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Sample records for lumbar discectomy clinical

  1. Clinical outcomes and efficacy of transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy

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    Cezmi Çagri Türk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy (TLED is a minimally invasive procedure for removing lumbar disc herniations. This technique was initially reserved for herniations in the foraminal or extraforaminal region. This study concentrated on our experience regarding the outcomes and efficacy of TLED. Materials and Methods: A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The patients were retrospectively evaluated for demographic features, lesion levels, numbers of affected levels, visual analog scores (VASs, Oswestry disability questionnaire scale scores and MacNab pain relief scores. Results: A total of 48 female and 57 male patients aged between 25 and 64 years (mean: 41.8 years underwent TLED procedures. The majority (83% of the cases were operated on at the levels of L4-5 and L5-S1. Five patients had herniations at two levels. There were significant decreases between the preoperative VAS scores collected postoperatively at 6 months (2.3 and those collected after 1-year (2.5. Two patients were referred for microdiscectomy after TLED due to unsatisfactory pain relief on the 1 st postoperative day. The overall success rate with respect to pain relief was 90.4% (95/105. Seven patients with previous histories of open discectomy at the same level reported fair pain relief after TLED. Conclusions: Transforaminal lumbar endoscopic discectomy is a safe and effective alternative to microdiscectomy that is associated with minor tissue trauma. Herniations that involved single levels and foraminal/extraforaminal localizations were associated with better responses to TLED.

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy Versus Fenestration Discectomy in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

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    Zheng-mei DING

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fenestration discectomy (FD is a common treatment method for lumber disc herniation (LDH, with good effects obtained. Nevertheless, it also causes many complications, such as lumbar instability, lumbago and back pain. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PTED is a new minimally invasive treatment available for LDH with conservative therapy failure. At present, this technique has been carried out in China. The purpose of this study was to conduct a randomized prospective trial to compare the surgical outcomes of PTED and FD, explore the clinical application value of PTED, and discuss the operative manipulated skills of PTED.Methods: Totally 100 patients with LDH were enrolled from March 2014 to December 2015 and randomly divided into PTED group and FD group, 50 cases in each group. FD group received FD including epidural anesthesia, unilateral fenestration decompression, removal of nucleus pulposus, and nerve root decompression and release, while FTED group received PTED including local anesthesia, endoscopic removal of herniated nucleus pulposus and nerve root decompression and release. Both groups were followed up postoperatively. The duration of operation, incision length, postoperative bed-rest and hospital stay were compared between two groups, and the visual analogue scale (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI, and therapeutic effects at the final follow-up time were recorded and compared between 2 groups.Results: All patients completed the operation successfully. The surgical duration was similar between two groups (P>0.05. PTED group showed a less incision length and shorter postoperative bed-rest time and hospital stay than FD group (P<0.01. The VAS and ODI scores showed a significant decrease in both groups postoperatively when compared with operation before (P<0.05, but with no significant difference between two groups (P>0.05. Moreover, the excellent and good rate was higher in PTED group thanin FD group, with no

  3. Clinical outcomes after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for lumbar disc herniation : A prospective case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gadjradj, Pravesh S.; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Peul, Wilco C.; Harhangi, B. Sanjay

    Objective Throughout the last decades, full-endoscopic techniques to treat lumbar disc herniation (LDH) have gained popularity in clinical practice. To date, however, no Class I evidence on the efficacy of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) has been published, and studies

  4. Clinical outcomes after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for lumbar disc herniation: A prospective case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Gadjradj (Pravesh S.); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); W.C. Peul (Wilco); B.S. Harhangi (Biswadjiet)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective__ Throughout the last decades, full-endoscopic techniques to treat lumbar disc herniation (LDH) have gained popularity in clinical practice. To date, however, no Class I evidence on the efficacy of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) has been

  5. Ameliorative percutaneous lumbar discectomy

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    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To ameliorate the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (APLD) for improving the effectiveness and amplifying the indicative range of PLD. Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and discectomy of extracting pulp out of the herniated disc with special pulpforceps. The statistical analysis of the therapeutic results on 750 disc protrusions of 655 cases undergone APLD following up from 6 to 54 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 40.2%, good for 46.6% and bad of 13.3%. No occurrance of intervertebral inflammation and paradiscal hematoma, there were only 1 case complicated with injuried cauda equina, and 4 cases with broken appliance within disc. Conclusions: APLD is effective and safe, not only indicative for inclusion disc herniation, but also for noninclusion herniation. (authors)

  6. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chengjiang; Su Huanbin; Xu Sui; He Xiaofeng; Li Yanhao

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To probe the therapeutic effects, indications and safety of the percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLDP). Methods: To ameliorate percutaneous punctured route based on classic PLD and modified jaw structure of pulpiform nacleus forceps, with statistic analysis of the therapeutic results of 352 cases of patient undergone PLDP and follow up ranging from 6 to 38 months retrospectively. Results: The effective ratios were excellent in 45.5%, good for 45.4% and bad in 9.1%. 44 of 352 cases with pulps prolapse were cured. No intervertebral inflammation and paradisc hematoma took place. One case complicated with cauda equina injury and 4 cases with appliances broken inside the disc. Conclusions: PLDP is effective and safe, not only adaptive to the contained disc herniation, but also for noncontained herniation. (authors)

  7. A systematic review of preoperative predictors for postoperative clinical outcomes following lumbar discectomy.

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    Wilson, Courtney A; Roffey, Darren M; Chow, Donald; Alkherayf, Fahad; Wai, Eugene K

    2016-11-01

    Sciatica is often caused by a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc. When conservative treatment fails, a lumbar discectomy can be performed. Surgical treatment via lumbar discectomy is not always successful and may depend on a variety of preoperative factors. It remains unclear which, if any, preoperative factors can predict postsurgical clinical outcomes. This review aimed to determine preoperative predictors that are associated with postsurgical clinical outcomes in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. This is a systematic review. This systematic review of the scientific literature followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guidelines. MEDLINE and PubMed were systematically searched through June 2014. Results were screened for relevance independently, and full-text studies were assessed for eligibility. Reporting quality was assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Quality of evidence was assessed using a modified version of Sackett's Criteria of Evidence Support. No financial support was provided for this study. No potential conflict of interest-associated biases were present from any of the authors. The search strategy yielded 1,147 studies, of which a total of 40 high-quality studies were included. There were 17 positive predictors, 20 negative predictors, 43 non-significant predictors, and 15 conflicting predictors determined. Preoperative predictors associated with positive postoperative outcomes included more severe leg pain, better mental health status, shorter duration of symptoms, and younger age. Preoperative predictors associated with negative postoperative outcomes included intact annulus fibrosus, longer duration of sick leave, worker's compensation, and greater severity of baseline symptoms. Several preoperative factors including motor deficit, side and level of herniation, presence of type 1 Modic changes and degeneration, age, and gender had non-significant associations with postoperative clinical

  8. Lumbar (Open) Microscopic Discectomy

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    ... recommended. However, open discectomy is still considered the “gold standard” by the spine community for surgical treatment ... sutures and the patient is taken to a recovery room. After the Procedure After surgery, you may ...

  9. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy: Results of first 100 cases

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    Kanthila Mahesha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar disc herniation is a major cause of back pain and sciatica. The surgical management of lumbar disc prolapse has evolved from exploratory laminectomy to percutaneous endoscopic discectomy. Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy is the least invasive procedure for lumbar disc prolapse. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical outcome, quality of life, neurologic function, and complications. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with lumbar disc prolapse who were treated with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy from May 2012 to January 2014 were included in this retrospective study. Clinical followup was done at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, and at yearly interval thereafter. The outcome was assessed using modified Macnab′s criteria, visual analog scale, and Oswestry Disability Index. Results: The mean followup period was 2 years (range 18 months - 3 years. Transforaminal approach was used in 84 patients, interlaminar approach in seven patients, and combined approach in nine patients. An excellent outcome was noted in ninety patients, good outcome in six patients, fair result in two patients, and poor result in two patients. Minor complications were seen in three patients, and two patients had recurrent disc prolapse. Mean hospital stay was 1.6 days. Conclusions: Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy is a safe and effective procedure in lumbar disc prolapse. It has the advantage that it can be performed on a day care basis under local anesthesia with shorter length of hospitalization and early return to work thus improving the quality of life earlier. The low complication rate makes it the future of disc surgery. Transforaminal approach alone is sufficient in majority of cases, although 16% of cases required either percutaneous interlaminar approach or combined approach. The procedure definitely has a learning curve, but it is acceptable with adequate preparations.

  10. Primary limited lumbar discectomy with an annulus closure device: one-year clinical and radiographic results from a prospective, multi-center study.

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    Lequin, Michiel B; Barth, Martin; Thomė, Claudius; Bouma, Gerrit J

    2012-12-01

    Discectomy as a treatment for herniated lumbar discs results in outcomes after surgery that are not uniformly positive. Surgeons face the dilemma between limited nucleus removal which is associated with a higher risk of recurrence, or more aggressive nucleus removal which may lead to disc height loss and persistent back-pain. annulus closure devices may allow for the benefits of limited nucleus removal without the increased risk of recurrence. This is an interim report of an ongoing 24-month post-marketing study of the Barricaid® annulus closure device, consisting of a flexible polymer mesh that blocks the defect, held in place by a titanium bone anchor. We prospectively enrolled 45 patients at four hospitals, and implanted the Barricaid® after a limited discectomy. annulus defect size and volume of removed nucleus were recorded. Reherniations were reported, pain and function were monitored and imaging was performed at regular intervals during 24 months of follow-up. At 12 months postsurgery, pain and function were significantly improved, comparing favorably to reported results from limited discectomy. Disc height has been well maintained. One reherniation has occurred (2.4%), which was associated with a misplaced device. No device fracture, subsidence or migration has been observed. The use of an annulus closure device may provide a reduction in reherniation rate for lumbar discectomy patients with large annulus defects who are at the greatest risk of recurrence. Using such a device should provide the surgeon increased confidence in minimizing nucleus removal, which, in turn, may preserve disc height and biomechanics, reducing degeneration and associated poor clinical outcomes in the long-term. A randomized multicenter study evaluating limited discectomy with and without the Barricaid® is currently underway, and will provide a higher level of evidence.

  11. Aggressive discectomy for single level lumbar disk herniation

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    Md. Kamrul Ahsan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive open lumbar discectomy is the most commonly performed surgical procedure for patients with persistent low back and leg pain. In this retrospective study,  1,380 patients were evaluated for long-term results of aggressive discectomy for the single level lumbar disk herniation. Demographic data, surgical data, complications and reherniation rate were collected and clinical outcomes were assessed using visual analogue score (VAS, Oswestry disability index (ODI and modified Mcnab criteria. The mean follow-up period was 28.8 months. According to the modified Mcnab criteria, the long-term results were excellent in 640 cases, good in 445 cases, fair in 255 cases, and poor in 40 cases. The mean VAS scores for back and radicular pains and ODI at the end of 2 years were 1.1 ± 1.0, 1.5 ± 0.5 and 6.6 ± 3.1% respectively. The complications were foot drop (n=7, dural tear (n=14, superficial wound infection (n=17, discitis (n=37 and reherniation (n=64. The dural tear and superficial wound infections resolved after treatment but 28 discitis patients were treated by conservatively and the remaining 9 underwent surgery. Among reherniation patients, 58 underwent revision discectomy and 4 underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and stabilization. Aggressive discectomy is an effective treatment of lumbar disk herniation and maintains a lower incidence of reherniation but leads to a collapse of disc height and in long run gives rise to intervertebral instability and accelerates spondylosis.

  12. Automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy: technique, indications and clinical follow-up in over 1000 patients

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    Bonaldi, G. [Department of Neuroradiology, Ospedali Riuniti, Bergamo (Italy)

    2003-10-01

    This paper summarises my experience, over 14 years, treating over 1350 patients suffering from lumbar disc pathology, using minimally invasive intradiscal decompressive percutaneous techniques. The vast majority underwent the method introduced by Onik in 1985, referred to as ''automated'' since it involves a mechanical probe, working by a ''suction and cutting'' action for removal of the nucleus pulposus. Postoperative follow-up of at least 6 months was available for 1047 patients aged 15-92 years, who underwent this procedure up to June 2002. Results, based on a patient satisfaction, have been good in 58% of patients at 2 months and in 67.5% at 6 months; they have been particularly favourable in some subgroups such as elderly people (79.5% of excellent or good results), patients previously operated upon (78%) and those with ''discogenic'' low back pain (79%). Complication rates have been extremely low (less than 1%) and all complications cleared up without sequelae. In comparison with other percutaneous disc treatments, Onik's achieves the best compromise between clinical efficacy, comfort for the patient and low invasiveness. (orig.)

  13. Intraoperative "Analgesia Nociception Index"-Guided Fentanyl Administration During Sevoflurane Anesthesia in Lumbar Discectomy and Laminectomy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Upton, Henry D; Ludbrook, Guy L; Wing, Andrew; Sleigh, Jamie W

    2017-07-01

    The "Analgesia Nociception Index" (ANI; MetroDoloris Medical Systems, Lille, France) is a proposed noninvasive guide to analgesia derived from an electrocardiogram trace. ANI is scaled from 0 to 100; with previous studies suggesting that values ≥50 can indicate adequate analgesia. This clinical trial was designed to investigate the effect of intraoperative ANI-guided fentanyl administration on postoperative pain, under anesthetic conditions optimized for ANI functioning. Fifty patients aged 18 to 75 years undergoing lumbar discectomy or laminectomy were studied. Participants were randomly allocated to receive intraoperative fentanyl guided either by the anesthesiologist's standard clinical practice (control group) or by maintaining ANI ≥50 with boluses of fentanyl at 5-minute intervals (ANI group). A standardized anesthetic regimen (sevoflurane, rocuronium, and nonopioid analgesia) was utilized for both groups. The primary outcome was Numerical Rating Scale pain scores recorded from 0 to 90 minutes of recovery room stay. Secondary outcomes included those in the recovery room period (total fentanyl administration, nausea, vomiting, shivering, airway obstruction, respiratory depression, sedation, emergence time, and time spent in the recovery room) and in the intraoperative period (total fentanyl administration, intraoperative-predicted fentanyl effect-site concentrations over time [CeFent], the correlation between ANI and predicted CeFent and the incidence of movement). Statistical analysis was performed with 2-tailed Student t tests, χ tests, ordinal logistic generalized estimating equation models, and linear mixed-effects models. Bonferroni corrections for multiple comparisons were made for primary and secondary outcomes. Over the recovery room period (0-90 minutes) Numerical Rating Scale pain scores were on average 1.3 units lower in ANI group compared to the control group (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.4 to 2.4; P= .01). Patients in the ANI group

  14. Minimally invasive discectomy versus microdiscectomy/ discectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation

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    Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Rasouli, Mohammad; Shokraneh, Farhad; Moradi-lakeh, Maziyar; Vakaro, Alex; Sadeghi-Naini, Mohsen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Lumbar discectomy is a surgery to remove all or part of a disc cushion that helps protect the spinal column. These cushions, called disks, separate the spinal vertebrae/bones. When one of the disks herniates (moves out of place) in patients with protruded disc, the soft gel inside pushes through the wall of the disk. The disk may then place pressure on the spinal cord and nerves that are coming out of the spinal column. The lumbar discectomy procedure remained basically ...

  15. Endoscopic anatomy and features of lumbar discectomy by Destandau technique

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    Keyvan Mostofi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive spine surgery prevents alteration of paraspinal muscles and avoids traditional open surgery, so in the majority of cases, recovery is much quicker and patients have less back pain after surgery. The authors describe an endoscopic approach to lumbar disc herniation by the Destandau's method originated in Bordeaux. Destandau designed ENDOSPINE for discectomy will be inserted, and the procedure will continue using endoscopy. The Endoscopic approach to lumbar disc herniation by Destandau's method offers a convenient access to lumbar disc herniation with less complications and negligible morbidity. It gives maximum exposure to the disc space with maximal angles and minimal cutaneous incision. Contrary to other minimally invasive approaches, the visual field in discectomy by Destandau technique is broad and depending on the workability of ENDOSPINE an adequate access to lumbar disc herniation is possible.

  16. Results of arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy

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    Mohinder Kaushal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Avaialable minimal invasive arthro/endoscopic techniques are not compatible with 30 degree arthroscope which orthopedic surgeons uses in knee and shoulder arthroscopy. Minimally invasive “Arthrospine assisted percutaneous technique for lumbar discectomy” is an attempt to allow standard familiar microsurgical discectomy and decompression to be performed using 30° arthroscope used in knee and shoulder arthroscopy with conventional micro discectomy instruments. Materials and Methods: 150 patients suffering from lumbar disc herniations were operated between January 2004 and December 2012 by indiginously designed Arthrospine system and were evaluated retrospectively. In lumbar discectomy group, there were 85 males and 65 females aged between 18 and 72 years (mean, 38.4 years. The delay between onset of symptoms to surgery was between 3 months to 7 years. Levels operated upon included L1-L2 (n = 3, L2-L3 (n = 2, L3-L4 (n = 8, L4-L5 (n = 90, and L5-S1 (n = 47. Ninety patients had radiculopathy on right side and 60 on left side. There were 22 central, 88 paracentral, 12 contained, 3 extraforaminal, and 25 sequestrated herniations. Standard protocol of preoperative blood tests, x-ray LS Spine and pre operative MRI and pre anaesthetic evaluation for anaesthesia was done in all cases. Technique comprised localization of symptomatic level followed by percutaneous dilatation and insertion of a newly devised arthrospine system devise over a dilator through a 15 mm skin and fascial incision. Arthro/endoscopic discectomy was then carried out by 30° arthroscope and conventional disc surgery instruments. Results: Based on modified Macnab's criteria, of 150 patients operated for lumbar discectomy, 136 (90% patients had excellent to good, 12 (8% had fair, and 2 patients (1.3% had poor results. The complications observed were discitis in 3 patients (2%, dural tear in 4 patients (2.6%, and nerve root injury in 2 patients (1.3%. About 90% patients

  17. Comparison of discectomy versus sequestrectomy in lumbar disc herniation: a meta-analysis of comparative studies.

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    Jisheng Ran

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc removal is currently the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation. No consensus has been achieved whether aggressive disc resection with curettage (discectomy versus conservative removal of the offending disc fragment alone (sequestrectomy provides better outcomes. This study aims to compare the reherniation rate and clinical outcomes between discectomy and sequestrectomy by literature review and a meta-analysis.A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed up to June 1, 2014. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical baseline characteristics, perioperative variables, complications, recurrent herniation rate and post-operative functional outcomes.Twelve eligible trials evaluating discectomy vs sequestrectomy were identified including one randomized controlled study, five prospective and six retrospective comparative studies. By contrast to discectomy, sequestrectomy was associated with significantly less operative time (p<0.001, lower visual analogue scale (VAS for low back pain (p<0.05, less post-operative analgesic usage (p<0.05 and better patients' satisfaction (p<0.05. Recurrent herniation rate, reoperation rate, intraoperative blood loss, hospitalization duration and VAS for sciatica were without significant difference.According to our pooled data, sequestrectomy entails equivalent reherniation rate and complications compared with discectomy but maintains a lower incidence of recurrent low back pain and higher satisfactory rate. High-quality prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to firmly assess these two procedures.

  18. Nursing care for patients receiving percutaneous lumbar discectomy and intradiscal electrothermal treatment for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mou Ling

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To summarize the nursing experience in caring patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who received percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) together with intradiscal electrothermal treatment (IDET) under DSA guidance. Methods: The perioperative nursing care measures carried out in 126 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who underwent PLD and IDET were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Successful treatment of PLD and IDET was accomplished in 112 cases. Under comprehensive and scientific nursing care and observation, no serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Scientific and proper nursing care is a strong guarantee for a successful surgery and a better recovery in treating lumbar intervertebral disc herniation with PLD and IDET under DSA guidance. (authors)

  19. Multivariate prognostic modeling of persistent pain following lumbar discectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2013-03-04

    Persistent postsurgical pain (PPSP) affects between 10% and 50% of surgical patients, the development of which is a complex and poorly understood process. To date, most studies on PPSP have focused on specific surgical procedures where individuals do not suffer from chronic pain before the surgical intervention. Individuals who have a chronic nerve injury are likely to have established peripheral and central sensitization which may increase the risk of developing PPSP. Concurrent analyses of the possible factors contributing to the development of PPSP following lumbar discectomy have not been examined.

  20. [Biomechanics changes of lumbar spine caused by foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy].

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    Qian, J; Yu, S S; Liu, J J; Chen, L; Jing, J H

    2018-04-03

    Objective: To analyze the biomechanics changes of lumbar spine caused by foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy using the finite element method. Methods: Three healthy adult males (aged 35.6 to 42.3 years) without spinal diseases were enrolled in this study and 3D-CT scans were carried out to obtain the parameters of lumbar spine. Mimics software was applied to build a 3D finite element model of lumbar spine. Graded resections (1/4, 2/4, 3/4 and 4/4) of the left superior articular process of L(5) were done via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Then, the pressure of the L(4/5) right facets, the pressure of the L(4/5) intervertebral disc and the motion of lumbar spine were recorded after simulating the normal flexion and extension, lateral flexion and rotation of the lumbar spine model during different resections. The data were compared among groups with analysis of variance. Results: Comparing with the normal group, after 1/4 resection of the left superior articular process of L(5), the pressure of the L(4/5) right facets showed significant differences during left lateral flexion and rotation of lumbar spine ( q =8.823, 8.248, both P biomechanics and the stability of lumbar spine changed partly after 1/4 resection of the superior articular process and obviously after more than 2/4 is resected. The superior articular process should be paid more attention during foraminotomy via percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy.

  1. Athletic performance outcomes following lumbar discectomy in professional basketball players.

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    Anakwenze, Okechukwu A; Namdari, Surena; Auerbach, Joshua D; Baldwin, Keith; Weidner, Zachary D; Lonner, Baron S; Huffman, G R; Sennett, Brian J

    2010-04-01

    Retrospective case-control study. To quantify the athletic performance profiles after lumbar discectomy (LD) in a cohort of National Basketball Association (NBA) players in comparison with a control group of matched NBA players who did not undergo LD during the same study period. LD provides symptomatic relief and improved functional outcomes in the majority of patients as assessed by validated measures such as Oswestry Disability Index, Visual Analog Scale, and Short Form-36 (SF-36). Among professional athletes, however, the goal of lumbar HNP treated by discectomy is not only to improve functional status but also, ultimately, to return the player to preinjury athletic performance levels. No study to date has compared the athletic performance profiles before and after discectomy in professional athletes. An analysis of NBA games summaries, weekly injury reports, player profiles, and press releases was performed to identify 24 NBA players who underwent LD for symptomatic lumbar HNP between 1991 and 2007. A 1:2 case: control study was performed using players without history of lumbar HNP who were matched for age, position, experience, and body mass index as control subjects (n = 48). Paired t tests were conducted on the following parameters: games played, minutes per game, points per 40 minutes, rebounds per 40 minutes, assists per 40 minutes, steals per 40 minutes, blocks per 40 minutes, and shooting percentage. For each athletic performance outcome, between-group comparisons evaluating preindex to postindex season performance were done (index season = season of surgery). In the LD group, 18 of 24 players (75%) returned to play again in the NBA, compared with 42 of 48 players (88%, P = 0.31) in the control group. One year after surgery, between-group comparisons revealed statistically significant increase in blocked shots per 40 minutes in the LD (0.18) versus control group (-0.33; P = 0.008) and a smaller decrease in rebounds per 40 minutes in the LD (-0

  2. Epidural versus intravenous steroids application following percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy.

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    Hu, Annan; Gu, Xin; Guan, Xiaofei; Fan, Guoxin; He, Shisheng

    2018-05-01

    Retrospectively study.The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intraoperative epidural steroids and single dose intravenous steroids following a percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD).Inflammatory irritation of dorsal root ganglia or sensory nerve roots may cause postoperative pain. Epidural steroids have been applied after a lumbar discectomy for more than 20 years. Epidural steroid application after a PELD is easier to perform and safer because the operations are under observation of the scope.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation who had undergone transforaminal PELD at our department. There are 60 patients in epidural steroid group, intravenous steroid group, and control group, respectively. Visual analog scores (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were collected. Successful pain control is defined as 50% or more reduction in back and leg pain (VAS scores).VAS scores (back and leg) and ODI showed a significant decrease in all groups when comparing pre- and postoperatively. Epidural steroid group had a significant improvement in successful pain control compared with the control group at 2 weeks of follow-up. VAS scores (leg) in the epidural steroid group showed a significant decrease compared with the intravenous steroids group at 1, 3, and 7 days after the surgery, but this difference had no statistical significance at 1, 6, and 12 months of follow-up. All groups did not show a significant difference in ODI at 1, 6, and 12 months follow-up.Epidural application of steroid has a better effect on controlling the postoperative pain of PELD in the short term. The epidural application of steroid did not show a tendency to cause infection.

  3. Perioperative pregabalin improves pain and functional outcomes 3 months after lumbar discectomy.

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    Burke, Siun M

    2010-04-01

    Patient outcome after lumbar discectomy for radicular low back pain is variable and the benefit is inconsistent. Many patients continue to experience pain 3 months after surgery. Pregabalin, a membrane stabilizer, may decrease perioperative central sensitization and subsequent persistent pain.

  4. Application of the polystyrene model made by 3-D printing rapid prototyping technology for operation planning in revision lumbar discectomy.

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    Li, Chao; Yang, Mingyuan; Xie, Yang; Chen, Ziqiang; Wang, Chuanfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of 3-D rapid prototyping technology in revision lumbar discectomy. 3-D rapid prototyping technology has not been reported in the treatment of revision lumbar discectomy. Patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation who were preparing to undergo revision lumbar discectomy from a single center between January 2011 and 2013 were included in this analysis. Patients were divided into two groups. In group A, 3-D printing technology was used to create subject-specific lumbar vertebral models in the preoperative planning process. Group B underwent lumbar revision as usual. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcomes were compared between groups included operation time, perioperative blood loss, postoperative complications, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Japan Orthopaedics Association (JOA) scores, and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back pain and leg pain. A total of 37 patients were included in this study (Group A = 15, Group B = 22). Group A had a significantly shorter operation time (106.53 ± 11.91 vs. 131.92 ± 10.81 min, P < 0.001) and significantly less blood loss (341.67 ± 49.45 vs. 466.77 ± 71.46 ml, P < 0.001). There was no difference between groups for complication rate. There were also no differences between groups for any clinical metric. Using the 3-D printing technology before revision lumbar discectomy may reduce the operation time and the perioperative blood loss. There does not appear to be a benefit to using the technology with respect to clinical outcomes. Future prospective studies are needed to further elucidate the efficacy of this emerging technology.

  5. Comparison of nerve conduction and injury degree in patients with lumbar disc herniation after microendoscopic discectomy and fenestration discectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the difference of nerve conduction and injury degree in patients with lumbar disc herniation after microendoscopic discectomy and fenestration discectomy. Methods: Patients with single-segment lumbar disc herniation who were treated in Dazhou Central Hospital between May 2014 and February 2017 were selected as the research subjects, the history data were reviewed and the operation methods were referred to divide them into FD group and MED group who received fenestration discectomy and microendoscopic discectomy respectively. The conduction velocity of common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve were detected before operation and 4 weeks after operation; serum levels of nerve and muscle injury-related molecules as well as inflammation and stress-related molecules were detected before operation and 3 days after operation. Results: MNCV levels of common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve 4 weeks after operation as well as serum CRP, TNF-α, MDA and AOPP contents 3 d after operation of both groups of patients were significantly higher than those before operation, and the MNCV levels of common peroneal nerve and tibial nerve of MED group 4 weeks after operation were significantly higher than those of FD group while serum CRP, TNF-α, MDA and AOPP contents of MED group 3 d after operation were not significantly different from those of FD group; serum NSE, S100B, Tau, pNF-H, CPK, Myo and LDH contents of FD patients 3 d after operation were significantly higher than those before operation while serum NSE, S100B, Tau, pNF-H, CPK, Myo and LDH contents of MED group were not significantly different from those before operation. Conclusion: Microendoscopic discectomy for lumbar disc herniation can relieve the nerve and muscle injury, and is equivalent to fenestration discectomy in activating the systemic stress and inflammatory response.

  6. Long-term outcomes and quality of lift after percutaneous lumbar discectomy for lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wengui; Geng Gaojun; Guo Jinhe; He Shicheng; Deng Gang; Liu Wengui

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess the long-term outcomes as well as the living quality of the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) after the treatment of percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD), and to discuss the influential factors related to the long-term effectiveness. Methods: During the period of January 2000 to March 2002, PLD was performed in 129 patients with LDH. By using self-evaluation questionnaires of Oswestry disability index(ODI), Short Form-36(SF-36) and Japanese Orthopaedic Association(JOA) through letter or telephone interviews as well as the patients' initial medical records, the related clinical data were collected. Statistical analysis was conducted by using Wilcoxon's rank sum test, Chi-square test. Results: One hundred and eight patients (83.7%) were able to be followed up and 104 effective ques-tionnaires were collected. The mean follow-up time was (6.64±0.67) years, the excellent rate(ODI score, 0-20%) was 71.15%. The average scores of the JOA and SF-36 was 23.66±5.72 and 75.88±25.57, respectively. The scores of quality of life were obviously improved in all follow-up subscales. Conventional operations were carried out subsequently in 9 patients as they failed to respond to PLD. No complications related to PLD occurred in this study. The age,course of the disease and the patient's condition at the time of discharge might bear a relationship to long-term effectiveness. Conclusion: PLD is a safe and minimally-invasive technique for the treatment of LDH with quick and reliable effect. PLD can dramatically improve the quality of life. Many factors,such as the age, course of the disease and the patient's condition at the time of discharge,can affect the long-term outcomes. (authors)

  7. Predictive Score Card in Lumbar Disc Herniation: Is It Reflective of Patient Surgical Success after Discectomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Azimi

    Full Text Available Does the Finneson-Cooper score reflect the true value of predicting surgical success before discectomy? The aim of this study was to identify reliable predictors for surgical success two year after surgery for patients with LDH. Prospective analysis of 154 patients with LDH who underwent single-level lumbar discectomy was performed. Pre- and post-surgical success was assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI over a 2-year period. The Finneson-Cooper score also was used for evaluation of the clinical results. Using the ODI, surgical success was defined as a 30% (or more improvement on the ODI score from the baseline. The ODI was considered the gold standard in this study. Finally, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive power of the Finneson-Cooper score in predicting surgical success were calculated. The mean age of the patients was 49.6 (SD = 9.3 years and 47.4% were male. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed (P < 0.001. Post-surgical success was 76.0% (n = 117. The patients' rating on surgical success assessments by the ODI discriminated well between sub-groups of patients who differed with respect to the Finneson-Cooper score. Regarding patients' surgical success, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the Finneson-Cooper ratings correlated with success rate. The findings indicated that the Finneson-Cooper score was reflective of surgical success before discectomy.

  8. The long-term therapeutic effect of central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation: a comparison between microendoscopy discectomy and percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yonggang; Wei Jinan; Lu Jun; Wang Chen; Wu Xiaotao; He Shicheng; Teng Gaojun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the indications, long-term outcomes and complications of microendoscopy discectomy (MED) and percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) in treating central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, and to compare the advantages of the two procedures. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to March 2002 surgical procedure was carried out in sixty-three patients with single central lumbar disc herniation. The surgeries included MED (n=23) and PLD (n=40). The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. The lesion site, the operation time, the blood loss in operation, the time staying in bed, the hospitalization cost and the postoperative hospitalization days were recorded. Oswestry disability index (ODI) and MacNab score were determined. Statistical analysis was performed by using pair sample t-test, κ-test and Fisher exact test. All patients were followed up. Results: A mean follow-up time was (5.1±0.6) years for patients receiving MED and (6.6±0.7) years for patients receiving PLD. The ODI and MacNab scores of patients receiving MED were better than these of patients receiving PLD. The hospitalization cost and the postoperative hospitalization days of MED group was higher and longer than these of PLD group, the differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The occurrence of long-term complication in MED group was 3.49%, while no complication was seen in PLD group. Conclusion: For the treatment of central lumbar intervertebral disc herniation, both MED and PLD are safe and minimally-invasive procedures with satisfactory long-term effectiveness, and the patients recover from clinical symptoms quickly. The PLD has used more common than MED. The performance of MED needs more skill and experience. Therefore, an interventional radiologist has to follow a relatively long learning curve in order to get the sufficient training and practice before he or she can master the technique of MED with full confidence. However, the long

  9. Clinical and radiological instability following standard fenestration discectomy

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    Mascarenhas Amrithlal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-surgical lumbar instability is an established complication but there is limited evidence in the literature regarding the incidence of lumbar instability following fenestration and discectomy. We analyzed our results following fenestration discectomy with a special focus on instability. Materials and Methods: Eighty-three patients between the age of 17 and 52 years who had undergone fenestration discectomy for a single-level lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse were followed-up for a period of 1-5 years. The criteria for instability included "instability catch,", "painful catch," and "apprehension." The working capacity of the patient and the outcome score of the surgery were assessed by means of the Oswestry disability score and the Prolo economic and functional outcome score. Flexion-extension lateral radiographs were taken and analyzed for abnormal tilt and translation. Results: Of the 83 patients included, 70 were men and 13 were women, with an average age of 37.35 years (17-52 years at 5 years follow-up. Clinical instability was seen in 10 (12.04% patients. Radiological instability was noted in 29 (34.9% patients. Only six (60% of the 10 patients who demonstrated clinical instability had radiological evidence of instability. Twenty (68.96% patients with radiological instability were asymptomatic. Three (10.34% patients with only radiological instability had unsatisfactory outcome. The Oswestry scoring showed an average score of 19.8%. Mild disability was noted in 59 (71.08% patients and moderate disability was seen in 24 (28.91% patients. None of the patients had severe disability. These outcomes were compared with the outcomes in other studies in the literature for microdiscectomy and the results were found to be comparable. Conclusion: The favorable outcome of this study is in good agreement with other studies on microdiscectomy. Clinical instability in 12.04% of the patients is in agreement with other studies. Radiological

  10. Cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a prospective randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN51857546

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Ronald

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Open discectomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with long-lasting sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Minimally invasive approaches such as microendoscopic discectomy have gained attention in recent years. Reduced tissue trauma allows early ambulation, short hospital stay and quick resumption of daily activities. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–70 years presenting with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation lasting more than 6–8 weeks are included. Patients with disc herniation larger than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, or disc herniation less than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter with concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eliglible for participation. Randomisation into microendoscopic discectomy or conventional unilateral transflaval discectomy will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The length of skin incision is equal in both groups. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient, measured by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. We will also evaluate several other outcome parameters, including perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine kinase, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, open discectomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc

  11. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Application of percutaneous endoscopic RF/holmium laser lumbar discectomy in the lumbar disc herniation (attach 160 cases reported)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhengxu; Hu Tongzhou; He Jun; Jiang Zenghui; Wang Weiqi; Lin Hang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic discectomy for the lumbar disc herniation and to determine the prognostic factors affecting surgical outcome. Methods: In the group of 160 cases, posterolateral and trans-interlaminar endoscopic Ho: YAG laser and radio frequency-assisted disc excisions were performed under local anesthesia. Results: In 160 patients with post-surgical follow-up period was 15 months on average (7 ∼ 24 months). Based on the MacNab criteria, there were 117 cases in which result was excellent, in 19 cases good, in 12 cases fair, and in 12 cases poor, and successful rate was 85%. Conclusion: Percutaneous endoscopy lumbar discectomy is effective for recurrent disc herniation in the selected. In applies in particular to the traditional open surgery of lumbar disc herniation in patients with recurrent. (authors)

  13. Predictors of clinical outcome following lumbar disc surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Jeffrey J; Fritz, Julie; Koppenhaver, S.L.

    2016-01-01

    scheduled for first time, single-level lumbar discectomy. Participants underwent a standardized preoperative evaluation including real-time ultrasound imaging assessment of lumbar multifidus function, and an 8-week postoperative rehabilitation programme. Clinical outcome was defined by change in disability....... CONCLUSIONS: Information gleaned from the clinical history and physical examination helps to identify patients more likely to succeed with lumbar disc surgery. While this study helps to inform clinical practice, additional research confirming these results is required prior to confident clinical...

  14. Changes in gray matter volume after microsurgical lumbar discectomy: A longitudinal analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eLuchtmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available People around the world suffer chronic lower back pain. Because spine imaging often does not explain the degree of perceived pain reported by patients, the role of the processing of nociceptor signals in the brain as the basis of pain perception is gaining increased attention. Modern neuroimaging techniques (including functional and morphometric methods have produced results that suggest which brain areas may play a crucial role in the perception of acute and chronic pain. In this study, we examined twelve patients with chronic low back pain and sciatica, both resulting from lumbar disc herniation. Structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the brain was performed one day prior to and about four weeks after microsurgical lumbar discectomy. The subsequent MRI revealed an increase in gray matter volume in the basal ganglia but a decrease in volume in the hippocampus, which suggests the complexity of the network that involves movement, pain processing, and aspects of memory. Interestingly, volume changes in the hippocampus were significantly correlated to preoperative pain intensity but not to the duration of chronic pain. Mapping structural changes of the brain that result from lumbar disc herniation has the potential to enhance our understanding of the neuropathology of chronic low back pain and sciatica and therefore may help to optimize the decisions we make about conservative and surgical treatments in the future. The possibility of illuminating more of the details of central pain processing in lumbar disc herniation, as well as the accompanying personal and economic impact of pain relief worldwide, calls for future large-scale clinical studies.

  15. Efficacy of triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine for pain after lumbar discectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bahari, Syah

    2012-02-01

    The study is a prospective blinded randomised controlled trial to compare the efficacy of triamcinolone acetonide, bupivacaine or in combination in managing pain after lumbar discectomy. Patients undergoing primary single-level lumbar discectomy were randomised. Triamcinolone acetonide, bupivacaine or in combination was instilled at the nerve root as decompression. Preoperative, day 1 and 6 weeks pain score, 24-h postoperative opiate requirements and duration of inpatient stay were recorded. Data was analysed using Mann-Whitney test for statistical significance. 100 patients were recruited. A significant difference was noted in day one postoperative mean pain score, mean 24-h opiate requirement and mean inpatient stay in the triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine group. At 8 weeks postoperatively, no significant differences were seen in the pain score in all groups. Significant postoperative pain reduction and opiate requirements in the first 24 h, and significantly shortened duration of inpatient stay were achieved in the triamcinolone acetonide and bupivacaine group compared with other groups.

  16. Lumbar Discectomy of a Patient of Mitral Stenosis with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation Under Epidural Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya R Kulkarni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female patient posted for discectomy of lumbar region L 3 -L 4 was accidently diagnosed to have chronic atrial fibrillation of rheumatic aetiology.This is a case report of this patient of critical mitral stenosis with mild mitral regurgitation with chronic atrial fibrillation managed successfully under lower thoracic epidural anaesthesia,in prone position without any compli-cation.

  17. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2010-08-01

    One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus.

  18. Long-Term Outcomes of Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation Treated with Percutaneous Discectomy: Comparative Study with Microendoscopic Discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wengui; Wu Xiaotao; Guo Jinhe; Zhuang Suyang; Teng Gaojun

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the long-term outcomes of patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) or microendoscopic discectomy (MED). A retrospective study was performed in consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with PLD (n = 129) or MED (n = 101) in a single hospital from January 2000 to March 2002. All patients were followed up with MacNab criteria and self-evaluation questionnaires comprising the Oswestry Disability Index and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Several statistical methods were used for analyses of the data, and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 104 patients (80.62%) with PLD and 82 patients (81.19%) with MED were eligible for analyses, with a mean follow-up period of 6.64 ± 0.67 years and 6.42 ± 0.51 years, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, number of lesions, major symptoms and physical signs, and radiological findings. According to the MacNab criteria, 75.96% in the PLD group and 84.15% in the MED group achieved excellent or good results, respectively, this was statistically significant (p = 0.0402). With the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires, the average scores and minimal disability, respectively, were 6.97 and 71.15% in the PLD group and 4.89 and 79.27% in the MED group. Total average scores of Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were 75.88 vs. 81.86 in PLD group vs. MED group (p = 0.0582). The cost and length of hospitalization were higher or longer in MED group, a statistically significant difference (both p < 0.0001). Long-term complications were observed in two patients (2.44%) in the MED group, no such complications were observed in the PLD group. Both PLD and MED show an acceptable long-term efficacy for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Compared with MED patients, long-term satisfaction is slightly lower in the PLD patients; complications

  19. Comparison of lumbar discectomy alone and lumbar discectomy with direct repair of pars defect for patients with disc herniation and spondylolysis at the nearby lumbar segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gun Woo; Ryu, Ji Hyun; Kim, Jae-Do; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Kim, Ho-Joong; Yeom, Jin S

    2015-10-01

    It is unknown whether direct repair (DR) of pars defect after lumbar discectomy (LD) for patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and spondylolysis leads to better outcomes than LD alone. The aim was to compare two surgical methods, LD alone and LD with DR, for LDH patients with spondylolysis at a nearby lumbar segment. This was a retrospective comparative study. This study enrolled 89 patients who were diagnosed with LDH and spondylolysis at the same or adjacent lumbar segment and were followed up for at least 1 year. The primary outcome was pain intensity of the lower back and lower extremities as measured with visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes included clinical outcomes as assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index and the 12-item short form health survey, radiologic outcomes as assessed with the gap distance and the union rate at the pars defect, surgical outcomes, and complications. Enrolled patients were classified into two groups: LD alone (Group A, 48 patients) and LD with DR (Group B, 41 patients). Pain intensity of the lower back and lower extremities and clinical outcomes were significantly improved 1 year after surgery compared with preoperative scores. However, the scores in the group receiving LD alone steadily worsened during follow-up, whereas the scores in the group receiving LD with DR did not deteriorate over time. The difference in the gap distance of the pars defect between baseline and 1 year after surgery was significantly different between the groups. The fusion rate of the pars defect was 59% (24/41). With the exception of surgical time, which was longer in Group B, surgical outcomes and complications did not differ significantly between the groups. At the 1-year follow-up, DR after LD was associated with better outcomes for LDH with spondylolysis than LD alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Disc Herniation in Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Charitoudis, George; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    A case-control study. To investigate the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Patients with PD frequently suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain. Additionally, they demonstrate higher complication rates after open spine surgery. However, the clinical outcome of minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, such as TPED, have not been established for this population. Patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were divided into Group A (11 patients diagnosed with PD), and Group B (10 patients as the control, non-PD group). All patients underwent TPED. Indexes of visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were assessed right before surgery and at six weeks, three months, six months and one year post-surgery. At the baseline visit, groups did not differ significantly with age (p=0.724), gender (p=0.835), level of operation (p=0.407), ODI (p=0.497) and VAS (p=0.772). Parkinson's patients had higher scores in ODI at every visit, but the outcome was statistically significant only at 3 months (p=0.004) and one year (p=0.007). Similarly, VAS measurements were higher at each time point, with the difference being significant at 3 (p<0.001), 6 (0.021), and 12 (p<0.001) months after surgery. At the end of a year of follow up, ODI was reduced by 49.6% (±16.7) in Group A and 59.2% (±8.0) in Group B (p=0.111), translating to a 79.5% (±13.0) and 91.5% (±4.1) average improvement in daily functionality (p=0.024). VAS was reduced by 59.1 mm (±11.8) in Group A and 62.2 mm (±7.4) in Group B (p=0.485), leading to an 85.3 % (±4.0) and 91.9% (±2.6) general improvement in leg pain (p<0.001). Our data indicate that TPED led to satisfactory improvement in leg pain and daily living in PD patients a year after surgery.

  1. Microendoscopic lumbar discectomy: Technique and results of 188 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind G Kulkarni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Discectomy performed open or with an operating microscope remains the standard surgical management. Tubular retractor system is being increasingly used. Potential benefits include less muscle and local damage, better cosmesis, decreased pain and operative time and faster recovery after surgery. We have evaluated the outcome of micro endoscopic discectomy (MED utilizing tubular retractors in terms of safety and efficacy of the technique. Materials and Methods: 188 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for herniated disc using the tubular retractors between April 2007 and April 2012 are reported. All patients had a preoperative MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging and were operated by a single surgeon with the METRx system (Medtronic, Sofamor-Danek, Memphis, TN using 18 and 16 mm ports. All patients were mobilized as soon as pain subsided and discharged within 24-48 hours post surgery. The results were evaluated by using VAS (Visual Analog Scale 0-5 for back and leg pain and ODI (Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were followed up at intervals of 1 week, 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 2 years. Results: The mean age of patients was 46 years (range 16-78 years and the sex ratio was 1.5 males to 1 female. The mean followup was 22 months (range 8-69 months. The mean VAS scale for leg pain improved from 4.14 to 0.76 ( P < 0.05 and the mean VAS scale for back pain improved from 4.1 to 0.9 ( P < 0.05. The mean ODI changed from 59.5 to 22.6 ( P < 0.05. The mean operative time per level was about 50 minutes (range 20-90 minutes. Dural punctures occurred in 11 (5% cases. Average blood loss was 30 ml (range 10-500 ml. A wrong level was identified and later corrected in a case of revision discectomy. Four patients with residual disc-herniation had revision MED and three patients with recurrent disc herniation later underwent fusion. One patient had wound infection which needed a debridement. Conclusion: MED for herniated discs

  2. Determinantes clínicos com influência no prognóstico da discectomia lombar: análise multifatorial Determinantes clínicos que influyen en el pronóstico de la disectomía lumbar: análisis multifactorial Clinical determinants' influence on lumbar discectomy prognosis: multi-factor analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Jorge Da Rocha Carvalho

    2010-03-01

    lumbares, los cuales fueron sometidos a la discectomía entre 2003 y 2007. El seguimiento promedio fue de 3.9±0.1 años. Los resultados clínicos fueron evaluados utilizando el JOA (Japonese Orthopaedic Association Assessment Scoring System score (JOA=29. RESULTADOS: los resultados postoperatorios buenos y excelentes fueron obtenidos en 75% de los pacientes. Enfermos del sexo masculino y la preponderancia de síntomas subjetivos sobre síntomas clínicos estuvieron asociados con los mejores resultados clínicos y con el regreso más precoz a la actividad laboral. El tiempo de espera para la cirugía no influyó en el resultado final. La necesidad de cirugía fue cuestionada en la ausencia de déficits neurológicos significativos (JOA para resultados clínicos >3/6. Un valor JOA preoperatorio > 15 (debilidad inicial baja está correlacionado con los peores resultados clínicos postoperatorios. CONCLUSIONES: el JOA score se presenta de fácil aplicación para clínicos y enfermos, uniformiza datos subjetivos y presenta un valor predictivo para los resultados de los pacientes sometidos a la discectomía lumbar.Inappropriate patient selection and timing for lumbar disc surgery are still the the major causes of failures. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the clinical outcome and predictive factors that influence the prognosis of patients submitted to lumbar discectomy using a multivariate analysis model. METHODS: We report a prospective series of 68 patients with herniated lumbar disc who underwent limited discectomy during 2003 to 2007. The average follow-up period was 3.9±0.1 years. Clinical findings were evaluated using Japonese Orthopaedic Association Assessment Scoring System (JOA=29. RESULTS: Excellent and good postoperative improvement rates were obtained in 75% of the patients. Male gender and preponderance of subjective symptoms over clinical signs were associated with better clinical outcomes and faster return to work. Waiting time for surgery had no consistent effect on the

  3. Comparison of elective lumbar discectomy outcomes between civilians and military personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzanegan, G.; Mohebbi, H.A.; Moharamzad, Y.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the results of discectomy surgery for lumbar disc herniation in military personnel and compare it with civilians. One-hundred and seventeen military patients (54 subjects as combat forces and 63 as office personnel) and 115 civilians, who underwent discectomy surgery were included. In a mean duration of 50.8 months, the ability to return to full duty and resolution of complaints were assessed and satisfaction was measured using a Visual Analog Scale. Inability to return to previous duty was significantly higher in military personnel compared to civilians (p = 0.002); and in combat forces compared to office personnel (p 0.05). Surgical intervention had relatively poor outcomes in military personnel, specifically in combat forces. Prevention of injury to back region should be considered in military training programs and in case of presence of disc herniation related symptoms, efforts should be made to save patients effective function by conservation and medical therapies. (author)

  4. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy via contralateral approach: a technical case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Sung; Choi, Gun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2011-08-01

    Technical case report. The authors report a new percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) technique for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation via a contralateral approach. When there are highly down-migrated lumbar disc herniation along just medial to pedicle and narrow ipsilateral intervertebral foramen, the conventional PELD is not easily accessible via ipsilateral transforaminal route. Five patients manifested gluteal and leg pain because of a soft disc herniation at the L4-L5 level. Transforaminal PELD via a contralateral approach was performed to remove the herniated fragment, achieving complete decompression of the nerve root. The symptom was relieved and the patient was discharged the next day. When a conventional transforaminal PELD is difficult because of some anatomical reasons, PELD via a contralateral route could be a good alternative option in selected cases.

  5. PERCUTANEOUS DISCECTOMY: A CURRENT TREATMENT FOR LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Gerardo Lima-Ramírez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Describe the functional outcomes of patients with contained lumbar disc herniation (L4-L5, L5-S1 treated with manual percutaneous nucleotomy (MPN and demonstrate that it remains a technique with good results. Methods: A prospective, longitudinal study with 110 patients contained with lumbar disc herniation (LDH treated with (MPN. The evaluation was pre-surgical and 4, 30, 180 and 365 days after the surgery. We used Numeric Pain Scale (NPS, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Macnab criteria. Descriptive and inferential statistics for differences. Results: N=110: 58 (52.72% men, 52 (47.27% women; average age 37.95 years (14-56 ± 10.60; most affected level: L4-L5 in 63 (57.14% patients. NPS preoperative average: 7.75 (5-9 ± 1.12, and at 365 days: 2.14 (0-7 ± 2.37. The mean preoperative ODI was 37% (28%-40% + 3.06, and at 365 days 9.52% (0%-40% + 13.92. The prognosis (ODI was good to 79 (71.81% patients at 365 days, regular in 26 (23.63% and poor in 5 (4.57%, corresponding respectively to patients with no, mild, moderate and severe disability. The Macnab criteria showed similar results (p = 0.00, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.13 - Student's t. Conclusions: The results were good at one-year follow-up (p = 0.00, demonstrating that the MPN is still a good option for lumbosciatic pain relief.

  6. Determinants of outcome for patients undergoing lumbar discectomy: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hickey, Oonagh T

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: One-third of patients who undergo lumbar discectomy continue to suffer from persistent pain postoperatively. Greater preoperative warmth thresholds and greater preoperative cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of stable serum nitric oxide metabolites are associated with a worse outcome. The principal objective of this study was to examine the relationship between patient outcome (defined using the Modified Stauffer-Coventry evaluating criteria) and preoperative pain perception threshold to an electrical stimulus. METHODS: A prospective observational pilot study of patients (n = 39) was performed. Quantitative sensory testing, visual analogue scales for anxiety and pain, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HADS) Scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were completed, and serum nitric oxide metabolites were measured perioperatively. Excised disc tissue was examined histologically, and immunohistochemistry for phospholipase A2 was performed. RESULTS: Ten patients (26%) had an unsatisfactory outcome. Those with a satisfactory outcome had greater preoperative pain perception thresholds over the affected dermatome, which decreased by 2 months postoperatively. These patients also demonstrated a decrease in nitric oxide metabolites from preoperatively to 18 h postoperatively. Greater preoperative HADS scores, and greater pain intensity 4 h and 24 h postoperatively were associated with an unsatisfactory outcome. CONCLUSION: Patients with a satisfactory outcome demonstrate a decrease in pain perception thresholds and plasma concentration of stable nitric oxide metabolites during the perioperative period. Patients with an unsatisfactory outcome following lumbar discectomy experience greater preoperative anxiety and greater pain during the early postoperative period. These findings justify a larger prospective observational study.

  7. Development of an optimised 1:1 physiotherapy intervention post first-time lumbar discectomy: a mixed-methods study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, A; White, L; Heap, A; Heneghan, N; Goodwin, P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To develop an optimised 1:1 physiotherapy intervention that reflects best practice, with flexibility to tailor management to individual patients, thereby ensuring patient-centred practice. Design Mixed-methods combining evidence synthesis, expert review and focus groups. Setting Secondary care involving 5 UK specialist spinal centres. Participants A purposive panel of clinical experts from the 5 spinal centres, comprising spinal surgeons, inpatient and outpatient physiotherapists, provided expert review of the draft intervention. Purposive samples of patients (n=10) and physiotherapists (n=10) (inpatient/outpatient physiotherapists managing patients with lumbar discectomy) were invited to participate in the focus groups at 1 spinal centre. Methods A draft intervention developed from 2 systematic reviews; a survey of current practice and research related to stratified care was circulated to the panel of clinical experts. Lead physiotherapists collaborated with physiotherapy and surgeon colleagues to provide feedback that informed the intervention presented at 2 focus groups investigating acceptability to patients and physiotherapists. The focus groups were facilitated by an experienced facilitator, recorded in written and tape-recorded forms by an observer. Tape recordings were transcribed verbatim. Data analysis, conducted by 2 independent researchers, employed an iterative and constant comparative process of (1) initial descriptive coding to identify categories and subsequent themes, and (2) deeper, interpretive coding and thematic analysis enabling concepts to emerge and overarching pattern codes to be identified. Results The intervention reflected best available evidence and provided flexibility to ensure patient-centred care. The intervention comprised up to 8 sessions of 1:1 physiotherapy over 8 weeks, starting 4 weeks postsurgery. The intervention was acceptable to patients and physiotherapists. Conclusions A rigorous process informed an

  8. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy and Foraminoplasty after Lumbar Spinal Fusion Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Hui-Zhen; Zheng, Changkun

    2017-07-01

    The most common causes of pain following lumbar spinal fusions are residual herniation, or foraminal fibrosis and foraminal stenosis that is ignored, untreated, or undertreated. The original surgeon may advise his patient that nothing more can be done in his opinion that the nerve was visually decompressed by the original surgery. Post-operative imaging or electrophysiological assessment may be inadequate to explain all the reasons for residual or recurrent symptoms. Treatment of failed lumbar spinal fusions by repeat traditional open revision surgery usually incorporates more extensive decompression causing increased instability and back pain. The authors, having limited their practice to endoscopic surgery over the last 10 years, report on their experience gained during that period to relieve pain by transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic revision of lumbar spinal fusions. To assess the effectiveness of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty in patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusion. Retrospective study. Inpatient surgery center. Sixteen consecutive patients with pain after lumbar spinal fusions presenting with back and leg pain that had supporting imaging diagnosis of foraminal stenosis and/or residual/recurrent disc herniation, or whose pain complaint was supported by relief from diagnostic and therapeutic injections, were offered percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminoplasty over a repeat open procedure. Each patient sought consultation following a transient successful, partially successful or unsuccessful open lumbar spinal fusions treatment for disc herniation or spinal stenosis. Endoscopic foraminoplasty was also performed to either decompress the bony foramen in the case of foraminal stenosis, or to allow for endoscopic visual examination of the affected traversing and exiting nerve roots in the axilla. The average follow-up time was 30.3 months, minimum 12 months. Outcome data at each visit

  9. A Modified Translaminar Osseous Channel-Assisted Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for Highly Migrated and Sequestrated Disc Herniations of the Upper Lumbar: Clinical Outcomes, Surgical Indications, and Technical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to describe a safe and effective percutaneous endoscopic approach for removal of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar spine and to report the results, surgical indications, and technical considerations of the new technique. Eleven patients who had highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations in the upper lumbar were included in this study. A retrospective study was performed for all patients after translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD was performed. Radiologic findings were investigated, and pre-and postoperative visual analog scale (VAS assessments for back and leg pain and Oswestry disability index (ODI evaluations were performed. Surgical outcomes were evaluated under modified MacNab criteria. All of the patients were followed for more than 1 year. The preoperative and postoperative radiologic findings revealed that the decompression of the herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP was complete. After surgery, the mean VAS scores for back and leg pain immediately improved from 8.64 (range, 7–10 and 8.00 (range, 6–10 to 2.91 (range, 2–4 and 2.27 (range, 1–3, respectively. The mean preoperative ODI was 65.58 (range, 52.2–86, which decreased to 7.51 (range, 1.8–18 at the 12-month postoperative follow-up. The MacNab scores at the final follow-up included nine excellent, one good, and one fair. The modified translaminar osseous channel-assisted PELD could be a safe and effective option for the treatment of highly migrated and sequestrated disc herniations of the upper lumbar.

  10. Our Experience with 67 Cases of Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

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    Mehmat Ozer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Minimally invasive interventions have become increasingly popular with the developments in technology and surgical tools. In this article, we present our experience with 67 cases of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic lumbar discectomy. Material and Method: A total of 67 cases that underwent endoscopic surgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc hernia between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively examined. Results: The mean pre-operative VAS score was 8.13. The mean post-operative VAS score was 2.4 in the 1st month and 2.01 in the 12th month. Satisfaction according to MacNab criteria in the 12th month was excellent in 35 (52.2% patients, good in 18 (26.9% patients, fair in 11 (16.4% patients, and poor in 3 (4.5% patients. Microdiscectomy was required due to continuing symptoms in 3 patients (4.5%. Temporary dysesthesia was found in 3 patients. Discussion: Percutaneous endoscopic discectomy has become a good alternative to microsurgery for foraminal and extraforaminal disc herniations because of the developments in technology and surgical tools as well as the increased experience of surgeons. The technique is not limited to these localizations; it can also be used for free fragments within the channel, recurrent disc herniations, and narrow channels.

  11. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; Design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Brouwer (Patrick); W.C. Peul (Wilco); R. Brand (René); M.P. Arts (Mark); B.W. Koes (Bart); A.A. van den Berg (Annette); M.A. van Buchem (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser

  12. Spinal sagittal imbalance in patients with lumbar disc herniation: its spinopelvic characteristics, strength changes of the spinal musculature and natural history after lumbar discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Sun, Jianmin; Cui, Xingang; Jiang, Zhensong; Zhang, Wen; Li, Tao

    2016-07-22

    Spinal sagittal imbalance is a widely acknowledged problem, but there is insufficient knowledge regarding its occurrence. In some patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH), their symptom is similar to spinal sagittal imbalance. The aim of this study is to illustrate the spinopelvic sagittal characteristics and identity the role of spinal musculature in the mechanism of sagittal imbalance in patients with LDH. Twenty-five adults with spinal sagittal imbalance who initially came to our clinic for treatment of LDH, followed by posterior discectomy were reviewed. The horizontal distance between C7 plumb line-sagittal vertical axis (C7PL-SVA) greater than 5 cm anteriorly with forward bending posture is considered as spinal sagittal imbalance. Radiographic parameters including thoracic kyphotic angle (TK), lumbar lordotic angle (LL), pelvic tilting angle (PT), sacral slope angle (SS) and an electromyography(EMG) index 'the largest recruitment order' were recorded and compared. All patients restored coronal and sagittal balance immediately after lumbar discectomy. The mean C7PL-SVA and trunk shift value decreased from (11.6 ± 6.6 cm, and 2.9 ± 6.1 cm) preoperatively to (-0.5 ± 2.6 cm and 0.2 ± 0.5 cm) postoperatively, while preoperative LL and SS increased from (25.3° ± 14.0° and 25.6° ± 9.5°) to (42.4° ± 10.2° and 30.4° ± 8.7°) after surgery (P imbalance caused by LDH is one type of compensatory sagittal imbalance. Compensatory mechanism of spinal sagittal imbalance mainly includes a loss of lumbar lordosis, an increase of thoracic kyphosis and pelvis tilt. Spinal musculature plays an important role in spinal sagittal imbalance in patients with LDH.

  13. Lumbar Scoliosis Combined Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Herniation Diagnosed Patient Was Treated with “U” Route Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy

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    Binbin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to report a case of a 63-year-old man with a history of low back pain (LBP and left leg pain for 2 years, and the symptom became more serious in the past 5 months. The patient was diagnosed with lumbar scoliosis combined with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS and lumbar disc herniation (LDH at the level of L4-5 that was confirmed using Computerized Topography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. The surgical team preformed a novel technique, “U” route transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD, which led to substantial, long-term success in reduction of pain intensity and disability. After removing the osteophyte mass posterior to the thecal sac at L4-5, the working channel direction was changed to the gap between posterior longitudinal ligament and thecal sac, and we also removed the herniation and osteophyte at L3-4 with “U” route PELD. The patient’s symptoms were improved immediately after the surgical intervention; low back pain intensity decreased from preoperative 9 to postoperative 2 on a visual analog scale (VAS recorded at 1 month postoperatively. The success of the intervention suggests that “U” route PELD may be a feasible alternative to treat lumbar scoliosis with LSS and LDH patients.

  14. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery. In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared. The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively. PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period

  15. Comprehensive comparing percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy with posterior lumbar internal fixation for treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis: A retrospective case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yapeng; Zhang, Wei; Qie, Suhui; Zhang, Nan; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong

    2017-07-01

    The study was to comprehensively compare the postoperative outcome and imaging parameter characters in a short/middle period between the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) and the internal fixation of bone graft fusion (the most common form is posterior lumbar interbody fusion [PLIF]) for the treatment of adjacent segment lumbar disc prolapse with stable retrolisthesis after a previous lumbar internal fixation surgery.In this retrospective case-control study, we collected the medical records from 11 patients who received PELD operation (defined as PELD group) for and from 13 patients who received the internal fixation of bone graft fusion of lumbar posterior vertebral lamina decompression (defined as control group) for the treatment of the lumbar disc prolapse combined with stable retrolisthesis at Department of Spine Surgery, the Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University (Shijiazhuang, China) from May 2010 to December 2015. The operation time, the bleeding volume of perioperation, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were compared between 2 groups. Before and after surgery at different time points, ODI, VAS index, and imaging parameters (including Taillard index, inter-vertebral height, sagittal dislocation, and forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae) were compared.The average operation time, the blooding volume, and the rehabilitation days of postoperation were significantly less in PELD than in control group. The ODI and VAS index in PELD group showed a significantly immediate improving on the same day after the surgery. However, Taillard index, intervertebral height, sagittal dislocation in control group showed an immediate improving after surgery, but no changes in PELD group till 12-month after surgery. The forward bending angle of lumbar vertebrae was significantly increased and decreased in PELD and in control group, respectively.PELD operation was superior in terms of operation time, bleeding volume, recovery period, and financial

  16. Significance of preoperative planning software for puncture and channel establishment in percutaneous endoscopic lumbar DISCECTOMY: A study of 40 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhouyang; Li, Xinhua; Cui, Jian; He, Xiaobo; Li, Cong; Han, Yingchao; Pan, Jie; Yang, Mingjie; Tan, Jun; Li, Lijun

    2017-05-01

    Preoperative planning software has been widely used in many other minimally invasive surgeries, but there is a lack of information describing the clinical benefits of existing software applied in percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD). This study aimed to compare the clinical efficacy of preoperative planning software in puncture and channel establishment of PELD with routine methods in treating lumbar disc herniation (LDH). From June 2016 to October 2016, 40 patients who had single L4/5 or L5/S1 disc herniation were divided into two groups. Group A adopted planning software for preoperative puncture simulation while Group B took routine cases discussion for making puncture plans. The channel establishment time, operative time, fluoroscopic times and complications were compared between the two groups. The surgical efficacy was evaluated according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and modified Macnab's criteria. The mean channel establishment time was 25.1 ± 4.2 min and 34.6 ± 5.4 min in Group A and B, respectively (P  0.05). The findings of modified Macnab's criteria at each follow-up also showed no significant differences (P > 0.05). The application of preoperative planning software in puncture and cannula insertion planning in PELD was easy and reliable, and could reduce the channel establishment time, operative time and fluoroscopic times of PELD significantly. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A 90-day Bundled Payment for Primary Single-level Lumbar Discectomy/Decompression: What Does "Big Data" Say?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nikhil; Virk, Sohrab S; Phillips, Frank M; Yu, Elizabeth; Khan, Safdar N

    2018-04-01

    Episode-based bundling may become the major form of reimbursement for many elective spine procedures. As the amount for a 90-day episode of care is not known for a lumbar discectomy, we analyzed the previous reimbursements from Commercial payers (2007-Q2 2015), Medicare Advantage (2007-Q2 2015), and Medicare (2005-2012) for a primary single-level lumbar discectomy/decompression. Distribution of payments among various service providers was studied and a 90-day bundle was simulated. Depending on the payer type, the average facility costs constituted 59.7% to 73.6% of total payments, followed by surgeon's fees, which accounted for 13.7% to 18.5%. Postacute services made up 8.8% to 15.8% of the total reimbursement. Surgeries performed in the inpatient setting were significantly more expensive as compared with surgeries performed in the outpatient setting (P<0.01). The average 90-day bundle amount was estimated at $11,091, $6571, and $6239 for Commercial payers, Medicare Advantage, and Medicare, respectively. Overall, service providers in the Southern region were reimbursed the lowest from Commercial payers and Medicare, compared with other regions. Postacute services are not as major cost drivers after discectomy as after total joint arthroplasty or hip fracture repair.

  18. Percutaneous lumbar discectomy in treatment of chronic discogenic low back pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiao; Duang Zhaohui; Xu Zhitao; Wang Jianhui; Yu Xiaolong

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous lumbar discectomy in treating chronic discogenic low back pain. Methods: The authors retrospectively reviewed the treatment of 26 patients with chronic discogenic low back pain. All of the cases were treated with PLD under TV monitoring. Results: A follow-up of 26 patients for 3 to 48 months showing no severe complication. Followed-up lasting for 3 to 6 months, 15 cases were evaluated as excellent, 7 as good, 3 as fair and 1 as poor with the excellent and good rates reaching 84.6% by MacNab standard. Followed up from 7 to 12 months, 11 cases were evaluated as excellent, 6 as good, 3 as fair and 2 as poor with total effective rate of 77.2%. 14 cases were followed up for 12 to 48 months, the results revealed excellent in 7 patients, good in 4, fair in 1, and poor in 2, the excellent and good rates reached 78.5%. Conclusions: PLD is an effective and safe procedure in treating discogenic low back pain. (authors)

  19. Development and validation of an artificial wetlab training system for the lumbar discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adermann, Jens; Geissler, Norman; Bernal, Luis E; Kotzsch, Susanne; Korb, Werner

    2014-09-01

    An initial research indicated that realistic haptic simulators with an adapted training concept are needed to enhance the training for spinal surgery. A cognitive task analysis (CTA) was performed to define a realistic and helpful scenario-based simulation. Based on the results a simulator for lumbar discectomy was developed. Additionally, a realistic training operating room was built for a pilot. The results were validated. The CTA showed a need for realistic scenario-based training in spine surgery. The developed simulator consists of synthetic bone structures, synthetic soft tissue and an advanced bleeding system. Due to the close interdisciplinary cooperation of surgeons between engineers and psychologists, the iterative multicentre validation showed that the simulator is visually and haptically realistic. The simulator offers integrated sensors for the evaluation of the traction being used and the compression during surgery. The participating surgeons in the pilot workshop rated the simulator and the training concept as very useful for the improvement of their surgical skills. In the context of the present work a precise definition for the simulator and training concept was developed. The additional implementation of sensors allows the objective evaluation of the surgical training by the trainer. Compared to other training simulators and concepts, the high degree of objectivity strengthens the acceptance of the feedback. The measured data of the nerve root tension and the compression of the dura can be used for intraoperative control and a detailed postoperative evaluation.

  20. State-of-the-art transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar surgery under local anesthesia: Discectomy, foraminoplasty, and ventral facetectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairyo, Koichi; Chikawa, Takashi; Nagamachi, Akihiro

    2018-03-01

    Transforaminal (TF) percutaneous endoscopic surgery for the lumbar spine under the local anesthesia was initiated in 2003 in Japan. Since it requires only an 8-mm skin incision and damage of the paravertebral muscles would be minimum, it would be the least invasive spinal surgery at present. At the beginning, the technique was used for discectomy; thus, the procedure was called PELD (percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy). TF approach can be done under the local anesthesia, there are great benefits. During the surgery patients would be in awake and aware condition; thus, severe nerve root damage can be avoided. Furthermore, the procedure is possible for the elderly patients with poor general condition, which does not allow the general anesthesia. Historically, the technique was first applied for the herniated nucleus pulposus. Then, foraminoplasty, which is the enlargement surgery of the narrow foramen, became possible thanks to the development of the high speed drill. It was called the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar foraminoplasty (PELF). More recently, this technique was applied to decompress the lateral recess stenosis, and the technique was named percutaneous endoscopic ventral facetectomy (PEVF). In this review article, we explain in detail the development of the surgical technique of with time with showing our typical cases. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Puncture Reduction in Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy with HE's Lumbar LOcation (HELLO) System: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Guan, Xiaofei; Sun, Qi; Hu, Annan; Zhu, Yanjie; Gu, Guangfei; Zhang, Hailong; He, Shisheng

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) usually requires numerous punctures under X-ray fluoroscopy. Repeated puncture will lead to more radiation exposure and reduce the beginners' confidence. This cadaver study aimed to investigate the efficacy of HE's Lumbar Location (HELLO) system in puncture reduction of PTED. Cadaver study. Comparative groups. HELLO system consists of self-made surface locator and puncture locator. One senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of 20 cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of HELLO system (Group A). Additionally, the senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the right side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with traditional methods (Group B). On the other hand, an inexperienced surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of our HELLO system (Group C). At L4/L5 level, there was significant difference in puncture times between Group A and Group B (PHELLO system reduced 39%-45% radiation dosage when comparing Group A and Group B, but there was no significant difference in radiation exposure between Group A and Group C whatever at L4/L5 level or L5/S1 level (P>0.05). There was no difference in location time between Group A and Group B or Group A and Group C either at L4/L5 level or L5/S1 level (P>0.05). Small-sample preclinical study. HELLO system was effective in reducing puncture times, fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure, as well as the difficulty of learning PTED. (2015-RES-127).

  2. Puncture Reduction in Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy with HE's Lumbar LOcation (HELLO System: A Cadaver Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Fan

    Full Text Available Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED usually requires numerous punctures under X-ray fluoroscopy. Repeated puncture will lead to more radiation exposure and reduce the beginners' confidence.This cadaver study aimed to investigate the efficacy of HE's Lumbar Location (HELLO system in puncture reduction of PTED.Cadaver study.Comparative groups.HELLO system consists of self-made surface locator and puncture locator. One senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of 20 cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of HELLO system (Group A. Additionally, the senior surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the right side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with traditional methods (Group B. On the other hand, an inexperienced surgeon conducted the puncture procedure of PTED on the left side of the cadavers at L4/L5 and L5/S1 level with the assistance of our HELLO system (Group C.At L4/L5 level, there was significant difference in puncture times between Group A and Group B (P0.05. There was no difference in location time between Group A and Group B or Group A and Group C either at L4/L5 level or L5/S1 level (P>0.05.Small-sample preclinical study.HELLO system was effective in reducing puncture times, fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure, as well as the difficulty of learning PTED. (2015-RES-127.

  3. Anterior cervical discectomy with or without fusion with ray titanium cage: a prospective randomized clinical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauerberg, J.; Kosteljanetz, M.; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective randomized clinical study. OBJECTIVE: To compare 2 surgical methods in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy caused by hard or soft disc herniation; namely, simple discectomy versus discectomy with an additional interbody fusion with a Ray titanium cage. SUMMARY...... by fusion with a Ray titanium cage (40 patients) or to discectomy alone (46 patients). Clinical and radiologic follow-up was performed 3, 12, and 24 months after surgery. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups concerning self-reported satisfaction or severity of pain...... adjacent disc degeneration or spondylosis were the same in both groups. CONCLUSION: This study showed no statistically significant difference between simple discectomy and discectomy followed by interbody fusion with a titanium cage in the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy caused by disc...

  4. Analysis and treatment of surgical complications after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang HAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the causes of surgical complications after treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis by percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED.  Methods From December 2009 to December 2014, 286 patients with LDH (N = 201 and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis (N = 85 were confirmed by X-ray, CT or MRI and treated by PTED in our hospital. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was used to evaluate the degree of pain in each paitent before and after operation. The curative effect was evaluated by Macnab score. Surgical complications were recorded to find out the causes and methods to prevent them.  Results All cases were followed up for 3 months, and the VAS score decreased significantly compared with preoperation [1.00 (0.00, 1.05 vs 8.50 (7.75, 9.25; Z = 2.825, P = 0.050]. According to Macnab score, the rate of excellent and good functional recovery was 95.45% (273/286. Procedure-related complications included nerve injury in 8 cases (2.80%, hemorrhage at the operation site and hematoma formation around nerve root in 6 cases (2.10%, rupture of dural sac in one case (0.35%, muscle cramps in 3 cases (1.05%, surgical infection in one case (0.35%, postoperative recurrence in 4 cases (1.40%. All patients with complications were cured after symptomatic treatment. Conclusions The overall effect of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy for treating lumbar disc herniation and lumbar intervertebral foraminal stenosis is satisfactory, which has a low incidence rate of postoperative complications. Some tips can effectively reduce the rate of surgical complications such as preoperative evaluation, precise performance, careful hemostasis, shortening the operation time and postoperatively symptomatic treatment, etc. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.007

  5. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo

    1997-01-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  6. Measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube in the lumbar spine on magnetic resonance imaging. Comparison between normal, pre- and post-discectomy conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Yasutomo [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This study evaluated the usefulness of pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of lumbar disc hernia with special attention to measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube. Twenty-five patients (20 men and 5 women; 25 discs) who underwent posterior lumbar discectomy and 73 normal individuals (44 men and 29 women; 219 discs) of a similar age distribution were studied. Axial MRI was mainly used for the measurement of the dural tube. In the patient group, MRI examination was performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Assessment of the clinical symptoms was also included and used for comparison with the MRI evaluation. The cross-sectional area was significantly reduced to about 50% of the normal preoperatively. One month postoperatively, there was no significant increase in the size of the area, but after three months, the area increased significantly and progressed to the normal size within a year. One-month postoperatively, MRI examination was not considered useful because of postoperative hematoma and/or edema at the surgical site. The increase in the size of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube correlated well with the improvement in clinical symptoms. Three-months postoperatively, MRI evaluation of the lumbar disc seemed useful and measurement of the cross-sectional area of the dural tube appeared to serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of the surgery. (author)

  7. Physiotherapy Post Lumbar Discectomy: Prospective Feasibility and Pilot Randomised Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Alison; Goodwin, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate: acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures; distribution of scores on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ, planned primary outcome); and efficient working of trial components. Design and Setting A feasibility and external pilot randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN33808269, assigned 10/12/2012) was conducted across 2 UK secondary care outpatient physiotherapy departments associated with regional spinal surgery centres. Participants Consecutive consenting patients aged >18 years; post primary, single level, lumbar discectomy. Interventions Participants were randomised to either 1:1 physiotherapy outpatient management including patient leaflet, or patient leaflet alone. Main Outcome Measures Blinded assessments were made at 4 weeks post surgery (baseline) and 12 weeks post baseline (proposed primary end point). Secondary outcomes included: Global Perceived Effect, back/leg pain, straight leg raise, return to work/function, quality of life, fear avoidance, range of movement, medication, re-operation. Results At discharge, 110 (44%) eligible patients gave consent to be contacted. 59 (54%) patients were recruited. Loss to follow up was 39% at 12 weeks, with one site contributing 83% losses. Mean (SD) RMDQ was 10.07 (5.58) leaflet and 10.52 (5.94) physiotherapy/leaflet at baseline; and 5.37 (4.91) leaflet and 5.53 (4.49) physiotherapy/leaflet at 12 weeks. 5.1% zero scores at 12 weeks illustrated no floor effect. Sensitivity to change was assessed at 12 weeks with mean (SD) change -4.53 (6.41), 95%CI -7.61 to -1.44 for leaflet; and -6.18 (5.59), 95%CI -9.01 to -3.30 for physiotherapy/leaflet. RMDQ mean difference (95%CI) between change from baseline to twelve weeks was 1.65(-2.46 to 5.75). Mean difference (95%CI) between groups at 12 weeks was -0.16 (-3.36 to 3.04). Participant adherence with treatment was good. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions Both interventions were acceptable, and it is promising that they both

  8. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Sá

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation.

  9. A retrospective study of epidural and intravenous steroids after percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy for large lumbar disc herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhang

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Patients who underwent PELD with epidural steroid administration for large lumbar disc herniation showed favorable curative effect compared with those who underwent PELD with intravenous steroid administration.

  10. Imaging of the lumbar spine after diskectomy; Imagerie du rachis lombaire apres discectomie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laredo, J.D.; Wybier, M. [Hopital Lariboisiere, 75 - Paris (France)

    1995-12-31

    The radiological investigation of persistent or recurrent sciatica after lumbar diskectomy essentially consists of demonstrating recurrent disk herniation. Comparison between plain and contrast enhanced CT or MR examinations at the level of the diskectomy is the main step of the radiological survey. The meanings of the various radiological findings are discussed. Other lesions that may induce persistent sciatica after lumbar diskectomy include degenerative narrowing of the lateral recess, spinal instability, stress fracture of the remaining neural arch, pseudo-meningomyelocele after laminectomy. (authors). 34 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. How does accounting for worker productivity affect the measured cost-effectiveness of lumbar discectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Lane; Dall, Timothy M; Gu, Qian; Saavoss, Josh; Schafer, Michael F

    2014-04-01

    Back pain attributable to lumbar disc herniation is a substantial cause of reduced workplace productivity. Disc herniation surgery is effective in reducing pain and improving function. However, few studies have examined the effects of surgery on worker productivity. We wished to determine the effect of disc herniation surgery on workers' earnings and missed workdays and how accounting for this effect influences the cost-effectiveness of surgery? Regression models were estimated using data from the National Health Interview Survey to assess the effects of lower back pain caused by disc herniation on earnings and missed workdays. The results were incorporated into Markov models to compare societal costs associated with surgical and nonsurgical treatments for privately insured, working patients. Clinical outcomes and utilities were based on results from the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial and additional clinical literature. We estimate average annual earnings of $47,619 with surgery and $45,694 with nonsurgical treatment. The increased earnings for patients receiving surgery as compared with nonsurgical treatment is equal to $1925 (95% CI, $1121-$2728). After surgery, we also estimate that workers receiving surgery miss, on average, 3 fewer days per year than if workers had received nonsurgical treatment (95% CI, 2.4-3.7 days). However, these fewer missed work days only partially offset the assumed 20 workdays missed to recover from surgery. More fully accounting for the effects of disc herniation surgery on productivity reduced the cost of surgery per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) from $52,416 to $35,146 using a 4-year time horizon and from $27,359 to $4186 using an 8-year time horizon. According to a sensitivity analysis, the 4-year cost per QALY varies between $27,921 and $49,787 depending on model assumptions. Increased worker earnings resulting from disc herniation surgery may offset the increased direct medical costs associated with surgery. After

  12. A CLINICAL STUDY OF OPERATIVE TREATMENT FOR LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC PROLAPSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anilkumar S. D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Amongst painful diseases, sciatica occupies a foremost place by reason of its prevalence, its production by a great variety of conditions, the great disablement it may produce and its tending to relapse all of which have led to its recognition as one of the great scourges of humanity. Intervertebral disc prolapse is the important and common cause of low back pain and sciatica. Here, the subject of laminectomy and discectomy in the treatment of proven intervertebral disc prolapse in the lower lumbar region is reviewed and its results examined. AIM OF STUDY This study was undertaken in order to evaluate the following objectives. PRIMARY Analysis of clinical parameters and per operative findings of lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse. SECONDARY Analysis of clinical parameters and surgical outcome in lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse with respect to improvement in pain and neurological status. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was undertaken in 22 patients who attended the Orthopaedic Department of Mount Zion Medical College, Adoor, between August 2014 to July 2015. All of them were suffering from a prolapsed lumbar vertebral disc as shown by clinical examination and investigations. Lumbar laminectomy and discectomy constituted the operative procedure for all of them. RESULTS In acute onset cases and cases with short duration, results were good. By six months, 80% of patients recorded of good pain relief, 80% of patients returned to work within six 6 months, 60% of patients showed good neurological recovery by 6 months. Laminectomy and discectomy in proven cases of lumbar intervertebral disc prolapse is a rewarding procedure. LT definitely relieved pain in all cases and improved morbidity and neurological deficits in most of the cases. CONCLUSION 1. Laminectomy and discectomy is an effective method of treatment in herniation of lumbar intervertebral disc. 2. The procedure is ideally done in those with the disc prolapse proved with the

  13. Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy for the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation in Obese Patients: Health-Related Quality of Life Assessment in a 2-Year Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkantsinikoudis, Nikolaos; Chaniotakis, Constantinos; Charitoudis, Georgios; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2018-05-01

    Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED) is a minimally invasive surgical technique used principally for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). LDH is a frequent spinal ailment in obese individuals. The aim of this prospectively designed study was to assess for the first time in the literature the impact of PTED in postoperative parameters of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in obese patients with LDH within a 2-year follow-up period, to further evaluate the effectiveness of PTED. Patients with surgically treatable LDH were divided into 2 groups. Group A constituted 20 obese patients, and group B was composed of 10 patients with normal body mass index (BMI). A visual analog scale was used for pain evaluation, and the Short Form SF-36 Medical Survey Questionnaire contributed to HRQoL assessment. Follow-up was conducted preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Two of the 20 patients (10%) presented with severe postoperative pain, necessitating conventional microdiscectomy. All studied parameters exhibited maximal improvement at 6 months in group A and at 6 weeks in group B, with subsequent stabilization. Obese patients scored lower in all parameters compared with their healthy counterparts with normal BMI, acquiring a less favorable clinical benefit. PTED appears to be a generally safe and effective method for treating obese patients with LDH. However, major technical challenges that lead to a higher frequency of complications, as well as the lesser acquired clinical benefit, in obese patients may contribute to the further consideration for PTED in specific obese patients, especially on the grounds of low surgical experience. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) for lumbar disc herniation: A prospective cohort study - early results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, S; Giovannopoulou, E; Charitoudis, G; Kazakos, K

    2017-11-06

    Lumbar discectomy is among the most frequently performed procedures in spinal surgery. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) is a minimally invasive technique that gains ground among surgeons in the recent years. TPED has been studied in terms of effectiveness, however little is known about its overall impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of the patients. To investigate the progress of HRQoL following TPED. Seventy-six (76) patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 56.5 ±12.1 years with 38 (50%) males and 38 (50%) females. All patients underwent TPED at L3-L4 (27.6%), L4-L5 (52.6%) and L5-S1 (19.7%). SF-36 was used for the assessment of HRQoL preoperatively and at 6 weeks, at 3, 6 and 12 months after the procedure. All aspects of SF-36 questionnaire showed statistically significant improvement one year after the procedure (p< 0.001). Role limitations due to physical problems, bodily pain and role limitations due emotional problems showed the highest improvement, followed by physical functioning, vitality, social functioning, mental health and general health. TPED for lumbar disc herniation is associated with significant improvement in all aspects of health-related quality of life within 6 weeks postoperatively and the improvement remains significant one year after surgery, as measured by the SF-36 questionnaire.

  15. The value of the dynamic mechanical spinal test in the management of automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiao; Yang Liwen; Wang Jianhui; Duan Zaohui; Xu Zhitao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively assess the predictive power of centralization phenomenon in the curative effect of automated PLD. Methods: The survey population was consisted of 109 patients with inclusion heraiation demonstrated by CT/MRI, 74 men and 35 women with average age of 43.1 years(17-75 years). All were complained of low back pain, with varying degrees of lower extremity pain and altered sensation, lasting for more than 2 months; including one symptomatic disc in 99 patients and two symptomatic discs in 10 patients. Patients were undergone dynamic mechanical spinal test and reported whether the test would aggravate their pain. The assessment included forward flexion, extension, rotation of the trunk to the right and left, rotation to the left with right extension, rotation to the right with left extension, and whether straight leg raising in the supine position would aggravate back pain or leg pain. Symptom resposes were categorized into three groups: centralization group (CG), partial-centralization group (PCG) and noncentralization group (NCG). Centralization of pain is the progressive retreat of the most distal extent of the referred or radicular pain toward or to the lumbar midline. Noncentralization of pain is the peripheralization of pain in one or more directions, and no change in the distal-most pain location or intensity. All patients received a single therapy with PLD. Results: A follow-up of 109 patients for 3 to 6 months, including 46 cases with 24 as exellent and 22 as good reaching 100% of excellent good rate in CG by MacNab standards; 43 cases with 5 as exellent, 29 as good, 9 as fair and poor, with total effective rate of 79.1% in PCG. Twenty cases of NCG symptoms showed no improvement and therefore surgery was considered. Conclusions: Centralization phenomenon occurrence during initial mechanical evaluation is a very accurate predictor for successful PLD outcome. Nonoccurrence of centralization would accurately predict poor PLD outcome and

  16. Percutaneous discectomy on lumbar radiculopathy related to disk herniation: Why under CT guidance? An open study of 100 consecutive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Hauger, Olivier; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Amoretti, Marie-eve; Lesbats, Virginie; Yvonne, Maratos; Ianessi, Antoine; Boileau, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study conducted on 100 patients is to demonstrate that performing CT-guided percutaneous discectomy for herniated disks results in a significant improvement in pain symptoms at several times (D1, D2, D7, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months). This objective assesses the effectiveness and feasibility of this technique under CT guidance in patients presenting documented lower back pain related to disk herniation that has not improved with appropriate medical treatment. The impact of various factors on the effectiveness of discectomy will also be evaluated. At 1 week, we notes a decrease in average VAS respectively of 71% and 67% in patients treated for posterolateral and foraminal herniated disks; the result for posteromedian herniated disks is only 45% in average decrease. At 6 months post op, 79% of lateralized herniated disks have a satisfactory result (≥70% decrease in pain as compared to initial pain), whereas post median herniated disks had a satisfactory result in only 50% of cases. Percutaneous fine needle discectomy probe under combined CT and fluoroscopic guidance is a minimally invasive spine surgery which should be considered as an alternative to surgery. This technique presents several advantages: the small diameter of the probe used (maximum 16G or 1.5 mm) allows a cutaneous incision of only a few millimeters, and a trans-canal approach can be possible; it also decreases the risk of ligamentary lesion and does not cause an osseous lesion of the posterior arc or of the adjacent muscular structures.

  17. [The post-discectomy syndrome: clinical and electroneuromyographic characteristics and methods of treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaev, A V; Guseĭnova, S G; Musaeva, I R

    2008-01-01

    The data of the Azerbaijan Neurosurgical Center, including 2618 case-reports of patients operated on for low back discal hernia between 1997 and 2002, have been analyzed. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. The retrospective analysis of the data reveals that 26,4% of patients need further restorative treatment due to the presence of various neurological disturbances: pain syndromes of different intensity, motor deficits (pareses), sensory disorders and functional disorders of pelvic organs. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. Along with these data, the results of our own clinical and neurophysiological study of 110 patients have been summarized as well. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. A high effectiveness of electrostimulation and naphthalan therapy alone and in combination with massage and medical gymnastics has been revealed. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented. Electroneuromyographic data revealing the positive dynamics as a result of the treatment of patients with the post-discectomy syndrome are presented.

  18. Significant Improvement of Puncture Accuracy and Fluoroscopy Reduction in Percutaneous Transforaminal Endoscopic Discectomy With Novel Lumbar Location System: Preliminary Report of Prospective Hello Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoxin; Guan, Xiaofei; Zhang, Hailong; Wu, Xinbo; Gu, Xin; Gu, Guangfei; Fan, Yunshan; He, Shisheng

    2015-12-01

    Prospective nonrandomized control study.The study aimed to investigate the implication of the HE's Lumbar LOcation (HELLO) system in improving the puncture accuracy and reducing fluoroscopy in percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy (PTED).Percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy is one of the most popular minimally invasive spine surgeries that heavily depend on repeated fluoroscopy. Increased fluoroscopy will induce higher radiation exposure to surgeons and patients. Accurate puncture in PTED can be achieved by accurate preoperative location and definite trajectory.The HELLO system mainly consists of self-made surface locator and puncture-assisted device. The surface locator was used to identify the exact puncture target and the puncture-assisted device was used to optimize the puncture trajectory. Patients who had single L4/5 or L5/S1 lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and underwent PTED were included the study. Patients receiving the HELLO system were assigned in Group A, and those taking conventional method were assigned in Group B. Study primary endpoint was puncture times and fluoroscopic times, and the secondary endpoint was location time and operation time.A total of 62 patients who received PTED were included in this study. The average age was 45.35 ± 8.70 years in Group A and 46.61 ± 7.84 years in Group B (P = 0.552). There were no significant differences in gender, body mass index, conservative time, and surgical segment between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). The puncture times were 1.19 ± 0.48 in Group A and 6.03 ± 1.87 in Group B (P HELLO system is accurate preoperative location and definite trajectory. This preliminary report indicated that the HELLO system significantly improves the puncture accuracy of PTED and reduces the fluoroscopic times, preoperative location time, as well as operation time. (ChiCTR-ICR-15006730).

  19. Case Report: A case report highlighting bilateral EDB wasting as a clinical marker for lumbar canal stenosis [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy Mohan Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Herein we discuss a case of a 55 year old male presenting with history suggestive of sciatica on the left leg. Straight leg raising (SLR test was positive at 45 degrees on the left side. His ankle reflex was absent and the power of extensor hallusus longus (EHL was 4/5 on the same side. MRI lumbosacral spine revealed left paramedian disc prolapsed on L4/L5 level with spinal canal diameter of 9mm.However since his bilateral extensor digitorm brevis (EDB were wasted, we suspected associated lumbar canal stenosis and thereby opted for laminectomy and discectomy in this case. Intraoperatively dural wasting, hypertrophied facets and narrow canal were confirmed. Laminectomy, medial facectectomy and discectomy were carried out. The patient recovered uneventfully with resolution of his sciatica-like pain. Bilateral EDB wasting thereby provides a clinical clue to the underlying lumbar canal stenosis and can help in making correct therapeutic decisions.

  20. Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro-discectomy Surgery: A Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients' Views and Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boote, Jonathan; Newsome, Ruth; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2017-07-01

    Sciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life-changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica. A qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi-structured interviews. Twenty-one in-depth, semi-structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed. Most patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first. Many patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Physiotherapy for Patients with Sciatica Awaiting Lumbar Micro‐discectomy Surgery: A Nested, Qualitative Study of Patients' Views and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Ruth; Reddington, Michael; Cole, Ashley; Dimairo, Munyaradzi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Sciatica is a common clinical condition that can be extremely painful, disabling and life‐changing. Whether conservative or surgical treatment for sciatica secondary to an intervertebral disc prolapse is most effective is still much debated. An important component of conservative treatment is physiotherapy, which aims to promote physical and psychological health for the patient, whilst resorption of the disc takes place. This paper reports a qualitative study of patients' views and experiences of a bespoke physiotherapy intervention for the treatment of sciatica. Methods A qualitative study nested within a pilot randomized controlled trial of bespoke physiotherapy for the treatment of patients with sciatica awaiting lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Patients randomized to receive bespoke physiotherapy in the intervention arm of the trial were invited to take part in semi‐structured interviews. Twenty‐one in‐depth, semi‐structured interviews took place. All interviews were recorded, fully transcribed and thematically analysed. Results Most patients in the sample found the physiotherapy valuable, appreciating the individual nature of the approach, the exercises to reduce pain and discomfort, techniques for improving functional spinal movement, walking and dynamic posture, and manual therapy and cardiovascular exercise. A small number did not find the physiotherapy of benefit. Sixteen patients in the sample went on to proceed with surgery, but most of these found value in having had the physiotherapy first. Discussion Many patients with sciatica appreciate the value of physiotherapy prior to surgery. Future research should examine patients' experiences of bespoke physiotherapy delivered within primary care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors Physiotherapy Research International published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26914525

  2. Discectomia lombar transforaminal: estudo quantitativo em cadáveres Discectomía lumbar transforaminal: estudio cuantitativo en cadáveres Transforaminal lumbar discectomy: quantitative study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Neves Vialle

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a eficácia da discectomia lombar por via transforaminal, de modo quantitativo, em estudo experimental com cadáveres. MÉTODOS: este estudo utilizou cinco cadáveres humanos frescos, submetidos à discectomia pela via de acesso póstero-lateral nos níveis L3-L4 e L4-L5, visando remover a maior quantidade de material discal possível. Uma abordagem anterior complementar, expondo os mesmos discos intervertebrais, permitiu a remoção do material discal remanescente, para posterior comparação. RESULTADOS: em L3-L4, a remoção transforaminal do disco obteve, em média, 48% do volume total, e em L4-L5, cerca de 38%. CONCLUSÃO: apesar de segura e de fácil realização, a via transforaminal não é tão eficaz quanto à via anterior na remoção do disco intervertebral.OBJETIVO: evaluar la eficacia de la discectomía lumbar por vía transforaminal, de modo cuantitativo, en un estudio experimental con cadáveres. MÉTODOS: este estudio utilizó cinco cadáveres humanos frescos, sometidos à discectomía por vía de acceso posterolateral en los niveles L3-L4 y L4-L5, visando remover la mayor cantidad de material discal posible. Un abordaje anterior complementar, exponiendo los mismos discos intervertebrales, permitió la remoción del material discal remanente, para posterior comparación. RESULTADOS: en L3-L4, la remoción transforaminal del disco obtuvo en promedio 48% del volumen total y en L4-L5, cerca del 38%. CONCLUSIÓN: aunque segura y de fácil realización, la vía transforaminal no es tan eficaz como la vía anterior en la remoción del disco intervertebral.OBJECTIVE: to evaluate the quantitative efficacy of transforaminal lumbar discectomy, through a cadaver study. METHODS: this study used five fresh human cadavers, that underwent L3-L4 and L4-L5 posterolateral discectomy, aiming to remove as much disc material as possible. After that, the remaining disc material was removed through an anterior approach, for further

  3. Postoperative Clinical Outcome and Risk Factors for Poor Outcome of Foraminal and Extraforaminal Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Sik; Kang, Kyung Hee; Park, Jeong Hyun; Lim, Jae Hyeon; Jang, Il Tae

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated postoperative outcomes in patients who have lumbar foraminal or extraforaminal disc herniation (FELDH) and suggested the risk factors for poor outcomes. A total of 234 patients were selected for this study. Pre- and post-operative Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Korean version Oswestry Disability Index (KODI) were evaluated and the changes of both score were calculated. Outcome was defined as excellent, good, fair, and poor based on Mcnab classification. The percentage of superior facetectomy was calculated by using the Maro-view 5.4 Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS). Paramedian lumbar discectomy was performed in 180 patients and combined lumbar discectomy was performed in 54 patients. Paramedian lumbar discectomy group showed better outcome compared with combined discectomy group. p value of VAS change was 0.009 and KODI was 0.013. The average percentage of superior facetectomy was 33% (range, 0-79%) and it showed negative correlation with VAS and KODI changes (Pearson coefficient : -0.446 and -0.498, respectively). Excellent or good outcome cases (Group I) were 136 (58.1%) and fair or poor outcome cases (Group II) were 98 (41.9%). The percentage of superior facetectomy was 26.5% at Group I and 42.5% at Group II. There was significant difference in superior facetectomy percentage between Group I and II (p=0.000). This study demonstrated that paramedian lumbar discectomy with preservation of facet joints is an effective and good procedure for FELDH. At least 60% of facet should be preserved for excellent or good outcomes.

  4. Natural course of pain and disability following primary lumbar discectomy: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rushton, A.; Heneghan, N.; Heijmans, M.W.; Staal, J.B.; Goodwin, P.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knowledge about the natural clinical course is needed to improve understanding of recovery postsurgery as outcome is poor for some patients. Knowledge of the natural clinical course of symptoms and disability will inform optimal timing and the nature of rehabilitation intervention. The

  5. Translaminar screw fixation in the lumbar spine: technique, indications, results

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, D.; Humke, T.

    1998-01-01

    Translaminar screw fixation of the lumbar spine represents a simple and effective technique for short segment fusion in the degenerative spine. Clinical experience with 173 patients who underwent translaminar screw fixation revealed a fusion rate of 94%. The indications for translaminar screw fixation as a primary fixation procedure are: segmental dysfunction, lumbar spinal stenosis with painful degenerative changes, segmental revision surgery after discectomies, and painful disc-related synd...

  6. Clinical study of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability

    OpenAIRE

    GUO, SHUGUANG; SUN, JUNYING; TANG, GENLIN

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the clinical effects of bilateral decompression via vertebral lamina fenestration for lumbar interbody fusion in the treatment of lower lumbar instability. The 48 patients comprised 27 males and 21 females, aged 47?72 years. Three cases had first and second degree lumbar spondylolisthesis and all received bilateral vertebral lamina fenestration for posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using a threaded fusion cage (TFC), which maintains the three-column...

  7. PEEK Cages versus PMMA Spacers in Anterior Cervical Discectomy: Comparison of Fusion, Subsidence, Sagittal Alignment, and Clinical Outcome with a Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Marie T.; Sircar, Ronen; Kogias, Evangelos; Scholz, Christoph; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare radiographic and clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease using PEEK cages or PMMA spacers with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Methods. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 107 patients in one or two levels using empty PEEK cages (51 levels), Sulcem PMMA spacers (49 levels) or Palacos PMMA spacers (41 levels) between January, 2005 and February, 2009. Bony fusion, subsidence, and sagittal alignment were retrospectively assessed in CT scans and radiographs at follow-up. Clinical outcome was measured using the VAS, NDI, and SF-36. Results. Bony fusion was assessed in 65% (PEEK cage), 57% (Sulcem), and 46% (Palacos) after a mean follow-up of 2.5 years. Mean subsidence was 2.3–2.6 mm without significant differences between the groups. The most pronounced loss of lordosis was found in PEEK cages (−4.1°). VAS was 3.1 (PEEK cage), 3.6 (Sulcem), and 2.7 (Palacos) without significant differences. Functional outcome in the PEEK cage and Palacos group was superior to the Sulcem group. Conclusions. The substitute groups showed differing fusion rates. Clinical outcome, however, appears to be generally not correlated with fusion status or subsidence. We could not specify a superior disc substitute for anterior cervical discectomy. This trial is registered with DRKS00003591. PMID:25110734

  8. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Tevfik; Turan, Yahya; Gülşen, İsmail; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury. PMID:25210343

  9. Co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and lumbar disc herniation with lumbosacral nerve root anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tevfik Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbosacral nerve root anomalies are the leading cause of lumbar surgery failures. Although co-occurrence of lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation is common, it is very rare to observe that a nerve root anomaly accompanies these lesions. A 49-year-old male patient presented with sudden-onset right leg pain. Examinations revealed L5/S1 lumbar spondylolysis and disc herniation. At preoperative period, he was also diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly. Following discectomy and root decompression, stabilization was performed. The complaints of the patient diagnosed with lumbosacral root anomaly at intraoperative period were improved at postoperative period. It should be remembered that in patients with lumbar disc herniation and spondylolysis, lumbar root anomalies may coexist when clinical and neurological picture is severe. Preoperative and perioperative assessments should be made meticulously to prevent neurological injury.

  10. Clinical application of percutaneous lumbar puncture to treat sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation under CT guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Linyou; Li Yuan; Shao Yangtong

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of the percutaneous lumbar puncture to treat sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Methods: 75 cases of lumbar disc herniation with significant clinical signs were confirmed by CT scan. The technique of the percutaneous lumbar puncture led the needle to approach nerve root and injected medicine diffusing into extraduramater, and then relieved the symptom of sciatica. Results: The rate of success of percutaneous lumbar puncture guided by CT reached to 100%. After two weeks of follow-up, the symptom of pain was obviously improved and disappeared in 63.3% cases. There were 23.0% cases needed a second procedure, and no change was obsesved in 9.3% cases. Conclusions: The percutaneous lumbar puncture guided by CT to treat sciatica resulted from lumbar disc herniation is one of the safe, reliable, effective new methods with no complication. The long term effectiveness is still in need of investigation. (authors)

  11. Clinical outcomes of two minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yonghao; Liu, Xinyu

    2016-10-01

    There are two modified TLIF, including MIS-TLIF and TLIF through Wiltse approach (W-TLIF). Although both of the two minimally invasive surgical procedures can be effective in the treatment for lumbar degenerative diseases, no comparative analysis has been made so far regarding their clinical outcomes. To compare the clinical outcomes of MIS-TLIF and W-TLIF for the treatment for single-segment degenerative lumbar diseases. Ninety-seven patients with single-segment degenerative lumbar disorders were included in this study. Forty-seven underwent MIS-TLIF surgery (group A). For group B, fifty patients underwent W-TLIF. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, the visual analog scale (VAS) of low back pain (LBP) and leg pain, MRI score and atrophy rate of CSA, interbody fusion rate were assessed during the postoperative follow-up. Incision length, blood loss, operative time, CPK, and postoperative incision pain VAS were better in group A (P degenerative disease. MIS-TLIF has less blood loss, shorter surgical incision, and less lower postoperative back pain, while W-TLIF is less expensive for hospital stay with lower exposure to X-rays.

  12. Clinical and radiological outcome after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiban, Ehab; Gapon, Karina; Wostrack, Maria; Meyer, Bernhard; Lehmberg, Jens

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate long-term results after one-, two-, and three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone empty polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. We performed a retrospective review of a consecutive patient cohort that underwent ACDF with stand-alone empty PEEK cages between 2007 and 2010 with a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Radiographic follow-up included static and flexion/extension radiographs. Changes in the operated segments were measured and compared to radiographs directly after surgery. Clinical outcome was evaluated by a physical examination, pain visual analog scale (VAS), and health-related quality of life (HRQL) using the EuroQOL questionnaire (EQ-5D). Analysis of associations between fusion, subsidence, cervical alignment, and clinical outcome parameters were performed. Of 407 consecutive cases, 318 met all inclusion criteria. Follow-up data were obtained from 265 (83 %) cases. The mean age at presentation was 55 years and 139 patients were male (52 %). In the sample, 127, 125, and 13 patients had one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively; 132 (49 %) presented with spondylotic cervical myelopathy and 133 (50 %) with cervical radiculopathy. Fusion was achieved in 85, 95, and 94 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. Non-fusion was associated with higher VAS pain levels. Radiographic adjacent segment disease (ASD) was observed in 20, 29, and 15 % in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. ASD was associated with lower HRQL. Subsidence was observed in 25, 27, and 15 % of segments in one-, two-, and three-level surgeries, respectively. However, this had no influence on clinical outcome. Follow-up operations for symptomatic adjacent disc disease and implant failure at index level were needed in 16 (6 %) and four (1.5 %) cases, respectively. Younger age was associated with better clinical outcome. Multilevel surgery favored better myelopathy outcomes and fusion reduced overall

  13. Lumbar disc herniation at high levels : MRI and clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Chung Ho; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ahn, Jae Sung; Lee, Hwan Do; Chung, Yon Su; Jeong, Ki Ho; Cho, Jun Sik

    1999-01-01

    To assess the frequency, location, associated MR findings, and clinical symptoms of the high level lumbar disc herniation(HLDH). A total of 1076 patients with lunbar disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. MR images of 41 of these with HLDH(T12-L1, L1-2, L2-3) were analysed in terms of frequency, location, and associated MR findings, and correlated with clinical symptoms of HLDH. The prevalence of HLDH was 3.8%(41/1076). HLDH was located at T12-L1 level in four patients(10%), at L1-2 level in 14(34%), at L2-3 level in 21(51%), and at both L1-2 and L2-3 levels in two. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 72 years (mean, 44), and there were 26 men and 16 women. In 11(27%), whose mean age was 32 years, isolated disc herniation was limited to these high lumbar segments. The remaining 30 patients had HLDH associated with variable involvement of the lower lumbar segments. Associated lesions were as follow : lower level disc herniation(14 patients, 34%); apophyseal ring fracture(8 patients, 19%); Schmorl's node and spondylolisthesis (each 6 patients, each 14%); spondylolysis(3 patients, 7%); and retrolisthesis(2 patients, 5%). In 20 patients(49%) with HLDH(n=41), there was a previous history of trauma. Patients with HLDH showed a relatively high incidence of associated coexisting abnormalities such as lower lumbar disc herniation, apophyseal ring fracture, Schmorl's node, spondylolysis, and retrolisthesis. In about half of all patients with HLDH there was a previous history of trauma. The mean age of patients with isolated HLDH was lower; clinical symptoms of the condition were relatively nonspecific and their incidence was low

  14. Lumbar disc herniation at high levels : MRI and clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paek, Chung Ho; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ahn, Jae Sung; Lee, Hwan Do; Chung, Yon Su; Jeong, Ki Ho; Cho, Jun Sik [Chungnam National Univ. College of Medicine, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    To assess the frequency, location, associated MR findings, and clinical symptoms of the high level lumbar disc herniation(HLDH). A total of 1076 patients with lunbar disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. MR images of 41 of these with HLDH(T12-L1, L1-2, L2-3) were analysed in terms of frequency, location, and associated MR findings, and correlated with clinical symptoms of HLDH. The prevalence of HLDH was 3.8%(41/1076). HLDH was located at T12-L1 level in four patients(10%), at L1-2 level in 14(34%), at L2-3 level in 21(51%), and at both L1-2 and L2-3 levels in two. The age of patients ranged from 20 to 72 years (mean, 44), and there were 26 men and 16 women. In 11(27%), whose mean age was 32 years, isolated disc herniation was limited to these high lumbar segments. The remaining 30 patients had HLDH associated with variable involvement of the lower lumbar segments. Associated lesions were as follow : lower level disc herniation(14 patients, 34%); apophyseal ring fracture(8 patients, 19%); Schmorl's node and spondylolisthesis (each 6 patients, each 14%); spondylolysis(3 patients, 7%); and retrolisthesis(2 patients, 5%). In 20 patients(49%) with HLDH(n=41), there was a previous history of trauma. Patients with HLDH showed a relatively high incidence of associated coexisting abnormalities such as lower lumbar disc herniation, apophyseal ring fracture, Schmorl's node, spondylolysis, and retrolisthesis. In about half of all patients with HLDH there was a previous history of trauma. The mean age of patients with isolated HLDH was lower; clinical symptoms of the condition were relatively nonspecific and their incidence was low.

  15. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zi-hai

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP. All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical

  16. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sheng; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Ding, Zi-hai; Xu, Xin Ming; Xu, Yong-qing

    2011-04-14

    Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D

  17. Clinical evaluation of MRI for lumbar spinal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriwaka, Yosuke; Nakayama, Sachiko; Murai, Nobuko; Watanabe, Katsushi; Kawano, Keiichiro; Tajima, Naoya; Kihara, Yasushi; Okada, Akihiko; Fujimoto, Toshiro.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine. MRI using a resistive magnet at 0.1 Tesla was compared with computed tomography (CT) and myelography. A saturation recovery (SR) technique with repetition time (TR) of 500 msec was used in all cases. There were 19 cases with disk herniation, 5 with canal stenosis, 2 with spondylosis deformans and 6 with other suspected disease. MRI showed the protrusion of disk, displacement of epidural fat and degenerative change of disk more clearly than CT and myelography. Of the 12 herniated disks, 8 disks were clearly shown and one was not detected by MRI. In some cases, herniated disk could not be differentiated from disk bulging. With further technical advance, MRI is likely to become the initial procedure for evaluation of lumbar spinal disease. (author)

  18. COMPLICATIONS OF NON-ENDOSCOPIC DISCECTOMY: A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF TWENTY-ONE YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Felipe Ramírez León

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To report and compare the number and grade of major complications presented with non-endoscopic thermal discectomy and nucleoplasty for the treatment of discogenic axial lumbar pain using laser and radiofrequency. Methods: A 21 years retrospective study was conducted of the clinical charts of patients whose reason for consultation was axial lumbar pain from degenerative disc disease, and who underwent surgery using non-endoscopic discectomy and nucleoplasty (NEDN. Two groups were established; the first, NEDN with laser, and second, NEDN with radiofrequency. The number and types of complications reported in the case-series were counted, and their statistical differences determined. Results: The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by 643 of the medical charts. 26 complications were reported, the most common being radiculitis (n=12. Statistically significant differences were found between the complications occurring in the two groups (p=0.01. Conclusion: The number of complications showed statistically significant difference. The severity of the complications and adverse outcomes provide an argument for choosing one technology over the other. Training and the learning curve stage are important factors to be taken into account, to avoid complications.

  19. Ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy: A novel treatment option for refractory discogenic sciatica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crockett, M.T.; Moynagh, M.; Long, N.; Kilcoyne, A.; Dicker, P.; Synnott, K.; Eustace, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To assess the short and medium-term efficacy and safety of a novel, minimally invasive therapeutic option combining automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, intradiscal ozone injection, and caudal epidural: ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy (OPLD). Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-seven patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of discogenic sciatica who were refractory to initial therapy were included. Fifty patients underwent OPLD whilst 97 underwent a further caudal epidural. Outcomes were evaluated using McNab's score, improvement in visual analogue score (VAS) pain score, and requirement for further intervention. Follow-up occurred at 1 and 6 months, and comparison was made between groups. Results: OPLD achieved successful outcomes in almost three-quarters of patients in the short and medium term. OPLD achieved superior outcomes at 1 and 6 months compared to caudal epidural. There was a reduced requirement for further intervention in the OPLD group. No significant complications occurred in either group. Discussion: OPLD is a safe and effective treatment for patients with refractory discogenic sciatica in the short and medium term. OPLD has the potential to offer an alternative second-line minimally invasive treatment option that could reduce the requirement for surgery in this patient cohort. - Highlights: • Discogenic sciatica is a common condition which causes significant morbidity. • Ozone augmented percutaneous lumbar discectomy (OPLD) is a novel treatment. • Comparison was made to caudal epidural injection. • All outcomes were superior in the OPLD treatment group. • OPLD appears is an effective treatment for refractory discogenic sciatica

  20. Performance and complications of lumbar puncture in memory clinics : Results of the multicenter lumbar puncture feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duits, Flora H.; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Paquet, Claire; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lleo, Alberto; Hausner, Lucrezia; Molinuevo, Jose L.; Stomrud, Erik; Farotti, Lucia; Ramakers, Inez H. G. B.; Tsolaki, Magda; Skarsgard, Constance; Astrand, Ragnar; Wallin, Anders; Vyhnalek, Martin; Holmber-Clausen, Marie; Forlenza, Orestes V.; Ghezzi, Laura; Ingelsson, Martin; Hoff, Erik I.; Roks, C.M.A.A.; de Mendonca, Alexandre; Papma, Janne M.; Izagirre, Andrea; Taga, Mariko; Struyfs, Hanne; Alcolea, Daniel A.; Froelich, Lutz; Balasa, Mircea; Minthon, Lennart; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Persson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar puncture (LP) is increasingly performed in memory clinics. We investigated patient-acceptance of LP, incidence of and risk factors for post-LP complications in memory clinic populations. Methods We prospectively enrolled 3868 patients (50% women, age 66 ± 11 years, mini mental

  1. Clinical tests to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Abdullah M; Schneiders, Anthony G; Cook, Chad E; Hendrick, Paul A

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to systematically review the diagnostic ability of clinical tests to detect lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis. A systematic literature search of six databases, with no language restrictions, from 1950 to 2014 was concluded on February 1, 2014. Clinical tests were required to be compared against imaging reference standards and report, or allow computation, of common diagnostic values. The systematic search yielded a total of 5164 articles with 57 retained for full-text examination, from which 4 met the full inclusion criteria for the review. Study heterogeneity precluded a meta-analysis of included studies. Fifteen different clinical tests were evaluated for their ability to diagnose lumbar spondylolisthesis and one test for its ability to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis. The one-legged hyperextension test demonstrated low to moderate sensitivity (50%-73%) and low specificity (17%-32%) to diagnose lumbar spondylolysis, while the lumbar spinous process palpation test was the optimal diagnostic test for lumbar spondylolisthesis; returning high specificity (87%-100%) and moderate to high sensitivity (60-88) values. Lumbar spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis are identifiable causes of LBP in athletes. There appears to be utility to lumbar spinous process palpation for the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolisthesis, however the one-legged hyperextension test has virtually no value in diagnosing patients with spondylolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment and outcome of herniated lumbar intervertebral disk in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The goal of treatment in cases of lumbar disk herniation is to return the patient to .... instability during surgery on the lumbar spine for the treatment of reherniation ... H. H. Failure within one year following subtotal lumbar discectomy. J Bone ...

  3. Comparison Between Acrylic Cage and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage in Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid R; Nikoo, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Hosseini, Khadijeh

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, single-blind randomized-controlled clinical study. To compare polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with a novel Acrylic cage to find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical outcomes following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is considered a standard neurosurgical treatment for degenerative diseases of cervical intervertebral disks. There are many options, including bone grafts, bone cement, and spacers made of titanium, carbon fiber, and synthetic materials, used to restore physiological disk height and enhance spinal fusion, but the ideal device, which would provide immediate structural support and subsequent osteointegration and stability, has not been identified yet. To overcome this, we designed a new, inexpensive Acrylic cage. A total of 64 patients were eligible to participate and were randomly allocated to undergo ACDF either with Acrylic interbody fusion cage filled with bone substitute (n=32) or PEEK cage (n=32). Nurick's grading was used for quantifying the neurological deficit. Clinical and radiologic outcome was assessed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and subsequently at 2, 6, and 12 months of follow-up using Odom's criteria and dynamic radiographs (flexion-extension) and computed tomography scans, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of the Acrylic cage group compared with the PEEK cage group (mean difference: -0.438; 95% confidence interval, -0.807 to -0.068; P=0.016). There was a statistically significant difference in disk space height increase between the 2 groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. The Acrylic cage achieved higher fusion rate (good fusion) than the PEEK cage (96.9% vs. 93.8%). Intervertebral angle demonstrated a significant difference among the 2 treated groups throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that the use of Acrylic cage is associated with good clinical and radiologic outcomes and it can be therefore a

  4. Ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy: a novel treatment option for refractory discogenic sciatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, M T; Moynagh, M; Long, N; Kilcoyne, A; Dicker, P; Synnott, K; Eustace, S J

    2014-12-01

    To assess the short and medium-term efficacy and safety of a novel, minimally invasive therapeutic option combining automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, intradiscal ozone injection, and caudal epidural: ozone-augmented percutaneous discectomy (OPLD). One hundred and forty-seven patients with a clinical and radiological diagnosis of discogenic sciatica who were refractory to initial therapy were included. Fifty patients underwent OPLD whilst 97 underwent a further caudal epidural. Outcomes were evaluated using McNab's score, improvement in visual analogue score (VAS) pain score, and requirement for further intervention. Follow-up occurred at 1 and 6 months, and comparison was made between groups. OPLD achieved successful outcomes in almost three-quarters of patients in the short and medium term. OPLD achieved superior outcomes at 1 and 6 months compared to caudal epidural. There was a reduced requirement for further intervention in the OPLD group. No significant complications occurred in either group. OPLD is a safe and effective treatment for patients with refractory discogenic sciatica in the short and medium term. OPLD has the potential to offer an alternative second-line minimally invasive treatment option that could reduce the requirement for surgery in this patient cohort. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical Gait Evaluation of Patients with Lumbar Spine Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Liu, Yan-Cheng; Yan, Song-Hua; Wang, Sha-Sha; Lester, D Kevin; Zeng, Ji-Zhou; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Kuan

    2018-02-01

    The third generation Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA3, MiniSun, CA) has been developed for clinical gait evaluation, and this study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of IDEEA3 for the gait measurement of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) patients. Twelve healthy volunteers were recruited to compare gait cycle, cadence, step length, velocity, and number of steps between a motion analysis system and a high-speed video camera. Twenty hospitalized LSS patients were recruited for the comparison of the five parameters between the IDEEA3 and GoPro camera. Paired t-test, intraclass correlation coefficient, concordance correlation coefficient, and Bland-Altman plots were used for the data analysis. The ratios of GoPro camera results to motion analysis system results, and the ratios of IDEEA3 results to GoPro camera results were all around 1.00. All P-values of paired t-tests for gait cycle, cadence, step length, and velocity were greater than 0.05, while all the ICC and CCC results were above 0.950 with P GoPro camera are highly consistent with the measurements with the motion analysis system. The measurements for IDEEA3 are consistent with those for the GoPro camera. IDEEA3 can be effectively used in the gait measurement of LSS patients. © 2018 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Kinematics of the lumbar spine : clinical significance of lateral X-rays of the lumbar spine in anteflexion and retroflexion in healthy individuals, in cases of symptomatic herniated lumbar disc diseases and of spondylolisthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Berfelo

    1989-01-01

    textabstractAbout half of the population of the Netherlands suffers at some stage in their life from low back pain (Haanen, 1984) ; clinical examination of the lumbar spine is a matter of daily routine. X-Rays of the lumbar spine are taken in order to detect morphological changes that may be

  7. Resonancia magnética nuclear en el postoperatorio de discectomía lumbar en pacientes asintomáticos y con síndrome de cirugía lumbar fallida Ressonância nuclear magnética no pós-operatório da discectomia lombar em pacientes assintomáticos e com síndrome de cirurgia lombar falida Nuclear magnetic resonance in postoperative lumbar discectomy in asymptomatic patients and with failed back surgery syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Alpizar-Aguirre

    2010-03-01

    evolução satisfatória, assim como naqueles com "Síndrome de Cirurgia Falida", dando ênfase ao justo valor que a ressonância nuclear magnética tem. MÉTODOS: o universo do trabalho esta constituído por dois grupos, Grupo I com cinco pacientes com evolução satisfatória, assintomáticos. O Grupo II possui dez pacientes com resultados considerados não-satisfatórios e/ou "Síndrome Falida Lombar". Analisaram-se os resultados obtidos na imagem da ressonância nuclear magnética, emitindo um diagnóstico com avaliação externa sem conhecimento do estado clínico dos pacientes, e realizou-se uma correlação com o estado clínico de ambos os grupos. RESULTADOS: as manifestações clínicas pré-operatórias tiveram uma distribuição muito similar. Em nenhum dos grupos se reportaram complicações transoperatórias. Em todos os grupos, foi feito o estudo histopatológico e foi informado o disco degenerado ou hialinizado. No Grupo I, não foi encontrada imagem de alguma anomalia apesar de seu estado clínico. Em todos os pacientes foram encontrados dados de fibroses pós-cirúrgica, em quatro casos, disco residual, com compressão radicular nos cinco pacientes. No Grupo II, só foi possível encontrar em oito pacientes, e a ressonância nuclear magnética demonstrou algum achado anormal, os quais foram fibroses pós-cirúrgica, em cinco casos (50%; disco residual, em três casos (30%; e dados de compressão radicular, em seis casos (60%. CONCLUSÃO: não há congruência entre os achados da ressonância nuclear magnética e a clínica em pacientes pós-operatórios da discectomia lombar com evolução satisfatória, até o momento, assintomáticos. A ressonância nuclear magnética não é confiável nestes pacientes.OBJECTIVE: to analyze the postoperative changes in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy, both in patients whose evolution has been satisfactory, as in those with "Failed lumbar Surgery Syndrome", emphasizing the fair value that the nuclear magnetic

  8. Increased incidence of pseudarthrosis after unilateral instrumented transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lumbar spondylosis: Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gologorsky, Yakov; Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Moore, Max; Arginteanu, Marc; Moore, Frank; Steinberger, Alfred

    2014-10-01

    Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) with segmental pedicular instrumentation is a well established procedure used to treat lumbar spondylosis with or without spondylolisthesis. Available biomechanical and clinical studies that compared unilateral and bilateral constructs have produced conflicting data regarding patient outcomes and hardware complications. A prospective cohort study was undertaken by a group of neurosurgeons. They prospectively enrolled 80 patients into either bilateral or unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation groups (40 patients/group). Demographic data collected for each group included sex, age, body mass index, tobacco use, and Workers' Compensation/litigation status. Operative data included segments operated on, number of levels involved, estimated blood loss, length of hospital stay, and perioperative complications. Long-term outcomes (hardware malfunction, wound dehiscence, and pseudarthrosis) were recorded. For all patients, preoperative baseline and 6-month postoperative scores for Medical Outcomes 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) outcomes were recorded. Patient follow-up times ranged from 37 to 63 months (mean 52 months). No patients were lost to follow-up. The patients who underwent unilateral pedicle screw instrumentation (unilateral cohort) were slightly younger than those who underwent bilateral pedicle screw instrumentation (bilateral cohort) (mean age 42 vs. 47 years, respectively; p = 0.02). No other significant differences were detected between cohorts with regard to demographic data, mean number of lumbar levels operated on, or distribution of the levels operated on. Estimated blood loss was higher for patients in the bilateral cohort, but length of stay was similar for patients in both cohorts. The incidence of pseudarthrosis was significantly higher among patients in the unilateral cohort (7 patients [17.5%]) than among those in the bilateral cohort (1 patient [2.5%]) (p = 0.02). Wound dehiscence occurred for

  9. Clinical And Surgical Anatomy Of Lumbar Hernia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Victor Souza Sanders

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar hernia is defined as the presence of failure in the transverse fascia or in the aponeurosis of the transverse abdominal muscle that results in the extrusion of intra or extra peritoneal organs through the discontinuity of the postero lateral abdominal wall. The aim of this study was to conduct a methodical review of the anatomy of the hernia form grynfelt dated from 2006 to 2017. For this, we performed a bibliographic review by means of electronic databases like SciELO, PubMed, Science Direct, LILACS and Bireme to get better approach to the subject. It has been found that the lumbar hernia is a disease little known by doctors whose diagnostics are often performed in the wrong way and for surgical correction needs a good anatomical knowledge. Lumbar hernias, although rare, must be taken into account, since ischemia of herniated intestinal segments can lead to the death of the patient, especially in the elderly. Knowledge about the anatomy of the lumbar region is of vital importance because it makes surgery safe and reduces risks of complications and recidivating of the hernia.

  10. Clinical characterization of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions in English Cocker Spaniels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardy, Thomas J A; Tzounos, Caitlin E; Volk, Holger A; De Decker, Steven

    2016-02-15

    To assess the anatomic distribution of thoracolumbar and lumbar intervertebral disk extrusions (IVDEs) in English Cocker Spaniels as compared with findings in Dachshunds and to characterize clinical findings in English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar or lumbar IVDEs affecting various regions of the vertebral column. Retrospective observational study. 81 English Cocker Spaniels and 81 Dachshunds with IVDEs. Signalment, clinical signs, neurologic examination findings, and affected intervertebral disk spaces (IVDSs) were recorded for both breeds. Management methods and outcomes were recorded for English Cocker Spaniels. Lesions were categorized as thoracolumbar (IVDSs T9-10 through L1-2), midlumbar (L2-3 through L4-5), or caudal lumbar (L5-6 through L7-S1). Midlumbar and caudal lumbar IVDEs were significantly more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDEs had a longer median duration of clinical signs before evaluation and more commonly had unilateral pelvic limb lameness or spinal hyperesthesia as the predominant clinical sign than did those with IVDEs at other sites. Those with caudal lumbar IVDEs less commonly had neurologic deficits and had a higher median neurologic grade (indicating lesser severity), shorter mean postoperative hospitalization time, and faster mean time to ambulation after surgery than those with other sites affected. These variables did not differ between English Cocker Spaniels with thoracolumbar and midlumbar IVDEs. Caudal and midlumbar IVDEs were more common in English Cocker Spaniels than in Dachshunds. English Cocker Spaniels with caudal lumbar IVDE had clinical signs and posttreatment responses that differed from those in dogs with midlumbar or thoracolumbar IVDE.

  11. Do Modic changes have an impact on clinical outcome in lumbar spine surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Aske Foldbjerg; Bech-Azeddine, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    = 607), 1 fusion versus discectomy (n = 91), 3 fusion surgery (n = 454), and 4 total disc replacement (TDR, n = 500). A trend toward less improvement in low back pain or Oswestry Disability Index score was found in the discectomy studies, and a trend toward increased improvement was demonstrated...

  12. Transarticular fixation with cortical screws combined with dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy as surgical treatment of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in 17 dogs: clinical and computed tomography follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golini, Lorenzo; Kircher, Patrick R; Lewis, Fraser I; Steffen, Frank

    2014-05-01

    To describe clinical outcome and technical outcome assessed using computed tomography (CT) in dogs with degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS) treated by dorsal laminectomy, partial discectomy, and transarticular screw fixation. Retrospective observational case series. Dogs with DLSS (n = 17). Dogs with neurologic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings compatible with DLSS treated by dorsal laminectomy, partial discectomy and transarticular screw fixation were enrolled. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status was compared. Lumbosacral (LS) angle in extension and misalignment in preoperative MRI were compared with the postoperative CT. Residual mobility of the LS joint after fixation was also evaluated. Status of screws, presence of new bone formation over screw heads/articular facets and presence of adjacent segment disease (ASD) were assessed. Median CT follow-up was 12 months. Clinical improvement was seen in 13 dogs, 2 dogs had intermittent LS pain, and 2 dogs needed revision surgery. In 5 dogs, screws were either pulled out or broken. Reduction of LS angle in extension and misalignment was achieved. Residual mobility of the LS segment was present and ASD was not recognized. Transarticular screw fixation in dogs with DLSS is associated with a considerable number of technical failures and does not result in rigid stabilization; however, this did not significantly adversely influence clinical outcome. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Reoperation for Recurrent Sciatica Symptoms: A Retrospective Analysis of Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in 94 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junlong; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Kang; Li, Changqing; Zhou, Yue

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent symptoms of sciatica after previous surgical intervention is a relatively common and troublesome clinical problem. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression has been proved to be an effective method for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. However, the prognostic factors and outcomes of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation (PELR) for recurrent sciatica symptoms were still unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes and prognostic factors of patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms. From 2009 to 2015, 94 patients who underwent PELR for recurrent sciatica symptoms were enrolled. The primary surgeries include transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (n = 16), microendoscopic discectomy (n = 31), percutaneous endoscopic lumbar decompression (PELD, n = 17), and open discectomy (n = 30). The mean follow-up period was 36 months, and 86 (91.5%) patients had obtained at least 24 months' follow-up. Of the 94 patients with adequate follow-up, 51 (54.3%) exhibited excellent improvement, 23 (24.5%) had good improvement, and 7 (7.4%) had fair improvement according to modified Macnab criteria. The average re-recurrence rate was 9.6%, with no difference among the different primary surgery groups (PELD, 3/17; microendoscopic discectomy, 2/31; open discectomy, 3/30; transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, 1/16). There was a trend toward greater rates of symptom recurrence in the primary group of PELD who underwent percutaneous endoscopic lumbar reoperation compared with other groups, but this did not reach statistical significance (P > 0.05). Multivariate analysis suggested that age, body mass index, and surgeon level was independent prognostic factors. Obesity (hazard ratio 13.98, 95% confidence interval 3.394-57.57; P sciatica symptoms regardless of different primary operation type. Obesity, inferior surgeon level, and patient age older than 40 years were associated with a worse prognosis. Obesity was also a strong and

  14. Differences between clinical "snap-shot" and "real-life" assessments of lumbar spine alignment and motion - What is the "real" lumbar lordosis of a human being?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreischarf, Marcel; Pries, Esther; Bashkuev, Maxim; Putzier, Michael; Schmidt, Hendrik

    2016-03-21

    The individual lumbar lordosis and lumbar motion have been identified to play an important role in pathogenesis of low back pain and are essential references for preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation. The clinical "gold-standard" for measuring lumbar lordosis and its motion are radiological "snap-shots" taken while standing and during upper-body flexion and extension. The extent to which these clinically assessed values characterise lumbar alignment and its motion in daily life merits discussion. A non-invasive measurement-system was employed to measure lumbar lordosis and lumbar motion in 208 volunteers (age: 20-74yrs; ♀/♂: 115/93). For an initial short-term measurement, comparable with the clinical "snap-shot", lumbar lordosis and its motion were assessed while standing and during flexion and extension. Subsequently, volunteers were released to their daily lives while wearing the device, and measurements were performed during the following 24h. The average lumbar lordosis during 24h (8.0°) differed significantly from the standardised measurement while standing (33.3°). Ranges of motion were significantly different throughout the day compared to standing measurements. The influence of the factors age and gender on lordosis and its motion resulted in conflicting results between long- and short-term-measurements. In conclusion, results of short-term examinations differ considerably from the average values during real-life. These findings might be important for surgical planning and increase the awareness of the biomechanical challenges that spinal structures and implants face in real-life. Furthermore, long-term assessments of spinal alignment and motion during daily life can provide valid data on spinal function and can reveal the importance of influential factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical study on microsurgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation assisted by METRx system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-gang ZHAO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the techniques and curative effect of microsurgical procedures assisted by minimal exposure tubular retractor system (METRx in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH.  Methods A total of 51 LDH patients, including 24 patients with L4-5 herniation and 27 patients with L5-S1 herniation, underwent discectomy assisted by METRx system. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative complications and hospital stay were recorded. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used to evaluate the degree of low back pain before operation, one week, 3 months after operation, and in the last follow-up. Lumbar MRI was used to evaluate the decompression of spinal canal.  Results The success rate of operations in 51 cases was 98.04% (50/51. The average operation time was 125 min, the average intraoperative blood loss was 50 ml, the mean hospital stay was 5 d, all patients were followed up for 6-48 months (average 24 months. Compared with preoperation, both VAS and ODI scores decreased significantly one week after operation (P = 0.036, 0.029, 3 months after operation (P = 0.018, 0.023 and in the last follow-up (P = 0.007, 0.013. The improvement rate of ODI was 35.37% in the last follow-up. No infection, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF fistula, neurological defects or incision infection was found. One patient presented acute abdominalgia on the 2nd day after operation, and was diagnosed as annexitis. One patient showed nerve root irritation symptoms after operation caused by thick nerve root during the surgery. They were cured after symptomatic treatment.  Conclusions Microsurgical procedures for treating LDH assisted by METRx system can effectively relieve nerve root compression, protect the dural sac and nerve roots, and reduce surgical complications. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.04.008

  16. Predictors of vocational prognosis after herniated lumbar disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Frost, Poul; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2011-01-01

    at hospital. Methods. We followed all in- and outpatients diagnosed with HLD at a Danish University Hospital 2001 to 2005 eligible for the labor market in the Danish National Register on Public Transfer Payments (n = 2039). Clinical data were obtained from the Danish National Patient Register. The outcome...... were lumbar fusion alone HR 1.4 (CI = 1.1–1.8) and in combination with discectomy HR 1.6 (CI = 1.2–2.2) as compared with nonsurgical treatment, ethnicity other than Danish HR 1.55 (CI = 1.2–1.8), and female gender HR 1.2 (CI = 1.1–1.4). Discectomy, age, and year of inclusion were not associated...... with the outcome. Conclusion. The risk of an unfavorable vocational prognosis after hospital contact for HLD was substantial. Nonacademic work and less than 40 weeks of employment within year two before hospital contact were the strongest prognostic factors, but also lumbar fusion alone and in combination...

  17. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  18. Clinical evaluation of lumbar CT assisted discography in comparison with human cadaver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Shigehiko

    1988-04-01

    In order to estimate the clinical value of lumbar CT assisted discography (CTD), results obtained by this method were compared with histological findings of the cross section of the spine in fresh human cadavera. Based on these findings, preoperative CTD of lumbar disc herniation was investigated. In the discs of human cadavera, the contrast medium mainly invaded the fissures of nucleus pulposus and the ruptures of annulus fibrosus and then diffused to the surrounding tissues. These ruptures were classified into two categories: radial and circumferential. This indentification was possible only in CTD and was obscure in the usual discogram. Not all the ruptures could be dyed in a severe degenerative disc, and a rupture which was not communicated with nucleus pulposus was not dyed in a mild degenerative disc. In the preoperative CTD of lumbar disc herniation, the posterior radial ruptures representing the route of herniated nuclei were characteristic and the circumferential ruptures were found complicated.

  19. [Clinical observation of post-extension pulling massage in treating lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Li-Jiang; Ke, Xue-Ai; Mao, Xu-Dan; Chen, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Fang-Chao; Tong, Hong-Jie

    2010-10-01

    To observe the clinical effect of post-extension pulling massage in treating lumbar disc herniation. From January 2008 to December 2008, 61 patients with lumbar disc herniation, 34 males and 27 females, ranging in age from 17 to 67 years with an average of 42.6 years, were treated with post-extension pulling massage after continued traction for 30 minutes (on alternate days one time, 3 times as a course of treatment). There was bulging type in 9 cases, hernia type in 22, free type in 30. After a course of treatment, the clinical effects were evaluated according to standard of Macnab, the items included pain, lumbar activity, normal work and life of patients. All patients were followed up from 1 to 9 months with an average of 4.6 months. After treatment, the symptoms and signs of patients had obviously improved in above aspects. According to standard of Macnab, 48 cases got excellent result, 10 good, 2 fair, 1 poor. The post-extension pulling massage in treating lumbar disc herniation can obtain satisfactory results, which have localized site of action, small compression for vertebral body and can reduce accidental injury.

  20. Assessing the clinical utility of combined movement examination in symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monie, A P; Price, R I; Lind, C R P; Singer, K P

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to report the development and validation of a low back computer-aided combined movement examination protocol in normal individuals and record treatment outcomes of cases with symptomatic degenerative lumbar spondylosis. Test-retest, following intervention. Self-report assessments and combined movement examination were used to record composite spinal motion, before and following neurosurgical and pain medicine interventions. 151 normal individuals aged from 20 years to 69 years were assessed using combined movement examination between L1 and S1 spinal levels to establish a reference range. Cases with degenerative low back pain and sciatica were assessed before and after therapeutic interventions with combined movement examination and a battery of self-report pain and disability questionnaires. Change scores for combined movement examination and all outcome measures were derived. Computer-aided combined movement examination validation and intraclass correlation coefficient with 95% confidence interval and least significant change scores indicated acceptable reliability of combined movement examination when recording lumbar movement in normal subjects. In both clinical cases lumbar spine movement restrictions corresponded with self-report scores for pain and disability. Post-intervention outcomes all showed significant improvement, particularly in the most restricted combined movement examination direction. This study provides normative reference data for combined movement examination that may inform future clinical studies of the technique as a convenient objective surrogate for important clinical outcomes in lumbar degenerative spondylosis. It can be used with good reliability, may be well tolerated by individuals in pain and appears to change in concert with validated measures of lumbar spinal pain, functional limitation and quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy in Parkinson Disease: Preliminary Results and Short Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Giovannopoulou, Eirini; Thomaidis, Triphonas; Charitoudis, George; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2016-09-01

    To study the effectiveness of Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy (TPED) for lumbar disc herniation in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Fifteen patients diagnosed with PD and lumbar disc hernia were recruited to the study. All patients underwent TPED. Mean age was 61.27±6 years, with 8 male (53.3%) and 7 female patients (46.7%). Level of operation was L3-4 (33.3%), L4-5 (33.3%) and L5-S1 (33.3%). Visual analogue scale (VAS) for leg pain and Oswestry Disabillity Index (ODI) for back pain, as well as the Medical Outcomes Study Questionnaire Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) for health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed right before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months after surgery. VAS and ODI showed significant (p<0.005) reduction one year after TPED, with a percentage improvement of 83.9% and 79.4%, respectively. Similarly, all aspects of quality of life (SF-36) were significantly (p<0.005) improved 1 year after the procedure. Bodily pain and role physical demonstrated the highest increase followed by role emotional, physical function, social function, vitality, mental health, and general health. Beneficial impact of TPED on clinical outcome and HRQoL was independent of gender and operated level. TPED is effective in reducing lower limb symptoms and low back pain in patients with lumbar disc hernia, suffering from PD. Positive effect of endoscopy is, also, evident in HRQoL of those patients one year after the procedure.

  2. Diagnostic method for lumbar foraminal stenosis based on the clinical results of transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Utility of the foraminal stenosis score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Katsutaka; Nakamura, Jun-ichiro; Mitsugi, Naoto; Sato, Masatsune; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2010-01-01

    In this study we analyzed 73 cases treated by transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) for lumbar foraminal stenosis or central canal stenosis and foraminal stenosis, and based on the perioperative findings and outcome of treatment, we considered the diagnostic procedure for lumbar foraminal stenosis in the future. In 25 cases (34.2%) cases there was actually no clear perioperative evidence of foraminal stenosis. We compared the preoperative clinical and imaging findings in the group with perioperative findings and the group without perioperative findings performed a multiple logistic regression analysis to identify factors associated with foraminal stenosis. We also calculated the odds ratio for the perioperative findings and proposed a foraminal stenosis scoring system. (author)

  3. Ozone therapy for t he complex prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc: a clinical observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yong; Wei Mengqi; Wu Juan; Zhou Jianshou; Yang Yong; Zhao Hongliang; Shi Mingguo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic outcome of ozone injection therapy for the treatment of complex prolapse of lumbar intervertebral disc, which is accompanied with spinal stenosis due to hypertrophy of ligamentum flavum, degeneration of intervertebral facet joints, intervertebral hyperosteogeny and degeneration, lumbar muscle strain and negative pressure in intervertebral discs. Methods: Seventy patients with simple intervertebral disc prolapse (simple group) and 70 patients with complex intervertebral disc prolapse (complex group) were selected for the study. The complex intervertebral disc prolapse included negative pressure in intervertebral disc (n=11), recurrence after resection of nucleus polposus of intervertebral disc (n=5), spinal stenosis (n=10), degeneration of intervertebral facet joints and interver-tebral hyperosteogeny (n=30), stenosis of lateral recess (n=4) and lumbar muscle strain (n=10). All patients were treated with ozone injection under the CT guidance. A total of 2-3 ml ozone with the concentration of 40-50 μg / ml was injected into the intervertebral disk and a total of 5-8 ml ozone with the concentration of 30-40 μg / ml was injected into the paraspinal space. Infiltration injection into the pain spots with 20 ml ozone was carried out in patients with lumbar muscle strain. Results: A comparison of the therapeutic outcomes between simple group and complex group was made. Immediate relief from clinical symptoms was obtained in 80% of all treated patients. The effective rate one week after the procedure was 95%, which became 96% at 3-6 months after the treatment. Conclusion: Correct clinical diagnosis, skilled and accurate manipulation during the surgery and reasonable use of ozone injection in the treatment of soft tissue injury, etc. can markedly improve the therapeutic effect for complex lumbar intervertebral disc prolase. (authors)

  4. Evidence for Policy Making: Clinical Appropriateness Study of Lumbar Spine MRI Prescriptions Using RAND Appropriateness Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Yousefi Manesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MRI is a new and expensive diagnostic technology, which has been used increasingly all over the world. Low back pain is a worldwide prevalent disorder and MRI technique is one of the several ways to diagnose it. This paper aims to identify the appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions in Shiraz teaching hospitals using standardized RAND Appropriateness Method (RAM criteria. Methods This study consisted of two phases. The first phase involved a qualitative enquiry and the second phase had a quantitative cross-sectional nature. In the first phase RAM was used for developing lumbar spine MRI indications and scenarios. In the second phase, the finalized scenarios were compared with the history and physical examination of 300 patients with low back pain. The rate of appropriateness of lumbar spine MRI prescription was then calculated. Results Of 300 cases of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, approximately 167 (56% were considered inappropriate, 72 (24% were uncertain, and 61 (20% were deemed to be appropriate. The economic burden of inappropriate prescriptions was calculated at 88,009,000 Rials. In addition, the types of expertise and physical examination were considered as related factors to appropriateness of prescriptions. Conclusion In conclusion, a large proportion of lumbar spine MRI prescriptions, which result in financial burden on the insurance companies and the patients alike is unnecessary. This study suggests that policy makers consider this evidence while decision-making. Our findings highlight the imperative role of Health Technology Assessment (HTA and Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs. As a result, developing local clinical guidelines may create the commitment needed in physicians in prescribing appropriate prescriptions within the health sector. The study further recommends that appropriate scenarios should be considered as a criterion for payment and reimbursement.

  5. Finite element simulation and clinical follow-up of lumbar spine biomechanics with dynamic fixations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Más

    Full Text Available Arthrodesis is a recommended treatment in advanced stages of degenerative disc disease. Despite dynamic fixations were designed to prevent abnormal motions with better physiological load transmission, improving lumbar pain and reducing stress on adjacent segments, contradictory results have been obtained. This study was designed to compare differences in the biomechanical behaviour between the healthy lumbar spine and the spine with DYNESYS and DIAM fixation, respectively, at L4-L5 level. Behaviour under flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation are compared using healthy lumbar spine as reference. Three 3D finite element models of lumbar spine (healthy, DYNESYS and DIAM implemented, respectively were developed, together a clinical follow-up of 58 patients operated on for degenerative disc disease. DYNESYS produced higher variations of motion with a maximum value for lateral bending, decreasing intradiscal pressure and facet joint forces at instrumented level, whereas screw insertion zones concentrated stress. DIAM increased movement during flexion, decreased it in another three movements, and produced stress concentration at the apophyses at instrumented level. Dynamic systems, used as single systems without vertebral fusion, could be a good alternative to degenerative disc disease for grade II and grade III of Pfirrmann.

  6. [Clinical research progress of direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haichao; Qian, Jixian

    2013-01-01

    To review and summarize the surgical techniques and their outcomes for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair. Both home and abroad literature on the surgical techniques and their outcomes respectively for the treatment of lumbar spondylolysis in young patients by direct surgical repair was reviewed extensively and summarized. Direct surgical repair of lumbar spondylolysis can offer a simple reduction and fixation for the injured vertebra, which is also in accord with normal anatomy and physiology. In this way, normal anatomy of vertebra can be sustained. As reported surgical techniques of direct repair, such as single lag screw, hook screw, cerclage wire, pedicle screw cable, pedicle screw rod, and pedicle screw hook system, they all can provide acceptable results for lumbar spondylolysis in young patients. Furthermore, to comply strictly with the inclusion criteria of surgical management and select the appropriate internal fixation can also contribute to a good effectiveness. Within the various methods of internal fixation, pedicle screw hook system has been widely recognized. Pedicle screw hook system fixation is simple and safe clinically. With the gradual improvement of this method and the development of minimally invasive technologies, it will have broad application prospects.

  7. A Rare Incidence of Breakage of tip of Micropituitary Forceps during Percutaneous Discectomy - How to Remove it: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureisen M

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breakage of the tip of the micropituitary forceps during spine surgery is a rare occurrence. Retrieval of the broken tip could be a challenge in minimally invasive surgeries due to limitation of access and retrieval instruments. We describe our experience in handling such a situation during percutaneous radiofrequency discectomy. The removal was attempted, without converting into open surgery, by utilising percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy working cannula and guided by image intensifier. We were able to remove the fragment without any significant morbidity to the patient. This technique for removal has not been reported previously in the literature.

  8. Tophaceous gout causing lumbar stenosis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huigen; Sheng, Jianming; Dai, Jiaping; Hu, Xuqi

    2017-08-01

    Gout in the spine is very rare. The clinical symptoms of the spinal gout are various and lack of specificity. The authors report a case of spinal gout causing lumbar stenosis. We never find such wide-invasive spinal gouty lesion in the published studies. A 68-year-old male had low back pain radiating to bilateral lower limbs, accompanying with intermittent claudication that lasted for 3 months and aggravated 5 days ago. Spinal gout, lumbar stenosis. The patient underwent L2-L4 laminectomy, L2/3 L3/4 an d L4/5 discectomy and transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with pedicle screw fixation. Dual-energy computed tomography detected extensive tophaceous deposits in L1/2 L2/3 L3/4 and L4/5 lumbar discs as well as the posterior column, especially L2-L3 and L4-L5 facet joints. During the surgery, we found a mass of chalky white material at the posterior column of L3 to L5 vertebral bodies, which also involved the intervertebral discs. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of spinal gout. Although spinal gout is thought to be rare, the diagnosis should be considered if the patient had severe back pain and a history of gout. Dual-energy computed tomography is highly recommended for these patients.

  9. Radiographic and clinical outcomes following MIS-TLIF in patients with adult lumbar degenerative scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongfei; Liang, Yan; Mao, Keya

    2018-04-19

    Patients suffering from adult lumbar degenerative scoliosis (ALDS) are commonly complicated with advanced age, osteoporosis, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and some other medical comorbidity. Therefore, the traditional open surgery can lead to high rate of postoperative complications. The purposes of this study were to introduce our experiences and explore the efficacy and feasibility of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) in the treatment of patients with ALDS. From January 2008 to January 2014, a retrospective study of 22 patients with ALDS treated with MIS-TLIF was followed up at least 2 years. All patients suffered from one-level lumbar stenosis, and the nerve root block was performed to make sure the exact level. The clinical and radiographic outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and at the time of 2-year follow-up. The mean visual analog scale (VAS) back pain scores decreased from 6.2 ± 1.8 preoperatively to 2.2 ± 0.7 at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.05), and the mean VAS leg pain scores decreased from 8.2 ± 0.7 preoperatively to 1.4 ± 1.4 at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.05). The Oswestry Disability Index score improved from 62.4 ± 16.1% preoperatively to 24.2 ± 9.3% at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.05). The average lumbar curve was 20.7° ± 7.0° preoperatively and 12.7° ± 7.1° at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.05). The lumbar lordosis changed from - 39.5° ± 13.6° to - 43.6° ± 10.6° at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.05). Solid fusion was achieved in all patients. The technique of MIS-TLIF can be used to treat the patients with ALDS whose symptom is mainly from one-level lumbar stenosis, achieving favorable clinical outcomes and good fusion, with less blood loss and complications.

  10. Qualitative grading of disc degeneration by magnetic resonance in the lumbar and cervical spine: lack of correlation with histology in surgical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, B M; Atkinson, R A; Ludwinski, F; Freemont, A J; Hoyland, J A; Gnanalingham, K K

    2016-08-01

    Clinically, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the most effective non-invasive tool for assessing IVD degeneration. Histological examination of the IVD provides a more detailed assessment of the pathological changes at a tissue level. However, very few reports have studied the relationship between these techniques. Identifying a relationship may allow more detailed staging of IVD degeneration, of importance in targeting future regenerative therapies. To investigate the relationship between MR and histological grading of IVD degeneration in the cervical and lumbar spine in patients undergoing discectomy. Lumbar (N = 99) and cervical (N = 106) IVD samples were obtained from adult patients undergoing discectomy surgery for symptomatic IVD herniation and graded to ascertain a histological grade of degeneration. The pre-operative MR images from these patients were graded for the degree of IVD (MR grade) and vertebral end-plate degeneration (Modic Changes, MC). The relationship between histological and MR grades of degeneration were studied. In lumbar and cervical IVD the majority of samples (93%) exhibited moderate levels of degeneration (ie MR grades 3-4) on pre-operative MR scans. Histologically, most specimens displayed moderate to severe grades of degeneration in lumbar (99%) and cervical spine (93%). MR grade was weakly correlated with patient age in lumbar and cervical study groups. MR and histological grades of IVD degeneration did not correlate in lumbar or cervical study groups. MC were more common in the lumbar than cervical spine (e.g. 39 versus 20% grade 2 changes; p < 0.05), but failed to correlate with MR or histological grades for degeneration. In this surgical series, the resected IVD tissue displayed moderate to severe degeneration, but there is no correlation between MR and histological grades using a qualitative classification system. There remains a need for a quantitative, non-invasive, pre-clinical measure of IVD degeneration that

  11. Radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion: a clinical observation of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Weidong; Li Yazhou; Cao Wei; Yang Wei; Zhang Peng; Wang Zhimin; Wu Zhiqun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effects and safety of radiofrequency thermocoagulation in treating the lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion. Methods: Thirty patients with lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion, whose diagnoses were confirmed by clinical manifestations and CT findings, were involved in this study. The needle was punctured to the target point of the diseased intervertebral space under C-arm fluoroscopic guidance. After the testing of sensory nerve, motor nerve and temperature was made, the target needles were heated until the nerve radiofrequency temperature meter reached the point of 92 degree C. This point of temperature was held for 100 seconds and the procedure was repeated for four cycles. Results: Six months after the treatment, all patients showed an obvious improvement in VAS, which decreased from 7.83 ± 0.33 before operation to 2.37 ± 0.48 after treatment (P < 0.05). According to the modified Macnab therapeutic evaluation criteria, excellent result was seen in 9, good result in 12, fair result in 5 and poor result in 4 cases, with a total effective rate of 86.7%. No serious complications occurred in all patients. Conclusion: Radiofrequency thermocoagulation is an effective and safe method for the treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion. (authors)

  12. Clinical study on minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis

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    Hao WU

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the operative essentials and therapeutic effects of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS.  Methods A total of 17 DLS patients without prior spinal diseases were treated by MIS-TLIF and percutaneous pedicle screw fixation from January 2013 to September 2015 in Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University. The operation time, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and postoperative complication were recorded in each patient. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI were used to evaluate postoperative improvement of low back and leg pain, and clinical effects were assessed according to Medical Outcome Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Coronal Cobb angle, sagittal lordosis angle and spinal deviation distances on coronal and sagittal plane were measured before operation, one week, 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up in spinal full-length X-ray examination. Fusion rate was calculated according to X-ray or CT scan, and the degree of decompression was evaluated by MRI.  Results Decompression and fusion levels ranged from T12-S1 vertebrae, and interbody fusion was performed in 17 patients and 56 levels were fused. Average operation time was 200 min (180-300 min, intraoperative blood loss was 320 ml (200-1000 ml and hospital stay was 8.21 d (5-12 d. All patients were followed-up for 12.13 months (5-24 months. Compared with preoperation, VAS (P = 0.000, for all and ODI scores (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly, SF-36 score increased (P = 0.000, for all, coronal Cobb angle (P = 0.000, for all, sagittal lordosis angle (P = 0.000, for all, coronal and sagittal deviation (P = 0.000, for all decreased significantly one week and 3 months after operation and in the last follow-up. The improvement rate of ODI was (86.51 ± 6.02%, fusion rate of vertebral bodies

  13. Huge Intracanal lumbar Disc Herniation: a Review of Four Cases

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    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar disc herniation (LDH is the most common cause of sciatica and only in about 10% of the affected patients, surgical intervention is necessary. The side of the patient (the side of most prominent clinical complaints is usually consistent with the side of imaging (the side with most prominent disc herniation on imaging scans. In this case series, we presented our experience in four cases with huge intracanal LDH that a mismatch between the patient’s side and the imaging’s side was present. In these cases, for deciding to do the operation, the physicians need to rely more on clinical findings, but for deciding the side of discectomy, imaging characteristic (imaging side may be a more important criterion.

  14. Does change in isolated lumbar extensor muscle function correlate with good clinical outcome? A secondary analysis of data on change in isolated lumbar extension strength, pain, and disability in chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, James; Fisher, James; Perrin, Craig; Conway, Rebecca; Bruce-Low, Stewart; Smith, Dave

    2018-01-12

    Secondary analysis of data from studies utilising isolated lumbar extension exercise interventions for correlations among changes in isolated lumbar extension strength, pain, and disability. Studies reporting isolated lumbar extension strength changes were examined for inclusion criteria including: (1) participants with chronic low back pain, (2) intervention ≥ four weeks including isolated lumbar extension exercise, (3) outcome measures including isolated lumbar extension strength, pain (Visual Analogue Scale), and disability (Oswestry Disability Index). Six studies encompassing 281 participants were included. Correlations among change in isolated lumbar extension strength, pain, and disability. Participants were grouped as "met" or "not met" based on minimal clinically important changes and between groups comparisons conducted. Isolated lumbar extension strength and Visual Analogue Scale pooled analysis showed significant weak to moderate correlations (r = -0.391 to -0.539, all p Disability Index pooled analysis showed significant weak correlations (r = -0.349 to -0.470, all p disability, isolated lumbar extension strength changes were greater for those "met" compared with those "not met" (p disability. This study shows significant correlations between increases in isolated lumbar extension strength and reductions in pain and disability. Strengthening of the lumbar extensor musculature could be considered an important target for exercise interventions.

  15. The Low-Back Outcome Scale and the Oswestry disability index: are they reflective of patient satisfaction after discectomy? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C

    2017-12-01

    The Low-Back Outcome Scale (LBOS) of Greenough and Fraser and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) were compared to the patient satisfaction index (PSI) in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) surgery. A total of 134 patients who underwent discectomy were followed through assessment of pre- and post-surgical satisfaction by the PSI, the LBOS, and the ODI. The LBOS were rated as satisfied if the outcomes were excellent or good and as dissatisfied if fair and poor. Considering the ODI, clinically satisfied was defined as a 13-point improvement from the baseline ODI scores. Phi (Φ) correlation analysis was used to study the correlation among the PSI, the LBOS and the ODI scores as proxy for patients' satisfaction. Mean age of patients was 48.9 years. Significant improvement from the pre- to post-operative ODI scores was observed. Post-surgical satisfaction based on the PSI, the ODI, and the LBOS were 70.9%, 76.8%, and 81.3%, respectively. Regarding patient satisfaction, there were weak associations between LBOS vs. PSI and ODI vs. PSI (Φ=-0.054, P=0.533) and (Φ=-0.129, P=0.136), respectively. Our study showed that the ODI and the LBOS were not reflective of patients' satisfaction after discectomy.

  16. Supervised methods for detection and segmentation of tissues in clinical lumbar MRI.

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    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2014-10-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is widely prevalent all over the world and more than 80% of the people suffer from LBP at some point of their lives. Moreover, a shortage of radiologists is the most pressing cause for the need of CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) systems. Automatic localization and labeling of intervertebral discs from lumbar MRI is the first step towards computer-aided diagnosis of lower back ailments. Subsequently, for diagnosis and characterization (quantification and localization) of abnormalities like disc herniation and stenosis, a completely automatic segmentation of intervertebral discs and the dural sac is extremely important. Contribution of this paper towards clinical CAD systems is two-fold. First, we propose a method to automatically detect all visible intervertebral discs in clinical sagittal MRI using heuristics and machine learning techniques. We provide a novel end-to-end framework that outputs a tight bounding box for each disc, instead of simply marking the centroid of discs, as has been the trend in the recent past. Second, we propose a method to simultaneously segment all the tissues (vertebrae, intervertebral disc, dural sac and background) in a lumbar sagittal MRI, using an auto-context approach instead of any explicit shape features or models. Past work tackles the lumbar segmentation problem on a tissue/organ basis, and which tend to perform poorly in clinical scans due to high variability in appearance. We, on the other hand, train a series of robust classifiers (random forests) using image features and sparsely sampled context features, which implicitly represent the shape and configuration of the image. Both these methods have been tested on a huge clinical dataset comprising of 212 cases and show very promising results for both disc detection (98% disc localization accuracy and 2.08mm mean deviation) and sagittal MRI segmentation (dice similarity indices of 0.87 and 0.84 for the dural sac and the inter-vertebral disc, respectively

  17. Successful use of nitrous oxide during lumbar punctures: A call for nitrous oxide in pediatric oncology clinics.

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    Livingston, Mylynda; Lawell, Miranda; McAllister, Nancy

    2017-11-01

    Numerous reports describe the successful use of nitrous oxide for analgesia in children undergoing painful procedures. Although shown to be safe, effective, and economical, nitrous oxide use is not yet common in pediatric oncology clinics and few reports detail its effectiveness for children undergoing repeated lumbar punctures. We developed a nitrous oxide clinic, and undertook a review of pediatric oncology lumbar puncture records for those patients receiving nitrous oxide in 2011. No major complications were noted. Minor complications were noted in 2% of the procedures. We offer guidelines for establishing such a clinic. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparison of Clinical and Radiologic Results of Mini-Open Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Extreme Lateral Interbody Fusion Indirect Decompression for Degenerative Lumbar Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Yutaka; Gen, Hogaku; Sakuma, Yoshio; Koshika, Yasuhide

    2018-04-01

    Retrospective study. In this study, we compared the postoperative outcomes of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) indirect decompression with that of mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. There are very few reports examining postoperative results of XLIF and minimally invasive TLIF for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis, and no reports comparing XLIF and mini-open TLIF. Forty patients who underwent 1-level spinal fusion, either by XLIF indirect decompression (X group, 20 patients) or by mini-open TLIF (T group, 20 patients), for treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis were included in this study. Invasiveness of surgery was evaluated on the basis of surgery time, blood loss, hospitalization period, and perioperative complications. The Japanese Orthopedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ), disc angle (DA), disc height (DH), and slipping length (SL) were evaluated before surgery, immediately after surgery, and at 12 months after surgery. Cross-sectional spinal canal area (CSA) was also measured before surgery and at 1 month after surgery. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of surgery time or hospitalization period; however, X group showed a significant decrease in blood loss ( p X group ( p <0.05), and the changes in DA and SL were not significantly different between the two groups. The change in CSA was significantly greater in the T group ( p <0.001). Postoperative clinical results were equally favorable for both procedures; however, in comparison with mini-open TLIF, less blood loss and greater correction of DH were observed in XLIF.

  19. Preoperative MRI findings predict two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis.

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    Pekka Kuittinen

    Full Text Available To study the predictive value of preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings for the two-year postoperative clinical outcome in lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS.84 patients (mean age 63±11 years, male 43% with symptoms severe enough to indicate LSS surgery were included in this prospective observational single-center study. Preoperative MRI of the lumbar spine was performed with a 1.5-T unit. The imaging protocol conformed to the requirements of the American College of Radiology for the performance of MRI of the adult spine. Visual and quantitative assessment of MRI was performed by one experienced neuroradiologist. At the two-year postoperative follow-up, functional ability was assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI 0-100% and treadmill test (0-1000 m, pain symptoms with the overall Visual Analogue Scale (VAS 0-100 mm, and specific low back pain (LBP and specific leg pain (LP separately with a numeric rating scale from 0-10 (NRS-11. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was also assessed.Preoperative severe central stenosis predicted postoperatively lower LP, LBP, and VAS when compared in patients with moderate central stenosis (p<0.05. Moreover, severe stenosis predicted higher postoperative satisfaction (p = 0.029. Preoperative scoliosis predicted an impaired outcome in the ODI (p = 0.031 and lowered the walking distance in the treadmill test (p = 0.001. The preoperative finding of only one stenotic level in visual assessment predicted less postoperative LBP when compared with patients having 2 or more stenotic levels (p = 0.026. No significant differences were detected between quantitative measurements and the patient outcome.Routine preoperative lumbar spine MRI can predict the patient outcome in a two-year follow up in patients with LSS surgery. Severe central stenosis and one-level central stenosis are predictors of good outcome. Preoperative finding of scoliosis may indicate worse functional ability.

  20. Discectomia simples: ainda há espaço para a técnica? Discectomía lumbar: todavía hay espacio para la técnica? Lumbar discectomy: is there still place for the technique?

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    Felipe de Albuquerque Araujo Luyten

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar retrospectivamente os resultados a longo prazo do procedimento de discectomia convencional como tratamento de dor ciática causada por hérnia discal lombar. MÉTODOS: análise retrospectiva de 96 pacientes com hernia discal lombar, submetidos à discectomia convencional, com acompanhamento mínimo de dois anos. RESULTADOS: pacientes apresentavam ciática esquerda em 54% dos casos, com hérnia discal extrusa em 60% e 48% no nível L4-5; média de idade de 42 anos, 53% do sexo feminino, VAS médio de 9,6 no pré-operatório e 2,2 no pós-operatório. CONCLUSÃO: a discectomia convencional mostrou-se eficaz no tratamento da dor ciatica originada por hernia discal lombar, com baixo custo e restabelecimento precoce do paciente.OBJETIVOS: evaluar de manera retrospectiva los resultados a largo plazo del procedimiento del discectomía convencional como tratamiento de dolor de la ciática causado por hernia discal lumbar. MÉTODOS: análisis retrospectiva de 96 pacientes con hernia discal lumbar, que fueron sometidos al discectomía convencional, con el acompañamiento mínimo de dos años. RESULTADOS: los pacientes presentaron ciática izquierda en el 54% de los casos, con extrusa discal de la hernia en el 60% y el 48% en el nivel L4-5; una media de la edad de 42 años, el 53% correspondiente al sexo femenino; el medio EAV de 9.6 en el pre-operatorio y 2.2 en el postoperatorio. CONCLUSIÓN: el discectomía convencional se reveló eficiente en el tratamiento del dolor de la ciática originado por hernia discal lumbar, con bajo costo y restablecimiento precoz del paciente.OBJECTIVES: retrospective evaluation of long term results of conventional discectomia as treatment to sciatic pain caused by lumbar disc hernia. METHODS: retrospective analysis of 96 patients with lumbar disc hernia submitted to conventional discectomia, with minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS: the patients presented left sciatic pain in 54% of the cases, with

  1. Foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease: clinical features, prognostic factors of surgical outcome and clinical stage.

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    Kun Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features and prognostic factors of surgical outcome of foot drop caused by lumbar degenerative disease and put forward the clinical stage. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 135 patients with foot drop due to lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical features and mechanism were analyzed. Age, sex, duration of palsy, preoperative muscle strength of tibialis anterior (TA, sensation defect of affected lower limb, affected foot, diagnosis and compressed nerve roots were recorded and compared with surgical outcome. RESULTS: Foot drop was observed in 8.1% of all inpatients of lumbar degenerative disease. L5 nerve root compression was observed in 126 of all 135 patients (93.3%. Single, double and triple roots compression was observed respectively in 43, 83, and 9 patients (31.9%, 61.5%, and 6.6%. But there was no significant relationship between preoperative muscle strength of TA and the number of compressed roots. The muscle strength of TA was improved in 113 (83.7% patients after surgery, but it reached to >=4 in only 21 (15.6% patients. Improvement of the muscle strength of TA was almost stable at the 6-month follow-up. At the last follow-up, the muscle strength of TA was 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 respectively in 28, 24, 62, 13, 8 patients. Multivariate logistic regression showed duration of palsy (p=0.0360, OR=2.543, preoperative muscle strength of TA (p=0.0064, OR=5.528 and age (p=0.0309, OR=3.208 were factors that influenced recovery following an operation. CONCLUSIONS: L5 nerve root was most frequently affected. The muscle strength of TA improved in most patients after surgery, but few patients can get a good recovery from foot drop. Patients of shorter duration of palsy, better preoperative muscle strength of TA and younger age showed a better surgical outcome.

  2. Quantifying the lumbar flexion-relaxation phenomenon: theory, normative data, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Gatchel, Robert J; Keeley, Janice; Proctor, Tim; Anagnostis, Christopher

    2003-07-01

    A two-part investigation was conducted: 1) a prospective study of asymptomatic subjects quantitatively comparing trunk mobility to surface electromyographic (sEMG) signals from the erector spinae during trunk flexion; and 2) a prospective repeated-measures cohort study of patients with chronic disabled work-related spinal disorder tested for the flexion-relaxation (FR) phenomenon while measured simultaneously for lumbar spine inclinometric range of motion (ROM). To describe a theoretical model for the potential use of FR unloaded in assessing patients with chronic low back pain patients before and after rehabilitation, and to establish a normative database (Part 1) for subsequent use in comparison to patients with chronic low back pain (Part 2). The second part of the study assessed the clinical utility of combined sEMG and ROM measurements for assessing the FR phenomenon as a test to assist potentially in planning rehabilitation programs, guiding patients' individual rehabilitation progress, and identifying early posttreatment outcome failures. The FR phenomenon has been recognized since 1951, and it can be reproducibly assessed in normal subjects with FR unloaded. It can be found intermittently in patients with chronic low back pain. Recent studies have moved toward deriving formulas to identify FR, but only a few have examined a potential relation between inclinometric lumbar motion measures and the sEMG signal. No previous studies have developed normative data potentially useful for objectively assessing nonoperative treatment progress, effort, or the validity of permanent impairment rating measures. In Part 1, 12 asymptomatic subjects were evaluated in an intra- and interrater repeated-measures protocol to examine reliability of sEMG signal readings in FR, as well as ROM measures at FR and maximum voluntary flexion. The mean sEMG signal averaging right-left electrode recordings, as well as the gross, true, and sacral lumbar ROM measurements, were recorded as

  3. Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy using Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System technique: Pitfalls that a beginner should avoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Angoules, Antonios G; Givissis, Panagiotis

    2017-12-18

    Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy (TPED) is a minimally invasive technique mainly used for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation from a lateral approach. Performed under local anesthesia, TPED has been proven to be a safe and effective technique which has been also associated with shorter rehabilitation period, reduced blood loss, trauma, and scar tissue compared to conventional procedures. However, the procedure should be performed by a spine surgeon experienced in the specific technique and capable of recognizing or avoiding various challenging conditions. In this review, pitfalls that a novice surgeon has to be mindful of, are reported and analyzed.

  4. Clinical validation study to measure the performance of the Nerve Root Sedimentation Sign for the diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staub, Lukas P.; Barz, Thomas; Melloh, Markus; Lord, Sarah J.; Chatfield, Mark; Bossuyt, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis is a common degenerative disorder of the spine in elderly patients that can be effectively treated with decompression surgery in some patients. Radiological findings in the diagnostic work-up of the patients do not always correlate well with clinical symptoms, and guidance

  5. Percutaneous treatment of lumbar disc herniation by oxygen-ozone injection -clinical study with indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuying; Jiang Caimei; Wang Zhimin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical effect and the range of indications of oxygen-ozone treatment for lumber disc herniation. Methods: 6-15 ml of oxygen-ozone (35-45 μg/ml) were injected percutaneously into lumbar disc. In case of multiple disc herniations, the procedure could be taken with two discs for once. Results: 323 patients with 433 discs were treated by oxygen-ozone injection procedure. Total effective rate was 77.7%. Conclusions: The treatment of lumber disc herniation by oxygen-ozone injection is simple, safe and effective with mild trauma. Oxygen-ozone not only can oxidize the proteoglycan in the nucleus leading to the contraction of nucleus, but also provide anti-inflammation effect with pain relief and without complication yet. (authors)

  6. The lumbar facet arthrosis syndrome. Clinical presentation and articular surface changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, S M; Parry, C R

    1987-01-01

    We describe a lumbar facet syndrome in which disabling symptoms are associated with normal or near-normal plain radiographs. Local spinal fusion relieved symptoms in 12 patients; the excised facet joint surfaces showed some of the histological changes seen in chondromalacia patellae and in osteoarthritis of other large joints. The most frequent change was focal full-thickness cartilage necrosis or loss of cartilage with exposure of subchondral bone, but osteophyte formation was remarkably absent in all specimens. We suggest that there are both clinical and histological similarities between the facet arthrosis syndrome and chondromalacia patellae. Facet arthrosis may be a relatively important cause of intractable back pain in young and middle-aged adults.

  7. Development of a clinically relevant impingement test method for a mobile bearing lumbar total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskey, Ryan; Peck, Jonathan; Mehta, Hitesh; Kosydar, Allison; Kurtz, Steven; Hill, Genevieve

    2016-09-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is an alternative therapy to spinal fusion for the treatment of neck or low back pain and is hypothesized to reduce the risk of disease progression to the adjacent spinal levels. Radiographic and retrieval analyses of various total disc replacements (TDRs) have shown evidence of impingement damage. Impingement of TDRs can occur when the device reaches the limits of its functional range of motion, causing contact between peripheral regions of the device. Impingement can be associated with increased wear and mechanical damage; however, impingement conditions are not simulated in current standardized mechanical bench test methods. This study explored the test conditions necessary to apply clinically relevant impingement loading to a lumbar TDR in vitro. An experimental protocol was developed and evaluated using in vivo retrievals for qualitative and quantitative validation. Retrieval analysis was conducted on a set of 11 size 3 retrieved Charité devices using American Society for Testing and Materials F561 as a guide. The impingement range of motion was determined using a combination of modeling and experiments, and was used as an input in vitro testing. A 1-million cycle in vitro test was then conducted, and the in vitro samples were characterized using methods similar to the retreived devices. All in vitro tested samples exhibited impingement regions and damage patterns consistent with retrieved devices. Consistent with the retrievals, the impingement damage on the rim was a combination of abrasive wear and plastic deformation. Micro computed tomography (microCT) was used to quantitatively assess rim damage due to impingement. Rim penetration was statistically lower in the retrievals when compared with both in vitro groups. Rim elongation was comparable among all groups. The simulated-facet group had statistically greater angular rim deformations than the retrieval group and the no-facet group. Results demonstrate that clinically relevant

  8. Surgical management for lumbar disc herniation in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, S; Giovannopoulou, E; Blontzos, N; Kazakos, G; Givissis, P

    2017-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common surgical spine pathology that may be presented during pregnancy. The state of pregnancy complicates the diagnosis and therapeutical management of this entity. Specific considerations rule the decision for surgical intervention, the optimal timing of it and the type of selected procedure in a pregnant patient, due to the potential risks for the fetus. In the last 30 years, evolution in the field of spine surgery has provided options other than open standard discectomy. The well-established concept of "minimal intervention" has led to the development of microdiscectomy and other innovative, full-endoscopic techniques for lumbar discectomy. The aim of the present study is to review the surgical management of lumbar disc herniation in pregnancy and investigate the potential role of minimally invasive spine surgery in this specific population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of sports modification on clinical outcome in children and adolescent athletes with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Rassi, Georges; Takemitsu, Masakazu; Glutting, Joseph; Shah, Suken A

    2013-12-01

    This cohort study aimed to report the compliance of young athletes with nonoperative treatment and to clarify the role of sports modification on clinical outcome of symptomatic spondylolysis. This study included patients with a chief complaint of low back pain participating in regular sports activity, having spondylolysis, and being treated and followed up between 1990 and 2002 in the authors' hospital. One hundred thirty-two athletes were included in this study: 78 males and 54 females. The mean age of the patients was 13 yrs (range, 7-18 yrs). Only 56 patients (42.4%) were compliant to nonoperative treatment. Eighty-six patients (65%) stopped all sports activities for at least 3 mos, and 46 patients (35%) stopped exercising for a variable period of less than 3 mos. The grading of clinical outcome after nonoperative treatment was as follows: excellent in 48 patients (36.4%), good in 74 patients (56.1), fair in 6 patients (4.5%), and poor in 4 patients (3%). The patients who stopped sports for at least 3 mos were 16.39 times more likely to have an excellent result than those who did not stop sports. Bony healing on radiographs did not correlate with clinical outcome. Timely cessation of sports activity for 3 mos is considered an effective method of nonoperative treatment for young athletes with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis.

  10. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko

    1984-01-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereoobservation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc. (J.P.N.)

  11. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

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    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1984-05-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereo observation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc.

  12. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

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    Raspe, Heiner

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective: Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: * Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. * To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. * If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc

  13. Clinical evaluation of patients undergoing dynamic pedicle fixation in lumbar spine

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    Felipe José Vieira Figueiredo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the preliminary clinical results and complications in patients undergoing dynamic pedicle fixation of the spine in the treatment of a specific group of degenerative lumbar disease.METHODS: In this preliminary retrospective study, we selected 14 patients who underwent surgery from January 2006 to July 2010. We selected only patients with spondylolisthesis without spondylolysis (Grade 1 Meyerding. All patients underwent surgery at one level and the levels mostly addressed were: L3-L4, L4-L5 or L5-S1. The approach was the same in all patients (posterior median approach with preservation of the posterior elements. All patients underwent intense conservative treatment without clinical response and the same research algorithm preoperatively.RESULTS: Retrospective analysis of Oswestry questionnaire after selection and publication of results of 14 patients with Grade 1 spondylolisthesis who underwent dynamic pedicle stabilization in a total of 56 pedicle screws, being all in one level. There was no fracture of any screws, the mean hospital stay was a day and a half, no patient required blood transfusion and there were no cases of infection, with significant improvement in the Oswestry questionnaire.CONCLUSION: In this study, the dynamic pedicle stabilization method proved to be an excellent treatment option when surgical criteria are strictly adhered to. There was an improvement in Oswestry values, lower hospital stay and low rate of complications, consisting of an alternative in motion preservation surgery.

  14. Which level is responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guofang; Zhou, Jianhe; Liu, Yutan; Sang, Hongxun; Xu, Xiangyang; Ding, Zihai

    2016-08-22

    There are many different reasons why patients could be experiencing pain in the gluteal area. Previous studies have shown an association between radicular low back pain (LBP) and gluteal pain (GP). Studies locating the specific level responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernias have rarely been reported. All patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in the Kanghua hospital from 2010 to 2014 were recruited. All patients underwent a lumbar spine MRI to clarify their LDH diagnosis, and patients were allocated to a GP group and a non-GP group. To determine the cause and effect relationship between LDH and GP, all of the patients were subjected to percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD). A total of 286 cases were included according to the inclusive criteria, with 168 cases in the GP group and 118 cases in the non-GP group. Of these, in the GP group, 159 cases involved the L4/5 level and 9 cases involved the L5/S1 level, while in the non-GP group, 43 cases involved the L4/5 level and 48 cases involved the L5/S1 level. PELD was performed in both groups. Gluteal pain gradually disappeared after surgery in all of the patients. Gluteal pain recrudesced in a patient with recurrent disc herniation (L4/5). As a clinical finding, gluteal pain is related to low lumbar disc hernia. The L4/5 level is the main level responsible for gluteal pain in lumbar disc hernia. No patients with gluteal pain exhibited involvement at the L3/4 level.

  15. Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karppinen, Jaro; Leino-Arjas, Päivi; Solovieva, Svetlana; Varonen, Helena; Kalso, Eija; Ukkola, Olavi; Viikari-Juntura, Eira

    2007-01-01

    Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. We conducted a systematic search of the Medline database for all original articles on lumbar radicular pain or sciatica published until August 2006. Twenty-two papers from 19 studies were included in the review. Overweight or obesity was associated with sciatica in most of the case-control and cohort studies. Some studies showed an increased risk of lumbar radicular pain in smokers with a long smoking history or in those with high levels of physical activity. A few case-control studies showed an association between serum C-reactive protein and sciatica. No consistent associations were found for serum lipids levels or high blood pressure. In summary, the associations of overweight, long smoking history, high physical activity and a high serum C-reactive protein level with lumbar radicular pain or sciatica were substantiated by the present review. However, more prospective studies are needed in order to further clarify these associations and the mechanisms of action. PMID:17525856

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: determining clinical impact and potential harm from overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Nathan M; Alkasab, Tarik K; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2018-04-18

    Lumbar spine MRI is frequently said to be "overused" in the evaluation of low-back pain, yet data concerning the extent of overuse and on potential harmful effects are lacking. To determine the proportion of examinations with a detectable impact on patient care (actionable outcomes). Retrospective cohort study PATIENT SAMPLE: 5,365 outpatient lumbar spine MR examinations OUTCOME MEASURES: Actionable outcomes included: 1) findings leading to an intervention making use of anatomical information such as surgery; 2) new diagnoses of cancer, infection, or fracture; or 3) following known lumbar spine pathology. Potential harm was assessed by identifying examinations where suspicion of cancer or infection was raised but no positive diagnosis made. A medical record aggregation/search system was used to identify lumbar spine MR examinations with positive outcome measures. Patient notes were examined to verify outcomes. A random sample was manually inspected to identify missed positive outcomes. The proportion of actionable lumbar spine MRIs was 13%, although 93% were appropriate according to American College of Radiology guidelines. Of 36 suspected cases of cancer/infection 81% were false positives. Further investigations were ordered on 59% of suspicious exams, 86% of which were false positives. The proportion of lumbar spine MR examinations that inform management is small. The false positive rate and proportion of false positives involving further investigation is high. Further study to improve the efficiency of imaging is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Strategy and Early Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Full-Endoscopic Interlaminar or Extraforaminal Approach for Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Kong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to analyze the surgical strategy, safety, and clinical results of percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar or extraforaminal puncture technique for LDH. Preoperative CT and MRI were analyzed, which were based on the main location of the herniated disc and its relationship with compressed nerve root. Sixty-two patients satisfied the inclusion criteria during the period from August 2012 to March 2014. We use percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through different puncture technique to remove the protrusive NP for LDH. Sixty patients completed the full-endoscopic operation successfully. Their removed disc tissue volume ranged from 1.5 mL to 3.8 mL each time. Postoperative ODI and VAS of low back and sciatica pain were significantly decreased in each time point compared to preoperative ones. No nerve root injury, infection, and other complications occurred. The other two patients were shifted to open surgery. No secondary surgery was required and 91.6% of excellent-to-good ratio was achieved on the basis of Macnab criteria at postoperative 12 months. Acquired benefits are fewer complications, rapid recovery, complete NP removal, effective nerve root decompression, and satisfactory cosmetic effect as well. This is a safe, effective, and rational minimally invasive spine-surgical technology with excellent clinical outcome.

  18. Clinical experiences of dynamic stabilizers: Dynesys and Dynesys top loading system for lumbar spine degenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ta Hsieh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Dynesys (Dynamic Neutralization System was designed to overcome the shortcomings of fusion. The Dynesys top loading (DTL system is a new alternative Dynesys system that can be applied via a minimally invasive procedure. This study aimed to ascertain whether DTL is a suitable device for motion preservation and prevention of instability, and to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes between DTL and Dynesys. In this study, 12 patients were treated with Dynesys and 21 patients were treated with DTL. Back and leg pain were evaluated using the visual analog scale. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to evaluate the patients' function. Range of motion (ROM at the operative level and for the whole lumbar spine was measured pre- and postoperatively. The length of wound, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and operation duration were also compared. All patients were followed up for 12–76 months. Scores on the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index were significantly improved postoperatively. The median ROM of the whole spine and index level ROM in all patients showed 12.5% and 79.6% loss, respectively. The DTL group exhibited significantly better results in terms of blood loss, wound length, and operation duration, in addition to early ambulation. In conclusion, Dynesys and DTL are semirigid fixation systems that can significantly improve clinical symptoms and signs. Our results suggested that DTL was better than Dynesys as a result of it being a minimally invasive procedure. However, further study with large sample sizes and longer follow-up durations is required to validate the effects of these dynamic stabilizers.

  19. [Clinical effects of Dynesys system and transfacet decompression through Wiltse approach in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, K; Chen, M J; Wang, D G

    2017-05-23

    Objective: To investigate the early clinical effects of Dynesys system and transfacet decompression by Wiltse approach in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Methods: From January 2010 to December 2013, 48 patients suffering from lumbar degenerative diseases were treated with Dynesys system in addition to transfacet decompression through Wiltse approach.There were 28 males and 20 females with age of (51.8±6.8). The preoperative diagnosis included lumbar spinal stenosis(10 cases); lumber intervertebral disc herniation (38 cases). There were 23 cases in L4/5, 16 cases in L5/S1 and 9 cases in both of L4/5 and L5/S1.Posterolateral fixation with Dynesys pedicle screw through Wiltse approach.Unilateral resection of the inferior articular facet of the superior vertebra and the superior articular facet of the inferior vertebra.Decompression of the vertebral canal until the never root was decompressed satisfactorily.In the end, Dynesys was performed according to normal procedure.VAS, ODI evaluating standards were applied to evaluate the therapeutic effect.The intervertebral space and ROM of the lumbar were observed by X ray. Results: All patients underwent surgery safely without severe complications occurred.The average following up time was 33.5 (24-60) months.Compared with preoperative parameters (7.7±1.3, 70.8±13.5), the scores of VAS and ODI decreased significantly after surgery (2.3±1.5, 23.6±12.2) and at the final follow-up (2.2±1.4, 20.0±9.8) ( P 0.05). X-ray scan showed neither instability or internal fixation loosen, breakage or distortion in follow-up. Conclusion: Dynesys system in addition to transfacet decompression through Wiltse approach is a therapy option for mild lumbar degenerative disease.This method can retention the structure of lumbar posterior complex and the activity of the fixed segment, reduce the risk of low back pain together with nerve root decompressed.The early clinical results are satisfactory.

  20. Clinical significance of nerve root enhancement in contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the postoperative lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Lee, Eun Ja; Kang, Si Won; Choi, Eun Seok; Song, Chang June; Kim, Jong Chul

    2001-01-01

    To determine the significance of nerve root contrast enhancement in patients with residual or recurrent symptomatic postoperative lumbar spine. Eighty-eight patients with 116 postoperative lumbar disc lesions causing radiating back pain underwent enhanced MR imaging. Intradural nerve root enhancement was quantified by pixel measurement, and affected nerve roots were compared before and after contrast administration. Extradural nerve root enhancement was assessed visually, and nerve root enhancement and clinical symptoms were correlated. Associated lesions such as recurrent disc herniation, scar tissue, nerve root thickening and nerve root displacement were also evaluated. Of 26 cases (22.4%) involving intradural nerve root enhancement, 22 (84.6%) showed significant clinical symptoms (p=0.002). and of 59 (50.9%) demonstrating extradural enhancement, clinical symptoms showed significant correlation in 47 (79.7%) (p=0.001). Nerve root enhancement, including eleven cases where this was both intra-and extradural, showed highly significant association with clinical symptoms in 74 of the 116 cases (63.8%) (p=0.000). Among 33 cases (28.4%) of recurrent disc herniation, nerve root enhancement was observed in 28 (84.8%) and in 24 of these 28 (85.7%), significant correlation with clinical symptoms was observed (p=0.000). Where epidural fibrosis was present, correlation between nerve root enhancement and clinical symptoms was not significant (p>0.05). Nerve root thickening and displaced nerve root were, however, significantly associated with symptoms (87.2% and 88.6%, respectively). In patients with postoperative lumbar spine, the association between nerve root enhancement revealed by MRI and clinical symptoms was highly significant

  1. Techniques of lumbar-sacral spine fusion in spondylosis: systematic literature review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeta, Ricardo S G; Avanzi, Osmar

    2011-07-01

    Spine fusions can be performed through different techniques and are used to treat a number of vertebral pathologies. However, there seems to be no consensus regarding which technique of fusion is best suited to treat each distinct spinal disease or group of diseases. To study the effectiveness and complications of the different techniques used for spinal fusion in patients with lumbar spondylosis. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis. Randomized clinical studies comparing the most commonly performed surgical techniques for spine fusion in lumbar-sacral spondylosis, as well as those reporting patient outcome were selected. Identify which technique, if any, presents the best clinical, functional, and radiographic outcome. Systematic literature review and meta-analysis based on scientific articles published and indexed to the following databases: PubMed (1966-2009), Cochrane Collaboration-CENTRAL, EMBASE (1980-2009), and LILACS (1982-2009). The general search strategy focused on the surgical treatment of patients with lumbar-sacral spondylosis. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were selected with a total of 1,136 patients. Meta-analysis showed that patients who underwent interbody fusion presented a significantly smaller blood loss (p=.001) and a greater rate of bone fusion (p=.02). Patients submitted to fusion using the posterolateral approach had a significantly shorter operative time (p=.007) and less perioperative complications (p=.03). No statistically significant difference was found for the other studied variables (pain, functional impairment, and return to work). The most commonly used techniques for lumbar spine fusion in patients with spondylosis were interbody fusion and posterolateral approach. Both techniques were comparable in final outcome, but the former presented better rates of fusion and the latter the less complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Local irrigation of the surgical field with antibiotics in the end of procedure reduces the infection rate in herniated lumbar disc surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kërveshi, Armend; Halili, Nehat; Kastrati, Bujar; Qosja, Faik; Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin

    2014-12-01

    Reported rate of infections after lumbar discectomy is 1%-15 %. This complication may result in disability or even the death. The aim of the study is to assess the rate of infection associated with lumbar discectomies when combined systemic and local antibiotic prophylaxis was employed. In this retrospective study we analyzed all patients operated for herniated lumbar disc from 2009 -2012 in our institute. Beside of receiving systemic prophylaxis with 2g of Cefazoline, all patients had their operative field irrigated at the end of operation with Amikacin sulfate injection. Wound was considered infected when local and systemic signs of infection were revealed and were associated with elevated ESR, leukocytosis and elevated CRP. Assessment of infection is done by neurosurgeon during the hospitalization and later at outpatient's clinic along postoperative course of three months. A total of 604 patients were operated, of those 285 patients (47.2 %) females and 319 males (52.8 %), 12 patients were operated on two levels (1.98 %). Average patient age was 32.5 years (range 20-65 years) Localization of herniated disc was: in L/2-L/3 20 patients or 3.3 %, the L/3-L/4 level 42 patients or 7 % , the L/4 -L /5 262 patients or 43.3 % at the level L/V- S/1 280 patients or 46.3 %. Three patients (0.49%) developed wound infection, two of them superficial infection only with local signs: local pain, redness and leakage. They were treated with oral antibiotics. One with deep wound infection. He presented with local and systemic signs and treated with i.v antibiotics. All the cultures from wound swab revealed staphylococcus aureus. Prophylaxis with systemic antibiotic (Cefazoline 2.0) intravenous administration 30 minutes before the incision and irrigation of operative field with local antibiotic Amikacine sulfate at the end of procedure reduces the infection rate in patients operated for herniated lumbar disc when compared with systemic antibiotic prophylaxis only.

  3. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Tomiichi [Fukushima Medical Coll., Matsuoka (Japan)

    1995-06-01

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L{sub 5} radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author).

  4. Clinical significance of the position of dorsal root ganglia in degenerative lumbar diseases. Correlation between anatomic study and imaging study with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Masahiro; Kikuchi, Tomiichi

    1995-01-01

    In order to estimate the ralationship between the position of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and radicular symptoms, anatomical study was done on 81 cadavers, and a clinical study with MRI was done on 20 cases of lumbar disc herniation and 20 of lumbar spondylosis with L 5 radiculopathy. The position of DRG is not related to the occurrence of radicular symptoms in disc herniation, while in lumbar spondylosis proximally placed DRG are related to both of unilateral and bilateral occurrence of redicular symptoms. Unilateral occurrence of radicular symptoms is influenced by surrounding tissues of the nerve root, rather than the position of DRG. (author)

  5. High sensitive C-reactive protein-Effective tool in determining postoperative recovery in lumbar disc disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Narayan Rathod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is common in medical practice to see patients having persistent pain and radiculopathy even after undergoing discectomy surgery. Inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins are produced at the site of disc herniation and are now considered responsible for the pain perceived by the patient. This study has used high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP assay for predicting inflammation around the nerve roots on very same principle, which has used HSCRP for predicting coronary artery diseases in current clinical practice. Thus, purpose of this study is to test whether HSCRP can stand as an objective tool to predict postoperative recovery in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. That is, to study association between preoperative HSCRP blood level and postoperative recovery with the help of modified Oswestry Back Disability Score. Materials and Methods: A study group consisting of 50 cases of established lumbar disc disease and control group of 50 normal subjects, matched with the study group. Both the study and control groups were subjected to detailed evaluation with the help of modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale both pre and postoperatively at 3 months, 6 months and 1-year. The preoperative blood samples were analyzed to assess the HSCRP concentration. All the cases underwent surgery over a period of 1-year by the same surgeon. Results: The level of HSCRP in the study group was between 0.050- and 0.710 mg/dL and in the control group, 0.005-0.020 mg/dL. There was highly significant positive correlation between preoperative HSCRP level and postoperative score at P 10 points, while those with HSCRP level in the range of 0.470 ± 0.163 mg/dL, showed poor recovery (score improved < 10 points. Conclusion: HSCRP will serve as a good supplementary prognostic marker for operative decision making in borderline and troublesome cases of lumbar disc disease.

  6. Effect of levomepromazine on EEG and on clinical side effects after lumbar myelography with metrizamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standnes, B.; Oftedal, S.-I.; Weber, H.

    1982-01-01

    In patients with lumbago-sciatica levomepromazine is a potent supplement to analgetics in pain treatment. The hypothesis that neuroleptics increase the risk of epileptic seizures after metrizamide myelography was not comfirmed in a series of 77 patients, 26 with and 51 without levomepromazine medication, before and after lumbar metrizamide myelography. No differences existed between the groups with regard to the appearance of EEG abnormalities such as slow waves or spikes. Mild side effects were more frequent in the levomepromazine group, except nausea and vomiting. Lumbar metrizamide epidurography in 30 patients did not cause any abnormal EEG. (Auth.)

  7. Effect of levomepromazine on EEG and on clinical side effects after lumbar myelography with metrizamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Standnes, B.; Oftedal, S.I.; Weber, H. (Ullevaal Sykehus, Oslo (Norway))

    1982-01-01

    In patients with lumbago-sciatica levomepromazine is a potent supplement to analgesics in pain treatment. The hypothesis that neuroleptics increase the risk of epileptic seizures after metrizamide myelography was not comfirmed in a series of 77 patients, 26 with and 51 without levomepromazine medication, before and after lumbar metrizamide myelography. No differences existed between the groups with regard to the appearance of EEG abnormalities such as slow waves or spikes. Mild side effects were more frequent in the levomepromazine group, except nausea and vomiting. Lumbar metrizamide epidurography in 30 patients did not cause any abnormal EEG.

  8. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tessitore, Enrico; Molliqaj, Granit; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Schaller, Karl

    2015-01-01

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making

  9. Clinical evaluation and surgical decision making for patients with lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tessitore, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.tessitore@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Molliqaj, Granit, E-mail: granitmolliqaj@gmail.com [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland); Schatlo, Bawarjan, E-mail: schatlo@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Georg-August University, University of Medicine Gottingen, 37075 Gottingen (Germany); Schaller, Karl, E-mail: karl.schaller@hcuge.ch [Neurosurgical Unit, Geneva University Hospitals, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    In industrialized countries, more than two thirds of the population suffers from low back pain (LBP) in their lifetime. LBP associated with lumbar disc herniation, stenosis, and instability is a well-known and documented entity. On the other hand, the lumbar discogenic pain and facet syndrome are difficult to be clearly identified, and they are not always detectable by imaging. This article describes the causes of these painful syndromes, which are typically without radicular component, explains the modern diagnostic procedures, and provides guidelines for surgical decision making.

  10. Experimental substantiation and clinical use of functional pneumoepidurography in the diagnosis of lumbar osteochondrosis i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharov, B.K.; Plekhanov, L.G. (Chelyabinskij Meditsinskij Inst. (USSR))

    Anatomic and X-ray correlations in 31 postmortem unfixed specimens of the vertebral lumbar region have shown that in the diagnosis of disk prolapse and commissural processes in the anterior epidural space roentgenopositive contrast substances are not much superior to roentgenonegative ones. Functional pneumoepidurogaphy used in 102 patients with lumbar osteochondrosis helped to reveal intervertebral disk prolapse at all the stages of degenerative affection, to evaluate function of the disk-ligamentous apparatus and to specify the nature of a pathological process in the epidural space.

  11. Impact of sagittal spinopelvic alignment on clinical outcomes after decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis without coronal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kota; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-10-01

    The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA imbalance (Group B: SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs. 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA imbalance. Decompression surgery improved the SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance after decompression surgery. Both clinical and HRQOL outcomes were negatively affected by postoperative residual sagittal imbalance.

  12. Public Reporting of MRI of the Lumbar Spine for Low Back Pain and Changes in Clinical Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flug, Jonathan A; Lind, Kimberly E

    2017-12-01

    OP-8 is the Medicare imaging efficiency metric for MRI of the lumbar spine for low back pain in the outpatient hospital. We studied trends in exclusion criteria coding over time by site of service after implementation of OP-8 to evaluate provider's response to public reporting. We conducted a secondary data analysis using the Medicare Limited Data Set 5% sample for beneficiaries with MRI lumbar spine and lower back pain during 2009 to 2014. We evaluated the association between excluding condition prevalence and site by using generalized estimating equations regression. We produced model-based estimates of excluding condition prevalence by site and year. As a sensitivity analysis, we repeated the analysis while including additional conditions in the outcome measure. We included 285,911 MRIs of the lumbar spine for low back pain. Generalized estimating equations regression found that outpatient hospitals had a higher proportion of MRIs with at least one excluding condition documented compared with outpatient clinics (P low back pain. When accounting for all relevant conditions, the proportion of patients with low back pain considered uncomplicated and being measured by OP-8 would be small, reflecting a small proportion of patients with low back pain. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical efficacy of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion in treatment of lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-yi DAI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the therapeutic effect of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system combined with intervertebral fusion for lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis. Methods  The clinical data were analyzed retrospectively of 21 patients with lumbar spondylolysis and osteoporosis who received treatment of bone cement injectable pedicle screw system and intervertebral fusion from Aug. 2013 to Nov. 2015. The 21 patients (9 males and 12 females aged from 60 to 80 years (mean 64 years old; 6 of them presented degenerative spondylolysis, 15 with isthmic spondylolisthesis; 2 cases had I degree slippage, 13 had Ⅱdegree slippage, 6 had Ⅲdegree slippage, and all the cases were unisegmental slippage including 9 cases in L4 and 12 cases in L5. Bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae (L2-L5 was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and T values conforming to the diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis were less than or equal to -2.5; All patients were operated with whole lamina resection for decompression, bone cement injectable pedicle screws system implantation, propped open reduction and fixation intervertebral fusion. The clinical outcomes were determined by the radiographic evaluation including intervertebral height, height of intervertebral foramen, slip distance, slip rate and slip angle, and Oswestry disability index (ODI on preoperative, 3 months after operation and the end of the time, and the interbody fusion were followed up. Results  Cerebrospinal fluid leakage of incision was observed in two cases after operation, compression and dressing to incision, Trendelenburg position, dehydration and other treatments were taken, and the stitches of incisions were taken out on schedule. Slips in the 21 patients were reset to different extent, and lumbar physiological curvatures were recovered. The intervertebral height and height of intervertebral foramen were obviously higher 3 months after operation than that before operation (P0

  14. Effect of Smoking Status on Successful Arthrodesis, Clinical Outcome, and Complications After Anterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion (ALIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Fadhil, Matthew; Chang, Nicholas; Giang, Gloria; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2018-02-01

    Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is a surgical technique indicated for the treatment of several lumbar pathologies. Smoking has been suggested as a possible cause of reduced fusion rates after ALIF, although the literature regarding the impact of smoking status on lumbar spine surgery is not well established. This study aims to assess the impact of perioperative smoking status on the rates of perioperative complications, fusion, and adverse clinical outcomes in patients undergoing ALIF surgery. A retrospective analysis was performed on a prospectively maintained database of 137 patients, all of whom underwent ALIF surgery by the same primary spine surgeon. Smoking status was defined by the presence of active smoking in the 2 weeks before the procedure. Outcome measures included fusion rates, surgical complications, Short-Form 12, and Oswestry Disability Index. Patients were separated into nonsmokers (n = 114) and smokers (n = 23). Univariate analysis demonstrated that the percentage of patients with successful fusion differed significantly between the groups (69.6% vs. 85.1%, P = 0.006). Pseudarthrosis rates were shown to be significantly associated with perioperative smoking. Results for other postoperative complications and clinical outcomes were similar for both groups. On multivariate analysis, the rate of failed fusion was significantly greater for smokers than nonsmokers (odds ratio 37.10, P = 0.002). The rate of successful fusion after ALIF surgery was found to be significantly lower for smokers compared with nonsmokers. No significant association was found between smoking status and other perioperative complications or adverse clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of the Economic Downturn on Elective Lumbar Spine Surgery in the United States: A National Trend Analysis, 2003 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, David N; Brodell, David; Li, Yue; Rubery, Paul T; Mesfin, Addisu

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective database analysis. The impact of the 2008-2009 economic downtown on elective lumbar spine surgery is unknown. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the economic downturn on the overall trends of elective lumbar spine surgery in the United States. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used in conjunction with US Census and macroeconomic data to determine historical trends. The economic downturn was defined as 2008 to 2009. Codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), were used in order to identify appropriate procedures. Confidence intervals were determined using subgroup analysis techniques. From 2003 to 2012, there was a 19.8% and 26.1% decrease in the number of lumbar discectomies and laminectomies, respectively. Over the same time period, there was a 56.4% increase in the number of lumbar spinal fusions. The trend of elective lumbar spine surgeries per 100 000 persons in the US population remained consistent from 2008 to 2009. The number of procedures decreased by 4.5% from 2010 to 2011, 7.6% from 2011 to 2012, and 3.1% from 2012 to 2013. The R 2 value between the number of surgeries and the S&P 500 Index was statistically significant ( P ≤ .05). The economic downturn did not affect elective lumbar fusions, which increased in total from 2003 to 2013. The relationship between the S&P 500 Index and surgical trends suggests that during recessions, individuals may utilize other means, such as insurance, to cover procedural costs and reduce out-of-pocket expenditures, accounting for no impact of the economic downturn on surgical trends. These findings can assist multiple stakeholders in better understanding the interconnectedness of macroeconomics, policy, and elective lumbar spine surgery trends.

  16. Clinical results of posterolateral fusion for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. A follow-up study of more than 10 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Hiroshi; Tajima, Naoya; Kubo, Shinichiro

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term clinical outcomes and the effects on unfused motion segments of posterolateral fusion. This study involved 35 cases (37 intervertebral levels) of posterolateral fusion performed to treat degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. There were 20 male and 15 female patients ranging in age from 30 to 67 years, with a mean age of 49 years. The postoperative period ranged from 10 years to 17 years and 8 months, with a mean period of 13 years. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for assessment of treatment for low back pain. The effects on unfused motion segments were investigated with radiographic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Postoperative satisfactory improvement (mean recovery rate, 66.9%) reached a plateau at 1 year and was maintained at final follow-up. Radiographically, the union rate was 86.5%. There were few cases of induced instability of unfused motion segments. On MR imaging, increased signal intensity in both T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images was seen in the paravertebral muscles in 15 of 20 cases (75.0%). Posterolateral fusion is a useful technique for the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Clinical outcomes were stable throughout follow-up. Instability of unfused motion segments rarely occurred. (author)

  17. Microstructural Changes in Compressed Nerve Roots Are Consistent With Clinical Symptoms and Symptom Duration in Patients With Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weifei; Liang, Jie; Ru, Neng; Zhou, Caisheng; Chen, Jianfeng; Wu, Yongde; Yang, Zong

    2016-06-01

    A prospective study. To investigate the association between microstructural nerve roots changes on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and clinical symptoms and their duration in patients with lumbar disc herniation. The ability to identify microstructural properties of the nervous system with DTI has been demonstrated in many studies. However, there are no data regarding the association between microstructural changes evaluated using DTI and symptoms assessed with the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and their duration. Forty consecutive patients with foraminal disc herniation affecting unilateral sacral 1 (S1) nerve roots were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography was performed on the S1 nerve roots. Clinical symptoms were evaluated using an ODI questionnaire for each patient, and the duration of clinical symptoms was noted based on the earliest instance of leg pain and numbness. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values were calculated from tractography images. The mean FA value of the compressed lumbar nerve roots was significantly lower than the FA of the contralateral nerve roots (P leg pain, indicating that the microstructure of the nerve root has been damaged. 3.

  18. Clinical and imaging characteristics of foraminal nerve root disorders of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Tomio; Tani, Takayuki; Suzuki, Norio; Aonuma, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed cases of lumbar nerve root compression at intervertebral foramina, by comparing 19 cases of foraminal stenosis (FS), and 38 cases of foraminal hernia (FH) with 21 cases of lumbar canal stenosis (LCS). Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, intervertebral disc degeneration, anatomical measurements of the nerve root foramina and the MRI findings were reviewed. The scores for pain in the lower extremities, and walking ability were both lowest in the FS group. The scores for low back pain, lower extremities, and sensory disturbances were lowest in the FH group. Anterior-posterior diameters of the nerve root foramina were smaller in the FS group and FH group than in the LCS group. More degenerated discs and short length of upper part of the nerve root foramina were seen in FS group than in the other groups. The MRI images of so-called black out nerve root foramina were positive in 63.6% of FS cases, 75% of FH cases. (author)

  19. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy by anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion

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    Osman A Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since the pioneering days of the anterior cervical approach introduced by Cloward et al. in the early 1950s, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF has been the standard procedure for most discogenic and degenerative cervical spinal lesions. Although traditional interbody fusion using iliac bone can maintain the patency of the neuroforamen and ensure solid fusion, selection of patients, and of surgical procedure for ACDF is a continuous challenge. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the results of cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical cages in treatment of cervical radiculopathy clinically and radiologically. Materials and Methods: Eighteen patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy were operated upon using this technique. They were 15 males and 3 females. Clinical and radiological assessment, visual analog scale (VAS for neck and arm and modified Oswestery neck disability index (NDI were done preoperatively and at 4 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Polyetheretherketone (Peek cages filled with iliac bone graft were used after cervical discectomy. The levels operated upon were C 5-6 in 16 patients and C4-5 in 2 patients. Results: Marked clinical improvement as regard arm and neck pain, and NDI was observed. The pre and post operative mean and standard deviations (SD of the various scores were as follows. VAS for pain in arm reduced from mean of 8 (SD 1.76 to mean 0.4 (SD 0.4, VAS for neck pain reduced from mean of 3.5 (SD 1.58 to mean of 0.8 (SD 0.47, and NDI from mean of 20.2 (SD 0.89 to 2.1(SD 1.05. Fusion occurred in all patients. Subjectively 79% of the patients reported marked improvement in neck pain, and 95% reported marked reduction in arm pain. Conclusion: Anterior cervical discectomy and cage fusion resulted in high fusion rate with minimal preservation of lordosis.

  20. Gd-DTPA: Clinical use in MR imaging of postoperative lumbar recurrent disk herniation and fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narang, A.K.; Hueftle, M.; Williams, A.; Modic, M.; Davis, D.O.

    1987-01-01

    Gd-DTPA, a paramagnetic MR contrast agent, is most familiarly utilized for delineation of brain and cord abnormalities. Since contrast-enhanced CT may help distinguish epidural fibrosis from recurrent herniated lumbar disk, the efficacy of Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging was evaluated. Symptomatic patients with previous back surgery are being evaluated with pre- and post-Gd-DTPA T1- and T2-weighted images. Results to date (over 40 cases) suggest that this technique will be extremely helpful

  1. POSTERIOR LUMBAR INTERBODY FUSION AND INSTRUMENTED POSTEROLATERAL FUSION IN ADULT SPONDYLOLISTHESIS: ASSESSMENT AND CLINICAL OUTCOME

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    Rajarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to assess and compare the outcomes of posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and posterolateral fusion (PLF in adult isthmic spondylosthesis. BACKGROUND: Posterolateral fusion has been considered the best method and widely been used for surgical treatment of adult spondylolisthesis.Superior results have subsequently been reported with interbody fusion with cages and posterior instrumentation MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty six patients with isthmic spondylolisthesis were operated. One group (20 patients had decompression and posterolateral fusion (PLF with a pedicle screw system; other group (16 patients was treated by decompression, posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF and a Pedicle screw system. In both groups adequate decompression was done RESULTS: Seventy seven percent of the patients had a good result with (PLIF and 68 percent with posterolateral fusion (PLF. However there was no statistical difference in cases with low grade slipping, whereas the difference was significant for cases with high grade slipping. Fusion rate was 93% with (PLIF and 68% with (PLF, but without any significant incidence in the functional outcome. 78% has relief of sciatica and neurogenic claudication. CONCLUSION: Based on these findings we found that for high grade spondylolisthesis which requires reduction or if the disc space is still high posterior lumbar inter body fusion is preferable. For low grade spondylolisthesis or if the disc space is narrow posterolateral fusion is preferable. A successful result of fusion operation depends on adequate decompression which relieves radicular symptoms.

  2. Osteoporosis of lumbar spine, hip joints and calcaneous: a clinical-radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoplich, J.; Braun, W.; Roque, J.A.O.; Strapetti, F.; Iachida, O.; Staub, H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to accurately ascertain the presence of osteoporosis, the AA examined 92 women over 65 by means of radiographies of lumbar spine, hip joints and calcaneus. They concluded that even with examinations by four investigators the certainty ratio is 29.8% of the X-ray examinations reviewed, which is still very low. The ratio psoas-3rd lumbar vertebra width is an indicator which is difficult to apply in women over 65 owing to the prevalence of lumbar scoliosis in this age group. Pain is a complaint commonly found in this age group. 82 patients (89.2%) complained of some kind of pain (abdominal, articular bones and spine) but the complaint of pain in general was more frequent in the osteoporotic group. The women in the osteoporotic group were leaner than non-osteoporotic ones, as measured by the ratio height (which may be shortened) to weight (p < 0.05), and also older (p < 0.05) patients. The gamma globulin was elevated in 55.5% of the patients in this sample and the relative tests aided in detecting three cases of more serious pathologies. (author)

  3. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion: A Perspective on Current Evidence and Clinical Knowledge

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    Ali Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current published data regarding open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF in relation to minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF. Introduction. MI-TLIF, a modern method for lumbar interbody arthrodesis, has allowed for a minimally invasive method to treat degenerative spinal pathologies. Currently, there is limited literature that compares TLIF directly to MI-TLIF. Thus, we seek to discuss the current literature on these techniques. Methods. Using a PubMed search, we reviewed recent publications of open and MI-TLIF, dating from 2002 to 2012. We discussed these studies and their findings in this paper, focusing on patient-reported outcomes as well as complications. Results. Data found in 14 articles of the literature was analyzed. Using these reports, we found mean follow-up was 20 months. The mean patient study size was 52. Seven of the articles directly compared outcomes of open TLIF with MI-TLIF, such as mean duration of surgery, length of post-operative stay, blood loss, and complications. Conclusion. Although high-class data comparing these two techniques is lacking, the current evidence supports MI-TLIF with outcomes comparable to that of the traditional, open technique. Further prospective, randomized studies will help to further our understanding of this minimally invasive technique.

  4. Effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar disc herniation in patients with acute low back pain measured by magnetic resonance imaging: A single arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Noureddin; Akbarov, Parvin; Rahnama, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) is considered as one of the most frequent disorders, which about 80% of adults experience in their lives. Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a cause for acute LBP. Among conservative treatments, traction is frequently used by clinicians to manage LBP resulting from LDH. However, there is still a lack of consensus about its efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar discs herniation, pain, lumbar range of motion (ROM), and back extensor muscles endurance in patients with acute LBP induced by LDH. Fifteen patients with acute LBP diagnosed by LDH participated in the present study. Participants undertook 15 sessions of segmental traction therapy along with conventional physiotherapy, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. Lumbar herniated mass size was measured before and after the treatment protocol using magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, pain, lumbar ROM and back muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the procedure using clinical outcome measures. Following the treatment protocol, herniated mass size and patients' pain were reduced significantly. In addition, lumbar flexion ROM showed a significant improvement. However, no significant change was observed for back extensor muscle endurance after the treatment procedure. The result of the present study showed segmental traction therapy might play an important role in the treatment of acute LBP stimulated by LDH.

  5. Analysis of 1058 Lumbar Prolapsed Intervertebra Disc Cases in Two Terdtiary Care Hospitals of Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaid, M.; Bukhari, S. S.; Kalsoom, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Characteristics of Prolapsed Intervertebral Disc (PID) in two tertiary care hospitals of Pakistan. The objective of this was to study the demographic characteristics of lumbar PID by age, gender, clinical presentation, levels of spinal column involvement, treatment options and post-operative complications for lumber disc prolapse. Methods: One thousand and fifty eight cases (708 males, 350 females) of prolapsed intervertebral disc over six years between January 2009 and December 2014 were studied for location of prolapsed disks, gender, age, clinical presentation, treatment options and complications of surgery. Results: Of the determined locations L5/S1 was the commonest (34.6 percent), followed by L4/L5 (33.4 percent). 24.2 percent of the patients had prolapsed disks at 2 levels (L3/L4, L4/L5 and L4/L5, L5/S1). Prolapsed disc was commonest in the 31-49 year age group. Male were mostly affected with male to female ratio of 2.02 percent. Most common surgery performed was discectomy with fenestration (60.64 percent of total surgeries performed) and most common postoperative complication being mechanical backache (4.8 percent). Conclusion: Prolapsed intervertebral disc is common in the lower lumbar region at the level of L4/L5 and L5/S1. The outcome of the patients who underwent surgery is very good with 92.19 percent of patients, being free of postoperative complications. (author)

  6. Imaging appearances and clinical outcome following sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction for sacral neoplasia

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    Thomas, Marianna; Davies, A.M.; James, Steven L.J. [Department of Radiology, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Stirling, A.J.; Grainger, M. [Department of Spinal Surgery, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Grimer, R.J. [Department of Orthopaedic Oncology, The Royal Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction is an uncommonly performed complex surgical procedure for the treatment of sacral neoplasia. There are many challenges in the post-operative period including the potential for tumor recurrence, infection, and construct failure. We present our experience of this patient cohort and describe the complications and imaging appearances that can be encountered during the follow-up period. Retrospective review of our Orthopaedic Oncology database was undertaken which has been collected over a 30-year period to identify patients that had undergone sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction. Pre and post-operative imaging including radiographs, CT, and MRI was reviewed. These were viewed by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists with consensus opinion if there was disagreement over the imaging findings. Data regarding patient demographics, tumor type, and dimensions was collected. Serial review of radiographs, CT, and MRI was performed to assess implant position and integrity, strut graft position and union, and for the presence of recurrence within the surgical bed. Five male and two female patients (mean age 36 years, age range 15-54 years) were treated with this procedure. Histological diagnoses included chordoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and spindle cell sarcoma. Mean maximal tumor size on pre-operative imaging was 10.7 cm (range, 6-16 cm). Post-operative follow-up ranged from 10-46 months. A total of 76 imaging studies were reviewed. Commonly identified complications included vertical rod and cross-connector fracture and screw loosening. Fibula strut graft non-union and fracture was also evident on imaging review. Two patients demonstrated disease recurrence during the follow-up period. This study demonstrates the spectrum and frequency of complications that can occur following sacrectomy and ilio-lumbar reconstruction for sacral neoplasia. (orig.)

  7. Prevalence and Severity of Preoperative Disabilities in Iranian Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

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    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Literature recommends that refractory cases with lumbar disc herniation and appropriate indications are better to be treated surgically, but do all the patients throughout the world consent to the surgery with a same disability and pain threshold? We aim to elucidate the prevalence and severity of disabilities and pain in Iranian patients with lumbar disc herniation who have consented to the surgery.   Methods: In this case series study, we clinically evaluated 194 (81 female and 113 male admitted patients with primary, simple, and stable L4-L5 or L5-S1 lumbar disc herniation who were undergoing surgical discectomy. The mean age of the patients was 38.3±11.2 (range: 18-76 years old. Disabilities were evaluated by the items of the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI questionnaire and severity of pain by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Chi-square test was used to compare the qualitative variables. Results: Severe disability (39.2% and crippled (29.9% were the two most common types of disabilities. Mean ODI score was 56.7±21.1 (range: 16-92. Total mean VAS in all patients was 6.1±1.9 (range: 0-10. Sex and level of disc herniation had no statistical effect on preoperative ODI and VAS. The scale of six was the most frequent scale of preoperative VAS in our patients. Conclusion: Iranian patients with lumbar disc herniation who consented to surgery have relatively severe pain or disability. These severities in pain or disabilities have no correlation with sex or level of disc herniation and are not equal with developed countries.

  8. Spine surgeon's kinematics during discectomy, part II: operating table height and visualization methods, including microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-05-01

    Surgeon spine angle during surgery was studied ergonomically and the kinematics of the surgeon's spine was related with musculoskeletal fatigue and pain. Spine angles varied depending on operation table height and visualization method, and in a previous paper we showed that the use of a loupe and a table height at the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum are optimal for reducing musculoskeletal loading. However, no studies have previously included a microscope as a possible visualization method. The objective of this study is to assess differences in surgeon spine angles depending on operating table height and visualization method, including microscope. We enrolled 18 experienced spine surgeons for this study, who each performed a discectomy using a spine surgery simulator. Three different methods were used to visualize the surgical field (naked eye, loupe, microscope) and three different operating table heights (anterior superior iliac spine, umbilicus, the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum) were studied. Whole spine angles were compared for three different views during the discectomy simulation: midline, ipsilateral, and contralateral. A 16-camera optoelectronic motion analysis system was used, and 16 markers were placed from the head to the pelvis. Lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, cervical lordosis, and occipital angle were compared between the different operating table heights and visualization methods as well as a natural standing position. Whole spine angles differed significantly depending on visualization method. All parameters were closer to natural standing values when discectomy was performed with a microscope, and there were no differences between the naked eye and the loupe. Whole spine angles were also found to differ from the natural standing position depending on operating table height, and became closer to natural standing position values as the operating table height increased, independent of the visualization method

  9. ISSLS Prize Winner: Consensus on the Clinical Diagnosis of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Results of an International Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkins-Lane, Christy; Melloh, Markus; Lurie, Jon; Smuck, Matt; Battié, Michele C; Freeman, Brian; Samartzis, Dino; Hu, Richard; Barz, Thomas; Stuber, Kent; Schneider, Michael; Haig, Andrew; Schizas, Constantin; Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Mannion, Anne F; Staub, Lukas; Comer, Christine; Macedo, Luciana; Ahn, Sang-Ho; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Sandella, Danielle

    2016-08-01

    Delphi. The aim of this study was to obtain an expert consensus on which history factors are most important in the clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). LSS is a poorly defined clinical syndrome. Criteria for defining LSS are needed and should be informed by the experience of expert clinicians. Phase 1 (Delphi Items): 20 members of the International Taskforce on the Diagnosis and Management of LSS confirmed a list of 14 history items. An online survey was developed that permits specialists to express the logical order in which they consider the items, and the level of certainty ascertained from the questions. Phase 2 (Delphi Study) Round 1: Survey distributed to members of the International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine. Round 2: Meeting of 9 members of Taskforce where consensus was reached on a final list of 10 items. Round 3: Final survey was distributed internationally. Phase 3: Final Taskforce consensus meeting. A total of 279 clinicians from 29 different countries, with a mean of 19 (±SD: 12) years in practice participated. The six top items were "leg or buttock pain while walking," "flex forward to relieve symptoms," "feel relief when using a shopping cart or bicycle," "motor or sensory disturbance while walking," "normal and symmetric foot pulses," "lower extremity weakness," and "low back pain." Significant change in certainty ceased after six questions at 80% (P < .05). This is the first study to reach an international consensus on the clinical diagnosis of LSS, and suggests that within six questions clinicians are 80% certain of diagnosis. We propose a consensus-based set of "seven history items" that can act as a pragmatic criterion for defining LSS in both clinical and research settings, which in the long term may lead to more cost-effective treatment, improved health care utilization, and enhanced patient outcomes. 2.

  10. A clinical case study of long-term injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine

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    Vladimir V Zaretskov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Overestimation of the efficacy of conservative treatment of spine injuries children often leads to unsatisfactory long-term results. The effective correction of post-traumatic spinal column deformities occurs in patients who undergo the operation in the early post-traumatic period. While choosing treatment strategies for children, higher reparative opportunities, which provide early fracture consolidation, including those in faulty positions, should be considered. This study presents a case of surgical treatment for uncomplicated injury of the thoracic and lumbar spine, with long-term compression fragmental fracture of the L1 vertebra body in a 12-year-old child. Due to the long-standing character of the injury right thoraco-frenotomy was conducted with partial L1 vertebral body and resection of the adjacent discs, deformity correction of the thoracic and lumbar spine with a transpedicular system, and ventral spondylodesis with an autograft. This extensive intervention was justified by the peculiarities in the vertebral body damage and the post-traumatic segmental kyphotic deformity that resulted from delayed medical treatment. An anterior approach was chosen to achieve immobilization at the site of the damage before correction using the transpedicular system. Surgical correction of long-term spinal injuries in children, with the use of a combined approach, is usually laborious and traumatic. The prevention of rigid post-traumatic spine deformities with the help of timely diagnostics and appropriate treatment, including surgery, should be a priority to prevent such cases.

  11. Does restoration of focal lumbar lordosis for single level degenerative spondylolisthesis result in better patient-reported clinical outcomes? A systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Chanseok; Visintini, Sarah; Dunning, Cynthia E; Oxner, William M; Glennie, R Andrew

    2017-10-01

    It is controversial whether the surgical restoration of sagittal balance and spinopelvic angulation in a single level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis results in clinical improvements. The purpose of this study to systematically review the available literature to determine whether the surgical correction of malalignment in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis correlates with improvements in patient-reported clinical outcomes. Literature searches were performed via Ovid Medline, Embase, CENTRAL and Web of Science using search terms "lumbar," "degenerative/spondylolisthesis" and "surgery/surgical/surgeries/fusion". This resulted in 844 articles and after reviewing the abstracts and full-texts, 13 articles were included for summary and final analysis. There were two Level II articles, four Level III articles and five Level IV articles. Most commonly used patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) were Oswestery disability index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Four articles were included for the final statistical analysis. There was no statistically significant difference between the patient groups who achieved successful surgical correction of malalignment and those who did not for either ODI (mean difference -0.94, CI -8.89-7.00) or VAS (mean difference 1.57, CI -3.16-6.30). Two studies assessed the efficacy of manual reduction of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and their clinical outcomes after the operation, and there was no statistically significant improvement. Overall, the restoration of focal lumbar lordosis and restoration of sagittal balance for single-level lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis does not seem to yield clinical improvements but well-powered studies on this specific topic is lacking in the current literature. Future well-powered studies are needed for a more definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Avaliação clínica radiológica da artrodese lombar transforaminal aberta versus minimamente invasiva Evaluación clínica radiológica de la artrodesis lumbar transforaminal abierta versus mínimamente invasiva Clinical and radiological evaluation of open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion versus minimally invasive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Magalhães Menezes

    2009-09-01

    artrodesis transforaminal abierta y mínimamente invasiva. MÉTODOS: cuarenta y cinco pacientes fueron sometidos a la artrodesis lumbar transforaminal por el Grupo de Cirugía Espinal del Hospital Lifecenter/Ortopédico de Belo Horizonte, en el periodo de Diciembre de 2005 a Mayo de 2007, siendo 15 en el grupo de artrodesis abierta y 30 pacientes del grupo de artrodesis mínimamente invasiva (MIS. Las indicaciones para la artrodesis intersomática fueron: enfermedad degenerativa de disco, asociada o no a hernia de disco o estenosis del canal; espondilolistesis de bajo grado espondilolítica o degenerativa; y síndrome post-laminectomía/discectomía. Las variables analizadas fueron: tiempo de cirugía, tiempo de internación hospitalar, necesidad de hemotransfusión, escala analógica visual de dolor (VAS lumbar y de los miembros inferiores, Oswestry, índice de consolidación de la artrodesis y regreso al trabajo. RESULTADOS: el seguimiento mínimo fue de 24 meses. Fueron ocho hombres y siete mujeres en el Grupo Abierto y 17 hombres y 13 mujeres en el Grupo MIS. El tiempo quirúrgico promedio fue de 222 minutos y 221 minutos, respectivamente. Hubo mejora significativa del VAS y Oswestry en el postoperatorio en ambos grupos. El tiempo de internación hospitalar varió de 3.3 días para el Grupo Abierto y 1.8 días para el Grupo MIS. El índice de fusión obtenido fue de 93.3% en ambos grupos. Hubo necesidad de hemotransfusión en tres pacientes en el Grupo Abierto (20% y ningún caso MIS. CONCLUSIONES: la TLIF mínimamente invasiva presenta resultados similares a largo plazo cuando comparada con TLIF abierta, con los beneficios adicionales de menor morbilidad postoperatoria, menor periodo de internación y rehabilitación precoz.OBJECTIVE: the aim of this article is to compare the clinical and radiological results of patients who underwent open and minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. METHODS: forty-five patients underwent transforaminal lumbar

  13. [Lumbar spondylosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seichi, Atsushi

    2014-10-01

    Lumbar spondylosis is a chronic, noninflammatory disease caused by degeneration of lumbar disc and/or facet joints. The etiology of lumbar spondylosis is multifactorial. Patients with lumbar spondylosis complain of a broad variety of symptoms including discomfort in the low back lesion, whereas some of them have radiating leg pain or neurologenic intermittent claudication (lumbar spinal stenosis). The majority of patients with spondylosis and stenosis of the lumbosacral spine can be treated nonsurgically. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and COX-2 inhibitors are helpful in controlling symptoms. Prostaglandin, epidural injection, and transforaminal injection are also helpful for leg pain and intermittent claudication. Operative therapy for spinal stenosis or spondylolisthesis is reserved for patients who are totally incapacitated by their condition.

  14. Does smoking affect the outcomes of lumbar decompression surgery?

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    Mehta Radha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar decompressions and micro-discectomies are commonly performed non-complex spinal surgeries that do not involve the insertion of metalwork into the spine and are done for symptomatic disc prolapse and lumbar spinal stenosis, whereas complex-spinal surgery does require metalwork [1]. Studies of complex-spinal surgeries show that smoking has a significant negative impact on the outcome of the surgery [2] therefore, the cessation of smoking is advised prior to surgery [3]. There are evidences in the literature supportive as well as opposing this statement about continued smoking and poor outcome of decompressive spinal surgeries. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 143 consecutive patients who have had either a micro-discectomy or a micro-decompression. Results: We found no statistical difference between smokers and non-smokers in the outcomes of lumbar decompression surgery. Both groups improved equally and significantly in terms of back pain, leg pain and functions. Out of 143 patients, only 2% more non-smokers had improved leg pain compared to smokers, 1% less non-smokers had improved back pain and 2% more non-smokers had an improved Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. Discussion: We recommend that it is important to surgically treat both smokers and non-smokers in need of a lumbar spinal decompression.

  15. Computed tomography in lumbar canal stenosis. Relationship between its findings and clinical symptoms

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    Ohta, Shu; Baba, Itsushi; Ishida, Akihisa; Sumida, Tadayuki; Sasaki, Seishu (Hiroshima Shiritsu Asa Shimin Hospital (Japan))

    1984-09-01

    Preoperative CT was done in 39 patients with lumbar canal stenosis. Marked symmetrical narrowing of the whole vertebral canal was seen in the group with nervous symptoms in the cauda equina. Deformed bilateral intervertebral joints were seen in the group with both nervous symptoms in the cauda equina and radicular sciatica. The lateral recess on the affected side was markedly narrowed by the projection of the upper and lower joints and herniation. In the group with radicular sciatica, the vertebral canal itself was not so narrowed, but the unilateral intervertebral joint was extremely deformed, causing a narrowing of the lateral recess. There were large differences in the angle of the left and right intervertebral joints.

  16. Defining the minimum clinically important difference for grade I degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis: insights from the Quality Outcomes Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Anthony L; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Bisson, Erica F; Glassman, Steven D; Foley, Kevin T; Slotkin, Jonathan; Potts, Eric A; Shaffrey, Mark E; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Coric, Domagoj; Knightly, John J; Park, Paul; Fu, Kai-Ming; Devin, Clinton J; Archer, Kristin R; Chotai, Silky; Chan, Andrew K; Virk, Michael S; Bydon, Mohamad

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) play a pivotal role in defining the value of surgical interventions for spinal disease. The concept of minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is considered the new standard for determining the effectiveness of a given treatment and describing patient satisfaction in response to that treatment. The purpose of this study was to determine the MCID associated with surgical treatment for degenerative lumbar spondylolisthesis. METHODS The authors queried the Quality Outcomes Database registry from July 2014 through December 2015 for patients who underwent posterior lumbar surgery for grade I degenerative spondylolisthesis. Recorded PROs included scores on the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, and numeric rating scale (NRS) for leg pain (NRS-LP) and back pain (NRS-BP). Anchor-based (using the North American Spine Society satisfaction scale) and distribution-based (half a standard deviation, small Cohen's effect size, standard error of measurement, and minimum detectable change [MDC]) methods were used to calculate the MCID for each PRO. RESULTS A total of 441 patients (80 who underwent laminectomies alone and 361 who underwent fusion procedures) from 11 participating sites were included in the analysis. The changes in functional outcome scores between baseline and the 1-year postoperative evaluation were as follows: 23.5 ± 17.4 points for ODI, 0.24 ± 0.23 for EQ-5D, 4.1 ± 3.5 for NRS-LP, and 3.7 ± 3.2 for NRS-BP. The different calculation methods generated a range of MCID values for each PRO: 3.3-26.5 points for ODI, 0.04-0.3 points for EQ-5D, 0.6-4.5 points for NRS-LP, and 0.5-4.2 points for NRS-BP. The MDC approach appeared to be the most appropriate for calculating MCID because it provided a threshold greater than the measurement error and was closest to the average change difference between the satisfied and not-satisfied patients. On subgroup analysis, the MCID thresholds for laminectomy-alone patients were

  17. Imaging Determinants of Clinical Effectiveness of Lumbar Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maus, Timothy P; El-Yahchouchi, Christine A; Geske, Jennifer R; Carter, Rickey E; Kaufmann, Timothy J; Wald, John T; Diehn, Felix E

    2016-12-01

    To examine associations between imaging characteristics of compressive lesions and patient outcomes after lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) stratified by steroid formulation (solution versus suspension). Retrospective observational study, academic radiology practice. A 516-patient sample was selected from 2,634 consecutive patients receiving lumbar TFESI for radicular pain. The advanced imaging study(s) preceding sampled TFESI were reviewed. Compressive lesions were described by a) nature of the lesion [disc herniation, fixed stenosis, synovial cyst, epidural fibrosis, no lesion] b) degree of neural compression [4 part scale], and c) presence of a tandem lesion. Associations between 2-month categorical outcomes (responder rates for pain, functional recovery) and imaging characteristics, stratified by steroid formulation, were examined with chi-squared tests of categorical outcomes and multivariable logistic regression models. Disc herniation patients had more responders for functional recovery than patients with fixed lesions (54% versus 38%, P = 0.01). Patients with fixed lesions receiving steroid solution (dexamethasone) had more responders for pain relief, with a similar trend for functional recovery, than patients receiving suspensions (59% versus 40%, P = 0.01). Outcomes for patients with fixed lesions treated with dexamethasone were not statistically different from those for disc herniation patients. Patients with single compressive lesions had more responders than those with tandem lesions (55% versus 41%, P = 0.03). In the entire sample, outcomes for disc herniations were more favorable than for fixed lesions. However, fixed lesions treated with dexamethasone had outcomes indistinguishable from disc herniations. Single lesions had better outcomes than tandem lesions. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Does sensory stimulation threshold affect lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation outcomes? A prospective clinical correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Steven P; Strassels, Scott A; Kurihara, Connie; Lesnick, Ivan K; Hanling, Steven R; Griffith, Scott R; Buckenmaier, Chester C; Nguyen, Conner

    2011-11-01

    Radiofrequency facet denervation is one of the most frequently performed procedures for chronic low back pain. Although sensory stimulation is generally used as a surrogate measure to denote sufficient proximity of the electrode to the nerve, no study has examined whether stimulation threshold influences outcome. We prospectively recorded data in 61 consecutive patients undergoing lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation who experienced significant pain relief after medial branch blocks. For each nerve lesioned, multiple attempts were made to maximize sensory stimulation threshold (SST). Mean SST was calculated on the basis of the lowest stimulation perceived at 0.1-V increments for each medial branch. A positive outcome was defined as a ≥50% reduction in back pain coupled with a positive satisfaction score lasting ≥3 months. The relationship between mean SST and denervation outcomes was evaluated via a receiver's operating characteristic (ROC) curve, and stratifying outcomes on the basis of various cutoff values. No correlation was noted between mean SST and pain relief at rest (Pearson's r=-0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.24 to 0.23, P=0.97), with activity (r=-0.17, 95% CI: -0.40 to 0.07, P=0.20), or a successful outcome. No optimal SST could be identified. There is no significant relationship between mean SST during lumbar facet radiofrequency denervation and treatment outcome, which may be due to differences in general sensory perception. Because stimulation threshold was optimized for each patient, these data cannot be interpreted to suggest that sensory testing should not be performed, or that high sensory stimulation thresholds obtained on the first attempt should be deemed acceptable.

  19. First clinical results of minimally invasive vector lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-VLIF) in spondylodiscitis and concomitant osteoporosis: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Bernhard; Jiang, Hongzhen; Ruess, Daniel; Reinshagen, Clemens; Molcanyi, Marek; Zivcak, Jozef; Tong, Huaiyu; Schackert, Gabriele

    2017-12-01

    First description of MIS-VLIF, a minimally invasive lumbar stabilization, to evaluate its safety and feasibility in patients suffering from weak bony conditions (lumbar spondylodiscitis and/or osteoporosis). After informed consent, 12 patients suffering from lumbar spondylodiscitis underwent single level MIS-VLIF. Eight of them had a manifest osteoporosis, either. Pre- and postoperative clinical status was documented using numeric rating scale (NRS) for leg and back pain. In all cases, the optimal height for the cage was preoperatively determined using software-based range of motion and sagittal balance analysis. CT scans were obtained to evaluate correct placement of the construct and to verify fusion after 6 months. Since 2013, 12 patients with lumbar pyogenic spondylodiscitis underwent MIS-VLIF. Mean surgery time was 169 ± 28 min and average blood loss was less than 400 ml. Postoperative CT scans showed correct placement of the implants. Eleven patients showed considerable postoperative improvement in clinical scores. In one patient, we observed screw loosening. After documented bony fusion in the CT scan, the fixation system was removed in two cases to achieve lower material load. The load-bearing trajectories (vectors) of MIS-VLIF are different from those of conventional coaxial pedicle screw implantation. The dorsally converging construct combines the heads of the dorsoventral pedicle screws with laminar pedicle screws following cortical bone structures within a small approach. In case of lumbar spondylodiscitis and/or osteoporosis, MIS-VLIF relies on cortical bony structures for all screw vectors and the construct does not depend on conventional coaxial pedicle screws in the presence of inflamed, weak, cancellous or osteoporotic bone. MIS-VLIF allows full 360° lumbar fusion including cage implantation via a small, unilateral dorsal midline approach.

  20. Clinically acceptable agreement between the ViMove wireless motion sensor system and the Vicon motion capture system when measuring lumbar region inclination motion in the sagittal and coronal planes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mjøsund, Hanne Leirbekk; Boyle, Eleanor; Kjær, Per

    2017-01-01

    . CONCLUSIONS: We found a clinically acceptable level of agreement between these two methods for measuring standing lumbar inclination motion in these two cardinal movement planes. Further research should investigate the ViMove system's ability to measure lumbar motion in more complex 3D functional movements...

  1. [Surgical treatment for incisions fat colliquation or infections at early stage after operation of lumbar disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ting-Jin; Zheng, Liang-Guo; Sun, Peng; Li, Xing-Xue

    2014-05-01

    To explore the reason, key diagnosic point and therapeutic method of the incisions fat colliquation or infections at early stage after operation of lumbar disc herniation. From July 2007 to May 2012, clinical data of 11 patients with incision fat liquefaction or early infection after lumbar discectomy were retrospectively analyzed. There were 5 males and 6 females with an average age of 43.1 years, and the mean time of incisions fat colliquation or infection was 5 days and a half after operation. The main clinical features included local wound pain aggravating, fervescence, fresh seepage in the wound, and blood inflammatory index increased, etc. The wound could heal at the first treatment stage or not was an evaluation standard of curative effect. All patients were followed up with an average period of 21 months. The wounds of 10 cases healed at the first stage without recurrence and complications. In 1 case infected by staphylococcus aureus, distal part of the wound present local red, swelling and with wave motion at 2 months after operation, staphylococcus aureus infection was confirmed after puncture and bacterial culture, and 1 thrum was found after local incision. The wound healed after change dressings for 1 week, without recurrence after followed up for 13 months. Preventing the risk factors before operation, minimizing invasive technique during operation reasonable antibiotics application for the lumbar operation reguiring placement objects, and correctly handling with wound after operation could prevent and reduce the incidence of incisions fat liquefaction or infection after operation of lumbar disc herniation. For incision fat liquefaction or infection, early diagnosis, debridement, VSD negative pressure irrigation and drainage, to choosing sensitive antibiotics according to the results of drug sensitivity, may contribute to wound early healing and decrease complication.

  2. Lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogduk, N

    1980-11-15

    Low back pain, referred pain in the lower limbs, and spasm of the back, gluteal, and hamstring muscles are clinical features which can be induced in normal volunteers by stimulating structures which are innervated by the lumbar dorsal rami. Conversely, they can be relieved in certain patients by selective interruption of conduction along dorsal rami. These facts permit the definition of a lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome, which can be distinguished from the intervertebral disc syndrome and other forms of low back pain. The distinguishing feature is that, in lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome, all the clinical features are exclusively mediated by dorsal rami and do not arise from nerve-root compression. The pathophysiology, pathology, and treatment of this syndrome are described. Recognition of this syndrome, and its treatment with relatively minor procedures, can obviate the need for major surgery which might otherwise be undertaken.

  3. The use of tubular retractors for translaminar discectomy for cranially and caudally extruded discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind G Kulkarni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The conventional interlaminar approach is adequate for access to most disc herniations in lumbar spine surgery. The access to cranially and caudally migrated disc fragments, by conventional interlaminar fenestration, requires an extension of the fenestration with the potential destruction of the facet joint complex and consequent postsurgical instability. To describe the technique and results of the translaminar technique of targeted discectomy using tubular retractors for the surgical treatment of cranially and caudally extruded discs. Materials and Methods: The study period extended from January 2008 to December 2014. All patients with lumbar herniated discs who failed conservative management were selected for surgery and underwent routine erect radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the lumbar spine. The patients with cranially or caudally migrated discs were included in this study. The technique involves approaching migrated disc through an oval window (sculpted through an 18 mm tubular retractor using a burr in the lamina precisely over the location of the migrated disc as predicted by the preoperative MRI (inferior lamina for inferior migration and superior lamina for superior migration. The perioperative parameters studied were operative time, blood loss, complications, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, and visual analog scale (VAS for leg pain before surgery and at last followup. In the study, 4 patients underwent a postoperative computed tomography-scan with a three-dimensional reconstruction to visualize the oval window and to rule out any pars fracture. All technical difficulties and complications were analyzed. Results: 17 patients in the age group of 41–58 years underwent the translaminar technique of targeted discectomy. The migration of disc was cranial in 12 patients and caudal in 5 patients. Fourteen of the affected discs were at the L4–L5 level and three were at the L5-S1 level. The mean VAS (leg pain

  4. Clinical study on treatment of HIVD of lumbar spine using Scolopendrid herbal acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park, So-Yeong

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is performed for the purpose of examining into the efficacy of the scolopendrid(Scolopendra morsitans L which has been used among the Korean people for the H.I.V.D of lumbar spine. Methods & Results: Using the herbal acupuncture made of scolopendrid(Scolopendra morsitans L, we treated the 10 H.l. V.D patients for 1 week and operated 4 pre and post treatment test ; D.I.T.I, 6 kind of physical test, Oswestry disability index, and self-conscious pain rate. Trough Lite test, we saw 50-100% of efficacy rate in each test. Otherwise, only 5 of the 7 point in D.I.T.I and self-conscious pain rate showed statistically valuable change. Conclusion: we brought to the conclusion that the scolopendrid herbal acupuncture has possibility to be efficient to cure the H.I.V.D patients. So we suggest the possibility to use this new remedy for the H.I.V.D.

  5. Two-year comprehensive medical management of degenerative lumbar spine disease (lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, or disc herniation): a value analysis of cost, pain, disability, and quality of life: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Zuckerman, Scott L; Shau, David N; McGirt, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    Current health care reform calls for a reduction of procedures and treatments that are less effective, more costly, and of little value (high cost/low quality). The authors assessed the 2-year cost and effectiveness of comprehensive medical management for lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, and herniation by utilizing a prospective single-center multidisciplinary spine center registry in a real-world practice setting. Analysis was performed on a prospective longitudinal quality of life spine registry. Patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis (n = 50), stenosis (n = 50), and disc herniation (n = 50) who had symptoms persisting after 6 weeks of medical management and who were eligible for surgical treatment were entered into a prospective registry after deciding on nonsurgical treatment. In all cases, comprehensive medical management included spinal steroid injections, physical therapy, muscle relaxants, antiinflammatory medication, and narcotic oral agents. Two-year patient-reported outcomes, back-related medical resource utilization, and occupational work-day losses were prospectively collected and used to calculate Medicare fee-based direct and indirect costs from the payer and societal perspectives. The maximum health gain associated with medical management was defined as the improvement in pain, disability, and quality of life experienced after 2 years of medical treatment or at the time a patient decided to cross over to surgery. The maximum health gain in back pain, leg pain, disability, quality of life, depression, and general health state did not achieve statistical significance by 2 years of medical management, except for pain and disability in patients with disc herniation and back pain in patients with lumbar stenosis. Eighteen patients (36%) with spondylolisthesis, 11 (22%) with stenosis, and 17 (34%) with disc herniation eventually required surgical management due to lack of improvement. The 2-year improvement did not achieve a minimum clinically

  6. Endolymphatic hydrops in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: prevalence and clinical outcome after lumbar puncture. Preliminary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Angelo; Cavaliere, Michele; Sicignano, Stefania; Falco, Pietro; Cautiero, Federico; De Simone, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by raised intracranial pressure (ICP) without any underlying pathology, presenting with (IIH) or without papilledema (IIHWOP). Headache, often on daily basis, is the most frequent symptom. Among audiovestibular symptoms, tinnitus and dizziness are commonly reported, while vertigo and hearing impairment are infrequent reports. Endolymphatic hydrops (ELH) is the typical histopathologic feature of Ménière disease, a condition featured by episodes of vertigo, dizziness, fluctuating hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. Evidences suggest that ICP is transmitted to inner ear. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of ELH symptoms in IIH/IIHWOP and the relationship between the raised ICP and ELH. The prevalence of chronic headache and of ELH symptoms was investigated in a consecutive series of IIH/IIHWOP patients, and a standard audiometry with hearing threshold measurement (pure-tone average-PTA) was performed. Differences in chronic headache and ELH symptoms prevalence and changes of PTA threshold were calculated after ICP normalization by lumbar puncture (LP). Thirty-one patients (17 with IIH and 14 with IIHWOP) were included. Before LP, chronic headache was present in 93.5%. The percentages of patients reporting tinnitus, dizziness, vertigo, and aural fullness were 67.7, 77.4, 22.6, and 61.3%, respectively. Headache frequency as well as ELH symptoms and PTA significantly improved after LP. The improvement of PTA and of ELH symptoms observed after LP in this series of IIH/IIHWOP patients indicates that a raised ICP, a condition known to be involved in the progression and refractoriness of migraine pain, has also a role in ELH. We propose that intracranial hypertension may represent the shared pathogenetic step explaining the large epidemiological comorbidity between migraine and vestibular symptoms, at present conceptualized as "vestibular migraine."

  7. Prediction of Postoperative Clinical Recovery of Drop Foot Attributable to Lumbar Degenerative Diseases, via a Bayesian Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Shota; Aono, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Drop foot resulting from degenerative lumbar diseases can impair activities of daily living. Therefore, predictors of recovery of this symptom have been investigated using univariate or/and multivariate analyses. However, the conclusions have been somewhat controversial. Bayesian network models, which are graphic and intuitive to the clinician, may facilitate understanding of the prognosis of drop foot resulting from degenerative lumbar diseases. (1) To show a layered correlation among predictors of recovery from drop foot resulting from degenerative lumbar diseases; and (2) to develop support tools for clinical decisions to treat drop foot resulting from lumbar degenerative diseases. Between 1993 and 2013, we treated 141 patients with decompressive lumbar spine surgery who presented with drop foot attributable to degenerative diseases. Of those, 102 (72%) were included in this retrospective study because they had drop foot of recent development and had no diseases develop that affect evaluation of drop foot after surgery. Specifically, 28 (20%) patients could not be analyzed because their records were not available at a minimum of 2 years followup after surgery and 11 (8%) were lost owing to postoperative conditions that affect the muscle strength evaluation. Eight candidate variables were sex, age, herniated soft disc, duration of the neurologic injury (duration), preoperative tibialis anterior muscle strength (pretibialis anterior), leg pain, cauda equina syndrome, and number of involved levels. Manual muscle testing was used to assess the tibialis anterior muscle strength. Drop foot was defined as a tibialis anterior muscle strength score of less than 3 of 5 (5 = movement against gravity and full resistance, 4 = movement against gravity and moderate resistance, 3 = movement against gravity through full ROM, 3- = movement against gravity through partial ROM, 2 = movement with gravity eliminated through full ROM, 1 = slight contraction but no movement, and 0 = no

  8. [The shor-term clinical outcomes and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for the treatment of degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Ma, Wei-Hu; Jiang, Wei-Yu; Ruan, Chao-Yue; Chen, Yun-Lin

    2017-02-25

    To evaluate the early efficacy and safety of extreme lateral interbody fusion (XLIF) combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation for lumbar degenerative disease. From January 2013 to June 2014, 13 patients with degenerative lumbar disease were treated with XLIF combined with percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, including 8 cases of lumbar instability, 5 cases of mild to moderate lumbar spondylolisthesis;there were 5 males and 8 females, aged from 56 to 73 years with an average of 62.1 years. All patients were single segment fusion. Operation time, perioperative bleeding and perioperative complications were recorded. Visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to evaluate the clinical efficacy. Interbody fusion rate was observed and the intervertebral foramen area changes were compared preoperation and postoperation by X-rays and CT scanning. The mean operation time and perioperative bleeding in the patients respectively was(62.8±5.2) min and(82.5±22.6) ml. One case occurred in the numbness of femoribus internus and 1 case occurred in the muscle weakness of hip flexion after operation, both of them recovered within 2 weeks. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 19 months with an average of 15.6 months. VAS was decreased from preoperative 7.31±0.75 to 2.31±0.75 at final follow-up( P degenerative disease.

  9. Lumbar spinal stenosis: comparison of surgical practice variation and clinical outcome in three national spine registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle; Nordvall, Dennis; Gerdhem, Paul; Lagerbäck, Tobias; Andersen, Mikkel; Eiskjaer, Søren; Gehrchen, Martin; Jacobs, Wilco; van Hooff, Miranda L; Solberg, Tore K

    2018-05-21

    Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains controversial, resulting in practice-based variation. The present study aimed to evaluate in a pragmatic study if surgical selection criteria and variation in use of arthrodesis in three Scandinavian countries can be linked to variation in treatment effectiveness. This is an observational study based on a combined cohort from the national spine registries of Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Patients aged 50 and older operated during 2011-2013 for LSS were included. Patient-Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs): Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) (primary outcome), Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for leg pain and back pain, and health-related quality of life (Euro-Qol-5D) were reported. Analysis included case-mix adjustment. In addition, we report differences in hospital stay. Analyses of baseline data were done by analysis of variance (ANOVA), chi-square, or logistic regression tests. The comparisons of the mean changes of PROMs at 1-year follow-up between the countries were done by ANOVA (crude) and analysis of covariance (case-mix adjustment). Out of 14,223 included patients, 10,890 (77%) responded at 1-year follow-up. Apart from fewer smokers in Sweden and higher comorbidity rate in Norway, baseline characteristics were similar. The rate of additional fusion surgery (patients without or with spondylolisthesis) was 11% (4%, 47%) in Norway, 21% (9%, 56%) in Sweden, and 28% (15%, 88%) in Denmark. At 1-year follow-up, the mean improvement for ODI (95% confidence interval) was 18 (17-18) in Norway, 17 (17-18) in Sweden, and 18 (17-19) in Denmark. Patients operated with arthrodesis had prolonged hospital stay. Real-life data from three national spine registers showed similar indications for decompression

  10. Lumbar total disc replacement from an extreme lateral approach: clinical experience with a minimum of 2 years' follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Luiz; Oliveira, Leonardo; Schaffa, Thomas; Coutinho, Etevaldo; Marchi, Luis

    2011-01-01

    current lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) devices require an anterior approach for implantation. This approach has inherent limitations, including risks to abdominal structures and the need for resection of the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL). Placement of a TDR device from a true lateral (extreme lateral interbody fusion [XLIF]) approach is thought to offer a less invasive option to access the disc space, preserving the stabilizing ligaments and avoiding scarring of anterior vasculature. In this study, the authors attempted to quantify the clinical and radiographic outcomes of a lateral approach to lumbar TDR from a prospective, single-center experience. a TDR device designed for implantation through a true lateral, retroperitoneal, transpsoas approach (XLIF) was implanted in 36 patients with discography-confirmed 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease. Clinical (pain and function) and radiographic (range of motion [ROM]) data were prospectively collected preoperatively, postoperatively, and serially for a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. thirty-six surgeries were performed in 16 men and 20 women (mean age 42.6 years). Surgeries included 15 single-level TDR procedures at L3-4 or L4-5, three 2-level TDR procedures spanning L3-4 and L4-5, and 18 hybrid procedures (anterior lumbar interbody fusion [ALIF]) at L5-S1 and TDR at L4-5 [17] or L3-4 [1]). Operative time averaged 130 minutes, with an average blood loss of 60 ml and no intraoperative complications. Postoperative radiographs showed good device placement. All patients were walking within 12 hours of surgery and all but 9 were discharged the next day (7 of 9 had hybrid TDR/ALIF procedures). Five patients (13.8%) had psoas weakness and 3 (8.3%) had anterior thigh numbness postoperatively, both resolving within 2 weeks. One patient (2.8%) demonstrated weakness of the leg ipsilateral to the approach side, which lasted through the 3-month visit but was resolved by the 6-month visit. One patient (2.8%) was

  11. Accuracy of Clinical Tests in Detecting Disk Herniation and Nerve Root Compression in Subjects With Lumbar Radicular Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekedahl, Harald; Jönsson, Bo; Annertz, Mårten; Frobell, Richard B

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of 3 commonly used neurodynamic tests (slump test, straight-leg raise [SLR] test, femoral neurodynamic test) and 2 clinical assessments to determine radiculopathy (radiculopathy I, 1 neurologic sign; radiculopathy II, 2 neurologic signs corresponding to 1 specific nerve root) in detecting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (extrusion, subarticular nerve root compression, and foraminal nerve root compression). Validity study. Secondary care. We included subjects (N=99; mean age, 58y; 54% women) referred for epidural steroid injection because of lumbar radicular symptoms who had positive clinical and MRI findings. Positive clinical findings included the slump test (n=67), SLR test (n=50), femoral neurodynamic test (n=7), radiculopathy I (n=70), and radiculopathy II (n=33). Positive MRI findings included extrusion (n=27), subarticular nerve compression (n=14), and foraminal nerve compression (n=25). Not applicable. Accuracy of clinical tests in detecting MRI findings was evaluated using sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operating characteristics analysis with area under the curve (AUC). The slump test had the highest sensitivity in detecting extrusion (.78) and subarticular nerve compression (1.00), but the respective specificity was low (.36 and .38). Radiculopathy I was most sensitive in detecting foraminal nerve compression (.80) but with low specificity (.34). Only 1 assessment had a concurrent high sensitivity and specificity (ie, radiculopathy II) in detecting subarticular nerve compression (.71 and .73, respectively). The AUC for all tests in detecting extrusion, subarticular nerve compression, and foraminal nerve compression showed ranges of .48 to .60, .63 to .82, and .33 to .57, respectively. In general, the investigated neurodynamic tests or assessments for radiculopathy lacked diagnostic accuracy. The slump test was the most sensitive test, while radiculopathy II was the most specific test. Most interestingly, no

  12. Clinical and biomechanical researches of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid lumbar fusion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chan; Liu, Lei; Shi, Jian-Yong; Yan, Kai-Zhong; Shen, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Zhen-Rong

    2018-04-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion using rigid rods is a common surgical technique. However, adjacent segment disease and other adverse effects can occur. Dynamic stabilization devices preserve physiologic motion and reduce painful stress but have a high rate of construct failure and reoperation. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods for semi-rigid fusions have a similar stiffness and adequate stabilization power compared with titanium rods, but with improved load sharing and reduced mechanical failure. The purpose of this paper is to review and evaluate the clinical and biomechanical performance of PEEK rods. A systematic review of clinical and biomechanical studies was conducted. A literature search using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases identified studies that met the eligibility criteria. Eight clinical studies and 15 biomechanical studies were included in this systematic review. The visual analog scale and the Oswestry disability index improved significantly in most studies, with satisfactory fusion rates. The occurrence of adjacent segment disease was low. In biomechanical studies, PEEK rods demonstrated a superior load-sharing distribution, a larger adjacent segment range of motion, and reduced stress at the rod-screw/screw-bone interfaces compared with titanium rods. The PEEK rod construct was simple to assemble and had a reliable in vivo performance compared with dynamic devices. The quality of clinical studies was low with confounding results, although results from mechanical studies were encouraging. There is no evidence strong enough to confirm better outcomes with PEEK rods than titanium rods. More studies with better protocols, a larger sample size, and a longer follow-up time are needed.

  13. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatments Discectomy Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise MRI NSAIDs Physical Therapy Radiographic Assessment for Back Pain Traction Watchful Waiting & Education ... © 2018 North American Spine Society | Terms Of Use | Privacy Statement

  14. Blood hsCRP And PGE2 Content With Clinical Outcome Using Modified Fenestrat Restorative Spinoplasty Better Than Lamonectomy-Fusion In Lumbar Stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    T Mahadewa; Sri Maliawan; A Raka-Sudewi; M Wiryana

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Modified Fenestration-Restorative Spinoplasty (MFRS) technique is an alternative to lumbar stenosis treatment, providing the equal decompression comparing with laminectomy techniques, without the implant, less expensive and complication rates. The purpose of this study was to determine which technique gives better inflammation and clinical outcome based on high sensitive C-Reactive Protein biomarker (hsCRP) and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2), Visua...

  15. Determining clinical practice of expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Esther R C; Scheijen, Elle E M; van Meeteren, Nico L U; de Bie, Rob A; Lenssen, Anton F; Willems, Paul C; Hoogeboom, Thomas J

    2016-05-01

    To determine the content of current Dutch expert hospital physiotherapy practice for patients undergoing lumbar spinal fusion (LSF), to gain insight into expert-based clinical practice. At each hospital where LSF is performed, one expert physiotherapist received an e-mailed questionnaire, about pre- and postoperative physiotherapy and discharge after LSF. The level of uniformity in goals and interventions was graded on a scale from no uniformity (50-60 %) to very strong uniformity (91-100 %). LSF was performed at 34 of the 67 contacted hospitals. From those 34 hospitals, 28 (82 %) expert physiotherapists completed the survey. Twenty-one percent of the respondents saw patients preoperatively, generally to provide information. Stated postoperative goals and administered interventions focused mainly on performing transfers safely and keeping the patient informed. Outcome measures were scarcely used. There was no uniformity regarding advice on the activities of daily living. Dutch perioperative expert physiotherapy for patients undergoing LSF is variable and lacks structural outcome assessment. Studies evaluating the effectiveness of best-practice physiotherapy are warranted.

  16. Current and future perspectives on lumbar degenerative disc disease: a UK survey exploring specialist multidisciplinary clinical opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite lumbar degenerative disc disease (LDDD) being significantly associated with non-specific low back pain and effective treatment remaining elusive, specialist multidisciplinary clinical stakeholder opinion remains unexplored. The present study examines the views of such experts. Design A reliable and valid electronic survey was designed to establish trends using theoretical constructs relating to current assessment and management practices. Clinicians from the Society of Back Pain Research (SBPR) UK were invited to take part. Quantitative data were collated and coded using Bristol Online Surveys (BOS) software, and content analysis was used to systematically code and categorise qualitative data. Setting Specialist multidisciplinary spinal interest group in the UK. Participants 38/141 clinically active, multidisciplinary SBPR members with specialist spinal interest participated. Among them, 84% had >9 years postgraduate clinical experience. Interventions None. Outcome measures Frequency distributions were used to establish general trends in quantitative data. Qualitative responses were coded and categorised in relation to each theme and percentage responses were calculated. Results LDDD symptom recurrence, in the absence of psychosocial influence, was associated with physical signs of joint stiffness (26%), weakness (17%) and joint hypermobility (6%), while physical factors (21%) and the ability to adapt (11%) were postulated as reasons why some experience pain and others do not. No one management strategy was supported exclusively or with consensus. Regarding effective modalities, there was no significant difference between allied health professional and medic responses (p=0.1–0.8). The future of LDDD care was expressed in terms of improvements in patient communication (35%), patient education (38%) and treatment stratification (24%). Conclusions Results suggest that multidisciplinary expert spinal clinicians appear to follow UK

  17. Lumbar lordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Ella; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar lordosis is a key postural component that has interested both clinicians and researchers for many years. Despite its wide use in assessing postural abnormalities, there remain many unanswered questions regarding lumbar lordosis measurements. Therefore, in this article we reviewed different factors associated with the lordosis angle based on existing literature and determined normal values of lordosis. We reviewed more than 120 articles that measure and describe the different factors associated with the lumbar lordosis angle. Because of a variety of factors influencing the evaluation of lumbar lordosis such as how to position the patient and the number of vertebrae included in the calculation, we recommend establishing a uniform method of evaluating the lordosis angle. Based on our review, it seems that the optimal position for radiologic measurement of lordosis is standing with arms supported while shoulders are flexed at a 30° angle. There is evidence that many factors, such as age, gender, body mass index, ethnicity, and sport, may affect the lordosis angle, making it difficult to determine uniform normal values. Normal lordosis should be determined based on the specific characteristics of each individual; we therefore presented normal lordosis values for different groups/populations. There is also evidence that the lumbar lordosis angle is positively and significantly associated with spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, no association has been found with other spinal degenerative features. Inconclusive evidence exists for association between lordosis and low back pain. Additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations. The optimal lordotic range remains unknown and may be related to a variety of individual factors such as weight, activity, muscular strength, and flexibility of the spine and lower extremities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Incidental abdominopelvic findings on expanded field-of-view lumbar spinal MRI: frequency, clinical importance, and concordance in interpretation by neuroimaging and body imaging radiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, A.W.P.; Keating, D.P.; Nickerson, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To characterize the frequency of identification, clinical importance, and concordance in interpretation of incidental abdominopelvic findings identified on routine lumbar spinal MRI using supplemental expanded field-of-view (FOV) coronal imaging. Materials and methods: All lumbar spinal MRI reports over a 12-month period were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of incidental abdominopelvic findings identified using expanded FOV coronal imaging. Medical records were used to identify those findings that received follow-up, which were then categorized according to final diagnosis and classified as “indeterminate,” “likely clinically unimportant,” and “likely clinically important”. All cases that received follow-up were blindly and independently re-reviewed by a neuroimaging radiologist and body-imaging radiologist, and reviewer performances were compared to assess for agreement with regard to lesion significance, need for follow-up, and other parameters. Results: In total, 2067 reports were reviewed: 687 (33.2%) featured one or more incidental abdominopelvic findings, and 102 (4.9%) findings received further evaluation. Of these, 11 (10.9%) were classified as “indeterminate,” 50 (49%) as “likely clinically unimportant,” and 41 (40.1%) were classified as “likely clinically important.” Excellent agreement was observed between the reviewing radiologists for all evaluated parameters. Conclusion: The addition of an expanded FOV coronal sequence to the standard lumbar spinal MRI protocol was associated with the identification of a large number of incidental abdominopelvic findings, the minority of which represent likely clinically important findings. Most incidental findings were confidently dismissed by a neuroimaging radiologist as likely clinically unimportant without utilization of additional clinical or radiographic resources. - Highlights: • Expanded field-of-view (FOV) MRI improves detection of important incidental findings.

  19. Clinical evaluation of CT discography in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maehara, Tadayuki; Katsumata, Yasushi; Noda, Masanobu; Tanaka, Mariko; Shirouzu, Ichirou

    1988-01-01

    The CT discographic findings of 56 discs in 43 patients with low-back and/or leg pain were evaluated mainly from the clinical standpoint including pain provocation during the injection of the contrast material, correlation between the type of the herniation and symptoms and clinical course after the examination. The clinical value of CT discography is controversial, but it is well recognized that CT discography is the diagnostic method of choice for equivocal situations as patients showing negative myelography and significant symptoms and for the preoperative evaluation of patient thought to have the extreme lateral disc herniation. Exact provoked pain response was noted in 72 % of 43 pathologic discs and almost all discs especially in patients showing positive SLR test at less than 70 deg. So this pain response seems to provide additional information indicating the true pathologic disc level. Sciatic pain in the legs was much more frequently seen in the paramedian or lateral type herniation, but there was no relation between low-back pain and central type herniation. Majority of either type of disc herniation showed both low-back and leg pains. This suggests that clinical symptoms are based on not only disc herniation but also disc degeneration itself. We injected steroid (4 mg of Decadron) and local anesthetic (1 ml of 1 % Carbocain) into the disc after the examination for the purpose of improving the clinical symptoms as the first attempt. Definite improvement of various degree was noted in 56 % of total 43 cases after the procedure and CT discography was thought to be a valuable method of diagnosis in proper indications despite risky needle puncture. (author)

  20. The Clinical Correlations between Diabetes, Cigarette Smoking and Obesity on Intervertebral Degenerative Disc Disease of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakoi, Ande M; Pannu, Gurpal; D'Oro, Anthony; Buser, Zorica; Pham, Martin H; Patel, Neil N; Hsieh, Patrick C; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L; Hah, Raymond; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2017-06-01

    Retrospective analysis of a nationwide private insurance database. Chi-square analysis and linear regression models were utilized for outcome measures. The purpose of this study was to investigate any relationship between lumbar degenerative disc disease, diabetes, obesity and smoking tobacco. Diabetes, obesity, and smoking tobacco are comorbid conditions known to individually have effect on degenerative disc disease. Most studies have only been on a small populous scale. No study has yet to investigate the combination of these conditions within a large patient cohort nor have they reviewed the combination of these conditions on degenerative disc disease. A retrospective analysis of insurance billing codes within the nationwide Humana insurance database was performed, using PearlDiver software (PearlDiver, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN, USA), to identify trends among patients diagnosed with lumbar disc degenerative disease with and without the associated comorbidities of obesity, diabetes, and/or smoking tobacco. Patients billed for a comorbidity diagnosis on the same patient record as the lumbar disc degenerative disease diagnosis were compared over time to patients billed for lumbar disc degenerative disease without a comorbidity. There were no sources of funding for this manuscript and no conflicts of interest. The total number and prevalence of patients (per 10,000) within the database diagnosed with lumbar disc degenerative disease increased by 241.4% and 130.3%, respectively. The subsets of patients within this population who were concurrently diagnosed with either obesity, diabetes, tobacco use, or a combination thereof, was significantly higher than patients diagnosed with lumbar disc degenerative disease alone ( p degenerative disease and smoking rose significantly more than patients diagnosed with lumbar disc degenerative disease and either diabetes or obesity ( p degenerative disease, smoking and obesity rose significantly more than the number of patients

  1. Comparative effectiveness of lumbar stabilization, dynamic strengthening, and Pilates on chronic low back pain: randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Esha A; Gurudut, Peeyoosha

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare three different forms of exercises namely lumbar stabilization, dynamic strengthening, and Pilates on chronic low back pain (LBP) in terms of pain, range of motion, core strength and function. In this study, 44 subjects suffering from non-specific LBP for more than 3 months were randomly allocated into the lumbar stabilization group, the dynamic strengthening group, and the Pilates group. Ten sessions of exercises for 3 weeks were prescribed along with interferential current and hot moist pack. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale, functional affection by modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, range of motion by assessing lumbar flexion and extension by modified Schober test and core strength was assessed by pressure biofeedback on day 1 and day 10 of the treatment. There was reduction of pain, improvement in range of motion, functional ability and core strength in all the 3 exercise groups. The improvement was significantly greater in the lumbar stabilization group for all the outcome measures, when compared the posttreatment after 10th session. Pairwise comparison showed that there was greater reduction of disability in the Pilates group than the dynamic strengthening group. It was concluded that the lumbar stabilization is more superior compared to the dynamic strengthening and Pilates in chronic nonspecific LBP. However, long-term benefits need to be assessed and compared with prospective follow-up studies.

  2. [Treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc displacement with chondroitinase ABC--experimental basis for clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toyomi

    2004-07-01

    After single intradiscal injection of C-ABC in rabbit inter-vertebral discs, water content in the matrix of nucleus pulposus diminished clearly. After similar injection of C-ABC in sheep discs, disc inner pressure was diminished. After single intradiscal injection of C-ABC in dog inter-vertebral discs suffering disc herniation, the syndromes coming from the herniation diminished or disappeared. Based on these observations C-ABC is expected to be a chemonucleolytic agent and a human clinical trial is now in progress.

  3. Impact of body mass index on surgical outcomes, narcotics consumption, and hospital costs following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Haws, Brittany E; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Yom, Kelly H; Markowitz, Jonathan; Singh, Kern

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, more patients with a high body mass index (BMI) will require surgical treatment for degenerative spinal disease. In previous investigations of lumbar spine pathology, obesity has been associated with worsened postoperative outcomes and increased costs. However, few studies have examined the association between BMI and postoperative outcomes following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare surgical outcomes, postoperative narcotics consumption, complications, and hospital costs among BMI stratifications for patients who have undergone primary 1- to 2-level ACDF procedures. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained surgical database of patients who had undergone primary 1- to 2-level ACDF for degenerative spinal pathology between 2008 and 2015. Patients were stratified by BMI as follows: normal weight (costs. Regression analyses were controlled for preoperative demographic and procedural characteristics. RESULTS Two hundred seventy-seven patients were included in the analysis, of whom 20.9% (n = 58) were normal weight, 37.5% (n = 104) were overweight, 24.9% (n = 69) were obese I, and 16.6% (n = 46) were obese II-III. A higher BMI was associated with an older age (p = 0.049) and increased comorbidity burden (p = 0.001). No differences in sex, smoking status, insurance type, diagnosis, presence of neuropathy, or preoperative VAS pain scores were found among the BMI cohorts (p > 0.05). No significant differences were found among these cohorts as regards operative time, intraoperative blood loss, length of hospital stay, and number of operative levels (p > 0.05). Additionally, no significant differences in postoperative narcotics consumption, VAS score improvement, complication rates, arthrodesis rates, reoperation rates, or total direct costs existed across BMI stratifications (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Patients with a

  4. Endoscopic Transforaminal Thoracic Foraminotomy and Discectomy for the Treatment of Thoracic Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6–41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

  5. [Clinical efficacy of unilateral percutaneous transfacet screws combined with contralateral pedicle screw versus bilateral pedicle screws fixation in the treatment of the degenerative lumbar disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rong-Xue; Zhou, Hui; Pan, Hao; Yue, Jun; Chen, Hui-Guo; Yang, He-Jie; Jia, Gao-Yong; Wang, Dong; Lin, Yan; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2017-09-25

    To investigate the surgical outcome of unilateral pedicle screw(UPS) after TLIF technique combined with contralateral percutaneous transfacet screw(PTS) fixation vs bilateral pedicle screws(BPS) fixation in treatment of degenerative lumbar disease. From January 2009 to June 2012, 46 patients with degenerative lumbar diseases, including 30 males and 16 females with an average age of 51.5 years old, who were divided into two groups according to different fixation methods. Twenty-two cases underwent UPS after TLIF technique combined with contralateral PTS fixation (group A), while the others underwent BPS fixation(group B). The relative data were analyzed, such as blood loss volume, operative time, fusion rate, ODI score, JOA score and so on. All the patients were followed up for 1 to 3 years with an average of 22 months. Except one case of each group was uncertainty fusion, the rest have obtained bony fusion, and the fusion rates in group A and B were 95.5% and 95.8%, respectively. No displacement and breakage of screw were found during follow-up. Operative time and blood loss volume in group A were better than of group B( P 0.05). Two approaches had similar clinical outcomes for degenerative lumbar disease with no severe instability. Compared with BPS fixation, the UPS after TLIF technique and contralateral PTS fixation has the advantages of less trauma, shorter operative time and less blood loss, and it is a safe and feasible surgical technique.

  6. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmink, Jan T.

    2010-01-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  7. Lumbar spinal imaging in radicular pain and related conditions. Understanding diagnostic images in a clinical context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmink, Jan T. [University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands). Dept. Radiology

    2010-07-01

    There is general agreement that lumbosacral nerve root compression is a prime factor in the pathogenesis of sciatica and neurogenic claudication, although humoral and vascular factors certainly play a role as well. This book focuses on imaging of the various ways in which nerve root compression can come about, and assessing which anatomic features are reliably associated with the occurrence of radicular pain, as opposed to morphologic findings which are probably coincidental. After a discussion of the nature of radicular pain and related symptoms, spinal imaging techniques and options are reviewed, with emphasis on the role of MR myelography in assessing the condition of the intradural nerve roots. A chapter on normal topographic, sectional, and functional (dynamic) radiologic anatomy is followed by a presentation on pathologic anatomy, addressing the various mechanisms of nerve root compression. In the chapter on pre- and postoperative imaging, features which may help to predict the evolution of the symptoms are discussed, with an eye to selecting candidates for surgical treatment. This is followed by a discussion of the role and limitations of imaging studies in various adverse postoperative conditions. In illustrations involving patient studies, imaging features are linked where possible to the clinical symptoms and history of the individuals involved. (orig.)

  8. The Effect of Anxiety, Depression, and Optimism on Postoperative Satisfaction and Clinical Outcomes in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Degenerative Spondylolisthesis Patients: Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Kim, Hong-Sik; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Park, Ye-Soo

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of depression, anxiety, and optimism on postoperative satisfaction and clinical outcomes in patients who underwent less than two-level posterior instrumented fusions for lumbar spinal stenosis and degenerative spondylolisthesis. Preoperative psychological status of subjects, such as depression, anxiety, and optimism, was evaluated using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Revised Life Orientation Test (LOT-R). Clinical evaluation was determined by measuring changes in a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before and after surgery. Postoperative satisfaction of subjects assessed using the North American Spine Society lumbar spine questionnaire was comparatively analyzed against the preoperative psychological status. The correlation between patient's preoperative psychological status (depression, anxiety, and optimism) and clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) was evaluated. VAS and ODI scores significantly decreased after surgery ( p optimism) was not related to the degree of improvement in clinical outcomes (VAS and ODI) after surgery. However, postoperative satisfaction was moderately correlated with optimism. Anxiety and optimism were more correlated with patient satisfaction than clinical outcomes. Accordingly, the surgeon can predict postoperative satisfaction of patients based on careful evaluation of psychological status before surgery.

  9. Sagittal spinal balance after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support results from a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year radiographic follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Bünger, Cody E; Henriksen, Mads; Neils, Egund; Christensen, Finn B

    2011-02-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To analyze the long-term clinical impact of anterior column support on sagittal balance after lumbar spinal fusion. Several investigators have stressed the importance of maintaining sagittal balance in relation to spinal fusion to avoid lumbar 'flat back,' accelerated adjacent segment degeneration, pain, and inferior functional outcome. Only limited evidence exists on how sagittal alignment affects clinical outcome. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. No randomized controlled trial has been published analyzing the effect of anterior support on radiographic measurements of sagittal balance. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for posterolateral lumbar fusion plus anterior support (PLF + ALIF) or posterolateral lumbar fusion. A total of 92 patients participated. Sagittal balance parameters were examined on full lateral radiographs of the spine: pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, and positioning of C7 plumb line. The type of lumbar lordosis was evaluated and outcome assessed by Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Follow-up rate was 74%. Sagittal balance parameters were similar between randomization groups. None of the parameters differed significantly between patients with an ODI from 0 to 40 and patients with ODI over 40. Balanced patients had a significantly superior outcome as measured by ODI (P Lumbar lordosis and type of lordosis correlated with outcome but could not explain the superior outcome in the group with anterior support. Whether sagittal balance and anterior support during fusion provide a protective effect on adjacent motion segments remains unclear.

  10. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunc Oktenoglu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group. The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications.

  11. Blood hsCRP And PGE2 Content With Clinical Outcome Using Modified Fenestrat Restorative Spinoplasty Better Than Lamonectomy-Fusion In Lumbar Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Mahadewa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Modified Fenestration-Restorative Spinoplasty (MFRS technique is an alternative to lumbar stenosis treatment, providing the equal decompression comparing with laminectomy techniques, without the implant, less expensive and complication rates. The purpose of this study was to determine which technique gives better inflammation and clinical outcome based on high sensitive C-Reactive Protein biomarker (hsCRP and Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2, Visual Analog Scale (VAS of the day 7th postsurgery and ODI scores 3rd month post surgery. Methods: This study design is an experimental pretest-posttest randomized control group design. Results: This study results showed that the mean levels of hsCRP day 7th postsurgery were differ significantly between MFRS (23,09 ± 15,3 mg/L compared to LF (39,53 ± 24,4 mg/L. Likewise for the mean levels of PGE2 day 7th postsurgery were differ significantly between MFRS (491,39 ± 528,5 pg/ml compared to LF (1103,7 ± 1033,6 pg/ml at the significance level of p <0.05. MFRS clinical outcomes better than LF (p <0.05, for means of VAS value day 7th postsurgery and ODI score 3rd month postsurgery. Perioperative variable analysis shows that MFRS was better than LF in: length of surgery, blood loss, postsurgery Hb and patient length of stay (p<0,05. Conclusions: MFRS technique is an alternative technique of lumbar stenosis treatment better than the LF, in terms of improved levels of hsCRP and PGE2, leading to faster clinical outcomes improvement, less complications and lower costs. MFRS technique should be used as a treatment of lumbar stenosis.

  12. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Feng; Shiuh-Lin Hwang; Chih-Lung Lin; I-Chen Lee; King-Teh Lee

    2012-01-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that in...

  13. Experience with titanium cages in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaid, M.; Afsheen, A.; Bukhari, S.S.; Rashid, M.U.; Kalsoom, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy is a common procedure for treating patients for cervical disc prolapse. This study was conducted to study the surgical outcome and demographic characteristics of patients who were treated for anterior cervical disc prolapse. Methods: Study was conducted in the combined military hospital (CMH) Peshawar. Study interval was 3 years from 1st September, 2011 to 31st August, 2014. Total number of patients were 84. Males were 54 (64.28 percentage) and females were 30 (35.71 percentage). All the patients had undergone the procedure of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages (ACDF). All the patients had plain MRI cervical spine done for diagnosis of anterior cervical disc prolapse. Results: Total 84 patients were operated. In the patients who complained of brachialgia, 100 percentage improvement was seen after the operation. Three (3.5 percentage) of the patients, who presented with axial neck pain, continued to complain of pain and 2 (2.5 percentage) of the patients complained of pain at the donor site after the operation. One of the patient had dural tear which resulted in subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation and was treated conservatively with repeated aspiration. Fusion rate was 100 percentage with titanium cages used for fusion after anterior cervical discectomy. No complications were noted after the surgery at 1 year of interval. Conclusion: Results with titanium cages are expectedly good. Symptoms resolved and fusion rate was 100 percentage at 1 year follow up. (author)

  14. Diagnostic value of MRI for nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Clinical and anatomic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi; Kageyama, Kazuhiro; Katakura, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Kenji

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was undertaken in 26 patients with surgically proven nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. The findings on coronary images were compared with those of selective radiculography to assess the diagnostic ability of MRI to determine the site of nerve root compression. Intermission and partial defect, which reflect nerve root compression, were seen in only 5 (19.2%) of 26 nerve roots on MRI, as compared with 20 (76.9%) on radiculography. Thus MRI alone was difficult to diagnose nerve root compression due to lumbar canal stenosis. Furthermore, the optimum angle of coronary views was determined in 13 cadavers. Para-sagittal views were found to be optimal for the observation of the whole running of the nerve root. Three-dimensional MRI was found to have a potential to diagnose nerve root compression in the intervertebral foramen and the distal part of the intervertebral foramen. (N.K.)

  15. Randomized sham-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial on the effect of percutaneous radiofrequency at the ramus communicans for lumbar disc pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, C W J; Stronks, D L; Groeneweg, J G; Huygen, F J P M

    2017-03-01

    Investigate the effect of percutaneous radiofrequency compared to a sham procedure, applied to the ramus communicans for treatment of lumbar disc pain. Randomized sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover, multicenter clinical trial. Multidisciplinary pain centres of two general hospitals. Sixty patients aged 18 or more with medical history and physical examination suggestive for lumbar disc pain and a reduction of two or more on a numerical rating scale (0-10) after a diagnostic ramus communicans test block. Treatment group: percutaneous radiofrequency treatment applied to the ramus communicans; sham: same procedure except radiofrequency treatment. pain reduction. Secondary outcome measure: Global Perceived Effect. No statistically significant difference in pain level over time between the groups, as well as in the group was found; however, the factor period yielded a statistically significant result. In the crossover group, 11 out of 16 patients experienced a reduction in NRS of 2 or more at 1 month (no significant deviation from chance). No statistically significant difference in satisfaction over time between the groups was found. The independent factors group and period also showed no statistically significant effects. The same applies to recovery: no statistically significant effects were found. The null hypothesis of no difference in pain reduction and in Global Perceived Effect between the treatment and sham group cannot be rejected. Post hoc analysis revealed that none of the investigated parameters contributed to the prediction of a significant pain reduction. Interrupting signalling through the ramus communicans may interfere with the transition of painful information from the discs to the central nervous system. Methodological differences exist in studies evaluating the efficacy of radiofrequency treatment for lumbar disc pain. A randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial on the effect of radiofrequency at the ramus

  16. [A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation-induced Sciatica by Acupuncture Stimulation of Sciatic Nerve Trunk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Hu, Xiao-Li; Zhao, Xue-Yu; Zheng, Xu; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Min; He, Liu

    2016-10-25

    To observe the efficacy of acupuncture stimulation of the sciatic nerve trunk in the treatment of patients suffering from sciatica induced by lumbar disc herniation (LDH). A total of 60 LDH sciatica patients met the inclusion criteria were randomly divided into treatment group and control group, with 30 cases in each. Patients of the treatment group were treated by directly needling the sciatic nerve and routine acupuncture of Ashi -points, Lumbar Jiaji (EX-B 2), Dachangshu (BL 28), etc., and those of the control group treated by simple routine acupuncture. The treatment was conducted once a day, 5 times a week, 4 weeks altogether. The clinical effect was evaluated according to the "Standards for Diagnosis and Therapeutic Effect Evaluation of Syndromes of Chinese Medicine" and the pain intensity was assessed by using simplified Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ) containing pain rating index (PRI), visual analogue scale (VAS) and present pain intensity (PPI). After the treatment, of the two 30 cases of LDH sciatica patients in the control and treatment groups, 11 and 18 were cured, 7 and 7 experienced marked improvement, 10 and 4 were effective, 2 and 1 was invalid, with the effective rate being 93.3% and 96.7%, respectively. The cured+markedly effective rate of the treatment group was significantly higher than that of the control group ( P sciatica in LDH patients, and is superior to simple routine acupuncture in the clinical efficacy.

  17. A comparison of the fascia iliaca block to the lumbar plexus block in providing analgesia following arthroscopic hip surgery: A randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiola, Ignacio; Liu, Jiabin; Huang, Stephanie; Kelly, John D; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2018-05-31

    This randomized controlled single blinded clinical trial compared the fascia iliaca block (FIB) and the lumbar plexus block (LPB) in patients with moderate to severe pain following hip arthroscopic surgery. Single blinded randomized trial. Postoperative recovery area, postoperative days 0 and 1. Fifty patients undergoing hip arthroscopy were approached in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) if they had moderate to severe pain (defined as > or equal 4/10 on the numeric rating scale). Twenty-five patients were allocated to the FIB and twenty-five patients to the LPB. Fascia iliaca block or lumbar plexus block. A blinded observer recorded pain scores just prior to the block, 15 min following the block (primary endpoint), and then every 15 min for 2 h (or until the patient was discharged). Total PACU time and opioid use were recorded. Pain scores and analgesic use on postoperative day (POD) 0, and POD 1 were recorded. At 24 h post block the Quality of Recovery 9 questionnaire was administered. The mean pre-block pain scores were comparable between the two groups (P = 0.689). There was no difference in mean post block pain scores between the two groups at 15 min (P = 0.054). In the PACU patients who underwent a LPB consumed less opioids compared to FIB patients (P = 0.02), however no differences were noted between the two groups in PACU length of stay, or POD 0 or 1 opioid use. A fascia iliaca block is not inferior to a lumbar plexus block in reducing PACU pain scores in patients with moderate to severe pain following hip arthroscopic surgery and is a viable option to help manage postoperative pain following hip arthroscopic surgery. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. ISSLS PRIZE IN BIOENGINEERING SCIENCE 2018: dynamic imaging of degenerative spondylolisthesis reveals mid-range dynamic lumbar instability not evident on static clinical radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Malcolm E; Rynearson, Bryan; LeVasseur, Clarissa; Adgate, Zach; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Aiyangar, Ameet; Anderst, William J

    2018-04-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) in the setting of symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis is commonly treated with spinal fusion in addition to decompression with laminectomy. However, recent studies have shown similar clinical outcomes after decompression alone, suggesting that a subset of DS patients may not require spinal fusion. Identification of dynamic instability could prove useful for predicting which patients are at higher risk of post-laminectomy destabilization necessitating fusion. The goal of this study was to determine if static clinical radiographs adequately characterize dynamic instability in patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS) and to compare the rotational and translational kinematics in vivo during continuous dynamic flexion activity in DS versus asymptomatic age-matched controls. Seven patients with symptomatic single level lumbar DS (6 M, 1 F; 66 ± 5.0 years) and seven age-matched asymptomatic controls (5 M, 2 F age 63.9 ± 6.4 years) underwent biplane radiographic imaging during continuous torso flexion. A volumetric model-based tracking system was used to track each vertebra in the radiographic images using subject-specific 3D bone models from high-resolution computed tomography (CT). In vivo continuous dynamic sagittal rotation (flexion/extension) and AP translation (slip) were calculated and compared to clinical measures of intervertebral flexion/extension and AP translation obtained from standard lateral flexion/extension radiographs. Static clinical radiographs underestimate the degree of AP translation seen on dynamic in vivo imaging (1.0 vs 3.1 mm; p = 0.03). DS patients demonstrated three primary motion patterns compared to a single kinematic pattern in asymptomatic controls when analyzing continuous dynamic in vivo imaging. 3/7 (42%) of patients with DS demonstrated aberrant mid-range motion. Continuous in vivo dynamic imaging in DS reveals a spectrum of aberrant motion with significantly greater

  19. Should Patients Walk From the Postanesthesia Care Unit to the General Ward After a Lumbar Discectomy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvarfordh, Pernilla; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard; Bendix, Tom

    2014-01-01

    , and needed fewer painkillers and less oxygen supplement during the first postoperative day. The length of stay and the number of postoperative complications were similar in the two groups as tested during the three weeks after surgery. CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that it might be feasible and safe...

  20. A clinical study on diagnostic value of CT-myelography in herniated lumbar disc and related disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Tohru

    1984-01-01

    In order to evaluate the diagnostic value of CT-myelography (CTM) in herniated lumbar disc and related disorders, myelography and CTM were performed on 60 patients with sciatic pain and the findings obtained were compared. Among these patients, operation was undertaken in 30 including 5 reoperated patients, and preoperative findings on CTM were compared with the grades of herniated disc observed at operation. On the basis of abnormal myelographic findings of 55 patients, excluding 5 reoperated patients, morphological changes of the CTM were classified into the following seven types; normal, anterior defect, lateral defect, antero-lateral defect, root defect or thinning, total defect, and anterior plus unilateral root defect or thinning. Agreetment between myelographic and CTM findings was found in 85.1% of the cases. While myelography permitted only an indefinite diagnosis of lumbar disc lesion, CTM permitted a define diagnosis in 8 intervertebral discs including 2 giving nomal results by CTM. In cases of reoperation, CTM provided usefull information for an analysis of the pathological changes included disc herniation, whereas myelography rarely provided usefull findings. A comparative study of CTM and surgical findings revealed that the morphological changes in CTM were closely related with the grades of herniated discs. Consequently, CTM may be performed after myelography. If findings by the two techniques are synthesized, the diagnostic rate of herniated lumbar disc and related disorders will be considerably improved. Furthermore, it is concluded that CTM is an important technique for observing bony and neural changes inside the spinal canal in the axial transverse plane. (author)

  1. Use of Piezosurgery for removal of retrovertebral body osteophytes in anterior cervical discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Kaminsky, Jan

    2014-04-01

    The relatively new technique of Piezosurgery is based on microvibrations, generated by the piezoelectrical effect, which results in selective bone cutting with preservation of adjacent soft tissue. To study the applicability of Piezosurgery in anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) surgery. Prospective clinical study at the neurosurgical department of the University of Freiburg, Germany. Nine patients with cervical disc herniation and retrovertebral osteophytes who underwent ACDF surgery. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to practicability, safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of adjacent neurovascular tissue. Pre- and postoperative clinical and radiological data were assessed. Piezosurgery was supportively used in ACDF in nine patients with either radiculopathy or myelopathy from disc herniation or ventral osteophytes. After discectomy, osteophytes were removed with Piezosurgery to decompress the spinal canal and the foramina. Angled inserts were used, allowing for cutting even retrovertebral osteophytes. In all nine cases, Piezosurgery cut bone selectively with no damage to nerve roots, dura, or posterior longitudinal ligament. None of the patients experienced any new neurological deficit after the operation. The handling of the instrument was safe and the cut precise. Osteophytic spurs, even retrovertebral ones that generally only can be approached via corpectomies, could be safely removed because of the angled inserts through the disc space. Currently, a slightly prolonged operation time was observed for Piezosurgery. Furthermore, the design of the handpiece could be further improved to facilitate the intraoperative handling in ACDF. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful and safe technique for selective bone cutting and removal of osteophytes with preservation of neuronal and soft tissue in ACDF. In particular, the angled inserts were effective in cutting bone spurs behind the adjacent vertebra which cannot be reached with

  2. Minimum clinically important difference in lumbar spine surgery patients: a choice of methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, Medical Outcomes Study questionnaire Short Form 36, and pain scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copay, Anne G; Glassman, Steven D; Subach, Brian R; Berven, Sigurd; Schuler, Thomas C; Carreon, Leah Y

    2008-01-01

    The impact of lumbar spinal surgery is commonly evaluated with three patient-reported outcome measures: Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the physical component summary (PCS) of the Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Study (SF-36), and pain scales. A minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is a threshold used to measure the effect of clinical treatments. Variable threshold values have been proposed as MCID for those instruments despite a lack of agreement on the optimal MCID calculation method. This study has three purposes. First, to illustrate the range of values obtained by common anchor-based and distribution-based methods to calculate MCID. Second, to determine a statistically sound and clinically meaningful MCID for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, and leg pain scale in lumbar spine surgery patients. Third, to compare the discriminative ability of two anchors: a global health assessment and a rating of satisfaction with the results of the surgery. This study is a review of prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes data. A total of 454 patients from a large database of surgeries performed by the Lumbar Spine Study Group with a 1-year follow-up on either ODI or PCS were included in the study. Preoperative and 1-year postoperative scores for ODI, PCS, back pain scale, leg pain scale, health transition item (HTI) of the SF-36, and Satisfaction with Results scales. ODI, SF-36, and pain scales were administered before and 1 year after spinal surgery. Several candidate MCID calculation methods were applied to the data and the resulting values were compared. The HTI of the SF-36 was used as the anchor and compared with a second anchor (Satisfaction with Results scale). Potential MCID calculations yielded a range of values: fivefold for ODI, PCS, and leg pain, 10-fold for back pain. Threshold values obtained with the two anchors were very similar. The minimum detectable change (MDC) appears as a statistically and clinically appropriate MCID value. MCID values

  3. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.).

  4. Clinical potential and limitation of MRI for degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Comparison of MRI, myelography, CT and selective nerve root infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Michihiro; Kikuchi, Shinichi

    1994-01-01

    To assess the clinical potential and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, the findings of MR imaging were compared with those of myelography and CT. The subjects were 80 patients with intervertebral disc herniation (46), spondylosis (28), degenerative spondylolisthesis (5), and spondylolysis (one). There was a good correlation between sagittal MRI (T1-weighted images) and myelography in measuring the anteroposterior diameter and the compression rate of the injured dural canal in all disease categories. However, MRI was inferior, irrespective of sagittal and coronal images, to myelography in detecting blocking of the dural canal and intradural findings such as redundant nerve roots. MRI was inferior to selective nerve root infiltration in visualizing the compression of the nerve root, irrespective of diseases; however, there was no difference in abnormal findings of the running of nerve root between the two modalities. Transverse MRI was superior to CT in visualizing the nerve root. Thus, MRI alone is insufficient for the diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spinal diseases, and the other modalities should be supplementary for pathophysiological understanding of these diseases. (N.K.)

  5. Health-related quality of life after transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy: An analysis according to the level of operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Charitoudis, Georgios; Thomaidis, Tryfon; Theodosiadis, Panagiotis; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Giatroudakis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Many patients suffer from radiculopathy and low back pain due to lumbar disc hernia. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (TPED) is a minimally invasive method that accesses the disc pathology through the intervertebral foramen. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has been previously assessed for this method. However, a possible effect of the level of operation on the postoperative progress of HRQoL remains undefined. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the level of operation on HRQoL, following TPED. A total of 76 patients diagnosed with lumbar disc hernia were enrolled in the study. According to the level of operation, they were divided into three groups: Group A (21 patients) for L3-L4, Group B (40 patients) for L4-L5, and Group C (15 patients) for L5-S1 intervertebral level. All patients underwent TPED. Their HRQoL was evaluated by the short-form-36 (SF-36) health survey questionnaire before the operation and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, and 12 months postsurgery. The progress of SF-36 was analyzed in relation to the operated level. All aspects of SF-36 showed statistical significant improvement, at every given time interval ( P ≤ 0.05) in the total of patients and in each group separately. Group A had a significantly higher increase in physical functioning (PF) score at 3 and 12 months postsurgery ( P = 0.046 and P = 0.056, respectively). On the other hand, Group B had a significant lower increase in mental health (MH) score at 6 months ( P = 0.009) postoperatively. Our study concludes that the level of operation in patients who undergo TPED for lumbar disc herniation affects the HRQoL 1 year after surgery, with Group A having a significantly greater improvement of PF in comparison with Groups B and C.

  6. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Predict the Clinical Outcome of Non-Surgical Treatment for Lumbar Interverterbal Disc Herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Chung Hwan; Shin, Myung Jin; Ryu, Dae Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo; Song, Jae Seok

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) findings and the clinical outcome after treatment with non-surgical transforaminal epidural steroid injections (ESI) for lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. Transforaminal ESI were performed in 91 patients (50 males and 41 females, age range: 13 78 yrs) because of lumbosacral HIVD from March 2001 to August 2002. Sixty eight patients whose MRIs and clinical follow-ups were available were included in this study. The medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups; the successful (responders, n = 41) and unsatisfactory (non-responders, n = 27) outcome groups. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction score greater than two and a pain reduction score greater than 50%. The MR findings were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to the type (protrusion, extrusion or sequestration), hydration (the T2 signal intensity), location (central, right/left central, subarticular, foraminal or extraforaminal), and size (volume) of the HIVD, the grade of nerve root compression (grade 1 abutment, 2 displacement and 3 entrapment), and an association with spinal stenosis. There was no significant difference between the responders and nonresponders in terms of the type, hydration and size of the HIVD, or an association with spinal stenosis (p > 0.05). However, the location of the HIVD and the grade of nerve root compression were different between the two groups (p < 0.05). MRI could play an important role in predicting the clinical outcome of non-surgical transforaminal ESI treatment for patients with lumbar HIVD

  7. Characteristics and determinants of clinical symptoms in radiographic lumbar spinal stenosis in a tertiary health care centre in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doualla-Bija, Marie; Takang, Mbeng Ashu; Mankaa, Emmanuella; Moutchia, Jude; Ongolo-Zogo, Pierre; Luma-Namme, Henry

    2017-11-28

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) refers to narrowing of the lumbar central spinal canal, lateral recess, and/or neuro-foramina. Radiographic LSS plays an important role in clinical LSS but is not solely accountable for the presence of symptoms. We sought to characterise clinical LSS and to determine factors associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in patients with radiographic LSS in a sub Saharan Africa setting. After prior ethical clearance, a case control study was done in a tertiary hospital in Douala-Cameroon, including 105 patients with radiographic LSS: 57 with symptoms of LSS (cases) and 58 with no symptoms (controls). Spinal stenosis was assessed using computed tomography (CT) scans. Data were analysed using SPSS version 23. The mean age of our study participants was 53.4 ± 13.1 years. The mean age of onset of symptoms of LSS was 50.3 ± 11.6 years and the most common symptoms were Low back pain (100.0%), radicular symptoms (98.2%) and neurogenic claudication (98.2%). Obesity (p history of low back pain (p = 0.004), vertebra lesion at L2 (p = 0.034), L3 (p = 0.002), L4 (p = 0.025) and multiple (p = 0.008) levels, degenerative disc protrusion (p = 0.044), disc lesion at L3-L4 (p = 0.001), L4-L5 (p = 0.011) and multiple (p = 0.046) levels were significantly associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in persons with radiographic LSS. Characteristics of clinical LSS have been described in this sub-Saharan Africa population. Obesity, a high waist circumference and a positive family history of low back pain are significantly associated with presence of symptoms of LSS in persons with radiographic LSS.

  8. Do various baseline characteristics of transversus abdominis and lumbar multifidus predict clinical outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Arnold Y L; Parent, Eric C; Funabashi, Martha; Stanton, Tasha R; Kawchuk, Gregory N

    2013-12-01

    Although individual reports suggest that baseline morphometry or activity of transversus abdominis or lumbar multifidus predict clinical outcome of low back pain (LBP), a related systematic review is unavailable. Therefore, this review summarized evidence regarding the predictive value of these muscular characteristics. Candidate publications were identified from 6 electronic medical databases. After review, 5 cohort studies were included. Although this review intended to encompass studies using different muscle assessment methods, all included studies coincidentally used ultrasound imaging. No research investigated the relation between static morphometry and clinical outcomes. Evidence synthesis showed limited evidence supporting poor baseline transversus abdominis contraction thickness ratio as a treatment effect modifier favoring motor control exercise. Limited evidence supported that high baseline transversus abdominis lateral slide was associated with higher pain intensity after various exercise interventions at 1-year follow-up. However, there was limited evidence for the absence of relation between the contraction thickness ratio of transversus abdominis or anticipatory onset of lateral abdominal muscles at baseline and the short- or long-term LBP intensity after exercise interventions. There was conflicting evidence for a relation between baseline percent thickness change of lumbar multifidus during contraction and the clinical outcomes of patients after various conservative treatments. Given study heterogeneity, the small number of included studies and the inability of conventional greyscale B-mode ultrasound imaging to measure muscle activity, our findings should be interpreted with caution. Further large-scale prospective studies that use appropriate technology (ie, electromyography to assess muscle activity) should be conducted to investigate the predictive value of morphometry or activity of these muscles with respect to LBP-related outcomes measures

  9. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Predict the Clinical Outcome of Non-Surgical Treatment for Lumbar Interverterbal Disc Herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Chung Hwan; Shin, Myung Jin; Ryu, Dae Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo [GangNeung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, GangNeung, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Seok [University of Kwandong College of Medicine, GangNeung (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) findings and the clinical outcome after treatment with non-surgical transforaminal epidural steroid injections (ESI) for lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. Transforaminal ESI were performed in 91 patients (50 males and 41 females, age range: 13 78 yrs) because of lumbosacral HIVD from March 2001 to August 2002. Sixty eight patients whose MRIs and clinical follow-ups were available were included in this study. The medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups; the successful (responders, n = 41) and unsatisfactory (non-responders, n = 27) outcome groups. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction score greater than two and a pain reduction score greater than 50%. The MR findings were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to the type (protrusion, extrusion or sequestration), hydration (the T2 signal intensity), location (central, right/left central, subarticular, foraminal or extraforaminal), and size (volume) of the HIVD, the grade of nerve root compression (grade 1 abutment, 2 displacement and 3 entrapment), and an association with spinal stenosis. There was no significant difference between the responders and nonresponders in terms of the type, hydration and size of the HIVD, or an association with spinal stenosis (p > 0.05). However, the location of the HIVD and the grade of nerve root compression were different between the two groups (p < 0.05). MRI could play an important role in predicting the clinical outcome of non-surgical transforaminal ESI treatment for patients with lumbar HIVD.

  10. Chondroblastoma of the lumbar vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, L.Y.J.; Shu, S.J.; Chan, M.K.; Chan, C.H.S. [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2001-12-01

    Chondroblastoma of the vertebra is a very rare condition. To our knowledge fewer than 20 cases have been reported in the world literature. We report a 54-year-old man with chondroblastoma of the fifth lumbar vertebra. The clinical and radiological aspects of the tumor are discussed, emphasizing the presence of an extraosseous mass suggestive of locally aggressive behavior. (orig.)

  11. NEUROMUSCULAR CONTROL IN LUMBAR DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Leinonen

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Impaired motor and sensory functions have been associated with low back pain (LBP. This includes disturbances in a wide range of sensorimotor control e.g. sensory dysfunctions, impaired postural responses and psychomotor control. However, the physiological mechanisms, clinical relevance and characteristics of these findings in different spinal pathologies require further clarification. The purposes of this study were to investigate postural control, lumbar muscle function, movement perception and associations between these findings in healthy volunteers (n=35, patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=20 and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS, n=26. Paraspinal muscle responses for sudden upper limb loading and muscle activation during flexion-extension movement and the lumbar endurance test were measured by surface electromyography (EMG. Postural stability was measured on a force platform during two- and one-footed standing. Lumbar movement perception was assessed in a motorised trunk rotation unit in the seated position. In addition, measurements of motor-(MEP and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP and needle EMG examination of lumbar multifidus muscles were performed in the LSS patients. Clinical and questionnaire data were also recorded. A short latency paraspinal muscle response (~50 ms for sudden upper limb loading was observed. The latency of the response was shortened by expectation (p=0.017. The response latency for unexpected loading was similar in healthy persons and disc herniation patients but the latency was not shortened by expectation in the patients (p = 0.014. Also impaired postural control (p < 0.05 and lumbar movement perception (p = 0.012 were observed in disc herniation patients. The impaired lumbar movement perception (p=0.054 and anticipatory muscle activation (p = 0.043 tended to be restored after successful surgery but postural control had still not recovered after 3 months of follow-up. The majority of LSS patients were unable

  12. Assessment of the level of agreement in the interpretation of plain radiographs of lumbar spondylosis among clinical physiotherapists in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Ajediran I; Ofori, Eric K; Alabi, Oluwasegun J; Adjei, David N

    2014-03-29

    Objective physical assessment of patients with lumbar spondylosis involves plain film radiographs (PFR) viewing and interpretation by the radiologists. Physiotherapists also routinely assess PFR within the scope of their practice. However, studies appraising the level of agreement of physiotherapists' PFR interpretation with radiologists are not common in Ghana. Forty-one (41) physiotherapists took part in the cross-sectional survey. An assessment guide was developed from findings of the interpretation of three PFR of patients with lumbar spondylosis by a radiologist. The three PFR were selected from a pool of different radiographs based on clarity, common visible pathological features, coverage body segments and short post production period. Physiotherapists were required to view the same PFR after which they were assessed with the assessment guide according to the number of features identified correctly or incorrectly. The score range on the assessment form was 0-24, interpreted as follow: 0-8 points (low), 9-16 points (moderate) and 17-24 points (high) levels of agreement. Data were analyzed using one sample t-test and fisher's exact test at α = 0.05. The mean score of interpretation for the physiotherapists was 12.7 ± 2.6 points compared to the radiologist's interpretation of 24 points (assessment guide). The physiotherapists' levels were found to be significantly associated with their academic qualification (p = 0.006) and sex (p = 0.001). However, their levels of agreement were not significantly associated with their age group (p = 0.098), work settings (p = 0.171), experience (p = 0.666), preferred PFR view (p = 0.088) and continuing education (p = 0.069). The physiotherapists' skills fall short of expectation for interpreting PFR of patients with lumbar spondylosis. The levels of agreement with radiologist's interpretation have no link with year of clinial practice, age, work settings and continuing education. Thus

  13. Assessment of the level of agreement in the interpretation of plain radiographs of lumbar spondylosis among clinical physiotherapists in Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bello, Ajediran I; Ofori, Eric K; Alabi, Oluwasegun J; Adjei, David N

    2014-01-01

    Objective physical assessment of patients with lumbar spondylosis involves plain film radiographs (PFR) viewing and interpretation by the radiologists. Physiotherapists also routinely assess PFR within the scope of their practice. However, studies appraising the level of agreement of physiotherapists’ PFR interpretation with radiologists are not common in Ghana. Forty-one (41) physiotherapists took part in the cross-sectional survey. An assessment guide was developed from findings of the interpretation of three PFR of patients with lumbar spondylosis by a radiologist. The three PFR were selected from a pool of different radiographs based on clarity, common visible pathological features, coverage body segments and short post production period. Physiotherapists were required to view the same PFR after which they were assessed with the assessment guide according to the number of features identified correctly or incorrectly. The score range on the assessment form was 0–24, interpreted as follow: 0–8 points (low), 9–16 points (moderate) and 17–24 points (high) levels of agreement. Data were analyzed using one sample t-test and fisher’s exact test at α = 0.05. The mean score of interpretation for the physiotherapists was 12.7 ± 2.6 points compared to the radiologist’s interpretation of 24 points (assessment guide). The physiotherapists’ levels were found to be significantly associated with their academic qualification (p = 0.006) and sex (p = 0.001). However, their levels of agreement were not significantly associated with their age group (p = 0.098), work settings (p = 0.171), experience (p = 0.666), preferred PFR view (p = 0.088) and continuing education (p = 0.069). The physiotherapists’ skills fall short of expectation for interpreting PFR of patients with lumbar spondylosis. The levels of agreement with radiologist’s interpretation have no link with year of clinial practice, age, work settings and continuing education. Thus, routine PFR viewing

  14. Enthesitis of lumbar spinal ligaments in clinically suspected spondyloarthritis: value of gadolinium-enhanced MR images in comparison to STIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agten, Christoph A.; Zubler, Veronika; Rosskopf, Andrea B.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [Balgrist University Hospital, Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Weiss, Bettina [Balgrist University Hospital, Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Faculty of Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    To compare detection of spinal ligament enthesitis between gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1+Gd) and STIR sequences in patients with suspected spondyloarthritis. Sixty-eight patients (37 males, 42 ± 14 years) with a sacroiliac-joint (SIJ) and lumbar spine MRI for suspected spondyloarthritis were prospectively included. Sagittal T1+Gd and STIR images of the lumbar spine were assessed by two readers for enthesitis of interspinous/supraspinous ligaments, and for capsulitis of facet-joints between T12-S1. Patients' MRI were grouped according to ASAS (Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society) criteria in positive (group A) or negative (group B) SIJs. Enthesitis/capsulitis were compared between groups. Interreader agreement was assessed. Enthesitis/capsulitis per patient was statistically significantly more frequent with T1+Gd compared to STIR (p ≤ 0.007), except for interspinous ligaments for reader 1 (p = 0.455). Interspinous enthesitis, supraspinous enthesitis, and capsulitis were present with T1+Gd(STIR) in 64.7 %(72.1 %), 60.3 %(17.7 %), and 61.8 %(29.4 %) for reader 1, and 51.5 %(41.2 %), 45.6 %(7.4 %), and 91.2 %(45.5 %) for reader 2. There were 76.5 %(52/68) patients in group A and 23.5 %(16/68) in group B. Total number of enthesitis/capsulitis on T1+Gd was statistically significantly higher in group A than B (4.96 vs. 2.94, p = 0.026; 8.12 vs. 5.25, p = 0.041 for reader 1 and 2, respectively). Interreader agreement showed mixed results for interspinous/supraspinous/capsulitis but was higher on T1+Gd (ICC = 0.838/0.783/0.367; p ≤ 0.001) compared to STIR (ICC = 0.652/0.298/0.224; p ≤ 0.032). In patients with suspected spondyloarthritis, enthesitis/capsulitis in the lumbar spine are common findings and more frequently/reliably detected with T1+Gd than STIR. In patients with positive SIJ-MRI, the total number of enthesitis/capsulitis in T1+Gd was higher compared to patients with

  15. [Clinical application of accurate placement of lumbar pedicle screws using three-dimensional printing navigational templates under Quadrant system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuanhuang; Yu, Zhengxi; Wu, Changfu; Li, Xing; Chen, Xu; Zhang, Guodong; Zheng, Zugao; Lin, Haibin

    2017-02-01

    To explore the feasibility and the effectiveness of the accurate placement of lumbar pedicle screws using three-dimensional (3D) printing navigational templates in Quadrant minimally invasive system. The L 1-5 spines of 12 adult cadavers were scanned using CT. The 3D models of the lumbar spines were established. The screw trajectory was designed to pass through the central axis of the pedicle by using Mimics software. The navigational template was designed and 3D-printed according to the bony surface where the soft tissues could be removed. The placed screws were scanned using CT to create the 3D model again after operation. The 3D models of the designed trajectory and the placed screws were registered to evaluate the placed screws coincidence rate. Between November 2014 and November 2015, 31 patients with lumbar instability accepted surgery assisted with 3D-printing navigation module under Quadrant minimally invasive system. There were 14 males and 17 females, aged from 42 to 60 years, with an average of 45.2 years. The disease duration was 6-13 months (mean, 8.8 months). Single segment was involved in 15 cases, two segments in 13 cases, and three segments in 3 cases. Preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) was 7.59±1.04; Oswestry disability index (ODI) was 76.21±5.82; and the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 9.21±1.64. A total of 120 screws were placed in 12 cadavers specimens. The coincidence rate of placed screw was 100%. A total of 162 screws were implanted in 31 patients. The operation time was 65-147 minutes (mean, 102.23 minutes); the intraoperative blood loss was 50-116 mL (mean, 78.20 mL); and the intraoperative radiation exposure time was 8-54 seconds (mean, 42 seconds). At 3-7 days after operation, CT showed that the coincidence rate of the placed screws was 98.15% (159/162). At 4 weeks after operation, VAS, ODI, and JOA score were 2.24±0.80, 29.17±2.50, and 23.43±1.14 respectively, showing significant differences when compared

  16. Comparison of Model Predictions of Image Quality with Results of Clinical Trials in Chest and Lumbar Spine Screen-film Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandborg, M.; McVey, G.; Dance, D.R.; Carlsson, G.A.

    2000-01-01

    The ability to predict image quality from known physical and technical parameters is a prerequisite for making successful dose optimisation. In this study, imaging systems have been simulated using a Monte Carlo model of the imaging systems. The model includes a voxelised human anatomy and quantifies image quality in terms of contrast and signal-to-noise ratio for 5-6 anatomical details included in the anatomy. The imaging systems used in clinical trials were simulated and the ranking of the systems by the model and radiologists compared. The model and the results of the trial for chest PA both show that using a high maximum optical density was significantly better than using a low one. The model predicts that a good system is characterised by a large dynamic range and a high contrast of the blood vessels in the retrocardiac area. The ranking by the radiologists and the model agreed for the lumbar spine AP. (author)

  17. MRI-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture for treatment of cervical disc herniation: an initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ming; Li Chengli; Lu Yubo; Huang Jie; Song Jiqing; Li Lei; Bao Shougang; Cao Qianqian; Wu Lebin

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture for treatment of cervical disc herniation. Methods: Eight herniated cervical discs in 7 patients were diagnosed by MRI, inclluding 5 discs of lateral protruding type, 2 discs of paramedian protruding type and one disc of central protruding type. All patients underwent MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture. The procedures were guided by a set of 0.23 T open MR system mounted with iPath 200 optical tracking system. The herniated portion of the disc was punctured with a 14 G MR-comparible needle in the healthy side via anterolateral oblique route. The interventional steps were as follows: firstly, cut herniated part with percutaneous discectomy probe and inject 2ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml; secondly, retreat the needle to the disc center, resect nucleus pulposus, and inject 2 ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml; secondly, retreat the needle to the disc center, resect nucleus pulposus, and inject 2 ml oxygen-ozone mixture of 60 μg/ml. All patients were followed up for 6 months, with 4 patients by telephone and 3 patients in outpatient clinic. The effect of treatment was evaluated according to Williams postoperative assessment standard. Results: All procedures were performed successfully. The clinical outcome was evaluated as excellent in 5 cases, good in 1 cases and fair in 1 case. The total ratio of excellent and good was 85.7%. No serious complication occurred expect 1 case with intraoperative paroxysmal pain. Conclusion: MR imaging-guided percutaneous cervical discectomy and discolysis with oxygen-ozone mixture was a safe, effective and minimally invasive method for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. (authors)

  18. The effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neblett, Randy; Mayer, Tom G; Brede, Emily; Gatchel, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Abnormal pretreatment flexion-relaxation in chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients has been shown to improve with functional restoration rehabilitation. Little is known about the effects of prior lumbar surgeries on flexion-relaxation and its responsiveness to treatment. To quantify the effect of prior lumbar surgeries on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon and its responsiveness to rehabilitative treatment. A prospective cohort study of chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients, including those with and without prior lumbar spinal surgeries. A sample of 126 chronic disabling occupational lumbar spinal disorder patients with prior work-related injuries entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program and agreed to enroll in this study. Fifty-seven patients had undergone surgical decompression or discectomy (n=32) or lumbar fusion (n=25), and the rest had no history of prior injury-related spine surgery (n=69). At post-treatment, 116 patients were reevaluated, including those with prior decompressions or discectomies (n=30), lumbar fusions (n=21), and no surgery (n=65). A comparison group of 30 pain-free control subjects was tested with an identical assessment protocol, and compared with post-rehabilitation outcomes. Mean surface electromyography (SEMG) at maximum voluntary flexion; subject achievement of flexion-relaxation (SEMG≤3.5 μV); gross lumbar, true lumbar, and pelvic flexion ROM; and a pain visual analog scale self-report during forward bending task. Identical measures were obtained at pretreatment and post-treatment. Patients entered an interdisciplinary functional restoration program, including a quantitatively directed, medically supervised exercise process and a multimodal psychosocial disability management component. The functional restoration program was accompanied by a SEMG-assisted stretching training program, designed to teach relaxation of the lumbar musculature during end-range flexion

  19. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevik, Belma; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  20. Clinical evaluation of an allogeneic bone matrix containing viable osteogenic cells in patients undergoing one- and two-level posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis with decompressive laminectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, David B; Firtha, Michael E; Atkinson, Brent L; Hahn, Rebekah; Ryaby, James T; Linovitz, Raymond J

    2016-05-27

    Trinity Evolution® cellular bone allograft (TE) possesses the osteogenic, osteoinductive, and osteoconductive elements essential for bone healing. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes when TE is used as a graft extender in combination with locally derived bone in one- and two-level instrumented lumbar posterolateral arthrodeses. In this retrospective evaluation, a consecutive series of subject charts that had posterolateral arthrodesis with TE and a 12-month radiographic follow-up were evaluated. All subjects were diagnosed with degenerative disc disease, radiculopathy, stenosis, and decreased disc height. At 2 weeks and at 3 and 12 months, plain radiographs were performed and the subject's back and leg pain (VAS) was recorded. An evaluation of fusion status was performed at 12 months. The population consisted of 43 subjects and 47 arthrodeses. At 12 months, a fusion rate of 90.7 % of subjects and 89.4 % of surgical levels was observed. High-risk subjects (e.g., diabetes, tobacco use, etc.) had fusion rates comparable to normal patients. Compared with the preoperative leg or back pain level, the postoperative pain levels were significantly (p < 0.0001) improved at every time point. There were no adverse events attributable to TE. Fusion rates using TE were higher than or comparable to fusion rates with autologous iliac crest bone graft that have been reported in the recent literature for posterolateral fusion procedures, and TE fusion rates were not adversely affected by several high-risk patient factors. The positive results provide confidence that TE can safely replace autologous iliac crest bone graft when used as a bone graft extender in combination with locally derived bone in the setting of posterolateral lumbar arthrodesis in patients with or without risk factors for compromised bone healing. Because of the retrospective nature of this study, the trial was not registered.

  1. Clinical Efficacy and Its Prognostic Factor of Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Annuloplasty and Nucleoplasty for the Treatment of Patients with Discogenic Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The choice of appropriate treatment of discogenic low back pain (DLBP) frequently is difficult. This study sought to identify the clinical efficacy of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar annuloplasty and nucleoplasty (PELAN) to treat patients with DLBP and to investigate prognostic clinical or radiologic variables. Eighty-nine patients with a diagnosis of DLBP who underwent PELAN were included. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for back pain, Oswestry Disability Index % (ODI%), and modified Macnab criteria were measured at short-term (3-4 weeks) and long-term follow-up period (at least 12 months) to investigate clinical efficacy of PELAN. The subjects were defined as successful group in case of 50% or more reduction of NRS, 40% or more reduction of ODI%, and good or excellent response of Macnab criteria. Clinical and radiologic variables were compared between successful and unsuccessful outcomes group to determine prognostic variables. NRS and ODI% were significantly reduced at short- and long-term follow-up after PELAN. Sixty-two (69.7%) and 68 (76.4%) obtained successful NRS reduction and 59 (66.3%) and 68 (76.4%) accomplished successful ODI% reduction at short-term and long-term follow-up, respectively. Successful Mcnab response was found in 61% at short term and 65.2% at long term. Pain during waist flexion among clinical variables was significantly related to good clinical outcomes and Modic change among radiologic variables was significantly related to poor clinical outcomes. PELAN provided favorable outcomes in patients with DLBP who were refractory to conservative treatments. Flexion pain was good prognostic, and Modic change was a poor prognostic variable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gonadal dose reduction in lumbar spine radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moilanen, A.; Kokko, M.L.; Pitkaenen, M.

    1983-01-01

    Different ways to minimize the gonadal dose in lumbar spine radiography have been studied. Two hundred and fifty lumbar spine radiographs were reviewed to assess the clinical need for lateral L5/S1 projection. Modern film/screen combinations and gonadal shielding of externally scattered radiation play a major role in the reduction of the genetic dose. The number of exposures should be minimized. Our results show that two projections, anteroposterior (AP) and lateral, appear to be sufficient in routine radiography of the lumbar spine. (orig.)

  3. Loss of inter-vertebral disc height after anterior cervical discectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haden, N; Latimer, M; Seeley, H M; Laing, R J

    2005-12-01

    Most surgeons undertaking anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) introduce a bone graft or cage into the disc space when the decompression is complete. This is done to prevent segmental collapse, preserve cervical spine alignment and to promote fusion. We have conducted a prospective observational cohort study to investigate the relationship between loss of disc height, cervical spine alignment and clinical outcome in 140 patients undergoing ACD without inter-body graft or cage. At a minimum of 12 months after operation changes in disc space height and cervical spine alignment were correlated with clinical outcome measured by SF36, Neck Disability Index, and visual analogue neck and arm pain scores. There was no relationship between loss of disc height and outcome. Loss of the overall cervical lordosis was present in 71 patients and segmental kyphosis was found in 69. Analysis of clinical outcome showed no significant differences between patients with preserved and abnormal cervical alignment. Neither loss of disc height nor disturbance of cervical alignment compromised clinical outcome in the first year following ACD.

  4. Validity and everyday clinical applicability of lumbar muscle fatigue assessment methods in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, Jorge H; Gobbo, Massimiliano; Peranzoni, Matteo; Naik, Ganesh; Imperio, Grace; Cleland, Joshua A; Negrini, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    This systematic literature review aimed at examining the validity and applicability in everyday clinical rehabilitation practise of methods for the assessment of back muscle fatiguability in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (CNSLBP). Extensive research was performed in MEDLINE, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) databases from their inception to September 2014. Potentially relevant articles were also manually looked for in the reference lists of the identified publications. Studies examining lumbar muscle fatigue in people with CNSLBP were selected. Two reviewers independently selected the articles, carried out the study quality assessment and extracted the results. A modified Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) scale was used to evaluate the scientific rigour of the selected works. Twenty-four studies fulfilled the selection criteria and were included in the systematic review. We found conflicting data regarding the validity of methods used to examine back muscle fatigue. The Biering-Sorensen test, performed in conjunction with surface electromyography spectral analysis, turned out to be the most widely used and comparatively, the most optimal modality currently available to assess objective back muscle fatigue in daily clinical practise, even though critical limitations are discussed. Future research should address the identification of an advanced method for lower back fatigue assessment in patients with CNSLBP which, eventually, might provide physical therapists with an objective and reliable test usable in everyday clinical practise. Implications for Rehabilitation Despite its limitations, the Biering-Sorensen test is currently the most used, convenient and easily available fatiguing test for lumbar muscles. To increase validity and reliability of the Biering

  5. A clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis; A case of radiation colitis treated by abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and lumbar plasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futamura, Manabu; Tanaka, Sengai; Oshita, Hiroo; Nagao, Naritoshi (Gifu City Hospital (Japan))

    1991-12-01

    Clinical study of 14 patients with radiation colitis who were treated surgically at our clinic in the past 16-year period and a patient whose treatment was very difficult are reported. Primary lesions included 13 cervical carcinomas and one ovarian cancer. Ten cases received surgery combined with radiation and 4 did radiation. Radiation dose was 6055 rad on average. Latent time ranged from 6 months to 25 years with the average of 8 years and 9 months. No significant correlation between radiation dose and latent time was noted. Symptoms included obstruction and stenosis in 56% (8/14), hematoemesis in 46% (5/14), and fistula in 46% (5/14). All lesions presented as remarkably adhesion and stenosis, and resection with anastomosis was performed in 9 (64%), colostomy in 5 (46%), and urostomy in 2 (14%). Lumbar plasty was added in one case. A 65-year-old female patient who had undergone radiation therapy 13 years before had a rectal perforation and pelvic fistula. Abdominoperineal resection of the rectum and closure of the fistula by transferring the major gluteal muscle pedicle were performed. The patient is followed on ambulant basis for more than one year, and no evidence of recurrence has been observed. (author).

  6. Prognostic Value of Impaired Preoperative Ankle Reflex in Surgical Outcome of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Omidi-Kashani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several prognostic factors exist influencing the outcome of surgical discectomy in the patients with lumbar disc herniation (LDH. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between severity of preoperative impaired ankle reflex and outcomes of lumbar discectomy in the patients with L5-S1 LDH. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 181 patients (108 male and 73 female who underwent simple discectomy in our orthopedic department from April 2009 to April 2013 and followed them up for more than one year. The mean age of the patients was 35.3±8.9 years old. Severity of reflex impairment was graded from 0 to 4+ and radicular pain and disability were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS and Oswestry disability index (ODI questionnaires, respectively. Subjective satisfaction was also evaluated at the last follow-up visit. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare qualitative variables. Results: Reflex impairment existed in 44.8% preoperatively that improved to 10% at the last follow-up visit. Statistical analyses could not find a significant relationship between the severity of impaired ankle reflex and sex or age (P=0.538 and P=0.709, respectively. There was a remarkable relationship between severity of reflex impairment and preoperative radicular pain or disability (P=0.012 and P=0.002, respectively. Kruskal-Wallis test showed that a more severity in ankle reflex impairment was associated with not only less improvement in postoperative pain and disability but also less satisfaction rate (P Conclusions: In the patients with L5-S1 LDH, more severe ankle reflex impairment is associated with less improvement in postoperative pain, disability, and subjective satisfaction.

  7. Immediate relief of herniated lumbar disc-related sciatica by ankle acupuncture: A study protocol for a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Anfeng; Xu, Mingshu; Liang, Yan; Wei, Jinzi; Liu, Sheng

    2017-12-01

    Around 90% of sciatica cases are due to a herniated intervertebral disc in the lumbar region. Ankle acupuncture (AA) has been reported to be effective in the treatment of acute nonspecific low back pain. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of a single session of ankle acupuncture for disc-related sciatica. This will be a double-blinded, randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients diagnosed with disc-related sciatica will be randomly divided into 3 parallel groups. The treatment group (n = 30) will receive ankle acupuncture. The 2 control groups will either undergo traditional needle manipulation (n = 30) or sham acupuncture (n = 30) at the same point as the treatment group. The primary outcome will be pain intensity on a visual analog scale (VAS). The secondary outcomes will be paresthesia intensity on a VAS and the Abbreviated Acceptability Rating Profile (AAPR). The success of blinding will be evaluated, and the needle-induced sensation and adverse events will be recorded. All outcomes will be evaluated before, during, and after the treatment. This study will determine the immediate effect and specificity of ankle acupuncture for the treatment of disc-related sciatica. We anticipate that ankle acupuncture might be more effective than traditional needle manipulation or sham acupuncture. ChiCTR-IPR-15007127 (http://www.chictr.org.cn/showprojen.aspx?proj=11989). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The LP-ESP(®) lumbar disc prosthesis with 6 degrees of freedom: development and 7 years of clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Aaron, Alain; Brusson, Adrien; Rakover, Jean-Patrick; Rousseau, Marc-Antoine

    2013-02-01

    The viscoelastic lumbar disk prosthesis-elastic spine pad (LP-ESP(®)) is an innovative one-piece deformable but cohesive interbody spacer providing 6 full degrees of freedom about the 3 axes, including shock absorption. A 20-year research program has demonstrated that this concept provides mechanical properties very close to those of a natural disk. Improvements in technology have made it possible to solve the problem of the bond between the elastic component and the titanium endplates and to obtain an excellent biostability. The prosthesis geometry allows limited rotation and translation with resistance to motion (elastic return property) aimed at avoiding overload of the posterior facets. The rotation center can vary freely during motion. It thus differs substantially from current prostheses, which are 2- or 3-piece devices involving 1 or 2 bearing surfaces and providing 3 or 5 degrees of freedom. This design and the adhesion-molding technology differentiate the LP-ESP prosthesis from other mono-elastomeric prostheses, for which the constraints of shearing during rotations or movement are absorbed at the endplate interface. Seven years after the first implantation, we can document in a solid and detailed fashion the course of clinical outcomes and the radiological postural and kinematic behavior of this prosthesis.

  9. Perioperative care for lumbar microdiscectomy: a survey of Australasian neurosurgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kai Zheong; Ghosh, Peter; Goldschlager, Tony

    2018-01-01

    Background Lumbar microdiscectomy is the most commonly performed spine surgery procedure. Over time it has evolved to a minimally invasive procedure. Traditionally patients were advised to restrict activity following lumbar spine surgery. However, post-operative instructions are heterogeneous. The purpose of this report is to assess, by survey, the perioperative care practices of Australasian neurosurgeons in the minimally invasive era. Methods A survey was conducted by email invitation sent to all full members of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia (NSA). This consisted of 11 multi-choice questions relating to operative indications, technique, and post-operative instructions for lumbar microdiscectomy answered by an electronically distributed anonymized online survey. Results The survey was sent to all Australasian Neurosurgeons. In total, 68 complete responses were received (28.9%). Most surgeons reported they would consider a period of either 4 to 8 weeks (42.7%) or 8 to 12 weeks (32.4%) as the minimum duration of radicular pain adequate to offer surgery. Unilateral muscle dissection with unilateral discectomy was practiced by 76.5%. Operative microscopy was the most commonly employed method of magnification (76.5%). The majority (55.9%) always refer patients to undergo inpatient physiotherapy. Sitting restrictions were advised by 38.3%. Lifting restrictions were advised by 83.8%. Conclusions Australasian neurosurgical lumbar microdiscectomy perioperative care practices are generally consistent with international practices and demonstrate a similar degree of heterogeneity. Recommendation of post-operative activity restrictions by Australasian neurosurgeons is still common. This suggests a role for the investigation of the necessity of such restrictions in the era of minimally invasive spine surgery. PMID:29732417

  10. Enlargement of lumbar spinal canal in lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis. Evaluation with three-dimensional computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishi, Yoshihiko

    2003-01-01

    A number of clinical studies have demonstrated that enlargement of the lumbar spinal canal is one of the effective surgical procedures for the treatment of the lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and provides a good result. In the present study, we have evaluated the long-term outcome of the enlargement of the lumbar canal without fusion in thirty eight patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) The improvement rate was excellent in 80% of the patients (mean improvement ratio, 83%) according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scoring system. We found that the sufficient enlargement of the canal was obtained by the surgery and maintained for a long period of time. The results from 3D-CT suggested that a round shape was maintained in the canal after the surgery because of pressures of the dura mater against to the bony canal. None of patients showed lumbar instability. In conclusion, enlargement of lumbar canal without fusion is useful for the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and the enlarged canal has been maintained for a long period of time after the surgery. The results demonstrated the clinical utility of 3D-CT to evaluate the preoperative and postoperative shape of the spine. (author)

  11. Three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in elderly patients with wedge shaped tricortical autologous graft: A consecutive prospective series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Suk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy/radiculopathy is a matter of debate, more so in elderly patients due to compromised physiology. We evaluated the clinical and radiological results of cervical fusion, using wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate for three-level anterior cervical discectomy in elderly patients. Materials and Methods: Twelve elderly patients with mean age of 69.7 years (65-76 years were treated between April 2000 and March 2005, for three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, using wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate. Outcome was recorded clinically according to Odom′s criteria and radiologically in terms of correction of lordosis angle and intervertebral disc height span at the time of bony union. The mean follow-up was 29.8 months (12-58 months. Results: All the patients had a complete recovery of clinical symptoms after surgery. Postoperative score according to Odom′s criteria was excellent in six patients and good in remaining six. Bony union was achieved in all the patients with average union time of 12 weeks (8-20 weeks. The mean of sum of three segment graft height collapse was 2.50 mm (SD = 2.47. The average angle of lordosis was corrected from 18.2° (SD = 2.59° preoperatively to 24.9° (SD = 4.54° at the final follow-up. This improvement in the radiological findings is statistically significant (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Cervical fusion with wedge-shaped tricortical autologous iliac graft and Orion plate for three-level anterior cervical discectomy is an acceptable technique in elderly patients. It gives satisfactory results in terms of clinical outcome, predictable early solid bony union, and maintenance of disc space height along with restoration of cervical lordosis.

  12. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy for discogenic cervical headache due to soft disc herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Y.; Lee, S.H.; Shin, S.W.; Chung, S.E.; Park, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    A discogenic cervical headache is a subtype of cervicogenic headache (CEH) that arises from a degenerative cervical disc abnormality. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy (PECD) for patients with chronic cervical headache due to soft cervical disc herniation. Seventeen patients underwent PECD for intractable headache. The inclusion criteria were soft disc herniation without segmental instability, proven by both local anesthesia and provocative discography for headache unresponsive to conservative treatment. The mean follow-up period was 37.6 months. Fifteen of the 17 patients (88.2%) showed successful outcomes based on the Macnab criteria. Pain scores on a visual analog scale (VAS) improved from a preoperative mean of 8.35±0.79 to 2.12±1.17, postoperatively (P<0.01). The mean disc height decreased from 6.81±1.08 to 5.98±1.07 mm (P<0.01). There was no newly developed segmental instability or spontaneous fusion on follow-up radiography. In conclusion, PECD appears to be effective for chronic severe discogenic cervical headache under strict inclusion criteria. (orig.)

  13. Higher preoperative Oswestry Disability Index is associated with better surgical outcome in upper lumbar disc herniations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Hooshang; Isfahani, Arash Vatankhahan

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcome in terms of functional and subjective recovery, patients who needed discectomies at L1-L2, L2-L3 and L3-L4 levels were compared with an age and sex-matched group of patients who required L4-L5 and L5-S1 discectomies. We prospectively enrolled 50 consecutive patients, referred to our center, who had L1-L2, L2-L3 and L3-L4 herniations and required surgical intervention. Likewise, a comparative group of 50 consecutive patients with herniations at L4-L5 and L5-S1 were selected. All 100 patients were treated and followed for a 1 year period. Physical examination findings as well as Oswestry Disability Questionnaire before surgery were recorded. After 1 year, patients were requested to fill the same questionnaire. Significant decline in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores was considered to be a measure of functional improvement and recovery. The mean age of patients with upper lumbar disc herniation (L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4) was 45.7 years and patients with lower lumbar disc herniation (L4-L5, L5-S1) had a mean age of 41.2 years. There was no statistically significant difference in age between the two groups. The preoperative Oswestry Disability (ODI) Index score had a statistically significant impact on ODI score improvement after surgery in both lower and upper lumbar disc groups. All 100 patients with either lower or upper lumbar disc herniation had statistically significant ODI change after surgical intervention (P disability (ODI of 21-40%) did not show significant improvement, while patients with ODI greater than 40% had significant reduction (P = 0.018). Surprisingly, as many as 25% of the former had even an increase in ODI scores after surgery. Gender was also a conspicuous factor in determining the surgical outcome of patients with upper lumbar disc herniation, and male patients had more reduction in ODI score than female patients (P = 0.007). Since the functional recovery in patients with herniated lumbar disc, especially

  14. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Tulder, M W; Jellema, P; van Poppel, M N

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lumbar supports are used in the treatment of low back pain patients to make the impairment and disability vanish or decrease. Lumbar supports are also used to prevent the onset of low back pain (primary prevention) or to prevent recurrences of a low back pain episode (secondary...... 1999, and the Embase database up to September 1998. We also screened references given in relevant reviews and identified controlled trials, and used Science Citation Index to identify additional controlled trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Controlled clinical trials that reported on any type of lumbar...... types of treatment or no intervention. No evidence was found on the effectiveness of lumbar supports for secondary prevention. The systematic review of therapeutic trials showed that there is limited evidence that lumbar supports are more effective than no treatment, while it is still unclear if lumbar...

  15. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  16. Lumbar disc excision through fenestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangwan S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Lumbar disc herniation often causes sciatica. Many different techniques have been advocated with the aim of least possible damage to other structures while dealing with prolapsed disc surgically in the properly selected and indicated cases. Methods : Twenty six patients with clinical symptoms and signs of prolapsed lumbar intervertebral disc having radiological correlation by MRI study were subjected to disc excision by interlaminar fenestration method. Results : The assessment at follow-up showed excellent results in 17 patients, good in 6 patients, fair in 2 patients and poor in 1 patient. The mean preoperative and postoperative Visual Analogue Scores were 9.34 ±0.84 and 2.19 ±0.84 on scale of 0-10 respectively. These were statistically significant (p value< 0.001, paired t test. No significant complications were recorded. Conclusion : Procedures of interlaminar fenestration and open disc excision under direct vision offers sufficient adequate exposure for lumbar disc excision with a smaller incision, lesser morbidity, shorter convalescence, early return to work and comparable overall results in the centers where recent laser and endoscopy facilities are not available.

  17. Lumbar hernia - a case report and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ippolito, Giuseppe; Yonamine, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    The authors present a case of lumbar hernia of inferior right space (Petit's triangle), classified as acquired hernia and diagnosed by clinical history and computed tomography. Lumbar hernia are quite rare. Authors have done a literature review of this disease. (author)

  18. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabraja Mario

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Titanium (TTN cages have a higher modulus of elasticity when compared with polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages. This suggests that TTN-cages could show more frequent cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF and therefore might lead to a higher loss of correction. We compared the long term results of stand-alone PEEK- and TTN-cages in a comparable patient collective that was operated under identical operative settings. Methods From 2002 to 2007 154 patients underwent single-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease (DDD. Clinical and radiological outcome were assessed in 86 eligible patients after a mean of 28.4 months. 44 patients received a TTN- and 42 patients a PEEK-cage. Results Solid arthrodesis was found in 93.2% of the TTN-group and 88.1% of the PEEK-group. Cage subsidence was observed in 20.5% of the TTN- and 14.3% of the PEEK-group. A significant segmental lordotic correction was achieved by both cage-types. Even though a loss of correction was found at the last follow-up in both groups, it did not reach the level of statistical significance. Statistical analysis of these results revealed no differences between the TTN- and PEEK-group. When assessed with the neck disability index (NDI, the visual analogue scale (VAS of neck and arm pain and Odom’s criteria the clinical data showed no significant differences between the groups. Conclusions Clinical and radiological outcomes of ACDF with TTN- or PEEK-cages do not appear to be influenced by the chosen synthetic graft. The modulus of elasticity represents only one of many physical properties of a cage. Design, shape, size, surface architecture of a cage as well as bone density, endplate preparation and applied distraction during surgery need to be considered as further important factors.

  19. Congenital lumbar vertebrae agenesis in a lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajli Abbasi, Mohammad; Shojaei, Bahador; Azari, Omid

    2017-01-01

    Congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae was diagnosed in a day-old female lamb based on radiology and clinical examinations. There was no neurological deficit in hindlimb and forelimb associated with standing disability. Radiography of the abdominal region revealed absence of lumbar vertebrae. Necropsy confirmed clinical and radiographic results. No other anomaly or agenesis was seen macroscopically in the abdominal and thoracic regions as well as vertebral column. Partial absence of vertebral column has been reported in human and different animal species, as an independent occurrence or associated with other organs anomalies. The latter has been designated as caudal regression syndrome. Vertebral agenesis may arise from irregularity in the differentiation of somites to the sclerotome or sclerotome to the vertebral primordium. Most of the previously reported cases of agenesis were related to the lumbosacral region, lonely or along with other visceral absences. This case was the first report of congenital agenesis of lumbar vertebrae in a lamb.

  20. Morphometric and Histological Study of Osteophytes in Human Cadaveric Lumbar Vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwini Aithal Padur; Naveen Kumar; Swamy Ravindra Shanthakumar; Arijit Bishnu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Osteophytes are bony outgrowth on the vertebral column. Its prevalence in the lumbar region and clinical importance mandates to conduct a detailed study of lumbar osteophytes in the cadaveric vertebral column. Aim: The present study was conducted to study the detailed features of lumbar osteophytes and document its prevalence, morphometric and histological structure. Materials and Methods: This was an observational study in which frequency of occurrence of lumbar osteophyt...

  1. Clinically important deterioration in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery: a choice of evaluation methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and pain scales: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Glassman, Steven D; Carreon, Leah Y

    2013-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures have become the mainstay for outcome appraisal in spine surgery. Clinically meaningful interpretation of HRQOL improvement has centered on the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). The purpose of this study was to calculate clinically important deterioration (CIDET) thresholds and determine a CIDET value for each HRQOL measure for patients undergoing lumbar fusion. Seven hundred twenty-two patients (248 males, 127 smokers, mean age 60.8 years) were identified with complete preoperative and 1-year postoperative HRQOLs including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and numeric rating scales (0-10) for back and leg pain following primary, instrumented, posterior lumbar fusion. Anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to calculate CIDET for each HRQOL. Anchor-based methods included change score, change difference, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The Health Transition Item, an independent item of the SF-36, was used as the external anchor. Patients who responded "somewhat worse" and "much worse" were combined and compared with patients responding "about the same." Distribution-based methods were minimum detectable change and effect size. Diagnoses included spondylolisthesis (n = 332), scoliosis (n = 54), instability (n = 37), disc pathology (n = 146), and stenosis (n = 153). There was a statistically significant change (p < 0.0001) for each HRQOL measure from preoperatively to 1-year postoperatively. Only 107 patients (15%) reported being "somewhat worse" (n = 81) or "much worse" (n = 26). Calculation methods yielded a range of CIDET values for ODI (0.17-9.06), SF-36 physical component summary (-0.32 to 4.43), back pain (0.02-1.50), and leg pain (0.02-1.50). A threshold for clinical deterioration was difficult to identify. This may be due to the small number of patients reporting being worse after surgery and the variability across

  2. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu-Tung; Hwang, Shiuh-Lin; Lin, Chih-Lung; Lee, I-Chen; Lee, King-Teh

    2012-09-01

    Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS) is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that involved cervical intervertebral levels C1-C2, spinal injury of traumatic origin, spinal tumors, or previous cervical fusion were excluded. Patients were then further classified into two groups: (1) level 1 or 2 disease (Group M) and (2) level 3 or 4 disease (Group S). Measures of mortality, complications after surgery as well as immediate reoperation for any reason were evaluated. Operation time, length of hospital stay, and hospitalization cost were defined as resource utilization. Ninety seven patients met the inclusion criteria and were further reviewed to characterize the sample better. There were no hematomas, airway complications or deaths, except in one patient who developed postoperative hemorrhage that required immediate surgical intervention, and resolved without any neurological deficit or casualty. Resource utilization indicated that the average operation time for Group S was significantly higher than for Group M (4.31±1.25 vs. 2.88±0.90 hours, p<0.0001). There were no significant differences in length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost between the two groups (p=0.265 and p=0.649). Our results indicate that neurosurgical intervention is safe for patients with DSC. Postoperative complication rates associated with these procedures are low. When surgery is considered appropriate for patients with multilevel diseases, these data suggest that ACDF is a safe surgical option. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Safety and resource utilization of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Feng

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative cervical spondylosis (DCS is part of the aging process and is the most common reason for degenerative changes with the spinal column. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF is a major option for operative management of DCS in our institution. This retrospective study investigated the frequency of postoperative complications and resource utilization in 145 patients who underwent ACDF procedures from January 2009 to December 2011. Patients with degenerative changes that involved cervical intervertebral levels C1–C2, spinal injury of traumatic origin, spinal tumors, or previous cervical fusion were excluded. Patients were then further classified into two groups: (1 level 1 or 2 disease (Group M and (2 level 3 or 4 disease (Group S. Measures of mortality, complications after surgery as well as immediate reoperation for any reason were evaluated. Operation time, length of hospital stay, and hospitalization cost were defined as resource utilization. Ninety seven patients met the inclusion criteria and were further reviewed to characterize the sample better. There were no hematomas, airway complications or deaths, except in one patient who developed postoperative hemorrhage that required immediate surgical intervention, and resolved without any neurological deficit or casualty. Resource utilization indicated that the average operation time for Group S was significantly higher than for Group M (4.31±1.25 vs. 2.88±0.90 hours, p<0.0001. There were no significant differences in length of hospital stay and hospitalization cost between the two groups (p=0.265 and p=0.649. Our results indicate that neurosurgical intervention is safe for patients with DSC. Postoperative complication rates associated with these procedures are low. When surgery is considered appropriate for patients with multilevel diseases, these data suggest that ACDF is a safe surgical option.

  4. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage filled with cancellous allograft in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2007-01-01

    From July 2004 to June 2005, 19 patients with 25 discs underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) in which polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages were filled with freeze-dried cancellous allograft bone. This kind of bone graft was made from femoral condyle that was harvested during total knee arthroplasty. Patient age at surgery was 52.9 (28–68) years. All patients were followed up at least 1 year. We measured the height of the disc and segmental sagittal angulation by pre-operative and post-operative radiographs. CT scan of the cervical spine at 1 year was used to evaluate fusion rates. Odom's criteria were used to assess the clinical outcome. All interbody disc spaces achieved successful union at 1-year follow-up. The use of a PEEK cage was found to increase the height of the disc immediately after surgery (5.0 mm pre-operatively, 7.3 mm immediately post-operatively). The final disc height was 6.2 mm, and the collapse of the disc height was 1.1 mm. The segmental lordosis also increased after surgery (2.0° pre-operatively, 6.6° immediately post-operatively), but the mean loss of lordosis correction was 3.3° at final follow-up. Seventy-four percent of patients (14/19) exhibited excellent/good clinical outcomes. Analysis of the results indicated the cancellous allograft bone-filled PEEK cage used in ACDF is a good choice for patients with cervical disc disease, and avoids the complications of harvesting iliac autograft. PMID:17639386

  5. Albert Dereymaeker and Joseph Cyriel Mulier's description of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in 1955

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, R.H.M.A.; Goffin, J.

    2018-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is a very well-known and often-performed procedure in the practice of spine surgeons. The earliest descriptions of the technique have always been attributed to Cloward, Smith, and Robinson. However, in the French literature, this procedure was also

  6. Multilevel magnetic resonance imaging analysis of multifidus-longissimus cleavage planes in the lumbar spine and potential clinical applications to Wiltse's paraspinal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Daniel Kyle; Allen, Jonathan L; Williams, Paul A; Voss, Ashley Elizabeth; Jadhav, Vikram; Wu, David S; Cheng, Wayne K

    2011-07-15

    Retrospective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based study. Our goal was to develop Wiltse's paraspinal surgical approach by determining the precise anatomic locations of the intermuscular cleavage planes formed by the multifidus and longissimus muscles. The primary objective was to measure the distances between the midline and the intermuscular planes, bilaterally, on MRI scans at each of the five disc levels between L1 and S1. Secondary objectives included identifying the existence of any correlations between patient demographics and the measured outcomes. In 1968, Wiltse described an approach to the spine using the natural cleavage plane of the multifidus and longissimus muscles as an entry to the posterior spinal elements. The small direct incisions lessened bleeding, tissue violation, and muscle retraction, which popularized Wiltse's approach among surgeons. A detailed description of the locations of the intermuscular cleavage planes at each lumbar disc level, however, is not available. MRI scans of 200 patients taken during routine care (2007-2009) were retrospectively reviewed to gather measurements of the distances from the intermuscular cleavage planes to the midline, bilaterally, at each disc level from L1 to S1. Age, sex, and BMI (body mass index) were obtained to determine correlations. Mean measurements significantly differed between all disc levels. At L5-S1, the mean distance was 37.8 mm; at L4-L5, 28.4 mm; at L3-L4, 16.2 mm; at L2-L3, 10.4 mm; and at L1-L2, 7.9 mm. The mean female distances were significantly greater than males (2 mm) on both sides of L5-S1 only. No correlation was discovered between BMI, age, height (N = 50), or weight (N = 50) with respect to measured distances. In the absence of any significant clinical correlation between patient demographics and the entry site in Wiltse's approach, the spine surgeon may use distances described in this paper to apply to a broad base of spine patients regardless of BMI, sex, or age.

  7. Benign fibrous histiocytoma of the lumbar vertebrae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Oguz, Erbil; Sehirlioglu, Ali; Kose, Ozkan; Sanal, Tuba; Ozcan, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma is an extremely rare spinal tumor with ten reported cases in the literature. Benign fibrous histiocytoma constitutes a diagnostic challenge because it shares common clinical symptoms, radiological characteristics, and histological features with other benign lesions involving the spine. We present a case of benign fibrous histiocytoma of the lumbar spine and discuss its differential diagnosis and management. (orig.)

  8. Concurrent Alzheimer's pathology in patients with clinical normal pressure hydrocephalus: correlation of high-volume lumbar puncture results, cortical brain biopsies, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeraniec, I Jonathan; Bond, Aaron E; Lopes, M Beatriz; Jane, John A

    2016-02-01

    Normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) remains most often a clinical diagnosis and has been widely considered responsive to the placement of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt. The high incidence of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) with NPH symptoms leads to poorer outcomes than would be expected in patients with NPH alone. This article reviews a series of patients operated on for presumed NPH in whom preoperative high-volume lumbar puncture (HVLP) and intraoperative cortical brain biopsies were performed. The data derived from these procedures were then used to understand the incidence of AD in patients presenting with NPH symptoms and to analyze the efficacy of HVLP in patients with NPH and patients with concurrent AD (NPH+AD). A review of the outcomes of shunt surgery is provided. The cases of all patients who underwent placement of a CSF shunt for NPH from 1998 to 2013 at the University of Virginia by the senior author were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who underwent HVLP and patients who underwent cortical brain biopsies were stratified based on the biopsy results into an NPH-only group and an NPH+AD group. The HVLP results and outcomes were then compared in these 2 groups. From 1998 to 2013, 142 patients underwent shunt operations because of a preoperative clinical diagnosis of NPH. Of the patients with a shunt who had a diagnosis of NPH, 105 (74%) received HVLPs. Of 142 shunt-treated patients with NPH, 27 (19%) were determined to have concomitant Alzheimer's pathology based on histopathological findings at the time of shunting. Patients who underwent repeat biopsies had an initial positive outcome. After they clinically deteriorated, they underwent repeat biopsies during shunt interrogation, and 13% of the repeat biopsies demonstrated Alzheimer's pathology. Improvements in gait and cognition did not reach significance between the NPH and NPH+AD groups. In total, 105 patients underwent HVLP before shunt placement. In the NPH cohort, 44.6% of patients

  9. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  10. Side effects after lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Myhr, G.; Dale, L.G.

    1990-01-01

    Side effects of iohexol lumbar myelography have been analyzed with respect to the influence of the type of radiological abnormality, sex and age in a group of 200 patients. Headache, postural headache, nausea and back/leg pain were significantly more frequent in patients without definite radiological abnormalities. Postural headache, nausea, dizziness and mental symptoms were more frequent in women, while headache, postural headache, nausea, dizziness, minor mental symptoms (i.e. anxiety or depression) and pain became less frequent with age. This pattern is similar to that reported after lumbar puncture. Young women without definite clinical signs of nerve root lesions probably have the greatest risk of experiencing side effects after iohexol lumbar myelography. (orig.)

  11. Noninfectious prevertebral soft-tissue inflammation and hematoma eliciting swelling after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kenji; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Okazaki, Toshiyuki; Irie, Shinsuke; Inagaki, Toru; Saito, Osamu; Nagahiro, Shinji; Saito, Koji

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) procedures are performed to treat patients with cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy. Dysphagia is a post-ACDF complication. When it coincides with prevertebral space enlargement and inflammation, surgical site infection and pharyngoesophageal perforation must be considered. The association between dysphagia and prevertebral inflammation has not been reported. The authors investigated factors eliciting severe dysphagia and its relationship with prevertebral inflammation in patients who had undergone ACDF. MATERIALS The clinical data of 299 patients who underwent 307 ACDF procedures for cervical radiculopathy or myelopathy at Kushiro Kojinkai Memorial Hospital and Kushiro Neurosurgical Hospital between December 2007 and August 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS After 7 ACDF procedures (2.3%), 7 patients suffered severe prolonged and/or delayed dysphagia and odynophagia that prevented ingestion. In all 7 patients the prevertebral space was enlarged. In 5 (1.6%) the symptom was thought to be associated with prevertebral soft-tissue edema; in all 5 an inflammatory response, hyperthermia, and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein level was observed. After 2 procedures (0.7%), we noted prevertebral hematoma without an inflammatory response. None of the patients who had undergone 307 ACDF procedures manifested pharyngoesophageal perforation or surgical site infection. CONCLUSIONS Severe dysphagia and odynophagia are post-ACDF complications. In most instances they are attributable to prevertebral soft-tissue edema accompanied by inflammatory responses such as fever and an increase in the white blood cell count and in C-reactive protein. In other cases these anomalies are elicited by hematoma not associated with inflammation.

  12. Etiology of lumbar lordosis and its pathophysiology: a review of the evolution of lumbar lordosis, and the mechanics and biology of lumbar degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrey, Carolyn J; Bailey, Jeannie F; Safaee, Michael; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of postural degeneration, particularly the loss of lumbar lordosis commonly observed in the elderly in the context of evolution, mechanical, and biological studies of the human spine and to synthesize recent research findings to clinical management of postural malalignment. Lumbar lordosis is unique to the human spine and is necessary to facilitate our upright posture. However, decreased lumbar lordosis and increased thoracic kyphosis are hallmarks of an aging human spinal column. The unique upright posture and lordotic lumbar curvature of the human spine suggest that an understanding of the evolution of the human spinal column, and the unique anatomical features that support lumbar lordosis may provide insight into spine health and degeneration. Considering evolution of the skeleton in isolation from other scientific studies provides a limited picture for clinicians. The evolution and development of human lumbar lordosis highlight the interdependence of pelvic structure and lumbar lordosis. Studies of fossils of human lineage demonstrate a convergence on the degree of lumbar lordosis and the number of lumbar vertebrae in modern Homo sapiens. Evolution and spine mechanics research show that lumbar lordosis is dictated by pelvic incidence, spinal musculature, vertebral wedging, and disc health. The evolution, mechanics, and biology research all point to the importance of spinal posture and flexibility in supporting optimal health. However, surgical management of postural deformity has focused on restoring posture at the expense of flexibility. It is possible that the need for complex and costly spinal fixation can be eliminated by developing tools for early identification of patients at risk for postural deformities through patient history (genetics, mechanics, and environmental exposure) and tracking postural changes over time.

  13. Retrospective, Demographic, and Clinical Investigation of the Causes of Postoperative Infection in Patients With Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Who Underwent Posterior Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaldiz, Can; Yaldiz, Mahizer; Ceylan, Nehir; Kacira, Ozlem Kitiki; Ceylan, Davut; Kacira, Tibet; Kizilcay, Gokhan; Tanriverdi, Taner

    2015-07-01

    Owing to the increasing population of elderly patients, a large number of patients with degenerative spondylosis are currently being surgically treated. Although basic measures for decreasing postoperative surgical infections (PSIs) are considered, it still remains among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this retrospective analysis is to present possible causes leading to PSI in patients who underwent surgery for lumbar degenerative spondylosis and highlight how it can be avoided to decrease morbidity and mortality. The study included 540 patients who underwent posterior stabilization due to degenerative lumbar stenosis between January 2013 and January 2014. The data before and after surgery was retrieved from the hospital charts. Patients with degenerative lumbar stenosis who were operated upon in this study had >2 levels of laminectomy and facetectomy. For this reason, posterior stabilization was performed for all the patients included in this study. Determining the causes of postoperative infection (PI) following spinal surgeries performed with instrumentation is a struggle. Seventeen different parameters that may be related to PI were evaluated in this study. The presence of systemic diseases, unknown glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions were among the parameters that increased the prevalence of PI. Alternatively, prolene sutures, double-layered gloves, and the use of rifampicin Sv (RIS) decreased the incidence of PI. Although the presence of systemic diseases, unnoticed glove perforations, and perioperative blood transfusions increased PIs, prolene suture material, double-layered gloves, and the use of RIS decreased PIs.

  14. Outcome after surgical treatment for lumbar spinal stenosis: the lumbar extension test is not a predictive factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Lars; Hauerberg, John; Springborg, Jacob B

    2009-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective clinical study. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the predictive value of the lumbar extension test for outcome after surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Studies have indicated that aggravation of the symptoms from LSS by extension...... of the lumbar spine has predictive value for the outcome after decompression. The aim of this study was to investigate this theory in a larger group of patients. METHODS: One hundred forty-six consecutive patients surgically treated for LSS were included in the study. The clinical condition was recorded before...... has no predictive value for the outcome after surgical treatment of LSS....

  15. The effect of preoperative dexamethasone on pain 1 year after lumbar disc surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna; Mathiesen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    discectomy. METHODS: This is a prospective 1-year follow-up on a single-centre, randomized, and blinded trial exploring the analgesic effect of 16 mg IV dexamethasone or placebo after lumbar discectomy. One year follow-up was a written questionnaire including back and leg pain (VAS 0-100 mm), Short Form 36...... survey (SF-36), EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D), OSWESTRY Low Back Pain Questionnaire, duration of sick leave, working capability, contentment with surgical result. RESULTS: Response rate was 71% (55 patients) in the dexamethasone group, 58% (44 patients) in the placebo group. Leg pain (VAS) was significantly lower...... in the placebo group compared to the dexamethasone group: 17 (95% CI 10-26) vs 26 (95% CI 19-33) mm, respectively (mean difference 9 mm (95% CI -1 to 0), (P = 0.03). No difference regarding back pain. The placebo group reported significantly more improvement of leg pain and were significantly more satisfied...

  16. Development of preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery and the guidance for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Cheng, Jun; Gu, Xin; Sun, Yi; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-04-01

    Preoperative planning is of great importance for transforaminal endoscopic techniques applied in percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy. In this study, a modular preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery was developed and demonstrated. The path searching method is based on collision detection, and the oriented bounding box was constructed for the anatomical models. Then, image reformatting algorithms were developed for multiplanar reconstruction which provides detailed anatomical information surrounding the virtual planned path. Finally, multithread technique was implemented to realize the steady-state condition of the software. A preoperative planning software for transforaminal endoscopic surgery (TE-Guider) was developed; seven cases of patients with symptomatic lumbar disc herniations were planned preoperatively using TE-Guider. The distances to the midlines and the direction of the optimal paths were exported, and each result was in line with the empirical value. TE-Guider provides an efficient and cost-effective way to search the ideal path and entry point for the puncture. However, more clinical cases will be conducted to demonstrate its feasibility and reliability.

  17. Effects of spine loading in a patient with post-decompression lumbar disc herniation: observations using an open weight-bearing MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Niladri Kumar; Sybert, Daryl; Law, Tim; Clark, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Our objective was to use an open weight-bearing MRI to identify the effects of different loading conditions on the inter-vertebral anatomy of the lumbar spine in a post-discectomy recurrent lumbar disc herniation patient. A 43-year-old male with a left-sided L5-S1 post-decompression re-herniation underwent MR imaging in three spine-loading conditions: (1) supine, (2) weight-bearing on standing (WB), and (3) WB with 10 % of body mass axial loading (WB + AL) (5 % through each shoulder). A segmentation-based proprietary software was used to calculate and compare linear dimensions, angles and cross sections across the lumbar spine. The L5 vertebrae showed a 4.6 mm posterior shift at L5-S1 in the supine position that changed to an anterior translation >2.0 mm on WB. The spinal canal sagittal thickness at L5-S1 reduced from supine to WB and WB + AL (13.4, 10.6, 9.5 mm) with corresponding increases of 2.4 and 3.5 mm in the L5-S1 disc protrusion with WB and WB + AL, respectively. Change from supine to WB and WB + AL altered the L5-S1 disc heights (10.2, 8.6, 7.0 mm), left L5-S1 foramen heights (12.9, 11.8, 10.9 mm), L5-S1 segmental angles (10.3°, 2.8°, 4.3°), sacral angles (38.5°, 38.3°, 40.3°), L1-L3-L5 angles (161.4°, 157.1°, 155.1°), and the dural sac cross sectional areas (149, 130, 131 mm 2 ). Notably, the adjacent L4-L5 segment demonstrated a retro-listhesis >2.3 mm on WB. We observed that with weight-bearing, measurements indicative of spinal canal narrowing could be detected. These findings suggest that further research is warranted to determine the potential utility of weight-bearing MRI in clinical decision-making.

  18. Comparison between anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by polyetheretherketone cages and tricortical iliac-crest graft for the treatment of cervical prolapsed intervertebral disc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Anowarul Islam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is effective surgical modality in the treatment of cervical prolapsed intervertebral disc, radiculopathy and myelopathy. Aims of our study is to evaluate fusion of cervical spine  by ICG with plating and PEEK cage with bone graft, also assess the donor site morbidity. Thirty patients (male 16; female 14 with mean age 46 ± 9.2 years and were distributed  into two treatment groups (PEEK cage group and ICG group. We assess the patients clinically for myelopathy and functional outcome by Nurick scale and Odom's criteria respectively and  neck and arm pain by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Eighteen patients were operated for single level discectomy and fusion by either ICG or PEEK cages and twelve patients for two levels. After surgery follow up was 2 years and better  postoperative score which was assessed by Nurick scale, Odoms criteria and VAS score. Total patients 14(93%were graded excellent in the PEEK cage group compared to 13 patients (86% in the ICG group.  Statistically it was not significant between two groups and p value was <0.35. Difference was significant in VAS score  after 24 months with more reduction of pain in PEEK cage group. Fusion occurred in 13 patients (86% of the PEEK cage group and 14 patient (93% of the ICG group. Result showed more fusion rate in ICG group and less donor site morbidity in PEEK group.  

  19. Systemic Inflammatory and Th17 Immune Activation among Patients Treated for Lumbar Radiculopathy Exceeds that of Patients Treated for Persistent Postoperative Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Guha, Daipayan; Paul, Darcia; Shcharinsky, Alina

    2017-09-01

    The pathophysiology of lumbar radiculopathy includes both mechanical compression and biochemical irritation of apposed neural elements. Inflammatory and immune cytokines have been implicated, induced by systemic exposure of immune-privileged intervertebral disc tissue. Surgical intervention provides improved symptoms and quality of life, but persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) afflicts a significant fraction of patients. To compare the inflammatory and immune phenotypes among patients undergoing structural surgery for lumbar radiculopathy and spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain. Consecutive patients undergoing surgical intervention for lumbar radiculopathy or neuropathic pain were studied. Demographic data included age, gender, and VAS and neuropathic pain scores. Serum was evaluated for cytokine levels (IL-6, Il-17, TNF-α) and cellular content [white blood cell (WBC)/differential, lymphocyte subtypes]. The primary analysis differentiated molecular and cellular profiles between radiculopathy and neuropathic pain patients. Subgroup analysis within the surgical radiculopathy population compared those patients achieving relief of symptoms and those with PPNP. Heightened IL-6, Il-17, and TNF-α levels were observed for the lumbar radiculopathy group compared with the neuropathic pain group. This was complemented by higher WBC count and a greater fraction of Th17 lymphocytes among radiculopathy patients. In the lumbar discectomy subgroup, pain relief was seen among patients with preoperatively elevated IL-17 levels. Those patients with PPNP refractory to surgical discectomy exhibited normal cytokine levels. Differences in Th17 immune activation are seen among radiculopathy and neuropathic pain patients. These cellular and molecular profiles may be translated into biomarkers to improve patient selection for structural spine surgery. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  20. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne, Greger; Fritzell, Peter; Hägg, Olle

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common spinal procedure in the elderly. To avoid persisting low back pain, adding arthrodesis has been recommended, especially if there is a coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis. However, this strategy remains con...

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty versus arthrodesis for single-level cervical spondylosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria Fallah

    Full Text Available To estimate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty (ACDA compared to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF for patient-important outcomes for single-level cervical spondylosis.Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Register for Randomized Controlled Trials, BIOSIS and LILACS, archives of spine meetings and bibliographies of relevant articles.We included RCTs of ACDF versus ACDA in adult patients with single-level cervical spondylosis reporting at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neurological success, neck pain, arm pain, quality of life, surgery for adjacent level degeneration (ALD, reoperation and dysphonia/dysphagia. We used no language restrictions. We performed title and abstract screening and full text screening independently and in duplicate.We used random-effects model to pool data using mean difference (MD for continuous outcomes and relative risk (RR for dichotomous outcomes. We used GRADE to evaluate the quality of evidence for each outcome.Of 2804 citations, 9 articles reporting on 9 trials (1778 participants were eligible. ACDA is associated with a clinically significant lower incidence of neurologic failure (RR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.37-0.75, p = 0.0004 and improvement in the Neck pain visual analogue scale (VAS (MD = 6.56, 95% CI = 3.22-9.90, p = 0.0001; Minimal clinically important difference (MCID = 2.5. ACDA is associated with a statistically but not clinically significant improvement in Arm pain VAS and SF-36 physical component summary. ACDA is associated with non-statistically significant higher improvement in the Neck Disability Index Score and lower incidence of ALD requiring surgery, reoperation, and dysphagia/dysphonia.There is no strong evidence to support the routine use of ACDA over ACDF in single-level cervical spondylosis. Current trials lack long-term data required to assess safety as well as surgery for ALD. We suggest that ACDA in patients with single

  2. The Cost-Effectiveness of Conventional Discectomy Compared to Other Surgical Techniques for Lumbar Disk Herniation. A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, May Tone; Ødegaard-Olsen, Øystein; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Background: The current study reviews the literature on the cost-effectiveness of conventional diskectomy compared to other surgical techniques, by assessing studies with economical evaluation and studies using proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. Methods: In April 2016, a comprehensive search w...... studies. The available evidence, however, suggests that any cost-effectiveness difference between conventional diskectomy and the alternatives is unlikely to be great.......Background: The current study reviews the literature on the cost-effectiveness of conventional diskectomy compared to other surgical techniques, by assessing studies with economical evaluation and studies using proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. Methods: In April 2016, a comprehensive search......-four articles were included in the review, 9 retrieved from the original search, and an additional 15 from reference lists. Four studies included an economical evaluation and 20 reported proxy measures of cost-effectiveness. The quality of studies varied considerably and results were ambiguous; the four...

  3. Comparison of quality of life between men and women who underwent Transforaminal Percutaneous Endoscopic Discectomy for lumbar disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Thomaidis, Tryfon; Charitoudis, Georgios; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Studies describing the efficacy of TPED on shortness of recovery and improvement of postoperative quality of life are limited, especially regarding gender something that has never been reported before in the literature. The purpose of this study is to evaluate possible differences of the health-related quality of life in patients who underwent TPED for LDH in accordance with sex. Seventy-six patients diagnosed and treated with TPED for LDH with 1 year follow-up were selected and divided into two groups of equal number depending on sex. Their quality of life was evaluated by using the SF-36 before the operation, six weeks, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. A statistical analysis was conducted, in order to compare the 8 scaled scores of the SF-36 combining each time two chronological phases in the total of patients, in each group and between groups. Fifty-two (68.4%) patients were ≤63 years old, while the rest 24 (31,4%) were >63 years old (mean ±SD = 56,5 ±12,1 years). Apart from the PF domain, the scores were higher in every visit for the two groups, but the change between groups was not significant. Women had a significantly higher increase of PF score in 3 months after TPED and in the interval 6 weeks-3 months comparing with men. However, in the intervals 3 months-6 months and 3 months-12 months men presented significantly higher increase compared to women. Statistically significant improvement of the quality of life for both men and women was observed. Generally, there was no significant difference between the two groups. As regards to the physical functioning, it appears to be a significant difference which is counterpoised over time. 2. TPED for LDH does not present major differences in the improvement of quality of life regarding gender.

  4. Discoscopic Findings of High Signal Intensity Zones on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

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    Kosuke Sugiura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32-year-old man underwent radiofrequency thermal annuloplasty (TA with percutaneous endoscopic discectomy (PED under local anesthesia for chronic low back pain. His diagnosis was discogenic pain with a high signal intensity zone (HIZ in the posterior corner of the L4-5 disc. Flexion pain was sporadic, and steroid injection was given twice for severe pain. After the third episode of strong pain, PED and TA were conducted. The discoscope was inserted into the posterior annulus and revealed a migrated white nucleus pulposus which was stained blue. Then, after moving the discoscope to the site of the HIZ, a migrated slightly red nucleus pulposus was found, suggesting inflammation and/or new vessels penetrating the mass. After removing the fragment, the HIZ site was ablated by TA. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the discoscopic findings of HIZ of the lumbar intervertebral disc.

  5. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using non resorbable poly-ether-ether-ketone versus resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide fusion devices. Clinical outcome at a minimum of 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiya, Timothy U; Smit, T; van Royen, B J; Mullender, M

    2011-04-01

    Previous papers on resorbable poly-L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide (PLDLLA) cages in spinal fusion have failed to report adequately on patient-centred clinical outcome measures. Also comparison of PLDLLA cage with a traditionally applicable counterpart has not been previously reported. This is the first randomized prospective study that assesses clinical outcome of PLDLLA cage compared with a poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) implant. Twenty-six patients were randomly assigned to undergo instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) whereby either a PEEK cage or a PLDLLA cage was implanted. Clinical outcome based on visual analogue scale scores for leg pain and back pain, as well as Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and SF-36 questionnaires were documented and analysed. When compared with preoperative values, all clinical parameters have significantly improved in the PEEK group at 2 years after surgery with the exception of SF-36 general health, SF-36 mental health and SF-36 role emotional scores. No clinical parameter showed significant improvement at 2 years after surgery compared with preoperative values in the PLDLLA patient group. Only six patients (50%) in the PLDLLA group showed improvement in the VAS scores for leg and back pain as well as the ODI, as opposed to 10 patients (71%) in the PEEK group. One-third of the patients in the PLDLLA group actually reported worsening of their pain scores and ODI. Three cases of mild to moderate osteolysis were seen in the PLDLLA group. Following up on our preliminary report, these 2-year results confirm the superiority of the PEEK implant to the resorbable PLDLLA implant in aiding spinal fusion and alleviating symptoms following PLIF in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis associated with either canal stenosis or foramen stenosis or both and emanating from a single lumbar segment.

  6. Non-fusion rates in anterior cervical discectomy and implantation of empty polyetheretherketone cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechlivanis, Ioannis; Thuring, Theresa; Brenke, Christopher; Seiz, Marcel; Thome, Claudius; Barth, Martin; Harders, Albrecht; Schmieder, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    A prospective analysis. Our aim was to assess the radiographically detectable bony fusion in patients with anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK)-cage implantation without additional filling. Furthermore, clinical data of patients with and without fusion were compared. PEEK-cage implantation is performed in cervical spinal surgery because of its benefits. However, fusion rates without filling of the cage have not been reported. Patients selected for ACD with PEEK-cage implantation prospectively underwent plain radiography in anterior-posterior and lateral projections during the postoperative hospital stay and at follow-up. Furthermore, clinical status was evaluated using the Odom scale, the Short Form-36, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for arm and neck pain, and the cervical Oswestry score. Fusion status, migration, and subsidence of the PEEK cage were evaluated on the basis of the lateral radiographs. Fusion was confirmed by presence of continuous trabecular bone bridges in the disc space. To exclude an influence of the cage on the evaluation of fusion rates, fusion was evaluated in analogous fashion retrospectively in a control group. A total of 52 patients underwent ACD and interbody fusion. One-level surgery was performed in 44 patients and 2-level surgery in 8 patients. A total of 60 ACD and interbody fusions with a PEEK cage were analyzed. A majority of operations were at the C5/6 level (40 patients, 77%). Cage height was 4 mm in 32 cases, 5 mm in 23 cases, and 6 mm in 5 cases. Bony fusion was present at 43 treated levels (71.7%), whereas at 17 levels (28.3%) no fusion was found. Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the fusion and non-fusion groups regarding time to follow-up, implanted cage height. Short Form-36, cervical Oswestry score, VAS arm and neck, or Odom criteria. In the control group, ACD was performed in 29 patients (42 levels; 18 one-level and 12 two-level operations). Bony fusion was present

  7. The role of cumulative physical work load in lumbar spine disease: risk factors for lumbar osteochondrosis and spondylosis associated with chronic complaints

    OpenAIRE

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Heiskel, H; Henkel, N; Roth-Kuver, B; Kaiser, U; Bickeboller, R; Willingstorfer, W; Beck, W; Elsner, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the relation with a case-control study between symptomatic osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine and cumulative occupational exposure to lifting or carrying and to working postures with extreme forward bending.
METHODS—From two practices and four clinics were recruited 229 male patients with radiographically confirmed osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine associated with chronic complaints. Of these 135 had additionally had acute lumbar disc...

  8. Massive Cerebral Gas Embolism under Discectomy due to Hydrogen Peroxide Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive cerebral and spinal gas embolism occurs rarely as a complication of discectomy. We report a 54-year-old female who had undergone a discectomy (L3/4 and L4/5 under epidural anesthesia in a local hospital developed multiple massive gas embolisms. At closure, surgeons irrigated the incision wound with hydrogen peroxide. Soon after the irrigation, the patient suddenly developed tachycardia, hypotension, and rapid oxygen desaturation. Subsequently, patient progressed into unconsciousness and right hemianopsia quadriplegia. Computed tomography (CT scan showed multiple hypointensity spots around the brain due to cerebral gas embolism, which indicated the pneumoencephalos. The likely mechanism was the absorption of hydrogen peroxide into blood. When the amount of oxygen evolved exceeded its maximal blood solubility, venous embolization occurred. Though the patient was treated with supportive treatments and hyperbaric oxygen, she did not get full recovery and was left with severe long-term cerebral injury.

  9. A Clinical Pilot Study Comparing Sweet Bee Venom parallel treatment with only Acupuncture Treatment in patient diagnosed with lumbar spine sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Yong-jeen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was carried out to compare the Sweet Bee Venom (referred to as Sweet BV hereafter acupuncture parallel treatment to treatment with acupuncture only for the patient diagnosed with lumbar spine sprain and find a better treatment. Methods: The subjects were patients diagnosed with lumbar spine sprain and hospitalized at Suncheon oriental medical hospital, which was randomly divided into sweet BV parallel treatment group and acupuncture-only group, and other treatment conditions were maintained the same. Then,VAS (Visual Analogue Scale was used to compare the difference in the treatment period between the two groups from VAS 10 to VAS 0, from VAS 10 to VAS 5, and from VAS 5 to VAS 0. Result & Conclusion: Sweet BV parallel treatment group and acupuncture-only treatment group were compared regarding the respective treatment period, and as the result, the treatment period from VAS 10 to VAS 5 was significantly reduced in sweet BV parallel treatment group compared to the acupuncture-only treatment group, but the treatment period from VAS 5 to VAS 0 did not show a significant difference. Therefore, it can be said that sweet BV parallel treatment is effective in shortening the treatment period and controlling early pain compared to acupuncture-only treatment.

  10. The top 100 classic papers in lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberger, Jeremy; Skovrlj, Branko; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2015-05-15

    Bibliometric review of the literature. To analyze and quantify the most frequently cited papers in lumbar spine surgery and to measure their impact on the entire lumbar spine literature. Lumbar spine surgery is a dynamic and complex field. Basic science and clinical research remain paramount in understanding and advancing the field. While new literature is published at increasing rates, few studies make long-lasting impacts. The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all papers relevant to lumbar spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each paper. The most cited paper was found to be the classic paper from 1990 by Boden et al that described magnetic resonance imaging findings in individuals without back pain, sciatica, and neurogenic claudication showing that spinal stenosis and herniated discs can be incidentally found when scanning patients. The second most cited study similarly showed that asymptomatic patients who underwent lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging frequently had lumbar pathology. The third most cited paper was the 2000 publication of Fairbank and Pynsent reviewing the Oswestry Disability Index, the outcome-measure questionnaire most commonly used to evaluate low back pain. The majority of the papers originate in the United States (n=58), and most were published in Spine (n=63). Most papers were published in the 1990s (n=49), and the 3 most common topics were low back pain, biomechanics, and disc degeneration. This report identifies the top 100 papers in lumbar spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the lumbar spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in lumbar spine surgery today. 3.

  11. [Discarthrosis with hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radicular syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardaru, D; Tiţu, Gabriela; Pendefunda, L

    2012-01-01

    The problems at the level of intervertebral discs are producing dysfunctions and important functional regression at the level of lumbar column, at a stage at which the patient could remain blocked in an anterior or lateral flexion position or producing an antalgic position of scoliosis that could incapacitate the patient to perform activities of daily living. The medical rehabilitation, in such cases, must seek not only the relief of local pain through different methods of obtaining it, but also the functional reeducation of the intervertebral articulations through specific analytical mobilization in order to achieve the biomechanical harmonization of the rachis. We report the case study of a 66 year-old patient who presented to our clinic for medical consult and physical therapy when he was diagnosed with discharthrosis, hyperalgic lumbar multileveled radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1. The lumbar x-ray showed osteophytes, disc narrowing at the level of L5-S1 and inter-apophysis arthrosis. The clinical examination revealed difficulty walking with pain in the right sacroiliac articulations and right sciatic emergence with plantar paraesthesia. The patient developed pain induced scoliosis on the right side that restricted the lumbar range of motion and prevented the right flexion blocking him into an left flexion, any attempt of straightening inducing pain. The condition was treated using specific analytical lumbar mobilization for the realignment of the vertebrae complex. In this case study, we found that functional reeducation in cases of pain induced deviations of the rachis of the column should be centered on the harmonization of inadequate pressure and position of the complex intervertebral articulations.

  12. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Da?l?, Murat; Er, Uygur; ?im?ek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  13. Cerebellar Herniation after Lumbar Puncture in Galactosemic Newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Kalay

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema resulting in elevated intracranial pressure is a well-known complication of galactosemia. Lumbar puncture was performed for the diagnosis of clinically suspected bacterial meningitis. Herniation of cerebral tissue through the foramen magnum is not a common problem in neonatal intensive care units because of the open fontanelle in infants. We present the case of a 3-week-old infant with galactosemia who presented with signs of cerebellar herniation after lumbar puncture.

  14. FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY, SAGITTAL ALIGNMENT AND PELVIC BALANCE IN LUMBAR SPONDYLOLISTHESIS

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    Luis Muñiz Luna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To demonstrate the recovery of lumbar sagittal pelvic alignment and sagittal pelvic balance after surgical reduction of lumbar spondylolisthesis and establish the benefits of the surgery for reduction and fixation of the lumbar spondylolisthesis with 360o circumferential arthrodesis for 2 surgical approaches by clinical and functional evaluation. Method: Eight patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis treated with surgical reduction and fixation of listhesis and segmental circumferential fusion with two surgical approaches were reviewed. They were evaluated before and after treatment with Oswestry, Visual Analogue for pain and Odom scales, performing radiographic measurement of lumbar sagittal alignment and pelvic sagittal balance with the technique of pelvic radius. Results: Oswestry scales and EVA reported improvement of symptoms after treatment in 8 cases; the Odom scale had six outstanding cases reported. The lumbar sagittal alignment presented a lumbosacral lordosis angle and a lumbopelvic lordosis angle reduced in 4 cases and increased in 4 other cases; pelvic sagittal balance increased the pelvic angle in 4 cases and decreased in 3 cases and the sacral translation of the hip axis to the promontory increased in 6 cases. Conclusion: The surgical procedure evaluated proved to be useful by modifying the lumbar sagittal alignment and the pelvic balance, besides reducing the symptoms, enabling the patient to have mobility and movement and the consequent satisfaction with the surgery.

  15. Lumbar spine chordoma

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    M.A. Hatem, M.B.Ch.B, MRes, LMCC

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  16. Boosted Regeneration and Reduced Denervated Muscle Atrophy by NeuroHeal in a Pre-clinical Model of Lumbar Root Avulsion with Delayed Reimplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo-Guitart, David; Forés, Joaquim; Navarro, Xavier; Casas, Caty

    2017-09-20

    The "gold standard" treatment of patients with spinal root injuries consists of delayed surgical reconnection of nerves. The sooner, the better, but problems such as injury-induced motor neuronal death and muscle atrophy due to long-term denervation mean that normal movement is not restored. Herein we describe a preclinical model of root avulsion with delayed reimplantation of lumbar roots that was used to establish a new adjuvant pharmacological treatment. Chronic treatment (up to 6 months) with NeuroHeal, a new combination drug therapy identified using a systems biology approach, exerted long-lasting neuroprotection, reduced gliosis and matrix proteoglycan content, accelerated nerve regeneration by activating the AKT pathway, promoted the formation of functional neuromuscular junctions, and reduced denervation-induced muscular atrophy. Thus, NeuroHeal is a promising treatment for spinal nerve root injuries and axonal regeneration after trauma.

  17. Return to Golf After Lumbar Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shifflett, Grant D; Hellman, Michael D; Louie, Philip K; Mikhail, Christopher; Park, Kevin U; Phillips, Frank M

    Spinal fusion surgery is being increasingly performed, yet few studies have focused on return to recreational sports after lumbar fusion and none have specifically analyzed return to golf. Most golfers successfully return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery. Case series. Level 4. All patients who underwent 1- or 2-level primary lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative pathologies performed by a single surgeon between January 2008 and October 2012 and had at least 1-year follow-up were included. Patients completed a specifically designed golf survey. Surveys were mailed, given during follow-up clinic, or answered during telephone contact. A total of 353 patients met the inclusion and exclusion criteria, with 200 responses (57%) to the questionnaire producing 34 golfers. The average age of golfers was 57 years (range, 32-79 years). In 79% of golfers, preoperative back and/or leg pain significantly affected their ability to play golf. Within 1 year from surgery, 65% of patients returned to practice and 52% returned to course play. Only 29% of patients stated that continued back/leg pain limited their play. Twenty-five patients (77%) were able to play the same amount of golf or more than before fusion surgery. Of those providing handicaps, 12 (80%) reported the same or an improved handicap. More than 50% of golfers return to on-course play within 1 year of lumbar fusion surgery. The majority of golfers can return to preoperative levels in terms of performance (handicap) and frequency of play. This investigation offers insight into when golfers return to sport after lumbar fusion surgery and provides surgeons with information to set realistic expectations postoperatively.

  18. Complications in posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuzer, Rolf-Peter

    2010-01-01

    From 1993 to 2000, 220 consecutive patients with unstable degenerative spondylolisthesis were studied after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using different types of grafts and pedicle screw systems. In a retrospective review the author detail the associated complications and their correlation with perioperative factors. The causes, strategies for their avoidance, and the clinical course of these complications are also disscused. The study group was composed of 136 women and 84 men...

  19. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with "mini-invasive" harvesting of iliac crest graft versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages: a retrospective outcome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallone, A; Marchione, P; Li Voti, P; Ferrante, L; Visocchi, M

    2014-12-01

    Limited outcome data suggested a minimal evidence for better clinical and radiographic outcome of polyetheretherketone cages compared with bone grafts in the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. We proposed a "mini-invasive" surgical technique for harvesting iliac crest grafts that provides bicortical autografts of sufficient size to be used in multilevel cervical procedures and is not associated with long-term significant donor site pain. All patients undergoing discectomy and fusion during a three years period were consecutively extracted from computer database and retrospectively evaluated by means of telephonic interview, independently from surgical procedure (iliac crest autograph or prosthesis). Two procedure-blinded neurologists retrieved baseline clinical-demographic data and pre-surgical scores of routinely performed scales for pain and functional abilities. Afterwards, a third blinded neurologist performed clinical follow up by a semi-structured interview including Verbal Analog Scale for pain and Neck Disability Scale for discomfort. 80 patients out of 115 selected cases completed the follow up. 40 patients had been treated by mini-invasive bone graft harvesting and 40 with PEEK cages for cervical fusion. VAS for both neck and arm pain were significantly reduced within groups. Patients did not complaint any significant pain and/or paraesthesias at donor site from the first week after intervention. Neck Disability Scale was significantly lower at the end of follow up in both groups. "Miniinvasive" bicortical autografts is a less invasive, inexpensive technique to harvest iliac graft that may produce a reduced amount of general and local donor-site complications without outcome differences with prosthetic cages. Copyright © 2014 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Steven M; Miller, Larry E; Block, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF) system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4-S1) intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.

  1. Use of thoracic spine thrust manipulation for neck pain and headache in a patient following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Renata; Rowe, Robert H; Osborne, Raine; Beneciuk, Jason M

    2014-06-01

    Case report. Thoracic spine thrust manipulation has been shown to be an effective intervention for individuals experiencing mechanical neck pain. The patient was a 46-year-old woman referred to outpatient physical therapy 2 months following multiple-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. At initial evaluation, primary symptoms consisted of frequent headaches, neck pain, intermittent referred right elbow pain, and muscle fatigue localized to the right cervical and upper thoracic spine regions. Initial examination findings included decreased passive joint mobility of the thoracic spine, limited cervical range of motion, and limited right shoulder strength. Outcome measures consisted of the numeric pain rating scale, the Neck Disability Index, and the global rating of change scale. Treatment consisted of a combination of manual therapy techniques aimed at the thoracic spine, therapeutic exercises for the upper quarter, and patient education, including a home exercise program, over a 6-week episode of care. Immediate reductions in cervical-region pain (mean ± SD, 2.0 ± 1.1) and headache (2.0 ± 1.3) intensity were reported every treatment session immediately following thoracic spine thrust manipulation. At discharge, the patient reported 0/10 cervical pain and headache symptoms during all work-related activities. From initial assessment to discharge, Neck Disability Index scores improved from 46% to 16%, with an associated global rating of change scale score of +7 ("a very great deal better"). This case report describes the immediate and short-term clinical outcomes for a patient presenting with symptoms of neck pain and headache following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion surgical intervention. Clinical rationale and patient preference aided the decision to incorporate thoracic spine thrust manipulation as a treatment for this patient. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4.

  2. PARAMETRIC MODEL OF LUMBAR VERTEBRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAPPETTI Nicola

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present work proposes the realization of a parametric/variational CAD model of a normotype lumbar vertebra, which could be used for improving the effectiveness of actual imaging techniques in informational augmentation of the orthopaedic and traumatological diagnosis. In addition it could be used for ergonomic static and dynamical analysis of the lumbar region and vertebral column.

  3. Regional differences in lumbar spinal posture and the influence of low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnett Angus F

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal posture is commonly a focus in the assessment and clinical management of low back pain (LBP patients. However, the link between spinal posture and LBP is not fully understood. Recent evidence suggests that considering regional, rather than total lumbar spine posture is important. The purpose of this study was to determine; if there are regional differences in habitual lumbar spine posture and movement, and if these findings are influenced by LBP. Methods One hundred and seventy female undergraduate nursing students, with and without LBP, participated in this cross-sectional study. Lower lumbar (LLx, Upper lumbar (ULx and total lumbar (TLx spine angles were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system in static postures and across a range of functional tasks. Results Regional differences in lumbar posture and movement were found. Mean LLx posture did not correlate with ULx posture in sitting (r = 0.036, p = 0.638, but showed a moderate inverse correlation with ULx posture in usual standing (r = -0.505, p Conclusion This study supports the concept of regional differences within the lumbar spine during common postures and movements. Global lumbar spine kinematics do not reflect regional lumbar spine kinematics, which has implications for interpretation of measures of spinal posture, motion and loading. BMI influenced regional lumbar posture and movement, possibly representing adaptation due to load.

  4. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Clostridium difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Guzman, Javier Z; Silvestre, Jason; Al Maaieh, Motasem; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2014-09-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after lumbar spine surgery. C. difficile colitis is reportedly increasing in hospitalized patients and can have a negative impact on patient outcomes. No data exist on estimates of C. difficile infection rates and its consequences on patient outcomes and health care resources among patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was examined from 2002 to 2011. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery for degenerative diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined and multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. The incidence of C. difficile infection in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery is 0.11%. At baseline, patients infected with C. difficile were significantly older (65.4 yr vs. 58.9 yr, Pinfection. Small hospital size was associated with decreased odds (odds ratio [OR], 0.5; Pinfection. Uninsured (OR, 1.62; Pinfection. C. difficile increased hospital length of stay by 8 days (Pdifficile infection after lumbar spine surgery carries a 36.4-fold increase in mortality and costs approximately $10,658,646 per year to manage. These data suggest that great care should be taken to avoid C. difficile colitis in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery because it is associated with longer hospital stays, greater overall costs, and increased inpatient mortality. 3.

  6. Grading system for migrated lumbar disc herniation on sagittal magnetic resonance imaging. An agreement study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Y.; Jeong, T.S. [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, T.; Jeon, J.Y. [Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2018-01-15

    Migrated lumbar disc herniations (LDHs) in the sagittal plane are common. Disc migration grading can be applied as a useful measurement tool in the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome evaluation of migrated LDH. No study has evaluated the reliability of migrated LDH grading. We evaluated the reliability and functionality of the current magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading system for migrated LDH. We assessed a six-level grading system developed based on sagittal MRI and graded according to the direction (rostral and caudal) and degree (low, high, and very high) of disc migration. One-hundred and one migrated LDHs treated with minimally invasive endoscopic discectomy were analyzed independently by two experienced radiologists. Intraobserver and interobserver agreements were assessed by kappa statistics. The most common migrated LDH grade was grade 4 (30.94%; caudal, low-grade migration). Rostral and caudal migrations were more common in the upper and lower lumbar levels, respectively. Interobserver agreement in the grading of migrated LDH was good at both the first (kappa = 0.737) and second assessment (kappa = 0.657). The intraobserver agreement for reader 1 was very good (kappa = 0.827) and for reader 2 was good (kappa = 0.620). The current grading system for migrated LDH was found to be reliable and functional with good interobserver and intraobserver agreement. It may be useful in the interpretation of disc migration patterns and outcomes of various minimally invasive surgical procedures. (orig.)

  7. Therapeutic efficacy of hydro-kinesiotherapy Programs in lumbar spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria BOTEZAN

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spondylarthrosis is a degenerative disease that affects the joint structures of the lumbar spine. In the course of time, numerous studies on the role of hydro-kinesiotherapy in the treatment of lumbar spondylosis have been conducted. The aim of this research is motivated by the significantly high number of patients with chronic pain in the lumbar spine due to lumbar spondylosis, as well as by the negative impact on their quality of life through the impairment of the activities of daily living. The prospective longitudinal study was carried out at the Clinical Rehabilitation Hospital Cluj-Napoca. The study included 35 patients with chronic low back pain and mobility limitation in the lumbar spine. The patients were assigned to two groups: the study group formed by 20 patients and the control group consisting of 15 patients aged between 40-70 years. The treatment of the patients included in the study was performed over a two week period and consisted of a hydro-kinesiotherapy program, for the patients of the study group, the duration of a treatment session being 40 minutes. Both the subjects of the study group and of the control group also benefited from sedative massage of the lumbosacral spine, kinesiotherapy, laser therapy of the lumbar spine. The patients were evaluated using Schober’s test, the Visual Analogue Scale, the Oswestry index. These evaluation methods were applied to the patients of both groups at the beginning of the rehabilitation programs and after two weeks. The results of the study demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of the medical rehabilitation programs that included hydro-kinesiotherapy programs. The patients of both groups had improvements through a decrease of lumbar pain, an increase in lumbar spine mobility, as well as in the patients’ ability to organize themselves in the activities of daily living. However, the patients of the study group, with a hydro-kinesiotherapy program performed for two weeks, had

  8. Intraoperative use of epidural methylprednisolone or bupivacaine for postsurgical lumbar disectomy pain relief: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotfinia, I.; Khallaghi, E.; Meshkini, A.; Shakeri, M.; Shima, M.; Safaeian, A.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients with lumbar disc surgery experience postoperative back and radicular pain, delaying hospital discharge and resumption of normal activity. Some surgeons have used intraoperative epidural corticosteroids and local anesthetics to decrease pain following surgery for a herniated lumbar disc. Controversies still exist regarding the benefits of these drugs. The present study was meant to compare the effects of the intraoperative administration of epidural methylprednisolone and bupivacaine with that of normal saline (placebo) in lumbar disc surgery for postoperative pain control. One hundred fifty patients with single level herniated nucleus pulposus (L4-L5 or L5-S1), which was refractory to 6 weeks of conservative management, were divided randomly in three groups. A standard hemipartial lamimectomy and discectomy was performed on all patients. At the end of the surgery, before the closure of fascia, 40 mg methylprednisoslone with 3 mL normal saline for group1, 2 mL bupivacaine 5% with 2mL normal saline for group 2 and 4 mL normal saline for group 3 were stilled on to the epidural and exposed nerve root. Postoperative back and radicular pain intensity was assessed by a visual analogue scale (VAS) before and at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after surgery. There was no significant difference in back and radicular pain intensity between the three groups. Introperative administration of epidural methylprednisolone or bupivacaine does not relieve postoperative back and radicular pain. (author)

  9. Conservative treatment for pediatric lumbar spondylolysis to achieve bone healing using a hard brace: what type and how long?: Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairyo, Koichi; Sakai, Toshinori; Yasui, Natsuo; Dezawa, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Various kinds of trunk braces have been used to achieve bone healing in cases of pediatric lumbar spondylolysis. However, the optimal brace for achieving bone healing is unclear. The purpose of the present study was to determine in what types of spondylolysis bone healing can be achieved and how long it takes. In this prospective study, 63 pars interarticularis defects (spondylolysis) among 37 patients who were younger than 18 years (mean 13.5 ± 2.7 years) were treated using a hard brace. The youngest patient was 8 years old. Based on the results of CT scanning, the lyses were classified into 3 categories: early, progressive, and terminal defects. Progressive defects were further divided into 2 types according to STIR MRI findings: those with high signal intensity at the adjacent pedicle and those with low signal intensity (that is, a normal appearance). A hard brace, such as a molded plastic thoracolumbosacral orthosis, was used to immobilize the trunk. Approximately every 3 months, CT scanning was performed to evaluate bone healing until approximately 6 months. The union rates were 94%, 64%, 27%, and 0% for the early, progressive with high signal intensity, progressive with low signal intensity, and terminal defects, respectively. It was noted that no terminal defect was healed using conservative treatment. The mean time to healing among the defects that showed bone healing was 3.2, 5.4, and 5.7 months for the early, progressive with high signal intensity, and progressive with low signal intensity groups, respectively. Patients with early-stage defects are the best candidates for conservative treatment with a hard brace because more than 90% of such cases can be healed in 3 months.

  10. Side effects after diagnostic lumbar puncture and lumbar iohexol myelography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, T.; Stovner, L.J.; Salvesen, R.; Dale, L.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study was performed to compare side effect incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography (n=97) and diagnostic lumbar puncture (n=85). No significant side effect incidence differences (iohexol vs. controls) were found regarding number of patients with any side effect (63 vs. 73%), headache (44 vs. 54%), nausea, dizziness, visual, auditory, or psychic symptoms. Early-onset headache occurred significantly more often in the iohexol group (16 vs 5%), while postural headache occurred most frequently after lumbar puncture (25 vs. 41%). These results suggest that apart from the slight early-onset headache, most side effets after lumbar iohexol myelography are related to the puncture per se, not to the contrast agent. (orig.)

  11. Herniated lumbar intervertebral disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochhauser, L.; Cacayorin, E.D.; Karcnik, T.J.; McGowan, D.P.; Clark, K.G.; Storrs, D.; Kieffer, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    From a series of 25 patients with low-back pain and sciatica who subsequently underwent surgical exploration, 24 lumbar herniated disks and one asymmetrically bulging disk were correctly diagnosed with use of a 0.5-T MR imaging unit. The radiologic findings on saggital images included a polypoid protrusion beyond the posterior margin of the vertebral bodies more clearly displayed with T1-weighted than with T-2 weighted sequences and a focal extension into the extradural space on axial views. In most, the signal intensity of HNP was isointense to the disk of origin. The study suggests that MR imaging is currently capable of accurately predicting an HNP. The diagnosis is based primarily on morphologic characteristics rather than signal intensity alterations

  12. Lumbar myelography with iohexol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestvold, K.; Sortland, O.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1983 iohexol has been routinely used for myelography in our hospital and 1 650 myelographies have been performed. The first 331 patients with lumbar myelography were included in a follow-up study. Headache was observed in 26 per cent, nausea in 12 per cent and vertigo in 6 per cent of the patients, a frequency very similar to that observed in an earlier study of side effects following spinal puncture. Severe reactions were not seen. Three patients had radicular symptoms and 3 patients had minor mental symptoms possibly caused by the contrast medium. It is concluded that most side effects are related to the spinal puncture and that iohexol probably can be used with safety in out-patients. (orig.)

  13. [Lumbar stabilization exercises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Ríos, Jorge Rodrigo; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés

    2014-01-01

    Exercise is the intervention with the highest level of evidence on efficacy for treatment of chronic low back pain, with a higher benefit in terms of pain and function compared to any other intervention. A wide variety of exercises programs have been designed; however, "lumbar stabilization exercises" have become increasingly popular among clinicians who are in contact with spine diseases. However, there is controversy regarding the adequate prescription and there are multiple protocols. The aim of this literature review is to analyze the information about these exercises to promote better decision-making among clinicians and design the best program for each patient. We found the program an essential tool in the treatment of low back pain in both therapeutic and preventive phases.

  14. Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Unilateral Fixation for Degenerative Lumbar Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Wang; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Wu, Zhan-Yong; Wu, Hua-Rong; Wu, Chun-Fu; Zhang, Lian-Suo; Xu, Wei-Kun; Fan, Hui-Long; Cai, Jin-Sheng; Ma, Jian-Qing

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of the minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation using a tubular retractor in the management of degenerative lumbar disease. A retrospective analysis was conducted to analyze the clinical outcome of 58 degenerative lumbar disease patients who were treated with minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral fusion and unilateral fixation during December 2012 to January 2015. The spine was unilaterally approached through a 3.0-cm skin incision centered on the disc space, located 2.5 cm lateral to the midline, and the multifidus muscles and longissimus dorsi were stripped off. After transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion and posterolateral fusion the unilateral pedicle screw fixation was performed. The visual analogue scale (VAS) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the MacNab score were applied to evaluate clinical effects. The operation time, peri-operative bleeding, postoperative time in bed, hospitalization costs, and the change in the intervertebral height were analyzed. Radiological fusion based on the Bridwell grading system was also assessed at the last follow-up. The quality of life of the patients before and after the operation was assessed using the short form-36 scale (SF-36). Fifty-eight operations were successfully performed, and no nerve root injury or dural tear occurred. The average operation time was 138 ± 33 min, intraoperative blood loss was 126 ± 50 mL, the duration from surgery to getting out of bed was 46 ± 8 h, and hospitalization cost was 1.6 ± 0.2 ten thousand yuan. All of the 58 patients were followed up for 7-31 months, with an average of 14.6 months. The postoperative VAS scores and ODI score were significantly improved compared with preoperative data (P degenerative lumbar disease, and the short-term clinical outcome is satisfactory

  15. LUMBAR CORSETS CAN DECREASE LUMBAR MOTION IN GOLF SWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Swinging a golf club includes the rotation and extension of the lumbar spine. Golf-related low back pain has been associated with degeneration of the lumbar facet and intervertebral discs, and with spondylolysis. Reflective markers were placed directly onto the skin of 11young male amateur golfers without a previous history of back pain. Using a VICON system (Oxford Metrics, U.K., full golf swings were monitored without a corset (WOC, with a soft corset (SC, and with a hard corset (HC, with each subject taking 3 swings. Changes in the angle between the pelvis and the thorax (maximum range of motion and angular velocity in 3 dimensions (lumbar rotation, flexion-extension, and lateral tilt were analyzed, as was rotation of the hip joint. Peak changes in lumbar extension and rotation occurred just after impact with the ball. The extension angle of the lumbar spine at finish was significantly lower under SC (38° or HC (28° than under WOC (44° conditions (p < 0.05. The maximum angular velocity after impact was significantly smaller under HC (94°/sec than under SC (177°/sec and WOC (191° /sec conditions, as were the lumbar rotation angles at top and finish. In contrast, right hip rotation angles at top showed a compensatory increase under HC conditions. Wearing a lumbar corset while swinging a golf club can effectively decrease lumbar extension and rotation angles from impact until the end of the swing. These effects were significantly enhanced while wearing an HC

  16. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Antonio; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  17. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Cerase, Alfonso

    2011-01-01

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  18. Lumbar spondylolysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Antonio; Magarelli, Nicola; Bonomo, Lorenzo [Dept. of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic Univ., Rome (Italy); Cianfoni, Alessandro [Dept. of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston (United States); Cerase, Alfonso [General Hospital, Unit Neuroimaging and Neurointervention (NINT), Department of Neurosciences, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Spondylolysis is an osseous defect of the pars interarticularis, thought to be a developmental or acquired stress fracture secondary to chronic low-grade trauma. It is encountered most frequently in adolescents, most commonly involving the lower lumbar spine, with particularly high prevalence among athletes involved in certain sports or activities. Spondylolysis can be asymptomatic or can be a cause of spine instability, back pain, and radiculopathy. The biomechanics and pathophysiology of spondylolysis are complex and debated. Imaging is utilized to detect spondylolysis, distinguish acute and active lesions from chronic inactive non-union, help establish prognosis, guide treatment, and to assess bony healing. Radiography with satisfactory technical quality can often demonstrate a pars defect. Multislice CT with multiplanar reformats is the most accurate modality for detecting the bony defect and may also be used for assessment of osseous healing; however, as with radiographs, it is not sensitive for detection of the early edematous stress response without a fracture line and exposes the patient to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging should be used as the primary investigation for adolescents with back pain and suspected stress reactions of the lumbar pars interarticularis. Several imaging pitfalls render MR imaging less sensitive than CT for directly visualizing the pars defects (regional degenerative changes and sclerosis). Nevertheless, the presence of bone marrow edema on fluid-sensitive images is an important early finding that may suggest stress response without a visible fracture line. Moreover, MR is the imaging modality of choice for identifying associated nerve root compression. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) use is limited by a high rate of false-positive and false-negative results and by considerable ionizing radiation exposure. In this article, we provide a review of the current concepts regarding spondylolysis, its

  19. Bias in the physical examination of patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jeffrey N

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No prior studies have examined systematic bias in the musculoskeletal physical examination. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI on perceived diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. Methods This was a cross-sectional comparison of the performance characteristics of the physical examination with blinding to MRI results (the 'independent group' with performance in the situation where the physical examination was not blinded to MRI results (the 'non-independent group'. The reference standard was the final diagnostic impression of nerve root impingement by the examining physician. Subjects were recruited from a hospital-based outpatient specialty spine clinic. All adults age 18 and older presenting with lower extremity radiating pain of duration ≤ 12 weeks were evaluated for participation. 154 consecutively recruited subjects with lumbar disk herniation confirmed by lumbar spine MRI were included in this study. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in the independent and non-independent groups for the four components of the radiculopathy examination: 1 provocative testing, 2 motor strength testing, 3 pinprick sensory testing, and 4 deep tendon reflex testing. Results The perceived sensitivity of sensory testing was higher with prior knowledge of MRI results (20% vs. 36%; p = 0.05. Sensitivities and specificities for exam components otherwise showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results may introduce bias into the pinprick sensory testing component of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. No statistically significant effect of bias was seen for other components of the physical examination. The effect of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results should be considered

  20. Bias in the physical examination of patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background No prior studies have examined systematic bias in the musculoskeletal physical examination. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging findings (MRI) on perceived diagnostic accuracy of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. Methods This was a cross-sectional comparison of the performance characteristics of the physical examination with blinding to MRI results (the 'independent group') with performance in the situation where the physical examination was not blinded to MRI results (the 'non-independent group'). The reference standard was the final diagnostic impression of nerve root impingement by the examining physician. Subjects were recruited from a hospital-based outpatient specialty spine clinic. All adults age 18 and older presenting with lower extremity radiating pain of duration ≤ 12 weeks were evaluated for participation. 154 consecutively recruited subjects with lumbar disk herniation confirmed by lumbar spine MRI were included in this study. Sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals were calculated in the independent and non-independent groups for the four components of the radiculopathy examination: 1) provocative testing, 2) motor strength testing, 3) pinprick sensory testing, and 4) deep tendon reflex testing. Results The perceived sensitivity of sensory testing was higher with prior knowledge of MRI results (20% vs. 36%; p = 0.05). Sensitivities and specificities for exam components otherwise showed no statistically significant differences between groups. Conclusions Prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results may introduce bias into the pinprick sensory testing component of the physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy. No statistically significant effect of bias was seen for other components of the physical examination. The effect of bias due to prior knowledge of lumbar MRI results should be considered when an isolated

  1. Multi-channel motor evoked potential monitoring during anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gun Kim

    Full Text Available Objectives: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF surgery is the most common surgical procedure for the cervical spine with low complication rate. Despite the potential prognostic benefit, intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM, a method for detecting impending neurological compromise, is not routinely used in ACDF surgery. The present study aimed to identify the potential benefits of monitoring multi-channel motor evoked potentials (MEPs during ACDF surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 200 consecutive patients who received IONM with multi-channel MEPs and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs. On average, 9.2 muscles per patient were evaluated under MEP monitoring. Results: The rate of MEP change during surgery in the multi-level ACDF group was significantly higher than the single-level group. Two patients from the single-level ACDF group (1.7% and four patients from the multi-level ACDF group (4.9% experienced post-operative motor deficits. Multi-channel MEPs monitoring during single and multi-level ACDF surgery demonstrated higher sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive value than SSEP monitoring. Conclusions: Multi-channel MEP monitoring might be beneficial for the detection of segmental injury as well as long tract injury during single- and multi-level ACDF surgery. Significance: This is first large scale study to identify the usefulness of multi-channel MEPs in monitoring ACDF surgery. Keywords: Disc disease, Somatosensory evoked potentials, Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring, Motor evoked potentials, Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

  2. Randomised sham-controlled double-blind multicentre clinical trial to ascertain the effect of percutaneous radiofrequency treatment for lumbar facet joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilburg, C W J; Stronks, D L; Groeneweg, J G; Huygen, F J P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of a percutaneous radiofrequency heat lesion at the medial branch of the primary dorsal ramus with a sham procedure, for the treatment of lumbar facet joint pain. A randomised sham-controlled double blind multicentre trial was carried out at the multidisciplinary pain centres of two hospitals. A total of 60 patients aged > 18 years with a history and physical examination suggestive of facet joint pain and a decrease of ≥ 2 on a numerical rating scale (NRS 0 to 10) after a diagnostic facet joint test block were included. In the treatment group, a percutaneous radiofrequency heat lesion (80 o C during 60 seconds per level) was applied to the medial branch of the primary dorsal ramus. In the sham group, the same procedure was undertaken without for the radiofrequency lesion. Both groups also received a graded activity physiotherapy programme. The primary outcome measure was decrease in pain. A secondary outcome measure was the Global Perceived Effect scale (GPE). There was a statistically significant effect on the level of pain in the factor Period (T0-T1). However, there was no statistically significant difference with the passage of time between the groups (Group × Period) or in the factor Group. In the crossover group, 11 of 19 patients had a decrease in NRS of ≥ 2 at one month crossover (p = 0.65). There was no statistically significant difference in satisfaction with the passage of time between the groups (Group × Period). The independent factors Group and Period also showed no statistically significant difference. There was no statistically significant Group × Period effect for recovery, neither an effect of Group or of Period. The null hypothesis of no difference in the decrease in pain and in GPE between the treatment and sham groups cannot be rejected. Post hoc analysis revealed that the age of the patients and the severity of the initial pain significantly predicted a positive outcome. Cite this article

  3. Reproduction of the lumbar lordosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Marianne Løgtholt; Langhoff, Lotte; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigates whether it is possible to reproduce the lumbar lordosis in the upright position during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by positioning the patient supine with straightened lower extremities and investigates intra- and interexaminer reliability of measurements...... of the lumbar lordosis on radiographs and MRI. METHODS: This was an observational study, which included an intra- and interexaminer reliability study. The lumbar lordosis was measured digitally on radiographs taken from 22 patients in an upright standing position, and 22 MRI scans of the same patients lying...... supine with straightened lower extremities. These measurements were compared statistically. Intra- and interexaminer reliability was calculated applying the Bland and Altman method. RESULTS: The lumbar lordosis in the standing position was reproduced in the straightened supine position with a median...

  4. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion--systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Thayaparan, Ganesha K; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the clinical and radiographic outcomes and complications of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) versus transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). A systematic literature search was conducted from six electronic databases. The relative risk and weighted mean difference (WMD) were used as statistical summary effect sizes. Fusion rates (88.6% vs. 91.9%, P = 0.23) and clinical outcomes were comparable between ALIF and TLIF. ALIF was associated with restoration of disk height (WMD, 2.71 mm, P = 0.01), segmental lordosis (WMD, 2.35, P = 0.03), and whole lumbar lordosis (WMD, 6.33, P = 0.03). ALIF was also associated with longer hospitalization (WMD, 1.8 days, P = 0.01), lower dural injury (0.4% vs. 3.8%, P = 0.05) but higher blood vessel injury (2.6% vs. 0%, P = 0.04). ALIF and TLIF appear to have similar success and clinical outcomes, with different complication profiles. ALIF may be associated with superior restoration of disk height and lordosis, but requires further validation in future studies.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus, a New Risk Factor for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Case–Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Asadian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus in patients with spinal stenosis and lumbar vertebral disk degeneration, and the correlation of diabetes with these diseases. Study Design This is a cross-sectional study. Methods This case–control study was performed during 2012–2014 with 110 patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis and 110 patients with lumbar disk herniation, who were diagnosed using clinical and radiological evidences. Additionally, 110 participants who were referred to the clinic and did not show clinical signs of degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine entered the study as a control group. Demographic data and medical histories of the patients were collected using checklists. Results A total of 50 patients (15.2% were diagnosed with diabetes, which comprised 32 (29.1% in the stenosis group, 7 (6.4% in the lumbar disk herniation group, and 11 (10% in the control group. The prevalence of diabetes in women with spinal stenosis and women with lumbar disk herniation was 35.9% and 10.3%, respectively, whereas prevalence of diabetes in women was 10.9% in the control group. This difference was statistically significant in the spinal stenosis group in comparison with the controls ( P < 0.0001. Conversely, no significant difference was found in men. Conclusions There is an association between diabetes and lumbar spinal stenosis. Diabetes mellitus may be a predisposing factor for the development of lumbar spinal stenosis.

  6. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Schneider, Wilke [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  7. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.; Schneider, Wilke

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  8. Outcomes After Lumbar Disc Herniation in the National Basketball Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minhas, Shobhit V; Kester, Benjamin S; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-01-01

    Professional basketball players are at risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), yet the evidence guiding treatment after operative or nonoperative management of this condition in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is limited. NBA players with LDH will have different performance outcomes based on treatment type. Case-control study. Level 4. Athletes in the NBA with an LDH were identified through team injury reports, transaction records, and public sports archives. A 1:2 case-control study was performed in which LDH players and players without LDH were matched for player variables. Statistical analysis was employed to compare pre- and postindex season performance (games played and player efficiency rating [PER]) and career longevity between test subjects and controls in the operatively treated (OT) and nonoperatively treated (NOT) cohorts. A total of 61 NBA players with LDH were included, of whom 34 underwent discectomy and 27 were managed nonoperatively. Return-to-play (RTP) rates did not differ between NOT and OT players (77.8% vs. 79.4%). When compared with controls, OT players played significantly fewer games and had a lower PER than controls during the first postoperative season, but no difference was seen 2 and 3 years after surgery, with no difference in postoperative career length. In contrast, no difference in games played or PER was seen between NOT players and controls, although NOT players played significantly fewer postindex seasons. NBA players have a high RTP rate regardless of type of treatment for LDH; however, postindex performance differs between surgically and nonoperatively managed patients when compared with players without an LDH. However, further studies with a larger sample size are required for more definitive recommendations. There is a high RTP rate after LDH in the NBA, although postindex performance may differ based on operative versus nonoperative treatment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. Biomechanical study of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuan; Huang Xianglong; Shen Tianzhen; Hu Zhou; Hong Shuizong; Mei Haiying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stiffness of lumbar spine after the injury caused by percutaneous diskectomy and evaluate the efficiency of percutaneous lumbar diskectomy by biomechanical study. Methods: Four fresh lumbar specimens were used to analyse load-displacement curves in the intact lumbar spine and vertical disc-injured lumbar spine. The concepts of average flexibility coefficient (f) and standardized average flexibility coefficient (fs) were also introduced. Results: The load-displacement curves showed a good stabilization effect of the intact lumbar spine and disc-injured lumbar spine in flexion, extension, right and left bending. The decrease of anti-rotation also can be detected (P<0.05). Conclusion: In biomechanical study, percutaneous lumbar diskectomy is one of the efficiency methods to treat lumbar diac hernia

  10. MRI of the lumbar spine. Technical aspect. T2-weighted fat saturation coronal dynamic MRI of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarisse, J.; Francke, J.P.; Leclet, H.; Bourgeois, Ph.; Chastanet, P.; Cotten, A.

    1998-01-01

    Assess the feasibility of 'dynamic' MRI of the lumbar spine and study the parameters of a single MRI sequence favorable for simultaneous imaging of the meningeal space and the epidural and foraminal venous system. Favor a decline in the number of sacco-radiculograms. Clinical assessment in the following circumstances: discordant clinical and and radiographic findings, difficulty in interpreting single or multiple disc-root conflicts, preoperative work-up in cases of narrow or stenotic lumbar canal. Dynamic MRI of the lumbar spine is possible if the hypothesis that the hyper-lordosis obtained in the supine position creates an anatomic and radiographic situation identical to the hyper-lordosis induced by the upright position is accepted. The 'radiculo-phlebographic' sequence gives images of the root sheaths and the epidural, foraminal and extra-foraminal veins simultaneously, particularly in the coronal plane. (authors)

  11. Does the duration of symptoms influence outcome in patients with sciatica undergoing micro-discectomy and decompressions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsika, Marina; Thomas, Eleanor; Shaheen, Sabeena; Sharma, Himanshu

    2016-04-01

    Early surgical treatment for back and leg pain secondary to disc herniation has been associated with very good outcomes. However, there are conflicting data on the role of surgical treatment in case of prolonged radicular symptomatology. We aimed to evaluate whether the duration of symptoms at presentation affects the subjective outcome. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a single surgeon including micro-discectomies and lateral recess decompressions in patients younger than 60 years old using patient medical notes, radiology imaging, operation notes, and Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS) including Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale for back pain and leg pain (VAS-BP and VAS-LP). The final follow-up was carried out through postal questionnaire or telephone consultation. Demographic information, duration of symptoms, type and incidence of complications, length of hospital stay, and follow-up were analyzed. Data were categorized into four subgroups: symptoms 0≥6 months, 6 months≥1 year, 1 year≥2 years, and >2 years. A clinically significant result was an average improvement of 2 or more points in the VAS and of 20% and over in the ODI. The level of statistical significance was 2 years (VAS-LP 4.77±3.61, VAS-BP 3.54±3.43, ODI 28.36±20.93). The length of hospital stay and complication rate was comparable between groups. Average follow-up was 15.69 months. Our study showed significant improvement in patients with symptoms beyond 1 as well as 2 years since onset, and surgery is a viable option in selected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the management of axial neck pain in the absence of radiculopathy or myelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riew, K Daniel; Ecker, Erika; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2010-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review Study rationale: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a proven, effective treatment for relieving neck pain due to degenerative conditions of the cervical spine. Since most patients also present with radiculopathy or myelopathy, little is known as to the effectiveness of ACDF to relieve pain and improve function in patients without radicular or myelopathic symptoms. Objective: To examine the clinical outcome in patients undergoing (ACDF) for axial neck pain without radicular or myelopathic symptoms. Methods: A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to March 2010. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies evaluating ACDF for the treatment of axial neck pain only. Radiculopathy and myelopathy, patients who suffered severe trauma, or with tumor/metastatic disease or infection were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the grading of recommendations assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: No comparative studies were identified. Three case series met our inclusion criteria and were evaluated. All studies showed a mean improvement of pain of at least 50% approximately 4-years following surgery. Functional outcomes improved between 32% and 52% from baseline. Most patients reported satisfaction with surgery, 56% in one study and 79% in another. Complications varied among studies ranging from 1% to 10% and included pseudoarthrosis (9%), nonunion and revision (3%) and screw removal (1%). Conclusion: There is low evidence suggesting that patients with axial neck pain without radicular or myelopathic symptoms may receive some improvement in pain and function following ACDF. However, whether this benefit is greater than nontreatment or other treatments cannot be determined with the present literature. PMID:22956927

  13. Effect of aging and lumbar spondylosis on lumbar lordosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Osita Okpala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lumbar lordosis (LL, the anterior convexity of the lumbar spine in the mid-sagittal plane, gives the spine some resilience and helps in protecting it from compressive forces because some of the force is taken by the anterior longitudinal ligaments. In aging and lumbar spondylosis, the intervertebral discs undergo the same degenerative changes though at different rates, and in both, while some authors reported a straightening of LL, others reported no significant change. This morphologic information would hopefully influence therapeutic decision-making, particularly in lumbar spondylosis, which though usually asymptomatic, is a common cause of low back pain. Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of aging and lumbar spondylosis on LL. Subjects and Methods: Lumbosacral joint angle (LSJA, an angular measure of LL, was retrospectively measured in 252 normal and 329 spondylotic adolescent and adult supine lateral lumbosacral spine archival radiographs, and data were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics 23.0 (New York, USA. Results: Normal LSJA range was 5°–39°; the mean was 18.7° and showed insignificant variation with gender and aging. Spondylotic range was 5°–40° and the mean (20.8° differed from the normal mean by about 2°, which probably have inconsequential effect on the lumbar curvature, suggesting that the normal and spondylotic mean values are essentially equal. The spondylotic mean also showed insignificant variation with aging and inconsequential 1° gender difference in favor of females. Conclusion: LL is substantially maintained in aging and lumbar spondylosis.

  14. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Right Lumbar Artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyayama, Shiro; Yamashiro, Masashi; Okuda, Miho; Yoshie, Yuichi; Sugimori, Natsuki; Igarashi, Saya; Nakashima, Yoshiko; Matsui, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical features of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) supplied by the right lumbar artery. Eleven patients with HCC supplied by the right lumbar artery were treated with chemoembolization. The patients' medical records were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent 6.7 ± 3.7 (mean ± SD) chemoembolization sessions, and the hepatic arterial branches were noted as being attenuated. The right inferior phrenic artery (IPA) was also embolized in 10 patients. The interval between initial chemoembolization and chemoembolization of the lumbar artery supply was 53.2 ± 26.9 months. Mean tumor diameter was 3.1 ± 2.4 cm and was located at the surface of S7 and S6. The feeding-branch arose proximal to the bifurcation of the dorsal ramus and muscular branches (n = 8) or from the muscular branches (n = 3) of the right first (n = 10) or second lumbar artery (n = 1). The anterior spinal artery originated from the tumor-feeding lumbar artery in one patient. All feeders were selected, and embolization was performed after injection of iodized oil and anticancer drugs (n = 10) or gelatin sponge alone in a patient with anterior spinal artery branching (n = 1). Eight patients died from tumor progression 10.1 ± 4.6 months later, and two patients survived 2 and 26 months, respectively. The remaining patient died of bone metastases after 32 months despite liver transplantation 10 months after chemoembolization. The right lumbar artery supplies HCC located in the bare area of the liver, especially in patients who undergo repeated chemoembolization, including chemoembolization by way of the right IPA. Chemoembolization by way of the right lumbar artery may be safe when the feeder is well selected.

  15. Clinical Analysis of Lumbar Cistern External Drainage for Intracranial Infection%腰池置管脑脊液外引流治疗颅内感染临床分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦涛; 周仲明

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨腰池置管脑脊液外引流治疗颅内感染的临床效果。方法选取2010年1月~2013年12月25例颅内感染患者作为研究对象,所有患者均接受腰池置管脑脊液外引流治疗。结果治疗后患者的体温(36.78±1.03)℃、白细胞计数(9.26±2.17)×109/L、脑脊液有核细胞计数(31.59±10.83)×106/L、微量蛋白浓度(0.96±0.71)g/L,相比于治疗前(38.56±1.27)℃、(12.89±2.84)×109/L、(148.27±74.67)×106/L、(2.85±1.34)g/L均降低(P<0.05),脑脊液葡萄糖浓度(3.39±1.25)mmol/L、氯化物浓度(123.72±8.46)mmol/L相比于治疗前(2.23±1.04)mmol/L、(114.56±7.95)mmol/L均明显增高(P<0.05)。结论对颅内感染患者采取腰池置管脑脊液外引流治疗,可有效缓解颅内感染症状,改善脑脊液情况。%Objective To investigate the clinical effect of lumbar cistern external drainage on intracranial infection. Methods Selected 25 patients with intracranial infection from January 2010 to December 2013 as the research object, all patients were treated with external drainage of cerebrospinal lfuid through lumbar cistern catheter placement in patients. ResultsThe body temperature of patients after treatment (36.78±1.03) ℃, white blood cell count (9.26±2.17)×109/L, cerebrospinal lfuid nucleated cell count (31.59±10.83)×106/L, trace protein concentration (0.96±0.71) g/L, compared with before treatment (38.56±1.27)℃, (12.89 + 2.84)×109/L and (148.27±74.67)×106/L, (2.85±1.34)g/L decreased (P<0.05), cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration (3.39±1.25) mmol/L, chloride concentration (123.72±8.46) mmol/L compared with before treatment (2.23±1.04) mmol/L (114.56±7.95) mmol/L were signiifcantly increased (P<0.05). Conclusion The treatment of intracranial infection with lumbar cistern external drainage can effectively relieve intracranial infection symptoms and improve cerebrospinal lfuid.

  16. Morphometric and Histological Study of Osteophytes in Human Cadaveric Lumbar Vertebrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Aithal Padur

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteophytes are bony outgrowth on the vertebral column. Its prevalence in the lumbar region and clinical importance mandates to conduct a detailed study of lumbar osteophytes in the cadaveric vertebral column. Aim: The present study was conducted to study the detailed features of lumbar osteophytes and document its prevalence, morphometric and histological structure. Materials and Methods: This was an observational study in which frequency of occurrence of lumbar osteophytes was studied in 40 cadaveric vertebral columns over a period of four years. The lumbar part of the vertebral columns was dissected and examined meticulously. The occurrence of lumbar osteophytes with their vertebral levels and morphometric measurements were recorded. A small excision of the osteophyte was processed histologically to study its microscopic details using routine Haematoxylin & Eosin stain. Results: Lumbar osteophytes were present in 4 specimens (10%. They were mostly found on the right side of the vertebral bodies. Histopathological examination of the osteophytes revealed degenerative osteophytic cartilage and fibrillation overlying the trabecular bone enclosing fatty marrow spaces containing haematopoietic elements. Conclusion: Lumbar osteophytes were found in 10% of the specimens studied and it is assumed that these cadaveric reports deserve further attention given their potential clinical implications. Knowledge regarding occurrence and incidence of osteophytes is essential for management of common degenerative changes of the vertebral column.

  17. Cumulative occupational lumbar load and lumbar disc disease – results of a German multi-center case-control study (EPILIFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaelis Martina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The to date evidence for a dose-response relationship between physical workload and the development of lumbar disc diseases is limited. We therefore investigated the possible etiologic relevance of cumulative occupational lumbar load to lumbar disc diseases in a multi-center case-control study. Methods In four study regions in Germany (Frankfurt/Main, Freiburg, Halle/Saale, Regensburg, patients seeking medical care for pain associated with clinically and radiologically verified lumbar disc herniation (286 males, 278 females or symptomatic lumbar disc narrowing (145 males, 206 females were prospectively recruited. Population control subjects (453 males and 448 females were drawn from the regional population registers. Cases and control subjects were between 25 and 70 years of age. In a structured personal interview, a complete occupational history was elicited to identify subjects with certain minimum workloads. On the basis of job task-specific supplementary surveys performed by technical experts, the situational lumbar load represented by the compressive force at the lumbosacral disc was determined via biomechanical model calculations for any working situation with object handling and load-intensive postures during the total working life. For this analysis, all manual handling of objects of about 5 kilograms or more and postures with trunk inclination of 20 degrees or more are included in the calculation of cumulative lumbar load. Confounder selection was based on biologic plausibility and on the change-in-estimate criterion. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated separately for men and women using unconditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for age, region, and unemployment as major life event (in males or psychosocial strain at work (in females, respectively. To further elucidate the contribution of past physical workload to the development of lumbar disc diseases, we performed lag

  18. Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome with congenital lumbar hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lucky; Mala, Tariq Ahmed; Gupta, Rahul; Malla, Shahid Amin

    2014-01-01

    Lumbo-costo-vertebral syndrome (LCVS) is a set of rare abnormalities involving vertebral bodies, ribs, and abdominal wall. We present a case of LCVS in a 2-year-old girl who had a progressive swelling over left lumbar area noted for the last 12 months. Clinical examination revealed a reducible swelling with positive cough impulse. Ultrasonography showed a defect containing bowel loops in the left lumbar region. Chest x-ray showed scoliosis and hemivertebrae with absent lower ribs on left side. Meshplasty was done.

  19. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery

  20. Mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangviriyapaiboon, Teera

    2008-09-01

    To demonstrate the surgical technique and advantages of the mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation. Clinical and radiographic results were assessed to determine the clinical outcomes in twelve consecutive patients selected for minimally invasive access (mini-open technique) for TLIF in Prasat Neurological Institute. A retrospective analysis was performed on 12 patients (age range, 38-74 yr; mean, 54. 8 yr) who underwent mini-open transforaminal approach for lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) combined with transpedicular screw fixation between September 2006 and June 2008. The titanium pedicle screws were introduced bilaterally through the 3.5 cm length, skin incisions with Spine Classics MLD- system retractor, autologous bone graft were inserted to perform TLIF in all patients. Eight patients were augmented anterior column support with titanium interbody cage, unilateral cage insertion in four patients and the others were inserted bilaterally interbody cages. Six patients presented with low back pain and associated radiculopathy, and six presented with low back pain only. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L3-L4 in two patients, L4-L5 in four patients, L5-S1 in five patients, and two levels fusion in one patient. All patients were able to ambulate after spinal fusion. The patients were able to walk within 1.4 days (range 1-2 days). The hospital stay averaged 4.4 days (range 3-7 days). Periodic follow-up took place 1 to 21 months after surgery (mean, 7.4 months). The radiological fusion was archived in all nine patients who were operated on more than two months age. The other three patients who had been follow-up less than two months were probably fusion on the 1-month followed-up radiological examination. The use of mini-open technique for pedicle screw instrumentation with spinal fusion procedure provides excellent clinical results and may be an operation of choice for

  1. Cobb Angle Changes in Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The annual incidence of spinal column fracture is 350 per million populations. with Motor vehicular accident being the major single cause of spine injuries. The victims are predominantly young and male. The aim of this study to evaluate the clinical outcome of conservative treatment of closed thoracic and lumbar spine ...

  2. Coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients undergoing TKA: how common and how serious?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chong Bum; Park, Kun Woo; Kang, Yeon Gwi; Kim, Tae Kyun

    2014-02-01

    Information on the coexistence of lumbar spondylosis and its influence on overall levels of pain and function in patients with advanced knee osteoarthritis (OA) undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) would be valuable for patient consultation and management. The purposes of this study were to document the prevalence and severity of coexisting lumbar spondylosis in patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA and to determine whether the coexisting lumbar spondylosis at the time of TKA adversely affects clinical scores in affected patients before and 2 years after TKA. Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms including lower back pain, radiating pain at rest, and radiating pain with activity were assessed in 225 patients undergoing TKA. In addition, the WOMAC score and the SF-36 scores were evaluated before and 2 years after TKA. Potential associations of radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptom severities with pre- and postoperative WOMAC subscales and SF-36 scores were examined. All 225 patients had radiographic degeneration of the lumbar spine, and the large majority (89% [200 of 225]) had either moderate or severe spondylosis (72% and 17%, respectively). A total of 114 patients (51%) had at least one moderate or severe lumbar spine symptom. No association was found between radiographic severity of lumbar spine degeneration and pre- and postoperative clinical scores. In terms of lumbar spine symptoms, more severe symptoms were likely to adversely affect the preoperative WOMAC and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores, but most of these adverse effects improved by 2 years after TKA with the exception of the association between severe radiating pain during activity and a poorer postoperative SF-36 PCS score (regression coefficient = -5.41, p = 0.015). Radiographic lumbar spine degeneration and lumbar spine symptoms are common among patients with advanced knee OA undergoing TKA. Severe lumbar spine symptoms

  3. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and lumbar sinus: An uncommon complication of posterior lumbar spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Tripathy, Pradipta; Das, Pulin Bihari; Mohapatra, Debahuti

    2017-01-01

    A 42-year-old female presented with the complaint of purulent discharging sinus over posterior lumbar area following one month of lumbar spinal surgery for prolapsed intervertebral disc. Gossypiboma complicated with paraspinal abscess and sinus track formation over posterior lumbar area was diagnosed in magnetic resonance imaging which was confirmed in re- exploration of lumbar spinal operative site.

  4. Retroperitoneal hemorrhage from an unrecognized puncture of the lumbar right segmental artery during lumbar chemical sympathectomy: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Ho-Jin; Choi, Yun-Mi; Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sun-Jae; Yoon, Seok-Hyun; Kim, Kyung-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Lumbar chemical sympathectomy has been performed using fluoroscopic guidance for needle positioning. An 84 year old woman with atherosclerosis obliterans was referred to the pain clinic for intractable cold allodynia of her right foot. A thermogram showed decreased temperature of both feet compared with temperatures above both ankles. The patient agreed to undergo lumbar chemical sympathectomy using fluoroscopy after being informed of the associated risks of nerve injury, hemorrhage, infection, transient back pain, and transient hypotension. During the procedure and three hours afterward, no abnormal signs or symptoms were found except an increase in right leg temperature. The patient was ambulatory after the procedure. However, one day after undergoing lumbar chemical sympathectomy, she visited our emergency department for abdominal discomfort and postural dizziness. Her blood pressure was 80/50 mmHg, and flank tenderness was noted. Retroperitoneal hemorrhage from the second right lumbar segmental artery was shown on computed tomography and angiography. Vital signs were stabilized immediately after embolization into the right lumbar segmental artery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Concordant pressure paresthesia during interlaminar lumbar epidural steroid injections correlates with pain relief in patients with unilateral radicular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido, Kenneth D; Rana, Maunak V; Sauer, Ruben; Chupatanakul, Lalida; Tharian, Antony; Vasic, Vladimir; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2013-01-01

    Transforaminal and interlaminar epidural steroid injections are commonly used interventional pain management procedures in the treatment of radicular low back pain. Even though several studies have shown that transforaminal injections provide enhanced short-term outcomes in patients with radicular and low back pain, they have also been associated with a higher incidence of unintentional intravascular injection and often dire consequences than have interlaminar injections. We compared 2 different approaches, midline and lateral parasagittal, of lumbar interlaminar epidural steroid injection (LESI) in patients with unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathic pain. We also tested the role of concordant pressure paresthesia occurring during LESI as a prognostic factor in determining the efficacy of LESI. Prospective, randomized, blinded study. Pain management center, part of a teaching-community hospital in a major metropolitan US city. After Institutional Review Board approval, 106 patients undergoing LESI for radicular low back pain were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups (53 patients each) based on approach: midline interlaminar (MIL) and lateral parasagittal interlaminar (PIL). Patients were asked to grade any pressure paresthesia as occurring ipsilaterally or contralaterally to their "usual and customary pain," or in a distribution atypical of their daily pain. Other variables such as: the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaire, pain scores at rest and during movement, use of pain medications, etc. were recorded 20 minutes before the procedure, and on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 60, 120, 180 and 365 after the injection. Results of this study showed statistically and clinically significant pain relief in patients undergoing LESI by both the MIL and PIL approaches. Patients receiving LESI using the lateral parasagittal approach had statistically and clinically longer pain relief then patients receiving LESI via a midline approach. They also had slightly better quality of

  6. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarush Rustagi

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.”

  7. Discectomy-related information on the internet: does the quality follow the surge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhassan, Yahya; Sheridan, Gerard; Nassiri, Mujtaba; Osman, Mugtaba; Kiely, Pat; Noel, Jacques

    2015-01-15

    A quality-control Internet-based study using recognized quality-scoring systems. To evaluate the quality of information available on the Internet. Quality of health information on the Internet is of much concern and the emphasis for appraisal of Internet Web sites is needed. This study is to determine if it has improved with the surge in Internet usage. The 3 most commonly used search engines were identified and a search for "Discectomy" was performed on each. Two reviewers categorized the Web sites according to their types and the quality of each was assessed using recognized scoring systems including the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) benchmark, DISCERN score, and discectomy-specific content score. The quality of the information was also assessed according to the presence and absence of the Health on the Net code. Fifty-three Web sites were identified, and analyzed. Commercial Web sites were predominant, 24 of them were identified, 7 were governmental, 6 were produced by physicians, none were produced by allied health professionals, 3 were academic, 4 were public health information Web sites, 4 were attached to social media and discussion groups, 3 were related to media, and 2 were unspecified. Internet sites with a Health on the Net code demonstrated significantly higher quality than those without the code (P increase in the number of users and Web sites, with a slight trend toward improvement, only 20% to 30% are of good quality, compared with that 10 years ago (<10%). Presence of Health on the Net code is a very reliable marker for health information quality.

  8. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Oehme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed.

  9. Short term outcome of posterior dynamic stabilization system in degenerative lumbar diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Dynamic stabilization system treating lumbar degenerative disease showed clinical benefits with motion preservation of the operated segments, but does not have the significant advantage on motion preservation at adjacent segments, to avoid the degeneration of adjacent intervertebral disk.

  10. Lumbar spondylolysis in the adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Kevin J; Elser, Tim; Stromberg, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Spondylolysis is a common occurrence for adolescent athletes who have low back pain. The injury involves a defect in the pars interarticularis, occurring as a result of repeated hyperextension and rotation. Clinical findings might include tightness of the hip flexors and hamstrings, weakness of the abdominals and gluteals, and an excessive lordotic posture. The validity of several clinical tests were compared alongside magnetic resonance imaging, but were not able to distinguish spondylolysis from other causes of low back pain. Medical referral should be arranged so that medical imaging and diagnostic testing can be completed to insure a proper diagnosis. Initial intervention includes rest from sport, which may vary from 2 weeks to 6 months. Bracing is also used to help minimize lumbar lordosis and lumbar extension. Exercises that focus on stabilization and spine neutral position should be incorporated in physical therapy intervention. Avoiding end ranges is important while performing exercises to minimize the translational and rotational stresses on the spine. Surgical interventions have also been recommended for athletes who have had persistent low back pain for more than six months with no relief from rest and bracing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectroscopic Parameters of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terbetas, G.; Kozlovskaja, A.; Varanius, D.; Graziene, V.; Vaitkus, J.; Vaitkuviene, A.

    2009-06-01

    There are numerous methods of investigating intervertebral disc. Visualization methods are widely used in clinical practice. Histological, imunohistochemical and biochemical methods are more used in scientific research. We propose that a new spectroscopic investigation would be useful in determining intervertebral disc material, especially when no histological specimens are available. Purpose: to determine spectroscopic parameters of intervertebral disc material; to determine emission spectra common for all intervertebral discs; to create a background for further spectroscopic investigation where no histological specimen will be available. Material and Methods: 20 patients, 68 frozen sections of 20 μm thickness from operatively removed intervertebral disc hernia were excited by Nd:YAG microlaser STA-01-TH third harmonic 355 nm light throw 0, 1 mm fiber. Spectrophotometer OceanOptics USB2000 was used for spectra collection. Mathematical analysis of spectra was performed by ORIGIN multiple Gaussian peaks analysis. Results: In each specimen of disc hernia were found distinct maximal spectral peaks of 4 types supporting the histological evaluation of mixture content of the hernia. Fluorescence in the spectral regions 370-700 nm was detected in the disc hernias. The main spectral component was at 494 nm and the contribution of the components with the peak wavelength values at 388 nm, 412 nm and 435±5 nm were varying in the different groups of samples. In comparison to average spectrum of all cases, there are 4 groups of different spectral signatures in the region 400-500 nm in the patient groups, supporting a clinical data on different clinical features of the patients. Discussion and Conclusion: besides the classical open discectomy, new minimally invasive techniques of treating intervertebral disc emerge (PLDD). Intervertebral disc in these techniques is assessed by needle, no histological specimen is taken. Spectroscopic investigation via fiber optics through the

  12. Is it possible to preserve lumbar lordosis after hybrid stabilization? Preliminary results of a novel rigid-dynamic stabilization system in degenerative lumbar pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formica, Matteo; Cavagnaro, Luca; Basso, Marco; Zanirato, Andrea; Felli, Lamberto; Formica, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the results of a novel rigid-dynamic stabilization technique in lumbar degenerative segment diseases (DSD), expressly pointing out the preservation of postoperative lumbar lordosis (LL). Forty-one patients with one level lumbar DSD and initial disc degeneration at the adjacent level were treated. Circumferential lumbar arthrodesis and posterior hybrid instrumentation were performed to preserve an initial disc degeneration above the segment that has to be fused. Clinical and spino-pelvic parameters were evaluated pre- and postoperatively. At 2-year follow-up, a significant improvement of clinical outcomes was reported. No statistically significant difference was noted between postoperative and 2-year follow-up in LL and in disc/vertebral body height ratio at the upper adjacent fusion level. When properly selected, this technique leads to good results. A proper LL should be achieved after any hybrid stabilization to preserve the segment above the fusion.

  13. Manejo del síndrome doloroso lumbar Management of lumbar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rivas Hernández

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica del síndrome doloroso lumbar y se seleccionaron los artículos relacionados con este síndrome publicados desde 1991 hasta 2009. Se hizo hincapié en la búsqueda de guías para el manejo del dolor lumbar en la práctica clínica, y sus criterios fueron revisados por el equipo de especialistas en Ortopedia y Traumatología del Servicio de columna vertebral del Hospital Ortopédico Docente "Fructuoso Rodríguez" y adaptados a las condiciones del Sistema Nacional de Salud cubano.A bibliographic review on painful syndrome was made selecting the articles published from 1991 to 2009 related to this syndrome. Authors emphasize in the search of guides for management of lumbar pain in the clinical practice, whose criteria were analyzed by the team Orthopedics and Traumatology team of the spinal column service from the "Fructuoso Rodríguez" Hospital and adjusted to conditions of the Cuban Health System.

  14. A lumbar body support (KBS 2000) alters lumbar muscle recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    random order) either a flat conventional mattress or a LBS placed on top of the ... mirrored these changes and were higher in patients only when lying on the flat ... While studies have examined the effect of lumbar support on LBP during sitting ... measured using a 4-channel EMG and customised software programme (EM8 ...

  15. Comparison Between Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion and Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion for the Treatment of Lumbar Degenerative Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tao; Hu, Shi-Yu; Zhang, Yuan-Tao; Zheng, Yu-Chen; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Zhe; Yang, Xin-Jian

    2018-04-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety in the management of lumbar diseases performed by either posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). Interbody fusion is considered the "gold standard" in the treatment of lumbar degenerative diseases. Both PLIF and TLIF have been advocated, and it remains controversial as to the best operative technique. The electronic databases including Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane library were searched to identify relevant studies up to September 2017. The primary outcomes were fusion rate, complications, and clinical satisfaction. The secondary outcomes were length of hospitalization, operation time, blood loss, postoperative visual analog scale, Oswestry Disability Index, and Japanese Orthopaedic Association Score. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 software. A total of 16 studies involving 1502 patients (805 patients in PLIF group and 697 in TLIF group) were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled analysis showed that there was no significant difference in terms of fusion rate (P > 0.05) and clinical satisfaction (P > 0.05) between the 2 groups. TLIF was superior to PLIF with significantly lower incidence of nerve root injury (P 0.05) and graft malposition (P > 0.05). PLIF required significant longer operation time (P degenerative lumbar diseases. However, TLIF was superior to PLIF with shorter operation time, less blood loss, and lower incidence of nerve root injury and dural tear. There is no significant difference between both groups regarding wound infection and graft malposition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of selected magnetic fields on the therapeutic effect in patients with lumbar discopathy: A prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taradaj, Jakub; Ozon, Marcin; Dymarek, Robert; Bolach, Bartosz; Walewicz, Karolina; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2018-03-23

    Interdisciplinary physical therapy together with pharmacological treatment constitute conservative treatment strategies related to low back pain (LBP). There is still a lack of high quality studies aimed at an objective evaluation of physiotherapeutic procedures according to their effectiveness in LBP. The aim of this study is to carry out a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, and placebocontrolled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness of magnetic fields in discopathy-related LBP. A group of 177 patients was assessed for eligibility based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. In the end, 106 patients were randomly assigned into 5 comparative groups: A (n = 23; magnetic therapy: 10 mT, 50 Hz); B (n = 23; magnetic therapy: 5 mT, 50 Hz); C (n = 20; placebo magnetic therapy); D (n = 20; magnetic stimulation: 49.2 μT, 195 Hz); and E (n = 20; placebo magnetic stimulation). All patients were assessed using tests for pain intensity, degree of disability and range of motion. Also, postural stability was assessed using a stabilographic platform. In this study, positive changes in all clinical outcomes were demonstrated in group A (p 0.05). It was determined that the application of magnetic therapy (10 mT, 50 Hz, 20 min) significantly reduces pain symptoms and leads to an improvement of functional ability in patients with LBP.

  17. Herpes zoster sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koda, Masao; Mannoji, Chikato; Oikawa, Makiko; Murakami, Masazumi; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Kon, Tamiyo; Okawa, Akihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Yamazaki, Masashi; Furuya, Takeo

    2015-07-29

    Symptom of herpes zoster is sometimes difficult to distinguish from sciatica induced by spinal diseases, including lumbar disc herniation and spinal canal stenosis. Here we report a case of sciatica mimicking lumbar canal stenosis. A 74-year-old Chinese male patient visited our hospital for left-sided sciatic pain upon standing or walking for 5 min of approximately 1 month's duration. At the first visit to our hospital, there were no skin lesions. A magnetic resonance imaging showed spinal canal stenosis between the 4th and 5th lumbar spine. Thus, we diagnosed the patient with sciatica induced by spinal canal stenosis. We considered decompression surgery for the stenosis of 4th and 5th lumbar spine because conservative therapy failed to relieve the patient's symptom. At that time, the patient complained of a skin rash involving his left foot for several days. A vesicular rash and erythema were observed on the dorsal and plantar surfaces of the great toe and lateral malleolus. The patient was diagnosed with herpes zoster in the left 5th lumbar spinal nerve area based on clinical findings, including the characteristics of the pain and vesicular rash and erythema in the 5th lumbar spinal dermatome. The patient was treated with famciclovir (1,500 mg/day) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. After 1 week of medication, the skin rash resolved and pain relief was obtained. In conclusion, spinal surgeons should keep in mind herpes zoster infection as one of the possible differential diagnoses of sciatica, even if there is no typical skin rash.

  18. The association of spinal osteoarthritis with lumbar lordosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Careful review of published evidence has led to the postulate that the degree of lumbar lordosis may possibly influence the development and progression of spinal osteoarthritis, just as misalignment does in other joints. Spinal degeneration can ensue from the asymmetrical distribution of loads. The resultant lesions lead to a domino- like breakdown of the normal morphology, degenerative instability and deviation from the correct configuration. The aim of this study is to investigate whether a relationship exists between the sagittal alignment of the lumbar spine, as it is expressed by lordosis, and the presence of radiographic osteoarthritis. Methods 112 female subjects, aged 40-72 years, were examined in the Outpatients Department of the Orthopedics' Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete. Lumbar radiographs were examined on two separate occasions, independently, by two of the authors for the presence of osteoarthritis. Lordosis was measured from the top of L1 to the bottom of L5 as well as from the top of L1 to the top of S1. Furthermore, the angle between the bottom of L5 to the top of S1was also measured. Results and discussion 49 women were diagnosed with radiographic osteoarthritis of the lumbar spine, while 63 women had no evidence of osteoarthritis and served as controls. The two groups were matched for age and body build, as it is expressed by BMI. No statistically significant differences were found in the lordotic angles between the two groups Conclusions There is no difference in lordosis between those affected with lumbar spine osteoarthritis and those who are disease free. It appears that osteoarthritis is not associated with the degree of lumbar lordosis. PMID:20044932

  19. Characteristics of lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toshinori; Goda, Yuichiro; Tezuka, Fumitake; Takata, Yoichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sato, Masahiro; Mase, Yasuyoshi; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a stress fracture of the pars interarticularis in the lumbar spine, is often precipitated by trauma, but there may be a congenital predisposition to this condition. There have been few studies on spondylolysis in young children, despite their suitability for studies on congenital defects. The aim of this study was to identify the clinical features of lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children in order to elucidate its pathogenesis. Thirty lumbar spondylolysis patients (23 boys, 7 girls, including a pair of twins; mean age 9.5 years, age range 5-12 years) were studied. Patient data on history of athletic activity, symptoms at first consultation, and radiological findings such as spinal level, stage of the stress fracture, and skeletal age were collected. Among the 30 patients, 27 (21 boys, 6 girls) had L5 spondylolysis (90.0 %). Only 2 patients had no history of athletic activity at the first consultation. All patients, except for 2 whose diagnosis was incidental, complained of low back pain. In the 27 patients with L5 spondylolysis, 17 (63.0 %) had terminal-stage fracture and 25 (92.6 %) had spina bifida occulta (SBO) involving the S1 lamina. Sixteen of the 27 (59.3 %) had SBO involving the affected lamina (L5) and S1 lamina. In contrast, the 3 patients with L3 or L4 spondylolysis had no evidence of SBO. With respect to skeletal age, 23 of the 27 L5 spondylolysis patients (85.2 %) were in the cartilaginous stage while the remaining 4 patients were in the apophyseal stage. Lumbar spondylolysis in elementary school age children was commonly a terminal-stage bone defect at L5, which was not necessarily related to history of athletic activity and was sometimes asymptomatic. It was often associated with SBO, indicating a possible congenital predisposition. These findings may provide further insight into the pathogenesis of lumbar spondylolysis.

  20. Comparison of Cervical Kinematics, Pain, and Functional Disability Between Single- and Two-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Andy; Lai, Dar-Ming; Wang, Shwu-Fen; Hsu, Wei-Li; Cheng, Chih-Hsiu; Wang, Jaw-Lin

    2016-08-01

    A prospective, time series design. The purpose of this study is two-fold: firstly, to investigate the impact of altered cervical alignment and range of motion (ROM) on patients' self-reported outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), and secondly, to comparatively differentiate the influence of single- and two-level ACDF on the cervical ROM and adjacent segmental kinematics up to 12-month postoperatively. ACDF is one of the most commonly employed surgical interventions to treat degenerative disc disease. However, there are limited in vivo data on the impact of ACDF on the cervical kinematics and its association with patient-reported clinical outcomes. Sixty-two patients (36 males; 55.63 ± 11.6 yrs) undergoing either a single- or consecutive two-level ACDF were recruited. The clinical outcomes were assessed with the Pain Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological results included cervical lordosis, global C2-C7 ROM, ROM of the Functional Spinal Unit (FSU), and its adjacent segments. The outcome measures were collected preoperatively and then at 3, 6, and 12-month postoperatively. A significant reduction of both VAS and NDI was found for both groups from the preoperative to 3-month period (P < 0.01). Pearson correlation revealed no significant correlation between global ROM with neither VAS (P = 0.667) nor NDI (P = 0.531). A significant reduction of global ROM was identified for the two-level ACDF group at 12 months (P = 0.017) but not for the single-level group. A significant interaction effect was identified for the upper adjacent segment ROM (P = 0.024) but not at the lower adjacent segment. Current study utilized dynamic radiographs to comparatively evaluate the biomechanical impact of single- and two-level ACDF. The results highlighted that the two-level group demonstrated a greater reduction of global ROM coupled with an increased upper adjacent segmental compensatory motions that

  1. A prospective randomized trial comparing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus plate-only open-door laminoplasty for the treatment of spinal stenosis in degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun-Qi; Li, Xi-Lei; Zhou, Xiao-Gang; Bian, Chong; Wang, Han-Ming; Huang, Jian-Ming; Dong, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For three or more involved cervical levels, there is a debate over which approach yields the best outcomes for the treatment of multilevel cervical degenerative disease. Our objective is to compare the radiological and clinical outcomes of two treatments for multilevel cervical degenerative disease: anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) versus plate-only open-door laminoplasty (laminoplasty). Patients were randomized on a 1:1 randomization schedule with 17 patients in the ACDF group and 17 patients in the laminoplasty group. Clinical outcomes were assessed by a visual analog scale (VAS), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, operative time, blood loss, rates of complications, drainage volume, discharge days after surgery, and complications. The cervical spine curvature index (CI) and range of motion (ROM) were assessed with radiographs. The mean VAS score, the mean JOA score, and the rate of complications did not differ significantly between groups. The laminoplasty group had greater blood loss, a longer operative time, more drainage volume, and a longer hospital stay than the ACDF group. There were no significant differences in the CI and ROM between the two groups at baseline and at each follow-up time point. ROM in both groups decreased significantly after surgery. Both ACDF and laminoplasty are effective and safe treatments for multilevel cervical degenerative disease. ACDF causes fewer traumas than laminoplasty.

  2. Lumbar myelography with omnipaque (iohexol)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilleaas, F.; Weber, H.

    1986-01-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes. (orig.)

  3. Lumbar myelography with Omnipaque (iohexol)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilleaas, F.; Bach-Gansmo, T.; Weber, H.

    1986-07-01

    Lumbar myelography with iohexol (Omnipaque) was performed in 103 consecutive adult patients with low back pain or sciatica. The patients were observed for 48 h with registration of possible adverse reactions. Mild or moderate transient side effects were recorded in 24 patients. No serious adverse reactions were noted, and EEG recorded in 25 patients showed no changes.

  4. Percutaneous full endoscopic lumbar foraminoplasty for adjacent level foraminal stenosis following vertebral intersegmental fusion in an awake and aware patient under local anesthesia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Kazuta; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Hayashi, Fumio; Tezuka, Fumitake; Morimoto, Masatoshi; Chikawa, Takashi; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Sairyo, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic surgery for the lumbar spine has become established in the last decade. It requires only an 8 mm skin incision, causes minimal damage to the paravertebral muscles, and can be performed under local anesthesia. With the advent of improved equipment, in particular the high-speed surgical drill, the indications for percutaneous endoscopic surgery have expanded to include lumbar spinal canal stenosis. Transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy has been used to treat intervertebral stenosis. However, it has been reported that adjacent level disc degeneration and foraminal stenosis can occur following intervertebral segmental fusion. When this adjacent level pathology becomes symptomatic, additional fusion surgery is often needed. We performed minimally invasive percutaneous full endoscopic lumbar foraminoplasty in an awake and aware 50-year-old woman under local anesthesia. The procedure was successful with no complications. Her radiculopathy, including muscle weakness and leg pain due to impingement of the exiting nerve, improved after the surgery. J. Med. Invest. 64: 291-295, August, 2017.

  5. Repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Ibarra, Javier; Arrieta Maria, Victor; Torres Romero Fernando; Ramirez Cabrales, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to present the surgical experience in the repair of the spondylolysis in lumbar spine. Background: Spodylolysis is an important cause of low back pain in young adults and is responsible for high grade of incapacity. Classically, patients with surgical indications with Spondylolysis have been treated with vertebral arthrodesis arthrodesis, with the following functional lost of the intervened segment and biomechanical overload of the upper contiguous segment. There are not previous reports about repairing of lysis in national literature and international references in this technique are scarce. Materials and methods: Eight patients within 2002-2004 were operated, a direct repairing of the lyses by in situ, fusion and interfragmental osteosynthesis with AO 3.5 mm titanium cortical screws with autogenous bone grafts was achieved. The casuistic was analyzed depending on clinical presentation, consolidation, mobility and vitality of the disc in imaginology studies. Results: During the follow-up a firm fusion in all cases, mobility and vitality preservation of the L5-S1 intervertebral disc was detected. There was neither infection nor neurological deficit. Recommendations: Repairing of spondylolysis in lumbar column, in young symptomatic patients without or with mild lystesis (grade I) and without associated disc damage, is a safe surgical technique

  6. Reproducibility of central lumbar vertebral BMD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, F.; Pocock, N.; Griffiths, M.; Majerovic, Y.; Freund, J.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Lumbar vertebral bone mineral density (BMD) using dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) has generally been calculated from a region of interest which includes the entire vertebral body. Although this region excludes part of the transverse processes, it does include the outer cortical shell of the vertebra. Recent software has been devised to calculate BMD in a central vertebral region of interest which excludes the outer cortical envelope. Theoretically this area may be more sensitive to detecting osteoporosis which affects trabecular bone to a greater extent than cortical bone. Apart from the sensitivity of BMD estimation, the reproducibility of any measurement is important owing to the slow rate of change of bone mass. We have evaluated the reproducibility of this new vertebral region of interest in 23 women who had duplicate lumbar spine DXA scans performed on the same day. The patients were repositioned between each measurement. Central vertebral analysis was performed for L2-L4 and the reproducibility of area, bone mineral content (BMC) and BMD calculated as the coefficient of variation; these values were compared with those from conventional analysis. Thus we have shown that the reproducibility of the central BMD is comparable to the conventional analysis which is essential if this technique is to provide any additional clinical data. The reasons for the decrease in reproducibility of the area and hence BMC requires further investigation

  7. AxiaLIF system: minimally invasive device for presacral lumbar interbody spinal fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapp SM

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven M Rapp1, Larry E Miller2,3, Jon E Block31Michigan Spine Institute, Waterford, MI, USA; 2Miller Scientific Consulting Inc, Biltmore Lake, NC, USA; 3Jon E. Block, Ph.D., Inc., San Francisco, CA, USAAbstract: Lumbar fusion is commonly performed to alleviate chronic low back and leg pain secondary to disc degeneration, spondylolisthesis with or without concomitant lumbar spinal stenosis, or chronic lumbar instability. However, the risk of iatrogenic injury during traditional anterior, posterior, and transforaminal open fusion surgery is significant. The axial lumbar interbody fusion (AxiaLIF system is a minimally invasive fusion device that accesses the lumbar (L4–S1 intervertebral disc spaces via a reproducible presacral approach that avoids critical neurovascular and musculoligamentous structures. Since the AxiaLIF system received marketing clearance from the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004, clinical studies of this device have reported high fusion rates without implant subsidence, significant improvements in pain and function, and low complication rates. This paper describes the design and approach of this lumbar fusion system, details the indications for use, and summarizes the clinical experience with the AxiaLIF system to date.Keywords: AxiaLIF, fusion, lumbar, minimally invasive, presacral

  8. Acquired spondylolysis after implantation of a lumbar ProDisc II prosthesis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tobias L; Lerner, Thomas; Hackenberg, Lars; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Bullmann, Viola

    2007-10-15

    A case of acquired lumbar spondylolysis following lumbar disc arthroplasty L5-S1 in an 40-year-old woman and review of the literature. To present and discuss a case of acquired lumbar spondylolysis after implantation of an artificial disc L5-S1 that may have impaired a good clinical result requiring additional posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion in order to improve understanding of this condition and to propose an effective method of surgical management. Lumbar disc arthroplasty is a possible surgical option for patients with degenerative disc disease. Acquired spondylolysis is a rare but known complication of spinal fusion but has never been described as a consequence of mobile disc arthroplasty. The authors present the first case in the literature who developed this complication. A 40-year-old woman with severe osteochondrosis L5-S1 and discogenic lumbar back pain underwent implantation of an artificial disc. Surgery and postoperative course were uneventful and the patient improved significantly as for back pain and mobility. Eighteen months after surgery, the patient was again admitted to our outpatient clinic for back pain that had slowly increased over time. The radiologic workup showed a new spondylolysis L5 without a spondylolisthesis. Because of unsuccessful conservative treatment, the patient underwent posterior lumbar instrumentation and fusion L5-S1, leading to a significant pain reduction and a good clinical outcome. Spine surgeons should be aware of the possibility of lumbar disc arthroplasty to induce acquired spondylolysis impairing good clinical results.

  9. Association between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging, pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing in patients awaiting lumbar diskectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hegarty, Dominic

    2011-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers important information regarding the morphology, location and size of a herniated disc, which influences the decision to offer lumbar diskectomy (LD). This study aims to examine the association between clinical neurophysiologic indices including pain intensity and quantitative sensory testing (QST), and the degree of lumbar nerve root compromise depicted on magnetic resonance (MR) in patients awaiting LD.

  10. Percutaneous endoscopic cervical discectomy: 16 years of experience and literature review Discectomía endoscópica percutánea cervical: 16 años de experiência y revisión de la literatura Discectomia endoscópica percutânea cervical: 16 anos de experiência e revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gun Choi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of the percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PECD and its clinical success have led to similar minimally invasive approaches to the cervical spine. The goal of PECD is the decompression of the cervical nerve root through a direct endoscopic visualization, removing the herniated mass and shrinking the nucleous pulposus with the use of microforceps and holmium: yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG laser. The senior author have performed PECD with cervical laser assisted endoscopy since 1993. The PECD is indicate to patients with constrained or unconstrained soft herniated cervical disc, positive provocative test, and no bony spur larger than 2 mm, regardless of the herniation size. The authors described the surgical technique of PECD and report their 16 years of experience in the endoscopic treatment of the herniated cervical disc.El avance en la discectomía endoscópica percutánea lumbar y su triunfo clínico llevaron a abordajes mínimamente invasivos en la columna cervical. El objetivo de la discectomía endoscópica percutánea cervical es descomprimir la raíz del nervio cervical, por una visualización endoscópica directa, eliminando el fragmento herniado y disminuyendo el núcleo pulposo, con el uso de fórceps y micro Holmio: itrio-aluminio-granada (Ho:YAG laser. La discectomía endoscópica percutánea cervical con laser ha sido utilizada desde 1993. Esta es indicada en pacientes con hernia discal contenida o no, test provocativo positivo, ausencia de osteofitos mayores que 2 mm, independientemente del tamaño de la hernia. Los autores describen la técnica quirúrgica de discectomía endoscópica percutánea cervical y relatan 16 años de experiencia en el tratamiento endoscópico de disco cervical herniado.O avanço da discectomia endoscópica percutânea lombar e seu sucesso clínico levaram a abordagens minimamente invasivas para a coluna cervical. O objetivo da discectomia endoscópica percutânea cervical é o de

  11. Direct repair of defects in lumbar spondylolysis with a new pedicle screw hook fixation: clinical, functional and Ct-assessed study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussel, Serge

    2007-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a common entity, a minority of people affected by this disease need medical care, and only a few require surgery. Reconstruction of the pars interarticularis is an interesting alternative to segmental fusion; this technique has the advantage of preserving segmental motion. Most authors report good results for young patients without intervertebral disk or facet degenerative changes. Moreover Louis also showed good to excellent results with his technique carried out among people who presented a satisfactory disk height (equal to two thirds of normal height). This could extend the number of patients for whom pars interarticularis repair could be proposed. In this study, the limit of reconstruction was set at grade 3of the Pfirrmann’s classification. The fixation of the isthmus was done with a new kind of pedicle screw hook system. This stable and strong device is easy to use, allows an anatomic pars interarticularis reconstruction of spondylolysis and avoids a postoperative bracing. Twenty-three patients were assessed in this study, the mean age at operation was 34 (range 16–52 years) and the average follow-up was for 59 months (range 6–113 months). Eight patients showed moderate degenerative disk disease before the surgery and 12 patients had a grade 1 spondylolisthesis. The visual analogical scale, the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and the modified Prolo score were used for assessment of pain and clinical outcome before and after surgery. The results were from “excellent” to “good” for twenty patients (87%) and “fair” for three of them (13%). The consolidation of the isthmus was assessed at the end of the study (CT-scan); the fusion rate was observed in 91%. Among patients aged less than 30 years results are from “good”, to “excellent” in all cases and consolidation was always observed. All of them showed normal disc signal before the surgery. In the group aged more than 30 years, the results varied from

  12. Septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint: Detection with bone SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, L.C.; Dorsky, S.; Caruana, V.; Kaplan, I.L.

    1989-01-01

    We present a rare case of septic arthritis of a lumbar facet joint with an associated epidural abscess resulting from Staphylococcus aureus. The infection was initially detected with planar bone scintigraphy and precisely localized with single photon emission computed tomography bone scintigraphy, despite an initially negative radiologic evaluation that included radiographs of the lumbar spine, lumbar myelography, and a postmyelography x-ray computed tomography scan. In the appropriate clinical setting, a bone scan demonstrating unilateral increased activity within the spine should raise the suspicion of inflammatory involvement of the posterior elements

  13. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Ninomiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to the initial MRI, this hernia occurred in an “intact” disc among multilevel severely degenerated discs. Right leg paresis and bladder dysfunction appeared a few days after admission. Microscopic lumbar disc herniotomy was performed. The right leg motor weakness improved just after the operation, but the moderate left leg motor weakness and difficulty in urination persisted.

  14. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.    

  15. Comparison of outcomes and safety of using hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft in cervical cages for anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Mashhadinezhad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background:   After cervical discectomy, autogenetic bone is packed into the cage to increase the rate of union between adjacent vertebral bodies, but donor site–related complications can still occur. In this study we evaluate the use   of hydroxyapatite granules as a substitute for autograft for interbody fusion.     Methods:   From November 2008 to November 2011, 236 patients participated in this study. Peek cages were packed with autologous bone grafts taken from the iliac crest in 112 patients and hydroxyapatite (HA granules in 124 patients.   Patients were followed for 12 months. The patients’ neurological signs, results, and complications were fully recorded   throughout the procedure. Radiological imaging was done to assess the fusion rate and settling ratio.     Results:   Formation of bony bridges at the third month was higher in the autograft group versus the granule group. However, there was no difference between both groups at the 12-month follow-up assessment. No difference (     P > 0.05   was found regarding improvement in neurological deficit as well as radicular pain and recovery rate between the two groups. Conclusions:   Interbody fusion cage containing HA granules proved to be an effective treatment for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. Clinical and neurological outcome, radiographic measurement and fusion rate   in cage containing HA are similar and competitive with autograft packed cages.

  16. Perioperative morbidity and mortality after lumbar trauma in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Ethan A; Yue, John K; Birk, Harjus; Robinson, Caitlin K; Manley, Geoffrey T; Dhall, Sanjay S; Tarapore, Phiroz E

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Traumatic fractures of the thoracolumbar spine are common injuries, accounting for approximately 90% of all spinal trauma. Lumbar spine trauma in the elderly is a growing public health problem with relatively little evidence to guide clinical management. The authors sought to characterize the complications, morbidity, and mortality associated with surgical and nonsurgical management in elderly patients with traumatic fractures of the lumbar spine. METHODS Using the National Sample Program of the National Trauma Data Bank, the authors performed a retrospective analysis of patients ≥ 55 years of age who had traumatic fracture to the lumbar spine. This group was divided into middle-aged (55-69 years) and elderly (≥ 70 years) cohorts. Cohorts were subdivided into nonoperative, vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty, noninstrumented surgery, and instrumented surgery. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to characterize and identify predictors of medical and surgical complications, mortality, hospital length of stay, ICU length of stay, number of days on ventilator, and hospital discharge in each subgroup. Adjusted odds ratios, mean differences, and associated 95% CIs were reported. Statistical significance was assessed at p elderly is associated with increased morbidity. In particular, instrumented fusion is associated with periprocedural complications, prolonged hospitalization, and a decreased likelihood of being discharged home. However, fusion surgery is also associated with reduced mortality. Age alone should not be an exclusionary factor in identifying surgical candidates for instrumented lumbar spinal fusion. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  17. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  18. Adaptations of lumbar biomechanics after four weeks of running training with minimalist footwear and technique guidance: Implications for running-related lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Szu-Ping; Bailey, Joshua P; Smith, Jo Armour; Barton, Stephanie; Brown, David; Joyce, Talia

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the changes in lumbar kinematic and paraspinal muscle activation before, during, and after a 4-week minimalist running training. Prospective cohort study. University research laboratory. Seventeen habitually shod recreational runners who run 10-50 km per week. During stance phases of running, sagittal lumbar kinematics was recorded using an electrogoniometer, and activities of the lumbar paraspinal muscles were assessed by electromyography. Runners were asked to run at a prescribed speed (3.1 m/s) and a self-selected speed. For the 3.1 m/s running speed, significant differences were found in the calculated mean lumbar posture (p = 0.001) during the stance phase, including a more extended lumbar posture after minimalist running training. A significant reduction in the contralateral lumbar paraspinal muscle activation was also observed (p = 0.039). For the preferred running speed, similar findings of a more extended lumbar posture (p = 0.002) and a reduction in contralateral lumbar paraspinal muscle activation (p = 0.047) were observed. A 4-week minimalist running training program produced significant changes in lumbar biomechanics during running. Specifically, runners adopted a more extended lumbar posture and reduced lumbar paraspinal muscle activation. These findings may have clinical implications for treating individuals with running-related lower back pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis: correlation with Oswestry Disability Index and MR Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sirvanci, Mustafa; Bhatia, Mona; Ganiyusufoglu, Kursat Ali; Duran, Cihan; Tezer, Mehmet; Ozturk, Cagatay; Aydogan, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2008-01-01

    Because neither the degree of constriction of the spinal canal considered to be symptomatic for lumbar spinal stenosis nor the relationship between the clinical appearance and the degree of a radiologically verified constriction is clear, a correlation of patient’s disability level and radiographic constriction of the lumbar spinal canal is of interest. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the degree of radiologically established anatomical stenosis and the severity o...

  20. Can the human lumbar posterior columns be stimulated by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation? A modeling study

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Simon M.; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Ladenbauer, Josef; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Stimulation of different spinal cord segments in humans is a widely developed clinical practice for modification of pain, altered sensation and movement. The human lumbar cord has become a target for modification of motor control by epidural and more recently by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation. Posterior columns of the lumbar spinal cord represent a vertical system of axons and when activated can add other inputs to the motor control of the spinal cord than stimulated posterior roots. ...

  1. Clinico-radiological profile of indirect neural decompression using cage or auto graft as interbody construct in posterior lumbar interbody fusion in spondylolisthesis: Which is better?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q R Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Study design: A prospective clinical study of posterior lumbar interbody fusion in grade I and II degenerative spondylolisthesis was conducted between Mar 2007 and Aug 2008. Purpose: The objective was to assess the clinicoradiological profile of structural v/s nonstructural graft on intervertebral disc height and its consequences on the low back pain (LBP assessed by Visual analog score (VAS score and oswestry disability index (ODI . This study involved 28 patients. Inclusion criteria: Age of 30-70 years, symptomatic patient with disturbed Activities of daily living (ADL, single-level L4/L5 or L5/S1 grade I or grade II degenerative spondylolisthesis. Exclusion criteria: Patients with osteoporosis, recent spondylodiscitis, subchondral sclerosis, visual and cognitive impairment and all other types of spondylolisthesis. All the patients underwent short-segment posterior fixation using CD2 or M8 instrumentation, laminectomy discectomy, reduction and distraction of the involved vertebral space. In 53.5% (n = 15 of the patients, snugly fitted local bone chips were used while in 46.4% (n = 13 of the patients, cage was used. Among the cage group, titanium cage was used in nine (32.1% and PEEK cages were used in four (14.2% patients. In one patient, a unilateral PEEK cage was used. The mean follow-up period was 24 months. Among the 28 patients, 67.8% (n = 19 were females and 32.14% (n = 9 were males. 68.24% (n = 18 had L4/L5 and 35.71% (n = 10 had L5/S1 spondylolisthesis. 39.28% (n = 11 were of grade I and 60.71% (n = 17 were of grade II spondylolisthesis. Conclusions: There was a statistically significant correlation (P < 0.012 and P < 0.027 between the change in disc height achieved and the improvement in VAS score in both the graft group and the cage group. The increment in disc height and VAS score was significantly better in the cage group (2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 7.2 [88%] than the graft group (1.2 mm ± SD vis-a-vis 5 [62 %].

  2. RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY OF SUBJECTIVE ASSESSMENT OF LUMBAR LORDOSIS IN CONVENTIONAL RADIOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhinda, E; Byanyima, R K; Mugerwa, H

    2014-10-01

    Reliability and validity studies of different lumbar curvature analysis and measurement techniques have been documented however there is limited literature on the reliability and validity of subjective visual analysis. Radiological assessment of lumbar lordotic curve aids in early diagnosis of conditions even before neurologic changes set in. To ascertain the level of reliability and validity of subjective assessment of lumbar lordosis in conventional radiography. A blinded, repeated-measures diagnostic test was carried out on lumbar spine x-ray radiographs. Radiology Department at Joint Clinical Research Centre (JCRC), Mengo-Kampala-Uganda. Seventy (70) lateral lumbar x-ray films were used for this study and were obtained from the archive of JCRC radiology department at Butikiro house, Mengo-Kampala. Poor observer agreement, both inter- and intra-observer, with kappa values of 0.16 was found. Inter-observer agreement was poorer than intra-observer agreement. Kappa values significantly rose when the lumbar lordosis was clustered into four categories without grading each abnormality. The results confirm that subjective assessment of lumbar lordosis has low reliability and validity. Film quality has limited influence on the observer reliability. This study further shows that fewer scale categories of lordosis abnormalities produce better observer reliability.

  3. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  4. Is There Variation in Procedural Utilization for Lumbar Spine Disorders Between a Fee-for-Service and Salaried Healthcare System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andrew J; Makanji, Heeren; Jiang, Wei; Koehlmoos, Tracey; Bono, Christopher M; Haider, Adil H

    2017-12-01

    Whether compensation for professional services drives the use of those services is an important question that has not been answered in a robust manner. Specifically, there is a growing concern that spine care practitioners may preferentially choose more costly or invasive procedures in a fee-for-service system, irrespective of the underlying lumbar disorder being treated. (1) Were proportions of interbody fusions higher in the fee-for-service setting as opposed to the salaried Department of Defense setting? (2) Were the odds of interbody fusion increased in a fee-for-service setting after controlling for indications for surgery? Patients surgically treated for lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis (2006-2014) were identified. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether the surgery was performed in the fee-for-service setting (beneficiaries receive care at a civilian facility with expenses covered by TRICARE insurance) or at a Department of Defense facility (direct care). There were 28,344 patients in the entire study, 21,290 treated in fee-for-service and 7054 treated in Department of Defense facilities. Differences in the rates of fusion-based procedures, discectomy, and decompression between both healthcare settings were assessed using multinomial logistic regression to adjust for differences in case-mix and surgical indication. TRICARE beneficiaries treated for lumbar spinal disorders in the fee-for-service setting had higher odds of receiving interbody fusions (fee-for-service: 7267 of 21,290 [34%], direct care: 1539 of 7054 [22%], odds ratio [OR]: 1.25 [95% confidence interval 1.20-1.30], p fee-for-service setting irrespective of the underlying diagnosis. These results speak to the existence of provider inducement within the field of spine surgery. This reality portends poor performance for surgical practices and hospitals in Accountable Care Organizations and bundled payment programs in which provider inducement is allowed

  5. Analysis of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Healthcare Costs via the Value-Driven Outcomes Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jared C; Karsy, Michael; Twitchell, Spencer; Bisson, Erica F

    2018-04-11

    Examining the costs of single- and multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is important for the identification of cost drivers and potentially reducing patient costs. A novel tool at our institution provides direct costs for the identification of potential drivers. To assess perioperative healthcare costs for patients undergoing an ACDF. Patients who underwent an elective ACDF between July 2011 and January 2017 were identified retrospectively. Factors adding to total cost were placed into subcategories to identify the most significant contributors, and potential drivers of total cost were evaluated using a multivariable linear regression model. A total of 465 patients (mean, age 53 ± 12 yr, 54% male) met the inclusion criteria for this study. The distribution of total cost was broken down into supplies/implants (39%), facility utilization (37%), physician fees (14%), pharmacy (7%), imaging (2%), and laboratory studies (1%). A multivariable linear regression analysis showed that total cost was significantly affected by the number of levels operated on, operating room time, and length of stay. Costs also showed a narrow distribution with few outliers and did not vary significantly over time. These results suggest that facility utilization and supplies/implants are the predominant cost contributors, accounting for 76% of the total cost of ACDF procedures. Efforts at lowering costs within these categories should make the most impact on providing more cost-effective care.

  6. Comparison of Radiologic Outcomes of Different Methods in Single-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Ik; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a choice of surgical procedure for cervical degenerative diseases associated with radiculopathy or myelopathy. However, the patients undergoing ACDF still have problems. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radiologic results of 3 different methods in single-level ACDF. We conducted a retrospective collection of radiological data from January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 67 patients were included in this study. The patients were divided into 3 groups by operation procedure: using stand-alone cage (group cage, n=20); polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK)-titanium combined anchored cage (group AC, n=21); and anterior cervical cage-plate (group CP, n=26). Global cervical lordosis (C2-C7 Cobb angle), fused segment height, fusion rate, and cervical range of motion (ROM) were measured and analyzed at serial preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and final 1-year follow-up. Successful bone fusion was achieved in all patients at the final follow-up examination; however, the loss of disc height over 3 mm at the surgical level was observed in 6 patients in group cage. Groups AC and CP yielded significantly better outcomes than group cage in fused segment height and cervical ROM(p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). Furthermore, group AC had similar radiologic outcomes to those of group CP. The PEEK-titanium combined anchored cage may be a good alternative procedure in terms of reducing complications induced by plate after ACDF.

  7. Improvements in Neck and Arm Pain Following an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, Dustin H; Mayo, Benjamin C; Bohl, Daniel D; Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Fineberg, Steven J; Louie, Philip K; Basques, Bryce A; Long, William W; Modi, Krishna D; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-15

    A retrospective analysis. The aim of this study was to quantify improvements in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short Form-12 (SF-12) Mental (MCS) and Physical (PCS) Composite scores following an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is evaluated with patient-reported outcomes. However, the extent to which these outcomes improve following ACDF remains poorly defined. A surgical registry of patients who underwent primary, one- or two-level ACDF during 2013 to 2015 was reviewed. Comparisons of VAS neck and arm, NDI, and SF-12 MCS and PCS scores were performed using paired t tests from preoperative to each postoperative time point. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to estimate the reduction in neck and arm pain over the first postoperative year. Subgroup analyses were performed for patients with predominant neck (pNP) or arm (pAP) pain, as well as for one- versus two-level ACDF. Eighty-nine patients were identified. VAS neck and arm, NDI, and SF-12 PCS improved from preoperative scores at all postoperative time points (P pain (P pain over the first 6 months and 12 weeks postoperatively, respectively (P pain and 55.1% reduction in arm pain over the first postoperative year (P pain following ACDF regardless of presenting symptom. In addition, patients undergoing one-level ACDF report greater reductions in neck and arm pain than patients undergoing two-level fusion. 4.

  8. The influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination during weightlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Boyi; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar muscle fatigue is a potential risk factor for the development of low back pain. In this study, we investigated the influence of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue on lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns during weightlifting. Each of the 15 male subjects performed five repetitions of weightlifting tasks both before and after a lumbar extensor muscle fatiguing protocol. Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected to assess fatigue. Trunk kinematics was recorded to calculate lumbar-pelvic continuous relative phase (CRP) and CRP variability. Results showed that fatigue significantly reduced the average lumbar-pelvic CRP value (from 0.33 to 0.29 rad) during weightlifting. The average CRP variability reduced from 0.17 to 0.15 rad, yet this change ws statistically not significant. Further analyses also discovered elevated spinal loading during weightlifting after the development of lumbar extensor muscle fatigue. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar extensor muscle fatigue should be avoided in an occupational environment. Lumbar extensor muscle fatigue generates more in-phase lumbar-pelvic coordination patterns and elevated spinal loading during lifting. Such increase in spinal loading may indicate higher risk of back injury. Our results suggest that frequently experienced lumbar muscle fatigue should be avoided to reduce the risk of LBP.

  9. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Nagrale, Sanket; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-06-01

    Observational study. To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=-0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=-0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain.

  10. Fuerza lumbar en jugadores de hockey hierba

    OpenAIRE

    Til Pérez, Lluís; Barceló Peiró, Oriol; Pomés Díes, Teresa; Martínez Navas, Roberto; Galilea Ballarini, Pedro; Bellver Vives, Montserrat

    2007-01-01

    Introducción: El dolor lumbar tiene una alta prevalencia entre los deportistas, se ha relacionado con déficits en la fuerza extensora lumbar, y el hecho de padecerlo representa un obstáculo importante para la práctica de deportes de alta intensidad. Método: Se ha medido la fuerza lumbar en 2 grupos de practicantes de hockey hierba mediante máquina MedX® y un test de resistencia isométrico lumbar. Resultados: Entre ambos grupos los resultados han sido muy homogéneos....

  11. Design of three-dimensional visualization based on the posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai XU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To establish a three-dimensional visualization model of posterior lumbar pedicle screw fixation.Methods A patient with lumbar intervertebral disc hernia and another patient with compression fracture of lumbar vertebra were involved in the present study.Both patients underwent multi-slice spiral CT scan before and after lumbar pedicle screw fixation.The degree of preoperative vertebral compression,vertebral morphology before and after surgery,postoperative pedicle screw position,and decompression effects were observed.The original data of the multi-slice spiral CT were inputted into the computer.The three-dimensional reconstructed images of the lumbar and implanted screws were obtained using the software Amira 4.1 to show the three-dimensional shape of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and the location of the implanted screws.Results The morphology and structure of the lumbar vertebrae before and after surgery and of the implanted screws were reconstructed using the digital navigation platform.The reconstructed 3D images could be displayed in multicolor,transparent,or arbitrary combinations.In the 3D surface reconstruction images,the location and structure of the implanted screws could be clearly observed,and the decompression of the spinal cord or nerve roots and the severity of the fracture and the compression of lumbar vertebrae could be fully evaluated.The reconstructed images before operation revealed the position of the vertebral pedicles and provided reference for intraoperative localization.Conclusions The three-dimensional computerized reconstructions of lumbar pedicle screw fixation may be valuable in basic research,clinical experiment,and surgical planning.The software Amira is one of the bases of three-dimensional reconstruction.

  12. A Narrative Review of Lumbar Fusion Surgery With Relevance to Chiropractic Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Clinton J; Wakefield, Pamela J; Bub, Glenn A; Toombs, James D

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this narrative review was to describe the most common spinal fusion surgical procedures, address the clinical indications for lumbar fusion in degeneration cases, identify potential complications, and discuss their relevance to chiropractic management of patients after surgical fusion. The PubMed database was searched from the beginning of the record through March 31, 2015, for English language articles related to lumbar fusion or arthrodesis or both and their incidence, procedures, complications, and postoperative chiropractic cases. Articles were retrieved and evaluated for relevance. The bibliographies of selected articles were also reviewed. The most typical lumbar fusion procedures are posterior lumbar interbody fusion, anterior lumbar interbody fusion, transforaminal interbody fusion, and lateral lumbar interbody fusion. Fair level evidence supports lumbar fusion procedures for degenerative spondylolisthesis with instability and for intractable low back pain that has failed conservative care. Complications and development of chronic pain after surgery is common, and these patients frequently present to chiropractic physicians. Several reports describe the potential benefit of chiropractic management with spinal manipulation, flexion-distraction manipulation, and manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion low back pain. There are no published experimental studies related specifically to chiropractic care of postfusion low back pain. This article describes the indications for fusion, common surgical practice, potential complications, and relevant published chiropractic literature. This review includes 10 cases that showed positive benefits from chiropractic manipulation, flexion-distraction, and/or manipulation under anesthesia for postfusion lumbar pain. Chiropractic care may have a role in helping patients in pain who have undergone lumbar fusion surgery.

  13. How should we grade lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiping; Fredrickson, Vance; Resnick, Daniel K

    2015-06-01

    MRI is the gold standard for evaluating the relationship of disc material to soft tissue and neural structures. However, terminologies used to describe lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression have always been a source of confusion. A clear understanding of lumbar disc terminology among clinicians, radiologists, and researchers is vital for patient care and future research. Through a systematic review of the literature, the purpose of this article is to describe lumbar disc terminology and comment on the reliability of various nomenclature systems and their application to clinical practice. PubMed was used for our literature search using the following MeSH headings: "Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Intervertebral Disc Displacement" and "Lumbar Vertebrae" and terms "nomenclature" or "grading" or "classification". Ten papers evaluating lumbar disc herniation/nerve root compression using different grading criteria and providing information regarding intraobserver and interobserver agreement were identified. To date, the Combined Task Force (CTF) and van Rijn classification systems are the most reliable methods for describing lumbar disc herniation and nerve root compression, respectively. van Rijn dichotomized nerve roots from "definitely no root compression, possibly no root compression, indeterminate root compression, possible root compression, and definite root compression" into no root compression (first three categories) and root compression (last two categories). The CTF classification defines lumbar discs as normal, focal protrusion, broad-based protrusion, or extrusion. The CTF classification system excludes "disc bulges," which is a source of confusion and disagreement among many practitioners. This potentially accounts for its improved reliability compared with other proposed nomenclature systems. The main issue in the management of patients with lumbar disc disease and nerve root compression is correlation of imaging findings with clinical

  14. Lumbar disc arthroplasty: indications, biomechanics, types, and radiological criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur-Melnyk, A.; Reiser, M.F.; Birkenmaier, C.

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) was developed to treat a painful degenerative lumbar motion segment while avoiding the disadvantages of fusion surgery, such as adjacent segment instabilities. Early clinical results with TDR have shown a significant reduction in low back pain and a significant improvement in disability scores. When compared to fusion, the results with TDR tend to be superior in the short-term follow-up and initial rehabilitation is faster. The radiological assessment is an integral part of the preoperative work-up. Plain X-rays of the lumbar spine should be complemented by flexion - extension views in order to assess residual segmental mobility. Computed tomography is used to exclude osteoarthritis of the zygapophyseal joints, Baastrup's disease (kissing spines) and other sources of low back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful to exclude substantial disc protrusions; it allows for the detection of disc dehydration and bone marrow edema in the case of activated spondylochondrosis. If osteoporosis is suspected, an osteodensitometry of the lumbar spine should be performed. Postoperative plain X-rays should include antero-posterior and lateral views as well as flexion - extension views in the later postoperative course. Measurements should determine the disc space height in the lateral view, the segmental and total lumbar lordosis as well as the segmental mobility in the flexion - extension views. The ideal position of a TDR is exactly central in the ap-view and close to the dorsal border of the vertebral endplates in the lateral view. Malpositioning may cause segmental hyperlordosis and unbalanced loading of the endplates with the risk of implant subsidence and migration. (orig.) [de

  15. Medium-term effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization versus posterior lumbar interbody fusion for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haiting; Pang, Qingjiang; Jiang, Guoqiang

    2017-10-01

    Objective To compare the medium-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of Dynesys dynamic stabilization and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) for treatment of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Methods Fifty-seven patients with multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease underwent Dynesys stabilization (n = 26) or PLIF (n = 31) from December 2008 to February 2010. The mean follow-up period was 50.3 (range, 46-65) months. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI). Radiographic evaluations included disc height and range of motion (ROM) of the operative segments and proximal adjacent segment on lumbar flexion-extension X-rays. The intervertebral disc signal change was defined by magnetic resonance imaging, and disc degeneration was classified by the Pfirrmann grade. Results The clinical outcomes including the VAS score and ODI were significantly improved in both groups at 3 months and the final follow-up, but the difference between the two was not significant. At the final follow-up, the disc height of stabilized segments in both groups was significantly increased; the increase was more notable in the Dynesys than PLIF group. The ROM of stabilized segments at the final follow-up decreased from 6.20° to 2.76° and 6.56° to 0.00° in the Dynesys and PLIF groups, respectively. There was no distinct change in the height of the proximal adjacent segment in the two groups. The ROM of the proximal adjacent segment in both groups increased significantly at the final follow-up; the change was significantly greater in the PLIF than Dynesys group. Only one case of adjacent segment degeneration occurred in the PLIF group, and this patient underwent a second operation. Conclusions Both Dynesys stabilization and PLIF can improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes of multisegmental lumbar degenerative disease. Compared with PLIF, Dynesys stabilization can maintain the mobility of the

  16. Adjacent Lumbar Disc Herniation after Lumbar Short Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Koshi; Iwatsuki, Koichi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ohkawa, Toshika; Yoshimine, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old outpatient presented with a chief complaint of sudden left leg motor weakness and sensory disturbance. He had undergone L4/5 posterior interbody fusion with L3–5 posterior fusions for spondylolisthesis 3 years prior, and the screws were removed 1 year later. He has been followed up for 3 years, and there had been no adjacent segment problems before this presentation. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a large L2/3 disc hernia descending to the L3/4 level. Compared to...

  17. Uninstrumented Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Have Technological Advances in Stabilizing the Lumbar Spine Truly Improved Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolo, Laura M; Oklund, Sally A; Zawadzki, Nadine; Desai, Manisha; Prolo, Donald J

    2018-04-06

    Since the 1980s, numerous operations have replaced posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with human bone. These operations often involve expensive implants and complex procedures. Escalating expenditures in lumbar fusion surgery warrant re-evaluation of classical PLIF with allogeneic ilium and without instrumentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term fusion rate and clinical outcomes of PLIF with allogeneic bone (allo-PLIF). Between 1981 and 2006, 321 patients aged 12-80 years underwent 339 1-level or 2-level allo-PLIFs for degenerative instability and were followed for 1-28 years. Fusion status was determined by radiographs and as available, by computed tomography scans. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Economic/Functional Outcome Scale. Of the 321 patients, 308 were followed postoperatively (average 6.7 years) and 297 (96%) fused. Fusion rates were lower for patients with substance abuse (89%, P = 0.007). Clinical outcomes in 87% of patients were excellent (52%) or good (35%). Economic/Functional Outcome Scale scores after initial allo-PLIF on average increased 5.2 points. Successful fusion correlated with nearly a 2-point gain in outcome score (P = 0.001). A positive association between a patient characteristic and outcome was observed only with age 65 years and greater, whereas negative associations in clinical outcomes were observed with mental illness, substance abuse, heavy stress to the low back, or industrial injuries. The total complication rate was 7%. With 3 decades of follow-up, we found that successful clinical outcomes are highly correlated with solid fusion using only allogeneic iliac bone. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment of a case of subacute lumbar compartment syndrome using the Graston technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Warren I; Pfefer, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    To discuss subacute lumbar compartment syndrome and its treatment using a soft tissue mobilization technique. A patient presented with low back pain related to exercise combined with prolonged flexion posture. The symptoms were relieved with rest and lumbar extension. The patient had restrictive lumbar fascia in flexion and rotation and no neurological deficits. The restrictive lumbar posterior fascial layers and adjoining restrictive fascia (thoracic, gluteal, hamstring) were treated with a form of instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization called the Graston technique. Restoration of fascial extensibility and resolution of the complaint occurred after 6 treatment visits. The posterior spinal fascial compartments may be responsible for intermittent lower back pain. Functional clinical tests can be employed to determine whether the involved fascia is abnormally restrictive. Treatment directed at the restrictive fascia using this soft tissue technique may result in improved fascial functional testing and reduction of symptoms.

  19. Surgical management of multilevel lumbar spondylolysis: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnis, A; Launay, O; Perrin, G; Barrey, C

    2014-05-01

    Multilevel lumbar spondylolysis accounts for less than 6% of the cases of lumbar spondylolysis and its treatment, as reported in the literature, has not been consistent. Fewer than ten cases presenting triple lumbar spondylosis have been published. We describe the case of a 33-year-old male presenting bilateral L3, L4, and L5 isthmic lysis with no spondylolisthesis or disc degeneration. The MRI and CT of the lumbar spine were decisive elements in the therapeutic choice and the surgical treatment performed was bilateral L3 and L4 isthmic repair via a combined anterior and posterior L5S1 approach. The clinical and radiological results were good at the last follow-up visit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of surgical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: does the intra-operative use of a microscope improve surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adogwa, Owoicho; Elsamadicy, Aladine; Reiser, Elizabeth; Ziegler, Cole; Freischlag, Kyle; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare the complications profile as well as long-term clinical outcomes between patients undergoing an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) procedure with and without the use of an intra-operative microscope. One hundred and forty adult patients (non-microscope cohort: 81; microscope cohort: 59) undergoing ACDF at a major academic medical center were included in this study. Enrollment criteria included available demographic, surgical and clinical outcome data. All patients had prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes measures and a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients completed the neck disability index (NDI), short-form 12 (SF-12) and visual analog pain scale (VAS) before surgery, then at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Clinical outcomes and complication rates were compared between both patient cohorts. Baseline characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The mean ± standard deviation duration of surgery was longer in the microscope cohort (microscope: 169±34 minutes vs. non-microscope: 98±42 minutes, Pmicroscope and non-microscope cohorts demonstrated similar improvement from base line in NDI (microscope: 13.52±25.77 vs. non-microscope: 19.51±27.47, Pmicroscope: 4.15±26.39 vs. non-microscope: 11.98±22.96, Pmicroscope: 9.47±32.38 vs. non-microscope: 16.19±30.44, Pmicroscope: 2.22±4.00 vs. non-microscope: 3.69±3.61, Pmicroscope does not improve overall surgery-related outcomes, nor does it lead to superior long-term outcomes in pain and functional disability, 2 years after index surgery.

  1. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  2. Lumbar foraminal stenosis, the hidden stenosis including at L5/S1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Eguchi, Yawara; Kubota, Go; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In patients with lower back and leg pain, lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS) is one of the most important pathologies, especially for predominant radicular symptoms. LFS pathology can develop as a result of progressing spinal degeneration and is characterized by exacerbation with foraminal narrowing caused by lumbar extension (Kemp's sign). However, there is a lack of critical clinical findings for LFS pathology. Therefore, patients with robust and persistent leg pain, which is exacerbated by lumbar extension, should be suspected of LFS. Radiological diagnosis is performed using multiple radiological modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, including plain examination and novel protocols such as diffusion tensor imaging, as well as dynamic X-ray, and computed tomography. Electrophysiological testing can also aid diagnosis. Treatment options include both conservative and surgical approaches. Conservative treatment includes medication, rehabilitation, and spinal nerve block. Surgery should be considered when the pathology is refractory to conservative treatment and requires direct decompression of the exiting nerve root, including the dorsal root ganglia. In cases with decreased intervertebral height and/or instability, fusion surgery should also be considered. Recent advancements in minimally invasive lumbar lateral interbody fusion procedures enable effective and less invasive foraminal enlargement compared with traditional fusion surgeries such as transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. The lumbosacral junction can cause L5 radiculopathy with greater incidence than other lumbar levels as a result of anatomical and epidemiological factors, which should be better addressed when treating clinical lower back pain.

  3. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G. (Turku City Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery; Social Insurance Institution, Turku (Finland). Rehabilitation Research Centre; Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; Liverpool Univ. (UK). Dept. of Orthopaedic and Accident Surgery)

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.).

  4. Lumbar spinal canal size of sciatica patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurme, M.; Alaranta, H.; Aalto, T.; Knuts, L.R.; Vanharanta, H.; Troup, J.D.G.; Social Insurance Institution, Turku; Helsinki Univ.; Liverpool Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Seven measures at the three lowest lumbar interspaces were recorded from conventional radiographs of the lumbar spines of 160 consecutive patients with low back pain and sciatica admitted for myelography and possible surgery. Eighty-eight patients were operated upon for disc herniation, and of the conservatively-treated 72 patients, 18 had a pathologic and 54 a normal myelogram. The results were evaluated after one year using the occupational handicap scales of WHO. Correlations of radiographic measures to stature were moderate and to age small. After adjusting for stature and age, only the male interpedicular distances and the antero-posterior diameter of intervertebral foramen at L3 were greater than those of females. The males with a pathologic myelogram had smaller posterior disc height at L3 and a smaller interarticular distance at L3 and L4 than those with normal myelogram, likewise the midsagittal diameter at L3 and L4 in females. In all patients other measures besides posterior disc height were smaller than those for low back pain patients (p<0.001) or for cadavers (p<0.001). The only correlation between measures and clinical manifestations was between pedicular length at L3 and limited straight leg raising. Where the disc material had been extruded into the spinal canal, the interpedicular distance was significantly wider. Only anterior disc height at L3 revealed differences between good and poor outcome one year after surgery, as did the interarticular distance at S1 in patients with normal myelogram after conservative treatment. (orig.)

  5. [Enlargement in managment of lumbar spinal stenosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steib, J P; Averous, C; Brinckert, D; Lang, G

    1996-05-01

    flexion, obesity or quite simply overuse, involve an increase in the lumbar lordosis. The posterior articulations are worn out and the disc gets damaged by shear forces. The disc space becomes shorter with a bulging disc, and the inferior articular process of the superior vertebra goes down. This is responsible of a loss of lordosis. For restoring the sagittal balance the patient needs more extension of the spine. Above and below the considered level the degenerative disease carries on extending to the whole spine. At the level considered, because of local extension, the inferior facet moves forward, the disc bulges, the ligamentum flavum is shortened and the stenosis is increased. This situation is improved by local kyphosis: the inferior facet moves backward, the disc and the ligamentum flavum are stretched with a quite normal posterior disc height and most often there is no more stenosis. Myelograms show this very well with a quite normal appearance lying, clear compression standing, worse in extension and improved, indeed disappeared in flexion. CT scan and MRI don't show that because they are done lying. The expression of the clinical situation is the same, mute lying and maximum standing with restriction of walking. For us lumbar stenosis is operated with lumbar reconstruction without opening the canal. The patient is in moderate kyphosis on the operating table. Pedicle screws rotated to match a bent rod allow reduction of the spine. The posterior disc height is respected and not distracted, and the anterior part of the disc is stretched in lordosis. The inferior facet is cut for the arthrodesis and no longer compresses the dura. The canal is well enlarged and the lumbar segment in lordosis is the best protection of the adjacent levels at follow-up. This behaviour responds to the same analysis as the ≪recalibrage≫ (enlargement). The mobile segment is damaged by the degenerative disease, the stenosis is a consequence of this damage. It's logical to treat the

  6. Estudo clínico da eficácia do bloqueio anestésico radicular transforaminal no tratamento da radiculopatia lombar Estudio clínico de la eficacia del bloqueo anestésico radicular transforaminal en el tratamiento de la radiculopatía lumbar Clinical study on the efficacy of transforaminal radicular block in lumbar radiculopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Fonseca Rodrigues de Souza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar a eficácia da injeção transforaminal nos pacientes com dor radicular devido à hérnia de disco ou estenose foraminal lombar por meio de estudo prospectivo randomizado. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 61 pacientes com quadro de radiculopatia nos membros inferiores. Esses pacientes foram divididos em dois grupos escolhidos aleatoriamente. Desses, 32 foram submetidos à injeção de corticosteroides e 29 foram submetidos à injeção salina. O período de acompanhamento foi de 12 meses. Para avaliar os resultados aplicamos a Escala Analógica Visual de Dor (EAV e o Índice Oswestry (ODI. RESULTADOS: Houve melhora significativa da intensidade de dor (p OBJETIVO: El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo evaluar la eficacia de la inyección transforaminal en pacientes con dolor radicular, debido a la hernia discal lumbar o estenosis foraminal, mediante un estudio prospectivo y aleatorizado. MÉTODOS: Se analizó un total de 61 pacientes con cuadro de radiculopatía en miembros inferiores. Estos pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos seleccionados al azar. De ellos, 31 fueron sometidos a inyecciones de corticoides y a 29 se les aplicaron inyecciones de suero fisiológico. El período de seguimiento fue de 12 meses. Para evaluar los resultados se les aplicó la Escala Visual Analógica del dolor (EAV y el Índice de Oswestry (ODI, sigla en inglés. RESULTADOS: Hubo una mejora significativa en la intensidad del dolor (p OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of corticosteroid injections in patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation or lumbar foraminal stenosis by a prospective randomized study. METHODS: There were analyzed 61 patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc degeneration. These patients were divided into two groups randomly chosen to radicular blocks with saline solution or corticosteroids. Thirty-one of these patients were submitted to corticosteroids radicular block and 29 patients were submitted

  7. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Radiology, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Foti, Pauline [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Medical Statistics, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France); Hauger, Olivier [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Hopital Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France); Boileau, Pascal [Centre Hospital-Universitaire de Nice, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hopital archet 2, Nice (France)

    2013-01-15

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 {+-} 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 {+-} 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 {+-} 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 {+-} 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 {+-} 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 {+-} 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 {+-} 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 {+-} 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  8. CT- and fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous discectomy for lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation: a comparative prospective study comparing lateral to medial herniated discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amoretti, Nicolas; Huwart, Laurent; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Foti, Pauline; Hauger, Olivier; Boileau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare two groups of patients with sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with no neurologic deficit. The groups consisted of patients with intervertebral disc herniation in a medial location (group 1) and those in a lateral location (group 2). A total of 200 patients were included in the study and were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In our series, we treated 80 postero-lateral herniated discs (40% of cases), 46 postero-medial herniated discs (23%), and 74 foraminal herniated discs (37%). Level L3-L4 was treated in 30 cases (15%), L4-L5 in 98 cases (49%), and L5-S1 in 72 cases (36%). The procedure was performed under dual guidance: fluoroscopic and CT. A helical probe was activated. It penetrates the herniated disc and causes the pulpous material to be mechanically evacuated through the probe. All 200 patients were followed for a minimum of 6 months. In group 1, the patients had a mean pain score of 7.9 ± 2.5 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 3.2 ± 2.1 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and increased to 3.9 ± 1.2 VAS units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 1 month follow-up and further reduced to 2.7 ± 1.2 units (range 0-10 VAS units) at 6 month follow-up. In group 2, the patients had a mean pain score of 8.2 ± 3.2 VAS units (range 6-10 units) prior to intervention. This was reduced to 2.8 ± 1.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 48 h follow-up and decreased to 1.5 ± 0.9 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 1 month and further reduced to 1.1 ± 0.5 VAS units (range 0-10 units) at 6 months. Our study showed that results were more satisfactory for the hernia located laterally (postero-lateral, foraminal, and extra-foraminal) as compared to the hernia located posteromedially. (orig.)

  9. Hernia discal lumbar: Tratamiento conservador

    OpenAIRE

    López-Sastre Núñez, Antonio; Candau Pérez, Ernesto

    1999-01-01

    Existe una gran demanda de patología lumbar crónica y aguda que debe de tratarse conjuntamente entre el especialista en Rehabilitación y el Cirujano de columna vertebral. En este trabajo se detallan las posibilidades del tratamiento conservador antes de optar por la cirugía. Se realiza una revisión bibliográfica de los resultados conservadores del tratamiento de la lumbociática de origen discal comparando aquellos estudios publicados con validez estadística. Se detallan las modernas pautas de...

  10. Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injections Followed by Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy to Prevent Surgery for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helvoirt, H.; Apeldoorn, A.T.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Knol, D.L.; Arts, M.P.; Kamper, S.J.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Objective: To report the clinical course of patients with MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation-related radicular noncentralizing pain who received transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Summary of

  11. [A woman with a postoperative lumbar swelling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Hanna M; Elsenburg, Patric H J M; Frequin, Stephan T F M

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year-old woman had developed a large lumbar swelling in a period of four weeks following lumbar laminectomy. An MRI-scan revealed a large fluid collection, which had formed from the spinal canal. The diagnosis 'liquorcele', a rare complication of spine surgery, was established.

  12. The relationship between changes of cervical sagittal alignment after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and spino-pelvic sagittal alignment under roussouly classification: a four-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Ning; Yu, Miao; Xu, Nan-Fang; Li, Mai; Wang, Shao-Bo; Sun, Yu; Jiang, Liang; Wei, Feng; Liu, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Zhong-Jun

    2017-02-20

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is widely used in the treatment of cervical degenerative disease; however, the variation of cervical sagittal alignment changes after ACDF has been rarely explored. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between changes of cervical sagittal alignment after ACDF and spino-pelvic sagittal alignment under Roussouly classification. A cohort of 133 Chinese cervical spondylotic patients who received ACDF from 2011 to 2012 was recruited. All patients were categorized with Roussouly Classification. Lateral X-ray images of global spine were obtained, and preoperative and postoperative parameters were measured and analyzed, including C2-C7 angles (C2-C7), C0-C7 angles (C0-C7), external auditory meatus (EAM) tilt, sacral slope (SS), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), spinal sacral angles (SSA), Superior adjacent inter-vertebral angle (SAIV), inferior adjacent inter-vertebral angle (IAIV) and et al. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for intragroup comparisons preoperatively and at postoperative 48 months. Among the parameters, C2-C7 and C0-C7 showed significant increase, while EAM TK, and IAIV decreased significantly. In type I, EAM and TK decreased significantly, however SS showed a significant increase; in type II, TK showed a significant decrease, but SSA showed a significant increase; in type III, a significant increase of C0-C7 was observed with a significant decrease in EAM, nevertheless, LL, SS and SSA showed significant decreases; and in type IV, C2-C7 showed a significant increase and EAM decreased significantly. The percentage of lordotic alignment in cervical spine increased, which was presenting in type I, III and IV. Nevertheless, the amount of patients with straight cervical alignment increased in type II. The backward movement of head occurs is the compensatory mechanism in cervical sagittal alignment modifications after ACDF. The compensatory alteration of spino-pelvic sagittal

  13. A Canadian perspective on anterior cervical discectomies: practice patterns and preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennardo, Michael; Farrokhyar, Forough; Martyniuk, Amanda; Reddy, Kesava

    2018-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study is to elucidate the current practice patterns of Canadian neurosurgeons with regards to anterior cervical discectomy (ACD). Methods A one-page questionnaire was sent out using SurveyMonkey to all neurosurgeon members of the Canadian Neurological Sciences Federation (CNSF). End points were surgeon preference for ACD surgical method, graft source, the length of collar usage and the recommended time before returning to work. Results Response rate was 74.0%. Of the responders, 75.0% performed single level ACD and 18.3% had completed spine fellowships. The majority (68.2%) chose ACD with fusion and plating (ACDFP) as their preferred method with allograft being the most popular choice of fusion material (44.3%). Most of the respondents did not prescribe collars (60.9%) and when they did, hard collar was prescribed most often (76.9%) and AspenTM collar was the most popular choice (67.7%). The majority of surgeons chose ‘other’ as their response for length of time for collar use (40.0%) while allowing them to take their collars off at night (78.1%). Most of the surgeons recommended physiotherapy post-operatively (58.1%) and time to physiotherapy was 6–8 weeks. Recommended back to work time was 6 weeks for 44.9% of respondents. In the cross analysis, surgeons who performed ACDF were more likely to prescribe collars (50%, P=0.01) versus surgeons who performed ACDFP (21.7%, P=0.01). Conclusions Our survey is an up to date description of current practice patterns for ACD amongst Canadian neurosurgeons. PMID:29732425

  14. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  15. Geographic variation in lumbar diskectomy: a protocol for evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, M; Kazandjian, V A

    1992-03-01

    In 1989 the Maryland Hospital Association (MHA) began developing a protocol related to lumbar diskectomy, a procedure with widely reported geographic variation in its use. The MHA's Laminectomy Advisory Committee drafted three criteria for performance of lumbar diskectomy and also developed a data-collection instrument with which the eight hospitals participating in a pilot study could abstract the necessary data from medical records. Both individual hospital and aggregate results showed wide variation in compliance with the criteria. These findings suggest research and development activities such as refinement of the data-collection instrument, use of the protocol for bench-marking, further investigation of clinical and other determinants of rate variation, and study of the effect of new diagnostic technology on utilization rates for this procedure.

  16. Natural history of symptomatic lumbar disk herniation controlled by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Hiromichi; Yamaura, Isakichi; Kurosa, Yoshiro; Yoshida, Hirotoshi; Nakai, Osamu.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare changes in clinical symptoms and sequential findings of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 66 patients managed with conservative treatment for lumbar disc herniation. In all but 12 patients, there was a good correlation between leg pain and MRI findings, although findings of MRI tended to slightly follow symptom improvement. A notable reduction of herniated mass was seen in a high frequency in sequentrated herniation from an extremely degenerated lumbar disk. The greater the degree of sequentration, the greater the reduction of herniated mass. A shorter duration of leg pain was significantly associated with greater reduction of the herniated mass; leg pain disappeared within 2 months when the herniated mass disappeared on MRI. Because herniated mass disappeared within a short period of time, the involvement of immune reaction was suggested, as well as the possibility of sequentration, degeneration, and phagocytosis. (N.K.)

  17. Single anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using self- locking stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage: evaluation of pain and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Thomaidis, Tryfon; Charitoudis, George; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Theodosiadis, Panagiotis; Gkasdaris, Grigorios

    2017-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) constitutes the conventional treatment of cervical disc herniation due to degenerative disc disease (DDD). ACDF with plating presents a variety of complications postoperatively and stand-alone cages are thought to be a promising alternative. The aim of this study was firstly, to analyze prospectively collected data from a sample of patients treated with single ACDF using C-Plus self-locking stand-alone PEEK cage system, without the use of plates or screws, in order to evaluate pain levels of patients, utilizing Neck and Arm Pain scale as an expression of visual analogue scale (VAS). Secondly, we aimed to evaluate health-related quality of life, via the short-form 36 (SF-36) and Neck Disability Index (NDI). Thirty-six patients (19 male and 17 female) with mean age 49.6±7 years old who underwent successful single ACDF using self-locking stand-alone PEEK cage for symptomatic cervical DDD were selected for the study. Neck and Arm pain, as well as SF-36 and NDI were estimated preoperatively and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Patients underwent preoperative and postoperative clinical, neurological and radiological evaluation. The clinical and radiological outcomes were satisfactory after a minimum 1-year follow-up. All results were statistically important (P<0.05), excluding improvement in NDI measured between 6 and 12 months. SF-36, Neck Pain, as well as Arm Pain featured gradual and constant improvement during follow-up, with best scores presenting at 12 months after surgery, while NDI reached its best at 6 months postoperatively. Generally, all scores showed improvement postoperatively during the different phases of the follow-up. Subsequently, ACDF using C-Plus cervical cage constitutes an effective method for cervical disc herniation treatment, in terms of postoperative improvement on pain levels and health-related quality of life and a safe alternative to the conventional method of treatment for cervical DDD.

  18. The activL® Artificial Disc: a next-generation motion-preserving implant for chronic lumbar discogenic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, James J; Garcia, Rolando; Miller, Larry E

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of the lumbar intervertebral discs is a leading cause of chronic low back pain in adults. Treatment options for patients with chronic lumbar discogenic pain unresponsive to conservative management include total disc replacement (TDR) or lumbar fusion. Until recently, only two lumbar TDRs had been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration − the Charité Artificial Disc in 2004 and the ProDisc-L Total Disc Replacement in 2006. In June 2015, a next-generation lumbar TDR received Food and Drug Administration approval − the activL® Artificial Disc (Aesculap Implant Systems). Compared to previous-generation lumbar TDRs, the activL® Artificial Disc incorporates specific design enhancements that result in a more precise anatomical match and allow a range of motion that better mimics the healthy spine. The results of mechanical and clinical studies demonstrate that the activL® Artificial Disc results in improved mechanical and clinical outcomes versus earlier-generation artificial discs and compares favorably to lumbar fusion. The purpose of this report is to describe the activL® Artificial Disc including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, postoperative care, mechanical testing, and clinical experience to date. PMID:27274317

  19. Adjacent segment degeneration after lumbar spinal fusion: the impact of anterior column support: a randomized clinical trial with an eight- to thirteen-year magnetic resonance imaging follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbaek, Tina S; Egund, Niels; Christensen, Finn B; Grethe Jurik, Anne; Bünger, Cody E

    2010-10-15

    Randomized controlled trial. To analyze long-term adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after lumbar fusion on magnetic resonance imaging and compare randomization groups with and without anterior column support. ASD can be a long-term complication after fusion. The prevalence and the cause of ASD are not well documented, but ASD are one of the main arguments for introducing the use of motion-preserving techniques as an alternative to fusion. Anterior lumbar interbody fusion combined with posterolateral lumbar fusion (ALIF+PLF) has been proved superior to posterolateral fusion alone regarding outcome and cost-effectiveness. Between 1996 and 1999, 148 patients with severe chronic low back pain were randomly selected for ALIF+PLF or for PLF alone. Ninety-five patients participated. ASD was examined on magnetic resonance imaging with regard to disc degeneration, disc herniation, stenosis, and endplate changes. Disc heights on radiographs taken at index surgery and at long-term follow-up were compared. Outcome was assessed by validated questionnaires. The follow-up rate was 76%. ASD was similar between randomization groups. In the total cohort, endplate changes were seen in 26% of the participants and correlated significantly with the presence of disc degeneration and disc herniation. Disc degeneration and dorsal disc herniation were the parameters registered most frequently and were significantly more pronounced at the first adjacent level than at the second and the third adjacent levels. Patients without disc height reduction over time were significantly younger than patients with disc height reduction. Disc degeneration and stenosis correlated significantly with outcome at the first adjacent level. The cause of the superior outcome in the group with anterior support is still unclear. Compared with the findings reported in the literature, the prevalence of ASD is likely to be in concordance with the expected changes in a nonoperated symptomatic population and therefore

  20. Lumbar ultrasound: useful gadget or time-consuming gimmick?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambling, D R

    2011-10-01

    Despite widespread enthusiasm for using lumbar ultrasound in obstetrics, there are some who believe it is expensive and time-consuming, with undetermined risks and uncertain benefits. For decades, anesthesiologists have striven to perfect the identification and cannulation of the epidural space using skills learned during training and early clinical practice. These skills include knowledge of the relevant anatomy and detection of subtle tactile clues that aid successful placement of an epidural catheter. Indeed, obstetric anesthesiologists have managed to do this with great success without using imaging techniques. There is a long learning curve associated with lumbar ultrasound and it is unclear from the literature if the success rates associated with its use are superior to clinical skill alone. Is it only a matter of time before regulators insist that lumbar ultrasound is used before inserting an epidural? Indeed, this has already happened for central vein catheters. The United States spent $2.2 trillion on health care in 2007, nearly twice the average of other developed nations. If rapid health cost growth persists, one out of every four dollars in the US national economy will be tied up in the health system by 2025. Do obstetric anesthesiologists want to add to these costs by using unnecessary and expensive equipment? Although many feel that diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics is safe, some argue that we have yet to perform an appropriate risk analysis for lumbar ultrasound during pregnancy. The issue of ultrasound bio-safety needs to be considered before we all jump on the ultrasound bandwagon. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.