action potentials (PNS-CMAPs). The latencies of the TES-MEP and PNS-CMAP were initially elongated in the 8-week group. The amplitudes of TES-MEP and PNS-CMAP were initially attenuated in the 16-week group. The isolateral amplitude ratio of the TES-MEP to the PNS-CMAP was apparently decreased, and spontaneous activities emerged at 16 weeks postoperatively. Superior and inferior trunk models of BPVCS were created in 72 male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats that were divided into six experimental groups. The latencies, amplitudes and isolateral amplitude ratios of the TES-MEPs and PNS-CMAPs were recorded at different postoperative intervals. Electrophysiological and histological examinations of the rats' compressed brachial plexus nerves were utilized to establish preliminary electrodiagnostic criteria for BPVCS.

  14. Liquid plugs bouncing against a solid basis, comparison of SIMMER-III and PLEXUS results; Zum Aufprall von Fluessigkeitssaeulen auf starre Hindernisse Vergleich von SIMMER-III und PLEXUS Ergebnissen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maschek, W.; Arnecke, G.; Flad, M.

    1995-08-01

    The SIMMER III code is being tested by application to problems of reactor accidents. The fluid dynamics/thermohydraulics part of the code can be applied also to evaporation/condensation, melt, and freezing phenomena. For a liquid plug bouncing against a solid basis, the momentum transfer is calculated. PLEXUS results turn out to be in significant disagreement with the SIMMER calculations. (orig.)

  15. Operative treatment with nerve repair can restore function in patients with traction injuries in the brachial plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiasny, Jerzy; Birkeland, Peter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Brachial plexus injuries are usually a result of road traffic accidents and a cause of severe disability that typically affects young adult males. In 2010, a national centre was established for referral of these cases from Danish trauma centres. In this paper, we report on our...

  16. Ultrasound-guided training in the performance of brachial plexus block by the posterior approach: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Rettig, H.C.; Koornwinder, T.; Renes, S.H.; Gielen, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The application of ultrasonography in guiding and controlling the path of the stimulating needle to the brachial plexus via the posterior approach (Pippa technique) was studied. In 21 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for surgery of the shoulder or upper arm, needle insertion was

  17. MUSCLE-FIBER CONDUCTION-VELOCITY IN AMYOTROPHIC-LATERAL-SCLEROSIS AND TRAUMATIC LESIONS OF THE PLEXUS BRACHIALIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERHOEVEN, JH; ZWARTS, MJ; VANWEERDEN, TW

    1993-01-01

    Muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV) in biceps brachii was studied in traumatic brachial plexus lesions (16 patients) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (22 patients) by means of an invasive (S-MFCV) and a surface (S-MFCV) method. After complete denervation an exponential decrease of the

  18. Comparison between isotropic linear-elastic law and isotropic hyperelastic law in the finite element modeling of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perruisseau-Carrier, A; Bahlouli, N; Bierry, G; Vernet, P; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2017-12-01

    Augmented reality could help the identification of nerve structures in brachial plexus surgery. The goal of this study was to determine which law of mechanical behavior was more adapted by comparing the results of Hooke's isotropic linear elastic law to those of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic law, applied to a biomechanical model of the brachial plexus. A model of finite elements was created using the ABAQUS ® from a 3D model of the brachial plexus acquired by segmentation and meshing of MRI images at 0°, 45° and 135° of shoulder abduction of a healthy subject. The offset between the reconstructed model and the deformed model was evaluated quantitatively by the Hausdorff distance and qualitatively by the identification of 3 anatomical landmarks. In every case the Hausdorff distance was shorter with Ogden's law compared to Hooke's law. On a qualitative aspect, the model deformed by Ogden's law followed the concavity of the reconstructed model whereas the model deformed by Hooke's law remained convex. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that the behavior of Ogden's isotropic hyperelastic mechanical model was more adapted to the modeling of the deformations of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Aqueous Extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill Prevents Age-Related Changes in the Myenteric Plexus of the Jejunum in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula de Santi-Rampazzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of the supplementation with aqueous extract of Agaricus blazei Murrill (ABM on biometric and blood parameters and quantitative morphology of the myenteric plexus and jejunal wall in aging Wistar rats. The animals were euthanized at 7 (C7, 12 (C12 and CA12, and 23 months of age (C23 and CA23. The CA12 and CA23 groups received a daily dose of ABM extract (26 mg/animal via gavage, beginning at 7 months of age. A reduction in food intake was observed with aging, with increases in the Lee index, retroperitoneal fat, intestinal length, and levels of total cholesterol and total proteins. Aging led to a reduction of the total wall thickness, mucosa tunic, villus height, crypt depth, and number of goblet cells. In the myenteric plexus, aging quantitatively decreased the population of HuC/D+ neuronal and S100+ glial cells, with maintenance of the nNOS+ nitrergic subpopulation and increase in the cell body area of these populations. Supplementation with the ABM extract preserved the myenteric plexus in old animals, in which no differences were detected in the density and cell body profile of neurons and glial cells in the CA12 and CA23 groups, compared with C7 group. The supplementation with the aqueous extract of ABM efficiently maintained myenteric plexus homeostasis, which positively influenced the physiology and prevented the death of the neurons and glial cells.

  20. Aspects of activities and participation of 7-8 year-old children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, E.; Ahmed, J.; van Ouwerkerk, W.J.R.; de Groot, V.; Beckerman, H.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) can experience problems in the performance of meaningful activities such as writing, bimanual activities, and participation in sports and leisure activities. Aims: To quantify the everyday functioning and participation of 7-8

  1. Effectiveness of low-field magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosing brachial plexus tumours in dogs – short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamiak Zbigniew

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify magnetic resonance imaging (MRI sequences that contribute to a quick and reliable diagnosis of brachial plexus tumours in dogs. The tumours were successfully diagnosed in 6 dogs by the MRI with the use of SE, FSE, STIR, Turbo 3 D, 3D HYCE, and GE sequences and the gadolinium contrast agent

  2. 76 FR 59767 - Plexus Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ..., Financings which Constitute Conflicts of Interest of the Small Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). Plexus II, L.P., proposes to provide debt security financing to Project Empire... the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended (``the Act''), in connection with the financing...

  3. A comparison of the analgesic efficacy of transforaminal methylprednisolone alone and with low doses of clonidine in lumbo-sacral radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauheed, Nazia; Usmani, Hammad; Siddiqui, Anwar Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Although transforaminal epidural steroid injections under fluoroscopic guidance have become a common mode of treatment of lumbosacral radiculopathy due to herniated disc, the efficacy of steroid with low doses of clonidine has not been compared yet. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of methylprednisolone alone and with low doses of clonidine for transforaminal injection in lumbosacral radiculopathy. A randomized, double-blind trial. This study was performed at the Pain Clinic under the Department of Anaesthesiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India. One hundred and eighty ASA grade I and II patients aged between 18 and 55 years were allocated into groups I, II and III to receive methylprednisolone 60 mg alone or methylprednisolone 60 mg with or without low doses of clonidine (0.5 mcg/kg or 1 mcg/kg) as transforaminal epidural injection. Pain relief and patient's satisfaction were evaluated with the global pain scale. Follow-up visits were advised at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks and then at 6 months after injection. Associated complications were recorded. Maximum pain relief was observed at 2 weeks after injection in all the three groups, with no difference in complication rate among the three groups. The most common complication observed was paresthesia in the nerve distribution. Greater than 60% improvement in pain scores was seen in 40% of the patients in group I, 50% of the patients in group II and 75% of the patients in group III. This study is limited by the lack of a placebo group. Adding 1 mcg/kg clonidine to 60 mg methylprednisolone in transforaminal epidural injections provided better pain relief than 60 mg methylprednisolone with 0.5 mcg/kg clonidine or 60 mg methylprednisolone alone in patients suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy, with practically no significant side-effects.

  4. MR Imaging of Brachial Plexus and Limb-Girdle Muscles in Patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerevini, Simonetta; Agosta, Federica; Riva, Nilo; Spinelli, Edoardo G; Pagani, Elisabetta; Caliendo, Giandomenico; Chaabane, Linda; Copetti, Massimiliano; Quattrini, Angelo; Comi, Giancarlo; Falini, Andrea; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-05-01

    To assess brachial plexus magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities as signs of muscle denervation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This study was approved by the local ethical committees on human studies, and written informed consent was obtained from all subjects before enrollment. By using an optimized protocol of brachial plexus MR imaging, brachial plexus and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were evaluated in 23 patients with ALS and clinical and neurophysiologically active involvement of the upper limbs and were compared with MR images in 12 age-matched healthy individuals. Nerve root and limb-girdle muscle abnormalities were visually evaluated by two experienced observers. A region of interest-based analysis was performed to measure nerve root volume and T2 signal intensity. Measures obtained at visual inspection were analyzed by using the Wald χ(2) test. Mean T2 signal intensity and volume values of the regions of interest were compared between groups by using a hierarchical linear model, accounting for the repeated measurement design. The level of interrater agreement was very strong (κ = 0.77-1). T2 hyperintensity and volume alterations of C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots were observed in patients with ALS (P < .001 to .03). Increased T2 signal intensity of nerve roots was associated with faster disease progression (upper-limb Medical Research Council scale progression rate, r = 0.40; 95% confidence interval: 0.001, 0.73). Limb-girdle muscle alterations (ie, T2 signal intensity alteration, edema, atrophy) and fat infiltration also were found, in particular, in the supraspinatus muscle, showing more frequent T2 signal intensity alterations and edema (P = .01) relative to the subscapularis and infraspinatus muscles. Increased T2 signal intensity and volume of brachial nerve roots do not exclude a diagnosis of ALS and suggest involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the ALS pathogenetic cascade. MR

  5. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shoulder area. These nerves provide the shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand with movement and sensation. ... Pectoral girdle and upper limb: overview and surface anatomy. In: Standring S, ed. Gray's Anatomy: The Anatomical Basis ...

  6. End plate marrow changes in the asymptomatic lumbosacral spine: frequency, distribution and correlation with age and degenerative changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Christine B.; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Malghem, Jacques; Tavernier, Thierry; Cotten, Anne; Laredo, Jean-Denis; Vallee, Christian

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the frequency and distribution of end plate marrow signal intensity changes in an asymptomatic population and to correlate these findings with patient age and degenerative findings in the spine. MR imaging studies of the lumbosacral (LS) spine in 59 asymptomatic subjects were retrospectively reviewed by 2 musculoskeletal radiologists to determine the presence and location of fat-like and edema-like marrow signal changes about the end plates of the L1-2 through L5-S1 levels. The presence of degenerative changes in the spine was recorded as was patient age. Descriptive statistics were utilized to determine the frequency and associations of end plate findings and degenerative changes in the spine. Interobserver variability was determined by a kappa score. Binomial probability was used to predict the prevalence of the end plate changes in a similar subject population. The Fisher exact test was performed to determine statistical significance of the relationship of end plate changes with degenerative changes in the spine, superior versus inferior location about the disc and age of the patient population. Focal fat-like signal intensity adjacent to the vertebral end-plate was noted in 15 out of 59 subjects by both readers, and involved 38 and 36 out of 590 end plates by readers 1 and 2, respectively. Focal edema-like signal intensity adjacent to the vertebral end plate was noted in 8 out of 59 subjects by both readers and involved 11 and 10 out of 590 end plates by readers 1 and 2, respectively. Either fat or edema signal intensity occurred most often at the anterior (p<.05) aspects of the mid-lumbar spine and was seen in an older sub-population of the study (p<.05). End plate marrow signal intensity changes are present in the lumbar spine of some asymptomatic subjects with a characteristic location along the spine and in vertebral end plates. (orig.)

  7. Symptomatic lumbosacral transitional vertebra: a review of the current literature and clinical outcomes following steroid injection or surgical intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Emil Kongsted

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Bertolotti’s syndrome (BS refers to the possible association between the congenital malformation lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV, and low back pain (LBP. Several treatments have been proposed including steroid injections, resections of the LSTV, laminectomy, and lumbar spinal fusion. The aim of this review was to compare the clinical outcomes in previous trials and case reports for these treatments in patients with LBP and LSTV. A PubMed search was conducted. We included English studies of patients diagnosed with LSTV treated with steroid injection, laminectomy, spinal fusion or resection of the transitional articulation. Of 272 articles reviewed 20 articles met the inclusion criteria. Their level of evidence were graded I–V and the clinical outcomes were evaluated. Only 1 study had high evidence level (II. The remainders were case series (level IV. Only 5 studies used validated clinical outcome measures. A total of 79 patients were reported: 31 received treatment with steroid injections, 33 were treated with surgical resection of the LSTV, 8 received lumbar spinal fusion, and 7 cases were treated with laminectomy. Surgical management seems to improve the patient’s symptoms, especially patients diagnosed with “far out syndrome” treated with laminectomy. Clinical outcomes were more heterogenetic for patient’s treated with steroid injections. The literature regarding BS is sparse and generally with low evidence. Non-surgical management (e.g., steroid injections and surgical intervention could not directly be compared due to lack of standardization in clinical outcome. Generally, surgical management seems to improve patient’s clinical outcome over time, whereas steroid injection only improves the patient’s symptoms temporarily. Further studies with larger sample size and higher evidence are warranted for the clinical guidance in the treatment of BS.

  8. An analysis of general surgery-related complications in a series of 412 minilaparotomic anterior lumbosacral procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byung-Uk; Choi, Won-Chul; Lee, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Sang Hyeop; Park, Jong Dae; Maeng, Dae Hyeon; Choi, Young-Geun

    2009-01-01

    Anterior lumbar surgery is associated with certain perioperative visceral and vascular complications. The aim of this study was to document all general surgery-related adverse events and complications following minilaparotomic retroperitoneal lumbar procedures and to discuss strategies for their management or prevention. The authors analyzed data obtained in 412 patients who underwent anterior lumbosacral surgery between 2003 and 2005. The series comprised 114 men and 298 women whose mean age was 56 years (range 34-79 years). Preoperative diagnoses were as follows: isthmic spondylolisthesis (32%), degenerative spondylolisthesis (24%), instability/stenosis (15%), degenerative disc disease (15%), failed-back surgery syndrome (7%), and lumbar degenerative kyphosis or scoliosis (7%). A single level was exposed in 264 patients (64%), 2 in 118 (29%), and 3 or 4 in 30 (7%). The average follow-up period was 16 months. Overall, 52 instances of complications and adverse events occurred in 50 patients (12.1%), including sympathetic dysfunction in 25 (6.06%), vascular injury repaired with/without direct suture in 12 (2.9%), ileus lasting > 3 days in 5 (1.2%), pleural effusion in 4 (0.97%), wound dehiscence in 2 (0.49%), symptomatic retroperitoneal hematoma in 2 (0.49%), angina in 1 (0.24%), and bowel laceration in 1 patient (0.24%). There was no instance of retrograde ejaculation in male patients, and most complications had no long-term sequelae. This report presents a detailed analysis of complications related to anterior lumbar surgery. Although the incidence of complications appears low considering the magnitude of the procedure, surgeons should be aware of these potential complications and their management.

  9. Symptomatic lumbosacral transitional vertebra: a review of the current literature and clinical outcomes following steroid injection or surgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Emil Kongsted; Bünger, Cody; Foldager, Casper Bindzus

    2017-01-01

    Bertolotti's syndrome (BS) refers to the possible association between the congenital malformation lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV), and low back pain (LBP). Several treatments have been proposed including steroid injections, resections of the LSTV, laminectomy, and lumbar spinal fusion. The aim of this review was to compare the clinical outcomes in previous trials and case reports for these treatments in patients with LBP and LSTV. A PubMed search was conducted. We included English studies of patients diagnosed with LSTV treated with steroid injection, laminectomy, spinal fusion or resection of the transitional articulation. Of 272 articles reviewed 20 articles met the inclusion criteria. Their level of evidence were graded I-V and the clinical outcomes were evaluated. Only 1 study had high evidence level (II). The remainders were case series (level IV). Only 5 studies used validated clinical outcome measures. A total of 79 patients were reported: 31 received treatment with steroid injections, 33 were treated with surgical resection of the LSTV, 8 received lumbar spinal fusion, and 7 cases were treated with laminectomy. Surgical management seems to improve the patient's symptoms, especially patients diagnosed with "far out syndrome" treated with laminectomy. Clinical outcomes were more heterogenetic for patient's treated with steroid injections. The literature regarding BS is sparse and generally with low evidence. Non-surgical management (e.g., steroid injections) and surgical intervention could not directly be compared due to lack of standardization in clinical outcome. Generally, surgical management seems to improve patient's clinical outcome over time, whereas steroid injection only improves the patient's symptoms temporarily. Further studies with larger sample size and higher evidence are warranted for the clinical guidance in the treatment of BS. © The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  10. Age-dependent trigeminal and female-specific lumbosacral increase in herpes zoster distribution in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Kimiyasu; Toyama, Nozomu; Shiraki, Atsuko; Yajima, Misako

    2018-05-01

    Varicella-zoster virus causes herpes zoster (HZ) along specific dermatomes, but the effects of age and sex on HZ distribution are unclear. We investigated the age- and sex-dependent distribution characteristics of HZ. Patients with HZ were monitored by members of the Miyazaki Dermatologist Society. Questionnaires containing information on age, sex, and dermatome distribution and lesion specimens from 2730 patients were collected, and 2508 PCR-diagnosed cases were analyzed. The ratio of lesions in the thoracic area to lesions in the whole body decreased with age, whereas those of other areas increased. HZ incidence increased with age to about four times that of the basic incidence in the dermatome areas at age 0-29 years; the incidence in the trigeminal area in both sexes increased 11-fold, and the incidence in the thoracic and lumbosacral areas increased in females more than in males. Furthermore, the fact that the highest incidence was found along the first branch of the trigeminal nerve suggests an association with long-term ultraviolet ray exposure. Segmental dermatomes comprising thoracic 10-lumbar 1/sacral 2-4 and thoracic 5-6 were significantly more frequently affected in female patients at age 50-59 years and are consistent with areas of obstetric anesthesia for childbirth and of breastfeeding, respectively. HZ incidence increased with age; moreover, exposure to ultraviolet rays, childbirth, and breastfeeding might increase the incidence at specific dermatomes in older individuals. This study provides important information on the etiology of HZ. Copyright © 2018 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Termination Level of the Dural Sac Relevant to Caudal Epidural Block in Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: A Comparison between Sacralization and Lumbarization Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ji Young; Jeong, Yu Mi; Lee, Sheen-Woo; Kim, Jeong Ho; Choi, Hye-Young; Ahn, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are a relatively common variant and have been considered as one of the reasons for back pain. It is not unusual for clinicians to encounter patients with LSTV who require caudal epidural block (CEB) for pain management. We investigated the termination level of the dural sac (DS) and anatomical features of the lumbosacral region relevant to CEB in patients with LSTV and compared these findings between sacralization and lumbarization groups. A retrospective evaluation. A university hospital with inpatient and outpatient LSTV cases presenting low back pain. Four hundred ninety-four LSTV patients were included and categorized into sacralization (n = 201) or lumbarization groups (n = 293). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of all of the LSTV patients were reviewed to determine the level of DS termination, the shortest distance between the apex of the sacral hiatus and DS, and the presence and the caudal level of sacral perineural cysts. Each lumbosacral vertebra column was divided into 3 equal portions (upper, middle, and lower thirds). The MRI findings in both of the groups were compared and analyzed. The distribution frequency of the levels of DS termination demonstrated a significant difference between the 2 groups. The mean caudal DS level in the lumbarization group was significantly lower than the sacralization group (lower third of the S2 [131 {44.7%} of 293 patients] vs. lower third of the S1 [78 {38.8%} of 201 patients]). The DS terminated at the S3 in more than 19% of the lumbarization group, whereas in only one case of the sacralization group. Although the incidence of perineural cysts was not significantly different between the 2 groups, the mean level of caudal margin of perineural cysts in the lumbarization group was significantly lower than the sacralization group (middle third of the S3 [10 {35.7%} of 28 cases] vs. middle third of the S2 [11 {44%} of 25 cases]). This study reveals several limitations including the

  12. Short-term and long-term effects of a minimally invasive transilial vertebral blocking procedure on the lumbosacral morphometry in dogs measured by computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Friedrich; Schenk, Henning C; Forterre, Franck

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effects of a minimally invasive transilial vertebral (MTV) blocking procedure on the computed tomographic (CT) appearance of the lumbosacral (L7/S1) junction of dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS). Prospective study. 59 client-owned dogs with DLSS. Lumbosacral CT images were acquired with hyperextended pelvic limbs before and after MTV in all dogs. Clinical follow-up was obtained after 1 year, including a neurologic status classified in 4 grades, and if possible, CT. Morphometric measurements (Mean ± SEM) including foraminal area, endplate distance at L7/S1 and LS angle were obtained on sets of reformatted parasagittal and sagittal CT images. The mean foraminal area (ForL) increased from 32.5 ± 1.7 mm 2 to 59.7 ± 1.9 mm 2 on the left and from 31.1 ± 1.4 mm 2 to 59.1 ± 2.0 mm 2 on the right (ForR) side after MTV. The mean endplate distance (EDmd) between L7/S1 increased from 3.7 ± 0.1 mm to 6.0 ± 0.1 mm, and mean lumbosacral angle (LSa) from 148.0 ± 1.1° to 170.0 ± 1.1° after MTV. CT measurements were available 1 year postoperatively in 12 cases: ForL: 41.2 ± 3.1 mm 2 ; ForR: 37.9 ± 3.1 mm 2 ; EDmd: 4.3 ± 0.4 mm, and LSa 157.6 ± 2.1° (values are mean and standard error of mean =  SEM). All 39 dogs with long-term follow-up improved by at least 1 neurologic grade, 9/39 improving by 3 grades, 15/39 by 2 grades, and 15/39 by 1 grade. MTV results in clinical improvement and morphometric enlargement of the foraminal area in dogs with variable degrees of foraminal stenosis. MTV may be a valuable minimally invasive option for treatment of dogs with DLSS. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. High prevalence of cranial asymmetry exists in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Megan; Gorbutt, Kimberly A; Peethambaran, Ammanath; Yang, Lynda; Nelson, Virginia S; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu

    2016-11-30

    This study aimed to: 1) evaluate the prevalence of cranial asymmetry (positional plagiocephaly) in infants with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP); 2) examine the association of patient demographics, arm function, and NBPP-related factors to positional plagiocephaly; and 3) determine percentage of spontaneous recovery from positional plagiocephaly and its association with arm function. Infants plagio group), including infants with resolved positional plagiocephaly (plagio-resolved subgroup); and 2) those who never had positional plagiocephaly (non-plagio group). Standard statistics were applied. Eighteen of 28 infants (64%) had positional plagiocephaly. Delivery type might be predictive for plagiocephaly. Infants in the non-plagio group exhibited more active range of motion than infants in the plagio group. All other factors had no significant correlations. A high prevalence of positional plagiocephaly exists among the NBPP population examined. Parents and physicians should encourage infants to use their upper extremities to change position and reduce chance of cranial asymmetry.

  14. Risk factors for brachial plexus injury in a large cohort with shoulder dystocia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Katherine A; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Caughey, Aaron B

    2016-11-01

    To examine birthweight and other predictors of brachial plexus injury (BPI) among births complicated by shoulder dystocia. A retrospective cohort study of term births complicated by shoulder dystocia in California between 1997 and 2006. Birthweight at time of delivery was stratified into 500-g intervals. Women were further stratified by diabetes status, parity, and race/ethnicity. The perinatal outcome of BPI was assessed. This study included 62,762 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, of which 3168 (5 %) resulted in BPI. The association between birthweight and BPI remained significant regardless of confounders. Each increasing birthweight interval was associated with an increasing risk of BPI compared with 3000-3499-g birthweight. Race/ethnicity, diabetes, and parity were also independently associated with BPI. Increasing birthweight increases the risk of BPI among births with shoulder dystocia, independent of advanced maternal age, race, parity, gestational diabetes, or operative vaginal delivery.

  15. Contribution of denervated muscle to contractures after neonatal brachial plexus injury: not just muscle fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Liangjun, Hu; Tuttle, Lori J; Weekley, Holly; Christopher, Wylie; Lieber, Richard L; Cornwall, Roger

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the contribution of muscle fibrosis to elbow flexion contractures in a murine model of neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI). Four weeks after NBPI, biceps and brachialis fibrosis were assessed histologically and compared with the timing of contracture development and the relative contribution of each muscle to contractures. Modulus of elasticity and hydroxyproline (collagen) content were measured and correlated with contracture severity. The effect of halofuginone antifibrotic therapy on fibrosis and contractures was investigated. Elbow contractures preceded muscle fibrosis development. The brachialis was less fibrotic than the biceps, yet contributed more to contractures. Modulus and hydroxyproline content increased in both elbow flexors, but neither correlated with contracture severity. Halofuginone reduced biceps fibrosis but did not reduce contracture severity. Contractures after NBPI cannot be explained solely by muscle fibrosis, arguing for investigation of alternate pathophysiologic targets for contracture prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Preoperative diagnosis of tumors of the brachial plexus by use of computed tomography in three dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, R.J.; Feeney, D.A.; Lipowitz, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    Three dogs with forelimb lameness of 3 months' to 1 year's duration were examined by computed tomography and determined to have a tumor of the brachial plexus. In each case, the clinician had been unable to determine the cause of lameness by other means, and in 2 dogs, surgery had been performed on the affected limb for unrelated conditions prior to diagnosis of the tumor. Computed tomography was performed by use of a third-generation scanner, with dogs under general anesthesia and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Intravenous contrast enhancement with iodinated contrast material was used to help differentiate vascular structures, and a 5-mm scanning width allowed detection of small tumors. In all dogs, approximate tumor location in the transverse plane, invasiveness, and relationship to surrounding structures compared favorably between computed tomographic images and surgical findings

  17. Choroid plexus papilloma in an adult ewe – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose María González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary neoplasms of the central nervous system have been rarely reported in sheep. A three-year-old Rasa Aragonesa ewe was admitted to the small ruminant external consultancy at the Veterinary Faculty of University of Zaragoza, Spain. Clinical, haematological and neurological examinations were performed. Neurological examination showed signs of ataxia, hyperextension of the right front limb and abnormal postural reactions. The animal was unable to stand and walk, even with help. Patellar and flexor reflexes were normal and superficial sensation was present but decreased. Humanitarian sacrifice was carried out one month later. Gross and histopathological findings revealed a choroid plexus papilloma located in the fourth ventricle of the brain. To the authors’ knowledge this is the first description of this neoplastic disorder in sheep.

  18. Preoperative interscalene brachial plexus block aids in perioperative temperature management during arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Se Hun; Lee, Wonjin; Park, JaeGwan; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Cho, Kwangrae; Lee, Jeong Han; Cheong, Soon Ho; Lee, Kun Moo

    2016-08-01

    Hypothermia is common during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under general anesthesia, and anesthetic-impaired thermoregulation is thought to be the major cause of hypothermia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind study was designed to compare perioperative temperature during arthroscopic shoulder surgery with interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) followed by general anesthesia vs. general anesthesia alone. Patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were randomly allocated to receive IBPB followed by general anesthesia (group GB, n = 20) or general anesthesia alone (group GO, n = 20), and intraoperative and postoperative body temperatures were measured. The initial body temperatures were 36.5 ± 0.3℃ vs. 36.4 ± 0.4℃ in group GB vs. GO, respectively (P = 0.215). The body temperature at 120 minutes after induction of anesthesia was significantly higher in group GB than in group GO (35.8 ± 0.3℃ vs. 34.9 ± 0.3℃; P shoulder surgery.

  19. Interscalene plexus block versus general anaesthesia for shoulder surgery: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lars J; Loosen, Gregor; Weiss, Christel; Schmittner, Marc D

    2015-02-01

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB), general anaesthesia (GA) and the combination of both anaesthetic methods (GA + ISB) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. From July 2011 until May 2012, 120 patients (male/female), aged 20-80 years, were allocated randomly to receive ISB (10 ml mepivacaine 1 % and 20 ml ropivacaine 0.375%), GA (propofol, sunfentanil, desflurane) or ISB + GA. The primary outcome variable was opioid consumption at the day of surgery. Anaesthesia times were analysed as secondary endpoints. After surgery, 27 of 40 patients with a single ISB bypassed the recovery room (p surgery [GA: n = 25 vs. GA + ISB: n = 10 vs. ISB: n = 10, p = 0.0037]. ISB is superior to GA and GA + ISB in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in terms of faster recovery and analgesics consumption.

  20. Karakteristik dan Faktor Risiko Obstetrical Brachial Plexus Palsy pada Bayi Baru Lahir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Vincent Handoyo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP is an injury of entire or part of brachial plexus correlated with delivery process. Incidence in developing countries is around 0.15%. Risk factors include intrapartum and intrauterine. Three types of OBPP are Duchenne Erb, Klumpke, and whole arm palsy. This was a retrospective study of characteristic and risk factors of OBPP in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, period January 2002-April 2007. Data were collected from perinatology ward medical records, and analyzed using binary logistic regression. OBPP incidence was 0.141%. All were Erb palsy and single pregnancy, 68.75% were head-occiput posterior presentation, 50% were spontaneous birth, 18.75% had meconeal staining, 62.5% had birth weight ≥3,500 g, 56.25% were male, 68.75% asphyxia, 12.5% shoulder dystocia, and 6.25% clavicle fracture. Risk factors significantly correlated were foot presentation (OR 9.357; 95%CI, transverse fetal position (OR 5.136; 95%CI, vacuum, forceps, breech/foot extraction (OR 5.240;95%CI, 4.320; 95%CI, 14.411; 95%CI, respectively, birth weight 3,500-3,999 g (OR 4.571;95%CI, birth weight ≥4,500 g (OR 57.759; 95%CI, asphyxia (ORs 5.992; 95%CI, and severe asphyxia (OR 6.094; 95%CI. Sectio cesarea tend to have protective effect {OR 0.244; 95%CI; p=0.062 (>0.05}. The important risk factors of OBPP are foot presentation, breech/foot extraction, and birth weight >4,500 g.

  1. C8 cross transfer for the treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion in three dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moissonnier, Pierre; Carozzo, Claude; Thibaut, Jean-Laurent; Escriou, Catherine; Hidalgo, Antoine; Blot, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the cervical nerve 8 cross-transfer technique (C8CT) as a part of surgical treatment of caudal brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) in the dog. Case series. Client-owned dogs suspected to have caudal BPA based on neurological examination and electrophysiological testing (n = 3). The distal stump of the surgically transected contralateral C8 ventral branch (donor) was bridged to the proximal stump of the avulsed C8 ventral branch (recipient) and secured with 9-0 polypropylene suture under an operating microscope. A carpal panarthrodesis was performed on the injured limb after C8CT. Surgical exploration confirmed avulsion of nerve roots C7, C8, and T1 in all cases. There was no evidence of an iatrogenic effect on the donor forelimb. Gradual improvement in function of the affected forelimb occurred in all dogs, with eventual recovery of voluntary elbow extension. Reinnervation was evident in EMG recordings 6 months postoperatively in all three dogs. Stimulation of the donor C8 ventral branch led to motor evoked potentials in the avulsed side triceps brachialis and radial carpus extensor muscles. Variable functional outcome was observed in the 3 dogs during clinical evaluation 3-4 years after surgery. Digital abrasion wounds, distal interphalangeal infectious arthritis, and self-mutilation necessitated distal phalanx amputation of digits 3 and 4 in 2 dogs. C8CT provided partial reconnection of the donor C8 ventral branch to the avulsed brachial plexus in the 3 dogs of this series. Reinnervation resulted in active elbow extension and promoted functional recovery in the affected limb. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  2. A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Brachial Plexus Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marie T; Daluiski, Aaron; Dy, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Patients with brachial plexus injury (BPI) and their family members contribute to Internet discussion groups dedicated to BPI. We hypothesized that a thematic analysis of posts from BPI Internet discussion groups would reveal common themes related to the BPI patient experience, providing topics for patient education and counseling. Internet discussion boards were identified using the search term "brachial plexus injury support group" in Google, Bing, and Yahoo! search engines. Two discussion boards had substantially more posts than other Web sites and were chosen for analyses. Posts from January 1, 2015, through January 1, 2016, were examined. Using an iterative and established process, 2 investigators (M.T.M. and C.J.D) independently analyzed each post using thematic analysis in 3 steps (open coding, axial coding, and selective coding) to determine common themes. In this process, each post was reviewed 3 times. A total of 328 posts from the 2 leading discussion boards were analyzed. Investigators reached a consensus on themes for all posts. One central theme focused on emotional aspects of BPI. Four other central themes regarding information support were identified: BPI disease, BPI treatment, recovery after BPI treatment, and process of seeking care for BPI. Examination of posts on Internet support groups for BPI revealed recurring concerns, questions, and opinions of patients and their family members. The most common themes related to disease information, treatment, recovery, and the emotional element of BPI. These findings provide a helpful starting point in refining topics for patient education and support that are targeted on patients' interests and concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel rat model of brachial plexus injury with nerve root stumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jintao; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Li, Liang; Qin, Bengang; He, Wenting; Yan, Liwei; Chen, Gang; Tu, Zhehui; Liu, Xiaolin; Gu, Liqiang

    2018-02-01

    The C5-C6 nerve roots are usually spared from avulsion after brachial plexus injury (BPI) and thus can be used as donors for nerve grafting. To date, there are no appropriate animal models to evaluate spared nerve root stumps. Hence, the aim of this study was to establish and evaluate a rat model with spared nerve root stumps in BPI. In rupture group, the proximal parts of C5-T1 nerve roots were held with the surrounding muscles and the distal parts were pulled by a sudden force after the brachial plexus was fully exposed, and the results were compared with those of sham group. To validate the model, the lengths of C5-T1 spared nerve root stumps were measured and the histologies of the shortest one and the corresponding spinal cord were evaluated. C5 nerve root stump was found to be the shortest. Histology findings demonstrated that the nerve fibers became more irregular and the continuity decreased; numbers and diameters of myelinated axons and thickness of myelin sheaths significantly decreased over time. The survival of motoneurons was reduced, and the death of motoneurons may be related to the apoptotic process. Our model could successfully create BPI model with nerve root stumps by traction, which could simulate injury mechanisms. While other models involve root avulsion or rupturing by distal nerve transection. This model would be suitable for evaluating nerve root stumps and testing new therapeutic strategies for neuroprotection through nerve root stumps in the future. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Assessment tools used by occupational therapists in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaianny Taís Dantas de Brito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy (OBPP is a result of brachial plexus injury at birth and may cause dysfunction of the affected upper limb, reflecting significantly in the child’s life. When evaluating a child with OBPP the occupational therapist can use evaluation tools, and has to have knowledge to choose and apply the most appropriate instrument. Objective: This review aimed to analyze the literature on the use of evaluation tools by occupational therapists in children with OBPP. Method: The search for articles was performed in the databases Scirus, Cinahl, Medline, Psycinfo, Scopus and Lilacs using the following selection criteria: studies with 0-12 years old children with OBPP in English, Portuguese and Spanish, published in the last 10 years, with the occupational therapist as one of the authors and/or reporting the application of the instrument by this professional. Results: There were 15 studies from six countries that reported 17 evaluation instruments, five of which, recently developed, were specific to this clientele. The study did not identify the need to modify the non-specific instruments to the application in children with OBPP, demonstrating that they can be used in its original format, facilitating the use in the clinical practice. Most instruments included aspects related to occupational performance inserted in the field of Activity and Participation of the International Classification of Functioning, indicating the concern of this professional in suiting the assessment process of the child with the OBPP to the current paradigm of health understanding and occupational therapy field.

  5. Value of computed tomography for evaluating the injection site in endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Hiroki; Kitano, Masayuki; Nishio, Takeshi; Takeyama, Yoshifumi; Yasuda, Chikao; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2006-01-01

    Endosonography-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) safely and effectively relieves pain associated with intra-abdominal malignancies when the neurolytic is accurately injected. We applied contrast medium to evaluate the ethanol injection sites in patients who received EUS-CPN due to abdominal pain caused by malignancies. We injected, under the guidance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS), ethanol containing 10% contrast medium into the celiac plexus of patients with intra-abdominal pain due to malignancies. Immediately after the endoscopic therapy, patients underwent computed tomography (CT) to confirm the injection site. Images of distribution of injected solutions were classified into three groups. Injected solution dispersed in unilateral and bilateral anterocrural space was defined as ''unilateral injection'' or bilateral injection'', respectively. Injected solution located out of the anterocrural space was defined as ''inappropriate injection''. Pre- and postprocedure pain was assessed using a standard analog scale. Before and 2, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks after the procedure, pain scores were evaluated. From April 2003 to May 2005, 13 patients were enrolled in this study. Improvement of pain score in the ''bilateral injection'' and ''unilateral injection'' groups was significantly superior to the change in the ''inappropriate injection'' group. Although EUS-CPN was effective in eight of 13 patients (61.5%), additional EUS-CPN to the ''inappropriate injection group'' increased the response rate to 84.6%. Injection of ethanol to the anterocrural space by EUS-CPN produced adequate pain relief. Immediate examination by CT for confirmation of injection sites after EUS-CPN would increase the likelihood of induction of pain relief. (author)

  6. CT-guided celiac plexus block with absolute alcohol : the anterior approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Lee, Mi Suk; Jang, Young Ik; Kim, Jeong Hoi; Ym, Seong Hee; Lee, Jin Hee; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Choi, Ki Chul

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CT-guided celiac plexus block (CPB) using an anterior approach, and to determine the role of CT in this procedure. CPB was attempted in 15 patients(10 men and 5 women;mean age, 62.3 years) with intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancy of the pancreas, liver, bowel,and kidney. To permit an anterior approach, patients lied supine on the CT scan table during the procedure. One or two 21-guage needles were placed just anterior to the diaphragmatic crus at or between the levels of the celiac and superior mesenteric arteries and 10-40ml of 99.9% alcohol was injected. Pain relief following the procedure was assessed and pain was graded on a visual analogue scale (VAS) from 0 to 10. There were no technical failures and no neurologic or hemorrhagic complications. Abdominal pain during alcohol injection occurred in all patients, and transient hypotension in three. One patient with recurrent cancer of the pancreatic head died of sepsis five days after the procedure;the cause of sepsis was difficult to determine, but there was thought to be a biliary source of infection. Two days after block, 13 of 15 procedures(86.7%) had produced at least partial pain relief;in 12 patients, relief was good. With CT guidance, more directed positioning of the needle is possible, allowing alcohol to be deposited in specific ganglion areas. CT-guided celiac plexus block using an anterior approach was an easy and effective way of reducing intractable upper abdominal pain due to terminal malignancies. CT guidance allowed precise needle placement and a safer procedure

  7. Fluorescein-methotrexate transport in dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baehr, Carsten H; Fricker, Gert; Miller, David S

    2006-08-01

    The vertebrate choroid plexus removes potentially toxic metabolites and xenobiotics from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to blood for subsequent excretion in urine and bile. We used confocal microscopy and quantitative image analysis to characterize the mechanisms driving transport of the large organic anion, fluorescein-methotrexate (FL-MTX), from bath (CSF-side) to blood vessels in intact lateral choroid plexus from dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, an evolutionarily ancient vertebrate. With 2 microM FL-MTX in the bath, steady-state fluorescence in the subepithelium/vascular space exceeded bath levels by 5- to 10-fold, and fluorescence in the epithelial cells was slightly below bath levels. FL-MTX accumulation in both tissue compartments was reduced by NaCN, Na removal, and ouabain, but not by a 10-fold increase in medium K. Certain organic anions, e.g., probenecid, MTX, and taurocholate, reduced FL-MTX accumulation in both tissue compartments; p-aminohippurate and estrone sulfate reduced subepithelial/vascular accumulation, but not cellular accumulation. At low concentrations, digoxin, leukotriene C4, and MK-571 reduced fluorescence in the subepithelium/vascular space while increasing cellular fluorescence, indicating preferential inhibition of efflux over uptake. In the presence of 10 microM digoxin (reduced efflux, enhanced cellular accumulation), cellular FL-MTX accumulation was specific, concentrative, and Na dependent. Thus transepithelial FL-MTX transport involved the following two carrier-mediated steps: electroneutral, Na-dependent uptake at the apical membrane and electroneutral efflux at the basolateral membrane. Finally, FL-MTX accumulation in both tissue compartments was reduced by phorbol ester and increased by forskolin, indicating antagonistic modulation by protein kinase C and protein kinase A.

  8. Collagen nerve guides for surgical repair of brachial plexus birth injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, William W; Weatherly, Trisha; Park, Tae Sung

    2006-12-01

    Standard brachial plexus repair techniques often involve autologous nerve graft placement and neurotization. However, when performed to treat severe injuries, this procedure can sometimes yield poor results. Moreover, harvesting the autologous graft is time-consuming and exposes the patient to additional surgical risks. To improve surgical outcomes and reduce surgical risks associated with autologous nerve graft retrieval and placement, the authors use collagen matrix tubes (Neurogen) instead of autologous nerve graft material. Between 1991 and 2005, the authors surgically treated 65 infants who had suffered brachial plexus injury at birth. During this time, seven patients were treated using collagen matrix tubes (Neurogen). This study is a retrospective analysis of the initial five patients who were treated using the tubes. Two patients underwent tube placement recently and were excluded from the analysis because of the inadequate follow-up period. Four of the five patients experienced a good recovery (motor scale composite [MSC] > 0.6), and three exhibited an excellent recovery (MSC > 0.75) at 2 years postoperatively. The MSC improved by an average of 69 and 78% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. The movement scores improved to greater than or equal to 50% range of motion in most patients, and the contractures were usually mild or moderate. Follow-up physical and occupational therapy evaluations confirm these patients' functional status. When last seen, four of five of these children could feed and dress themselves. Technically, the use of the collagen matrix tubes was straightforward and efficient, and there were no complications. The outcomes in this small series are encouraging.

  9. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep

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    Safoura Ghadirian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg-1 (LID, n = 6, lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with epinephrine 5 μg mL-1 (LIDEP, n = 6 or lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with xylazine 0.05 mg kg-1 (LIDXY, n = 6. Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg-1 for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

  10. External evaluation of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group brachial plexus contouring protocol: several issues identified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Myo; Carruthers, Scott; Zanchetta, Lydia; Roos, Daniel; Keating, Elly; Shakeshaft, John; Baxi, Siddhartha; Penniment, Michael; Wong, Karen

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate interobserver variability in contouring the brachial plexus (BP) using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-approved protocol and to analyse BP dosimetries. Seven outliners independently contoured the BPs of 15 consecutive patients. Interobserver variability was reviewed qualitatively (visually by using planning axial computed-tomography images and anteroposterior digitally reconstructed radiographs) and quantitatively (by volumetric and statistical analyses). Dose–volume histograms of BPs were calculated and compared. We found significant interobserver variability among outliners in both qualitative and quantitative analyses. These were most pronounced for the T1 nerve roots on visual inspection and for the BP volume on statistical analysis. The BP volumes were smaller than those described in the RTOG atlas paper, with a mean volume of 20.8cc (range 11–40.7 cc) compared with 33±4cc (25.1–39.4cc). The average values of mean dose, maximum dose, V60Gy, V66Gy and V70Gy for patients treated with conventional radiotherapy and IMRT were 42.2Gy versus 44.8Gy, 64.5Gy versus 68.5Gy, 6.1% versus 7.6%, 2.9% versus 2.4% and 0.6% versus 0.3%, respectively. This is the first independent external evaluation of the published protocol. We have identified several issues, including significant interobserver variation. Although radiation oncologists should contour BPs to avoid dose dumping, especially when using IMRT, the RTOG atlas should be used with caution. Because BPs are largely radiologically occult on CT, we propose the term brachial-plexus regions (BPRs) to represent regions where BPs are likely to be present. Consequently, BPRs should in principle be contoured generously.

  11. The surface topography of the choroid plexus. Environmental, low and high vacuum scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Pedro; Pütz, Norbert; Garcia Gómez de Las Heras, Soledad; García Poblete, Eduardo; Morguet, Andrea; Laue, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) allows the examination of hydrated and dried specimens without a conductive metal coating which could be advantageous in the imaging of biological and medical objects. The aim of this study was to assess the performance and benefits of wet-mode and low vacuum ESEM in comparison to high vacuum scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using the choroid plexus of chicken embryos as a model, an organ of the brain involved in the formation of cerebrospinal fluid in vertebrates. Specimens were fixed with or without heavy metals and examined directly or after critical point drying with or without metal coating. For wet mode ESEM freshly excised specimens without any pre-treatment were also examined. Conventional high vacuum SEM revealed the characteristic morphology of the choroid plexus cells at a high resolution and served as reference. With low vacuum ESEM of dried but uncoated samples the structure appeared well preserved but charging was a problem. It could be reduced by a short beam dwell time and averaging of images or by using the backscattered electron detector instead of the gaseous secondary electron detector. However, resolution was lower than with conventional SEM. Wet mode imaging was only possible with tissue that had been stabilized by fixation. Not all surface details (e.g. microvilli) could be visualized and other structures, like the cilia, were deformed. In summary, ESEM is an additional option for the imaging of bio-medical samples but it is problematic with regard to resolution and sample stability during imaging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. MafB is required for development of the hindbrain choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshida, Ryusuke; Oishi, Hisashi; Hamada, Michito; Takei, Yosuke; Takahashi, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    The choroid plexus (ChP) is a non-neural epithelial tissue that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The ChP differentiates from the roof plate, a dorsal midline structure of the neural tube. However, molecular mechanisms underlying ChP development are poorly understood compared to neural development. MafB is a bZip transcription factor that is known to be expressed in the roof plate. Here we investigated the role of MafB in embryonic development of the hindbrain ChP (hChP) using Mafb-deficient mice. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that MafB is expressed in the roof plate and early hChP epithelial cells but its expression disappears at a later embryonic stage. We also found that the Mafb-deficient hChP exhibits delayed differentiation and results in hypoplasia compared to the wild-type hChP. Furthermore, the Mafb-deficient hChP exhibits increased apoptotic cell death and decreased proliferating cells at E12.5, an early stage of hChP development. Collectively, our findings reveal that MafB play an important role in promoting hChP development during embryogenesis. - Highlights: • MafB is expressed in the roof plate and the early hindbrain choroid plexus (hChP). • Loss of MafB causes delayed differentiation and hypoplasia of the embryonic hChP. • The Mafb-deficient hChP exhibits increased apoptosis and decreased proliferation.

  13. Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles Highlight Early Involvement of the Choroid Plexus in Central Nervous System Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Millward

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation during multiple sclerosis involves immune cell infiltration and disruption of the BBB (blood–brain barrier. Both processes can be visualized by MRI (magnetic resonance imaging, in multiple sclerosis patients and in the animal model EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We previously showed that VSOPs (very small superparamagnetic iron oxide particles reveal CNS (central nervous system lesions in EAE which are not detectable by conventional contrast agents in MRI. We hypothesized that VSOP may help detect early, subtle inflammatory events that would otherwise remain imperceptible. To investigate the capacity of VSOP to reveal early events in CNS inflammation, we induced EAE in SJL mice using encephalitogenic T-cells, and administered VSOP prior to onset of clinical symptoms. In parallel, we administered VSOP to mice at peak disease, and to unmanipulated controls. We examined the distribution of VSOP in the CNS by MRI and histology. Prior to disease onset, in asymptomatic mice, VSOP accumulated in the choroid plexus and in spinal cord meninges in the absence of overt inflammation. However, VSOP was undetectable in the CNS of non-immunized control mice. At peak disease, VSOP was broadly distributed; we observed particles in perivascular inflammatory lesions with apparently preserved glia limitans. Moreover, at peak disease, VSOP was prominent in the choroid plexus and was seen in elongated endothelial structures, co-localized with phagocytes, and diffusely disseminated in the parenchyma, suggesting multiple entry mechanisms of VSOP into the CNS. Thus, using VSOP we were able to discriminate between inflammatory events occurring in established EAE and, importantly, we identified CNS alterations that appear to precede immune cell infiltration and clinical onset.

  14. (125I)LSD labels 5-TCsub(IC) recognition sites in pig choriod plexus membranes. Comparison with (3H)mesulergine and (3H)5-HT binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, D.; Srivatsa, S.; Pazos, A.; Engel, G.; Palacios, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The mammalian choroid plexus is enriched in a newly described serotonin recognition site, the binding characteristics of ( 125 I)LSD, ( 3 H)mesulergine and ( 3 H)serotonin to pig choroid plexus membranes were compared. These ligands labelled with high affinity a similar number of sites. The binding profiles of the sites labelled with these radioligands are indistinguishable as illustrated by highly significant correlation parameters. These sites are very similar to those labelled by Nsub(I)-methyl-2-( 125 I)LSD in pig and rat choroid plexus membranes. The data demonstrate that these ligands label 5-HTsub(IC) recognition sites in the pig and rat choroid plexus membranes. (author)

  15. Bilateral spontaneous thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus; A rare etiology of acute scrotal pain: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ktari Kamel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute testicular pain is frequent in urology. If torsion of the spermatic cord and orchiepididymites are usual, thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus is a very uncommon clinical entity. We present an unusual case and review the literature to explore potential etiologies and therapeutic strategies. Observation: A rare case of bilateral thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus occurred in a 39 year-old male.The diagnosis was confirmed with doppler sonographie and Computer Tomography. Urethral infection and protein C deficiency were found as associated factors. The treatment was conservative with good result. Conclusions: Anatomical factors are probably responsible for almost exclusive involvement of the left side. However, coagulation abnormalities and retroperitoneal tumors or absence of inferior vena cava must be sought especially in cases of right side or bilateral thrombosis of the pampiniform plexus. The management of pampiniform plexus thrombosis remains non surgical based on symptomatic treatment with good clinical and radiological evolution. Keywords: Thrombosis, Varicocele, Pain, Thrombophilia

  16. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelein Vitringa, V. M.; van Kooten, E.O.; Jaspers, R.T.; Mullender, M.G.; Loogman, M.H.; van der Sluijs, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study

  17. The diagnostic accuracy of 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging for detecting root avulsions in traumatic adult brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Ryckie G; Itte, Vinay; Rankine, James J; Ridgway, John P; Bourke, Grainne

    2018-03-01

    Identification of root avulsions is of critical importance in traumatic brachial plexus injuries because it alters the reconstruction and prognosis. Pre-operative magnetic resonance imaging is gaining popularity, but there is limited and conflicting data on its diagnostic accuracy for root avulsion. This cohort study describes consecutive patients requiring brachial plexus exploration following trauma between 2008 and 2016. The index test was magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5 Tesla and the reference test was operative exploration of the supraclavicular plexus. Complete data from 29 males was available. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 79%. The diagnostic accuracy of a pseudomeningocoele as a surrogate marker of root avulsion(s) of C5-T1 was 68%. We conclude that pseudomeningocoles were not a reliable sign of root avulsion and magnetic resonance imaging has modest diagnostic accuracy for root avulsions in the context of adult traumatic brachial plexus injuries. III.

  18. Olbrzymi brodawczak splotu naczyniówkowego – opis przypadku = Giant choroid plexus papilloma – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Woźniak

    2016-08-01

    Kamila Woźniak1, Dorota Ratuszek-Sadowska2, Agnieszka Nowacka1, Maciej Śniegocki1    1.        Klinika Neurochirurgii, Neurotraumatologii i Neurochirurgii Dziecięcej, Collegium Medicum im. Ludwika Rydygiera w Bydgoszczy, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu 2.        Katedra i Klinika Rehabilitacji, Collegium Medicum im. Ludwika Rydygiera w Bydgoszczy, Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika w Toruniu       Streszczenie   Brodawczak splotu naczyniówkowego (ang. choroid plexus papilloma to rzadki nowotwór ośrodkowego układu nerwowego, wywodzący się z nabłonka splotu naczyniówkowego układu komorowego mózgowia. W 50% przypadków rozwija się w komorze bocznej, w 40% w komorze IV i w 5% w komorze III. Guzy splotu naczyniówkowego występują przede wszystkim w 1. dekadzie życia. Guz produkuje płyn mózgowo - rdzeniowy, co przyczynia się do wodogłowia i nadciśnienia śródczaszkowego. Histologicznie zbudowany jest ze struktur brodawkowatych, utworzonych przez cylindrycznego kształtu komórki spoczywające na błonie podstawnej. Autorzy przedstawiają opis przypadku klinicznego chorej leczonej operacyjnie w Klinice Neurochirurgii, Neurotraumatologii i Neurochirurgii Dziecięcej Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego nr 1 im. dr A. Jurasza w Bydgoszczy z rozpoznanym w badaniu histopatologicznym brodawczakiem splotu naczyniówkowego.   Słowa kluczowe: brodawczak splotu naczyniówkowego, nowotwór, ośrodkowy układ nerwowy, neurochirurgia.   Abstract   Choroid plexus papilloma is a rare cancer of the central nervous system, derived from epithelial cells of the choroid plexus of the ventricular system of the brain. In 50% of cases resolve the side chamber, and in 40% in the fourth chamber and 5% in the third ventricle. Choroid plexus tumors occur primarily in the first decade of life. The tumor produces cerebrospinal fluid, which contributes to hydrocephalus and brain edema. Histologically is built with papillary structures formed by the

  19. Vascular endothelial growth factor gene therapy improves nerve regeneration in a model of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Matthias; Holzbach, Thomas; Matiasek, Kaspar; Schlegel, Jürgen; Giunta, Riccardo E

    2015-03-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy has been limited to conservative therapies and surgical reconstruction of peripheral nerves. In addition to the damage of the brachial plexus itself, it also leads to a loss of the corresponding motoneurons in the spinal cord, which raises the need for supportive strategies that take the participation of the central nervous system into account. Based on the protective and regenerative effects of VEGF on neural tissue, our aim was to analyse the effect on nerve regeneration by adenoviral gene transfer of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in postpartum nerve injury of the brachial plexus in rats. In the present study, we induced a selective crush injury to the left spinal roots C5 and C6 in 18 rats within 24 hours after birth and examined the effect of VEGF-gene therapy on nerve regeneration. For gene transduction an adenoviral vector encoding for VEGF165 (AdCMV.VEGF165) was used. In a period of 11 weeks, starting 3 weeks post-operatively, functional regeneration was assessed weekly by behavioural analysis and force measurement of the upper limb. Morphometric evaluation was carried out 8 months post-operatively and consisted of a histological examination of the deltoid muscle and the brachial plexus according to defined criteria of degeneration. In addition, atrophy of the deltoid muscle was evaluated by weight determination comparing the left with the right side. VEGF expression in the brachial plexus was quantified by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Furthermore the motoneurons of the spinal cord segment C5 were counted comparing the left with the right side. On the functional level, VEGF-treated animals showed faster nerve regeneration. It was found less degeneration and smaller mass reduction of the deltoid muscle in VEGF-treated animals. We observed significantly less degeneration of the brachial plexus and a greater number of surviving motoneurons (P reason for these effects. The clinical use

  20. Comparative study of phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Gao, Kaiming; Gu, Yudong; Zhao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Nerve transfer is a valuable surgical technique in peripheral nerve reconstruction, especially in brachial plexus injuries. Phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion was proved to be one of the optimal procedures in the treatment of brachial plexus injuries in the study of Gu et al. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion brachial plexus injury was carried out. All the 33 patients were confirmed to have global root avulsion brachial plexus injury by preoperative and intraoperative electromyography (EMG), physical examination and especially by intraoperative exploration. There were two types of phrenic nerve transfers: type1 - the phrenic nerve to anterolateral bundle of anterior division of upper trunk (14 patients); type 2 - the phrenic nerve via nerve graft to anterolateral bundle of musculocutaneous nerve (19 patients). Motor function and EMG evaluation were performed at least 3 years after surgery. The efficiency of motor function in type 1 was 86%, while it was 84% in type 2. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of Medical Research Council (MRC) grade (p=1.000) and EMG results (p=1.000). There were seven patients with more than 4 month's delay of surgery, among whom only three patients regained biceps power to M3 strength or above (43%). A total of 26 patients had reconstruction done within 4 months, among whom 25 patients recovered to M3 strength or above (96%). There was a statistically significant difference of motor function between the delay of surgery within 4 months and more than 4 months (p=0.008). Phrenic nerve transfers with and without nerve graft for elbow flexion after brachial plexus injury had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation according to MRC grading and EMG. A delay of the surgery

  1. Bed wise cost analysis of in-patient treatment of brachial plexus injury at a Level I trauma Center in India

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, Nityanand; Gupta, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok; Harshvardhan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to calculate, in monetary terms, total cost incurred by a Level I trauma center in providing in-patient care to brachial plexus injury patients during their preoperative and the postoperative stay. Subjects and Methods: All patients of brachial plexus injury admitted and discharged between January and December 2010 were included in the study. Total cost per bed was calculated under several cost heads in pre- and post-operative ward care. Intra-operative costs were excluded. R...

  2. A study of the formation and branching pattern of brachial plexus and its variations in adult human cadavers of north Karnataka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal V Pattanshetti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: The brachial plexus is highly variable, in its formation and branching pattern thus, knowledge of its anatomical patterns, may be insufficient for the surgeon operating on or around these nerves or for the regional anesthesiologist working in this area. Therefore, the present study was an attempt to study further about variations of brachial plexus encountered during routine dissection classes. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was carried out by dissection of 60 upper limbs of 30 cadavers, in the age group of 18 to 85 years, obtained during a study period of 2 years from the Department of Anatomy. The plexus was studied in its entire course commencing from the formation in cervical region, course through root of the neck and axilla, up to the main terminal branches of the upper extremity. During the dissection, variations of brachial plexus pertaining to its formation from the roots, trunks, divisions and cords and the branching pattern were observed and data was collected. Results: Out of the 60 cadaveric upper limbs studied for the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus, 2 limbs (3.33% were pre-fixed plexuses. Fusion of adjacent trunks was detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. Variations in branches of lateral cord were detected in 8 limbs (13.33%. Among Posterior cord variations 2-thoracodorsal nerves were detected in 2 limbs (3.33%. All the other branches from brachial plexus had been found to have no anatomical variations. Conclusion: In the present study, an attempt has been made to know the possible variations of the brachial plexus. Though the variations mentioned may not alter the normal functioning of the limb of the individual, but knowledge of the variations is of prime importance to be kept in mind, during anaesthetic and surgical procedures.

  3. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies

  4. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: amchen@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Wang, Pin-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Vijayakumar, Srinivasan [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Mississippi School of Medicine, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Farwell, D. Gregory [Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  5. Effects of anatomic conformation on three-dimensional motion of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Monika I; Seiler, Gabriela S; Robinson, Leanne E; Ferguson, Stephen J; Bonél, Harald M; Busato, André R; Lang, Johann

    2006-01-01

    To determine the association between the 3-dimensional (3-D) motion pattern of the caudal lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the canine vertebral column and the morphology of vertebrae, facet joints, and intervertebral disks. Vertebral columns of 9 German Shepherd Dogs and 16 dogs of other breeds with similar body weights and body conditions. Different morphometric parameters of the vertebral column were assessed by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging. Anatomic conformation and the 3-D motion pattern were compared, and correlation coefficients were calculated. Total range of motion for flexion and extension was mainly associated with the facet joint angle, the facet joint angle difference between levels of the vertebral column in the transverse plane on CT images, disk height, and lever arm length. Motion is a complex process that is influenced by the entire 3-D conformation of the lumbar portion of the vertebral column. In vivo dynamic measurements of the 3-D motion pattern of the lumbar and lumbosacral portions of the vertebral column will be necessary to further assess biomechanics that could lead to disk degeneration in dogs.

  6. The role of Gd-enhanced three-dimensional MRI fast low-angle shot (FLASH) in the evaluation of symptomatic lumbosacral nerve roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikkawa, Ichiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Saita, Kazuo; Ookami, Hitoshi; Nakama, Sueo; Hoshino, Yuichi [Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    In the field of lumbar spine disorders, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can clearly depict a lumbar nerve root from the distal region to the dorsal root ganglion. In this study, we used a gadoliniumdiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced-three-dimensional (3-D) fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence when examining lumbosacral disorders. The subjects were 33 patients (14 men and 19 women) in whom lumbosacral neural compression had been diagnosed clinically. Twenty-one patients had lumbar disc herniation, 11 had lumbar spinal stenosis, and 1 had lumbar radiculopathy caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Five subjects with low back pain were also studied as a control group. In all patients and in all 5 of the controls, the dorsal root ganglion of every root was enhanced clearly. There was no root enhancement in the 5 controls. Enhancement of the symptomatic nerve roots, caused by compression, was found in 11 of the 33 patients. All 11 patients had rediculopathy, and muscle weakness was more frequent in patients with enhanced nerve roots than in those without enhancement. There was no enhancement of the cauda equina, even in the patients with cauda syndrome. The enhancement effect may reflect some pathological condition of the compressed nerve root and needs to be studied further. (author)

  7. Suitability of cerebrospinal fluid as a signal-intensity reference on MRI: evaluation of signal-intensity variations in the lumbosacral dural sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luoma, E.K.; Luukkonen, R.; Riihimaeki, H.A.; Raininko, R.; Manninen, H.I.; Nummi, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The suitability of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the lumbosacral dural sac as an internal signal-intensity reference was studied on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine using a surface coil and motion artefact suppression technique. A signal-intensity reference is needed when signal is compared between images, studies or subjects. Homogeneity of the CSF was estimated visually on T2-weighted images of 60 subjects at 1.5 T and of another 60 subjects at 0.1 T. Spines with a severely narrowed dural sac or marked scoliosis were excluded from the study to avoid partial volume effect. CSF was homogeneous in 82% and 73% of the examinations at 1.5 T and 0.1 T, respectively. The type and location of the local inhomogeneities did not relate to local narrowings of the dural sac. The signal intensity of CSF was measured in 108 examinations at 0.1 T after correcting the spatially-dependent signal-intensity nonuniformities with a phantom-based method. The signal-intensity difference between the CSF in the upper and lower lumbar dural sac was less than 10% in 73% of the examinations. The CSF in the lumbosacral dural sac can be a useful signal-intensity reference for estimation of the signal of the adjacent structures in patients without severe narrowing of the dural sac or marked scoliosis. It may contribute to assessing spinal disease processes. (orig.). With 1 fig., 3 tabs

  8. The role of Gd-enhanced three-dimensional MRI fast low-angle shot (FLASH) in the evaluation of symptomatic lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikkawa, Ichiro; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Saita, Kazuo; Ookami, Hitoshi; Nakama, Sueo; Hoshino, Yuichi

    2001-01-01

    In the field of lumbar spine disorders, three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can clearly depict a lumbar nerve root from the distal region to the dorsal root ganglion. In this study, we used a gadoliniumdiethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) enhanced-three-dimensional (3-D) fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence when examining lumbosacral disorders. The subjects were 33 patients (14 men and 19 women) in whom lumbosacral neural compression had been diagnosed clinically. Twenty-one patients had lumbar disc herniation, 11 had lumbar spinal stenosis, and 1 had lumbar radiculopathy caused by rheumatoid arthritis. Five subjects with low back pain were also studied as a control group. In all patients and in all 5 of the controls, the dorsal root ganglion of every root was enhanced clearly. There was no root enhancement in the 5 controls. Enhancement of the symptomatic nerve roots, caused by compression, was found in 11 of the 33 patients. All 11 patients had rediculopathy, and muscle weakness was more frequent in patients with enhanced nerve roots than in those without enhancement. There was no enhancement of the cauda equina, even in the patients with cauda syndrome. The enhancement effect may reflect some pathological condition of the compressed nerve root and needs to be studied further. (author)

  9. CT-guided percutaneous ethanol nerve block therapy of celiac plexus embedded in metastatic lymph nodes for the treatment of intractable carcinomatous abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Qian; Wang Peijun; Shang Mingyi; Ma Jun; Lu Ying; Huang Zongliang; Tang Junjun; Gao Xiaolong

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate CT-guided percutaneous ethanol nerve block therapy of celiac plexus embedded in metastatic lymph nodes in treating intractable carcinomatous abdominal pain. Methods: A total of 104 patients with late stage cancers were enrolled in this study. All patients suffered from serious carcinomatous pain at upper abdomen and their retroperitoneal lymph nodes were extensively enlarged and fused, together with the involved celiac plexus, into a hard crumb. As the patients failed to respond to narcotic analgesics CT-guided ethanol nerve block therapy of celiac plexus was carried out by pushing the puncture needle through the fused lymphatic mass to celiac plexus site. The analgesic effects and complications were observed and the therapeutic results were evaluated. Results: The analgesic effective rate of ethanol nerve block therapy immediately after the procedure was 100%, and at 2 weeks, 1, 2, 3 and 4 months after the treatment it was 100%, 100%, 98.0%, 96.9% and 92.6%, respectively. No serious complications occurred during perioperative period. The living quality was markedly improved in all patients. Conclusion: For the treatment of intractable carcinomatous abdominal pain in patients with their celiac plexus being embedded in mass-like metastatic retroperitoneal lymph nodes CT-guided percutaneous ethanol nerve block therapy by pushing the puncture needle through the fused lymphatic mass to celiac plexus site is of great clinical value in relieving carcinomatous abdominal pain. (authors)

  10. Combined Sciatic and Lumbar Plexus Nerve Blocks for the Analgesic Management of Hip Arthroscopy Procedures: A Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, J Douglas; Morgan, Theodore Ross; Russell, Gregory B

    2017-06-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive alternative to open hip surgery. Despite its minimally invasive nature, there can still be significant reported pain following these procedures. The impact of combined sciatic and lumbar plexus nerve blocks on postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy was investigated. A retrospective analysis of 176 patients revealed that compared with patients with no preoperative peripheral nerve block, significant reductions in pain scores to 24 hours were reported and decreased opioid consumption during the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) stay was recorded; no significant differences in opioid consumption out to 24 hours were discovered. A subgroup analysis comparing two approaches to the sciatic nerve block in patients receiving the additional lumbar plexus nerve block failed to reveal a significant difference for this patient population. We conclude that peripheral nerve blockade can be a useful analgesic modality for patients undergoing hip arthroscopy.

  11. Unusual Branching Pattern of the Lateral Cord of the Brachial Plexus Associated with Neurovascular Compression; Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitendra K. Loh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus consists of a network of nerves that innervates the upper limbs and its musculature. We report a rare formation of the lateral cord of the brachial plexus observed during the dissection of a 47-year-old male cadaver at the Department of Anatomy, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, New Delhi, India, in 2016. The lateral cord was exceptionally long with twin lateral pectoral nerves and twin lateral roots of the median nerve. The proximal lateral root of the median nerve was thin in comparison to the medial root of the median nerve. The distal lateral root of the median nerve was thicker and followed an unusual course through the coracobrachialis muscle. In the lower third of the arm, the median nerve and the brachial artery—along with its vena comitans—spanned through the brachialis muscle. Surgeons, anaesthesiologists, radiologists and anatomists should be aware of such anatomical variations as they may result in neurovascular compression.

  12. Delayed vocal fold paralysis after continuous interscalene level brachial plexus block with catheter placement: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollapalli, Lakshman; McKelvey, George; Wang, Hong

    2014-08-01

    We report an incident of delayed onset of true vocal fold paralysis with continuous interscalene brachial plexus block. A 51 year old woman underwent left shoulder manipulation and lysis of adhesions with fluoroscopy and general anesthesia. An interscalene brachial plexus block was performed and a catheter with a continuous infusion pump was placed for postoperative pain control. Following hospital discharge, approximately 8 hours after the initial catheter bolus the patient developed hoarseness, dysphagia, and dyspnea, secondary to left vocal fold palsy. The patient was admitted for observation and the catheter was discontinued with no intubation required. By the next morning, the patient's dysphagia and dyspnea had resolved and her hoarseness improved. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Noninvasive in vivo optical characterization of blood flow and oxygen consumption in the superficial plexus of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liasi, Faezeh Talebi; Samatham, Ravikant; Jacques, Steven L.

    2017-11-01

    Assessing the metabolic activity of a tissue, whether normal, damaged, aged, or pathologic, is useful for diagnosis and evaluating the effects of drugs. This report describes a handheld optical fiber probe that contacts the skin, applies pressure to blanch the superficial vascular plexus of the skin, then releases the pressure to allow refill of the plexus. The optical probe uses white light spectroscopy to record the time dynamics of blanching and refilling. The magnitude and dynamics of changes in blood content and hemoglobin oxygen saturation yield an estimate of the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) in units of attomoles per cell per second. The average value of OCR on nine forearm sites on five subjects was 10±5 (amol/cell/s). This low-cost, portable, rapid, noninvasive optical probe can characterize the OCR of a skin site to assess the metabolic activity of the epidermis or a superficial lesion.

  14. Retropharyngeal Contralateral C7 Nerve Transfer to the Lower Trunk for Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Technique and Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Anthony T; Sparkman, Darlene M; van Belle, Christopher J; Yakuboff, Kevin P; Schwentker, Ann R

    2018-05-01

    Brachial plexus birth injuries with multiple nerve root avulsions present a particularly difficult reconstructive challenge because of the limited availability of donor nerves. The contralateral C7 has been described for brachial plexus reconstruction in adults but has not been well-studied in the pediatric population. We present our technique and results for retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer to the lower trunk for brachial plexus birth injury. We performed a retrospective review. Any child aged less than 2 years was included. Charts were analyzed for patient demographic data, operative variables, functional outcomes, complications, and length of follow-up. We had a total of 5 patients. Average nerve graft length was 3 cm. All patients had return of hand sensation to the ulnar nerve distribution as evidenced by a pinch test, unprompted use of the recipient limb without mirror movement, and an Active Movement Scale (AMS) of at least 2/7 for finger and thumb flexion; one patient had an AMS of 7/7 for finger and thumb flexion. Only one patient had return of ulnar intrinsic hand function with an AMS of 3/7. Two patients had temporary triceps weakness in the donor limb and one had clinically insignificant temporary phrenic nerve paresis. No complications were related to the retropharyngeal nerve dissection in any patient. Average follow-up was 3.3 years. The retropharyngeal contralateral C7 nerve transfer is a safe way to supply extra axons to the severely injured arm in brachial plexus birth injuries with no permanent donor limb deficits. Early functional recovery in these patients, with regard to hand function and sensation, is promising. Therapeutic V. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Advanced radiological work-up as an adjunct to decision in early reconstructive surgery in brachial plexus injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björkman Anders

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As neurophysiologic tests may not reveal the extent of brachial plexus injury at the early stage, the role of early radiological work-up has become increasingly important. The aim of the study was to evaluate the concordance between the radiological and clinical findings with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injuries. Methods Seven consecutive male patients (median age 33; range 15-61 with brachial plexus injuries, caused by motor cycle accidents in 5/7 patients, who underwent extensive radiological work-up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, computed tomography myelography (CT-M or both were included in this retrospective study. A total of 34 spinal nerve roots were evaluated by neuroradiologists at two different occasions. The degree of agreement between the radiological findings of every individual nerve root and the intraoperative findings was estimated by calculation of kappa coefficient (К-value. Using the operative findings as a gold standard, the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of the clinical findings and the radiological findings were estimated. Results The diagnostic accuracy of radiological findings was 88% compared with 65% for the clinical findings. The concordance between the radiological findings and the intraoperative findings was substantial (К = 0.76 compared with only fair (К = 0.34 for the clinical findings. There were two false positive and two false negative radiological findings (sensitivity and PPV of 0.90; specificity and NPV of 0.87. Conclusions The advanced optimized radiological work-up used showed high reliability and substantial agreement with the intraoperative findings in adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

  16. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  17. MR imaging of the brachial plexus: comparison between 1.5-T and 3-T MR imaging: preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Calabrese, Massimo [National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Succio, Giulia; Serafini, Giovanni; Ghidara, Matteo [Santa Corona Hospital, Radiology Department, Savona (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Universita di Genova, Radiology Department, Genova (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    To compare 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brachial plexus. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers and 30 consecutive patients with brachial plexus disturbances. MR was prospectively performed with comparable sequence parameters and coils with a 1.5-T and a 3-T system. Imaging protocols at both field strengths included T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences and T2-weighed turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences with fat saturation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between muscle and nerve were calculated for both field strengths. The visibility of brachial plexus nerve at various anatomic levels (roots, interscalene area, costoclavicular space, and axillary level) was analyzed with a four-point grading scale by two radiologists. MR imaging diagnoses and pathological findings were also compared qualitatively. SNR and CNRs were significantly higher on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (Friedman test) for all sequences. Nerve visibility was significantly better on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (paired sign test). Pathological findings (n = 30/30) were seen equally well with both field strengths. MR imaging diagnoses did not differ for the 1.5- and 3-T protocols. High-quality MR images of the brachial plexus can be obtained with 3-T MR imaging by using sequences similar to those used at 1.5-T MR imaging. In patients and healthy volunteers, the visibility of nerve trunks and cords at 3-T MR imaging appears to be superior to that at 1.5-T MR imaging. (orig.)

  18. Adrenergic-induced enhancement of brain barrier system permeability to small nonelectrolytes: choroid plexus versus cerebral capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, V.A.; Johanson, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    Acute hypertension induced by adrenergic agents opens up the blood-CSF barrier (choroid plexus) to nonelectrolyte and protein tracers. Sprague-Dawley adult rats anesthetized with ketamine were given an intravenous bolus of either epinephrine (10 micrograms/kg), phenylephrine (100 micrograms/kg), isoproterenol (10 micrograms/kg), or D,L-amphetamine (2 mg/kg). Tracers were injected simultaneously with test agents, and the animals killed 10 min later. Epinephrine raised MABP by 57 mm Hg, to a peak pressure of 160 mm Hg; and it increased the volume of distribution (Vd) of urea, mannitol, and 125 I-bovine serum albumin in CSF by 1.5-, 2.7-, and 30-fold, respectively. There was enhanced uptake by lateral and fourth ventricle choroid plexuses, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, medulla, and thalamus. Phenylephrine also elevated MABP to 160 mm Hg, but it increased permeation of tracers into CSF (and several brain regions) to a lesser extent than epinephrine, attributable to protective vasoconstriction associated with alpha-agonist activity. Ratio analysis of Vd data provides evidence that augmented permeation of nonelectrolyte tracers in acute hypertension occurs predominantly by diffusion rather than vesicular transport. It is postulated that elevated MABP distends the central cores of choroid plexus villi and cerebral capillaries, with resultant stretching and opening of tight junctions in both barrier systems; with less hindrance to diffusion, urea and mannitol are cleared at rates closer to free diffusion. Neither isoproterenol (decreased MABP by 40 mm Hg) nor amphetamine (did not alter MABP) significantly opened the choroid plexus or blood-brain barrier to tracers

  19. Case report 388: Transient paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm secondary to blocking anesthesia of the intrascalene brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogdon, B.G.; Arcement, L.J.

    1986-08-01

    Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of transient, unilateral paralysis of the phrenic nerve, secondary to anesthesia performed in a block of the brachial plexus used in surgical procedures of the upper extremity and in manipulation of fractures and dislocations. The disorder is self-limited and requires no further investigation or treatment. This entity is well-illustrated and fully described in this case report.

  20. Case report 388: Transient paralysis of the left hemidiaphragm secondary to blocking anesthesia of the intrascalene brachial plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brogdon, B.G.; Arcement, L.J.

    1986-01-01

    Radiologists and clinicians should be aware of the phenomenon of transient, unilateral paralysis of the phrenic nerve, secondary to anesthesia performed in a block of the brachial plexus used in surgical procedures of the upper extremity and in manipulation of fractures and dislocations. The disorder is self-limited and requires no further investigation or treatment. This entity is well-illustrated and fully described in this case report. (orig.)