WorldWideScience

Sample records for lucite

  1. Influence of lucite phantoms on calibration of dosimetric pens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, E.C.; Xavier, M.; Caldas, L.E.V.

    1992-01-01

    Dosimetrical pens were studied for the answer repetition and were tested in gamma radiation fields ( 60 Co and 137 Cs) in air and in front of a lucite phantom, obtaining a backscattering contribution. The medium backscattering factors were 1,053 and 1,108 for respectively 60 Co and 137 Cs. The pens were placed behind the phantom for verifying the radiation attenuation. (C.G.C.)

  2. Estimating the Cerenkov neutron sensitivity of Suprasil (SiO2) and Lucite (C5H8O2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.

    1982-01-01

    Fast neutrons hitting a sample of suprasil will produce light. This light is Cerenkov light produced by high energy (> .2 MeV) electrons traversing the transparent medium. Neutrons produce these electrons in a two step process. First, the neutrons inelastically scatter with either the silicon (Si) or the oxygen (O) atoms producing inelastic gamma rays. Some of these gammas, in turn, will also react producing, primarily, Compton electrons with some pair production electrons possible. The majority of these Compton electrons will have enough energy to induce Cerenkov light production. For intermediate energy neutrons (2 to 20 MeV), this process is efficient enough to produce a relatively simple neutron detector with some desirable properties. Estimations of the Cherenkov/neutron sensitivities of suprasil and lucite are presented

  3. Design of a head phantom produced on a 3D rapid prototyping printer and comparison with a RANDO and 3M lucite head phantom in eye dosimetry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homolka, Peter; Figl, Michael; Wartak, Andreas; Glanzer, Mathias; Dünkelmeyer, Martina; Hojreh, Azadeh; Hummel, Johann

    2017-04-21

    An anthropomorphic head phantom including eye inserts allowing placement of TLDs 3 mm below the cornea has been produced on a 3D printer using a photo-cured acrylic resin to best allow tissue equivalence. Thus H p (3) can be determined in radiological and interventional photon radiation fields. Eye doses and doses to the forehead have been compared to an Alderson RANDO head and a 3M Lucite skull phantom in terms of surface dose per incident air kerma for frontal irradiation since the commercial phantoms do not allow placement of TLDs 3 mm below the corneal surface. A comparison of dose reduction factors (DRFs) of a common lead glasses model has also been performed. Eye dose per incident air kerma were comparable between all three phantoms (printed phantom: 1.40, standard error (SE) 0.04; RANDO: 1.36, SE 0.03; 3M: 1.37, SE 0.03). Doses to the forehead were identical to eye surface doses for the printed phantom and the RANDO head (ratio 1.00 SE 0.04, and 0.99 SE 0.03, respectively). In the 3M Lucite skull phantom dose on the forehead was 15% lower than dose to the eyes attributable to phantom properties. DRF of a sport frame style leaded glasses model with 0.75 mm lead equivalence measured were 6.8 SE 0.5, 9.3 SE 0.4 and 10.5 SE 0.5 for the RANDO head, the printed phantom, and the 3M Lucite head phantom, respectively, for frontal irradiation. A comparison of doses measured in 3 mm depth and on the surface of the eyes in the printed phantom revealed no difference larger than standard errors from TLD dosimetry. 3D printing offers an interesting opportunity for phantom design with increasing potential as printers allowing combinations of tissue substitutes will become available. Variations between phantoms may provide a useful indication of uncertainty budgets when using phantom measurements to estimate individual personnel doses.

  4. Critical mass experiment using U-235 foils and lucite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of this experiment was to show how the multiplication of the system increases as moderated material is placed between highly enriched uranium foils. In addition, this experiment served to demonstrate the hand-stacking techniques, and approach to criticality by remote operation. This experiment was designed by Tom McLaughlin in the mid seventies as part of the criticality safety course that is taught at Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF). The W-U-235 ratio for this experiment was 215 which is where the minimum critical mass for this configuration occurs

  5. Critical mass experiment using 235U foils and lucite plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.

    1998-01-01

    This experiment demonstrated how the neutron multiplication of a system increases as moderated material is placed between highly enriched uranium foils. In addition, this experiment served to demonstrate the hand-stacking technique and approach to criticality be remote operation. This experiment was designed by McLaughlin in the mid-seventies as part of the criticality safety course that is taught at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The H/ 235 U ratio for this experiment was 215, which is the ratio at which the minimum critical mass for this configuration occurs

  6. Aurel Ion Maican (III. Declinul unei cariere strălucite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Molea

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the last part of a monographic study on stage director Aurel Ion Maican, who contributed decisively to the making of Romanian modern theatre in the interwar period. After having traced back the beginnings of Maican’s career and his outstanding activity at the National Theatre of Jassy, the author brings to light little known facts regarding the artist’s work from late 1934 till his death in 1952. For the Romanian theatre it was a period of decay. Because of the insecure political climate in the late 1930s and the vicissitudes of the Second World War, theatre practitioners turned quite often to light, escapist entertainment. Under these circumstances, Maican moved from one city to another, staging mainly boulevard comedies, operettas and variety shows. In 1943, during the Romanian occupation of Transnistria, he was appointed director of Odessa National Theatre, where he worked for a season. When Romania changed sides and joined the Allies, Maican was imprisoned under false accusations, but he was eventually released without trial. After the war, the newly established Communist regime brought dramatic changes: theatres were nationalised in 1948, and an increasing number of propaganda plays were included in the repertoire. Maican worked mainly as a theatre director and as a professor at the Institute of Theatre, trying to fit in this new world. In the last part of his career, few were the productions in which the stage director succeeded to materialize his reformist vision. The troubled history of those years, as well as personal circumstances prevented Maican, once a brilliant innovative artist, from achieving his full potential.

  7. Evaluation of attenuating materials: model for the distribution of scattered radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paulo R.

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model for the behaviour of the distribution of photon scattered by attenuating media is presented. Shielding barriers or attenuating materials used in tests of quality control in radiology are proposed. Comparative results for Lucite are reported

  8. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program — Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-03-01

    NASA’s Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program has Lucite disks containing Apollo lunar samples and meteorite samples that are available for trained educators to borrow for use in classrooms, museums, science center, and libraries.

  9. Evaluation of secondary electron filter for removing contaminant electrons from high-energy 6 MV x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Kozo

    1988-01-01

    When using high energy X-rays, the dose increases at the skin surface and build-up region of beam contamination of secondary electrons coming out from the inner surface of the lineac head. At our radiotherapy department, many cases of external otitis from severe skin reactions, particularly resulting from whole brain irradiation of primary and metastatic brain tumors with a 6 MV X-ray lineac, have been encountered. An investigation was made of the physical aspects of a 6 MV X-ray beam using three electron filters, lead lucite, lead glass and lucite to remove secondary electrons. Transparent materials for filters should be preferable for locating the light field. The following results were obtained: 1) For removing secondary electrons, a lead lucite filter was found best. 2) The lead lucite filter proved most effective for removing secondary electrons from the area of treatment. It reduced the dose of irradiation to the skin surface and build-up region, and furthermore improved the depth dose relative to that without filters. 3) From a clinical standpoint, skin reactions such as external otitis remarkably decreased using a lead lucite filter. 4) It thus appears necessary to use a high energy X-ray with newly designed filters to reduce beam contamination of secondary electrons. (author)

  10. Thermophysical Properties of Aircraft Structural Materials in Solid and Molten States. A Comprehensive Survey of Available Data and Feasibility Study of Estimation and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    methylmethacrylate and 0-100% methacrylic acid . 25-300 90025 Polymethacrylic acid . 50-200 66583 Polyethylm ethacrylate, poly-n-butyl acrylate, and...Polyacrylic acid and some of its salts (H, Na, Cu, Hg). 10. Lucite "Lucite" is a trade name of DuPont for polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The other trade name...2.2 40338 7.13 mm before and after methacrylate) fading. Poly(n-butyl 300 2.0-15.0 19814 methacrylate) Poly(acrylic acid ) 300 3-7 34840 Poly( ethylene

  11. Beam test of Cherenkov counter prototype for ZDF setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacharava, A.K.; Macharashvili, G.G.; Nioradze, M.S.; Komarov, V.I.; Sopov, V.S.; Chernyshev, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a Cherenkov counter of total internal reflection for particle separation in the momentum range where all types of particles radiate Cherenkov light. The Cherenkov counter prototype with the lucite radiator was tested on the secondary beam of the ITEP (Moscow) accelerator. Dependence of the photomultiplier pulse height on the particle entrance angle was clearly observed. 4 refs., 4 figs

  12. Practical radiation shielding for biomedical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.C.; Reginatto, M.; Party, E.; Gershey, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on calculations which exist for estimating shielding required for radioactivity; however, they are often not applicable for the radionuclides and activities common in biomedical research. A variety of commercially available Lucite shields are being marketed to the biomedical community. Their advertisements may lead laboratory workers to expect better radiation protection than these shields can provide or to assume erroneously that very weak beta emitters require extensive shielding. The authors have conducted a series of shielding experiments designed to simulate exposures from the amounts of 32 P, 51 Cr and 125 I typically used in biomedical laboratories. For most routine work, ≥0.64 cm of Lucite covered with various thicknesses of lead will reduce whole-body occupational exposure rates of < 1mR/hr at the point of contact

  13. Design and Construction of a Test Phantom for Screen/Film Mammography Quality Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvan, Hector; Grabski, Varlen; Ruiz, Cesar; Brandan, Maria-Ester; Villasenor, Yolanda

    2006-01-01

    A 10 x 10 x 4 cm Lucite phantom for quality control tests in mammography has been designed and built. It contains internal elements to quantify contrast and resolution, a mixture of talc and Lucite fibers to simulate the breast architecture, a 9-step aluminum wedge to verify the constancy of the film developing process, and metallic foils to evaluate kVp. Associated with an ionization chamber, the mean glandular dose can be evaluated. Its performance has been compared against the phantom accredited by the American College of Radiology. For a series of kV, both phantoms OD are similar within 5%. The step wedge can detect developer temperature changes of ±1 deg. C. Relative metal foils/acrylic OD permits to calculate kVp with precision of ±0.43 kV. Radiological measurements have been interpreted by numerical calculations

  14. SU-E-T-425: Feasibility of Establishing a National Postal Dosimetry System Using EBT3 Gafchromic Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rahman, W; Mohammed, I; Bamajboor, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a postal dosimeter consisting of EBT3 films and a miniature Lucite phantom to be used for photon beams output audits for mega-voltage photon beams across the Saudi Arabia. Methods: Two batches of EBT3 films were calibrated in 5 mega-voltage photon beams with energies ranging between 6 MV and 18 MV in the dose range between 0 to 4 Gy. A 4×4×20 cm 3 lucite phantom was constructed to be used as an irradiation phantom. The lucite irradiation phantom consists of two parts and allows for embedding a 2.5×2.0 cm 2 EBT3 film at 8.9 cm depth. Factors that convert the dose measured in the lucite irradiation phantom at 8.9 cm depth to the dose at 10 cm depth in water for 10×10 cm 2 field for different photon energies were calculated using the dosxyznrc/EGSnrcMP user code. The performance of the proposed postal dosimeter was tested in 17 different photon beams across 4 radiotherapy centres in Saudi Arabia. The outputs of the 17 beams are monitored by either the International Atomic Energy Agency or by the Radiological Physics Centre. Results: For the 17 photon beams, the average of the ratios of measured to stated outputs was 1.01 ± 0.02 and with a maximum ratio of 1.05. Conclusion: The results of our work indicate that the proposed postal dosimetry system can be used for national auditing of outputs for mega-voltage photon beams. The service can be offered to other national radiotherapy centres or to a be used for credentialing of centres participating in national trials

  15. SU-E-T-425: Feasibility of Establishing a National Postal Dosimetry System Using EBT3 Gafchromic Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Rahman, W [KING FAHAD SPECIALIST HOSPITAL, Dammam, Eastern Province (Saudi Arabia); Mohammed, I [King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Eastern Province (Saudi Arabia); Bamajboor, S [Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of a postal dosimeter consisting of EBT3 films and a miniature Lucite phantom to be used for photon beams output audits for mega-voltage photon beams across the Saudi Arabia. Methods: Two batches of EBT3 films were calibrated in 5 mega-voltage photon beams with energies ranging between 6 MV and 18 MV in the dose range between 0 to 4 Gy. A 4×4×20 cm{sup 3} lucite phantom was constructed to be used as an irradiation phantom. The lucite irradiation phantom consists of two parts and allows for embedding a 2.5×2.0 cm{sup 2} EBT3 film at 8.9 cm depth. Factors that convert the dose measured in the lucite irradiation phantom at 8.9 cm depth to the dose at 10 cm depth in water for 10×10 cm{sup 2} field for different photon energies were calculated using the dosxyznrc/EGSnrcMP user code. The performance of the proposed postal dosimeter was tested in 17 different photon beams across 4 radiotherapy centres in Saudi Arabia. The outputs of the 17 beams are monitored by either the International Atomic Energy Agency or by the Radiological Physics Centre. Results: For the 17 photon beams, the average of the ratios of measured to stated outputs was 1.01 ± 0.02 and with a maximum ratio of 1.05. Conclusion: The results of our work indicate that the proposed postal dosimetry system can be used for national auditing of outputs for mega-voltage photon beams. The service can be offered to other national radiotherapy centres or to a be used for credentialing of centres participating in national trials.

  16. Preliminary studies on fragmentation in tissue-equivalent material produced by 55 MeV/u 40Ar17+ ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Bingrong; Wei Zengquan; Duan Limin; Zhang Baoguo; Li Songlin; Yin Xu; Zhu Yongtai; Li Wenjian; Li Qiang; Yuan Shibin

    2002-01-01

    By using a 55 MeV/u 40 Ar 17+ beam produced by HIRFL, the distribution of fragments in 1.5 mm lucite on three different directions were measured at the radiobiology terminal. Feasibilities of the phoswich detector composed of fast plastic scintillator and CsI(Tl) detectors for determination of angular distribution of fragments in tissue-equivalent materials were investigated. The results obtained were satisfactory

  17. Counter support for WA35

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1977-01-01

    This assembly was equipped with 78 counters, each consisting of a lucite cone, to produce Cerenkov light, and a CsI scintillator plate of 3 mm thickness glued on the face of the cone. The experiment WA35 was set-up in the s1 beam (West Hall) by the Darmstadt-Heidelberg-Virginia-Warsaw Collaboration to measure angular distributions and multiplicities of pions and recoil protons produced by hadrons interacting in nuclei. (See Annual Report 1976 p. 39)

  18. Continuous-Tone Electrostatic Electrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1948-09-15

    15 Optical Measurements ....••• .,.••• 15 Electrical Measurements .1.6 Physical Measurements- .............. » • • • 16...these items.of equipment will "be recorded here. Optical Measurements Equipment is "being assembled to provide monochromatic and poly- chromatic light...the dust patterns which formed in the nonimage areas of the plate. Such patterns have heen noted previously on Lucite plates. RESTRICTED BATTEI

  19. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  20. A feasibility study of the Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of beam profiles at various gantry angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C.; Chu, James C.H.; Bernard, Damian B.; Abrams, Ross A.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20×12×6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross‐beam‐profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full‐size (60×60×50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full‐size water phantom was first performed at a 0° gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8 mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC‐shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  1. The water equivalence of solid materials used for dosimetry with small proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Uwe; Pemler, Peter; Besserer, Juergen; Dellert, Matthias; Moosburger, Martin; Boer, Jorrit de; Pedroni, Eros; Boehringer, Terence

    2002-01-01

    Various solid materials are used instead of water for absolute dosimetry with small proton beams. This may result in a dose measurement different to that in water, even when the range of protons in the phantom material is considered correctly. This dose difference is caused by the diverse cross sections for inelastic nuclear scattering in water and in the phantom materials respectively. To estimate the magnitude of this effect, flux and dose measurements with a 177 MeV proton pencil beam having a width of 0.6 cm (FWHM) were performed. The proton flux and the deposited dose in the beam path were determined behind water, lucite, polyethylene, teflon, and aluminum of diverse thicknesses. The number of out-scattered protons due to inelastic nuclear scattering was determined for water and the different materials. The ratios of the number of scattered protons in the materials relative to that in water were found to be 1.20 for lucite, 1.16 for polyethylene, 1.22 for teflon, and 1.03 for aluminum. The difference between the deposited dose in water and in the phantom materials taken in the center of the proton pencil beam, was estimated from the flux measurements, always taking the different ranges of protons in the materials into account. The estimated dose difference relative to water in 15 cm water equivalent thickness was -2.3% for lucite, -1.7% for polyethylene, -2.5% for teflon, and -0.4% for aluminum. The dose deviation was verified by a measurement using an ionization chamber. It should be noted that the dose error is larger when the effective point of measurement in the material is deeper or when the energy is higher

  2. A Detector for 2-D Neutron Imaging for the Spallation Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, Charles L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Wintenberg, Alan Lee; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; McKnight, Timothy E.; Frank, Steven Shane; Cooper, Ronald G.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Veith, Gabriel M.

    2006-01-01

    We have designed, built, and tested a 2-D pixellated thermal neutron detector. The detector is modeled after the MicroMegas-type structure previously published for collider-type experiments. The detector consists of a 4X4 square array of 1 cm 2 pixels each of which is connected to an individual preamplifier-shaper-data acquisition system. The neutron converter is a 10B film on an aluminum substrate. We describe the construction of the detector and the test results utilizing 252Cf sources in Lucite to thermalize the neutrons. Drift electrode (Aluminum) Converter (10B) 3 mm Conversion gap neutron (-900 V)

  3. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  4. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-01-01

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling

  5. Spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core obtained by means of foil activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestnik Filho, J.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional distribution of the neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor, obtained by activating gold foils, is presented. The foils of diameter 8mm and thickness 0,013mm were mounted on lucite plates and located between the fuel element plates. Foil activities were measured using a 3x3 inches Nal(Tl) scintilation detector calibrated against a 4πβγ coincidence detector. Foil positions were chosen to minimize the errors of measurement; the overall estimated error on the measured flux is 5%. (Author) [pt

  6. Quantitative determination of bone mineral content (QCT) - intercomparison of computer tomographs of the same construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, R.; Banzer, D.; Felsenberg, D.; Wolf, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    An intercomparison of 4 CT scanners of the same manufacturer was performed. The bone mineral content of 11 lumbar vertebral columns removed directly post mortem was determined in a specially constructed lucite-water phantom. Even devices of the same construction were shown to yield a variation in the quantitative evaluation markedly exceeding the annual physiological mineral loss. As long as scanner adjustment by physical calibration phantoms has not yet been established, a course assessment and therapy control of bone mineral content should always be carried out on the same QCT scanner. (orig.) [de

  7. Model of the contribution of the compton generated radiation to the dose rate for an experiment in a semi industrial irradiation plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangussi, Josefina

    2007-01-01

    The model of the build up contribution to the absorbed dose rate in a semi industrial irradiation plant is presented. A static irradiation of a lucite phantom with and without water is modeled. The absorbed dose was measured with silver and potassium dichromate dosemeters. Two approximations are used, the first one is a global adjustment of the attenuation coefficient and the second one consists in a detailed description of the Compton scattering. A specific numerical model is developed for each approximation and the absorbed dose rates calculated are compared with the experimental measurements. The achievements and limitations of both models are discussed. (author) [es

  8. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-01-01

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite reg-sign and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone

  9. Practical dosimetric aspects of blood and blood product irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fearon, T.C.; Luban, N.L.

    1986-01-01

    The method of choice to reduce susceptibility to transfusion-transmitted graft-versus-host disease is irradiation of allogenic blood and blood products for transfusion to immunosuppressed recipients. Optimal irradiation requires delivery of a known and homogeneous absorbed dose. The use of absorbed dose in air measured at the center of the irradiation volume without proper compensation for sample absorption can lead to approximately 20 percent underexposure. A lucite cylinder was used to provide the delivery of a homogeneous irradiation dose to blood products of different volumes by allowing rotation of the product

  10. The results of a quality-control programme in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdale, M.L.; Hiles, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    A quality-control programme at a breast screening clinic is described. Daily checks include film sensitometry for X-ray processor control and radiography of a lucite phantom to monitor the consistency of the X-ray machine automatic exposure control. Weekly checks include additional measurements on the performance of the automatic exposure control for different breast thickness and an overall assessment of image quality using a prototype mammography test phantom. The test phantom measures low-contrast sensitivity, high-control resolution and small-detail visibility. The results of the quality-control programme are presented with particular attention paid to tolerances and limiting values. (author)

  11. High resolution extremity CT for biomechanics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, A.E.; Brand, H.; Hollerbach, K.; Logan, C.M.; Martz, H.E.

    1995-09-23

    With the advent of ever more powerful computing and finite element analysis (FEA) capabilities, the bone and joint geometry detail available from either commercial surface definitions or from medical CT scans is inadequate. For dynamic FEA modeling of joints, precise articular contours are necessary to get appropriate contact definition. In this project, a fresh cadaver extremity was suspended in parafin in a lucite cylinder and then scanned with an industrial CT system to generate a high resolution data set for use in biomechanics modeling.

  12. Large-Area Liquid Scintillation Detector Slab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, M. F.; Gurr, H. S.; Hruschka, A. A.; Jenkins, T. L.; Kropp, W.; Reines, F.; Sobel, H.; Hruschka, A. A.

    1966-01-01

    A low-cost detector 18' x 2' x 5' has been developed for an underground cosmic ray neutrino experiment. The liquid employed is a high-clarity mineral oil-based mixture, and light is guided to the ends of the detector by total internal reflection at the surface of the Lucite container. Signals from 2 five-inch photomultipliers at each end give energy and event location for single penetrating particles, with relatively good discrimination against natural radioactivity by virtue of the substantial thickness. Data are presented on the response function of the tank, energy resolution, rates and thresholds. A number of modifications that have been tried are also described

  13. Establishment of 137Cs radiation fields for instrument calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M. da P.P.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Xavier, M.

    1988-09-01

    In order to study the energy dependence of clinical dosemeters, systems constituted of ionization chambers connected to special electrometers, many times their calibration with the gamma radiation of 137 Cs is necessary. In this case, the radiation field characterization is fundamental. The source used presents and activity of 38,8 Tbq and belongs to the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. Dosimetric films, gammagraphy films, ionization chambers and Lucite phantons were used. At the calibration distance, 80 cm (detector-source detection), the homogeneity of a 10 X 10 cm 2 radiation field was equal 68%. (author) [pt

  14. Assembly Manual for the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Michael

    2002-01-01

    The Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector consists of 3 main components that must be prepared separately before they can be assembled. These components are the scintillator, circuit board, and casing. They are described in the main sections of this report, which may be completed in any order. Preparing the scintillator paddles involves several steps--cutting the scintillator material to the appropriate size and shape, preparing and attaching Lucite cookies (optional), polishing the edges, gluing the end to the photomultiplier tube (optional), and wrapping the scintillator. Since the detector has 2 paddles, each of the sections needs to be repeated for the other paddle

  15. New opportunities from nuclear R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a new initiative within Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), the intention to look for spin-off business opportunities from main-line research and development. In 1982 AECL began encouraging ideas for spin-off applications. Some problems were encountered: the reluctance of staff to divert attention from the CANDU program; resource allocation; difficulties in getting market input; and difficulties in deciding what to license and what to retain as an in-house business opportunity. Successes have come in the areas of using CANDU technology in LWRs, SLOWPOKE reactors, industrial accelerators, stable isotope production, intelligent sensing systems, and deuterated lucite for fibre optics. (L.L.)

  16. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungan, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2008-02-05

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in 0 reactive flow JWL++ and Linked Cheetah V4, mostly at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. The physical basis of the input parameters is considered.

  17. Microdosimetry of 0.5 to 2.0 MeV electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braby, L.A.; Roesch, W.C.

    1980-08-01

    The energy imparted in microscopic volumes by electron beams with initial energies from 0.5 to 2.0 MeV has been measured at various depths in plastic. The problems associated with measuring energy deposition spectra of low LET radiations are serious, but the potential importance of these measurements in radiation biophysics justifies the effort required to obtain them. Recent results obtained by Goodhead et al. indicate an RBE greater than 2 for 0.3 keV x-rays compared to 250 kV x-rays, and our results with Chlamydomonas reinhardi indicate an RBE of 1.6 for a 1.5 MeV electron beam at a depth of 400 gm/cm 2 in lucite compared to the same beam at the surface. Development of a theory which appears to explain these results in terms of the microscopic distribution of energy deposition has motivated a detailed study of energy deposition spectra for an electron beam attenuated by various thicknesses of lucite. Simulated sites from 0.5 to 1.9 μm in diameter were studied. The values of anti y determined in these single event measurements compare favorably with those calculated from direct measurements of z reported previously. As expected, the means of the distributions increase significantly with increasing depth in an absorber

  18. Indications for and comparative diagnostic value of combined ultrasound and X-ray mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, D.

    1983-01-01

    A standardised method of ultrasound mammography is described. In order to achieve the same position, form, and shape of the breast as during roentgen mammography a Lucite plate in horizontal, and vertical position us used. Ultrasound contact scanning of the whole breast is carried out in cranio-caudal as well as in medio-lateral direction of the ultrasound beam. Ultrasound scanning is performed with the compression of the breast corresponding to the compression during roentgen mammography. It was found that the ultrasound breast examination combined with X-ray mammography optimizes the differentiation between benign and malignant masses and therefore may reduce the incidence of breast biopsy. A combined use of both examination modalities in the evaluation of the breast is advocated. (orig.)

  19. Observer performance in detecting multiple radiographic signals: prediction and analysis using a generalized ROC approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Starr, S.J.; Lusted, L.B.

    1975-01-01

    The theories of decision processes and signal detection provide a framework for the evaluation of observer performance. Some radiologic procedures involve a search for multiple similar lesions, as in gallstone or pneumoconiosis examinations. A model is presented which attempts to predict, from the conventional receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve describing the detectability of a single visual signal in a radiograph, observer performance in an experiment requiring detection of more than one such signal. An experiment is described which tests the validity of this model for the case of detecting the presence of zero, one, or two low-contrast radiographic images of a two-mm.-diameter lucite bead embedded in radiographic mottle. Results from six observers, including three radiologists, confirm the validity of the model and suggest that human observer performance for relatively complex detection tasks can be predicted from the results of simpler experiments

  20. Use of the electrodeposition technique in the preparation of samples of 237Np and its determination by alpha spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertzig, W.; Matsuda, H.T.; Araujo, B.F. de; Araujo, J.A. de.

    1981-05-01

    The electroplating technique to prepare 237 Np source and its determination by alpha spectrometry is presented. The samples were prepared using a lucite-eletrolitic cell manufactured at IPEN, specially to trace amounts of actinides. A polished brass disk coated with Ni film has been used as cathodo and a fixed Pt wire as anode. The electroplated samples were alpha counted using a surface barrier detector. The optimum conditions to obtain the quantitative deposition of 237 Np have been achieved by studying the effects of some parameters as current density, pH and concentration of eletrolitic solution and time of eletrodeposition, using a carrier technique. After preliminary purification, the method is applied to control trace amounts of 237 Np in the Purex process solutions. (Author) [pt

  1. Measurement of the proton $A_1$ and $A_2$ spin asymmetries. Probing Color Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Whitney [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function $g_2$ in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < x < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element $d_2^p$ (an integral of $g_2$ weighted by $x^2$) is most sensitive. The data was taken from $Q^2$ equal to 2.5 $GeV^2$ up to 6.5 $GeV^2$. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, A∥ and A⊥ were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of $d_2^p$ is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  2. Prediction of interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation using statistical energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of predicting interior noise due to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation was investigated in experiments in which a statistical energy analysis model (VAPEPS) was used to analyze measurements of the acceleration response and sound transmission of flat aluminum, lucite, and graphite/epoxy plates exposed to random acoustic or turbulent boundary layer excitation. The noise reduction of the plate, when backed by a shallow cavity and excited by a turbulent boundary layer, was predicted using a simplified theory based on the assumption of adiabatic compression of the fluid in the cavity. The predicted plate acceleration response was used as input in the noise reduction prediction. Reasonable agreement was found between the predictions and the measured noise reduction in the frequency range 315-1000 Hz.

  3. Doses rate in contact with plastic syringes of 1, 2 and 5 mL for different beta and gamma emitting radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Berdeguez, Mirta; Ayra Pardo, Enrique; Falcon, Lazaro

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to calculate the dose rate in contact with plastic syringes of 1, 2 and 5 m L volume, unshielded and the dose rate in the same syringes after a lead or a Lucite shield of various thickness has been installed, depending on the emission of the radionuclide used. The radionuclides involved in the assessment were 32 P, 51 Cr, 90 Y, 99m Tc, 125 I, 131 I, 153 Sm, 186 Re, 188 Re, 169 Er and 177 Lu. The code used was the MCNP4C. The results are intended to be used by a Radiation Protection Officer wherever the radionuclides in question are handled to rapidly assess the dose in hands of the operators. (author)

  4. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  5. The results of a quality-control programme in mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdale, M.L.; Hiles, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    With the introduction of a breast screening programme in the UK, quality assurance in mammography is of paramount importance in assuring optimum imaging performance with low dose. Quality control checks are an essential part of the quality-assurance system. A quality-control programme at a breast screening clinic is described. Daily checks include film sensitometry for X-ray processor control and radiography of a lucite phantom to monitor the consistency of the X-ray machine automatic exposure control. Weekly checks include additional measurements on the performance of the automatic exposure control for different breast thickness and an overall assessment of image quality using a prototype mammography test phantom. The test phantom measures low-contrast sensitivity, high-contrast resolution and small-detail visibility. The results of the quality-control programme are presented with particular attention paid to tolerances and limiting values. (author)

  6. Moeller scattering with unpolarized electrons for the development of a Moeller polarimeter at ELSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueffer, C.

    1992-07-01

    In future experiments with polarized electrons are planned at ELSA, so it is necessary to measure the polarisation of the extracted electron beam. One possibility is to use the method of Moeller-scattering. A suitable arrangement with two lucite Cerenkov-detectors has been investigated and Moeller-scattering with unpolarized electrons has been studied. A low noise-to-signal-ratio in the time spectra allowed to separate Moeller events from background. Therefore it was possible to observe the linear dependence of Moeller-scattering-events on the atomic number of the target foil and on the current of the extracted electron beam. With regard to planned experiments it was important to show that the separation of the Moeller-electrons from the primary beam by the use of one single dipole magnet has been succesful. (orig.) [de

  7. Stopping powers for protons in materials of interest in dosimetry and in medical and biological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D.I.

    1985-01-01

    Stopping powers are required for many radiation applications in medicine and biology. Their accuracy can be critical. Some published calculations for these situations have not included recent developments in stopping power theory or the body of work on deviations from additivity due to phase of chemical binding effects. These areas have recently been reviewed and mean excitation energies recommended for a range of materials of interest. Calculated stopping powers are presented for protons of 0.4 to 200 MeV taking the available information into account. The materials considered are Lucite, ICRU composition muscle and bone, A-150 plastic, a TE gas, acetylene and polystyrene and water and water vapour. With suitable corrections and suitable I values in the Bethe stopping power expression, accuracies of <2% can be achieved. (author)

  8. Design and thermometry of an intracavitary microwave applicator suitable for treatment of some vaginal and rectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.J.; Luk, K.H.; Jiang, H.B.; Chou, C.K.; Hwang, G.Z.

    1984-01-01

    The construction of a modified coaxial cable as an intracavitary microwave applicator suitable for use in some vaginal and rectal cancers is presented. Thermometry is performed for microwave frequencies of 300, 400, 650, and 915 MHz. Temperature profiles in tissue phantoms were obtained with Vitek 101 temperature probes and thermography, and the data were compared with those obtained in dogs. The temperature profiles are dependent on the frequency of the microwaves and the insertion depth of the applicator. In addition, a lucite cylindrical spacer external to the applicator also altered the heating pattern. Therefore, with proper combinations of frequency, insertion depth, and spacer, the applicator can be used for heating tumors in some clinical situations. Two patients were treated with this intracavitary microwave applicator in conjunction with interstitial radiation therapy. Tolerance to such combined therapy was satisfactory in these preliminary trial treatments

  9. Study of critical behavior in concrete during curing by application of dynamic linear and nonlinear means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacouture, Jean-Christoph; Johnson, Paul A; Cohen-Tenoudji, Frederic

    2003-03-01

    The monitoring of both linear and nonlinear elastic properties of a high performance concrete during curing is presented by application of compressional and shear waves. To follow the linear elastic behavior, both compressional and shear waves are used in wide band pulse echo mode. Through the value of the complex reflection coefficient between the cell material (Lucite) and the concrete within the cell, the elastic moduli are calculated. Simultaneously, the transmission of a continuous compressional sine wave at progressively increasing drive levels permits us to calculate the nonlinear properties by extracting the harmonics amplitudes of the signal. Information regarding the chemical evolution of the concrete based upon the reaction of hydration of cement is obtained by monitoring the temperature inside the sample. These different types of measurements are linked together to interpret the critical behavior.

  10. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) the threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons. 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system. 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage. 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  11. Energy dependence of an ionization chamber with parallel plates in standard gamma and x-radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistella, M.A.; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1988-09-01

    The characteristics of low energy X-radiation standard fields were determined and the energy dependence of a ionization chamber of the superficial type, with parallel plates and fixed volume, normally utilized in the dosimetry at the Radiotherapy level was studied. The possibility of adaptation of this chamber type for use in gamma radiation dosimetry was verified. Different thickness Lucite build-up caps, from 2.0 up to 5.5 mm, were produced and tested in 60 Co and 137 Cs gamma radiation fields. This type of detector, with the adequate build-up cap, presented a performance comparable to that of the thimble type ionization chamber. It was concluded that it is not necessary to use different kinds of chambers for each high and mean energy interval. The superficial chamber, specially produced to detect low energy X-radiation, may be adapted to detect gamma radiation. (author) [pt

  12. Degradation of organophosphorus compounds by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebse, P.; Arcon, I.

    2002-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Our research presented in this contribution aims to elucidate the degradation mechanisms of organophosphate pesticides as organic pollutants by X-ray irradiation. Diazinon, one of the most widely used pesticides in Slovenia, has been chosen as a model compound for the study of radiation induced degradation of organophosphorus pesticides. Recent studies have shown that the degradation of the pesticide at normal conditions (room temperature, exposure to daylight) is strongly enhanced when the pesticide is exposed to UV light (Hg lamp, λ=254 nm, XeCl excimer laser, λ=308 nm). In our study we irradiated the pesticide in aqueous media with a white x-ray beam from a conventional x-ray source. Mo X-ray tube operating at the high voltage of 55 kV and a current of 45 mA was used. The flux of the continuous X-ray beam was stabilized within 1%. Saturated water solution of the pesticide (volume: 4mL, conc. of 40 mg L -1 ) was inserted in 1 cm long lucite cell with 1 mm thick lucite windows. The whole volume of the solution in the cell was exposed to the unfiltered X-ray beam. The dose rate on the sample was about 1 mGy/s. Different irradiation times between 30 min to 120 min were chosen to study the dependence of the pesticide decomposition with the absorbed dose. Solid phase extraction was employed for sample extraction from the solution, and gas chromatography was used for the identification and quantification of the compounds. The results show that the concentration of the pesticide in the solution decreases exponentially with the exposure time, i.e. with the absorbed dose. At irradiation conditions described above, the time constant of the exponential decrease was 74 min

  13. Air Gaps, Size Effect, and Corner-Turning in Ambient LX-17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souers, P C; Hernandez, A; Cabacungen, C; Fried, L; Garza, R; Glaesemann, K; Lauderbach, L; Liao, S; Vitello, P

    2007-05-30

    Various ambient measurements are presented for LX-17. The size (diameter) effect has been measured with copper and Lucite confinement, where the failure radii are 4.0 and 6.5 mm, respectively. The air well corner-turn has been measured with an LX-07 booster, and the dead-zone results are comparable to the previous TATB-boosted work. Four double cylinders have been fired, and dead zones appear in all cases. The steel-backed samples are faster than the Lucite-backed samples by 0.6 {micro}s. Bare LX-07 and LX-17 of 12.7 mm-radius were fired with air gaps. Long acceptor regions were used to truly determine if detonation occurred or not. The LX-07 crossed at 10 mm with a slight time delay. Steady state LX-17 crossed at 3.5 mm gap but failed to cross at 4.0 mm. LX-17 with a 12.7 mm run after the booster crossed a 1.5 mm gap but failed to cross 2.5 mm. Timing delays were measured where the detonation crossed the gaps. The Tarantula model is introduced as embedded in the Linked Cheetah V4.0 reactive flow code at 4 zones/mm. Tarantula has four pressure regions: off, initiation, failure and detonation. A report card of 25 tests run with the same settings on LX-17 is shown, possibly the most extensive simultaneous calibration yet tried with an explosive. The physical basis of some of the input parameters is considered.

  14. Surface-conductivity enhancement of PMMA by keV-energy metal-ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannister, M.E.; Hijazi, H.; Meyer, H.M.; Cianciolo, V.; Meyer, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    An experiment has been proposed to measure the neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) with high precision at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source. One of the requirements of this experiment is the development of PMMA (Lucite) material with a sufficiently conductive surface to permit its use as a high-voltage electrode while immersed in liquid He. At the ORNL Multicharged Ion Research Facility, an R and D activity is under way to achieve suitable surface conductivity in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) using metal ion implantation. The metal implantation is performed using an electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) ion source and a recently developed beam line deceleration module that is capable of providing high flux beams for implantation at energies as low as a few tens of eV. The latter is essential for reaching implantation fluences exceeding 1 × 10 16 cm −2 , where typical percolation thresholds in polymers have been reported. In this contribution, we report results on initial implantation of Lucite by Ti and W beams with keV energies to average fluences in the range 0.5–6.2 × 10 16 cm −2 . Initial measurements of surface-resistivity changes are reported as function of implantation fluence, energy, and sample temperature. We also report X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface and depth profiling measurements of the ion implanted samples, to identify possible correlations between the near surface and depth resolved implanted W concentrations and the measured surface resistivities

  15. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles.

  16. Tenth ORNL Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Chou, T.L.; Sims, C.S.; Greene, R.T.

    1985-03-01

    The Tenth Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during April 9-11, 1984. Dosemeter badges from 31 participating organizations were mounted on 40cm Lucite phantoms and exposed to a range of dose equivalents which could be encountered during routine personnel monitoring in mixed radiation fields. The Health Physics Research Reactor served as the only source of radiation for eight of the ten irradiations which included a low (approx. 0.50 mSv) and high (approx. 10.00 mSv) neutron dose equivalent run for each of four shield conditions. Two irradiations were also conducted for which concrete- and Lucite-shield reactor irradiations were gamma-enhanced using a 137 Cs source. Results indicated that some participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron and gamma exposures at dose equivalents less than about 0.50 mSv and 0.20 mSv, respectively. Albedo dosemeters provided the best overall accuracy and precision for the neutron measurements. Direct interaction TLD systems showed significant variation in accuracy with incident spectrum, and threshold neutron dosemeters (film and recoil track) underestimated reference values by more than 50%. Gamma dose equivalents estimated in the mixed fields were higher than reference values with TL gamma dosemeters generally yielding more accurate results than film. Under the conditions of this study in which participants had information concerning exposure conditions and radiation field characteristics prior to dosemeter evaluation, only slightly more than half of all reported results met regulatory standards for neutron and gamma accuracy. 19 refs., 2 figs., 29 tabs

  17. A gradient-based method for segmenting FDG-PET images: methodology and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geets, Xavier; Lee, John A.; Gregoire, Vincent; Bol, Anne; Lonneux, Max

    2007-01-01

    A new gradient-based method for segmenting FDG-PET images is described and validated. The proposed method relies on the watershed transform and hierarchical cluster analysis. To allow a better estimation of the gradient intensity, iteratively reconstructed images were first denoised and deblurred with an edge-preserving filter and a constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm. Validation was first performed on computer-generated 3D phantoms containing spheres, then on a real cylindrical Lucite phantom containing spheres of different volumes ranging from 2.1 to 92.9 ml. Moreover, laryngeal tumours from seven patients were segmented on PET images acquired before laryngectomy by the gradient-based method and the thresholding method based on the source-to-background ratio developed by Daisne (Radiother Oncol 2003;69:247-50). For the spheres, the calculated volumes and radii were compared with the known values; for laryngeal tumours, the volumes were compared with the macroscopic specimens. Volume mismatches were also analysed. On computer-generated phantoms, the deconvolution algorithm decreased the mis-estimate of volumes and radii. For the Lucite phantom, the gradient-based method led to a slight underestimation of sphere volumes (by 10-20%), corresponding to negligible radius differences (0.5-1.1 mm); for laryngeal tumours, the segmented volumes by the gradient-based method agreed with those delineated on the macroscopic specimens, whereas the threshold-based method overestimated the true volume by 68% (p = 0.014). Lastly, macroscopic laryngeal specimens were totally encompassed by neither the threshold-based nor the gradient-based volumes. The gradient-based segmentation method applied on denoised and deblurred images proved to be more accurate than the source-to-background ratio method. (orig.)

  18. WE-H-BRA-05: Investigation of LET Spectral Dependence of the Biological Effects of Therapeutic Protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, F; Bronk, L; Kerr, M; Wang, X; Li, Y; Peeler, C; Sahoo, N; Patel, D; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Grosshans, D; Mohan, R [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dependence of biologic effect (BE) of therapeutic protons on LET spectra by comparing BEs with equal dose-averaged LET (LETd) derived from different LET spectra using high-throughput in vitro clonogenic survival assays. Methods: We used Geant4 to design the relevant experimental setups and perform the dose, LETd, and LET spectra calculations for spot-scanning protons. The clonogenic assay was performed using the H460 lung cancer cell line cultured in 96-well plates. In the first experimental setup (S1), cells were irradiated using 127.4 MeV protons with a 93.22 mm Lucite buildup resulting in a LETd value of 3.4 keV/µm in the cell layer. In the second experimental setup (S2), cells were irradiated by a combination of 127.4 MeV and 136.4 MeV protons with a 96.61 mm Lucite buildup. The LETd values in the cell layer were 11.4 keV/µm and 1.5 keV/µm respectively, but an average LETd of 3.4 keV/µm was obtained by adjusting the relative fluence of each beam. Ten discrete dose levels with 0.5 Gy increments were delivered. Results: In the two setups, the energies or LET spectra were different but resulted in identical LETd values. We quantified the dose contributions from high-LET (≥10 keV/µm, threshold determined by previous experiments) events in the LET spectra separately for these two setups as 3.2% and 10.5%. The biologic effects at each identical dose level yielded statistically significant different survival curves (extra sum-of-squares F-test, P<0.0001). The second setup with a higher contribution from high-LET events exhibited the higher biologic effect with a dose enhancement factor of 1.17±0.03 at 0.10 surviving fraction. Conclusion: The dose-averaged LET may not be an accurate indicator of the biological effects of protons. Detailed LET spectra may need to be considered explicitly to accurately quantify the biologic effects of protons. Funding Support: U19 CA021239-35, R21 CA187484-01 and MDACC-IRG.

  19. Fundamental studies for CT in the oral region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shinichiro

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental studies were attempted regarding the clinical application of CT (TCT-60A) in the oral region. The investigation assessed the following: 1) calculation of CT-No for oral hard tissues, 2) test for linearity CT-No vs. the linear attenuation coefficient in high X-ray attenuation materials, 3) observation of artifacts caused by dental materials and 4) measurement of patient doses of CT used at the maxillary sinus. The results obtained were as follows. 1) Calculated CT-No (E=70 KeV) values for oral hard tissues were enamel 3.51 x 10 3 , dentine 2.40 x 10 3 , cementum 1.88 x 10 3 , cortical bone 1.48 x 10 3 and mandible 1.01 x 10 3 . 2) Linearity for CT-No vs. the linear attenuation coefficient gave a good relative coefficient between lucite and teflon, but linearity between lucite and aluminum was not good enough. 3) Three different artifacts from the copper rod were observed: (1) connection line artifact, (2) star-burst artifact and (3) figure-eight artifact. 4) Under shot caused by composite resin was observed, and artifact from both the radiopaque composite resin and amalgam were the same kinds as those from the copper rod. 5) Calculated CT-No (E=66 KeV) values for dental materials were copper 5.48 x 10 4 , composite resin 1.24 x 10 3 , radiopaque composite resin 4.65 x 10 3 and amalgam 2.27 x 10 5 . 6) Absorbed doses of lenses and thyroid gland using CT at the mixillary sinus region were 59 mrad (59 x 10 -2 mGy) and 17 mrad (17 x 10 -2 mGy) for a single scanning. 7) The volume dose of the head under a single CT scanning was estimated as 820 g.rad (820 x 10 -5 Kg.Gy) by the TLD method, and 900 g.rad (900 x 10 -5 Kg.Gy) by the film dosimetry method. The difference in these values was considered to be the effect arising from ununiformity of the X-ray beam. (author)

  20. Dosimetry of beta sources utilized in nuclear medicine and biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Rivera, E.; Cricco, G.; Martin, G.; Cocca, C.; Caro, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The use of high energy pure beta sources (i.e., 32 P= 1.71 MeV/des) is common in medicine (intratumoral therapy or treatment of non-malignant illness as restenosis) and in biochemistry (molecular biology). The external dosimetry of these sources offers some important points that must be considered: 1) beta particles emitted by the source are not monoenergetic; 2) the range (R 0 ) vary with the source energy and the Z of the absorber; 3) below an energy of 1 MeV, the specific ionization in the absorbent medium (air, water, lucite) increases as the beta energy (E β ) decreases; 4) the range of beta particles, R β , is independent from Z of the material, provided Z is low and the material has no hydrogen; in this case, the expression: R β δ 1 = R β δ 2 is valid; 5) the calculation of the external beta dosimetry must consider that since the used sources are not punctual there is self-absorption which should be taken into account. However, in the range of the fractions of activities for the above mentioned practices a theoretical model for punctual sources can be used; in this case, it is valid to use the expression: Dose Rate: = A (S/δ)E β e -S/δ δx /4 π d 2 , where: (S/δ) is the absorbent Mass Stopping Power and represents the loss of energy by unit mass thickness; it depends from E β and it is independent from Z; (δx) is the mass thickness of the absorber. By this way, e -S/δ δx is the attenuation of the beta particles flow. From the application of this formula it can be deduced that, for sources of 1 mCi of 32 P activities, as those employed in biochemistry, a small thickness of lucite is enough shield. When the source has higher activities, as those used in radiotherapy, the operator should take into account the regulations for a strict dosimetric control. These formulae allow a simplified calculation of the 32 P dosimetry of sources used in nuclear medicine and biomedical practices. (author) [es

  1. Calibration of Far West Technology (FWT-60) radiachromic dye dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincher, B.J.; Zaidi, M.K.

    1992-01-01

    Radiachromic dye dosimetry was used to measure kilogray doses absorbed by various liquid samples during gamma-ray exposure in a spent nuclear fuel pool. The source of nuclear fuel was the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Calibrations were performed using a 60 Co source and were run on bare dosemeters, as well as on dosemeters which mocked to simulate the samples. These dosemeters were prepared as a dye-impregnated nylon film and are commercially available. When exposed to gamma-ray doses of 0.5 to 200 kGy, a color change occurs which has an optical density proportional to absorbed dose. The difference in the calibration curves demonstrated the importance of irradiation of dosemeters under conditions as close to the actual samples as possible. Since these dosemeters could not be immersed directly in the organic solutions of interest, they were sandwiched between layers of lucite and stainless steel. This simulated the conditions inside an irradiated sample and provides a practical method of measuring absorbed doses. The reproducibility of measurements using the radiachromic dye dosemeters is also shown. 10 refs

  2. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Menegatti Pavan

    Full Text Available Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air. Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p < 0.05 quantified between groups. As a result, four phantoms were constructed for dorsoventral and lateral views. In conclusion, the present methodology allows the development of phantoms of the canine chest and possibly other body regions and/or animals. The proposed phantom is a practical tool that may be employed in future work to optimize veterinary X-ray procedures.

  3. Tissue quantification for development of pediatric phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, A.F.F.; Miranda, J.R.A.; Pina, D.R.

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of the risk- benefit ratio is a major concern in the pediatric radiology, due to the greater vulnerability of children to the late somatic effects and genetic effects of exposure to radiation compared to adults. In Brazil, it is estimated that the causes of death from head trauma are 18 % for the age group between 1-5 years and the radiograph is the primary diagnostic test for the detection of skull fracture . Knowing that the image quality is essential to ensure the identification of structures anatomical and minimizing errors diagnostic interpretation, this paper proposed the development and construction of homogeneous phantoms skull, for the age group 1-5 years. The construction of the phantoms homogeneous was performed using the classification and quantification of tissue present in the skull of pediatric patients. In this procedure computational algorithms were used, using Matlab, to quantify distinct biological tissues present in the anatomical regions studied , using pictures retrospective CT scans. Preliminary data obtained from measurements show that between the ages of 1-5 years, assuming an average anteroposterior diameter of the pediatric skull region of the 145.73 ± 2.97 mm, can be represented by 92.34 mm ± 5.22 of lucite and 1.75 ± 0:21 mm of aluminum plates of a provision of PEP (Pacient equivalent phantom). After its construction, the phantoms will be used for image and dose optimization in pediatric protocols process to examinations of computerized radiography

  4. Inelastic hadron-nucleus interactions at 20 and 37 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, M.A.; Lynen, U.; Niewisch, J.; Pietrzyk, B.; Povh, B.; Schroeder, H.; Gugelot, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    The experiment studies charged particle production for π - , K - , and anti p interactions on nuclei at 20 and 37 GeV/c at the CERN SPS. A non-magnetic detector, consisting of CsI(Tl) scintillation and lucite Cerenkov counters, distinguishes between fast particles, mainly pions, and slow particles, mainly nucleons, with a cut at velocity β approximately 0.7. Angular distributions, multiplicity distributions and correlations of slow and fast particles were analysed. It is shown that the measurement of the correlations can provide a critical test for different theoretical models of the hadron-nucleus interaction. At the energies studied so far a systematic deviation from KNO scaling is observed. This gives further support to the 'standard picture' of the hadron-nucleus interaction and it contrasts with predictions of the coherent-tube model. The regularity observed for the angular distribution of fast secondaries as a function of the number of slow particles can only be explained by combining features predicted by different models. (Auth.)

  5. Comparison of doses delivered in clinical trials of neutron capture therapy in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albritton, J.R.; Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Coderre, J.A.; Harling, O.K.; Kiger, W.S. III

    2006-01-01

    A combined 81 brain tumor patients have been treated in dose escalation trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) at Harvard-MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Pooling the clinical outcomes from these trials will permit evaluation with more statistical rigor. However, differences in physical and computational dosimetry between the institutions make direct comparison of the clinical dosimetry difficult. This paper describes work performed to normalize the BNL clinical dosimetry to that of Harvard-MIT for combined dose response analysis. This normalization involved analysis of MIT measurements and calculations using the BNL treatment planning system (TPS), BNCT - Rtpe, for two different phantoms. The BNL TPS was calibrated to dose measurements made by MIT at the BMRR in the BNL calibration phantom, a Lucite cube, and then validated by MIT dose measurements at the BMMR in an ellipsoidal water phantom. Treatment plans for all BNL patients were recomputed using the newly determined TPS calibration, yielding reductions in reported mean brain doses of 19% on average in the initial 15 patients and 31% in the latter 38 patients. These reductions in reported doses have clinically significant implications for those relying on reported BNL doses as a basis for initial dose selection in clinical studies. (author)

  6. Presence and absence of a water film between moving air bubbles and a plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remenyik, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of water films between an inclined Lucite plate submerged in water and air bubbles moving beneath it was measured with a small impedance probe. The instrument was calibrated with a laser interferometer built for this purpose. The bubbles released beneath the plate varied in size from 10 cc to 100 cc. At a plate inclination angle of 0.98 degree, and in tap water, an uninterrupted water film covered most of the bubbles. Some bubbles, however, dewetted the plate, and the water film covered only a forward part of the bubble. When the film was uninterrupted, its thickness was very uniform from front to rear. When the bubble dewetted the plate, a large forward section of the film had the same uniform thickness, but this was followed by a hump on the film the rear slope of which ended at the plate surface. For some of the experiments, the surface tension of the water was reduced by admixing a detergent. In these experiments, dewetting was not observed. In a second set of experiments, a hand held transparent container filled with water and a 1.3 cm3 air bubble was used to observe visually the behavior of the moving bubble and its associated water film

  7. Doppler Broadening Calculations of Compton Scattering for Molecules, Plastics, Tissues, and Few Biological Materials in the X-Ray Region: An Analysis in Terms of Compton Broadening and Geometrical Energy Broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, D. V.; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Gigante, G. E.; Akatsuka, T.; Takeda, T.; Itai, Y.

    2004-09-01

    Relativistic and nonrelativistic Compton profile cross sections for H, C, N, O, P, and Ca and for a few important biological materials such as water, polyethylene, lucite, polystyrene, nylon, polycarbonate, bakelite, fat, bone and calcium hydroxyapatite are estimated for a number of Kα x-ray energies and for 59.54 keV (Am-241) γ photons. Energy broadening and geometrical broadening (ΔG) is estimated by assuming θmin and θmax are symmetrically situated around θ=90°. FWHM of J(PZ) and FWHM of Compton energy broadening are evaluated at various incident photon energies. These values are estimated around the centroid of the Compton profile with an energy interval of 0.1 and 1.0 keV for 59.54 keV photons. Total Compton, individual shell, and Compton energy-absorption scattering cross sections are evaluated in the energy region from 0.005 to 0.5 MeV. It is an attempt to know the effect of Doppler broadening for single atoms, many of which constitute the biological materials.

  8. A rod-like plastic scintillation detector for use in gamma-ray dosimetry and attempts to attain uniform response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Mikio; Kawada, Yasushi; Avundukluoglu, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper describes experiments made in an effort to develop scintillation dosimeters with emphasis on some attempts to attain a uniform response over the whole length of scintillators. A new method is proposed for measuring absorbed dose rate in plastic scintillators, using the photon-counting technique for measuring the total amount of luminescence from the scintillator exposed to gamma-rays. If a rod plastic scintillator and lucite light guides with well-polished and non-coated surfaces are surrounded by non-reflective material with a definite air gap between them, the scintillation light is transmitted to the PMTs only by the inner total reflection from the surface; a good uniformity of response could be expected if it were not for light attenuation in the transmission through the medium. With a diffusion reflector in non-optical contact with the scintillator surface, the scintillation light which otherwise would escape from the surface is partly reflected back into the scintillator. This effect is examined quantitatively. Measurements show that the presence of the diffusion reflector permits the uniformity of response to be improved considerably; a uniformity within 20 % is obtained. (N.K.)

  9. Development of an algorithm for quantifying extremity biological tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavan, Ana L.M.; Miranda, Jose R.A.; Pina, Diana R. de

    2013-01-01

    The computerized radiology (CR) has become the most widely used device for image acquisition and production, since its introduction in the 80s. The detection and early diagnosis, obtained via CR, are important for the successful treatment of diseases such as arthritis, metabolic bone diseases, tumors, infections and fractures. However, the standards used for optimization of these images are based on international protocols. Therefore, it is necessary to compose radiographic techniques for CR system that provides a secure medical diagnosis, with doses as low as reasonably achievable. To this end, the aim of this work is to develop a quantifier algorithm of tissue, allowing the construction of a homogeneous end used phantom to compose such techniques. It was developed a database of computed tomography images of hand and wrist of adult patients. Using the Matlab ® software, was developed a computational algorithm able to quantify the average thickness of soft tissue and bones present in the anatomical region under study, as well as the corresponding thickness in simulators materials (aluminium and lucite). This was possible through the application of mask and Gaussian removal technique of histograms. As a result, was obtained an average thickness of soft tissue of 18,97 mm and bone tissue of 6,15 mm, and their equivalents in materials simulators of 23,87 mm of acrylic and 1,07mm of aluminum. The results obtained agreed with the medium thickness of biological tissues of a patient's hand pattern, enabling the construction of an homogeneous phantom

  10. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benites R, J. L.; Vega C, H. R.

    2017-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  11. The role of charged secondaries from nonelastic nuclear interactions by therapy proton beams in a PERSPEX target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesa, Joel; Gomes, Viviam da Silva; Evseev, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    The dose distribution delivered in charged particle therapy is due to both primary and secondary particles. The inclusion of the proton induced non-elastic nuclear reactions in the absorbed dose calculations carried out in proton-therapy, can modify the absorbed dose in two ways: by changing the energy spectrum as consequence of the primary proton fluence decreasing, and by giving rise to secondary products (i.e. p, n, α, d, t, 3 He) which contribute to the absorbed energy, thus affecting the irradiated target, as well as critical organs outside the target volume, besides enhancing the biological dose due to the high LET values. In this preliminary work, the dose distributions from primary and secondary charged particles for a pencil beam of protons with energies between 100 and 200 MeV in a PERSPEX (PMMA, Polymethyl Methacrylate, Lucite or Plexiglass) target was studied theoretically in the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) considering secondary particles energy spectra. In this sense, we have used a quite sophisticate multicollisional Monte Carlo code (MCMC) for pre-equilibrium emission, plus de-excitation of residual nucleus by fragmentation process. (author)

  12. Doses determination in UCCA treatments with LDR brachytherapy using Monte Carlo methods; Determinacion de dosis en tratamientos de CaCU con braquiterapia LDR usando metodos Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites R, J. L. [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Comite de Investigacion, Calz. de la Cruz 118 sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: neutronesrapidos@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    Using Monte Carlo methods, with the code MCNP5, a gynecological mannequin and a vaginal cylinder were modeled. The spatial distribution of absorbed dose rate in uterine cervical cancer (UCCA) treatments was determined under the modality of manual brachytherapy of low dose rate (B-LDR). The design of the model included the gynecological liquid water mannequin, a vaginal cylinder applicator of Lucite (PMMA) with hemisphere termination. The applicator was formed by a vaginal cylinder 10.3 cm long and 2 cm in diameter. This cylinder was mounted on a stainless steel tube 15.2 cm long by 0.6 cm in diameter. A linear array of four radioactive sources of Cesium 137 was inserted into the tube. 13 water cells of 0.5 cm in diameter were modeled around the vaginal cylinder and the absorbed dose was calculated in these. The distribution of the fluence of gamma photons in the mesh was calculated. It was found that the distribution of the absorbed dose is symmetric for cells located in the upper and lower part of the vaginal cylinder. The values of the absorbed dose rate were estimated for the date of manufacture of the sources. This result allows the use of the law of radioactive decay to determine the dose rate at any date of a gynecological treatment of B-LDR. (Author)

  13. Performance of computed tomography for contrast agent concentration measurements with monochromatic x-ray beams: comparison of K-edge versus temporal subtraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elleaume, H.; Charvet, A.M.; Corde, S.; Esteve, F.; Le Bas, J.F.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the performance of monochromatic computed tomography for the quantification of contrast agent concentrations. Two subtraction methods (K-edge subtraction and temporal subtraction) were evaluated and compared theoretically and experimentally in terms of detection limit, precision and accuracy. Measurements were performed using synchrotron x-rays with Lucite phantoms (10 cm and 17.5 cm in diameter) containing iodine or gadolinium solutions ranging from 50 μg ml -1 to 5 mg ml -1 . The experiments were carried out using monochromators developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) medical beamline. The phantoms were imaged either above and below the contrast agent K-edge, or before and after the addition of the contrast agent. Both methods gave comparable performance for phantoms less than 10 cm in diameter. For large phantoms, equivalent to a human head, the temporal subtraction is more suitable for detecting elements such as iodine, keeping a reasonable x-ray dose delivered to the phantom. A good agreement was obtained between analytical calculations, simulations and measurements. The beam harmonic content was taken into account in the simulations. It explains the performance degradation with high contrast agent concentrations. The temporal subtraction technique has the advantage of energy tunability and is well suited for imaging elements, such as iodine or gadolinium, in highly absorbing samples. For technical reasons, the K-edge method is preferable when the imaged organ is moving since the two measurements can be performed simultaneously, which is mandatory for obtaining a good subtraction. (author)

  14. Second generation ultralow background germanium gamma-ray spectrometer using super clean materials and improved multilayered cosmic ray anticoincidence and passive shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, J.H.; Hensley, W.K.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Our current paper describes the development of a low cost shielding system using liquid scintillator for the cosmic ray detector-neutron moderator which accounts for a tenfold reduction in the cosmic continuum. Our primary objective was to develop a low cost anticoincidence shield for laboratory use which would substantially reduce the background from cosmic ray interactions. The minimum thickness of scintillator which would provide the necessary moderation of neutrons as well as furnish detectable quantities of light generated from cosmic ray interactions was determined experimentally. Tanks holding the liquid scintillator were constructed from stainless steel and were partitioned in such a manner that 10, 20, 30, or 40 cm thicknesses could be selected for background measurements. Lucite was used for construction of a tank which would allow the comparison of light output relative to stainless steel for a 10 cm thickness of liquid scintillator. Plastic scintillator was used for the bottom layer in all cases, however, liquid scintillator could be used with proper internal support. A 20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm plastic scintillator was machined to completely surround the detector and fit inside 15 cm thick walls of lead which in turn, fit inside the stainless steel scintilllator tanks. Background measurements were taken with this inner scintillator both active and inactive. Measurements were also made using copper as well as iron as replacements for the inner scintillator

  15. Project, construction and calibration of parallel plate ionization chambers for x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, M.P.P.

    1989-01-01

    Two pairs of parallel-plate ionization chambers were projected and constructed. In each pair one of the chambers has a collecting electrode and a guard ring made of graphite and the other, of aluminium. The difference between both pairs is that in only one case screws were used to fix the chamber components. The chambers are made of Lucite with aluminized Mylar entrance windows; they have circular form and are unsealed. All chamber components are easily available. The main chamber characteristics were determined, applying the tests of current leakage, repetitively and long term stability. The energy and angular dependence, and the polarity effect were also studied, obtaining the saturation curves and determining the build-up effect for gamma radiation detection. The chambers were calibrated with low and intermediate energy X-radiation, gamma radiation of sup(60)Co an sup(137)Cs, and beta radiation of sup(90)Sr + sup(90)Y. The obtained results show the viability of utilization of these chambers in radiation dosimetry and the results were compared with those of imported commercial ionization chambers of the secondary standard type. The great difference between the energy dependence of the chambers according to the collecting electrode material, allowed the formation of a Tandem system (constituted by a chamber pair A, C), for the determination of the effective energy and the exposure rate in air of unknown X-radiation fields, in the case of low intermediate energy ranges. (author)

  16. Simulated study of solid materials used as phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmonte, Eduardo P.; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.; Pinto, Nivia G.Villela; Braz, Delson; Pereira Junior, Sielso B.; Lima, Gilberto S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the behavior of electrons in water and compares them with the behavior in the materials you want to analyze. It were simulated, using Monte Carlo code EGS4 (MC), 24 irradiation with electrons of 6 and 20 MeV in different materials (polyethylene C 2 H 4 ) n , polystyrene (C 8 H 8 ) n , lucite (C 5 H 8 O 2 ), nylon (C 6 H 11 NO), water (H 2 O) and solid water (55% polyethylene, polystyrene and 5% 40% calcium oxide). The data show that for the two energies most of radiation does not interact with the first 20 mm materials. However, when analyzed plates of 1 cm, most of the energy is deposited in the first 4 plates in case 6 MeV and in the first ten to 20 MeV electrons, for all materials. In case of similarity in behavior of radiation in water and other materials, it is observed that is in polyethylene and polystyrene that the behaviour of electrons more resembles the behavior in water

  17. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 07: Monte Carlo Simulation of Primary Dose and PET Isotope Production for the TRIUMF Proton Therapy Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, C; Jirasek, A [University of Victoria (Australia); Blackmore, E; Hoehr, C; Schaffer, P; Trinczek, M [TRIUMF (Canada); Sossi, V [University of British Columbia (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Uveal melanoma is a rare and deadly tumour of the eye with primary metastases in the liver resulting in an 8% 2-year survival rate upon detection. Large growths, or those in close proximity to the optic nerve, pose a particular challenge to the commonly employed eye-sparing technique of eye-plaque brachytherapy. In these cases external beam charged particle therapy offers improved odds in avoiding catastrophic side effects such as neuropathy or blindness. Since 1995, the British Columbia Cancer Agency in partnership with the TRIUMF national laboratory have offered proton therapy in the treatment of difficult ocular tumors. Having seen 175 patients, yielding 80% globe preservation and 82% metastasis free survival as of 2010, this modality has proven to be highly effective. Despite this success, there have been few studies into the use of the world's largest cyclotron in patient care. Here we describe first efforts of modeling the TRIUMF dose delivery system using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. Details on geometry, estimating beam parameters, measurement of primary dose and simulation of PET isotope production are discussed. Proton depth dose in both modulated and pristine beams is successfully simulated to sub-millimeter precision in range (within limits of measurement) and 2% agreement to measurement within in a treatment volume. With the goal of using PET signals for in vivo dosimetry (alignment), a first look at PET isotope depth distribution is presented — comparing favourably to a naive method of approximating simulated PET slice activity in a Lucite phantom.

  18. Study of electrodeposition technique to prepare alpha-counting plates of uranium 233

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertzig, W.

    1979-01-01

    The electrodeposition technique to prepare alpha-counting plates of 233 U for its determination is presented. To determine the optimum conditions for plating 233 U the effects of such parameters as current density, pH of eletrotype, salt concentration, time of electrolysis and distance electrodes were studied. A carrier method was developed to attain a quantitative electrodeposition of 233 U from aqueous solutions into alpha counting paltes. A single and incremental addition of natural uranium and thorium as carrier were studied. All samples were prepared using a electrodeposition cell manufactured at the IPEN, especially for use in electroplating tracer actinides. This cell is made of a metal-lucite to contain the electrolyte, which bottom is a polished brass disk coated with a Ni film serving as the cathode. A Pt wire anode is fixed on the top of the cell. The electroplated samples were alpha-counted using a surface barrier detector. A recovery of more than 99% was obtained in specific conditions. The plating procedure produced deposits which were firmly distributed over the plate area. The method was applied to determine tracer amounts of 233 U from oxalate and nitrate solutions coming from chemical processing irradiated thorium. (Author) [pt

  19. Characterization of film-converter screens systems for neutron radiography; Caracterizacao de sistemas filme-conversor para radiografia com neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Marcos Leandro Garcia

    2002-07-01

    In general a good quality radiography is that one able to furnish high contrast and sharp edge images. Technically 'high contrast' means high capability to discern material thickness and 'sharp edges', high resolution power. In the present work the optimal conditions to obtain neutron radiography images by using the following film-converter screen systems, Kodak-AA/Gd vaporated; Kodak-AA/Gd metallic; Kodak-AA/LiF; Min-R/GdS{sub 2}O{sub 4}, have been determined. The irradiations were performed in a radiographic facility which was designed and constructed by the neutron radiography working group and is installed at the beamhole 08 of the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor of the IPEN-CNEN/SP. In order to determine such conditions, the start point was to evaluate the neutron exposure interval for which the optical contrast is maximal and so quantify the sensitivity or capability to discern material thickness, as well as the spatial resolution achieved in the radiographic image, for these systems. The best results have been obtained for the Kodak-AA/Gd vaporated system which is able to discern, for example, 0,024 cm of lucite, with a maximal resolution of 22{mu}m. The radiography images presently obtained in IPEN-CNEN/SP have similar quality when compared to the ones from several other research centers, around the world, whose making use of the same film-converter screens systems. (author)

  20. A study on ultrasonic inspection of long steel pipes using lamb waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Ho

    1996-02-01

    An ultrasonic inspection technique with use of Lamb waves was evaluated to detect and determine the exact location of flaws present in long steel pipes. Since multiple modes of Lamb waves are generated in the inspected pipes due to their dispersive characteristics, selection of a specific Lamb wave mode is very important for inspection of flaws. Experimental studies of flaw detectability with use of each Lamb wave mode, namely, A 0 , S 0 , A 1 , and S 1 mode and their ultrasonic attenuation characteristics were conducted. Experimental results showed that A 0 mode is the most effective for detection and exact determination of the location of flaws. A lucite wedge containing water column that generates the A 0 Lamb wave mode was developed and used in the present inspection study. It was found that the ultrasonic beam divergence after its wrapping around once the inspected pipe interferes with exact determination of the location of flaws and that maximum reflection signals are obtained when the transducer is located axially offset from the straight line with the position of the flaw. The present study showed feasibility of ultrasonic inspection with use of Lamb waves for detection of flaws in several meters long insulated or inaccessible steel pipes

  1. Construction of pediatric homogeneous phantoms for optimization of chest and skull radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, Allan Felipe Fattori, E-mail: allan@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, P.O. BOX 510, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda, E-mail: jmiranda@ibb.unesp.br [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Bacchim Neto, Fernando Antonio, E-mail: fernando.bacchim@gmail.com [Instituto de Biociências de Botucatu, Departamento de Física e Biofísica, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil); Duarte, Sérgio Barbosa, E-mail: sbd@cbpf.br [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Laboratório de Altas Energias, Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Rio de Janeiro, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pina, Diana Rodrigues de, E-mail: drpina@fmb.unesp.br [Departamento de Doenças Tropicais e Diagnóstico por Imagem, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, UNESP—Universidade Estadual Paulista, Distrito de Rubião Junior S/N, Botucatu, 18618-000 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We developed two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms. • Our phantoms were used in the optimization process of computed radiography systems. • We evaluated physical quantities such as effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. • We determined optimized techniques for pediatric protocols. - Abstract: Objectives: To develop two pediatric patient-equivalent phantoms, the Pediatric Chest Equivalent Patient (PCEP) and the Pediatric Skull Equivalent Patient (PSEP) for children aged 1 to 5 years. We also used both phantoms for image quality evaluations in computed radiography systems to determine Gold Standard (GS) techniques for pediatric patients. Methods: To determine the simulator materials thickness (Lucite and aluminum), we quantified biological tissues (lung, soft, and bone) using an automatic computational algorithm. To objectively establish image quality levels, two physical quantities were used: effective detective quantum efficiency and contrast-to-noise ratio. These quantities were associated to values obtained for standard patients from previous studies. Results: For chest radiographies, the GS technique applied was 81 kVp, associated to 2.0 mAs and 83.6 μGy of entrance skin dose (ESD), while for skull radiographies, the GS technique was 70 kVp, associated to 5 mAs and 339 μGy of ESD. Conclusion: This procedure allowed us to choose optimized techniques for pediatric protocols, thus improving quality of diagnosis for pediatric population and reducing diagnostic costs to our institution. These results could also be easily applied to other services with different equipment technologies.

  2. Synthesis of the Mg2Ni alloy prepared by mechanical alloying using a high energy ball mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iturbe G, J. L.; Lopez M, B. E.; Garcia N, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Mg 2 Ni was synthesized by a solid state reaction from the constituent elemental powder mixtures via mechanical alloying. The mixture was ball milled for 10 h at room temperature in an argon atmosphere. The high energy ball mill used here was fabricated at ININ. A hardened steel vial and three steel balls of 12.7 mm in diameter were used for milling. The ball to powder weight ratio was 10:1. A small amount of powder was removed at regular intervals to monitor the structural changes. All the steps were performed in a little lucite glove box under argon gas, this glove box was also constructed in our Institute. The structural evolution during milling was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The hydrogen reaction was carried out in a micro-reactor under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature. The hydrogen storage properties of mechanically milled powders were evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analysis system. Although homogeneous refining and alloying take place efficiently by repeated forging, the process time can be reduced to one fiftieth of the time necessary for conventional mechanical milling and attrition. (Author)

  3. Synthesis of the Mg{sub 2}Ni alloy prepared by mechanical alloying using a high energy ball mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iturbe G, J. L.; Lopez M, B. E. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia N, M. R., E-mail: joseluis.iturbe@inin.gob.m [UNAM, Facultad de Estudios Superiores Zaragoza, Batalla 5 de Mayo s/n, Esq. Fuerte de Loreto, Col. Ejercito de Oriente, 09230 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    Mg{sub 2}Ni was synthesized by a solid state reaction from the constituent elemental powder mixtures via mechanical alloying. The mixture was ball milled for 10 h at room temperature in an argon atmosphere. The high energy ball mill used here was fabricated at ININ. A hardened steel vial and three steel balls of 12.7 mm in diameter were used for milling. The ball to powder weight ratio was 10:1. A small amount of powder was removed at regular intervals to monitor the structural changes. All the steps were performed in a little lucite glove box under argon gas, this glove box was also constructed in our Institute. The structural evolution during milling was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The hydrogen reaction was carried out in a micro-reactor under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature. The hydrogen storage properties of mechanically milled powders were evaluated by using a thermogravimetric analysis system. Although homogeneous refining and alloying take place efficiently by repeated forging, the process time can be reduced to one fiftieth of the time necessary for conventional mechanical milling and attrition. (Author)

  4. The effects of X-ray energy and an iodine-based contrast agent on chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsubara, Sho; Kubota, Nobuo; Katoh, Tsuguhisa; Yoshino, Norio; Sasaki, Takehito; Sasaki, Masao S.

    1994-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of combining irradiation with X rays of various energies and an iodine-based contrast agent on the induction of chromosome aberrations in the peripheral lymphocytes of blood samples taken from healthy young donors. Although no enhancement of the effect of radiation was induced when blood samples with the iodine-based contrast agent were given 35 kV X irradiation, an 80 kV X-ray exposure induced an enhanced level of chromosome aberrations, and a 250 kV X irradiation, an enhancement of the frequencies of chromosome aberrations was seen in blood samples with the iodine-based contrast agent, especially when a Lucite phantom was employed in studies to increase the scattered rays. It was thus shown by microdosimetric analysis that X irradiation combined with an iodine-based contrast agent causes an enhancement of the absorbed radiation dose, which is dependent on the X-ray energies employed. This phenomenon may have clinical use in the radiotherapeutic management of tumors, although further extensive studies of tumor vascularity must be pursued before this can be applied clinically. 21 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  5. X-ray quality assessment by MTF analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gais, P.; Burger, G.; Drexler, G.; Rappl, M.; Bunde, E.; Lissner, J.; Schaetzl, M.

    1985-01-01

    In a previous study a lucite phantom with several physical elements embedded, such as lead gratings with varying line widths, etc., was exposed at 200 X-ray installations in Bavaria, Federal Republic of Germany, by a conventional diagnostic standard technique. One of the parameters investigated was the local resolution achieved, determined visually by examination of the grating images. The same radiographs have now been used in a retrospective comparative study, based upon a quantitative analysis of TV images of the films. The films were positioned on a commercial illuminator screen and looked at by a TV camera through a simple magnifying optical system. The video signals were digitised, resulting in a pixel distance of 50 μm. In a first approach the edges of the broad frames of the lead gratings were adjusted vertically and the normalised sum of all 256 TV scanning lines taken as the edge function f(x). This was differentiated and suitably Fourier-transformed, delivering the modulation transfer function (MTF). The MTF can be analysed in several ways to describe quantitatively the maximum local resolution achievable. Correlation of some frequency measurements with the visually determined line resolution is generally good. (author)

  6. Comparison of the ANSI, RSD, KKH, and BRMD thyroid-neck phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, G H; Olender, G; Vlahovich, S; Hauck, B M; Meyerhof, D P

    1996-03-01

    The Human Monitoring Laboratory, which acts as the Canadian National Calibration Reference Centre for In Vivo Monitoring, has determined the performance characteristics of four thyroid phantoms for 125I thyroid monitoring. The phantoms were a phantom built to the specifications of the American National Standards Institute Standard N44.3; the phantom available from Radiology Support Devices; the phantom available from Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon; the phantom manufactured by the Human Monitoring Laboratory and known as the BRMD phantom. The counting efficiencies of the phantoms for 125I were measured at different phantom-to-detector distances. The anthropomorphic characteristics of the phantoms have been compared with the average man parameters. It was concluded that the BRMD, American National Standards Institute, and Radiology Support Devices phantoms have the same performance characteristics when the neck-to-detector distances are greater than 12 cm and all phantoms are essentially equivalent at 30 cm or more. The Kyoto Kagaku Hyohon phantom showed lower counting efficiencies at phantom-to-detector distances less than 30 cm. This was attributed to the design of the phantom. This study has also shown that the phantom need not be highly anthropomorphic provided the calibration is not performed at short neck-detector distances. Indeed, it might be possible to use t simple point source of 125I placed behind a 1.5 cm block of lucite at neck detector distances of 12 cm or more.

  7. PEP quark search proportional chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, S I; Harris, F; Karliner, I; Yount, D [Hawaii Univ., Honolulu (USA); Ely, R; Hamilton, R; Pun, T [California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Lawrence Berkeley Lab.; Guryn, W; Miller, D; Fries, R [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA)

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (lambdasub(i)) and is followed in both arms each with 45/sup 0/ <= theta <= 135/sup 0/, ..delta..phi=90/sup 0/ by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 lambdasub(i) thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 lambdasub(i) thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH/sub 4/ gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be >98% for q=1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q=1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  8. Homogeneous Canine Chest Phantom Construction: A Tool for Image Quality Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Rosa, Maria Eugênia Dela; Giacomini, Guilherme; Bacchim Neto, Fernando Antonio; Yamashita, Seizo; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Duarte, Sergio Barbosa; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda; de Pina, Diana Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Digital radiographic imaging is increasing in veterinary practice. The use of radiation demands responsibility to maintain high image quality. Low doses are necessary because workers are requested to restrain the animal. Optimizing digital systems is necessary to avoid unnecessary exposure, causing the phenomenon known as dose creep. Homogeneous phantoms are widely used to optimize image quality and dose. We developed an automatic computational methodology to classify and quantify tissues (i.e., lung tissue, adipose tissue, muscle tissue, and bone) in canine chest computed tomography exams. The thickness of each tissue was converted to simulator materials (i.e., Lucite, aluminum, and air). Dogs were separated into groups of 20 animals each according to weight. Mean weights were 6.5 ± 2.0 kg, 15.0 ± 5.0 kg, 32.0 ± 5.5 kg, and 50.0 ± 12.0 kg, for the small, medium, large, and giant groups, respectively. The one-way analysis of variance revealed significant differences in all simulator material thicknesses (p optimize veterinary X-ray procedures.

  9. Initial Experimental Verification of the Neutron Beam Modeling for the LBNL BNCT Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleuel, D.L.; Chu, W.T.; Donahue, R.J.; Ludewigt, B.A.; McDonald, R.J.; Smith, A.R.; Stone, N.A.; Vuji, J.

    1999-01-01

    In preparation for future clinical BNCT trials, neutron production via the 7Li(p,n) reaction as well as subsequent moderation to produce epithermal neutrons have been studied. Proper design of a moderator and filter assembly is crucial in producing an optimal epithermal neutron spectrum for brain tumor treatments. Based on in-phantom figures-of-merit,desirable assemblies have been identified. Experiments were performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-inch cyclotron to characterize epithermal neutron beams created using several microampere of 2.5 MeV protons on a lithium target. The neutron moderating assembly consisted of Al/AlF3 and Teflon, with a lead reflector to produce an epithermal spectrum strongly peaked at 10-20 keV. The thermal neutron fluence was measured as a function of depth in a cubic lucite head phantom by neutron activation in gold foils. Portions of the neutron spectrum were measured by in-air activation of six cadmium-covered materials (Au, Mn, In, Cu, Co, W) with high epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The results are reasonably reproduced in Monte Carlo computational models, confirming their validity

  10. Development of a computer model using the EGS4 simulation code to calculate scattered X-rays through some materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ghorabie, F.H.H.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a computer model based on the use of the well-known Monte Carlo simulation code EGS4 was developed to simulate the scattering of polyenergetic X-ray beams through some materials. These materials are: lucite, polyethylene, polypropylene and aluminium. In particular, the ratio of the scattered to total X-ray fluence (scatter fraction) has been calculated for X-ray beams in the energy region 30-120 keV. In addition scatter fractions have been determined experimentally using a polyenergetic superficial X-ray unit. Comparison of the measured and the calculated results has been performed. The Monte Carlo calculations have also been carried out for water, bakelite and bone to examine the dependence of scatter fraction on the density of the scatterer. Good agreement (estimated statistical error < 5%) was obtained between the measured and the calculated values of the scatter fractions for materials with Z < 20 that were studied in this paper. Copyright (2003) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  11. Spatially and temporally resolved diagnostics for microsecond, intense electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilgenbach, R.M.; Brake, M.; Horton, L.D.; Bidwell, S.; Lucey, R.F.; Smutek, L.; Tucker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments are underway to investigate new diagnostics for electron beams in vacuum and in a plasma background. Measured parameters include temporally resolved beam current profile and beam emittance. These characterizations are being performed during electron beam diode closure experiments (1) and beam-plasma interaction experiments with either of two long-pulse accelerators: MELBA (Michigan Electron Long Beam Accelerator): Voltage = -1 MV, Current = 10 kA, at Pulselength = 0.1 to 1μs (1.4μs) for voltage flat to within +.7% (+.10%). The second accelerator is a long-pulse Febetron with parameters: Voltage = -0.5 MV, Current = 1 kA, and Pulselength = 0.3 s. Two different configurations have been developed which use Cerenkov radiation to detect electron beam current profiles as a function of time. The first uses Cerenkov emission by electrons which impinge axially on a single fiberoptic lightguide enclosed in a lucite tube. Plasma light is blocked by graphite spray or thin foil covering the end of the optical fiber. This diagnostic has the following advantages: 1) The threshold energy for Cerenkov emission effectively discriminates between high energy beam electrons and low energy (3-5 eV) plasma electrons, 2) The small, nonconducting probe introduces a minimal perturbation into the beam-plasma system, 3) Excellent signal to noise ratio is obtained because the fiberoptic signal is directly transmitted to a photomultiplier tube in the Faraday cage, 4) Quantitative data is obtained directly

  12. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jaclyn; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo samples and meteorites first hand. Lunar rocks and soil, embedded in Lucite disks, are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks reveals the early history of our Earth-Moon system and meteorites reveal much of the history of the early solar system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet and solar system and the basic processes accretion, differentiation, impact and volcanism. With these samples, educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by many NASA planetary missions. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the

  13. Calibration of the nuclear power channels for the cylindrical configuration of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor obtained from the measurements of the spatial neutron flux distribution in the reactor core through the irradiation of gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Silva, Alexandre F. Povoa da; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Aredes, Vitor Ottoni Garcia; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br, E-mail: alexpovoa@yahoo.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The activation foil is one of the most used techniques to obtain and compare nuclear parameters from the nuclear data libraries, given by a gamma spectrometry system. Through the measurements of activity induced in the foils, it is possible to determine the neutron flux profile exactly where it has been irradiated. The power level operation of the reactor is a parameter directly proportional to the average neutron flux in the core. The objective of this work is to obtain, for a cylindrical configuration, the power generation through a spatial thermal neutron flux distribution in the core of IPEN/MB-01 Reactor, by irradiating gold foils positioned symmetrically into the core. They are put in a Lucite plate which will not interfere in the analysis of the neutron flux, because of its low microscopic absorption cross section for the analyzed neutrons. The foils are irradiated with and without cadmium covered small plates, to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron flux, through specific equations. The correlation between the average power neutron flux, as a result of the foil's irradiation, and the average power digital neutron flux of the nuclear power channels, allows the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. This same correlation was done in 2008 with the reactor in a rectangular configuration, which resulted in a specific calibration of the power level operation. This calibration cannot be used in the cylindrical configuration, because the nuclear parameters could change, which may lead to a different neutron profile. Furthermore, the precise knowledge of the power neutron flux in the core also validates the mathematics used to calculate the power neutron flux. (author)

  14. The final power calibration of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor for various configurations obtained from the measurements of the absolute average neutron flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alexandre Fonseca Povoa da, E-mail: alexandre.povoa@mar.mil.br [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Bitelli, Ulysses d' Utra; Mura, Luiz Ernesto Credidio; Lima, Ana Cecilia de Souza; Betti, Flavio; Santos, Diogo Feliciano dos, E-mail: ubitelli@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The use of neutron activation foils is a widely spread technique applied to obtain nuclear parameters then comparing the results with those calculated using specific methodologies and available nuclear data. By irradiation of activation foils and subsequent measurement of its induced activity, it is possible to determine the neutron flux at the position of irradiation. The power level during operation of the reactor is a parameter which is directly proportional to the average neutron flux throughout the core. The objective of this work is to gather data from irradiation of gold foils symmetrically placed along a cylindrically configured core which presents only a small excess reactivity in order to derive the power generated throughout the spatial thermal and epithermal neutron flux distribution over the core of the IPEN/MB-01 Nuclear Reactor, eventually lending to a proper calibration of its nuclear channels. The foils are fixed in a Lucite plate then irradiated with and without cadmium sheaths so as to obtain the absolute thermal and epithermal neutron flux. The correlation between the average power neutron flux resulting from the gold foils irradiation, and the average power digitally indicated by the nuclear channel number 6, allows for the calibration of the nuclear channels of the reactor. The reactor power level obtained by thermal neutron flux mapping was (74.65 ± 2.45) watts to a mean counting per seconds of 37881 cps to nuclear channel number 10 a pulse detector, and 0.719.10{sup -5} ampere to nuclear linear channel number 6 (a non-compensated ionization chamber). (author)

  15. Eleventh ORNL personnel dosimetry intercomparison study, May 22-23, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaja, R.E.; Oyan, R.; Sims, C.S.

    1986-07-01

    The Eleventh Personnel Dosimetry Intercomparison Study was conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during May 22-23, 1985. Dosimeter badges from 44 participating organizations were mounted on Lucite block phantoms and exposed to four mixed-radiation fields with neutron dose equivalents around 5 mSv and gamma dose equivalents between 0.1 and 0.7 mSv. Results of this study indicated that no participants had difficulty obtaining measurable indication of neutron exposure at the provided dose equivalent levels, and very few had difficulty obtaining indication of gamma exposure at dose equivalents as low as 0.10 mSv. Average neutron results for all dosimeter types were within 20% of reference values with no obvious spectrum dependence. Different dosimeter types (albedo, direct interaction TLD, film, recoil track, and combination albedo-track) with 10 or more reported measurements provided average results within 35% of reference values for all spectra. With regard to precision, about 80% of the reported neutron results had single standard deviations within 10% at the means which indicates that precision is not a problem relative to accuracy for most participants. Average gamma results were greater than reference values by factors of 1.07 to 1.52 for the four exposures with TLD systems being more accurate than film. About 80% of all neutron results and 67% of all gamma results met regulatory standards for measurement accuracy and approximately 70% of all neutron data satisfied national dosimetry accreditation criteria for accuracy plus precision. In general, neutron dosimeter performance observed in this intercomparison was much improved compared to that observed in the prior studies while gamma dosimeter performance was about the same

  16. Electrets for beta radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, L.L.; Caldas, L.V.E.; Mascarenhas, S.

    1983-01-01

    Electret dosimetry has been reviewed by Gross. A cylindrical electret ionization-chamber type dosimeter has been studied for X and gamma rays and neutrons. The principle of the dosimeter is electret charge compensation due to ionization in the chamber volume. Electret ionization chambers can be designed with one or more electrets and in various shapes. This study is concerned with a simple system, similar to a cylindrical ionization chamber (sensitive volume: 3,5 cm 3 ) using teflon electrets. Aluminum and lucite were used as wall-materials. Other experiences were performed using chambers without wall, i.e., without defined sensitive volume. The teflon electrets were obtained by Corona discharge in the gas surrounding them. The measurement of the electret charge was made by induction using a co-axial insulated metal chamber connected to an electrometer Keithley 610C. By measuring the charge before and after irradiation it is possible to obtain a calibration curve: charge (Q) versus absorbed dose (D) for the dosimeter. The irradiation setup used was the Beta Secondary Standard System of IPEN calibration laboratory with four beta sources: 90 Sr 90 Y (74 and 1850 MBq), 204 Tl (18,5 MBq) and 147 Pm (518 MBq). In some cases a 85 Kr source was also used. The electrets were tested in different radiation field geometries: electret axis parallel and perpendicular to the field. In conclusion, depending on the wall material and radiation field geometry, the teflon electret detector can be used for different dose interval determinations, using beta radiation

  17. Lactate stimulates migration of human cancer cells: possible consequences for the development of metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walenta, S.; Springborn, C.; Zilkens, S.; Groetzebach, B.; Mueller-Klieser, W.

    2003-01-01

    A high lactate production is a common feature of the majority of malignant tumors. In several independent series of clinical studies we could show that a high lactate content in primary human carcinomas was correlated with a higher incidence of metastases and a reduced patient survival, compared to tumors with a lower lactate content. Since one of the early events in metastasis is the active movement of cancer cells out of the primary tumor site, we have investigated the effect of exogenous lactate on the migratory activity of human cancer cells in vitro. - A 48 well micro chemotaxis chamber was used to quantify the migration of SQ20B and PCI13 cells which were derived from human head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. The chamber consists of bottom and a top Lucite slide, separated by a gelatin covered polycarbonate membrane with pores of 8 μm, where cells eventually migrate through. - In summary, there was a time and concentration dependent unidirectional enhancement of cell migration. For example, cells were incubated in growth medium supplemented with 20 mM L-lactate. On the average, the rate of cell migration was significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) to 139 % for SQ20 and 136 % for PCI cells, compared to untreated control cells (100 %). No effects on cell migration were detected for culture media containing 20 mM D-lactate or 20 mM sodium chloride. These results suggest that an elevated lactate production may not only be an accompanying phenomenon of malignant transformation, but may also play an active part in tumor progression by enhancing cell migration and dissemination of potentially metastatic cells from primary lesions

  18. Interfacial instability induced by a shock wave in a gas-liquid horizontal stratified system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutradhar, S.C.; Chang, J.S.; Yoshida, H.

    1987-01-01

    The experiments are performed in a rectangular lucite duct equipped with the facility of generating shock waves. Piezo-type pressure transducers are used to monitor the strength and propagation velocity of the shock wave. As the liquid phase has high sound velocity, a prepulse wave system of flow amplitude travels in this phase at a speed faster than the principal shock wave. The magnitude of the transmitted wave in the liquid phase is estimated using a transmission coefficient for gas-liquid system. From the initial pressure ratio of the shock wave, the amplitude of the prepulse as well as the induced interfacial fluid velocity are calculated. The wave length and height of the ripples during the passage of the shock wave are estimated for a specific strength of shock wave moving through the phases. From the high speed photographs, the wave length of the ripples can be assessed. The interfacial friction factor is calculated using colebrook's equation for high speed flow. At least five distinct phenomena are observed to exist during the propagation of a shock wave. These are - (1) the energy carried by the pre-pulse is utilized in perturbing the interface; (2) shock wave induces a mass velocity at the interface; (3) the wavelength of the ripples at the interface is the product of induced interfacial mass velocity and the time period of the prepulse; (4) a portion of the liquid mass of the perturbed interface is entrained in the gas phase may be due to the hydrodynamic lift in that phase; and finally (5) waves with long wavelength are established at the interface

  19. Industrial production and purification of 32P by sulfur irradiation with partially moderated neutron fluxes and target melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanis, J.; Navarrete, M.

    2007-01-01

    Target purification of S α is carried out by distillation at 444±2 deg C under N atmosphere and diluting the vapors in CS 2 . The solution is filtered through fiberglass, Teflon and cellulose to obtain S α by CS 2 evaporation. Once 30 g of this target are irradiated with fast neutron fluxes from 4.5 to 7.4 x 10 12 n x cm -2 x s -1 from 6 to 12 hours, the nuclear reaction 32 S(n,p) 32 P takes place. So, the irradiated S α sample is placed in a Pyrex container situated inside a furnace as the most important piece of equipment in one aluminum and Lucite glove box. The distillation of irradiated sulfur takes place at 444±2 deg C under N atmosphere during 1-2 hours. The vapors are connected to a sulfur diluter containing 20% CS 2 aqueous solution, followed by an activated carbon filter and the two similar additional sulfur diluters. Once cooled, the distillation chamber keeps the radioactive, carrier-free 32 P stuck to the wall. Then 25-50 ml of 0.1N HCl acid was injected by suction and heated again at 110±2 deg C during 1 hour. The corresponding chemical reaction takes place and the labeled H 3 32 PO 4 solution is produced. In such a way, industrial production of 32 P labeled molecules has started in Mexico, with an initial production of 3700-5550 MBq per week. (author)

  20. Determination of the flows profile in the role of power in the central thimble of TRIGA Mark III Reactor; Determinacion del perfil de flujos en funcion de la potencia en el dedal central del Reactor Triga Mark III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia F, A.

    2010-07-01

    The overall objective of the thesis project is to determine the flow profiles sub cadmic and epi cadmic in the central thimble to different powers and operation times of TRIGA Mark III Reactor, using activation foils as detectors. In the reactor operation, it is necessary to know the neutron flow profile for to realize other tasks as: the radioisotopes production, research in reactors physics and fuel burning. The distribution of the neutron flow, accurately reflects what is happening in the reactor core, plus the flows value in this distribution is directly related to the power generated. For this reason it is performed the sub cadmic flow measurement with energies between 0 and 0.4 eV (energy of the cadmium cut E{sub cd} approx 0.4 eV) and epi cadmic flow with energies greater than 0.4 eV, in the central thimble powers to the powers of 10, 100 W, 1, 10 100 Kw and 1 MW. The method used is known as flakes activation, which is to be arranged by placing flakes ( 3 mm of diameter and 0.0508 mm of thickness) of a given material (either Au, In, Cu, Mn, etc.) into an aluminum tube outside diameter equal to 6.35 mm, alternating flakes with lids covered and discovered of cadmium (3.4 mm of diameter and 0.508 mm of thickness) and separated by lucite pieces of 3 mm of diameter and 25.4 mm in length. After irradiating the flakes for some time, is measured the gamma activity of each of them, using a hyper pure germanium detector of high resolution. Already known gamma activity, proceed to calculate the epi cadmic and sub cadmic flows using a computer program in Fortran language, called Caflu. (Author)

  1. The radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy: Are ''photon-equivalent'' doses really photon-equivalent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coderre, J.A.; Diaz, A.Z.; Ma, R.

    2001-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) produces a mixture of radiation dose components. The high-linear energy transfer (LET) particles are more damaging in tissue than equal doses of low-LET radiation. Each of the high-LET components can multiplied by an experimentally determined factor to adjust for the increased biological effectiveness and the resulting sum expressed in photon-equivalent units (Gy-Eq). BNCT doses in photon-equivalent units are based on a number of assumptions. It may be possible to test the validity of these assumptions and the accuracy of the calculated BNCT doses by 1) comparing the effects of BNCT in other animal or biological models where the effects of photon radiation are known, or 2) if there are endpoints reached in the BNCT dose escalation clinical trials that can be related to the known response to photons of the tissue in question. The calculated Gy-Eq BNCT doses delivered to dogs and to humans with BPA and the epithermal neutron beam of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor were compared to expected responses to photon irradiation. The data indicate that Gy-Eq doses in brain may be underestimated. Doses to skin are consistent with the expected response to photons. Gy-Eq doses to tumor are significantly overestimated. A model system of cells in culture irradiated at various depths in a lucite phantom using the epithermal beam is under development. Preliminary data indicate that this approach can be used to detect differences in the relative biological effectiveness of the beam. The rat 9L gliosarcoma cell survival data was converted to photon-equivalent doses using the same factors assumed in the clinical studies. The results superimposed on the survival curve derived from irradiation with Cs-137 photons indicating the potential utility of this model system. (author)

  2. Comparison of a suspended radiation protection system versus standard lead apron for radiation exposure of a simulated interventionalist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marichal, Daniel A; Anwar, Temoor; Kirsch, David; Clements, Jessica; Carlson, Luke; Savage, Clare; Rees, Chet R

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the radiation protective characteristics of a system designed to enhance operator protection while eliminating weight to the body and allowing freedom of motion. Radiation doses to a mock interventionalist were measured with calibrated dosimeters in a clinical interventional suite. A standard lead apron (SLA; Pb equivalent, 0.5 mm) was compared with a suspended radiation protection system (ZeroGravity; Zgrav) that shields from the top of the head to the calves (except the right arm and left forearm) with a complex overhead motion system that eliminates weight on the operator and allows freedom of motion. Zgrav included a suspended lead apron with increased lead equivalency, greater length, proximal left arm and shoulder coverage, and a wraparound face shield of 0.5 mm Pb equivalency. A 26-cm-thick Lucite stack (ie, mock patient) created scatter during 10 controlled angiography sequences of 120 exposures each. Parameters included a field of view of 40 cm, table height of 94 cm, 124 cm from the tube to image intensifier, 50 cm from the image center to operator, 66 kVp, and 466-470 mA. Under identical conditions, average doses (SLA vs Zgrav) were 264 versus 3.4 (ratio, 78) to left axilla (P < .001), 456 versus 10.2 (ratio, 45) to left eye (P < .001), 379.4 versus 6.6 (ratio, 57) to right eye (P < .005), and 18.8 versus 1.2 (ratio, 16) to gonad (P < .001). Relative to a conventional lead apron, the Zgrav system provided a 16-78-fold decrease in radiation exposure for a mock interventionalist in a simulated clinical setting. Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of the flows profile in the role of power in the central thimble of TRIGA Mark III Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia F, A.

    2010-01-01

    The overall objective of the thesis project is to determine the flow profiles sub cadmic and epi cadmic in the central thimble to different powers and operation times of TRIGA Mark III Reactor, using activation foils as detectors. In the reactor operation, it is necessary to know the neutron flow profile for to realize other tasks as: the radioisotopes production, research in reactors physics and fuel burning. The distribution of the neutron flow, accurately reflects what is happening in the reactor core, plus the flows value in this distribution is directly related to the power generated. For this reason it is performed the sub cadmic flow measurement with energies between 0 and 0.4 eV (energy of the cadmium cut E cd ∼ 0.4 eV) and epi cadmic flow with energies greater than 0.4 eV, in the central thimble powers to the powers of 10, 100 W, 1, 10 100 Kw and 1 MW. The method used is known as flakes activation, which is to be arranged by placing flakes ( 3 mm of diameter and 0.0508 mm of thickness) of a given material (either Au, In, Cu, Mn, etc.) into an aluminum tube outside diameter equal to 6.35 mm, alternating flakes with lids covered and discovered of cadmium (3.4 mm of diameter and 0.508 mm of thickness) and separated by lucite pieces of 3 mm of diameter and 25.4 mm in length. After irradiating the flakes for some time, is measured the gamma activity of each of them, using a hyper pure germanium detector of high resolution. Already known gamma activity, proceed to calculate the epi cadmic and sub cadmic flows using a computer program in Fortran language, called Caflu. (Author)

  4. A phantom test of proton-induced dual-energy X-ray angiography using iodinated contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguri, Y.; Hasegawa, J.; Ogawa, M.; Kaneko, J.; Sasa, K.

    2007-01-01

    Characteristic-line radiation from heavy metal targets bombarded by MeV proton beams has been tested as an X-ray source for dual-energy K-edge subtraction imaging for human angiography (blood vessel imaging) based on iodinated contrast media. To utilize the strong absorption by iodine (Z=53) at its K-absorption edge (33.2 keV), we used K α -line of La (lanthanum, Z=57) at 33.4 keV. As a reference, also K α X emission of Sn (tin, Z=50) at 25.2 keV was employed. Metallic plates of La and Sn were irradiated by 7-MeV protons to produce these characteristic X-rays. Energy-subtraction method was tested using Lucite phantoms which contain aqueous solutions of KI (potassium iodide) with different concentrations. Also Ca(H 2 PO 4 ) 2 powder was stuffed in these phantoms to simulate bones. The transmission images of the phantoms were recorded on imaging plates. During the exposure, the energy spectra of the X-rays were monitored by a CdTe detector. We found that the contrast of images of iodide solutions taken with La X-rays was higher than that with Sn X-rays. Also the energy subtraction procedure was successfully applied to reduce the graphical noise due to the bones and inhomogeneity of the soft tissue. However, to apply the present method to actual clinical use, the X-ray intensity must be increased by several orders of magnitude. Also the transmission of the 'lower-energy' photons has to be a few orders higher for imaging of objects as thick as human chest. (author)

  5. WE-G-204-02: Utility of a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Over a Large Range of Angiographic Exposure Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetterly, K; Favazza, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mathematical model observers provide a figure of merit that simultaneously considers a test object and the contrast, noise, and spatial resolution properties of an imaging system. The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) to assess system performance over a large range of angiographic exposure conditions. Methods: A 4 mm diameter disk shaped, iodine contrast test object was placed on a 20 cm thick Lucite phantom and 1204 image frames were acquired using fixed x-ray beam quality and for several detector target dose (DTD) values in the range 6 to 240 nGy. The CHO was implemented in the spatial domain utilizing 96 Gabor functions as channels. Detectability index (DI) estimates were calculated using the “resubstitution” and “holdout” methods to train the CHO. Also, DI values calculated using discrete subsets of the data were used to estimate a minimally biased DI as might be expected from an infinitely large dataset. The relationship between DI, independently measured CNR, and changes in results expected assuming a quantum limited detector were assessed over the DTD range. Results: CNR measurements demonstrated that the angiography system is not quantum limited due to relatively increasing contamination from electronic noise that reduces CNR for low DTD. Direct comparison of DI versus CNR indicates that the CHO relatively overestimates DI for low DTD and/or underestimates DI values for high DTD. The relative magnitude of the apparent bias error in the DI values was ∼20% over the 40x DTD range investigated. Conclusion: For the angiography system investigated, the CHO can provide a minimally biased figure of merit if implemented over a restricted exposure range. However, bias leads to overestimates of DI for low exposures. This work emphasizes the need to verify CHO model performance during real-world application

  6. WE-G-204-02: Utility of a Channelized Hotelling Model Observer Over a Large Range of Angiographic Exposure Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetterly, K; Favazza, C [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Mathematical model observers provide a figure of merit that simultaneously considers a test object and the contrast, noise, and spatial resolution properties of an imaging system. The purpose of this work was to investigate the utility of a channelized Hotelling model observer (CHO) to assess system performance over a large range of angiographic exposure conditions. Methods: A 4 mm diameter disk shaped, iodine contrast test object was placed on a 20 cm thick Lucite phantom and 1204 image frames were acquired using fixed x-ray beam quality and for several detector target dose (DTD) values in the range 6 to 240 nGy. The CHO was implemented in the spatial domain utilizing 96 Gabor functions as channels. Detectability index (DI) estimates were calculated using the “resubstitution” and “holdout” methods to train the CHO. Also, DI values calculated using discrete subsets of the data were used to estimate a minimally biased DI as might be expected from an infinitely large dataset. The relationship between DI, independently measured CNR, and changes in results expected assuming a quantum limited detector were assessed over the DTD range. Results: CNR measurements demonstrated that the angiography system is not quantum limited due to relatively increasing contamination from electronic noise that reduces CNR for low DTD. Direct comparison of DI versus CNR indicates that the CHO relatively overestimates DI for low DTD and/or underestimates DI values for high DTD. The relative magnitude of the apparent bias error in the DI values was ∼20% over the 40x DTD range investigated. Conclusion: For the angiography system investigated, the CHO can provide a minimally biased figure of merit if implemented over a restricted exposure range. However, bias leads to overestimates of DI for low exposures. This work emphasizes the need to verify CHO model performance during real-world application.

  7. Void fraction measurements in two-phase flow by transmission and scattering of a neutrons beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.C.L.

    1984-01-01

    Calibration curves have been obtained which supply average values of void fraction (α) of water-steam two-phase mixtures for bubble, slug, annular and invert annular flow states. The measurements were carried out in simulated models of lucite-air for the steady-state, using the techniques of transmission and diffusion of a thermal neutrons beam. The calibration curves obtained were used for measurements of void fraction in a circuit containing two-phase water-air mixtures, in upward concurrent flow, for slug flow (P sub(max) = 1,06 bar) and annular flow (P sub(max) = 1,33 bar), using the same techniques. In both of the systems, a test section made up of an aluminium (99,9%) tube was used with internal diameter of 25,25 mm and 2,0 mm wall thichness. The beam of neutrons was obtained from a 5 Ci isotopic Am-Be source, thermalised in a cylindrical moderator of paraffin of 500 mm diameter (with H/D=1) which was covered by 2 mm thick cadmium sheets and having in its centre a parallepeliped made from high density polyethilene with the dimensions 240 x 240 x 144 mm. The neutrons escape through a rectangular collimator of 53,0 x 25,25 mm, with a length of 273 mm cut out of a single block of borated paraffin (32% of H 3 BO 3 ). The experimental results are in good agreement with theorical models in published literature. (Author) [pt

  8. Analysis of oxygen content in steel by means of 14 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, L.S.; Wong, K.C.; Chiu, W.Y.

    1975-01-01

    A sealed-tube type 14 MeV neutron generator with maximum neutron output of 10 11 n/sec, incorporating a pneumatic sample transfer system of single-tube type and with a single rotation of the sample during neutron irradiation, is used to develop a method suitable for routine work in industrial applications. A pulse shape analyser system incorporating an organic scintillation detector is used for monitoring neutron flux level during the neutron irradiation of the sample. Polyethylene, of oxygen content 163 ppm determined by comparison with lucite, is used as the steel sample carrier. A 3 x 3 in. NaI(Tl) crystal is used with a single channel analyser to count the 6.1 and 7.1 MeV gamma rays emitted from 16 N as a result of the reaction 16 O(n,p) 16 N. As the present activation analysis makes use of the comparison method, a steel-mylar standard made of layered steel and mylar discs is prepared and a calibration curve constructed. A method of correcting the oxygen contribution in the polyethylene sample carrier is devised and the content of oxygen in the steel standard is determined. A survey of neutron flux distribution is also attempted and it is found that nearly symmetrical distribution of the flux, about the centre of the sample carrier which is placed with its axis in parallel to the plane of the disc-shaped target of the neutron-generating tube, is far from being flat. (Auth.)

  9. Photographic and energy spectral evaluation of mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiyasu, Shikibu; Ise, Toshihide; Kato, Isao; Asakawa, Yoshihisa; Nakamae, Haruo

    1980-01-01

    The combination of molybdenium anode X-ray tube (with a beryllium window and 0.03 mm molybdenium filter) and a single high resolution intensifying screen (rare earth phosphors) with a green-sensitive single emulsion film is regarded as a very useful and optimum system for mammography. In order to find the optimum exposure condition in this system that we investigated the transmission properties of the mammographic cassette, the intensifying screen and the specimen of breast. We examined four cassettes by the contrast (0.1/0.5 mm aluminium), the visibility of small particles (Mg 2 SiO 4 , 150 -- 600 mu m diameter) by five observers and dose measurements using mammographic phantom, Kodak Min-R screen and Fuji RX-M film. We measured the transmission photon spectra by using pure germanium detector through tumor and normal glandular tissue of breast cancer (3.5 kg weight, 6.5 cm, thickness and 1.0 cm tumor diameter) after surgery. We examined the relationship between the contrast and the transmission photon spectra of macro-specimen of breast cancer (fixation in 10% folmalin solution). Then we selected the phantom materials for mammography which have the same property as the specimen of cancer in the transmission spectra. From these results, the low tube voltage (25 kV) technique gives high contrast and good visibility of small particles in this system. Also in the system, the smaller X-ray absorption of cassette (or package) gives higher contrast, better visibility and lower dose. For the phantom materials, ABS resin has almost same transmission property as the measured normal glandular tissue and Lucite is almost same as the measured tumor and glandular from the point of transmission spectra. (author)

  10. Evaluation of the distribution of absorbed dose in child phantoms exposed to diagnostic medical x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine, by theoretical calculation and experimental measurement, the absorbed dose distributions in two heterogeneous phantoms representing one-year- and five-year-old children from typical radiographic examinations for those ages. Theoretical work included the modification of an existing internal dose code which used Monte Carlo methods to determine doses within the Snyder-Fisher mathematical phantom. A Ge(Li) detector and a pinhole collimator were used to measure x-ray spectra which served as input (i.e., the source routine) to the modified Monte Carlo codes which were used to calculate organ doses in children. Experimental work included the fabrication of child phantoms to match the existing mathematical models. These phantoms were constructed of molded lucite shells filled with differing materials to simulate lung, skeletal, and soft-tissue regions. The skeleton regions of phantoms offered the opportunity to perform meaningful measurements of absorbed dose to bone marrow and bone. Thirteen to fourteen sites in various bones of the skeleton were chosen for placement of TLDs. These sites represented important regions in which active bone marrow is located. Sixteen typical radiographic examinations were performed representing common pediatric diagnostic procedures. The calculated and measured tissue-air values were compared for a number of organs. For most organs, the results of the calculated absorbed doses agreed with the measured absorbed doses within twice the coefficient of variation of the calculated value. The absorbed dose to specific organs for several selected radiological examinations are given for one-year-old, five-year-old, and adult phantoms. For selected radiological exposures, the risk factors of leukemia, thyroid cancer, and genetic death are estimated for one-year- and five-year-old children

  11. Extremity exams optimization for computed radiography; Otimizacao de exames de extremidade para radiologia computadorizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, Ana Luiza M.; Alves, Allan Felipe F.; Velo, Alexandre F.; Miranda, Jose Ricardo A., E-mail: analuiza@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Departamento de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departamento de Doencas Tropicais e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-08-15

    The computed radiography (CR) has become the most used device for image acquisition, since its introduction in the 80s. The detection and early diagnosis, obtained through CR examinations, are important for the successful treatment of diseases of the hand. However, the norms used for optimization of these images are based on international protocols. Therefore, it is necessary to determine letters of radiographic techniques for CR system, which provides a safe medical diagnosis, with doses as low as reasonably achievable. The objective of this work is to develop an extremity homogeneous phantom to be used in the calibration process of radiographic techniques. In the construction process of the simulator, it has been developed a tissues' algorithm quantifier using Matlab®. In this process the average thickness was quantified from bone and soft tissues in the region of the hand of an anthropomorphic simulator as well as the simulators' material thickness corresponding (aluminum and Lucite) using technique of mask application and removal Gaussian histogram corresponding to tissues of interest. The homogeneous phantom was used to calibrate the x-ray beam. The techniques were implemented in a calibrated hand anthropomorphic phantom. The images were evaluated by specialists in radiology by the method of VGA. Skin entrance surface doses were estimated (SED) corresponding to each technique obtained with their respective tube charge. The thicknesses of simulators materials that constitute the homogeneous phantom determined in this study were 19.01 mm of acrylic and 0.81 mm of aluminum. A better picture quality with doses as low as reasonably achievable decreased dose and tube charge around 53.35% and 37.78% respectively, compared normally used by radiology diagnostic routine clinical of HCFMB-UNESP. (author)

  12. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M.; Esteve, F.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of a method for correction of scatter radiation in thorax cone beam CT; Evaluation d'une methode de correction du rayonnement diffuse en tomographie du thorax avec faisceau conique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinkel, J.; Dinten, J.M. [CEA Grenoble (DTBS/STD), Lab. d' Electronique et de Technologie de l' Informatique, LETI, 38 (France); Esteve, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    2004-07-01

    Purpose: Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables three-dimensional imaging with isotropic resolution. X-ray scatter estimation is a big challenge for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax: scatter level is significantly higher on cone beam systems compared to collimated fan beam systems. The effects of this scattered radiation are cupping artefacts, streaks, and quantification inaccuracies. The beam stops conventional scatter estimation approach can be used for CBCT but leads to a significant increase in terms of dose and acquisition time. At CEA-LETI has been developed an original scatter management process without supplementary acquisition. Methods and Materials: This Analytical Plus Indexing-based method (API) of scatter correction in CBCT is based on scatter calibration through offline acquisitions with beam stops on lucite plates, combined to an analytical transformation issued from physical equations. This approach has been applied with success in bone densitometry and mammography. To evaluate this method in CBCT, acquisitions from a thorax phantom with and without beam stops have been performed. To compare different scatter correction approaches, Feldkamp algorithm has been applied on rough data corrected from scatter by API and by beam stops approaches. Results: The API method provides results in good agreement with the beam stops array approach, suppressing cupping artefact. Otherwise influence of the scatter correction method on the noise in the reconstructed images has been evaluated. Conclusion: The results indicate that the API method is effective for quantitative CBCT imaging of thorax. Compared to a beam stops array method it needs a lower x-ray dose and shortens acquisition time. (authors)

  14. Investigation of real tissue water equivalent path lengths using an efficient dose extinction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rongxiao; Baer, Esther; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Sharp, Gregory C.; Flanz, Jay; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2017-07-01

    For proton therapy, an accurate conversion of CT HU to relative stopping power (RSP) is essential. Validation of the conversion based on real tissue samples is more direct than the current practice solely based on tissue substitutes and can potentially address variations over the population. Based on a novel dose extinction method, we measured water equivalent path lengths (WEPL) on animal tissue samples to evaluate the accuracy of CT HU to RSP conversion and potential variations over a population. A broad proton beam delivered a spread out Bragg peak to the samples sandwiched between a water tank and a 2D ion-chamber detector. WEPLs of the samples were determined from the transmission dose profiles measured as a function of the water level in the tank. Tissue substitute inserts and Lucite blocks with known WEPLs were used to validate the accuracy. A large number of real tissue samples were measured. Variations of WEPL over different batches of tissue samples were also investigated. The measured WEPLs were compared with those computed from CT scans with the Stoichiometric calibration method. WEPLs were determined within  ±0.5% percentage deviation (% std/mean) and  ±0.5% error for most of the tissue surrogate inserts and the calibration blocks. For biological tissue samples, percentage deviations were within  ±0.3%. No considerable difference (extinction measurement took around 5 min to produce ~1000 WEPL values to be compared with calculations. This dose extinction system measures WEPL efficiently and accurately, which allows the validation of CT HU to RSP conversions based on the WEPL measured for a large number of samples and real tissues.

  15. The short and long term effects of intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy (IORT) on thoracic organs after pneumonectomy an experimental study in the canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, Willem J. de; Mehta, Dinesh M.; Timens, Wim; Hoekstra, Harald J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The tolerance of mediastinal structures and thoracic organs to intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) was investigated in the canine model. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two adult beagles divided into three groups were subjected to a left pneumonectomy and IORT (10 MeV electrons) at doses of 20 Gy (n = 9), 25 Gy (n = 4), or 30 Gy (n = 9). Intraoperative electron beam radiotherapy was delivered through a 5 cm circular lucite cone encompassing a mediastinal field including the bronchial stump, aorta, esophagus, heart, phrenic nerve, contralateral hilar structures, and lung. Clinical monitoring was performed with regular chest X-ray, ECG, bronchoscopy, esofagoscopy, and fluoroscopy. From the different treatment dose groups, dogs were electively sacrificed at 1.5, 6, 12, and 72 months with complete autopsies. Results: There was no bronchial stump dehiscence or acute morbidity. Four dogs developed radiation induced esophagitis (18%), one in the 20 Gy IORT group (11%) and three in the 30 Gy IORT group (33%). There were six IORT related mortalities (27.5%), one esophagoaortic fistula (4.5%) and five bronchovascular fistulas (23%): two in the 20 Gy IORT group (22%), two in the 25 Gy IORT group (50%) and two in the 30 Gy IORT group (22%). Histopathological findings in uncomplicated follow-up showed marked myointimal fibrosis in the muscular arteries, submucosal fibrosis of the esophagus, and interstitial fibrosis of bronchial and lung tissue, especially in the higher dose group. Conclusion: The mediastinal vascular, bronchial and esophageal structures are relatively sensitive to doses > 20Gy IORT. The IORT related morbidity found in this study may be lower when the current clinically used IORT doses of 10-15 Gy are applied. Further clinical application of IORT in the future treatment strategies for resectable non small cell lung cancer may be worthwhile to investigate

  16. Development of an algorithm for quantifying extremity biological tissue; Desenvolvimento de um algoritmo quantificador de tecido biologico de extremidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavan, Ana L.M.; Miranda, Jose R.A., E-mail: analuiza@ibb.unesp.br, E-mail: jmiranda@ibb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IBB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Biociencias. Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica; Pina, Diana R. de, E-mail: drpina@frnb.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Doencas Tropicas e Diagnostico por Imagem

    2013-07-01

    The computerized radiology (CR) has become the most widely used device for image acquisition and production, since its introduction in the 80s. The detection and early diagnosis, obtained via CR, are important for the successful treatment of diseases such as arthritis, metabolic bone diseases, tumors, infections and fractures. However, the standards used for optimization of these images are based on international protocols. Therefore, it is necessary to compose radiographic techniques for CR system that provides a secure medical diagnosis, with doses as low as reasonably achievable. To this end, the aim of this work is to develop a quantifier algorithm of tissue, allowing the construction of a homogeneous end used phantom to compose such techniques. It was developed a database of computed tomography images of hand and wrist of adult patients. Using the Matlab Registered-Sign software, was developed a computational algorithm able to quantify the average thickness of soft tissue and bones present in the anatomical region under study, as well as the corresponding thickness in simulators materials (aluminium and lucite). This was possible through the application of mask and Gaussian removal technique of histograms. As a result, was obtained an average thickness of soft tissue of 18,97 mm and bone tissue of 6,15 mm, and their equivalents in materials simulators of 23,87 mm of acrylic and 1,07mm of aluminum. The results obtained agreed with the medium thickness of biological tissues of a patient's hand pattern, enabling the construction of an homogeneous phantom.

  17. Out-of-Field Dose Equivalents Delivered by Passively Scattered Therapeutic Proton Beams for Clinically Relevant Field Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wroe, Andrew; Clasie, Ben; Kooy, Hanne; Flanz, Jay; Schulte, Reinhard; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Microdosimetric measurements were performed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, to assess the dose equivalent external to passively delivered proton fields for various clinical treatment scenarios. Methods and Materials: Treatment fields evaluated included a prostate cancer field, cranial and spinal medulloblastoma fields, ocular melanoma field, and a field for an intracranial stereotactic treatment. Measurements were completed with patient-specific configurations of clinically relevant treatment settings using a silicon-on-insulator microdosimeter placed on the surface of and at various depths within a homogeneous Lucite phantom. The dose equivalent and average quality factor were assessed as a function of both lateral displacement from the treatment field edge and distance downstream of the beam's distal edge. Results: Dose-equivalent value range was 8.3-0.3 mSv/Gy (2.5-60-cm lateral displacement) for a typical prostate cancer field, 10.8-0.58 mSv/Gy (2.5-40-cm lateral displacement) for the cranial medulloblastoma field, 2.5-0.58 mSv/Gy (5-20-cm lateral displacement) for the spinal medulloblastoma field, and 0.5-0.08 mSv/Gy (2.5-10-cm lateral displacement) for the ocular melanoma field. Measurements of external field dose equivalent for the stereotactic field case showed differences as high as 50% depending on the modality of beam collimation. Average quality factors derived from this work ranged from 2-7, with the value dependent on the position within the phantom in relation to the primary beam. Conclusions: This work provides a valuable and clinically relevant comparison of the external field dose equivalents for various passively scattered proton treatment fields

  18. Poster - Thur Eve - 50: Planning and delivery accuracy of stereotactic radiosurgery with Tomotherapy as compared to linear-accelerator and robotic based radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, V; Soisson, E; Ruo, R; Doucet, R; Parker, W; Seuntjens, J

    2012-07-01

    This study includes planning and delivery comparison of three stereotactic radiosurgery techniques : Helical Tomotherapy (HT), circular collimator-based Linear-accelerator and robotic-radiosurgery. Plans were generated for two spherical targets of diameter 6 mm and 10 mm contoured at the center of a Lucite phantom, using similar planning constrains. Planning comparison showed that average conformality (0-1best) for Linear-accelerator, robotic-radiosurgery and HT was 1.43, 1.24, and 1.77 and gradient index (less is better) was 2.72, 4.50 and 13.56 respectively. For delivery comparison, plans were delivered to radiochromic film and measured dose was compared with the planned dose. For Linear-accelerator and robotic-radiosurgery more than 99% pixels-passing a gamma criteria of 3% dose difference and 1 mm distance to agreement where as for HT this value was as low as 40% for off-axis targets. Further investigation of the delivery accuracy as a function of the location of the target with in the bore was initiated using small volume A1SL (0.057 cm 3 ) and MicroLion liquid ion chamber (0.0017 cm 3 ). Point dose measurements for targets located at the center and 10 cm away from the center of the bore showed that delivered dose varied by more than 15% for targets placed away from the center of the bore as opposed to at the center. In conclusion, Linear-accelerator and the robotic-radiosurgery techniques showed preferable gradient and conformality. For HT, point dose measurements were significantly lower than predicted by the TPS when the target was positioned away from the isocenter, while they were found to be higher at isocenter. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. SU-E-T-92: Achieving Desirable Lung Doses in Total Body Irradiation Based On in Vivo Dosimetry and Custom Tissue Compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, G; Shiu, A; Zhou, S; Cui, J; Ballas, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To achieve desirable lung doses in total body irradiation (TBI) based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensation. Methods: The 15 MV photon beam of a Varian TrueBeam STx linac was used for TBI. Patients were positioned in the lateral decubitus position for AP/PA treatment delivery. Dose was calculated using the midpoint of the separation distance across the patient’s umbilicus. Patients received 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days. The dose rate at the patient’s midplane was approximately 10 cGy/min. Cerrobend blocks with a 5-HVL thickness were used for the primary lung shielding. A custom styrofoam holder for rice-flour filled bags was created based on the lung block cutouts. This was used to provide further lung shielding based on in vivo dose measurements. Lucite plates and rice-flour bags were placed in the head, neck, chest, and lower extremity regions during the treatment to compensate for the beam off-axis output variations. Two patients were included in the study. Patients 1 and 2 received a craniospinal treatment (1080 cGy) and a mediastinum treatment (2520 cGy), respectively, before the TBI. During the TBI nanoDot dosimeters were placed on the patient skin in the forehead, neck, umbilicus, and lung regions for dose monitoring. The doses were readout immediately after the treatment. Based on the readings, fine tuning of the thickness of the rice-flour filled bags was exploited to achieve the desirable lung doses. Results: For both patients the mean lung doses, which took into consideration all treatments, were controlled within 900 +/−10% cGy, as desired. Doses to the forehead, neck, and umbilicus were achieved within +/−10% of the prescribed dose (1200 cGy). Conclusion: A reliable and robust method was developed to achieve desirable lung doses and uniform body dose in TBI based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensator

  20. SU-E-T-92: Achieving Desirable Lung Doses in Total Body Irradiation Based On in Vivo Dosimetry and Custom Tissue Compensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, G; Shiu, A; Zhou, S; Cui, J; Ballas, L [Univ Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To achieve desirable lung doses in total body irradiation (TBI) based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensation. Methods: The 15 MV photon beam of a Varian TrueBeam STx linac was used for TBI. Patients were positioned in the lateral decubitus position for AP/PA treatment delivery. Dose was calculated using the midpoint of the separation distance across the patient’s umbilicus. Patients received 200 cGy twice daily for 3 days. The dose rate at the patient’s midplane was approximately 10 cGy/min. Cerrobend blocks with a 5-HVL thickness were used for the primary lung shielding. A custom styrofoam holder for rice-flour filled bags was created based on the lung block cutouts. This was used to provide further lung shielding based on in vivo dose measurements. Lucite plates and rice-flour bags were placed in the head, neck, chest, and lower extremity regions during the treatment to compensate for the beam off-axis output variations. Two patients were included in the study. Patients 1 and 2 received a craniospinal treatment (1080 cGy) and a mediastinum treatment (2520 cGy), respectively, before the TBI. During the TBI nanoDot dosimeters were placed on the patient skin in the forehead, neck, umbilicus, and lung regions for dose monitoring. The doses were readout immediately after the treatment. Based on the readings, fine tuning of the thickness of the rice-flour filled bags was exploited to achieve the desirable lung doses. Results: For both patients the mean lung doses, which took into consideration all treatments, were controlled within 900 +/−10% cGy, as desired. Doses to the forehead, neck, and umbilicus were achieved within +/−10% of the prescribed dose (1200 cGy). Conclusion: A reliable and robust method was developed to achieve desirable lung doses and uniform body dose in TBI based on in vivo dosimetry and custom tissue compensator.

  1. Accurate joint space quantification in knee osteoarthritis: a digital x-ray tomosynthesis phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Tanzania S.; Piacsek, Kelly L.; Heckel, Beth A.; Sabol, John M.

    2011-03-01

    The current imaging standard for diagnosis and monitoring of knee osteoarthritis (OA) is projection radiography. However radiographs may be insensitive to markers of early disease such as osteophytes and joint space narrowing (JSN). Relative to standard radiography, digital X-ray tomosynthesis (DTS) may provide improved visualization of the markers of knee OA without the interference of superimposed anatomy. DTS utilizes a series of low-dose projection images over an arc of +/-20 degrees to reconstruct tomographic images parallel to the detector. We propose that DTS can increase accuracy and precision in JSN quantification. The geometric accuracy of DTS was characterized by quantifying joint space width (JSW) as a function of knee flexion and position using physical and anthropomorphic phantoms. Using a commercially available digital X-ray system, projection and DTS images were acquired for a Lucite rod phantom with known gaps at various source-object-distances, and angles of flexion. Gap width, representative of JSW, was measured using a validated algorithm. Over an object-to-detector-distance range of 5-21cm, a 3.0mm gap width was reproducibly measured in the DTS images, independent of magnification. A simulated 0.50mm (+/-0.13) JSN was quantified accurately (95% CI 0.44-0.56mm) in the DTS images. Angling the rods to represent knee flexion, the minimum gap could be precisely determined from the DTS images and was independent of flexion angle. JSN quantification using DTS was insensitive to distance from patient barrier and flexion angle. Potential exists for the optimization of DTS for accurate radiographic quantification of knee OA independent of patient positioning.

  2. Meteorites for K-12 Classrooms: NASA Meteorite Educational Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M.; Allen, J.

    1995-09-01

    The fall of a new meteorite is an event that catches the interest of the public in matters of science. The threat of a huge impact like last year's comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 gives us all reason to evaluate such potential risks. NASA's meteorite educational materials use our natural interest in rocks from space to present classroom activities on planetary science. The meteorite educational package includes a meteorite sample disk, a teachers's guide and a slide set. The sample disk is a lucite disk containing chips of six different kinds of meteorites (3 chondrites, achondrite, iron, stony-iron). EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERIES is a teacher's guide with background information and 19 hands-on or heads-on activities for grades 4-12. It was prepared in a partnership of planetary scientists and teachers. The slide set consists of 48 slides with captions to be used with the activities. The materials will be available in Fall 1995. Teachers may obtain a loan of the whole package from NASA Teacher Resource Centers; researchers may borrow them from the JSC meteorite curator. The booklet is available separately from the same sources, and the slide set will be available from NASA CORE. EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERIES is an interdisciplinary planetary science unit which teaches basic science concepts and techniques together with math, reading, writing and social studies The activities are done in a variety of different teaching styles which emphasize observation, experimentation and critical thinking. The activities are ideal for middle schools where teaming makes interdisciplinary units desireable, but most of the activities can be easily modified for grade levels from upper elementary through high school. Meteorites are a natural subject for interdisciplinary teaching because their study involves all fields of science and offers fascinating historical accounts and possibilities for creative expression. Topics covered in EXPLORING METEORITE MYSTERES are centered around basic

  3. SU-E-T-522: Investigation of Underdosage of Total Body Irradiation with Bilateral Irradiation Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, T; Eldib, A; Hossain, M; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient in-vivo measurements report lower readings than those predicted from TMR-based treatment planning on TBI patient knees and ankles where rice was placed to fill the gap between patient’s legs. This study is to understand and correct the under dosage of Total Body Irradiation(TBI) with rice tissue equivalent bolus placement at TBI treatment patient setup. Methods: Bilateral TBI scheme was investigated with rice bags bolus placing between patient’s two legs acting as missing tissue. In-house TMR based treatment planning system was commissioned with measurements under TBI condition at 10MV, i.e. source-to-reference distance 383.4cm with 40×40cm field size with 1cm thickness Lucite. Predictions of patient specific dose points are reported at different sites with 200cGy prescription at patient umbilicus point. Solid water and rice bag phantoms are used at TBI conditions for the attenuation factor verification and CT scanned to verify the CT number and electron density. Results: We found that the rice bag bolus overall density is 11% lower than the water; however, the attenuation factor of rice bags could become 15% lower than that of water at TBI condition. This overestimate of rice bag electron density could cause the lack of lateral scatter and the lack of backscatter. This could Result in an overestimate of dose at in-vivo dosimeter measurement points with TMR-based treatment planning systems. Observations of patient specific optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters(OSLDs) were used to confirm this overestimation. Measurements of setups with increasing the rice bag filled patient leg separation were performed to demonstrate eliminating the overdose issue. Conclusion: Rice bolus has a lower electron density than water does(11%) but results in 15% lower in attenuation factor at TBI condition. This effect was observed in patient delivery with OSLD measurements and can be corrected by increasing the filling rice bolus thickness with 15% longer of

  4. Selected problems in nuclear/high energy physics: Experimental hypernuclear physics, muon rare decay, and development of new detector system applicable to nuclear/high energy physics experiments. Final close-out report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, L.; Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA

    1998-08-01

    Under this DOE funding, the experimental program described in this report now consists of two major approved experiments at Jlab: Investigation of the Spin Dependence of the Effective AN interaction in p Shell (E89-009) which is tentatively scheduled to be completed in the fall of 1999 and Direct measurement of the Lifetime of the Heavy Λ-Hypernuclei at CEBAF (E95-002) which will be run in parasitic mode with E89-009. Also, a new experiment (E97-008) which attempts a directly observation of the spin-orbital splitting in the higher orbits with medium heavy targets was proposed and conditionally approved by Jlab PAC-12 in 1997. The condition for this experiment is simply to run E89-009 first and study the best possible energy resolution. The experimental group at Hampton University has played a leadership role in the development and preparation of these experiments. The Principal Investigator (PI) of this grant is spokesperson and acting program coordinator for all three experiments. Establishment of Jlab experiments is the group's main focus. In addition as originally proposed in the grant proposal, the group also contributed in completing the MEGA experiment at LAMPF. The detector development program established in the NuHEP Center has successfully constructed a large active area Lucite detector which uses a total internal reflection technique as a part of the kaon identification system for the Jlab Hall C SOS spectrometer. Its application in the first two experiments using the (e,e'K) reaction, E91-16 and E93-18 in 1996, has proved its effectiveness to reject the proton background both on-line and off-line. The author continued the program to develop new techniques and equipment associated with the Jlab experiments and possible future experiments at different national laboratories. This new work included developing: (1) a fission fragment detector with excellent timing and position resolution for the lifetime measurement of heavy hypernuclei and (2) new

  5. SU-E-T-522: Investigation of Underdosage of Total Body Irradiation with Bilateral Irradiation Scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, T; Eldib, A; Hossain, M; Price, R; Ma, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Patient in-vivo measurements report lower readings than those predicted from TMR-based treatment planning on TBI patient knees and ankles where rice was placed to fill the gap between patient’s legs. This study is to understand and correct the under dosage of Total Body Irradiation(TBI) with rice tissue equivalent bolus placement at TBI treatment patient setup. Methods: Bilateral TBI scheme was investigated with rice bags bolus placing between patient’s two legs acting as missing tissue. In-house TMR based treatment planning system was commissioned with measurements under TBI condition at 10MV, i.e. source-to-reference distance 383.4cm with 40×40cm field size with 1cm thickness Lucite. Predictions of patient specific dose points are reported at different sites with 200cGy prescription at patient umbilicus point. Solid water and rice bag phantoms are used at TBI conditions for the attenuation factor verification and CT scanned to verify the CT number and electron density. Results: We found that the rice bag bolus overall density is 11% lower than the water; however, the attenuation factor of rice bags could become 15% lower than that of water at TBI condition. This overestimate of rice bag electron density could cause the lack of lateral scatter and the lack of backscatter. This could Result in an overestimate of dose at in-vivo dosimeter measurement points with TMR-based treatment planning systems. Observations of patient specific optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters(OSLDs) were used to confirm this overestimation. Measurements of setups with increasing the rice bag filled patient leg separation were performed to demonstrate eliminating the overdose issue. Conclusion: Rice bolus has a lower electron density than water does(11%) but results in 15% lower in attenuation factor at TBI condition. This effect was observed in patient delivery with OSLD measurements and can be corrected by increasing the filling rice bolus thickness with 15% longer of

  6. Evaluation of the transmitted exposure through lead equivalent aprons used in a radiology department, including the contribution from backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christodoulou, Emmanuel G.; Goodsitt, Mitchell M.; Larson, Sandra C.; Darner, Katie L.; Satti, Jahangir; Chan, H.-P.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the radiation transmission through lead equivalent aprons that are used in a radiology department. A large area beam (poor geometry) was employed for the transmission measurements, and backscatter was simulated by placing 7 '' of Lucite behind each apron. Separate ionization chambers were used to measure the incident and transmitted x-ray beams. Transmission measurements were made at 70 kVp and 100 kVp through aprons and protective shields from eight different vendors that were marked 0.25 mm and 0.5 mm lead equivalent. Transmissions through 0.254 mm and 0.508 mm of pure lead were also measured and were compared with the transmissions through the lead equivalent materials. In addition, the area densities of the aprons were measured to compare radiation transmission with respect to the weights of the aprons. At 70 kVp, the transmission through 0.254 mm of pure lead was 5.4% and the transmissions through the 0.25 mm lead equivalent materials were 4.3% to 10.2% with a mean value of 7.1% and a standard deviation (s.d.) of 1.4%. At 100 kVp, the values were 15% for 0.254 mm pure lead and 12.3% to 20.7% (mean 16.8%, s.d. 2.1%) for the 0.25 mm lead equivalent materials. The transmission through the 0.508 mm pure lead sample was 0.9% at 70 kVp, and the corresponding transmissions through the 0.5 mm lead equivalent materials were 0.6% to 1.6% (mean 1.0%, s.d. 0.2%). At 100 kVp, the transmission through the 0.508 mm lead sample was 5% and those through the 0.5 mm lead equivalent materials were 3.5% to 6.7% (mean 4.9%, s.d. 0.7%). The radiation transmissions at 70 kVp, through two 'lead-free' 0.5 mm lead equivalent aprons, were 1.7% and 1.9% and at 100 kVp the transmissions were 6.1% and 6.8%, respectively. This study indicates that there is a need to establish methods for acceptance testing of aprons and a need to establish acceptance limits for the x-ray transmission of aprons at specific kVp values. There is also a need for the

  7. Determination of the response of a NaI(Tl) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Chacon R, A.

    2006-01-01

    By means of Monte Carlo calculations it was determined the response of a scintillator of NaI (Tl) of 7.62 Φ x 7.62 cm to monoenergetic gamma rays of 0.2 to 3.5 MeV. The response allows to determine the spectra of height of pulses of the monoenergetic photons. This type of calculations was also carried out for photons emitted by sources of Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, Na-24 and 239 PuBe, with the purpose of reproducing the gamma spectra obtained with this type of detecting. In the calculations the detector was modelled as a NaI cylinder with Al cover and the base of lucite; due to the absence of reliable information on the quantity of thallium in the calculations this information was omitted: for photons whose energy is greater to 1.022 MeV the presence of the gamma peak of the simple escape and twice is observed. The source was modelled as punctual and was located to 5 cm along the axial axis of the detector. To verify the calculations its were carried out measurements with a spectrometer with a scintillator of 7.62 Φ x 7.62 cm. In the measured spectra the sum peak is observed, while in those calculated it doesn't appear; because the simultaneous detection of photons of different energy doesn't happen each photon since, in single form, it is followed until its complete absorption in the scintillator or when it escapes from the volume of the detector. To reproduce the sum peak and to obtain height spectra of pulses similar to those measured, the sum photons were introduced in the calculations. With the purpose of that Monte Carlo calculation it reproduces the scattering around the photopeak it was used a gaussian function in each photopeak whose characteristics were obtained starting from the experimental data. The calculation of the response of a scintillator allows to establish the capacity of the measurement of the gamma radiation as well as to distinguish the real events of those that appear by the limitations of the detection process. (Author)

  8. Automated and angular time-synchronized directional gamma-ray scintillation sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenberg, S.; Brucker, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    The authors' previous research resulted in directional sensors for gamma rays and X rays that have a 4π solid angle of acceptance and, at the same time, a high angular resolution that is limited only by their ability to measure small angles. Angular resolution of ∼1 s of arc was achieved. These sensors are capable of operating and accurately detecting high and very low intensity radiation patterns. Such a system can also be used to image broad area sources and their scattering patterns. The principle of operation and design of directional sensors used in this study was described elsewhere; however, for convenience, a part of that text is repeated here. It was shown analytically that the angular distribution of radiation incident on the sensor is proportional to the first derivative of the scan data, that is, of the events' count rate versus orientation of the detector. The previously published results were obtained with a annual operating system. The detector assembly was set at a specific angle, and a pulse rate count was made. This was repeated at numerous other angles of orientation, a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. Recently, the authors automated this system, which is based on the detection of scintillations. The detector, which consists of a stack of plates of Lucite, plastic scintillator, and lead foils, rotates by means of a motor in front of a stationary photomultiplier tube (PMT). One revolution per second was chosen for the motor. At time zero, a trigger indicates that a revolution has started. The angle of orientation of the detector in the laboratory system is proportional to the time during one revolution. The process repeats itself a desired number of times. The trigger signal initiates a scan of a multichannel scalar (MCS). The detector assembly is allowed to rotate in the radiation field, and the MCS scans are repeated in an accumulated mode of operation until enough events are collected for the location of the radiation source to be

  9. CT imaging of the internal human ear: Test of a high resolution scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettuzzi, M., E-mail: matteo.bettuzzi@unibo.it [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Brancaccio, R.; Morigi, M.P. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Gallo, A. [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Strolin, S.; Casali, F. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and National Institute of Nuclear Physics Section of Bologna (Italy); Lamanna, Ernesto [Medicine Faculty, Magna Graecia University, Catanzaro and INFN Cosenza (Italy); Ariu, Marilu [CEFLA Dental Group, Imola (Italy)

    2011-08-21

    During the course of 2009, in the framework of a project supported by the National Institute of Nuclear Physics, a number of tests were carried out at the Department of Physics of the University of Bologna in order to achieve a good quality CT scan of the internal human ear. The work was carried out in collaboration with the local 'S. Orsola' Hospital in Bologna and a company (CEFLA) already involved in the production and commercialization of a CT scanner dedicated to dentistry. A laboratory scanner with a simple concept detector (CCD camera-lens-mirror-scintillator) was used to see to what extent it was possible to enhance the quality of a conventional CT scanner when examining the internal human ear. To test the system, some conventional measurements were made, such as the spatial resolution calculation with the MTF and dynamic range evaluation. Different scintillators were compared to select the most suitable for the purpose. With 0.5 mm thick structured cesium iodide and a field of view of 120x120 mm{sup 2}, a spatial resolution of 6.5l p/mm at 5% MTF was obtained. The CT of a pair of human head phantoms was performed at an energy of 120 kVp. The first phantom was a rough representation of the human head shape, with soft tissue made of coarse slabs of Lucite. Some inserts, like small aluminum cylinders and cubes, with 1 mm diameter drilled holes, were used to simulate the channels that one finds inside the human inner ear. The second phantom is a plastic PVC fused head with a real human cranium inside. The bones in the cranium are well conserved and the inner ear features, such as the cochlea and semicircular channels, are clearly detectable. After a number of CT tests we obtained good results as far as structural representation and channel detection are concerned. Some images of the 3D rendering of the CT volume are shown below. The doctors of the local hospital who followed our experimentation expressed their satisfaction. The CT was compared to a

  10. Conceptus radiation dose and risk from chest screen-film radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Dimovasili, Evangelia; Prassopoulos, Panos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas; Varveris, Haralambos

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to (a) estimate the conceptus radiation dose and risks for pregnant women undergoing posteroanterior and anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs, (b) study the conceptus dose as a function of chest thickness of the patient undergoing chest radiograph, and (c) investigate the possibility of a conceptus to receive a dose of more than 10 mGy, the level above which specific measurements of conceptus doses may be necessary. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for dose measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms simulating pregnancy at the three trimesters of gestation. The effect of chest thickness on conceptus dose and risk was studied by adding slabs of lucite on the anterior and posterior surface of the phantom chest. The conceptus risk for radiation-induced childhood fatal cancer and hereditary effects was calculated based on appropriate risk factors. The average AP chest dimension (d a ) was estimated for 51 women of childbearing age from chest CT examinations. The value of d a was estimated to be 22.3 cm (17.4-27.2 cm). The calculated maximum conceptus dose was 107 x 10 -3 mGy for AP chest radiographs performed during the third trimester of pregnancy with maternal chest thickness of 27.2 cm. This calculation was based on dose data obtained from measurements in the phantoms and d a estimated from the patient group. The corresponding average excess of childhood cancer was 10.7 per million patients. The risk for hereditary effects was 1.1 per million births. Radiation dose for a conceptus increases exponentially as chest thickness increases. The conceptus dose at the third trimester is higher than that of the second and first trimesters. The results of the current study suggest that chest radiographs carried out in women at any time during gestation will result in a negligible increase in risk of radiation-induced harmful effects to the unborn child. After a properly performed maternal chest X-ray, there is no need for

  11. Conceptus radiation dose and risk from chest screen-film radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Prassopoulos, Panos; Dimovasili, Evangelia; Varveris, Haralambos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2003-02-01

    The objectives of the present study were to (a) estimate the conceptus radiation dose and risks for pregnant women undergoing posteroanterior and anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs, (b) study the conceptus dose as a function of chest thickness of the patient undergoing chest radiograph, and (c) investigate the possibility of a conceptus to receive a dose of more than 10 mGy, the level above which specific measurements of conceptus doses may be necessary. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for dose measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms simulating pregnancy at the three trimesters of gestation. The effect of chest thickness on conceptus dose and risk was studied by adding slabs of lucite on the anterior and posterior surface of the phantom chest. The conceptus risk for radiation-induced childhood fatal cancer and hereditary effects was calculated based on appropriate risk factors. The average AP chest dimension (d(a)) was estimated for 51 women of childbearing age from chest CT examinations. The value of d(a) was estimated to be 22.3 cm (17.4-27.2 cm). The calculated maximum conceptus dose was 107 x 10(-3) mGy for AP chest radiographs performed during the third trimester of pregnancy with maternal chest thickness of 27.2 cm. This calculation was based on dose data obtained from measurements in the phantoms and d(a) estimated from the patient group. The corresponding average excess of childhood cancer was 10.7 per million patients. The risk for hereditary effects was 1.1 per million births. Radiation dose for a conceptus increases exponentially as chest thickness increases. The conceptus dose at the third trimester is higher than that of the second and first trimesters. The results of the current study suggest that chest radiographs carried out in women at any time during gestation will result in a negligible increase in risk of radiation-induced harmful effects to the unborn child. After a properly performed maternal chest X-ray, there is no need for

  12. Conceptus radiation dose and risk from chest screen-film radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, John; Perisinakis, Kostas; Dimovasili, Evangelia [Department of Medical Physics, University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1393, 714 09 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Prassopoulos, Panos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas [Department of Radiology, University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1393, 714 09 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Varveris, Haralambos [Department of Radiotherapy, University of Crete, Faculty of Medicine, P.O. Box 1393, 714 09 Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2003-02-01

    The objectives of the present study were to (a) estimate the conceptus radiation dose and risks for pregnant women undergoing posteroanterior and anteroposterior (AP) chest radiographs, (b) study the conceptus dose as a function of chest thickness of the patient undergoing chest radiograph, and (c) investigate the possibility of a conceptus to receive a dose of more than 10 mGy, the level above which specific measurements of conceptus doses may be necessary. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used for dose measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms simulating pregnancy at the three trimesters of gestation. The effect of chest thickness on conceptus dose and risk was studied by adding slabs of lucite on the anterior and posterior surface of the phantom chest. The conceptus risk for radiation-induced childhood fatal cancer and hereditary effects was calculated based on appropriate risk factors. The average AP chest dimension (d{sub a}) was estimated for 51 women of childbearing age from chest CT examinations. The value of d{sub a} was estimated to be 22.3 cm (17.4-27.2 cm). The calculated maximum conceptus dose was 107 x 10{sup -3} mGy for AP chest radiographs performed during the third trimester of pregnancy with maternal chest thickness of 27.2 cm. This calculation was based on dose data obtained from measurements in the phantoms and d{sub a} estimated from the patient group. The corresponding average excess of childhood cancer was 10.7 per million patients. The risk for hereditary effects was 1.1 per million births. Radiation dose for a conceptus increases exponentially as chest thickness increases. The conceptus dose at the third trimester is higher than that of the second and first trimesters. The results of the current study suggest that chest radiographs carried out in women at any time during gestation will result in a negligible increase in risk of radiation-induced harmful effects to the unborn child. After a properly performed maternal chest X-ray, there is

  13. Radiation Therapy of Large Intact Breasts Using a Beam Spoiler or Photons with Mixed Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lief, Eugene P.; Hunt, Margie A.; Hong, Linda X.; Amols, Howard I.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation treatment of large intact breasts with separations of more than 24 cm is typically performed using x-rays with energies of 10 MV and higher, to eliminate high-dose regions in tissue. The disadvantage of the higher energy beams is the reduced dose to superficial tissue in the buildup region. We evaluated 2 methods of avoiding this underdosage: (1) a beam spoiler: 1.7-cm-thick Lucite plate positioned in the blocking tray 35 cm from the isocenter, with 15-MV x-rays; and (2) combining 6- and 15-MV x-rays through the same portal. For the beam with the spoiler, we measured the dose distribution for normal and oblique incidence using a film and ion chamber in polystyrene, as well as a scanning diode in a water tank. In the mixed-energy approach, we calculated the dose distributions in the buildup region for different proportions of 6- and 15-MV beams. The dose enhancement due to the beam spoiler exhibited significant dependence upon the source-to-skin distance (SSD), field size, and the angle of incidence. In the center of a 20 x 20-cm 2 field at 90-cm SSD, the beam spoiler raises the dose at 5-mm depth from 77% to 87% of the prescription, while maintaining the skin dose below 57%. Comparison of calculated dose with measurements suggested a practical way of treatment planning with the spoiler-usage of 2-mm 'beam' bolus-a special option offered by in-house treatment planning system. A second method of increasing buildup doses is to mix 6- and 15-MV beams. For example, in the case of a parallel-opposed irradiation of a 27-cm-thick phantom, dose to D max for each energy, with respect to midplane, is 114% for pure 6-, 107% for 15-MV beam with the spoiler, and 108% for a 3:1 mixture of 15- and 6-MV beams. Both methods are practical for radiation therapy of large intact breasts

  14. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-09-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2/g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons [2]. A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6×10 7/cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cm×4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has

  15. Radiography and partial tomography of wood with thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osterloh, K.; Fratzscher, D.; Schwabe, A.; Schillinger, B.; Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.

    2011-01-01

    The effective high neutron scattering absorption coefficient of hydrogen (48.5 cm 2 /g) due to the scattering allows neutrons to reveal hydrocarbon structures with more contrast than X-rays, but at the same time limits the sample size and thickness that can be investigated. Many planar shaped objects, particularly wood samples, are sufficiently thin to allow thermal neutrons to transmit through the sample in a direction perpendicular to the planar face but not in a parallel direction, due to increased thickness. Often, this is an obstacle that prevents some tomographic reconstruction algorithms from obtaining desired results because of inadequate information or presence of distracting artifacts due to missing projections. This can be true for samples such as the distribution of glue in glulam (boards of wooden layers glued together), or the course of partially visible annual rings in trees where the features of interest are parallel to the planar surface of the sample. However, it should be possible to study these features by rotating the specimen within a limited angular range. In principle, this approach has been shown previously in a study with fast neutrons . A study of this kind was performed at the Antares facility of FRM II in Garching with a 2.6x10 7 /cm 2 s thermal neutron beam. The limit of penetration was determined for a wooden step wedge carved from a 2 cmx4 cm block of wood in comparison to other materials such as heavy metals and Lucite as specimens rich in hydrogen. The depth of the steps was 1 cm, the height 0.5 cm. The annual ring structures were clearly detectable up to 2 cm thickness. Wooden specimens, i.e. shivers, from a sunken old ship have been subjected to tomography. Not visible from the outside, clear radial structures have been found that are typical for certain kinds of wood. This insight was impaired in a case where the specimen had been soaked with ethylene glycol. In another large sample study, a planar board made of glulam has been

  16. NASA Lunar Sample Education Disk Program - Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    NASA is eager for students and the public to experience lunar Apollo rocks and regolith soils first hand. Lunar samples embedded in plastic are available for educators to use in their classrooms, museums, science centers, and public libraries for education activities and display. The sample education disks are valuable tools for engaging students in the exploration of the Solar System. Scientific research conducted on the Apollo rocks has revealed the early history of our Earth-Moon system. The rocks help educators make the connections to this ancient history of our planet as well as connections to the basic lunar surface processes - impact and volcanism. With these samples educators in museums, science centers, libraries, and classrooms can help students and the public understand the key questions pursued by missions to Moon. The Office of the Curator at Johnson Space Center is in the process of reorganizing and renewing the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program to increase reach, security and accountability. The new program expands the reach of these exciting extraterrestrial rocks through increased access to training and educator borrowing. One of the expanded opportunities is that trained certified educators from science centers, museums, and libraries may now borrow the extraterrestrial rock samples. Previously the loan program was only open to classroom educators so the expansion will increase the public access to the samples and allow educators to make the critical connections of the rocks to the exciting exploration missions taking place in our solar system. Each Lunar Disk contains three lunar rocks and three regolith soils embedded in Lucite. The anorthosite sample is a part of the magma ocean formed on the surface of Moon in the early melting period, the basalt is part of the extensive lunar mare lava flows, and the breccias sample is an important example of the violent impact history of the Moon. The disks also include two regolith soils and

  17. Comparison of proton therapy techniques for treatment of the whole brain as a component of craniospinal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Jeffrey; Stoker, Joshua; Georges, Rola H; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X Ronald; Rath, Smruti; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R

    2013-12-17

    For treatment of the entire cranium using passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) compensators are often employed in order to reduce lens and cochlear exposure. We sought to assess the advantages and consequences of utilizing compensators for the treatment of the whole brain as a component of craniospinal radiation (CSI) with PSPT. Moreover, we evaluated the potential benefits of spot scanning beam delivery in comparison to PSPT. Planning computed tomography scans for 50 consecutive CSI patients were utilized to generate passive scattering proton therapy treatment plans with and without Lucite compensators (PSW and PSWO respectively). A subset of 10 patients was randomly chosen to generate scanning beam treatment plans for comparison. All plans were generated using an Eclipse treatment planning system and were prescribed to a dose of 36 Gy(RBE), delivered in 20 fractions, to the whole brain PTV. Plans were normalized to ensure equal whole brain target coverage. Dosimetric data was compiled and statistical analyses performed using a two-tailed Student's t-test with Bonferroni corrections to account for multiple comparisons. Whole brain target coverage was comparable between all methods. However, cribriform plate coverage was superior in PSWO plans in comparison to PSW (V95%; 92.9 ± 14 vs. 97.4 ± 5, p left; 24.8 ± 0.8 vs. 22.2 ± 0.7, p right; 25.2 ± 0.8 vs. 22.8 ± 0.7, p vs. PSWO (mean cochlea dose Gy(RBE): 36.4 ± 0.2 vs. 36.7 ± 0.1, p = NS). Moreover, dose homogeneity was inferior in PSW plans in comparison to PSWO plans as reflected by significant alterations in both whole brain and brainstem homogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). In comparison to both PSPT techniques, multi-field optimized intensity modulated (MFO-IMPT) spot scanning treatment plans displayed superior sparing of both lens and cochlea (max lens: 12.5 ± 0.6 and 12.9 ± 0.7 right and left respectively; mean cochlea 28.6

  18. Comparison of proton therapy techniques for treatment of the whole brain as a component of craniospinal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, Jeffrey; Stoker, Joshua; Georges, Rola H; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X Ronald; Rath, Smruti; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R

    2013-01-01

    For treatment of the entire cranium using passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) compensators are often employed in order to reduce lens and cochlear exposure. We sought to assess the advantages and consequences of utilizing compensators for the treatment of the whole brain as a component of craniospinal radiation (CSI) with PSPT. Moreover, we evaluated the potential benefits of spot scanning beam delivery in comparison to PSPT. Planning computed tomography scans for 50 consecutive CSI patients were utilized to generate passive scattering proton therapy treatment plans with and without Lucite compensators (PSW and PSWO respectively). A subset of 10 patients was randomly chosen to generate scanning beam treatment plans for comparison. All plans were generated using an Eclipse treatment planning system and were prescribed to a dose of 36 Gy(RBE), delivered in 20 fractions, to the whole brain PTV. Plans were normalized to ensure equal whole brain target coverage. Dosimetric data was compiled and statistical analyses performed using a two-tailed Student’s t-test with Bonferroni corrections to account for multiple comparisons. Whole brain target coverage was comparable between all methods. However, cribriform plate coverage was superior in PSWO plans in comparison to PSW (V95%; 92.9 ± 14 vs. 97.4 ± 5, p < 0.05). As predicted, PSWO plans had significantly higher lens exposure in comparison to PSW plans (max lens dose Gy(RBE): left; 24.8 ± 0.8 vs. 22.2 ± 0.7, p < 0.05, right; 25.2 ± 0.8 vs. 22.8 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). However, PSW plans demonstrated no significant cochlear sparing vs. PSWO (mean cochlea dose Gy(RBE): 36.4 ± 0.2 vs. 36.7 ± 0.1, p = NS). Moreover, dose homogeneity was inferior in PSW plans in comparison to PSWO plans as reflected by significant alterations in both whole brain and brainstem homogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). In comparison to both PSPT techniques, multi-field optimized intensity modulated (MFO-IMPT) spot

  19. Determination of the response of a NaI(Tl) detector; Determinacion de la respuesta de un detector de NaI(Tl)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R.; Manzanares A, E.; Hernandez D, V.M.; Chacon R, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, A.P. 336, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    By means of Monte Carlo calculations it was determined the response of a scintillator of NaI (Tl) of 7.62 {phi} x 7.62 cm to monoenergetic gamma rays of 0.2 to 3.5 MeV. The response allows to determine the spectra of height of pulses of the monoenergetic photons. This type of calculations was also carried out for photons emitted by sources of Cs-137, Co-60, Na-22, Na-24 and {sup 239} PuBe, with the purpose of reproducing the gamma spectra obtained with this type of detecting. In the calculations the detector was modelled as a NaI cylinder with Al cover and the base of lucite; due to the absence of reliable information on the quantity of thallium in the calculations this information was omitted: for photons whose energy is greater to 1.022 MeV the presence of the gamma peak of the simple escape and twice is observed. The source was modelled as punctual and was located to 5 cm along the axial axis of the detector. To verify the calculations its were carried out measurements with a spectrometer with a scintillator of 7.62 {phi} x 7.62 cm. In the measured spectra the sum peak is observed, while in those calculated it doesn't appear; because the simultaneous detection of photons of different energy doesn't happen each photon since, in single form, it is followed until its complete absorption in the scintillator or when it escapes from the volume of the detector. To reproduce the sum peak and to obtain height spectra of pulses similar to those measured, the sum photons were introduced in the calculations. With the purpose of that Monte Carlo calculation it reproduces the scattering around the photopeak it was used a gaussian function in each photopeak whose characteristics were obtained starting from the experimental data. The calculation of the response of a scintillator allows to establish the capacity of the measurement of the gamma radiation as well as to distinguish the real events of those that appear by the limitations of the detection process. (Author)

  20. Temperature dependence of gafchromic MD-55 dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klassen, Norman V.; Zwan, Len van der; Cygler, Joanna

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Gafchromic MD-55 is a fairly new, thin film dosimeter that develops a blue color (λ max = 676 nm) when irradiated with ionizing radiation. The increase in absorbance is nearly proportional to the absorbed dose. MD-55 can be used for high precision dosimetry if care is taken to assure reproducible film orientation in the spectrophotometer as well as temperature control during both irradiation and reading. In order to achieve the maximum sensitivity of this dosimeter the readings of the optical density should be taken at λ max . It was reported for another type of Gafchromic film (DM-1260), that both λ max and ε max decrease with an increase in the temperature of the spectrophotometer. The purpose of this study was to characterize the reading temperature dependence of the new type of Gafchromic film available on the market and to find optimal conditions for using it for high precision dosimetry. Materials and Methods: Irradiations were carried out using 60 Co gamma rays from an Eldorado irradiator. The dosimeters were sandwiched in a lucite phantom with 4.4 mm build-up and irradiated in the center of a 10 cm x 10 cm field at 1 meter from the source. The temperature during irradiations was 22 deg. C. The dose rate was about 0.68 Gy/min. Measurements of optical density were made using a Cary 210 spectrophotometer. A bandpass of 3.5 nm was used. The temperature of the baseplate of the sample holder was regulated to +/-0.05 deg. C and measured by a probe lying on the baseplate. In all cases, values of OD were only recorded after they had come to a constant value, which was reached within 5 minutes of inserting the dosimeter into the sample chamber of the spectrophotometer. Results: The temperature dependence of the OD at 676 nm was measured in 2 studies using 6 dosimeters that had received 0, 1.0, 3.5, 6.2, 14.5 Gy. Readings were taken at 7 temperatures between 18.8 and 28.1 deg. C. By returning to the initial temperature several hours later, it was found

  1. Determination of Fallout Radionuclides in Environmental Samples by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry; Mesure Spectrometrique Gamma des Radionucleides de Retombee Presents dans des Echantillons du Millieu; Opredelenie radioizotopov radioaktivnykh osadkov v probakh iz okruzhayushchej sredy pri pomoshchi spektrometrii gamma-luchej; Determinacion, por Espectrometria Gamma, de los Radionuclidos de Precipitaciones en Muestras del Medio Ambiente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, G. M.; Johnson, J. E.; Wilson, D. W. [Department of Animal Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1965-10-15

    From May 1962 to date, many environmental samples have been collected from the University farm to study the passage of {sup 137}Cs through an important part of man's food chain. All samples were of low specific activity and determinations were made in a low level gamma-ray spectrometer system consisting of an 8-in diam., 4-in-thick Nal(Tl) crystal that was shielded from background by a 5-in-thick steel walled chamber and connected to a 400-channel pulse-height analyser. Air filter pads and large samples (1 kg) of dried forage, grains and bovine faeces were counted directly in a constant geometry. Precipitation samples were concentrated by passing through Dowex-50 cation exchange columns. Milk, meat, and urine Vere counted in large annular Lucite containers. {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 131}I and Ba-{sup 14}'0La are the only gamma-ray emitting radionuclides found in milk, meat and urine, since these are the only fission products absorbed in appreciable amounts. In addition, the other samples contained {sup 141,} {sup 144}Ce, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 103,106}Ru, Zr-{sup 95}Nb and {sup 54}Mn. In these samples, which were collected in 1962 and 1963, only Zr-{sup 95}Nb (because of its relative abundance) could be determined reliably by gamma-ray spectrometry during a period of about six months after collection. Photopeaks of {sup 137}Cs, {sup 54}Mn and were completely obscured and lower energy nuclides ({sup 141}, {sup 144}Ce and {sup 103}Ru) had large Compton contributions from higher energy nuclides. Spectrum stripping is not reliable if the photopeaks are not apparent. When interference makes the direct determination of {sup 137}Cs and other nuclides impossible, storage of the samples until decay of Zr-{sup 95}Nb (T{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 65 d) and {sup 103}Ru (T{sub Vulgar-Fraction-One-Half} = 40 d) makes possible identification of the photopeaks of the remaining nuclides. {sup 137}Cs and {sup 54}Mn can be separated chemically by digesting samples in concentrated

  2. U.S. Space Radioisotope Power Systems and Applications: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Bennett, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    -1906) and R. J. Strut. Almost 100 years ago, in 1913, English physicist H. G. J. Moseley (1887-1915) constructed the first nuclear battery using a vacuum flask and 20 mCi of radium (Corliss and Harvey, 1964, Proceedings of the Royal Society, 1913). After World War II, serious interest in radioisotope power systems in the U.S. was sparked by studies of space satellites such as North American Aviation s 1947 report on nuclear space power and the RAND Corporation s 1949 report on radioisotope power. (Greenfield, 1947, Gendler and Kock, 1949). Radioisotopes were also considered in early studies of nuclear-powered aircraft (Corliss and Harvey, 1964). In 1951, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) signed several contracts to study a 1-kWe space power plant using reactors or radioisotopes. Several of these studies, which were completed in 1952, recommended the use of RPS. (Corliss and Harvey, 1964). In 1954, the RAND Corporation issued the summary report of the Project Feedback military satellite study in which radioisotope power was considered (Lipp and Salter, 1954, RAND). Paralleling these studies, in 1954, K. C. Jordan and J. H. Birden of the AEC s Mound Laboratory conceived and built the first RTG using chromel-constantan thermocouples and a polonium-210 (210Po or Po-210) radioisotope heat source (see Figure 2). While the power produced (1.8 mWe) was low by today s standards, this first RTG showed the feasibility of RPS. A second thermal battery was built with more Po-210, producing 9.4 mWe. Jordan and Birden concluded that the Po-210 thermal battery would have about ten times the energy of ordinary dry cells of the same mass (Jordan and Birden, 1954). The heat source consisted of a 1-cm-diameter sphere of 57 Ci (1.8 Wt) of Po-210 inside a capsule of nickel-coated cold-rolled steel all inside a container of Lucite. The thermocouples were silver-soldered chromel-constantan. The thermal battery produced 1.8 mWe.