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Sample records for lowest mechanical resonance

  1. Giant angular resonance and the structure of the lowest-lying nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.; Usmanov, P.N.; Yuldashbaeva, Eh.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is given of the Hamiltonian of the two-rotor model, which is based on the assumption that the giant angular resonance exists, i.e. that it is possible to rotate the neutron component of a deformed nucleus as a whole with respect to the proton component. The realization of the projections on the intrinsic axes of the angular momentum operators is found, the Hamiltonian matrix is determined in the basis convenient for the case of strong neutron-proton coupling. The spectrum of the two-rotor model is determined taking into account the nondiagonal matrix elements in the lowest order of the perturbation theory. The g factors and the probabilities of the M1 transitions are discussed

  2. Electromagnetic structure of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L. S.; Camalich, J. Martin; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We present a calculation of the leading SU(3)-breaking O(p 3 ) corrections to the electromagnetic moments and charge radius of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory. In particular, the magnetic dipole moment of the members of the decuplet is predicted fixing the only low-energy constant (LEC) present up to this order with the well-measured magnetic dipole moment of the Ω - . We predict μ Δ ++ =6.04(13) and μ Δ + =2.84(2), which agree well with the current experimental information. For the electric quadrupole moment and the charge radius, we use state-of-the-art lattice QCD results to determine the corresponding LECs, whereas for the magnetic octupole moment there is no unknown LEC up to the order considered here, and we obtain a pure prediction. We compare our results with those reported in large N c , lattice QCD, heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, and other models.

  3. Time-resolved resonance raman spectrum of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in the lowest excited singlet state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilbrandt, Robert Walter; Jensen, Niels-Henrik; Langkilde, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrwn of all-trans-diphenylbutadiene in its lowest excited S1 state excited in resonance with the S1 → Sn absorption band at 650 nm in non-polar solvents is reported. Three vibrational bands at 1572, 1481 and 1165 cm−1 are observed. A possible assignment of the the 1481 cm−...

  4. Quantum mechanical resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros S, A.; McIntosh, H.V.

    1982-01-01

    A discussion of the nature of quantum mechanical resonances is presented from the point of view of the spectral theory of operators. In the case of Bohr-Feshbach resonances, graphs are presented to illustrate the theory showing the decay of a doubly excited metastable state and the excitation of the resonance by an incident particle with proper energy. A characterization of resonances is given as well as a procedure to determine widths using the spectral density function. A sufficient condition is given for the validity of the Breit-Wigner formula for Bohr-Feshbach resonances. (author)

  5. Projection-operator calculations of the lowest e(-)-He resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, A.; Bhatia, A. K.; Junker, B. R.; Temkin, A.

    1986-01-01

    The 1s (2s)2:2S Schulz resonance of He(-) is investigated theoretically, applying the full projection-operator formalism developed by Temkin and Bhatia (1985) in a Rayleigh-Ritz variational calculation. The technique is described in detail, and results for five different approximations of the He target state are presented in a table. Good convergence is obtained, but it is found that even the best calculated value of the resonance is about 130 meV higher than the experimentally measured value of 19.367 + or - 0.007 eV (Brunt et al., 1977), a discrepancy attributed to the contribution of the shift in the Feshbach formalism.

  6. Projection-operator calculations of the lowest e--He resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berk, A.; Bhatia, A.K.; Junker, B.R.; Temkin, A.

    1986-01-01

    Results for the lowest (Schulz) autodetaching state of He - [1s(2s) 2 ] are reported. The calculation utilizes the full projection-operator formalism as explicitly developed by Temkin and Bhatia [Phys. Rev. A 31, 1259 (1985)]. Eigenvalues, scrE = , are calculated using projection operators Q depending on increasingly elaborate target wave functions going up to a 10-term Hylleraas-form, and a configuration-interaction total wave function Phi of 40 configurations. Results are well converged, but our best value is --0.13 eV above the experimental position at 19.37 eV. We conclude that the shift (Δ) in the Feshbach formalism gives a large contribution (relative to the width) to the position E/sub r/ ( = scrE+Δ). An appendix is devoted to the evaluation of the most complicated type of three-center integral involved in the calculation

  7. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,

    2010-11-01

    Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance vibration is made from an indium tin oxide (ITO) coated vertically aligned nanorod array. Only this structure works as a radio with demodulator without any electrical circuit using field emission phenomenon. A top-down fabrication method of an ITO coated nanorod array is proposed using a modified UV lithography. The received radio frequency and the resonance frequency of nanoantenna can be controlled by the fabrication condition through the height of a nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  8. Advances in mechanical detection of magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, Seppe; Hickman, Steven A.; Marohn, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The invention and initial demonstration of magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) in the early 1990s launched a renaissance of mechanical approaches to detecting magnetic resonance. This article reviews progress made in MRFM in the last decade, including the demonstration of scanned probe detection of magnetic resonance (electron spin resonance, ferromagnetic resonance, and nuclear magnetic resonance) and the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance from a single spin. Force and force-gradient approaches to mechanical detection are reviewed and recent related work using attonewton sensitivity cantilevers to probe minute fluctuating electric fields near surfaces is discussed. Given recent progress, pushing MRFM to single proton sensitivity remains an exciting possibility. We will survey some practical and fundamental issues that must be resolved to meet this challenge.

  9. Electro-Mechanical Resonance Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    Recently I have been investigating the frequency response of galvanometers. These are direct-current devices used to measure small currents. By using a low-frequency function generator to supply the alternating-current signal and a stopwatch smartphone app to measure the period, I was able to take data to allow a resonance curve to be drawn. This…

  10. Electrothermal Frequency Modulated Resonator for Mechanical Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a mechanical memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical resonator utilizing an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. The microstructure

  11. Electrothermal Frequency Modulated Resonator for Mechanical Memory

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2016-08-18

    In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate a mechanical memory device based on the nonlinear dynamics of an electrostatically actuated microelectromechanical resonator utilizing an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. The microstructure is deliberately fabricated as an in-plane shallow arch to achieve geometric quadratic nonlinearity. We exploit this inherent nonlinearity of the arch and drive it at resonance with minimal actuation voltage into the nonlinear regime, thereby creating softening behavior, hysteresis, and coexistence of states. The hysteretic frequency band is controlled by the electrothermal actuation voltage. Binary values are assigned to the two allowed dynamical states on the hysteretic response curve of the arch resonator with respect to the electrothermal actuation voltage. Set-and-reset operations of the memory states are performed by applying controlled dc pulses provided through the electrothermal actuation scheme, while the read-out operation is performed simultaneously by measuring the motional current through a capacitive detection technique. This novel memory device has the advantages of operating at low voltages and under room temperature. [2016-0043

  12. Combined Monte Carlo and quantum mechanics study of the solvatochromism of phenol in water. The origin of the blue shift of the lowest pi-pi* transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Rafael C; Coutinho, Kaline; Georg, Herbert C; Canuto, Sylvio

    2009-03-07

    A combined and sequential use of Monte Carlo simulations and quantum mechanical calculations is made to analyze the spectral shift of the lowest pi-pi* transition of phenol in water. The solute polarization is included using electrostatic embedded calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level giving a dipole moment of 2.25 D, corresponding to an increase of 76% compared to the calculated gas-phase value. Using statistically uncorrelated configurations sampled from the MC simulation, first-principle size-extensive calculations are performed to obtain the solvatochromic shift. Analysis is then made of the origin of the blue shift. Results both at the optimized geometry and in room-temperature liquid water show that hydrogen bonds of water with phenol promote a red shift when phenol is the proton-donor and a blue shift when phenol is the proton-acceptor. In the case of the optimized clusters the calculated shifts are in very good agreement with results obtained from mass-selected free jet expansion experiments. In the liquid case the contribution of the solute-solvent hydrogen bonds partially cancels and the total shift obtained is dominated by the contribution of the outer solvent water molecules. Our best result, including both inner and outer water molecules, is 570 +/- 35 cm(-1), in very good agreement with the small experimental shift of 460 cm(-1) for the absorption maximum.

  13. Simultaneous electrical and mechanical resonance drive for large signal amplification of micro resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, M. H.

    2018-01-12

    Achieving large signal-noise ratio using low levels of excitation signal is key requirement for practical applications of micro and nano electromechanical resonators. In this work, we introduce the double electromechanical resonance drive concept to achieve an order-of-magnitude dynamic signal amplification in micro resonators. The concept relies on simultaneously activating the micro-resonator mechanical and electrical resonance frequencies. We report an input voltage amplification up to 15 times for a micro-resonator when its electrical resonance is tuned to match the mechanical resonance that leads to dynamic signal amplification in air (Quality factor enhancement). Furthermore, using a multi-frequency excitation technique, input voltage and vibrational amplification of up to 30 times were shown for the same micro-resonator while relaxing the need to match its mechanical and electrical resonances.

  14. Simultaneous electrical and mechanical resonance drive for large signal amplification of micro resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, M. H.; Alsaleem, F. M.; Jaber, Nizar; Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    Achieving large signal-noise ratio using low levels of excitation signal is key requirement for practical applications of micro and nano electromechanical resonators. In this work, we introduce the double electromechanical resonance drive concept to achieve an order-of-magnitude dynamic signal amplification in micro resonators. The concept relies on simultaneously activating the micro-resonator mechanical and electrical resonance frequencies. We report an input voltage amplification up to 15 times for a micro-resonator when its electrical resonance is tuned to match the mechanical resonance that leads to dynamic signal amplification in air (Quality factor enhancement). Furthermore, using a multi-frequency excitation technique, input voltage and vibrational amplification of up to 30 times were shown for the same micro-resonator while relaxing the need to match its mechanical and electrical resonances.

  15. QUANTUM MECHANICS. Quantum squeezing of motion in a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, E E; Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2015-08-28

    According to quantum mechanics, a harmonic oscillator can never be completely at rest. Even in the ground state, its position will always have fluctuations, called the zero-point motion. Although the zero-point fluctuations are unavoidable, they can be manipulated. Using microwave frequency radiation pressure, we have manipulated the thermal fluctuations of a micrometer-scale mechanical resonator to produce a stationary quadrature-squeezed state with a minimum variance of 0.80 times that of the ground state. We also performed phase-sensitive, back-action evading measurements of a thermal state squeezed to 1.09 times the zero-point level. Our results are relevant to the quantum engineering of states of matter at large length scales, the study of decoherence of large quantum systems, and for the realization of ultrasensitive sensing of force and motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Resonant laser ablation: mechanisms and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.E.; Bodla, R.; Eiden, G.C.; Nogar, N.S.; Smith, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Resonant laser ablation (RLA) typically relies on irradiation of a sample in a mass spectrometer with modest intensity laser pulses tuned to a one or two photon resonant transition in the analyte of interest. This paper shows that RLA is well suited for highly sensitive analyses of complex samples. The examples actually studied are trace components in rhenium and technetium in nickel. The authors also studied the 2+1 multiphoton ionization spectrum of iron-56 detected by RLA of Re containing 70 ppm iron. Two-photon transition rates for Fe transitions were calculated perturbatively and found to agree semi-quantitatively with experimentally observed intensities. 17 refs., 3 figs

  17. 3C-SiC microdisk mechanical resonators with multimode resonances at radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaesung; Zamani, Hamidrera; Rajgopal, Srihari; Zorman, Christian A.; X-L Feng, Philip

    2017-07-01

    We report on the design, modeling, fabrication and measurement of single-crystal 3C-silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk mechanical resonators with multimode resonances operating at radio frequencies (RF). These microdisk resonators (center-clamped on a vertical stem pedestal) offer multiple flexural-mode resonances with frequencies dependent on both disk and anchor dimensions. The resonators are made using a novel fabrication method comprised of focused ion beam nanomachining and hydroflouic : nitric : acetic (HNA) acid etching. Resonance peaks (in the frequency spectrum) are detected through laser-interferometry measurements. Resonators with different dimensions are tested, and multimode resonances, mode splitting, energy dissipation (in the form of quality factor measurement) are investigated. Further, we demonstrate a feedback oscillator based on a passive 3C-SiC resonator. This investigation provides important guidelines for microdisk resonator development, ranging from an analytical prediction of frequency scaling law to fabrication, suggesting RF microdisk resonators can be good candidates for future sensing applications in harsh environments.

  18. Chromomagnetic mechanism for the X(3872) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoegaasen, H.; Richard, J.-M.; Sorba, P.

    2006-01-01

    The chromomagnetic interaction, with proper account for flavor-symmetry breaking, is shown to explain the mass and coupling properties of the X(3872) resonance as a J PC =1 ++ state consisting of a heavy quark-antiquark pair and a light one. It is crucial to introduce all the spin-color configurations compatible with these quantum numbers and diagonalize the chromomagnetic interaction in this basis. This approach thus differs from the molecular picture DD* and from the diquark-anti-diquark picture

  19. Qubit Coupled Mechanical Resonator in an Electromechanical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu

    This thesis describes the development of a hybrid quantum electromechanical system. In this system the mechanical resonator is capacitively coupled to a superconducting transmon which is embedded in a superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavity. The difficulty of achieving high quality of superconducting qubit in a high-quality voltage-biased cavity is overcome by integrating a superconducting reflective T-filter to the cavity. Further spectroscopic and pulsed measurements of the hybrid system demonstrate interactions between the ultra-high frequency mechanical resonator and transmon qubit. The noise of mechanical resonator close to ground state is measured by looking at the spectroscopy of the transmon. At last, fabrication and tests of membrane resonators are discussed.

  20. The wave attenuation mechanism of the periodic local resonant metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I.-Ling; Liang, Zhen-Xian; Kao, Hao-Wei; Chang, Shih-Hsiang; Yang, Chih-Ying

    2018-01-01

    This research discusses the wave propagation behavior and attenuation mechanism of the elastic metamaterial with locally resonant sub-structure. The dispersion relation of the single resonance system, i.e., periodic spring mass system with sub-structure, could be derived based on lattice dynamics and the band gap could be easily identified. The dynamically equivalent properties, i.e., mass and elastic property, of the single resonance system are derived and found to be frequency dependent. Negative effective properties are found in the vicinity of the local resonance. It is examined whether the band gap always coincides with the frequency range of negative effective properties. The wave attenuation mechanism and the characteristic dynamic behavior of the elastic metamaterial are also studied from the energy point of view. From the analysis, it is clarified that the coupled Bragg-resonance band gap is much wider than the narrow-banded local resonance and the corresponding effective material properties at band gap could be either positive or negative. However, the band gap is totally overlapping with the frequency range of negative effective properties for the metamaterial with band gap purely caused by local resonance. The presented analysis can be extended to other forms of elastic metamaterials involving periodic resonator structures.

  1. Intrinsic resonance representation of quantum mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carioli, M.; Heller, E.J.; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    1997-01-01

    an optimal representation, based purely on classical mechanics. ''Hidden'' constants of the motion and good actions already known to the classical mechanics are thus incorporated into the basis, leaving the quantum effects to be isolated and included by small matrix diagonalizations. This simplifies...

  2. Mechanical Resonators for Quantum Optomechanics Experiments at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norte, R A; Moura, J P; Gröblacher, S

    2016-04-08

    All quantum optomechanics experiments to date operate at cryogenic temperatures, imposing severe technical challenges and fundamental constraints. Here, we present a novel design of on-chip mechanical resonators which exhibit fundamental modes with frequencies f and mechanical quality factors Q_{m} sufficient to enter the optomechanical quantum regime at room temperature. We overcome previous limitations by designing ultrathin, high-stress silicon nitride (Si_{3}N_{4}) membranes, with tensile stress in the resonators' clamps close to the ultimate yield strength of the material. By patterning a photonic crystal on the SiN membranes, we observe reflectivities greater than 99%. These on-chip resonators have remarkably low mechanical dissipation, with Q_{m}∼10^{8}, while at the same time exhibiting large reflectivities. This makes them a unique platform for experiments towards the observation of massive quantum behavior at room temperature.

  3. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species

  4. Quantum mechanical coherence, resonance, and mind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1995-03-26

    Norbert Wiener and J.B.S. Haldane suggested during the early thirties that the profound changes in our conception of matter entailed by quantum theory opens the way for our thoughts, and other experiential or mind-like qualities, to play a role in nature that is causally interactive and effective, rather than purely epiphenomenal, as required by classical mechanics. The mathematical basis of this suggestion is described here, and it is then shown how, by giving mind this efficacious role in natural process, the classical character of our perceptions of the quantum universe can be seen to be a consequence of evolutionary pressures for the survival of the species.

  5. High Q diamond hemispherical resonators: fabrication and energy loss mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, Jonathan J; Bancu, Mirela G; Bauer, Joseph M; Cook, Eugene H; Kumar, Parshant; Nyinjee, Tenzin; Perlin, Gayatri E; Ricker, Joseph A; Teynor, William A; Weinberg, Marc S; Newton, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We have fabricated polycrystalline diamond hemispheres by hot-filament CVD (HFCVD) in spherical cavities wet-etched into a high temperature glass substrate CTE matched to silicon. Hemispherical resonators 1.4 mm in diameter have a Q of up to 143 000 in the fundamental wineglass mode, for a ringdown time of 2.4 s. Without trimming, resonators have the two degenerate wineglass modes frequency matched as close as 2 Hz, or 0.013% of the resonant frequency (∼16 kHz). Laser trimming was used to match resonant modes on hemispheres to 0.3 Hz. Experimental and FEA energy loss studies on cantilevers and hemispheres examine various energy loss mechanisms, showing that surface related losses are dominant. Diamond cantilevers with a Q of 400 000 and a ringdown time of 15.4 s were measured, showing the potential of polycrystalline diamond films for high Q resonators. These resonators show great promise for use as hemispherical resonant gyroscopes (HRGs) on a chip. (paper)

  6. A cascade mechanism of three-particle resonance production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, A.M.; Polikarpov, M.I.; Simonov, Yu.A.

    1976-01-01

    We study the mechanism of the three-particle resonance production in a system consisting of a two-particle resonance and of one particle, the resonance and the particle permanently exchanging the decay product particle. The N/D method is used to show that the solution of the unitarity for the resonance-particle amplitude reduces to solving a one-dimensional nonsingular integral equation for the denominator of the amplitude D(y). The contribution from the right-hand cut of the exchange decay diagram is considered explicitly and the final equation contains only the integral over an arbitrary left-hand cut as in the case of the interaction amplitude of stable particles. It is as well shown that if only the right-hand cut is present, than the denominator D(y) for L=0 has no singularities, whereas the amplitude may have virtual or real poles at L=1

  7. Resonances in A=6 nuclei: use of supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, S.K.; Das, T.K.; Khan, M.A.; Chakrabarti, B.

    2004-01-01

    We propose a novel theoretical technique for the calculation of resonances at low excitation energies in weakly bound systems. Starting from an effective potential, supersymmetric quantum mechanics can be successfully used to generate families of isospectral potentials having desirable and adjustable properties. For resonance states, for which there is no bound ground state of the same spin-parity, one can construct an isospectral potential with a bound state in the continuum (BIC). The potential looks quite different but is strictly isospectral with the original one. The quasi-bound state in the original shallow potential will be effectively trapped in the deep well of the isospectral family facilitating an easier and more accurate calculation of the resonance energy. Application to 6 He, 6 Be, and 6 Li systems yields quite accurate results. The beauty of our technique: We get both the bound ground state and the resonances by a single technique and using the same potential. (author)

  8. Resonance charge exchange mechanism at high and moderate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanov, A.V.; Gevorkyan, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    Charge exchange mechanisms at high and medium energies are investigated, ta king the resonance charge exchange of a proton by an hydrogen atom as an example . It is established that there are two classical charge exchange mechanisms rel ated to direct proton knockout from the bound state and one quantum-mechanical mechanism corresponding to the electron tunnelling from one bound state to anoth er. The classical cross-section diverges for two of these mechanisms, and the quasiclassical scattering amplitude must be calculated on the base of a complex classical trajectory. Physical grounds for the choice of such trajectories are discussed and calculations of the Van Vleck determinant for these mechanisms a re presented. Contributions from different mechanisms to the total charge excha nge cross-section are analyzed. A comparison with experimental data and results of other authors is made

  9. Digital system to monitor the natural frequency of mechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brengartner, Tobias; Siegel, Michael; Urban, Martin; Monse, Benjamin; Frühauf, Dietmar

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical resonators are often used in process or condition monitoring. They are used for liquid-level limit detection or for viscosity and density sensing. Therefore, the resonator is preferably actuated at its natural frequency. In industrial applications, this is achieved by analogue closed resonant circuits. These circuits have been established because of the low energy consumption and low component costs. Due to the future trend of microprocessors, digital systems are now an interesting alternative and can achieve better results compared to analogue realizations. In this context, this paper presents a novel digital system for monitoring the natural frequency of mechanical resonators. The system is realized with newly developed algorithms and is based on a simple signal processing procedure with minimum computational cost. This allows the use of a low-power microcontroller, thus making the system interesting for industrial use. It is shown that the natural frequency can be measured in respect of high industrial requirements on reliability, fastness and accuracy, combined with the possibility of reducing energy consumption. (paper)

  10. Modelagem matemática para seleção de conjuntos mecanizados agrícolas pelo menor custo operacional Mathematical modeling to select mechanized agricultural systems by the lowest operational cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio H. R. Baio

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A seleção de uma máquina agrícola pode tornar-se uma tarefa árdua, pois há diversas variáveis que devem ser consideradas. A escolha do equipamento mais adequado para uma propriedade agrícola é uma das etapas mais importantes do processo produtivo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver um modelo de computador por programação linear em plataforma web para seleção automatizada de conjuntos mecanizados agrícolas, baseados no menor custo operacional. O programa, desenvolvido em linguagem ASP.NET, pode ser acessado gratuitamente pela Internet (http://www.maquinas.ufms.br. O usuário pode selecionar um conjunto mecanizado agrícola dentro de uma vasta lista de opções que contém suas especificações técnicas ou deixar que o programa lhe retorne automaticamente a melhor opção, pelo menor custo operacional. O programa desenvolvido proporciona ao usuário uma seleção racional via Internet de conjuntos mecanizados, permitindo o estudo econômico do uso das máquinas e implementos, sem a necessidade da instalação de programas dedicados no computador, que dificultariam a manutenção do banco de dados.The selection of an agricultural machine may become a challenging task, because there are several variables that must be considered. Choosing the more suitable equipment to a farm is one of the most important production process steps. The purpose of this study was to develop a computational model by linear programming based on web platform to select automatically mechanized agricultural systems founded on the lowest operational cost. The software was developed in ASP.NET language and can be accessed for free by the Internet (http://www.maquinas.ufms.br. The user can select a mechanized agricultural system in a list that contains the specifications or let the system returns automatically the best option at the lowest operational cost. The developed software brought to the user via Internet a rational selection of mechanized systems

  11. Driving a mechanical resonator into coherent states via random measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Ll; Wu, L-A; Chhajlany, R W; Li, Y

    2013-01-01

    We propose dynamical schemes to engineer coherent states of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled to an ancillary, superconducting flux qubit. The flux qubit, when repeatedly projected on to its ground state, drives the MR into a coherent state in probabilistic, albeit heralded fashion. Assuming no operations on the state of the MR during the protocol, coherent states are successfully generated only up to a certain value of the displacement parameter. This restriction can be overcome at the cost of a one-time operation on the initial state of the MR. We discuss the possibility of experimental realization of the presented schemes. (paper)

  12. Defect-related internal dissipation in mechanical resonators and the study of coupled mechanical systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Sullivan, John Patrick; Modine, Normand Arthur; Wendt, Joel Robert; Aslam, Dean (Michigan State University, Lansing, MI); Sepulveda-Alancastro, Nelson (University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, PR)

    2007-01-01

    Understanding internal dissipation in resonant mechanical systems at the micro- and nanoscale is of great technological and fundamental interest. Resonant mechanical systems are central to many sensor technologies, and microscale resonators form the basis of a variety of scanning probe microscopies. Furthermore, coupled resonant mechanical systems are of great utility for the study of complex dynamics in systems ranging from biology to electronics to photonics. In this work, we report the detailed experimental study of internal dissipation in micro- and nanomechanical oscillators fabricated from amorphous and crystalline diamond materials, atomistic modeling of dissipation in amorphous, defect-free, and defect-containing crystalline silicon, and experimental work on the properties of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled mechanical oscillator arrays. We have identified that internal dissipation in most micro- and nanoscale oscillators is limited by defect relaxation processes, with large differences in the nature of the defects as the local order of the material ranges from amorphous to crystalline. Atomistic simulations also showed a dominant role of defect relaxation processes in controlling internal dissipation. Our studies of one-dimensional and two-dimensional coupled oscillator arrays revealed that it is possible to create mechanical systems that should be ideal for the study of non-linear dynamics and localization.

  13. Mechanical detection of electron spin resonance beyond 1 THz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance (ESR) in the terahertz (THz) region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever. The ESR absorption of a tiny single crystal of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH 4 ) 2 (SO 4 ) 2 ⋅6H 2 O, was observed in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz using a backward travelling wave oscillator as a THz-wave source. This is the highest frequency of mechanical detection of ESR till date. The spectral resolution was evaluated with the ratio of the peak separation to the sum of the half-width at half maximum of two absorption peaks. The highest resolution value of 8.59 ± 0.53 was achieved at 685 GHz, while 2.47 ± 0.01 at 80 GHz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging

  14. Suppression of mechanical resonance in digital servo system considering oscillation frequency deviation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yangyang; Yang, Ming; Hu, Kun

    2017-01-01

    High-stiffness servo system is easy to cause mechanical resonance in elastic coupling servo system. Although on-line adaptive notch filter is effective in most cases, it will lead to a severer resonance when resonance frequency deviated from the natural torsional frequency. To explain...

  15. Quantum and classical control of single photon states via a mechanical resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiri-Esfahani, Sahar; Myers, Casey R; Combes, Joshua; Milburn, G J

    2016-01-01

    Optomechanical systems typically use light to control the quantum state of a mechanical resonator. In this paper, we propose a scheme for controlling the quantum state of light using the mechanical degree of freedom as a controlled beam splitter. Preparing the mechanical resonator in non-classical states enables an optomechanical Stern–Gerlach interferometer. When the mechanical resonator has a small coherent amplitude it acts as a quantum control, entangling the optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. As the coherent amplitude of the resonator increases, we recover single photon and two-photon interference via a classically controlled beam splitter. The visibility of the two-photon interference is particularly sensitive to coherent excitations in the mechanical resonator and this could form the basis of an optically transduced weak-force sensor. (paper)

  16. Design optimization and fatigue testing of an electronically-driven mechanically-resonant cantilever spring mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kheng, Lim Boon; Kean, Koay Loke; Gitano-Briggs, Horizon

    2010-01-01

    A light scanning device consisting of an electronically-driven mechanically-resonant cantilever spring-mirror system has been developed for innovative lighting applications. The repeated flexing of the cantilever spring during operation can lead to premature fatigue failure. A model was created to optimize the spring design. The optimized spring design can reduce stress by approximately one-third from the initial design. Fatigue testing showed that the optimized spring design can operate continuously for over 1 month without failure. Analysis of failures indicates surface cracks near the root of the spring are responsible for the failures.

  17. Opto-mechanical design of vacuum laser resonator for the OSQAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošek, Jan; Macúchová, Karolina; Nemcová, Šárka; Kunc, Štěpán.; Šulc, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives short overview of laser-based experiment OSQAR at CERN which is focused on search of axions and axion-like particles. The OSQAR experiment uses two experimental methods for axion search - measurement of the ultra-fine vacuum magnetic birefringence and a method based on the "Light shining through the wall" experiment. Because both experimental methods have reached its attainable limits of sensitivity we have focused on designing a vacuum laser resonator. The resonator will increase the number of convertible photons and their endurance time within the magnetic field. This paper presents an opto-mechanical design of a two component transportable vacuum laser resonator. Developed optical resonator mechanical design allows to be used as a 0.8 meter long prototype laser resonator for laboratory testing and after transportation and replacement of the mirrors it can be mounted on the LHC magnet in CERN to form a 20 meter long vacuum laser resonator.

  18. Loss mechanisms in superconducting thin film microwave resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan, E-mail: jan.goetz@wmi.badw.de; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Zollitsch, Christoph W.; Meier, Sebastian; Fischer, Michael; Fedorov, Kirill G.; Menzel, Edwin P. [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Deppe, Frank; Eder, Peter; Xie, Edwar; Gross, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.gross@wmi.badw.de [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meißner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-01-07

    We present a systematic analysis of the internal losses of superconducting coplanar waveguide microwave resonators based on niobium thin films on silicon substrates. In particular, we investigate losses introduced by Nb/Al interfaces in the center conductor, which is important for experiments where Al based Josephson junctions are integrated into Nb based circuits. We find that these interfaces can be a strong source for two-level state (TLS) losses, when the interfaces are not positioned at current nodes of the resonator. In addition to TLS losses, for resonators including Al, quasiparticle losses become relevant above 200 mK. Finally, we investigate how losses generated by eddy currents in conductive material on the backside of the substrate can be minimized by using thick enough substrates or metals with high conductivity on the substrate backside.

  19. Dynamic strain-mediated coupling of a single diamond spin to a mechanical resonator

    OpenAIRE

    Ovartchaiyapong, Preeti; Lee, Kenneth W.; Myers, Bryan A.; Jayich, Ania C. Bleszynski

    2014-01-01

    The development of hybrid quantum systems is central to the advancement of emerging quantum technologies, including quantum information science and quantum-assisted sensing. The recent demonstration of high quality single-crystal diamond resonators has led to significant interest in a hybrid system consisting of nitrogen-vacancy center spins that interact with the resonant phonon modes of a macroscopic mechanical resonator through crystal strain. However, the nitrogen-vacancy spin-strain inte...

  20. Orbital State Manipulation of a Diamond Nitrogen-Vacancy Center Using a Mechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. Y.; MacQuarrie, E. R.; Fuchs, G. D.

    2018-04-01

    We study the resonant optical transitions of a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center that is coherently dressed by a strong mechanical drive. Using a gigahertz-frequency diamond mechanical resonator that is strain coupled to a NV center's orbital states, we demonstrate coherent Raman sidebands out to the ninth order and orbital-phonon interactions that mix the two excited-state orbital branches. These interactions are spectroscopically revealed through a multiphonon Rabi splitting of the orbital branches which scales as a function of resonator driving amplitude and is successfully reproduced in a quantum model. Finally, we discuss the application of mechanical driving to engineering NV-center orbital states.

  1. Stamp transferred suspended graphene mechanical resonators for radio frequency electrical readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuefeng; Oksanen, Mika; Sillanpää, Mika A; Craighead, H G; Parpia, J M; Hakonen, Pertti J

    2012-01-11

    We present a simple micromanipulation technique to transfer suspended graphene flakes onto any substrate and to assemble them with small localized gates into mechanical resonators. The mechanical motion of the graphene is detected using an electrical, radio frequency (RF) reflection readout scheme where the time-varying graphene capacitor reflects a RF carrier at f = 5-6 GHz producing modulation sidebands at f ± f(m). A mechanical resonance frequency up to f(m) = 178 MHz is demonstrated. We find both hardening/softening Duffing effects on different samples and obtain a critical amplitude of ~40 pm for the onset of nonlinearity in graphene mechanical resonators. Measurements of the quality factor of the mechanical resonance as a function of dc bias voltage V(dc) indicates that dissipation due to motion-induced displacement currents in graphene electrode is important at high frequencies and large V(dc). © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. (Electro-) mechanical characteristics of electrostatically driven vacuum encapsulated polysilicon resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tilmans, H.A.C.; Tilmans, H.A.C.; Legtenberg, Rob; Legtenberg, R.; Schurer, H.; Schurer, H.; IJntema, D.J.; Ijntema, D.J.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Fluitman, J.H.J.

    The design, fabrication and performance of vacuum-encapsulated electrostatically driven polysilicon resonating beams, 210-510 μm long, 100 μm wide, and 1.5 μm thick, are described. The shortest beams have a fundamental frequency of 324 kHz, a gauge factor of 2400 and a quality factor of 600 at

  3. Modulation Spectroscopy and Opto Mechanics of Micro Toroidal Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    collaboration between UTRGV and Rice University. We planned 1) to acquire research instrumentation for experimental studies of micro-ring resonators on...reflected   from   the   ring   ( black   trace)   and   the   corresponding   I   and   Q   demodulation   outputs.  The

  4. Europe the continent with the lowest fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baird, D. T.; Collins, J.; Evers, J. L. H.; Leridon, H.; Lutz, W.; Velde, E. Te; Thevenon, O.; Crosignani, P. G.; Devroey, P.; Diedrich, K.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Fraser, L.; Geraedts, J. P. M.; Gianaroli, L.; Glasier, A.; Sunde, A.; Tarlatzis, B.; Van Steirteghem, A.; Veiga, A.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although fertility rates are falling in many countries, Europe is the continent with the lowest total fertility rate (TFR). This review assesses trends in fertility rates, explores possible health and social factors and reviews the impact of health and social interventions designed to

  5. Magnetically coupled resonance wireless charging technology principles and transfer mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiehua; Wan, Jian; Ma, Yinping

    2017-05-01

    With the tenure of Electric-Vehicle rising around the world, the charging methods have been paid more and more attention, the current charging mode mainly has the charging posts and battery swapping station. The construction of the charging pile or battery swapping station not only require lots of manpower, material costs but the bare conductor is also easy to generate electric spark hidden safety problems, still occupies large space. Compared with the wired charging, wireless charging mode is flexible, unlimited space and location factors and charging for vehicle safety and quickly. It complements the traditional charging methods in adaptability and the independent charge deficiencies. So the researching the wireless charging system have an important practical significance and application value. In this paper, wireless charging system designed is divided into three parts: the primary side, secondary side and resonant coupling. The main function of the primary side is to generate high-frequency alternating current, so selecting CLASS-E amplifier inverter structure through the research on full bridge, half-bridge and power amplification circuit. Addition, the wireless charging system is susceptible to outside interference, frequency drift phenomenon. Combined with the wireless energy transmission characteristics, resonant parts adopt resonant coupling energy transmission scheme and the Series-Series coupling compensation structure. For the electric vehicle charging power and voltage requirements, the main circuit is a full bridge inverter and Boost circuit used as the secondary side.

  6. The lowest surface brightness disc galaxy known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.I.; Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a galaxy with a prominent bulge and a dominant extremely low surface brightness disc component is reported. The profile of this galaxy is very similar to the recently discovered giant low surface brightness galaxy Malin 1. The disc central surface brightness is found to be ∼ 26.4 Rμ, some 1.5 mag fainter than Malin 1 and thus by far the lowest yet observed. (author)

  7. Mechanisms of generation of membrane potential resonance in a neuron with multiple resonant ionic currents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Fox

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal membrane potential resonance (MPR is associated with subthreshold and network oscillations. A number of voltage-gated ionic currents can contribute to the generation or amplification of MPR, but how the interaction of these currents with linear currents contributes to MPR is not well understood. We explored this in the pacemaker PD neurons of the crab pyloric network. The PD neuron MPR is sensitive to blockers of H- (IH and calcium-currents (ICa. We used the impedance profile of the biological PD neuron, measured in voltage clamp, to constrain parameter values of a conductance-based model using a genetic algorithm and obtained many optimal parameter combinations. Unlike most cases of MPR, in these optimal models, the values of resonant- (fres and phasonant- (fϕ = 0 frequencies were almost identical. Taking advantage of this fact, we linked the peak phase of ionic currents to their amplitude, in order to provide a mechanistic explanation the dependence of MPR on the ICa gating variable time constants. Additionally, we found that distinct pairwise correlations between ICa parameters contributed to the maintenance of fres and resonance power (QZ. Measurements of the PD neuron MPR at more hyperpolarized voltages resulted in a reduction of fres but no change in QZ. Constraining the optimal models using these data unmasked a positive correlation between the maximal conductances of IH and ICa. Thus, although IH is not necessary for MPR in this neuron type, it contributes indirectly by constraining the parameters of ICa.

  8. Mixing of the lowest-lying qqq configurations with JP =1/2- in different hyperfine interaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; An, Chunsheng; Chen, Hong

    2018-02-01

    We investigate mixing of the lowest-lying qqq configurations with JP = 1/2- caused by the hyperfine interactions between quarks mediated by Goldstone Boson Exchange, One Gluon Exchange, and both Goldstone Boson and One Gluon exchange, respectively. The first orbitally excited nucleon, Σ, Λ and Ξ states are considered. Contributions of both the contact term and tensor term are taken into account. Our numerical results show that mixing of the studied configurations in the two employed hyperfine interaction models are very different. Therefore, the present results, which should affect the strong and electromagnetic decays of baryon resonances, may be used to examine the present employed hyperfine interaction models. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11675131,11645002), Chongqing Natural Science Foundation (cstc2015jcyjA00032) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (SWU115020)

  9. Numerical analysis of the resonance mechanism of the lumped parameter system model for acoustic mine detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chi; Zhou Yu-Qiu; Shen Gao-Wei; Wu Wen-Wen; Ding Wei

    2013-01-01

    The method of numerical analysis is employed to study the resonance mechanism of the lumped parameter system model for acoustic mine detection. Based on the basic principle of the acoustic resonance technique for mine detection and the characteristics of low-frequency acoustics, the ''soil-mine'' system could be equivalent to a damping ''mass-spring'' resonance model with a lumped parameter analysis method. The dynamic simulation software, Adams, is adopted to analyze the lumped parameter system model numerically. The simulated resonance frequency and anti-resonance frequency are 151 Hz and 512 Hz respectively, basically in agreement with the published resonance frequency of 155 Hz and anti-resonance frequency of 513 Hz, which were measured in the experiment. Therefore, the technique of numerical simulation is validated to have the potential for analyzing the acoustic mine detection model quantitatively. The influences of the soil and mine parameters on the resonance characteristics of the soil—mine system could be investigated by changing the parameter setup in a flexible manner. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Tuning Acoustic Wave Properties by Mechanical Resonators on a Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    Vibrations generated by high aspects ratio electrodes are studied by the finite element method. It is found that the modes are combined of a surface wave and vibration in the electrodes. For increasing aspect ratio most of the mechanical energy is confined to the electrodes which act as mechanical...

  11. On the mechanism of bandgap formation in locally resonant finite elastic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugino, Christopher; Leadenham, Stephen; Ruzzene, Massimo; Erturk, Alper

    2016-10-01

    Elastic/acoustic metamaterials made from locally resonant arrays can exhibit bandgaps at wavelengths much longer than the lattice size for various applications spanning from low-frequency vibration/sound attenuation to wave guiding and filtering in mechanical and electromechanical devices. For an effective use of such locally resonant metamaterial concepts in finite structures, it is required to bridge the gap between the lattice dispersion characteristics and modal behavior of the host structure with its resonators. To this end, we develop a novel argument for bandgap formation in finite-length elastic metamaterial beams, relying on the modal analysis and the assumption of infinitely many resonators. We show that the dual problem to wave propagation through an infinite periodic beam is the modal analysis of a finite beam with an infinite number of resonators. A simple formula that depends only on the resonator natural frequency and total mass ratio is derived for placing the bandgap in a desired frequency range, yielding an analytical insight and a rule of thumb for design purposes. A method for understanding the importance of a resonator location and mass is discussed in the context of a Riemann sum approximation of an integral, and a method for determining the optimal number of resonators for a given set of boundary conditions and target frequency is introduced. The simulations of the theoretical framework are validated by experiments for bending vibrations of a locally resonant cantilever beam.

  12. The lowest Landau level in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckmann Falk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD in external (electro-magnetic fields shows some unexpected features like inverse magnetic catalysis, which have been revealed mainly through lattice studies. Many effective descriptions, on the other hand, use Landau levels or approximate the system by just the lowest Landau level (LLL. Analyzing lattice configurations we ask whether such a picture is justified. We find the LLL to be separated from the rest by a spectral gap in the two-dimensional Dirac operator and analyze the corresponding LLL signature in four dimensions. We determine to what extent the quark condensate is LLL dominated at strong magnetic fields.

  13. Amplitude calibration of 2D mechanical resonators by nonlinear optical transduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolleman, R.J.; Davidovikj, D.; van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Contactless characterization of mechanical resonances using Fabry-Perot interferometry is a powerful tool to study the mechanical and dynamical properties of atomically thin membranes. However, amplitude calibration is often not performed or only possible by making assumptions on the device

  14. Quantum ground state and single-phonon control of a mechanical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, A D; Hofheinz, M; Ansmann, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lenander, M; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; Sank, D; Wang, H; Weides, M; Wenner, J; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2010-04-01

    Quantum mechanics provides a highly accurate description of a wide variety of physical systems. However, a demonstration that quantum mechanics applies equally to macroscopic mechanical systems has been a long-standing challenge, hindered by the difficulty of cooling a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state. The temperatures required are typically far below those attainable with standard cryogenic methods, so significant effort has been devoted to developing alternative cooling techniques. Once in the ground state, quantum-limited measurements must then be demonstrated. Here, using conventional cryogenic refrigeration, we show that we can cool a mechanical mode to its quantum ground state by using a microwave-frequency mechanical oscillator-a 'quantum drum'-coupled to a quantum bit, which is used to measure the quantum state of the resonator. We further show that we can controllably create single quantum excitations (phonons) in the resonator, thus taking the first steps to complete quantum control of a mechanical system.

  15. Blueberry Galaxies: The Lowest Mass Young Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Junxian

    2017-09-01

    Searching for extreme emission line galaxies allows us to find low-mass metal-poor galaxies that are good analogs of high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies. These low-mass extreme emission line galaxies are also potential Lyman-continuum leakers. Finding them at very low redshifts (z≲ 0.05) allows us to be sensitive to even lower stellar masses and metallicities. We report on a sample of extreme emission line galaxies at z≲ 0.05 (blueberry galaxies). We selected them from SDSS broadband images on the basis of their broadband colors and studied their properties with MMT spectroscopy. From the entire SDSS DR12 photometric catalog, we found 51 photometric candidates. We spectroscopically confirm 40 as blueberry galaxies. (An additional seven candidates are contaminants, and four remain without spectra.) These blueberries are dwarf starburst galaxies with very small sizes (<1 kpc) and very high ionization ([O III]/[O II] ˜ 10-60). They also have some of the lowest stellar masses ({log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 6.5{--}7.5) and lowest metallicities (7.1< 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})< 7.8) of starburst galaxies. Thus, they are small counterparts to green pea galaxies and high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies.

  16. Flow-excited acoustic resonance excitation mechanism, design guidelines, and counter measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziada, Samir; Lafon, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The excitation mechanism of acoustic resonances has long been recognized, but the industry continues to be plagued by its undesirable consequences, manifested in severe vibration and noise problems in a wide range of industrial applications. This paper focuses on the nature of the excitation mechanism of acoustic resonances in piping systems containing impinging shear flows, such as flow over shallow and deep cavities. Since this feedback mechanism is caused by the coupling between acoustic resonators and shear flow instabilities, attention is focused first on the nature of various types of acoustic resonance modes and then on the aero-acoustic sound sources, which result from the interaction of the inherently unstable shear flow with the sound field generated by the resonant acoustic modes. Various flow-sound interaction patterns are discussed, in which the resonant sound field can be predominantly parallel or normal to the mean flow direction and the acoustic wavelength can be an order of magnitude longer than the length scale of the separated shear flow or as short as the cavity length scale. Since the state of knowledge in this field has been recently reviewed by Tonon et al. (2011, 'Aero-acoustics of Pipe Systems With Closed Branches', Int. J. Aeroacoust., 10(2), pp. 201-276), this article focuses on the more practical aspects of the phenomenon, including various flow sound interaction patterns and the resulting aero-acoustic sources, which are relevant to industrial applications. A general design guide proposal and practical means to alleviate the excitation mechanism are also presented. These are demonstrated by two examples of recent industrial case histories dealing with acoustic fatigue failure of the steam dryer in a boiling water reactor (BWR) due to acoustic resonance in the main steam piping and acoustic resonances in the roll posts of the Short Take-Off and Vertical Lift Joint Strike Fighter (JSF). (authors)

  17. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  18. Quantum Measurement Backaction and Upconverting Microwave Signals with Mechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. W.

    The limits of optical measurement and control of mechanical motion are set by the quantum nature of light. The familiar shot noise limit can be avoided by increasing the optical power, but at high enough powers, the backaction of the randomly-arriving photons' radiation pressure can grow to become the dominant force on the system. This thesis will describe an experiment showing how backaction limits the laser cooling of macroscopic drumhead membranes, as well as work on how these membranes can be used to upconvert microwave signals to optical frequencies, potentially preserving the fragile quantum state of the upconverted signal.

  19. Strain coupling between nitrogen vacancy centers and the mechanical motion of a diamond optomechanical crystal resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, J. V.; Lee, K. W.; Ovartchaiyapong, P.; Bleszynski Jayich, A. C.

    Several experiments have recently demonstrated coupling between nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond and mechanical resonators via crystal strain. In the strong coupling regime, such devices could realize applications critical to emerging quantum technologies, including phonon-mediated spin-spin interactions and mechanical cooling with the NV center1. An outstanding challenge for these devices is generating higher strain coupling in high frequency devices while maintaining the excellent coherence properties of the NV center and high mechanical quality factors. As a step toward these objectives, we demonstrate single-crystal diamond optomechanical crystal resonators with embedded NV centers. These devices host highly-confined GHz-scale mechanical modes that are isolated from mechanical clamping losses and generate strain profiles that allow for large strain coupling to NV centers far from noise-inducing surfaces.

  20. Mechanical Resonators for Material Characterization: Sensor Development and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casci Ceccacci, Andrea; Bosco, Filippo Giacomo

    The goals of this PhD project were to provide new approaches and developing new systems for material characterization, based on micro and nanomechanical sensors. Common issues that have shown to hinder large-scale integration of sensing techniques based on a micromechanical sensor are the readout......-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA), which is of high relevance in the biomedical research field. A second version of the system is currently under development, and it aims to increase the throughput of the system allowing to read out multiple microbridge arrays. For material characterization, spectroscopy analysis is often...... considered a benchmark technology. Conventional infrared spectroscopy approaches commonly require milligram amount of sample. Considering the frame of reference given by the overall aim of the project, mechanical sensors can be exploited to provide a unique tool for performing spectroscopy on a limited...

  1. Effect of mechanical tactile noise on amplitude of visual evoked potentials: multisensory stochastic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Balbuena, Ignacio; Huidobro, Nayeli; Silva, Mayte; Flores, Amira; Trenado, Carlos; Quintanar, Luis; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation documents the electrophysiological occurrence of multisensory stochastic resonance in the human visual pathway elicited by tactile noise. We define multisensory stochastic resonance of brain evoked potentials as the phenomenon in which an intermediate level of input noise of one sensory modality enhances the brain evoked response of another sensory modality. Here we examined this phenomenon in visual evoked potentials (VEPs) modulated by the addition of tactile noise. Specifically, we examined whether a particular level of mechanical Gaussian noise applied to the index finger can improve the amplitude of the VEP. We compared the amplitude of the positive P100 VEP component between zero noise (ZN), optimal noise (ON), and high mechanical noise (HN). The data disclosed an inverted U-like graph for all the subjects, thus demonstrating the occurrence of a multisensory stochastic resonance in the P100 VEP. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials studied by contact resonance atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan Wagner; Robert J. Moon; Arvind Raman

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of cellulose nanomaterials is key to the development of new cellulose nanomaterial based products. Using contact resonance atomic force microscopy we measured and mapped the transverse elastic modulus of three types of cellulosic nanoparticles: tunicate cellulose nanocrystals, wood cellulose nanocrystals, and wood cellulose...

  3. Broadening of Plasmonic Resonance Due to Electron Collisions with Nanoparticle Boundary: а Quantum Mechanical Consideration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uskov, Alexander; Protsenko, Igor E.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantum mechanical approach to calculate broadening of plasmonic resonances in metallic nanostructures due to collisions of electrons with the surface of the structure. The approach is applicable if the characteristic size of the structure is much larger than the de Broglie electron...

  4. Quantum Entanglement of a Tunneling Spin with Mechanical Modes of a Torsional Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Garanin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We solve the Schrödinger equation for various quantum regimes describing a tunneling macrospin coupled to a torsional oscillator. The energy spectrum and freezing of spin tunneling are studied. Magnetic susceptibility, noise spectrum, and decoherence due to entanglement of spin and mechanical modes are computed. We show that the presence of a tunneling spin can be detected via splitting of the mechanical mode at the resonance. Our results apply to experiments with magnetic molecules coupled to nanoresonators.

  5. Theoretical study of the lowest-lying electronic states of Aluminium monoiodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taher, F.; Kabbani, A.; Ani-El Houte, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.The spectroscopic study of Aluminium monohalides, especially the Aluminium monoiodide, is important for monitoring such species in high temperature fast-flow reactors. Theoretical calculations of AlI are not available, whereas several studies have been done for the other aluminium monohalides. In this work, CAS-SCF/MRCI calculations are performed for the lowest-lying electronic states of AlI in a range of internuclear distance between 2.30 A and 2.80 A. Ab-initio calculations have been effectuated by using the computational chemistry program Molpro. The basis set used in this study for aluminium atom is that used by Langhoff for aluminium monohalides, of contractions using atomic natural orbitals and a pseudopotential is used for iode. Accurate theoretical spectroscopic constants and potential curves are obtained for the ground state X 1 Σ + and the first excited states a 3 Π and A 1 Π. The calculated values of Te, ωe, ωexe and re of these states are compatible with the experimental results. An ordering of states is represented for the lowest five predicted singlet and lowest five predicted triplet states. These results provide a big support to determine the analogy in the ordering of the electronic states in AlF, AlBr and AlI respectively at lower energies. These theoretical results identify a set of electronic singlet and triplet states unobserved experimentally

  6. Resonance-enhanced laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for sensitive elemental analysis: Elucidation of enhancement mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lui, S.L.; Cheung, N.H.

    2002-01-01

    When performing laser-induced plasma spectroscopy for elemental analysis, the analyte signal-to-noise ratio increased from four to over fifty if the plume was reheated by a dye laser pulse tuned to resonant absorption. Time-resolved studies showed that the enhancement was not due to resonance photoionization. Rather, efficient and controlled rekindling of a larger plume volume was the key mechanism. The signal-to-noise ratio further increased to over a hundred if the atmosphere was replaced by a low-pressure heavy inert gas. The ambient gas helped confine and thermally insulate the expanding vapor

  7. Mechanically Reconfigurable Microstrip Lines Loaded with Stepped Impedance Resonators and Potential Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Naqui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on exploring the possibilities and potential applications of microstrip transmission lines loaded with stepped impedance resonators (SIRs etched on top of the signal strip, in a separated substrate. It is shown that if the symmetry plane of the line (a magnetic wall is perfectly aligned with the electric wall of the SIR at the fundamental resonance, the line is transparent. However, if symmetry is somehow ruptured, a notch in the transmission coefficient appears. The notch frequency and depth can thus be mechanically controlled, and this property can be of interest for the implementation of sensors and barcodes, as it is discussed.

  8. Extremely high Q-factor mechanical modes in quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators at millikelvin temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryachev, M.; Creedon, D. L.; Ivanov, E. N.; Tobar, M. E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, S.; Bourquin, R. [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l' Épitaphe, 25000, Besançon (France)

    2014-12-04

    We demonstrate that Bulk Acoustic Wave (BAW) quartz resonator cooled down to millikelvin temperatures are excellent building blocks for hybrid quantum systems with extremely long coherence times. Two overtones of the longitudinal mode at frequencies of 15.6 and 65.4 MHz demonstrate a maximum f.Q product of 7.8×10{sup 16} Hz. With this result, the Q-factor in such devices near the quantum ground state can be four orders of magnitude better than previously attained in other mechanical systems. Tested quartz resonators possess the ultra low acoustic losses crucial for electromagnetic cooling to the phonon ground state.

  9. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  10. Plasmonic resonances of nanoparticles from large-scale quantum mechanical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Xiang, Hongping; Zhang, Mingliang; Lu, Gang

    2017-09-01

    Plasmonic resonance of metallic nanoparticles results from coherent motion of its conduction electrons, driven by incident light. For the nanoparticles less than 10 nm in diameter, localized surface plasmonic resonances become sensitive to the quantum nature of the conduction electrons. Unfortunately, quantum mechanical simulations based on time-dependent Kohn-Sham density functional theory are computationally too expensive to tackle metal particles larger than 2 nm. Herein, we introduce the recently developed time-dependent orbital-free density functional theory (TD-OFDFT) approach which enables large-scale quantum mechanical simulations of plasmonic responses of metallic nanostructures. Using TD-OFDFT, we have performed quantum mechanical simulations to understand size-dependent plasmonic response of Na nanoparticles and plasmonic responses in Na nanoparticle dimers and trimers. An outlook of future development of the TD-OFDFT method is also presented.

  11. Optical fiber tip interferometer gas pressure sensor based on anti-resonant reflecting guidance mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. B.; Wang, D. N.; Xu, Ben; Wang, Z. K.

    2018-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a gas pressure sensor based on an anti-resonant reflecting guidance (ARRG) mechanism in quartz capillary tube with an open cavity. The device is simple in fabrication by only fusion splicing a segment of capillary tube with single mode fiber. It has compact size, robust structure, convenient mode of operation, and high sensitivity of 4.278 nm/MPa. Moreover, as two Faby-Perot cavities exist in the device, which create the interference spectrum with several distinct resonance dips, a simultaneous gas pressure and temperature detection can be readily achieved by tracing two dip wavelengths. The error in the measurement due to the choice of different resonant dips can be effectively reduced by using the Fourier band pass filtering method.

  12. Size modulated transition in the fluid–structure interaction losses in nano mechanical beam resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwakarma, S. D.; Pratap, R., E-mail: pratap@mecheng.iisc.ernet.in [Center for Nano Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru 560012 (India); Pandey, A. K., E-mail: ashok@iith.ac.in [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad, Kandi, Sangareddy - 502285 (India); Parpia, J. M.; Craighead, H. G. [Center for Materials Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Verbridge, S. S. [Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    An understanding of the dominant dissipative mechanisms is crucial for the design of a high-Q doubly clamped nanobeam resonator to be operated in air. We focus on quantifying analytically the viscous losses—the squeeze film damping and drag force damping—that limit the net quality factor of a beam resonator, vibrating in its flexural fundamental mode with the surrounding fluid as air at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, drag force damping dominates at smaller beam widths and squeeze film losses dominate at larger beam widths, with no significant contribution from structural losses and acoustic radiation losses. The combined viscous losses agree well with the experimentally measured Q of the resonator over a large range of beam widths, within the limits of thin beam theory. We propose an empirical relation between the maximum quality factor and the ratio of maximum beam width to the squeeze film air gap thickness.

  13. Mechanical nonlinearity elimination with a micromechanical clamped-free semicircular beams resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongyang; Chen, Xuying; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xinxin; Guan, Yangyang; Xie, Jin

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports a micro-machined clamped-free semicircular beam resonator aiming to eliminate the nonlinearity that widely exists in traditional mechanical resonators. Cubic coefficients over vibration displacement due to axial extension of the beams are analyzed through theoretical modelling, and the corresponding frequency effect is demonstrated. With the device working in the elastic vibration mode, the cubic coefficients are eliminated by using a free end to release the nonlinear extension of beams and thus the inside axial stress. The amplitude-frequency (A-f) effect is overcome in a large region of source power, and the coefficient of frequency softening is linearized in a large region of polarization voltage. As a result, the resonator can be driven at larger vibration amplitude to achieve a high signal to noise ratio and power handling performance.

  14. A general procedure for thermomechanical calibration of nano/micro-mechanical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauer, B.D.; Doolin, C.; Beach, K.S.D.; Davis, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a general procedure to calibrate the detection of a nano/micro-mechanical resonator’s displacement as it undergoes thermal Brownian motion. A brief introduction to the equations of motion for such a resonator is presented, followed by a detailed derivation of the corresponding power spectral density (PSD) function, which is identical in all situations aside from a system-dependent effective mass value. The effective masses for a number of different resonator geometries are determined using both finite element method (FEM) modeling and analytical calculations. -- Highlights: •Model micro- and nanomechanical resonators displaced by their own thermal motion. •Review the theoretical framework for describing thermomechanical systems. •Present a recipe for measurement calibration on devices of arbitrary shape. •Point out and correct inconsistencies in the existing literature. •Provide an authoritative guide and reference for practitioners in this area

  15. A general procedure for thermomechanical calibration of nano/micro-mechanical resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauer, B.D., E-mail: bhauer@ualberta.ca; Doolin, C.; Beach, K.S.D., E-mail: kbeach@ualberta.ca; Davis, J.P., E-mail: jdavis@ualberta.ca

    2013-12-15

    We describe a general procedure to calibrate the detection of a nano/micro-mechanical resonator’s displacement as it undergoes thermal Brownian motion. A brief introduction to the equations of motion for such a resonator is presented, followed by a detailed derivation of the corresponding power spectral density (PSD) function, which is identical in all situations aside from a system-dependent effective mass value. The effective masses for a number of different resonator geometries are determined using both finite element method (FEM) modeling and analytical calculations. -- Highlights: •Model micro- and nanomechanical resonators displaced by their own thermal motion. •Review the theoretical framework for describing thermomechanical systems. •Present a recipe for measurement calibration on devices of arbitrary shape. •Point out and correct inconsistencies in the existing literature. •Provide an authoritative guide and reference for practitioners in this area.

  16. Advances in Computational High-Resolution Mechanical Spectroscopy HRMS Part II: Resonant Frequency – Young's Modulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, M; Magalas, L B

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we compare the values of the resonant frequency f 0 of free decaying oscillations computed according to the parametric OMI method (Optimization in Multiple Intervals) and nonparametric DFT-based (discrete Fourier transform) methods as a function of the sampling frequency. The analysis is carried out for free decaying signals embedded in an experimental noise recorded for metallic samples in a low-frequency resonant mechanical spectrometer. The Yoshida method (Y), the Agrez' method (A), and new interpolated discrete Fourier transform (IpDFT) methods, that is, the Yoshida-Magalas (YM) and (YM C ) methods developed by the authors are carefully compared for the resonant frequency f 0 = 1.12345 Hz and the logarithmic decrement, δ = 0.0005. Precise estimation of the resonant frequency (Youngs' modulus ∼ f 0 2 ) for real experimental conditions, i.e., for exponentially damped harmonic signals embedded in an experimental noise, is a complex task. In this work, various computing methods are analyzed as a function of the sampling frequency used to digitize free decaying oscillations. The importance of computing techniques to obtain reliable and precise values of the resonant frequency (i.e. Young's modulus) in materials science is emphasized.

  17. Mechanical design parameters for detection of nuclear signals by magnetic resonance force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.J.; Hanlon, J.A.; Lamartine, B.; Hawley, M.; Solem, J.C.; Signer, S.; Jarmer, J.J.; Penttila, S.; Sillerud, L.O.; Pryputniewicz, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical work has shown that mechanical detection of magnetic resonance from a single nuclear spin is in principle possible. This theory has recently been experimentally validated by the mechanical detection of electron spin resonance signals using microscale cantilevers. Currently we are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are extending this technology in an attempt to detect nuclear signals which are three orders of magnitude lower in intensity than electron signals. In order to achieve the needed thousand-fold improvement in sensitivity we have undertaken the development of optimized mechanical cantilevers and highly polarized samples. Finite element modeling is used as a tool to simulate cantilever beam dynamics and to optimize the mechanical properties including Q, resonant frequency, amplitude of vibration and spring constant. Simulations are compared to experiments using heterodyne hologram interferometry. Nanofabrication of optimized cantilevers via ion milling will be directed by the outcome of these simulations and experiments. Highly polarized samples are developed using a three-fold approach: (1) high magnetic field strength (2.5T), (2) low temperature (1K), and (3) use of samples polarized by dynamic nuclear polarization. Our recent experiments have demonstrated nuclear polarizations in excess of 50% in molecules of toulene

  18. A novel flow sensor based on resonant sensing with two-stage microleverage mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Guo, X.; Wang, Q. H.; Lu, C. F.; Hu, D.

    2018-04-01

    The design, simulation, fabrication, and experiments of a novel flow sensor based on resonant sensing with a two-stage microleverage mechanism are presented in this paper. Different from the conventional detection methods for flow sensors, two differential resonators are adopted to implement air flow rate transformation through two-stage leverage magnification. The proposed flow sensor has a high sensitivity since the adopted two-stage microleverage mechanism possesses a higher amplification factor than a single-stage microleverage mechanism. The modal distribution and geometric dimension of the two-stage leverage mechanism and hair are analyzed and optimized by Ansys simulation. A digital closed-loop driving technique with a phase frequency detector-based coordinate rotation digital computer algorithm is implemented for the detection and locking of resonance frequency. The sensor fabricated by the standard deep dry silicon on a glass process has a device dimension of 5100 μm (length) × 5100 μm (width) × 100 μm (height) with a hair diameter of 1000 μm. The preliminary experimental results demonstrate that the maximal mechanical sensitivity of the flow sensor is approximately 7.41 Hz/(m/s)2 at a resonant frequency of 22 kHz for the hair height of 9 mm and increases by 2.42 times as hair height extends from 3 mm to 9 mm. Simultaneously, a detection-limit of 3.23 mm/s air flow amplitude at 60 Hz is confirmed. The proposed flow sensor has great application prospects in the micro-autonomous system and technology, self-stabilizing micro-air vehicles, and environmental monitoring.

  19. Carbon Nanofiber-Based, High-Frequency, High-Q, Miniaturized Mechanical Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Epp, Larry W.; Bagge, Leif

    2011-01-01

    High Q resonators are a critical component of stable, low-noise communication systems, radar, and precise timing applications such as atomic clocks. In electronic resonators based on Si integrated circuits, resistive losses increase as a result of the continued reduction in device dimensions, which decreases their Q values. On the other hand, due to the mechanical construct of bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators, such loss mechanisms are absent, enabling higher Q-values for both BAW and SAW resonators compared to their electronic counterparts. The other advantages of mechanical resonators are their inherently higher radiation tolerance, a factor that makes them attractive for NASA s extreme environment planetary missions, for example to the Jovian environments where the radiation doses are at hostile levels. Despite these advantages, both BAW and SAW resonators suffer from low resonant frequencies and they are also physically large, which precludes their integration into miniaturized electronic systems. Because there is a need to move the resonant frequency of oscillators to the order of gigahertz, new technologies and materials are being investigated that will make performance at those frequencies attainable. By moving to nanoscale structures, in this case vertically oriented, cantilevered carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that have larger aspect ratios (length/thickness) and extremely high elastic moduli, it is possible to overcome the two disadvantages of both bulk acoustic wave (BAW) and surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators. Nano-electro-mechanical systems (NEMS) that utilize high aspect ratio nanomaterials exhibiting high elastic moduli (e.g., carbon-based nanomaterials) benefit from high Qs, operate at high frequency, and have small force constants that translate to high responsivity that results in improved sensitivity, lower power consumption, and im - proved tunablity. NEMS resonators have recently been demonstrated using topdown

  20. Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerk, A A [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Marquardt, F [Department of Physics, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Center for Theoretical Physics and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Jacobs, K [Department of Physics, University of Massachussets at Boston, Boston, MA 02125 (United States)], E-mail: aashish.clerk@mcgill.ca, E-mail: florian.marquardt@physik.uni-muenchen.de, E-mail: kjacobs@cs.umb.edu

    2008-09-15

    We study the quantum measurement of a cantilever using a parametrically coupled electromagnetic cavity which is driven at the two sidebands corresponding to the mechanical motion. This scheme, originally due to Braginsky et al (Braginsky V, Vorontsov Y I and Thorne K P 1980 Science 209 547), allows a back-action free measurement of one quadrature of the cantilever's motion, and hence the possibility of generating a squeezed state. We present a complete quantum theory of this system, and derive simple conditions on when the quantum limit on the added noise can be surpassed. We also study the conditional dynamics of the measurement, and discuss how such a scheme (when coupled with feedback) can be used to generate and detect squeezed states of the oscillator. Our results are relevant to experiments in optomechanics, and to experiments in quantum electromechanics employing stripline resonators coupled to mechanical resonators.

  1. A nanoradio utilizing the mechanical resonance of a vertically aligned nanopillar array

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Chang Hwa; Lee, Seok Woo; Lee, Seung S.

    2014-01-01

    A nanoradio based on the mechanical resonance of a nanomaterial has promising applications in terms of size reduction of an antenna and integrity of all components of a radio except a speaker. In this letter, a nanopillar array radio utilizing the mechanical resonance of a vertically aligned nanopillar array is realized by a reliable top-down method. By exploiting the field emission phenomenon, it was found that the nanopillar array functions as a radio with a demodulator without any electrical circuitry. The array of vertically aligned nanopillars increases the demodulated current and signal to noise ratio, and this fabrication method makes manipulation and positioning of nanostructures possible intrinsically for industrial applications. © 2014 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. Development of 400- to 450-MHz RFQ resonator-cavity mechanical designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the development of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac, the resonator cavity's mechanical design may be a challenge similar in magnitude to that of the development of the accelerator structure itself. Experience with the all-copper 425-MHz RFQ proof-of-principle linac has demonstrated that the resonator cavity must be structurally stiff and easily tunable. This experience has led to development of copper-plated steel structures having vanes that may be moved within a cylinder for tuning. Design of a flexible vane-to-cylinder radio-frequency (rf) joint, the vane, and the cylinder has many constraints dictated by the small-diameter cavities in the 400-MHz-frequency region. Two types of flexible, mechanical vane-to-cylinder rf joints are being developed at Los Alamos: the C-seal and the rf clamp-joint

  3. Modelling the dynamic mechanisms associated with the principal resonance of the seated human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y; Griffin, M J

    2001-01-01

    Simple mathematical models have been developed to obtain insights into resonance phenomena observed at about 5 Hz in the dynamic responses of the seated human body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration. Alternative lumped parameter models with a few degrees-of-freedom have been investigated. Rotational degrees-of-freedom, with eccentricity of the centre of gravity of the mass elements, represented responses in the fore-and-aft and pitch axes caused by vertical vibration. The causes of body resonance are not fully understood, but this information is required to develop cause-effect relationships between vibration exposures and effects on human health, comfort and performance.Method. The inertial and geometric parameters for models were based on published anatomical data. Other mechanical parameters were determined by comparing model responses to experimental data. Two models, with four and five degrees-of-freedom, gave more reasonable representations than other models. Mechanical parameters obtained with median and individual experimental data were consistent for vertical degrees-of-freedom but varied for rotational degrees-of-freedom. The resonance of the apparent mass at about 5 Hz may be attributed to a vibration mode consisting of vertical motion of the pelvis and legs and a pitch motion of the pelvis, both of which cause vertical motion of the upper-body above the pelvis, a bending motion of the spine, and vertical motion of the viscera. The mathematical models developed in this study may assist understanding of the dynamic mechanisms responsible for resonances in the seated human body. The information is required to represent mechanical responses of the body and assist the development of models for specific effects of vibration.

  4. Ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography of physiological brain activity - Glymphatic pulsation mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Wang, Xindi; Korhonen, Vesa; Keinänen, Tuija; Tuovinen, Timo; Autio, Joonas; LeVan, Pierre; Keilholz, Shella; Zang, Yu-Feng; Hennig, Jürgen; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-06-01

    The theory on the glymphatic convection mechanism of cerebrospinal fluid holds that cardiac pulsations in part pump cerebrospinal fluid from the peri-arterial spaces through the extracellular tissue into the peri-venous spaces facilitated by aquaporin water channels. Since cardiac pulses cannot be the sole mechanism of glymphatic propulsion, we searched for additional cerebrospinal fluid pulsations in the human brain with ultra-fast magnetic resonance encephalography. We detected three types of physiological mechanisms affecting cerebral cerebrospinal fluid pulsations: cardiac, respiratory, and very low frequency pulsations. The cardiac pulsations induce a negative magnetic resonance encephalography signal change in peri-arterial regions that extends centrifugally and covers the brain in ≈1 Hz cycles. The respiratory ≈0.3 Hz pulsations are centripetal periodical pulses that occur dominantly in peri-venous areas. The third type of pulsation was very low frequency (VLF 0.001-0.023 Hz) and low frequency (LF 0.023-0.73 Hz) waves that both propagate with unique spatiotemporal patterns. Our findings using critically sampled magnetic resonance encephalography open a new view into cerebral fluid dynamics. Since glymphatic system failure may precede protein accumulations in diseases such as Alzheimer's dementia, this methodological advance offers a novel approach to image brain fluid dynamics that potentially can enable early detection and intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Dielectric micro-resonator-based opto-mechanical systems for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Roushdy

    In recent years, whispering gallery mode (WGM), or morphology dependent optical resonances (MDR) of dielectric micro-resonators have attracted interest with proposed applications in a wide range of areas due to the high optical quality factors, Q, they can exhibit (reaching ~ 10. 9 for silica spheres). Micro-resonator WGMs have been used in applications that include those in spectroscopy, micro-cavity laser technology, optical communications (switching, filtering and multiplexing), sensors technologies and even chemical and biological sensing. The WGM of these dielectric micro-resonators are highly sensitive to morphological changes (such as the size, shape, or refractive index) of the resonance cavity and hence, can be tuned by causing a minute change in the physical condition of the surrounding. In this dissertation, we have been creating opto-mechanical systems, which at their most basic, are extraordinarily sensitive sensors. One of the ultimate goals of this dissertation is to develop sensors capable of detecting the extremely small electric field changes. To improve the performance of the sensors, we couple a polymer cantilever beam to a dielectric micro-resonator. The eventual use of such ultra sensitive electric filed sensors could include neural-machine interfaces for advanced prosthetics devices. The work presented here includes a basic analysis and experimental investigations of the electric field sensitivity and range of micro-resonators of several different materials and geometries followed by the electric field sensor design, testing, and characterization. Also, the effects of angular velocity on the WGM shifts of spherical micro-resonators are also investigated. The elastic deformation that is induced on a spinning resonator due to the centrifugal force may lead to a sufficient shift in the optical resonances and therefore interfering with its desirable operational sensor design. Furthermore, this principle could be used for the development of

  6. Mechanical design and analysis of a low beta squeezed half-wave resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shou-Bo; Zhang, Cong; Yue, Wei-Ming; Wang, Ruo-Xu; Xu, Meng-Xin; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Huang, Shi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Lu; Jiang, Tian-Cai; Wang, Feng-Feng; Zhang, Sheng-Xue; He, Yuan; Zhang, Sheng-Hu; Zhao, Hong-Wei

    2014-08-01

    A superconducting squeezed type half-wave resonator (HWR) of β=0.09 has been developed at the Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou. In this paper, a basic design is presented for the stiffening structure for the detuning effect caused by helium pressure and Lorentz force. The mechanical modal analysis has been investigated the with finite element method (FEM). Based on these considerations, a new stiffening structure is proposed for the HWR cavity. The computation results concerning the frequency shift show that the low beta HWR cavity with new stiffening structure has low frequency sensitivity coefficient df/dp and Lorentz force detuning coefficient KL, and stable mechanical properties.

  7. Complementary theta resonance filtering by two spatially segregated mechanisms in CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hua; Vervaeke, Koen; Graham, Lyle J; Storm, Johan F

    2009-11-18

    Synaptic input to a neuron may undergo various filtering steps, both locally and during transmission to the soma. Using simultaneous whole-cell recordings from soma and apical dendrites from rat CA1 hippocampal pyramidal cells, and biophysically detailed modeling, we found two complementary resonance (bandpass) filters of subthreshold voltage signals. Both filters favor signals in the theta (3-12 Hz) frequency range, but have opposite location, direction, and voltage dependencies: (1) dendritic H-resonance, caused by h/HCN-channels, filters signals propagating from soma to dendrite when the membrane potential is close to rest; and (2) somatic M-resonance, caused by M/Kv7/KCNQ and persistent Na(+) (NaP) channels, filters signals propagating from dendrite to soma when the membrane potential approaches spike threshold. Hippocampal pyramidal cells participate in theta network oscillations during behavior, and we suggest that that these dual, polarized theta resonance mechanisms may convey voltage-dependent tuning of theta-mediated neural coding in the entorhinal/hippocampal system during locomotion, spatial navigation, memory, and sleep.

  8. Resonance-Based Sparse Signal Decomposition and its Application in Mechanical Fault Diagnosis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wentao; Sun, Hongjian; Wang, Weijie

    2017-06-03

    Mechanical equipment is the heart of industry. For this reason, mechanical fault diagnosis has drawn considerable attention. In terms of the rich information hidden in fault vibration signals, the processing and analysis techniques of vibration signals have become a crucial research issue in the field of mechanical fault diagnosis. Based on the theory of sparse decomposition, Selesnick proposed a novel nonlinear signal processing method: resonance-based sparse signal decomposition (RSSD). Since being put forward, RSSD has become widely recognized, and many RSSD-based methods have been developed to guide mechanical fault diagnosis. This paper attempts to summarize and review the theoretical developments and application advances of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis, and to provide a more comprehensive reference for those interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis. Followed by a brief introduction of RSSD's theoretical foundation, based on different optimization directions, applications of RSSD in mechanical fault diagnosis are categorized into five aspects: original RSSD, parameter optimized RSSD, subband optimized RSSD, integrated optimized RSSD, and RSSD combined with other methods. On this basis, outstanding issues in current RSSD study are also pointed out, as well as corresponding instructional solutions. We hope this review will provide an insightful reference for researchers and readers who are interested in RSSD and mechanical fault diagnosis.

  9. Optimization of metabolite detection by quantum mechanics simulations in magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarota, Giulio

    2017-07-15

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a well established modality for investigating tissue metabolism in vivo. In recent years, many efforts by the scientific community have been directed towards the improvement of metabolite detection and quantitation. Quantum mechanics simulations allow for investigations of the MR signal behaviour of metabolites; thus, they provide an essential tool in the optimization of metabolite detection. In this review, we will examine quantum mechanics simulations based on the density matrix formalism. The density matrix was introduced by von Neumann in 1927 to take into account statistical effects within the theory of quantum mechanics. We will discuss the main steps of the density matrix simulation of an arbitrary spin system and show some examples for the strongly coupled two spin system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Research progress of functional magnetic resonance imaging in mechanism studies of tinnitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, B B; Li, M; Zhang, J N

    2018-02-07

    Tinnitus is a subjective symptom of phantom sound in the ear or brain without sound or electrical stimulation in the environment. The mechanism of tinnitus is complicated and mostly unclear. Recent studies suggested that the abnormal peripheral auditory input lead to neuroplasticity changes in central nervous system followed by tinnitus. More research concerned on the tinnitus central mechanism. A rapid development of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique made it more widely used in tinnitus central mechanism research. fMRI brought new findings but also presented some shortages in technology and cognition in tinnitus study. This article summarized the outcomes of fMRI research on tinnitus in recent years, exploring its existing problems and application prospects.

  11. Dynamical response of multi-walled carbon nanotube resonators based on continuum mechanics modeling for mass sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Myungseok; Olshevskiy, Alexander; Kim, Chang-Wan [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Eom, Kilho [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Kwanwoong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dai, Mai Duc [Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology and Education, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam)

    2017-05-15

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has recently received much attention due to its excellent electromechanical properties, indicating that CNT can be employed for development of Nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) such as nanomechanical resonators. For effective design of CNT-based resonators, it is required to accurately predict the vibration behavior of CNT resonators as well as their frequency response to mass adsorption. In this work, we have studied the vibrational behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators by using a continuum mechanics modeling that was implemented in Finite element method (FEM). In particular, we consider a transversely isotropic hollow cylinder solid model with Finite element (FE) implementation for modeling the vibration behavior of Multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) resonators. It is shown that our continuum mechanics model provides the resonant frequencies of various MWCNTs being comparable to those obtained from experiments. Moreover, we have investigated the frequency response of MWCNT resonators to mass adsorption by using our continuum model with FE implementation. Our study sheds light on our continuum mechanics model that is useful in predicting not only the vibration behavior of MWCNT resonators but also their sensing performance for further effective design of MWCNT- based NEMS devices.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of non-resonant magneto-mechanical low-frequency vibration energy harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammari, Abdullah; Caskey, Logan; Negrete, Johnny; Bardaweel, Hamzeh

    2018-03-01

    This article presents a non-resonant magneto-mechanical vibration energy harvester. When externally excited, the energy harvester converts vibrations into electric charge using a guided levitated magnet oscillating inside a multi-turn coil that is fixed around the exterior of the energy harvester. The levitated magnet is guided using four oblique mechanical springs. A prototype of the energy harvester is fabricated using additive manufacturing. Both experiment and model are used to characterize the static and dynamic behavior of the energy harvester. Measured restoring forces show that the fabricated energy harvester retains a mono-stable potential energy well with desired stiffness nonlinearities. Results show that magnetic spring results in hardening effect which increases the resonant frequency of the energy harvester. Additionally, oblique mechanical springs introduce geometric, negative, nonlinear stiffness which improves the harvester's response towards lower frequency spectrum. The unique design can produce a tunable energy harvester with multi-well potential energy characteristics. A finite element model is developed to estimate the average radial flux density experienced by the multi-turn coil. Also, a lumped parameter model of the energy harvester is developed and validated against measured data. Both upward and downward frequency sweeps are performed to determine the frequency response of the harvester. Results show that at higher excitation levels hardening effects become more apparent, and the system dynamic response turns into non-resonant. Frequency response curves exhibit frequency jump phenomena as a result of coexistence of multiple energy states at the frequency branch. The fabricated energy harvester is hand-held and measures approximately 100.5 [cm3] total volume. For a base excitation of 1.0 g [m/s2], the prototype generates a peak voltage and normalized power density of approximately 3.5 [V] and 0.133 [mW/cm3 g2], respectively, at 15.5 [Hz].

  13. Mechanical detection and mode shape imaging of vibrational modes of micro and nanomechanical resonators by dynamic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulo, A S; GarcIa-Sanchez, D; Perez-Murano, F; Bachtold, A; Black, J; Bokor, J; Esplandiu, M J; Aguasca, A

    2008-01-01

    We describe a method based on the use of higher order bending modes of the cantilever of a dynamic force microscope to characterize vibrations of micro and nanomechanical resonators at arbitrarily large resonance frequencies. Our method consists on using a particular cantilever eigenmode for standard feedback control in amplitude modulation operation while another mode is used for detecting and imaging the resonator vibration. In addition, the resonating sample device is driven at or near its resonance frequency with a signal modulated in amplitude at a frequency that matches the resonance of the cantilever eigenmode used for vibration detection. In consequence, this cantilever mode is excited with an amplitude proportional to the resonator vibration, which is detected with an external lock-in amplifier. We show two different application examples of this method. In the first one, acoustic wave vibrations of a film bulk acoustic resonator around 1.6 GHz are imaged. In the second example, bending modes of carbon nanotube resonators up to 3.1 GHz are characterized. In both cases, the method provides subnanometer-scale sensitivity and the capability of providing otherwise inaccessible information about mechanical resonance frequencies, vibration amplitude values and mode shapes

  14. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappanda, K. N.; Ilyas, S.; Younis, M. I.

    2018-05-01

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5  ×  1012 oscillations.

  15. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    KAUST Repository

    Chappanda , K. N.; Ilyas, Saad; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5 × 10 oscillations.

  16. Micro-mechanical resonators for dynamically reconfigurable reduced voltage logic gates

    KAUST Repository

    Chappanda, K N

    2018-02-16

    Due to the limitations of transistor-based logic devices such as their poor performance at elevated temperature, alternative computing methods are being actively investigated. In this work, we present electromechanical logic gates using electrostatically coupled in-plane micro-cantilever resonators operated at modest vacuum conditions of 5 Torr. Operating in the first resonant mode, we demonstrate 2-bit XOR, 2- and 3-bit AND, 2- and 3-bit NOR, and 1-bit NOT gates; all condensed in the same device. Through the designed electrostatic coupling, the required voltage for the logic gates is reduced by 80%, along with the reduction in the number of electrical interconnects and devices per logic operation (contrary to transistors). The device is dynamically reconfigurable between any logic gates in real time without the need for any change in the electrical interconnects and the drive circuit. By operating in the first two resonant vibration modes, we demonstrate mechanical logic gates consisting of two 2-bit AND and two 2-bit XOR gates. The device is tested at elevated temperatures and is shown to be functional as a logic gate up to 150 °C. Also, the device has high reliability with demonstrated lifetime greater than 5 × 10 oscillations.

  17. Trampoline Resonator Fabrication for Tests of Quantum Mechanics at High Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Matthew; Pepper, Brian; Sonin, Petro; Eerkens, Hedwig; Buters, Frank; de Man, Sven; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2014-03-01

    There has been much interest recently in optomechanical devices that can reach the ground state. Two requirements for achieving ground state cooling are high optical finesse in the cavity and high mechanical quality factor. We present a set of trampoline resonator devices using high stress silicon nitride and superpolishing of mirrors with sufficient finesse (as high as 60,000) and quality factor (as high as 480,000) for ground state cooling in a dilution refrigerator. These devices have a higher mass, between 80 and 100 ng, and lower frequency, between 200 and 500 kHz, than other devices that have been cooled to the ground state, enabling tests of quantum mechanics at a larger mass scale.

  18. Release mechanisms of acetaminophen from polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol matrix tablets utilizing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Tomokazu; Morita, Shigeaki; Sakamoto, Ryosaku; Suzuki, Masazumi; Yamanashi, Shigeyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2010-08-16

    Release mechanism of acetaminophen (AAP) from extended-release tablets of hydrogel polymer matrices containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were achieved using flow-through cell with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrogel forming abilities are observed characteristically and the layer thickness which is corresponding to the diffusion length of AAP has a good correlation with the drug release profiles. In addition, polymeric erosion contribution to AAP releasing from hydrogel matrix tablets was directly quantified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The matrix erosion profile indicates that the PEG erosion kinetic depends primarily on the composition ratio of PEG to PEO. The present study has confirmed that the combination of in situ MRI and SEC should be well suited to investigate the drug release mechanisms of hydrogel matrix such as PEO/PEG. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Partly Duffing Oscillator Stochastic Resonance Method and Its Application on Mechanical Fault Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Dang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that the slight fault signals in early failure of mechanical system are usually submerged in heavy background noise, it is unfeasible to extract the weak fault feature via the traditional vibration analysis. Stochastic resonance (SR, as a method of utilizing noise to amplify weak signals in nonlinear dynamical systems, can detect weak signals overwhelmed in the noise. However, based on the analysis of the impact of noise intensity on SR effect, it is concluded that the detection results are dramatically limited by the noise intensity of measured signals, especially for incipient fault feature of mechanical system with poor working environment. Therefore, this paper proposes a partly Duffing oscillator SR method to extract the fault feature of mechanical system. In this method, to locate the appearance of weak fault feature and decrease noise intensity, the permutation entropy index is constructed to select the measured signals for the input of Duffing oscillator system. Then, according to the regulation of system parameters, a reasonable match between the selected signals and Duffing oscillator model is achieved to produce a SR phenomenon and realize the fault diagnosis of mechanical system. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method achieves a better effect on the fault diagnosis of mechanical system.

  20. Excitation of large-amplitude parametric resonance by the mechanical stiffness modulation of a microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krylov, Slava; Gerson, Yuval; Nachmias, Tali; Keren, Uri

    2010-01-01

    In this work we report on an approach allowing efficient parametric excitation of large-amplitude stable oscillations of a microstructure operated by a parallel-plate electrode, and present results of a theoretical and experimental investigation of the device. The frame-type structure, fabricated from a silicon on insulator (SOI) substrate using deep reactive ion etching (DRIE), consists a pair of cantilever-type suspensions connected at their ends by a link. The time-varying electrostatic force applied to the link by a parallel-plate electrode is transformed into a periodic tension of the beams, resulting in the modulation of their flexural stiffness and consequently the mechanical parametric excitation of the structure. The lateral compliance of the beams allows for large-amplitude in-plane oscillations in the direction parallel to the electrode while high axial stiffness prevents undesirable instabilities. The lumped model of the device, considered as an assembly of geometrically nonlinear massless flexures and a rigid massive link and built using the Rayleigh–Ritz method, predicted the feasibility of the excitation approach. The fabricated devices were operated in ambient air conditions by a combination of a steady (dc) and time-dependent (ac) components of voltage and the large-amplitude responses, up to 75 µm, in the vicinity of the principal parametric and primary resonances were registered by means of video acquisition and image processing. The shapes of the experimental resonant curves were consistent with those predicted by the model. The location and size of the instability regions on the frequency–voltage plane (parametric tongues) were quantitatively in good agrement with the model results. Theoretical and experimental results indicate that the suggested approach can be efficiently used for excitation of various types of microdevices where stable resonant operation combined with robustness and large vibrational amplitudes are desirable

  1. General classical and quantum-mechanical description of magnetic resonance: an application to electric-dipole-moment experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silenko, Alexander J. [Belarusian State University, Research Institute for Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Belarus); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    A general theoretical description of a magnetic resonance is presented. This description is necessary for a detailed analysis of spin dynamics in electric-dipole-moment experiments in storage rings. General formulas describing a behavior of all components of the polarization vector at the magnetic resonance are obtained for an arbitrary initial polarization. These formulas are exact on condition that the nonresonance rotating field is neglected. The spin dynamics is also calculated at frequencies far from resonance with allowance for both rotating fields. A general quantum-mechanical analysis of the spin evolution at the magnetic resonance is fulfilled and the full agreement between the classical and quantum-mechanical approaches is shown. Quasimagnetic resonances for particles and nuclei moving in noncontinuous perturbing fields of accelerators and storage rings are considered. Distinguishing features of quasimagnetic resonances in storage ring electric-dipole-moment experiments are investigated in detail. The exact formulas for the effect caused by the electric dipole moment are derived. The difference between the resonance effects conditioned by the rf electric-field flipper and the rf Wien filter is found and is calculated for the first time. The existence of this difference is crucial for the establishment of a consent between analytical derivations and computer simulations and for checking spin tracking programs. The main systematical errors are considered. (orig.)

  2. Quadrature squeezing of a mechanical resonator generated by the electromechanical coupling with two coupled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Yan [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Zhu, Jia-pei [Department of Physics, Honghe University, Mengzi (China); Zhao, Shao-ming; Li, Gao-xiang [Department of Physics, Huazhong Normal University, Wuhan (China)

    2015-01-01

    The quadrature squeezing of a mechanical resonator (MR) coupled with two quantum dots (QDs) through the electromechanical coupling, where the QDs are driven by a strong and two weak laser fields is investigated. By tuning the gate voltage, the electron can be trapped in a quantum pure state. Under certain conditions, the discrepancies between the transition frequency and that of two weak fields are compensated by the phonons induced by the electromechanical coupling of the MR with QDs. In this case, some dissipative processes occur resonantly. The phonons created and (or) annihilated in these dissipative processes are correlated thus leading to the quadrature squeezing of the MR. A squeezed vacuum reservoir for the MR is built up. By tuning the gate voltage to control the energy structure of the QDs, the present squeezing scheme has strong resistance against the dephasing processes of the QDs in low temperature limit. The role of the temperature of the phonon reservoir is to damage squeezing of the MR. (copyright 2014 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. High-resolution mechanical imaging of glioblastoma by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To generate high-resolution maps of the viscoelastic properties of human brain parenchyma for presurgical quantitative assessment in glioblastoma (GB. METHODS: Twenty-two GB patients underwent routine presurgical work-up supplemented by additional multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography. Two three-dimensional viscoelastic parameter maps, magnitude |G*|, and phase angle φ of the complex shear modulus were reconstructed by inversion of full wave field data in 2-mm isotropic resolution at seven harmonic drive frequencies ranging from 30 to 60 Hz. RESULTS: Mechanical brain maps confirmed that GB are composed of stiff and soft compartments, resulting in high intratumor heterogeneity. GB could be easily differentiated from healthy reference tissue by their reduced viscous behavior quantified by φ (0.37±0.08 vs. 0.58±0.07. |G*|, which in solids more relates to the material's stiffness, was significantly reduced in GB with a mean value of 1.32±0.26 kPa compared to 1.54±0.27 kPa in healthy tissue (P = 0.001. However, some GB (5 of 22 showed increased stiffness. CONCLUSION: GB are generally less viscous and softer than healthy brain parenchyma. Unrelated to the morphology-based contrast of standard magnetic resonance imaging, elastography provides an entirely new neuroradiological marker and contrast related to the biomechanical properties of tumors.

  4. Investigation on Mechanisms of Polymer Enhanced Oil Recovery by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Microscopic Theoretical Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Kao-Ping, Song; Er-Long, Yang; Li, Liu

    2008-01-01

    Polymer flooding is an efficient technique to enhance oil recovery over water flooding. There are lots of discussions regarding the mechanisms for polymer flooding enhancing oil recovery. The main focus is whether polymer flooding can increase sweep efficiency alone, or can increase both of sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. We present a study on this problem. Oil displacement experiments on 4 natural cores show that polymer flooding can increase oil recovery efficiency by more than 12% over water. Moreover, photos are taken by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method both after water flooding and after polymer flooding, which show remaining oil saturation distribution at the middle cross section and the central longitudinal section. Analyses of these photos demonstrate that polymer flooding can increase both sweep efficiency and displacement efficiency. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  5. Paralinguistic mechanisms of production in human "beatboxing": a real-time magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Michael; Bresch, Erik; Byrd, Dani; Nayak, Krishna; Narayanan, Shrikanth

    2013-02-01

    Real-time magnetic resonance imaging (rtMRI) was used to examine mechanisms of sound production by an American male beatbox artist. rtMRI was found to be a useful modality with which to study this form of sound production, providing a global dynamic view of the midsagittal vocal tract at frame rates sufficient to observe the movement and coordination of critical articulators. The subject's repertoire included percussion elements generated using a wide range of articulatory and airstream mechanisms. Many of the same mechanisms observed in human speech production were exploited for musical effect, including patterns of articulation that do not occur in the phonologies of the artist's native languages: ejectives and clicks. The data offer insights into the paralinguistic use of phonetic primitives and the ways in which they are coordinated in this style of musical performance. A unified formalism for describing both musical and phonetic dimensions of human vocal percussion performance is proposed. Audio and video data illustrating production and orchestration of beatboxing sound effects are provided in a companion annotated corpus.

  6. Flexural resonance mechanism of thermal transport across graphene-SiO2 interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhun-Yong; Qiu, Bo; Xu, Shanglong; Ruan, Xiulin; Pop, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the microscopic mechanism of heat dissipation at the dimensionally mismatched interface between a two-dimensional (2D) crystal and its substrate is crucial for the thermal management of devices based on 2D materials. Here, we study the lattice contribution to thermal (Kapitza) transport at graphene-SiO2 interfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). We find that 78 percent of the Kapitza conductance is due to sub-20 THz flexural acoustic modes, and that a resonance mechanism dominates the interfacial phonon transport. MD and NEGF estimate the classical Kapitza conductance to be hK ≈ 10 to 16 MW K-1 m-2 at 300 K, respectively, consistent with existing experimental observations. Taking into account quantum mechanical corrections, this value is approximately 28% lower at 300 K. Our calculations also suggest that hK scales as T2 at low temperatures (T < 100 K) due to the linear frequency dependence of phonon transmission across the graphene-SiO2 interface at low frequencies. Our study sheds light on the role of flexural acoustic phonons in heat dissipation from graphene to its substrate.

  7. Quantification of mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Direct comparison of velocity-encoded and cine magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muellerleile, K.; Baholli, L.; Groth, M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The preoperative assessment of mechanical dyssynchrony can help to improve patient selection in candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). The present study compared the performance of velocity-encoded (VENC) MRI to cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantifying mechanical ventricular dyssynchrony. Materials and Methods: VENC-MRI and cine-MRI were performed in 20 patients with heart failure NYHA class III and reduced ejection fraction (median: 24 %, interquartile range: 18 - 28 %) before CRT device implantation. The interventricular mechanical delay (IVMD) was assessed by VENC-MRI as the temporal difference between the onset of aortic and pulmonary flow. Intraventricular dyssynchrony was quantified by cine-MRI, using the standard deviation of time to maximal wall thickening in sixteen left ventricular segments (SDt-16). The response to CRT was assessed in a six-month follow-up. Results: 14 patients (70 %) clinically responded to CRT. A similar accuracy was found to predict the response to CRT by measurements of the IVMD and SDt-16 (75 vs. 70 %; p = ns). The time needed for data analysis was significantly shorter for the IVMD at 1.69 min (interquartile range: 1.66 - 1.88 min) compared to 9.63 min (interquartile range: 8.92 - 11.63 min) for the SDt-16 (p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Measurements of the IVMD by VENC-MRI and the SDt-16 by cine-MRI provide a similar accuracy to identify clinical responders to CRT. However, data analysis of the IVMD is significantly less time-consuming compared to data analysis of the SDt-16. (orig.)

  8. Effects of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation on bone mechanical properties and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeoh, S.Y.; Arias Moreno, A.J.; Rietbergen, van B.; Hoeve, ter N.D.; Diest, van P.J.; Grull, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for palliative treatment of bone pain. In this study, the effects of MR-HIFU ablation on bone mechanics and modeling were investigated. Methods A total of 12 healthy rat femurs were ablated

  9. Evidence of surface loss as ubiquitous limiting damping mechanism in SiN micro- and nanomechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Luis Guillermo; Schmid, Silvan

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN) micro- and nanomechanical resonators have attracted a lot of attention in various research fields due to their exceptionally high quality factors (Qs). Despite their popularity, the origin of the limiting loss mechanisms in these structures has remained controversial. In thi...

  10. Lowest order Virtual Element approximation of magnetostatic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão da Veiga, L.; Brezzi, F.; Dassi, F.; Marini, L. D.; Russo, A.

    2018-04-01

    We give here a simplified presentation of the lowest order Serendipity Virtual Element method, and show its use for the numerical solution of linear magneto-static problems in three dimensions. The method can be applied to very general decompositions of the computational domain (as is natural for Virtual Element Methods) and uses as unknowns the (constant) tangential component of the magnetic field $\\mathbf{H}$ on each edge, and the vertex values of the Lagrange multiplier $p$ (used to enforce the solenoidality of the magnetic induction $\\mathbf{B}=\\mu\\mathbf{H}$). In this respect the method can be seen as the natural generalization of the lowest order Edge Finite Element Method (the so-called "first kind N\\'ed\\'elec" elements) to polyhedra of almost arbitrary shape, and as we show on some numerical examples it exhibits very good accuracy (for being a lowest order element) and excellent robustness with respect to distortions.

  11. Measurement of mechanical properties of metallic glass at elevated temperature using sonic resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluvan, Suresh; Zhang, Haifeng; Mridha, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2017-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are fully amorphous multi-component alloys with homogeneous and isotropic structure down to the atomic scale. Some attractive attributes of bulk metallic glasses include high strength and hardness as well as excellent corrosion and wear resistance. However, there are few reports and limited understanding of their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. We used a nondestructive sonic resonance method to measure the Young's modulus and Shear modulus of a bulk metallic glass, Zr41.2Ti13.8Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5, at elevated temperatures. The measurement system was designed using a laser displacement sensor to detect the sonic vibration produced by a speaker on the specimen in high-temperature furnace. The OMICRON Bode-100 Vector Network Analyzer was used to sweep the frequency and its output was connected to the speaker which vibrated the material in its flexural mode and torsional modes. A Polytec OFV-505 laser vibrometer sensor was used to capture the vibration of the material at various frequencies. The flexural and torsional mode frequency shift due to the temperature variation was used to determine the Young's modulus and Shear modulus. The temperature range of measurement was from 50°C to 350°C. The Young's modulus was found to reduce from 100GPa to 94GPa for the 300°C temperature span. Similarly, the Shear modulus decreased from 38.5GPa at 50°C to 36GPa at 350°C.

  12. Assessment of mechanical properties of isolated bovine intervertebral discs from multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recuerda, Maximilien; Périé, Delphine; Gilbert, Guillaume; Beaudoin, Gilles

    2012-10-12

    The treatment planning of spine pathologies requires information on the rigidity and permeability of the intervertebral discs (IVDs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers great potential as a sensitive and non-invasive technique for describing the mechanical properties of IVDs. However, the literature reported small correlation coefficients between mechanical properties and MRI parameters. Our hypothesis is that the compressive modulus and the permeability of the IVD can be predicted by a linear combination of MRI parameters. Sixty IVDs were harvested from bovine tails, and randomly separated in four groups (in-situ, digested-6h, digested-18h, digested-24h). Multi-parametric MRI acquisitions were used to quantify the relaxation times T1 and T2, the magnetization transfer ratio MTR, the apparent diffusion coefficient ADC and the fractional anisotropy FA. Unconfined compression, confined compression and direct permeability measurements were performed to quantify the compressive moduli and the hydraulic permeabilities. Differences between groups were evaluated from a one way ANOVA. Multi linear regressions were performed between dependent mechanical properties and independent MRI parameters to verify our hypothesis. A principal component analysis was used to convert the set of possibly correlated variables into a set of linearly uncorrelated variables. Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering was performed on the 3 principal components. Multilinear regressions showed that 45 to 80% of the Young's modulus E, the aggregate modulus in absence of deformation HA0, the radial permeability kr and the axial permeability in absence of deformation k0 can be explained by the MRI parameters within both the nucleus pulposus and the annulus pulposus. The principal component analysis reduced our variables to two principal components with a cumulative variability of 52-65%, which increased to 70-82% when considering the third principal component. The dendograms showed a natural

  13. Mechanical Characterization of Tissue-Engineered Cartilage Using Microscopic Magnetic Resonance Elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ziying; Schmid, Thomas M.; Yasar, Temel K.; Liu, Yifei; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of mechanical properties of tissue-engineered cartilage is essential for the optimization of cartilage tissue engineering strategies. Microscopic magnetic resonance elastography (μMRE) is a recently developed MR-based technique that can nondestructively visualize shear wave motion. From the observed wave pattern in MR phase images the tissue mechanical properties (e.g., shear modulus or stiffness) can be extracted. For quantification of the dynamic shear properties of small and stiff tissue-engineered cartilage, μMRE needs to be performed at frequencies in the kilohertz range. However, at frequencies greater than 1 kHz shear waves are rapidly attenuated in soft tissues. In this study μMRE, with geometric focusing, was used to overcome the rapid wave attenuation at high frequencies, enabling the measurement of the shear modulus of tissue-engineered cartilage. This methodology was first tested at a frequency of 5 kHz using a model system composed of alginate beads embedded in agarose, and then applied to evaluate extracellular matrix development in a chondrocyte pellet over a 3-week culture period. The shear stiffness in the pellet was found to increase over time (from 6.4 to 16.4 kPa), and the increase was correlated with both the proteoglycan content and the collagen content of the chondrocyte pellets (R2=0.776 and 0.724, respectively). Our study demonstrates that μMRE when performed with geometric focusing can be used to calculate and map the shear properties within tissue-engineered cartilage during its development. PMID:24266395

  14. A novel 3D-printed mechanical actuator using centrifugal force for magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Wiebke; Schad, Lothar R; Zollner, Frank G

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a technique for the quantification of tissue stiffness during MR examinations. It requires consistent methods for mechanical shear wave induction to the region of interest in the human body to reliably quantify elastic properties of soft tissues. This work proposes a novel 3D-printed mechanical actuator using the principle of centrifugal force for wave induction. The driver consists of a 3D-printed turbine vibrator powered by compressed air (located inside the scanner room) and an active driver controlling the pressure of inflowing air (placed outside the scanner room). The generated force of the proposed actuator increases for higher actuation frequencies as opposed to conventionally used air cushions. There, the displacement amplitude decreases with increasing actuation frequency resulting in a smaller signal-to-noise ratio. An initial phantom study is presented which demonstrates the feasibility of the actuator for MRE. The wave-actuation frequency was regulated in a range between 15 Hz and 60 Hz for force measurements and proved sufficiently stable (± 0.3 Hz) for any given nominal frequency. The generated forces depend on the weight of the eccentric unbalance within the turbine and ranged between 0.67 N to 2.70 N (for 15 Hz) and 3.09 N to 7.77 N (for 60 Hz). Therefore, the generated force of the presented actuator increases with rotational speed of the turbine and offers an elegant solution for sufficiently large wave actuation at higher frequencies. In future work, we will investigate an optimal ratio of the weight of unbalance to the size of turbine for appropriately large but tolerable wave actuation for a given nominal frequency.

  15. 48 CFR 47.306-2 - Lowest overall transportation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation costs. 47.306-2 Section 47.306-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.306-2 Lowest overall transportation costs. (a) For the evaluation of offers, the transportation officer shall give to the contracting...

  16. Is action potential threshold lowest in the axon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2008-01-01

    Action potential threshold is thought to be lowest in the axon, but when measured using conventional techniques, we found that action potential voltage threshold of rat cortical pyramidal neurons was higher in the axon than at other neuronal locations. In contrast, both current threshold and voltage

  17. Nanomechanical Pyrolytic Carbon Resonators: Novel Fabrication Method and Characterization of Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksymilian Kurek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanomechanical string resonators, which essentially are highly stressed bridges, are of particular interest for micro- and nanomechanical sensing because they exhibit resonant behavior with exceptionally high quality factors. Here, we fabricated and characterized nanomechanical pyrolytic carbon resonators (strings and cantilevers obtained through pyrolysis of photoresist precursors. The developed fabrication process consists of only three processing steps: photolithography, dry etching and pyrolysis. Two different fabrication strategies with two different photoresists, namely SU-8 2005 (negative and AZ 5214e (positive, were compared. The resonant behavior of the pyrolytic resonators was characterized at room temperature and in high vacuum using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The experimental data was used to estimate the Young’s modulus of pyrolytic carbon and the tensile stress in the string resonators. The Young’s moduli were calculated to be 74 ± 8 GPa with SU-8 and 115 ± 8 GPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The tensile stress in the string resonators was 33 ± 7 MPa with AZ 5214e as the precursor. The string resonators displayed maximal quality factor values of up to 3000 for 525-µm-long structures.

  18. Mechanism and Characteristics of Humidity Sensing with Polyvinyl Alcohol-Coated Fiber Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yu; Wang, Ying; Cao, Shaoqing; Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Longfei; Zhang, Feng; Liao, Changrui; Wang, Yiping

    2018-06-25

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on a side-polished single mode fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is demonstrated for relative humidity (RH) sensing. The SPR sensor exhibits a resonant dip in the transmission spectrum in ambient air after PVA film coating, and the resonant wavelength shifts to longer wavelengths as the thickness of the PVA film increases. When RH changes, the resonant dip of the sensor with different film-thicknesses exhibits interesting characteristics for optical spectrum evolution. For sensors with initial wavelengths between 550 nm and 750 nm, the resonant dip shifts to longer wavelengths with increasing RH. The averaged sensitivity increases firstly and then drops, and shows a maximal sensitivity of 1.01 nm/RH%. Once the initial wavelength of the SPR sensor exceeds 850 nm, an inflection point of the resonant wavelength shift can be observed with RH increasing, and the resonant dip shifts to shorter wavelengths for RH values exceeding this point, and sensitivity as high as −4.97 nm/RH% can be obtained in the experiment. The sensor is expected to have potential applications in highly sensitive and cost effective humidity sensing.

  19. Mechanism and Characteristics of Humidity Sensing with Polyvinyl Alcohol-Coated Fiber Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Shao

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensor based on a side-polished single mode fiber coated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA is demonstrated for relative humidity (RH sensing. The SPR sensor exhibits a resonant dip in the transmission spectrum in ambient air after PVA film coating, and the resonant wavelength shifts to longer wavelengths as the thickness of the PVA film increases. When RH changes, the resonant dip of the sensor with different film-thicknesses exhibits interesting characteristics for optical spectrum evolution. For sensors with initial wavelengths between 550 nm and 750 nm, the resonant dip shifts to longer wavelengths with increasing RH. The averaged sensitivity increases firstly and then drops, and shows a maximal sensitivity of 1.01 nm/RH%. Once the initial wavelength of the SPR sensor exceeds 850 nm, an inflection point of the resonant wavelength shift can be observed with RH increasing, and the resonant dip shifts to shorter wavelengths for RH values exceeding this point, and sensitivity as high as −4.97 nm/RH% can be obtained in the experiment. The sensor is expected to have potential applications in highly sensitive and cost effective humidity sensing.

  20. A study on axial and torsional resonant mode matching for a mechanical system with complex nonlinear geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Brett; Yeo, Leslie; Friend, James

    2010-06-01

    Making use of mechanical resonance has many benefits for the design of microscale devices. A key to successfully incorporating this phenomenon in the design of a device is to understand how the resonant frequencies of interest are affected by changes to the geometric parameters of the design. For simple geometric shapes, this is quite easy, but for complex nonlinear designs, it becomes significantly more complex. In this paper, two novel modeling techniques are demonstrated to extract the axial and torsional resonant frequencies of a complex nonlinear geometry. The first decomposes the complex geometry into easy to model components, while the second uses scaling techniques combined with the finite element method. Both models overcome problems associated with using current analytical methods as design tools, and enable a full investigation of how changes in the geometric parameters affect the resonant frequencies of interest. The benefit of such models is then demonstrated through their use in the design of a prototype piezoelectric ultrasonic resonant micromotor which has improved performance characteristics over previous prototypes.

  1. Spectroscopic evidence of resonance energy transfer mechanism from PbS QDs to bulk silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernechea M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we study the efficiency of the resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon. We present spectroscopic evidence that resonance energy transfer from PbS quantum dots to bulk silicon can be an efficient process for separation distances below 12 nm. Temperature measurements are also presented for PbS quantum dots deposited on glass and silicon with 5 nm and 20nm spacer thicknesses substrates. Our findings show that the resonance energy transfer efficiency remains constant over the 50K to 300K temperature range.

  2. Excitation of lowest electronic states of thymine by slow electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontros, E. J.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2013-11-01

    Excitation of lowest electronic states of the thymine molecules in the gas phase is studied by elec- tron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition to dipole-allowed transitions to singlet states, transitions to the lowest triplet states were observed. The low-energy features of the spectrum at 3.66 and 4.61 eV are identified with the excitation of the first triplet states 13 A' (π → π*) and 13 A″ ( n → π*). The higher-lying features at 4.96, 5.75, 6.17, and 7.35 eV are assigned mainly to the excitation of the π → π* transitions to the singlet states of the molecule. The excitation dynamics of the lowest states is studied. It is found that the first triplet state 13 A'(π → π*) is most efficiently excited at a residual energy close to zero, while the singlet 21 A'(π → π*) state is excited with almost identical efficiency at different residual energies.

  3. Some properties of the resonant state in quantum mechanics and its computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Naomichi; Sasada, Keita; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Petrosky, Tomio

    2007-08-01

    The resonant state of the open quantum system is studied from the viewpoint of the outgoing momentum flux. We show that the number of particles is conserved for a resonant state, it we use an expanding volume of integration in order to take account of the outgoing momentum flux; the number of particles would decay exponentially in a fixed volume of integration. Moreover, we introduce new numerical methods of treating the resonant state with the use of the effective potential. We first give a numerical method of finding a resonance pole in the complex energy plane. The method seeks an energy eigenvalue iteratively. We found that our method leads to a super-convergence, the convergence exponential with respect to the iteration step. The present method is completely independent of commonly used complex scaling. We also give a numerical trick for computing the time evolution of the resonant state in limited spatial area. Since the wave function of the resonant state is diverging away from the scattering potential, it has been previously difficult to follow its time evolution numerically in a finite area. (author)

  4. Simulations of Various Driving Mechanisms for the 3rd Order Resonant Extraction from the MedAustron Medical Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Feldbauer, G; Dorda, U

    2011-01-01

    The MedAustron medical synchrotron is based on the CERN-PIMMS design and its technical implementation by CNAO [1]. This document elaborates on studies performed on the baseline betatron-core driven extraction method and investigates the feasibility of alternative resonance driving mechanisms like RF-knockout, RF-noise and the lattice tune. Single particle tracking results are presented, explained and compared to analytical results.

  5. Experimental elucidation: microscopic mechanism of resonant X-ray scattering in manganite films

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsumi, H; Kiyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Resonant X-ray scattering experiments have been performed on perovskite manganite La sub 0 sub . sub 5 Sr sub 0 sub . sub 5 MnO sub 3 thin films, which are grown on three distinct perovskite with a coherent epitaxial strain and have a forced ferro-type orbital ordering of Mn 3d orbitals. Using an interference technique, we have successfully observed the resonant X-ray scattering signal from the system having the ferro-type orbital ordering and also revealed the energy scheme of Mn 4p bands. For the forced ferro-type orbital ordering system, the present results evidence that the resonant X-ray scattering signal originates from the band structure effect due to the Jahn-Teller distortion of a MnO sub 6 octahedron, and not from the Coulomb interaction between 3d and 4p electrons. (author)

  6. Rationality, irrationality and escalating behavior in lowest unique bid auctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Baronchelli, Andrea; Amaral, Luís A N

    2012-01-01

    Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions--lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of "bid space". The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets.

  7. Rationality, irrationality and escalating behavior in lowest unique bid auctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Radicchi

    Full Text Available Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions--lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of "bid space". The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets.

  8. Rationality, Irrationality and Escalating Behavior in Lowest Unique Bid Auctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Baronchelli, Andrea; Amaral, Luís A. N.

    2012-01-01

    Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions – lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of “bid space”. The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets. PMID:22279553

  9. Techniques and mechanisms applied in electron cyclotron resonance sources for highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, AG

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are delivering beams of highly charged ions for a wide range of applications in many laboratories. For more than two decades, the development of these ion sources has been to a large extent an intuitive and experimental enterprise. Much effort has been spent

  10. Some applications of magnetic resonance imaging in fluid mechanics: Complex flows and complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonn, Daniel; Rodts, Stephane; Groenink, Maarten; Rafai, Salima; Shahidzadeh-Bonn, Noushine; Coussot, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    The review deals with applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to study flow. We first briefly discuss the principles of flow measurement by MRI and give examples of some applications, such as multiphase flows, the MRI rheology of complex fluid flows, and blood flows in the human

  11. Fibrillation mechanism of a model intrinsically disordered protein revealed by 2D correlation deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirzhytski, Vitali; Topilina, Natalya I; Takor, Gaius A; Higashiya, Seiichiro; Welch, John T; Uversky, Vladimir N; Lednev, Igor K

    2012-05-14

    Understanding of numerous biological functions of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) is of significant interest to modern life science research. A large variety of serious debilitating diseases are associated with the malfunction of IDPs including neurodegenerative disorders and systemic amyloidosis. Here we report on the molecular mechanism of amyloid fibrillation of a model IDP (YE8) using 2D correlation deep UV resonance Raman spectroscopy. YE8 is a genetically engineered polypeptide, which is completely unordered at neutral pH yet exhibits all properties of a fibrillogenic protein at low pH. The very first step of the fibrillation process involves structural rearrangements of YE8 at the global structure level without the detectable appearance of secondary structural elements. The formation of β-sheet species follows the global structural changes and proceeds via the simultaneous formation of turns and β-strands. The kinetic mechanism revealed is an important new contribution to understanding of the general fibrillation mechanism proposed for IDP.

  12. Frequency tuning, nonlinearities and mode coupling in circular mechanical graphene resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, A M; Midtvedt, D; Croy, A; Isacsson, A

    2013-01-01

    We study circular nanomechanical graphene resonators by means of continuum elasticity theory, treating them as membranes. We derive dynamic equations for the flexural mode amplitudes. Due to the geometrical nonlinearity the mode dynamics can be modeled by coupled Duffing equations. By solving the Airy stress problem we obtain analytic expressions for the eigenfrequencies and nonlinear coefficients as functions of the radius, suspension height, initial tension, back-gate voltage and elastic constants, which we compare with finite element simulations. Using perturbation theory, we show that it is necessary to include the effects of the non-uniform stress distribution for finite deflections. This correctly reproduces the spectrum and frequency tuning of the resonator, including frequency crossings. (paper)

  13. Electrical tuning of mechanical characteristics in qPlus sensor: Active Q and resonance frequency control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Manhee; Hwang, Jong Geun; Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, QHwan; Noh, Hanaul; An, Sangmin; Jhe, Wonho, E-mail: whjhe@snu.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Institute of Applied Physics and Centre for THz-Bio Application Systems, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-21

    We present an electrical feedback method for independent and simultaneous tuning of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of a harmonic oscillator, the so called “qPlus” configuration of quartz tuning forks. We incorporate a feedback circuit with two electronic gain parameters into the original actuation-detection system, and systematically demonstrate the control of the original resonance frequency of 32 592 Hz from 32 572 Hz to 32 610 Hz and the original quality factor 952 from 408 up to 20 000. This tunable module can be used for enhancing and optimizing the oscillator performance in compliance with specifics of applications.

  14. Electrical tuning of mechanical characteristics in qPlus sensor: Active Q and resonance frequency control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Manhee; Hwang, Jong Geun; Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, QHwan; Noh, Hanaul; An, Sangmin; Jhe, Wonho

    2016-01-01

    We present an electrical feedback method for independent and simultaneous tuning of both the resonance frequency and the quality factor of a harmonic oscillator, the so called “qPlus” configuration of quartz tuning forks. We incorporate a feedback circuit with two electronic gain parameters into the original actuation-detection system, and systematically demonstrate the control of the original resonance frequency of 32 592 Hz from 32 572 Hz to 32 610 Hz and the original quality factor 952 from 408 up to 20 000. This tunable module can be used for enhancing and optimizing the oscillator performance in compliance with specifics of applications.

  15. An investigation of the reaction mechanism for resonance neutron capture in 54Fe and 62Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectra produced following neutron capture in the low energy resonances of 54 Fe and 62 Ni have been observed, using the Harwell 136 MeV electron linear accelerator facility, HELIOS, as a source of pulsed neutrons. The work indicated that, for s-wave capture in the mass region A approx. 55, single particle effects may only be apparent if the size of the valence component is about an order of magnitude larger than the compound nuclear component, and that this may limit the importance of such effects to a few nuclides. In addition, some information was obtained on the radiative decay of p-wave resonances of 54 Fe and 62 Ni. (author)

  16. Mechanism for coherent production of pions from the decay of resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, C.S.; Lo, S.Y.

    1984-01-01

    Conditions and signatures for the induced emission of bosons from a microscopic device are discussed. Detailed formulae for a simple two-level model are derived. In this model the decay of N Δ-resonances residing in a microscopic volume V is discussed. It is shown that large amplification factors for unusual charge bunching of pions are obtained as a result of induced emissions

  17. Chaos control of the micro-electro-mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Shaohua; Sun, Quanping; Cheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses chaos control of the micro-electro- mechanical resonator by using adaptive dynamic surface technology with extended state observer. To reveal the mechanism of the micro- electro-mechanical resonator, the phase diagrams and corresponding time histories are given to research the nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior, and Homoclinic and heteroclinic chaos which relate closely with the appearance of chaos are presented based on the potential function. To eliminate the effect of chaos, an adaptive dynamic surface control scheme with extended state observer is designed to convert random motion into regular motion without precise system model parameters and measured variables. Putting tracking differentiator into chaos controller solves the ‘explosion of complexity’ of backstepping and poor precision of the first-order filters. Meanwhile, to obtain high performance, a neural network with adaptive law is employed to approximate unknown nonlinear function in the process of controller design. The boundedness of all the signals of the closed-loop system is proved in theoretical analysis. Finally, numerical simulations are executed and extensive results illustrate effectiveness and robustness of the proposed scheme.

  18. Probing edge-activated resonant Raman scattering from mechanically exfoliated 2D MoO3 nanolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Taka-aki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Ohuchi, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    We report spatially resolved vibrational analysis of mechanically exfoliated single-crystalline α-MoO 3 nanolayers. Raman scattering from α-MoO 3 was enhanced predominantly at the outside edges of the nanolayers. The enhanced Raman scattering at the edges was attributed primarily to the enhanced resonant Raman effect caused by a high density of oxygen vacancies localized at the edges. The localized vacancy sites corresponded to a non-stoichiometric phase of MoO 3 , which would provide reactive sites with high catalytic activity. (paper)

  19. Lowest cost due to highest productivity and highest quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Since global purchasing in the automotive industry has been taken up all around the world there is one main key factor that makes a TB-supplier today successful: Producing highest quality at lowest cost. The fact that Tailored Blanks, which today may reach up to 1/3 of a car body weight, are purchased on the free market but from different steel suppliers, especially in Europe and NAFTA, the philosophy on OEM side has been changing gradually towards tough evaluation criteria. "No risk at the stamping side" calls for top quality Tailored- or Tubular Blank products. Outsourcing Tailored Blanks has been starting in Japan but up to now without any quality request from the OEM side like ISO 13919-1B (welding quality standard in Europe and USA). Increased competition will automatically push the quality level and the ongoing approach to combine high strength steel with Tailored- and Tubular Blanks will ask for even more reliable system concepts which enables to weld narrow seams at highest speed. Beside producing quality, which is the key to reduce one of the most important cost driver "material scrap," in-line quality systems with true and reliable evaluation is going to be a "must" on all weld systems. Traceability of all process related data submitted to interfaces according to customer request in combination with ghost-shift-operation of TB systems are tomorrow's state-of-the-art solutions of Tailored Blank-facilities.

  20. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  1. Sinus of Valsalva aneurysm and bicuspid aortic valve: detection and mechanism by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen Li Looi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR demonstrated a sinus of Valsalva aneurysm (SVA with severe dilatation of the right coronary sinus in association with a congenital bicuspid aortic valve (BAV and subaortic membrane. The SVA had not been apparent on echocardiography as the dilatation was outside standard echo image planes. On both CMR and echo, blood flow was eccentrically directed into the right coronary sinus by the domed posterior leaflet of the BAV. The impact of the aortic jet on the wall of the right coronary sinus is probably important in the aetiology of the sinus dilatation. CMR proved valuable in demonstrating the SVA and understanding its aetiology.

  2. Multichannel coupling with supersymmetric quantum mechanics and exactly-solvable model for the Feshbach resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Samsonov, Boris F; Foucart, Francois; Baye, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    A new type of supersymmetric transformations of the coupled-channel radial Schroedinger equation is introduced, which do not conserve the vanishing behaviour of solutions at the origin. Contrary to the usual transformations, these 'non-conservative' transformations allow, in the presence of thresholds, the construction of well-behaved potentials with coupled scattering matrices from uncoupled potentials. As an example, an exactly-solvable potential matrix is obtained which provides a very simple model of the Feshbach-resonance phenomenon. (letter to the editor)

  3. Unparticle-Higgs field mixing: Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances, seesaw mechanism, and spinodal instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Holman, R.; Hutasoit, Jimmy A.

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by slow-roll inflationary cosmology we study a scalar unparticle weakly coupled to a Higgs field in the broken symmetry phase. The mixing between the unparticle and the Higgs field results in a seesaw type matrix and the mixing angles feature a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect as a consequence of the unparticle field being noncanonical. We find two (MSW) resonances for small and large spacelike momenta. The unparticlelike mode features a nearly flat potential with spinodal instabilities and a large expectation value. An effective potential for the unparticlelike field is generated from the Higgs potential, but with couplings suppressed by a large power of the small seesaw ratio. The dispersion relation for the Higgs-like mode features an imaginary part even at ''tree level'' as a consequence of the fact that the unparticle field describes a multiparticle continuum. Mixed unparticle-Higgs propagators reveal the possibility of oscillations, albeit with short coherence lengths. The results are generalized to the case in which the unparticle features a mass gap, in which case a low energy MSW resonance may occur for lightlike momenta depending on the scales. Unparticle-Higgs mixing leads to an effective unparticle potential of the new-inflation form. Slow-roll variables are suppressed by seesaw ratios and the anomalous dimensions and favor a red spectrum of scalar perturbations consistent with cosmic microwave background data.

  4. Unparticle-Higgs field mixing: Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein resonances, seesaw mechanism, and spinodal instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanovsky, D.; Holman, R.; Hutasoit, Jimmy A.

    2009-04-01

    Motivated by slow-roll inflationary cosmology we study a scalar unparticle weakly coupled to a Higgs field in the broken symmetry phase. The mixing between the unparticle and the Higgs field results in a seesaw type matrix and the mixing angles feature a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect as a consequence of the unparticle field being noncanonical. We find two (MSW) resonances for small and large spacelike momenta. The unparticlelike mode features a nearly flat potential with spinodal instabilities and a large expectation value. An effective potential for the unparticlelike field is generated from the Higgs potential, but with couplings suppressed by a large power of the small seesaw ratio. The dispersion relation for the Higgs-like mode features an imaginary part even at “tree level” as a consequence of the fact that the unparticle field describes a multiparticle continuum. Mixed unparticle-Higgs propagators reveal the possibility of oscillations, albeit with short coherence lengths. The results are generalized to the case in which the unparticle features a mass gap, in which case a low energy MSW resonance may occur for lightlike momenta depending on the scales. Unparticle-Higgs mixing leads to an effective unparticle potential of the new-inflation form. Slow-roll variables are suppressed by seesaw ratios and the anomalous dimensions and favor a red spectrum of scalar perturbations consistent with cosmic microwave background data.

  5. P-wave Feshbach resonances of ultracold 6Li

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, J.; Kempen, E.G.M. van; Bourdel, T.; Cubizolles, J.; Chevy, F.; Teichmann, M.; Tarruell, L.; Salomon, C.; Khaykovich, L.; Kokkelmans, S.J.J.M.F.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of three p-wave Feshbach resonances of 6 Li atoms in the lowest hyperfine state f=1/2. The positions of the resonances are in good agreement with theory. We study the lifetime of the cloud in the vicinity of the Feshbach resonances and show that, depending on the spin states, two- or three-body mechanisms are at play. In the case of dipolar losses, we observe a nontrivial temperature dependence that is well explained by a simple model

  6. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  7. Lowest auto-detachment state of the water anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houfek, K.; Cizek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Because of the abundance of water in living tissue the reactive low-energy electron collisions with the water molecule represent an important step in the radiation damage of cells. In this paper, the potential energy surface of the ground state of the water anion H_2O"- is carefully mapped using multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations for a large range of molecular geometries. Particular attention is paid to a consistent description of both the O"-+H_2 and OH"-+H asymptotes and to a relative position of the anion energy to the ground state energy of the neutral molecule. The auto-detachment region, where the anion state crosses to the electronic continuum is identified. The local minimum in the direction of the O"- + H_2 channel previously reported by Werner et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 87, 2913 (1987)] is found to be slightly off the linear geometry and is separated by a saddle from the auto-detachment region. The auto-detachment region is directly accessible from the OH"-+H asymptote. For the molecular geometries in the auto-detachment region and in its vicinity we also performed fixed-nuclei electron-molecule scattering calculations using the R-matrix method. Tuning of consistency of a description of the correlation energy in both the multireference CI and R-matrix calculations is discussed. Two models of the correlation energy within the R-matrix method that are consistent with the quantum chemistry calculations are found. Both models yield scattering quantities in a close agreement. The results of this work will allow a consistent formulation of the nonlocal resonance model of the water anion in a future publication

  8. Quench-induced resonant tunneling mechanisms of bosons in an optical lattice with harmonic confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistakidis, Simeon; Koutentakis, Georgios; Schmelcher, Peter; Theory Group of Fundamental Processes in Quantum Physics Team

    2017-04-01

    The non-equilibrium dynamics of small boson ensembles in one-dimensional optical lattices is explored upon a sudden quench of an additional harmonic trap from strong to weak confinement. We find that the competition between the initial localization and the repulsive interaction leads to a resonant response of the system for intermediate quench amplitudes, corresponding to avoided crossings in the many-body eigenspectrum with varying final trap frequency. In particular, we show that these avoided crossings can be utilized to prepare the system in a desired state. The dynamical response is shown to depend on both the interaction strength as well as the number of atoms manifesting the many-body nature of the tunneling dynamics. Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) in the framework of the SFB 925 ``Light induced dynamics and control of correlated quantum systems''.

  9. Development of Integrated Electronics for Readout of High Frequency Micro/Nano-mechanical Resonator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Meng

    Micro størrelse bulk type resonatorer er blevet udviklet gennern de sidste fem år til anvendelse inden for elektronikbranchen til lav strøm og billige alternativer til både passive og aktive komponenter. Dog kan denne type bulk resonator også bruges til bio/kemiske sensorer hvor, da på grund af den...... fri bevægelser omkring sin resonansfrekven. Metodens evne til at måle resonans frekvens, Q-faktor og den parallel kondensator på samme tid er verificeret både teoretisk og eksperimentelt i luft ved høj hastighed. Hertil kommer, at metoden ikke har brug for nogen kompliceret form for feedback som gøre...

  10. Resonance fluorescence and quantum jumps in single atoms: Testing the randomness of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erber, T.; Hammerling, P.; Hockney, G.; Porrati, M.; Putterman, S.; La Jolla Institute, La Jolla, California 92037; Department of Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90024)

    1989-01-01

    When a single trapped 198 Hg + ion is illuminated by two lasers, each tuned to an approximate transition, the resulting fluorescence switches on and off in a series of pulses resembling a bistable telegraph. This intermittent fluorescence can also be obtained by optical pumping with a single laser. Quantum jumps between successive atomic levels may be traced directly with multiple-resonance fluorescence. Atomic transition rates and photon antibunching distributions can be inferred from the pulse statistics and compared with quantum theory. Stochastic tests also indicate that the quantum telegraphs are good random number generators. During periods when the fluorescence is switched off, the radiationless atomic currents that generate the telegraph signals can be adjusted by varying the laser illumination: if this coherent evolution of the wave functions is sustained over sufficiently long time intervals, novel interactive precision measurements, near the limits of the time-energy uncertainty relations, are possible. Copyright 1989 Academic Press, Inc

  11. The mechanical structure of the WEST Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating launchers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliez, K., E-mail: karl.vulliez@cea.fr [Laboratoire d’étanchéité, CEA/DEN/DTEC/SDTC, 2 rue James Watt, 26700 Pierrelatte (France); Chen, Z. [Institute of Plasma Physics, CAS, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Ferlay, F. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Winkler, K. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Helou, W.; Hillairet, J.; Mollard, P.; Patterlini, J.C.; Bernard, J.M.; Delaplanche, J.M.; Lombard, G.; Prou, M.; Volpe, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The design of a CW ICRH launcher for WEST was achieved. • Major upgrade were made on the launcher to improve performances and reliability. • 3 launchers are about to be built to be operated on WEST in 2015. • Increasing information will decrease quality if hospital costs are very different. • The compete RF and mechanical structure were analyzed by FEM. - Abstract: The WEST ICRH system has to deal with two challenging issues that no other ICRH system before ITER has faced simultaneously so far, i.e. ELMs resilience and Continuous Wave (CW) RF operation. The technical solution chosen to meet the requests imposed by the WEST scenarios is to build three new launchers based on the RF structure successfully tested in short pulses in 2007 on Tore Supra prototype launcher. This paper gives an overview of the mechanical structure of the CW ELMs resilient WEST ICRH launchers. The technical solutions chosen to drive the mechanical design are presented, in regard of the past experience on the 2007 TS prototype, together with the significant work carried out on the mechanical design to improve the launcher structure. The thermal and electro-mechanical analyses conducted and their impact on the launcher design are also presented. These three new CW ELMs resilient ICRH launchers are foreseen to be installed on WEST in 2016, and operational for the first plasmas.

  12. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...... confined to the electrode as compared to the total mechanical energy is calculated and is found to be increasing for increasing aspect ratio and to tend to a definite limit for the two families of surface waves. This observation is in support of the interpretation that high aspect ratio electrodes act...

  13. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samosvat, D. M.; Chikalova-Luzina, O. P.; Vyatkin, V. M.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2016-11-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones.

  14. Resonant electronic excitation energy transfer by Dexter mechanism in the quantum dot system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samosvat, D M; Chikalova-Luzina, O P; Zegrya, G G; Vyatkin, V M

    2016-01-01

    In present work the energy transfer between quantum dots by the exchange (Dexter) mechanism is analysed. The interdot Coulomb interaction is taken into consideration. It is assumed that the quantum dot-donor and the quantum dot-acceptor are made from the same compound A3B5 and embedded in the matrix of other material creating potential barriers for electron and holes. The dependences of the energy transfer rate on the quantum-dot system parameters are found using the Kane model that provides the most adequate description spectra of semiconductors A3B5. Numerical calculations show that the rate of the energy transfer by Dexter mechanism is comparable to the rate of the energy transfer by electrostatic mechanism at the distances approaching to the contact ones. (paper)

  15. Lowest vibrational states of 4He3He+: Non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanke, Monika; Bubin, Sergiy; Kedziera, Dariusz; Molski, Marcin; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-01-01

    Very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the first five vibrational states of the 4 He 3 He + molecular ion are reported. The calculations have been performed explicitly including the coupling of the electronic and nuclear motions [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. The nonrelativistic non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the α 2 relativistic mass velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin interaction corrections. For the lowest vibrational transition, whose experimental energy is established with high precision, the calculated and the experimental results differ by only 0.16 cm -1

  16. Population trapping: The mechanism for the lost resonance lines in Pm-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    We report a population kinetics study on line emissions of the Pm-like Bi22+ performed by using a collisional-radiative (CR) model. Population rates of excited levels are analyzed to explain the population trapping in the 4f135s2 state which causes the loss of the 5s - 5p resonance lines in emission spectra. Based on the present analysis, we elucidate why the population trapping is not facilitated for a meta-stable excited level of the Sm-like Bi21+. The emission line spectra are calculated for the Pm-like isoelectronic sequence from Au18+ through W13+ and compared with experimental measurements by electron-beam-ion-traps (EBITs). Structures of the spectra are similar for all of the cases except for calculated W13+ spectra. The calculated spectra are hardly reconciled with the measured W13+ spectrum using the compact electron-beam-ion-trap (CoBIT) [Phys. Rev. A 92 (2015) 022510].

  17. Optical Control of Mechanical Mode-Coupling within a MoS2 Resonator in the Strong-Coupling Regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Hua; Kim, In Soo; Lauhon, Lincoln J

    2015-10-14

    Two-dimensional (2-D) materials including graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are an exciting platform for ultrasensitive force and displacement detection in which the strong light-matter coupling is exploited in the optical control of nanomechanical motion. Here we report the optical excitation and displacement detection of a ∼ 3 nm thick MoS2 resonator in the strong-coupling regime, which has not previously been achieved in 2-D materials. Mechanical mode frequencies can be tuned by more than 12% by optical heating, and they exhibit avoided crossings indicative of strong intermode coupling. When the membrane is optically excited at the frequency difference between vibrational modes, normal mode splitting is observed, and the intermode energy exchange rate exceeds the mode decay rate by a factor of 15. Finite element and analytical modeling quantifies the extent of mode softening necessary to control intermode energy exchange in the strong coupling regime.

  18. Mechanism of free radical generation in platelets and primary hepatocytes: A novel electron spin resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiun-Lang; Yang, Po-Sheng; Tsao, Jeng-Ting; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Chou, Duen-Suey

    2018-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of toxic liver injury and are thought to be involved in cardiac dysfunction in the cirrhotic heart. Therefore, direct evidence for the electron spin resonance (ESR) detection of how D‑galactosamine (GalN), an established experimental hepatotoxic substance, induced free radicals formation in platelets and primary hepatocytes is presented in the present study. ESR results demonstrated that GalN induced hydroxyl radicals (OH•) in a resting human platelet suspension; however, radicals were not produced in a cell free Fenton reaction system. The GalN‑induced OH• formation was significantly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethasin, though it was not affected by the lipoxygenase (LOX) or cytochrome P450 inhibitors, AA861 and 1‑aminobenzotriazole (ABT), in platelets. In addition, the present study demonstrated that baicalein induced semiquinone free radicals in platelets, which were significantly reduced by the COX inhibitor without affecting the formed OH•. In the mouse primary hepatocytes, the formation of arachidonic acid (AA) induced carbon‑centered radicals that were concentration dependently enhanced by GalN. These radicals were inhibited by AA861, though not affected by indomethasin or ABT. In addition, GalN did not induce platelet aggregation prior to or following collagen pretreatment in human platelets. The results of the present study indicated that GalN and baicalein may induce OH• by COX and LOX in human platelets. GalN also potentiated AA induced carbon‑centered radicals in hepatocytes via cytochrome P450. The present study presented the role of free radicals in the pathophysiological association between platelets and hepatocytes.

  19. Electron spin resonance studies of the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullis, P.M.; Symons, M.C.R.

    1986-01-01

    Electron spin resonance spectroscopy has only been used successfully on dry DNA at room temperature or on aqueous DNA at low temperatures. Under these conditions the direct damage results in electron-loss, which initially is indiscriminate, but rapidly ends up as G dot + , which is stable up to ca. 210 0 K. Electrons are trapped at T, giving T dot - anions, which are converted into dot TH in the 130 to 208 0 K range. Above these temperatures, both centers decay without the clear appearance of other intermediate radicals. Arguments are given against the concept that holes and/or electrons are extensively mobile within DNA molecules, and also against the concept that the ionic species studied by ESR spectroscopy recombine to give G and T to a major extent. In the presence of oxygen, O 2 - ions were detected and the primary yield of T dot - was reduced. However, both primry centers were lost at relatively low temperatures, with the concomitant formation of RO 2 dot radicals. The fate of these and the O 2 dot - anions could not be determined by ESR spectroscopy. In the presence of hydrogen peroxide or iodoacetamide, electrons were effectively scavenged, giving dot OH and H 2 C dot ONH 2 radicals and a reduced yield of T dot - . These active radicals were rapidly converted into new alkyl-type radicals, thought to be primarily formed by hydrogen atom abstraction. The ESR signals due to these radicals were lost at temperatures below those characteristic of the primary centers. This shows that these may well have been converted into such alkyl radical centers by hydrogen atom transfer despite our inability to detect them. 17 refs., 7 figs

  20. Comprehensive Cardiovascular magnetic resonance of myocardial mechanics in mice using three-dimensional cine DENSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Quantitative noninvasive imaging of myocardial mechanics in mice enables studies of the roles of individual genes in cardiac function. We sought to develop comprehensive three-dimensional methods for imaging myocardial mechanics in mice. Methods A 3D cine DENSE pulse sequence was implemented on a 7T small-bore scanner. The sequence used three-point phase cycling for artifact suppression and a stack-of-spirals k-space trajectory for efficient data acquisition. A semi-automatic 2D method was adapted for 3D image segmentation, and automated 3D methods to calculate strain, twist, and torsion were employed. A scan protocol that covered the majority of the left ventricle in a scan time of less than 25 minutes was developed, and seven healthy C57Bl/6 mice were studied. Results Using these methods, multiphase normal and shear strains were measured, as were myocardial twist and torsion. Peak end-systolic values for the normal strains at the mid-ventricular level were 0.29 ± 0.17, -0.13 ± 0.03, and -0.18 ± 0.14 for Err, Ecc, and Ell, respectively. Peak end-systolic values for the shear strains were 0.00 ± 0.08, 0.04 ± 0.12, and 0.03 ± 0.07 for Erc, Erl, and Ecl, respectively. The peak end-systolic normalized torsion was 5.6 ± 0.9°. Conclusions Using a 3D cine DENSE sequence tailored for cardiac imaging in mice at 7 T, a comprehensive assessment of 3D myocardial mechanics can be achieved with a scan time of less than 25 minutes and an image analysis time of approximately 1 hour. PMID:22208954

  1. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  2. D-wave resonances in positronium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiRienzi, Joseph; Drachman, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    In a previous paper [Phys. Rev. A 65, 032721 (2002)] we reexamined a model describing the structure of the low-energy Ps-H resonances as being due to quasibound states of the positron in the perturbed Coulomb potential of the H - ion appearing in the closed, rearranged channel. In particular, we wished to understand why the lowest p-state resonance was so far away from the lowest quasibound (2p) state. We found that the lowest resonance actually corresponds to the first-excited [3p] state, while the lowest state is not recognizable as a resonance. In the present work we repeat our analysis, but this time for the lowest d state. We find that the lowest [3d] state does correspond to a resonance shifted moderately

  3. Resonance Raman and excitation energy dependent charge transfer mechanism in halide-substituted hybrid perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-wook; Jain, Sagar M; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2015-02-24

    Organo-metal halide perovskites (OMHPs) are materials with attractive properties for optoelectronics. They made a recent introduction in the photovoltaics world by methylammonium (MA) lead triiodide and show remarkably improved charge separation capabilities when chloride and bromide are added. Here we show how halide substitution in OMHPs with the nominal composition CH3NH3PbI2X, where X is I, Br, or Cl, influences the morphology, charge quantum yield, and local interaction with the organic MA cation. X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence data demonstrate that halide substitution affects the local structure in the OMHPs with separate MAPbI3 and MAPbCl3 phases. Raman spectroscopies as well as theoretical vibration calculations reveal that this at the same time delocalizes the charge to the MA cation, which can liberate the vibrational movement of the MA cation, leading to a more adaptive organic phase. The resonance Raman effect together with quantum chemical calculations is utilized to analyze the change in charge transfer mechanism upon electronic excitation and gives important clues for the mechanism of the much improved photovoltage and photocurrent also seen in the solar cell performance for the materials when chloride compounds are included in the preparation.

  4. Mathematical modeling to select mechanized agricultural systems by the lowest operational cost

    OpenAIRE

    Baio, Fábio H. R.; Rodrigues, Andrew D.; Santos, Gilson S. dos; Silva, Simone P. da

    2013-01-01

    A seleção de uma máquina agrícola pode tornar-se uma tarefa árdua, pois há diversas variáveis que devem ser consideradas. A escolha do equipamento mais adequado para uma propriedade agrícola é uma das etapas mais importantes do processo produtivo. O objetivo deste trabalho foi desenvolver um modelo de computador por programação linear em plataforma web para seleção automatizada de conjuntos mecanizados agrícolas, baseados no menor custo operacional. O programa, desenvolvido em linguagem ASP.N...

  5. MEMS resonant load cells for micro-mechanical test frames: feasibility study and optimal design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrents, A.; Azgin, K.; Godfrey, S. W.; Topalli, E. S.; Akin, T.; Valdevit, L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the design, optimization and manufacturing of a novel micro-fabricated load cell based on a double-ended tuning fork. The device geometry and operating voltages are optimized for maximum force resolution and range, subject to a number of manufacturing and electromechanical constraints. All optimizations are enabled by analytical modeling (verified by selected finite elements analyses) coupled with an efficient C++ code based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm. This assessment indicates that force resolutions of ~0.5-10 nN are feasible in vacuum (~1-50 mTorr), with force ranges as large as 1 N. Importantly, the optimal design for vacuum operation is independent of the desired range, ensuring versatility. Experimental verifications on a sub-optimal device fabricated using silicon-on-glass technology demonstrate a resolution of ~23 nN at a vacuum level of ~50 mTorr. The device demonstrated in this article will be integrated in a hybrid micro-mechanical test frame for unprecedented combinations of force resolution and range, displacement resolution and range, optical (or SEM) access to the sample, versatility and cost.

  6. Pathological mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of chronic scarred myocardium in contrast agent enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate possible mechanism for delayed hyperenhancement of scarred myocardium by investigating the relationship of contrast agent (CA first pass and delayed enhancement patterns with histopathological changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighteen pigs underwent 4 weeks ligation of 1 or 2 diagonal coronary arteries to induce chronic infarction. The hearts were then removed and perfused in a Langendorff apparatus. The hearts firstly experienced phosphorus 31 MR spectroscopy. The hearts in group I (n = 9 and II (n = 9 then received the bolus injection of Gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (0.05 mmol/kg and gadolinium-based macromolecular agent (P792, 15 µmol/kg, respectively. First pass T2* MRI was acquired using a gradient echo sequence. Delayed enhanced T1 MRI was acquired with an inversion recovery sequence. Masson's trichrome and anti- von Willebrand Factor (vWF staining were performed for infarct characterization. RESULTS: Wash-in of both kinds of CA caused the sharp and dramatic T2* signal decrease of scarred myocardium similar to that of normal myocardium. Myocardial blood flow and microvessel density were significantly recovered in 4-week-old scar tissue. Steady state distribution volume (ΔR1 relaxation rate of Gd-DTPA was markedly higher in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium, whereas ΔR1 relaxation rate of P792 did not differ significantly between scarred and normal myocardium. The ratio of extracellular volume to the total water volume was significantly greater in scarred myocardium than in normal myocardium. Scarred myocardium contained massive residual capillaries and dilated vessels. Histological stains indicated the extensively discrete matrix deposition and lack of cellular structure in scarred myocardium. CONCLUSIONS: Collateral circulation formation and residual vessel effectively delivered CA into scarred myocardium. However, residual vessel without abnormal hyperpermeability allowed Gd

  7. Measurement of the lowest dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Donald A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Patel, Bhavesh N.; Pragada, Sreenivasa R.; Gordon, M. Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Accurate measurement of the threshold dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination (DD) may improve our understanding of the mechanisms and properties of such discrimination. Objectives Compare three methods for determining the threshold dosage for phenobarbital (D) versus no drug (N) DD. Methods Rats learned a D versus N DD in 2-lever operant training chambers. A titration scheme was employed to increase or decrease dosage at the end of each 18-day block of sessions depending on whether the rat had achieved criterion accuracy during the sessions just completed. Three criterion rules were employed, all based on average percent drug lever responses during initial links of the last 6 D and 6 N sessions of a block. The criteria were: D%>66 and N%50 and N%33. Two squads of rats were trained, one immediately after the other. Results All rats discriminated drug versus no drug. In most rats, dosage decreased to low levels and then oscillated near the minimum level required to maintain criterion performance. The lowest discriminated dosage significantly differed under the three criterion rules. The squad that was trained 2nd may have benefited by partially duplicating the lever choices of the previous squad. Conclusions The lowest discriminated dosage is influenced by the criterion of discriminative control that is employed, and is higher than the absolute threshold at which discrimination entirely disappears. Threshold estimations closer to absolute threshold can be obtained when criteria are employed that are permissive, and that allow rats to maintain lever preferences. PMID:19082992

  8. Assessing topology and surface orientation of an antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 using mechanically aligned bilayers and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Daniel J; Sahu, Indra D; Lorigan, Gary A

    2018-07-01

    Aligned CW-EPR membrane protein samples provide additional topology interactions that are absent from conventional randomly dispersed samples. These samples are aptly suited to studying antimicrobial peptides because of their dynamic peripheral topology. In this study, four consecutive substitutions of the model antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 were synthesized and labeled with the rigid TOAC spin label. The results revealed the helical tilts to be 66° ± 5°, 76° ± 5°, 70° ± 5°, and 72° ± 5° for the TOAC substitutions H7, S8, A9, and K10 respectively. These results are consistent with previously published literature. Using the EPR (electron paramagnetic resonance) mechanical alignment technique, these substitutions were used to critically assess the topology and surface orientation of the peptide with respect to the membrane. This methodology offers a rapid and simple approach to investigate the structural topology of antimicrobial peptides. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The tearing mode locking-unlocking mechanism to an external resonant field in EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Fridström, R.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.

    2014-10-01

    The tearing mode (TM) locking and unlocking process due to an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is experimentally studied in EXTRAP T2R. The RMP produces a reduction of the natural TM velocity and ultimately the TM locking if a threshold in the RMP amplitude is exceeded. During the braking process, the TM slows down via a mechanism composed of deceleration and acceleration phases. During the acceleration phases, the TM can reach velocities higher than the natural velocity. Once the TM locking occurs, the RMP must be reduced to a small amplitude to obtain the TM unlocking, showing that the unlocking threshold is significantly smaller than the locking threshold and that the process is characterized by hysteresis. Experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a model that describes the locking-unlocking process via the balance of the electromagnetic torque produced by the RMP that acts to brake the TM and the viscous torque that tends to re-establish the unperturbed velocity.

  10. The tearing mode locking–unlocking mechanism to an external resonant field in EXTRAP T2R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frassinetti, L; Fridström, R; Menmuir, S; Brunsell, P R

    2014-01-01

    The tearing mode (TM) locking and unlocking process due to an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) is experimentally studied in EXTRAP T2R. The RMP produces a reduction of the natural TM velocity and ultimately the TM locking if a threshold in the RMP amplitude is exceeded. During the braking process, the TM slows down via a mechanism composed of deceleration and acceleration phases. During the acceleration phases, the TM can reach velocities higher than the natural velocity. Once the TM locking occurs, the RMP must be reduced to a small amplitude to obtain the TM unlocking, showing that the unlocking threshold is significantly smaller than the locking threshold and that the process is characterized by hysteresis. Experimental results are in qualitative agreement with a model that describes the locking–unlocking process via the balance of the electromagnetic torque produced by the RMP that acts to brake the TM and the viscous torque that tends to re-establish the unperturbed velocity. (paper)

  11. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazariev, A; Graveron-Demilly, D; Allouche, A-R; Aubert-Frécon, M; Fauvelle, F; Piotto, M; Elbayed, K; Namer, I-J; Van Ormondt, D

    2011-01-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1 H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed

  12. Optimization of metabolite basis sets prior to quantitation in magnetic resonance spectroscopy: an approach based on quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazariev, A.; Allouche, A.-R.; Aubert-Frécon, M.; Fauvelle, F.; Piotto, M.; Elbayed, K.; Namer, I.-J.; van Ormondt, D.; Graveron-Demilly, D.

    2011-11-01

    High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is playing an increasingly important role for diagnosis. This technique enables setting up metabolite profiles of ex vivo pathological and healthy tissue. The need to monitor diseases and pharmaceutical follow-up requires an automatic quantitation of HRMAS 1H signals. However, for several metabolites, the values of chemical shifts of proton groups may slightly differ according to the micro-environment in the tissue or cells, in particular to its pH. This hampers the accurate estimation of the metabolite concentrations mainly when using quantitation algorithms based on a metabolite basis set: the metabolite fingerprints are not correct anymore. In this work, we propose an accurate method coupling quantum mechanical simulations and quantitation algorithms to handle basis-set changes. The proposed algorithm automatically corrects mismatches between the signals of the simulated basis set and the signal under analysis by maximizing the normalized cross-correlation between the mentioned signals. Optimized chemical shift values of the metabolites are obtained. This method, QM-QUEST, provides more robust fitting while limiting user involvement and respects the correct fingerprints of metabolites. Its efficiency is demonstrated by accurately quantitating 33 signals from tissue samples of human brains with oligodendroglioma, obtained at 11.7 tesla. The corresponding chemical shift changes of several metabolites within the series are also analyzed.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging and relaxometry to study water transport mechanisms in a commercially available gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Amber L; Fell, Rob J; Codd, Sarah L; Lightley, Kim A; Konagurthu, Sanjay; Koehler-King, Dory G; Seymour, Joseph D

    2010-09-15

    The hydration of 4 mg Cardura XL (Pfizer), a commercially available gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) tablet, was investigated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A short echo time (T(e)=2.81 ms) technique for MRI of the hydration of a GITS tablet was implemented. From the MR images, signal intensity profiles were generated and interpreted in the context of diffusive and osmotic transport mechanisms. A distinct transition from diffusive to osmotic transport was measured at a timescale relevant to the measured drug release time. Diffusion and osmotic rate coefficients for water in the drug and polymer sweller layers of the tablet were quantified. Spin-lattice T(1) and spin-spin T(2) relaxation times of the water signal from within the tablet were measured as a function of hydration time in order to incorporate the effects of relaxation into interpretation of signal intensity and provide unique information on the distribution of water in different physical and chemical environments within the tablet. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad; Farhat, Mohamed; Bagci, Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state

  15. Physics of Limiting Phenomena in Superconducting Microwave Resonators: Vortex Dissipation, Ultimate Quench and Quality Factor Degradation Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checchin, Mattia [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radio-frequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associate d to the

  16. Physics of limiting phenomena in superconducting microwave resonators: Vortex dissipation, ultimate quench and quality factor degradation mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checchin, Mattia

    Superconducting niobium accelerating cavities are devices operating in radiofrequency and able to accelerate charged particles up to energy of tera-electron-volts. Such accelerating structures are though limited in terms of quality factor and accelerating gradient, that translates--in some cases--in higher capital costs of construction and operation of superconducting rf accelerators. Looking forward for a new generation of more affordable accelerators, the physical description of limiting mechanisms in superconducting microwave resonators is discussed. In particular, the physics behind the dissipation introduced by vortices in the superconductor, the ultimate quench limitations and the quality factor degradation mechanism after a quench are described in detail. One of the limiting factor of the quality factor is the dissipation introduced by trapped magnetic flux vortices. The radio-frequency complex response of trapped vortices in superconductors is derived by solving the motion equation for a magnetic flux line, assuming a bi-dimensional and mean free path-dependent Lorentzian-shaped pinning potential. The resulting surface resistance shows the bell-shaped trend as a function of the mean free path, in agreement with the experimental data observed. Such bell-shaped trend of the surface resistance is described in terms of the interplay of the two limiting regimes identified as pinning and flux flow regimes, for low and large mean free path values respectively. The model predicts that the dissipation regime--pinning- or flux-flow-dominated--can be tuned either by acting on the frequency or on the electron mean free path value. The effect of different configurations of pinning sites and strength on the vortex surface resistance are also discussed. Accelerating cavities are also limited by the quench of the superconductive state, which limits the maximum accelerating gradient achievable. The accelerating field limiting factor is usually associated to the superheating

  17. Nanoantenna using mechanical resonance

    KAUST Repository

    Chang Hwa Lee,; Seok Woo Lee,; Lee, Seung S

    2010-01-01

    nanorod array. The modulated signals are received successfully with the transmission carrier wave frequency (248MHz) and the proposed nanoantenna is expected to be used in communication system for ultra small scale sensor. ©2010 IEEE.

  18. Effects of magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation on bone mechanical properties and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sin Yuin; Arias Moreno, Andrés J; van Rietbergen, Bert; Ter Hoeve, Natalie D; van Diest, Paul J; Grüll, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (MR-HIFU) is a promising technique for palliative treatment of bone pain. In this study, the effects of MR-HIFU ablation on bone mechanics and modeling were investigated. A total of 12 healthy rat femurs were ablated using 10 W for 46 ± 4 s per sonication with 4 sonications for each femur. At 7 days after treatments, all animals underwent MR and single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. Then, six animals were euthanized. At 1 month following ablations, the remaining six animals were scanned again with MR and SPECT/CT prior to euthanization. Thereafter, both the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones of three animals from each time interval were processed for histology, whereas the remaining bones were subjected to micro-CT (μCT), three-point bending tests, and micro-finite element (micro-FE) analyses. At 7 days after HIFU ablations, edema formation around the treated bones coupled with bone marrow and cortical bone necrosis was observed on MRI and histological images. SPECT/CT and μCT images revealed presence of bone modeling through an increased uptake of (99m)Tc-MDP and formation of woven bone, respectively. At 31 days after ablations, as illustrated by imaging and histology, healing of the treated bone and the surrounding soft tissue was noted, marked by decreased in amount of tissue damage, formation of scar tissue, and sub-periosteal reaction. The results of three-point bending tests showed no significant differences in elastic stiffness, ultimate load, and yield load between the HIFU-treated and contralateral control bones at 7 days and 1 month after treatments. Similarly, the elastic stiffness and Young's moduli determined by micro-FE analyses at both time intervals were not statistically different. Multimodality imaging and histological data illustrated the presence of HIFU-induced bone damage at the cellular level, which activated the

  19. On the role of resonances in double-mode pulsation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dziembowski, W.; Kovacs, G.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous effects of resonant coupling and non-linear saturation of linear driving mechanism on the finite amplitude solution of multi-modal pulsation problem and on its stability are investigated. Both effects are calculated in the lowest order of approximation in terms of amplitudes. It is shown that the 2:1 resonance between one of the two linearly unstable modes and a higher frequency mode causes double-mode (fundamental and first overtone) pulsation. In a certain range of parameters, such as the frequency mismatch, the linear growth and damping rates, it is the only stable solution of the problem. (author)

  20. [Reproducibility and accuracy in the morphometric and mechanical quantification of trabecular bone from 3 Tesla magnetic resonance images].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberich-Bayarri, A; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Sanz-Requena, R; Sánchez-González, J; Hervás Briz, V; García-Martí, G; Pérez, M Á

    2014-01-01

    We used an animal model to analyze the reproducibility and accuracy of certain biomarkers of bone image quality in comparison to a gold standard of computed microtomography (μCT). We used magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and μCT to study the metaphyses of 5 sheep tibiae. The MR images (3 Teslas) were acquired with a T1-weighted gradient echo sequence and an isotropic spatial resolution of 180μm. The μCT images were acquired using a scanner with a spatial resolution of 7.5μm isotropic voxels. In the preparation of the images, we applied equalization, interpolation, and thresholding algorithms. In the quantitative analysis, we calculated the percentage of bone volume (BV/TV), the trabecular thickness (Tb.Th), the trabecular separation (Tb.Sp), the trabecular index (Tb.N), the 2D fractal dimension (D(2D)), the 3D fractal dimension (D(3D)), and the elastic module in the three spatial directions (Ex, Ey and Ez). The morphometric and mechanical quantification of trabecular bone by MR was very reproducible, with percentages of variation below 9% for all the parameters. Its accuracy compared to the gold standard (μCT) was high, with errors less than 15% for BV/TV, D(2D), D(3D), and E(app)x, E(app)y and E(app)z. Our experimental results in animals confirm that the parameters of BV/TV, D(2D), D(3D), and E(app)x, E(app)y and E(app)z obtained by MR have excellent reproducibility and accuracy and can be used as imaging biomarkers for the quality of trabecular bone. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroaesthetic Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Neuroaesthetic Resonance emerged from a mature body of patient- centered gesture-control research investigating non-formal rehabilitation via ICT-enhanced-Art to question ‘Aesthetic Resonance’. Motivating participation, ludic engagement, and augmenting physical motion in non-formal (fun) treatment...... sessions are achieved via adaptive action-analyzed activities. These interactive virtual environments are designed to empower patients’ creative and/or playful expressions via digital feedback stimuli. Unconscious self- pushing of limits result from innate distractive mechanisms offered by the alternative...... the unencumbered motion-to-computer-generated activities - ‘Music Making’, ‘Painting’, ‘Robotic’ and ‘Video Game’ control. A focus of this position paper is to highlight how Aesthetic Resonance, in this context, relates to the growing body of research on Neuroaesthetics to evolve Neuroaesthetic Resonance....

  2. Contract Source Selection: An Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    using- spss - statistics.php Lamoureux, J., Murrow, M., & Walls, C. (2015). Relationship of source selection methods to contract outcomes: an analysis ...Contract Source Selection: an Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies 15 June 2016 LCDR Jamal M. Osman, USN...ACQUISITION RESEARCH PROGRAM SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Contract Source Selection: an Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff

  3. Study of the Relation between the Resonance Behavior of Thickness Shear Mode (TSM Sensors and the Mechanical Characteristics of Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Castro

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work analyzes some key aspects of the behavior of sensors based on piezoelectric Thickness Shear Mode (TSM resonators to study and monitor microbial biofilms. The operation of these sensors is based on the analysis of their resonance properties (both resonance frequency and dissipation factor that vary in contact with the analyzed sample. This work shows that different variations during the microorganism growth can be detected by the sensors and highlights which of these changes are indicative of biofilm formation. TSM sensors have been used to monitor in real time the development of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli biofilms, formed on the gold electrode of the quartz crystal resonators, without any coating. Strains with different ability to produce biofilm have been tested. It was shown that, once a first homogeneous adhesion of bacteria was produced on the substrate, the biofilm can be considered as a semi-infinite layer and the quartz sensor reflects only the viscoelastic properties of the region immediately adjacent to the resonator, not being sensitive to upper layers of the biofilm. The experiments allow the microrheological evaluation of the complex shear modulus (G* = G′ + jG″ of the biofilm at 5 MHz and at 15 MHz, showing that the characteristic parameter that indicates the adhesion of a biofilm for the case of S. epidermidis and E. coli, is an increase in the resonance frequency shift of the quartz crystal sensor, which is connected with an increase of the real shear modulus, related to the elasticity or stiffness of the layer. In addition both the real and the imaginary shear modulus are frequency dependent at these high frequencies in biofilms.

  4. Advances in magnetic resonance 10

    CERN Document Server

    Waugh, John S

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Magnetic Resonance, Volume 10, presents a variety of contributions to the theory and practice of magnetic resonance. The book contains three chapters that examine superoperators in magnetic resonance; ultrasonically modulated paramagnetic resonance; and the utility of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and electron-nuclear double-resonance (ENDOR) techniques for studying low-frequency modes of atomic fluctuations and their significance for understanding the mechanism of structural phase transitions in solids.

  5. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. These resonances occur when the betatron oscillation wave numbers ν/sub x/ or ν/sub y/ and the synchrotron wave number ν/sub s/ satisfy the relation (ν/sub x,y/ - mν/sub s/) = 5, with m an integer denoting the m/sup th/ satellite. The main difference between SPEAR II and SPEAR I is the value of ν/sub s/, which in SPEAR II is approximately 0.04, an order of magnitude larger than in SPEAR I. An ad hoc meeting was held at the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference, where details of the SPEAR II results were presented and various possible mechanisms for producing these resonances were discussed. Later, experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  6. Fully quantum-mechanical dynamic analysis of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide coupled to a traveling-wave resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hach, Edwin E. III; Elshaari, Ali W.; Preble, Stefan F.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the dynamics of single-photon transport in a single-mode waveguide coupled to a micro-optical resonator by using a fully quantum-mechanical model. We examine the propagation of a single-photon Gaussian packet through the system under various coupling conditions. We review the theory of single-photon transport phenomena as applied to the system and we develop a discussion on the numerical technique we used to solve for dynamical behavior of the quantized field. To demonstrate our method and to establish robust single-photon results, we study the process of adiabatically lowering or raising the energy of a single photon trapped in an optical resonator under active tuning of the resonator. We show that our fully quantum-mechanical approach reproduces the semiclassical result in the appropriate limit and that the adiabatic invariant has the same form in each case. Finally, we explore the trapping of a single photon in a system of dynamically tuned, coupled optical cavities.

  7. An isotope dependent study of acetone in its lowest excited triplet state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrtz, M.; Brauchle, C.; Voitlaender, J.

    1984-01-01

    The lowest excited triplet state T 1 of acetone-h 6 and acetone-d 6 was investigated with a pulsed dye laser equipped ODMR spectrometer. Acetone is found to be bent in T 1 and the out-of-plane distortion angle is estimated to be approx.= 38 0 . The observed zero-field splitting (ZFS) is surprisingly small. Both the spin-spin and the spin-orbit (SO) contribution to the ZFS are evaluated. The SO tensor contribution is calculated from a correlation between the deuterium effects on the ZFS parameters and the population rates. The sub-level selective kinetics of the acetone T 1 is largely determined by the mixing of the x- and z-level characteristics owing to magnetic axis rotation caused by the excited state out-of-plane distortion. Considerable deuterium effects are observed on the kinetic data and on the microwave transition frequencies. In all cases the spin-specific isotope effects (due to the promoting modes) and the global effects (due to the Franck-Condon factors) are specified. For the population rates and the SO contribution to ZFS, the inverse global isotope effects (deuterium factor > 1) was found for the first time. Based on the isotope dependence of the rates, the mechanisms of (vibrationally induced) SO coupling in acetone are discussed. It is concluded that non-adiabatic contributions have to be taken into account for the smallest population rate only, but that otherwise the adiabatic SO coupling mechanisms by far dominates in the acetone photophysics. (author)

  8. Mechanism of Exciplex Formation Between Cu-Porphyrin and Calf-thymus DNA as Revealed by Saturation Resonance Raman Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shvedko, A.G.; Kruglik, S.; Kruglik, S.G.; Ermolenkov, V.V.; Turpin, P.Y.; Greve, Jan; Otto, Cornelis

    1999-01-01

    The excited-state complex (exciplex) formation that results from the photoinduced interaction of water-soluble cationic copper(II) 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(N-methylpyridyl)]porphyrin [Cu(TMpy-P4)] with calf-thymus DNA has been studied in detail by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy using both ~10 ns

  9. The design and validation of a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible device for obtaining mechanical properties of plantar soft tissue via gated acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Evan D; Stebbins, Michael J; Cavanagh, Peter R; Haynor, David R; Chu, Baocheng; Fassbind, Michael J; Isvilanonda, Vara; Ledoux, William R

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissue in people with diabetes may contribute to the formation of plantar ulcers. Such ulcers have been shown to be in the causal pathway for lower extremity amputation. The hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer (HyPSTER) was designed to measure in vivo, rate-dependent plantar soft tissue compressive force and three-dimensional deformations to help understand, predict, and prevent ulcer formation. These patient-specific values can then be used in an inverse finite element analysis to determine tissue moduli, and subsequently used in a foot model to show regions of high stress under a wide variety of loading conditions. The HyPSTER uses an actuator to drive a magnetic resonance imaging-compatible hydraulic loading platform. Pressure and actuator position were synchronized with gated magnetic resonance imaging acquisition. Achievable loading rates were slower than those found in normal walking because of a water-hammer effect (pressure wave ringing) in the hydraulic system when the actuator direction was changed rapidly. The subsequent verification tests were, therefore, performed at 0.2 Hz. The unloaded displacement accuracy of the system was within 0.31%. Compliance, presumably in the system's plastic components, caused a displacement loss of 5.7 mm during a 20-mm actuator test at 1354 N. This was accounted for with a target to actual calibration curve. The positional accuracy of the HyPSTER during loaded displacement verification tests from 3 to 9 mm against a silicone backstop was 95.9% with a precision of 98.7%. The HyPSTER generated minimal artifact in the magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Careful analysis of the synchronization of the HyPSTER and the magnetic resonance imaging scanner was performed. With some limitations, the HyPSTER provided key functionality in measuring dynamic, patient-specific plantar soft tissue mechanical properties. © IMechE 2015.

  10. Conjunction of standing wave and resonance in asymmetric nanowires: a mechanism for thermal rectification and remote energy accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yue-Yang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2015-12-02

    As an important way to control and manage heat transport, thermal rectification has become an elementary issue in the field of phononics and plays a key role in the designing of thermal devices. Here we investigate systematically the standing wave and the accompanying resonance process in asymmetric nanowires to understand the standing wave itself and its great effect on thermal rectification. Results show that the standing wave is sensitive to both the structural and thermal properties of the material, and its great effect on enhancing the thermal rectification is realized not only by the energy-localization nature of the standing wave, but also by the resonance-caused large amplitude and high energy of the standing wave.

  11. Pricing strategies for combination pediatric vaccines based on the lowest overall cost formulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Banafsheh; Jacobson, Sheldon H; Sewell, Edward C

    2012-10-01

    This paper analyzes pricing strategies for US pediatric combination vaccines by comparing the lowest overall cost formularies (i.e., formularies that have the lowest overall cost). Three pharmaceutical companies compete pairwise over the sale of monovalent and combination vaccines. Particular emphasis is placed on examining the price of Sanofi Pasteur's DTaP-IPV/HIb under different conditions. The main contribution of the paper is to provide the lowest overall cost formularies for different prices of DTaP-IPV/HIb and other Sanofi Pasteur vaccines. The resulting analysis shows that DTaP-IPV/HIb could have been more competitively priced compared with the combination vaccine DTaP-HepB-IPV, for federal contract prices in 2009, 2010 and 2011. This study also proposes the lowest overall cost formularies when shortages of monovalent vaccines occur.

  12. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Loporto

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1 via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the

  13. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner, Joël; Besson, Marie-Hélène; Hampshire, Rachel; Tapert, Lisa; Chirenje, Mike; Saba, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP). Methods The GAP provides free HPV vaccin...

  14. Magnetic resonance elastography of the lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver: correlation of shear stiffness with trans-respiratory system pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with (1) H based magnetic resonance elastography is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (P(ao) ) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different P(ao) values. Mean (±STD error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13), and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for P(ao) values of 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O, respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing P(ao) , in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with (1) H magnetic resonance elastography using a noninvasive mechanical driver and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in P(ao) . Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Multilevel parametrization of fissile nuclei resonance cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, A.A.; Kolesov, V.V.; Janeva, N.

    1987-01-01

    Because the resonance interference has an important influence on the resonance structure of neutron cross sections energy dependence at lowest energies, multilevel scheme of the cross section parametrization which take into account the resonance interference is used for the description with the same provisions in the regions of the interferential maximum and minimum of the resonance cross sections of the fissile nuclei

  16. Fundamentals of nanomechanical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmid, Silvan; Roukes, Michael Lee

    2016-01-01

    This authoritative book introduces and summarizes the latest models and skills required to design and optimize nanomechanical resonators, taking a top-down approach that uses macroscopic formulas to model the devices. The authors cover the electrical and mechanical aspects of nano electromechanical system (NEMS) devices. The introduced mechanical models are also key to the understanding and optimization of nanomechanical resonators used e.g. in optomechanics. Five comprehensive chapters address: The eigenmodes derived for the most common continuum mechanical structures used as nanomechanical resonators; The main sources of energy loss in nanomechanical resonators; The responsiveness of micro and nanomechanical resonators to mass, forces, and temperature; The most common underlying physical transduction mechanisms; The measurement basics, including amplitude and frequency noise. The applied approach found in this book is appropriate for engineering students and researchers working with micro and nanomechanical...

  17. Quantitative description of the 3D regional mechanics of the left atrium using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuklik, P; Molaee, P; Ganesan, A N; Brooks, A G; Worthley, S G; Sanders, P; Podziemski, P

    2014-01-01

    The left atrium (LA) plays an important role in the maintenance of hemodynamic and electrical stability of the heart. One of the conditions altering the atrial mechanical function is atrial fibrillation (AF), leading to an increased thromboembolic risk due to impaired mechanical function. Preserving the regions of the LA that contribute the greatest to atrial mechanical function during curative strategies for AF is important. The purpose of this study is to introduce a novel method of regional assessment of mechanical function of the LA. We used cardiac MRI to reconstruct the 3D geometry of the LA in nine control and nine patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF). Regional mechanical function of the LA in pre-defined segments of the atrium was calculated using regional ejection fraction and wall velocity. We found significantly greater mechanical function in anterior, septal and lateral segments as opposed to roof and posterior segments, as well as a significant decrease of mechanical function in the PAF group. We suggest that in order to minimize the impact of the AF treatment on global atrial mechanical function, damage related to therapeutic intervention, such as catheter ablation, in those areas should be minimized. (paper)

  18. Concept for lowest emissions of a hydrogen internal combustion engine; Niedrigstemissionskonzept fuer einen wasserstoffbetriebenen Verbrennungsmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Marcel Christian Thomas

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a concept with lowest emissions for a hydrogen internal combustion engine for passenger cars. With optimisation of the combustion concept the level of nitrogen oxide is below 90%, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide below 99% of the SULEV target (CARB). This concept enables a potential in power density that is comparable to current supercharged combustion engines at lowest emission level without catalytic aftertreatment. Additionally with a catalytic aftertreatment system, the emission level of a current hydrogen combustion engine (mono-fuel) is lowered to a level, that this car can be labeled as air cleaning vehicle for hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  19. Mechanical alterations of rabbit Achilles' tendon after immobilization correlate with bone mineral density but not with magnetic resonance or ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Guy; Koike, Yoichi; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Doherty, Geoff; Dinh, Laurent; Lecompte, Martin; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2007-12-01

    To assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US) imaging, or bone mineral density (BMD) in predicting the mechanical properties of immobilized rabbit Achilles' tendons. Experimental study. Basic university laboratory. Twenty-eight rabbits. Twelve rabbits had 1 hindlimb casted for 4 weeks and 10 rabbits were casted for 8 weeks. Contralateral legs and 12 normal hindlimbs served as controls. Achilles' tendon dimensions on MRI and US, T1- and T2-signal intensities on MRI, classification of abnormalities on MRI and US; BMD of the calcaneus with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Biomechanic measures consisted of peak load, stiffness, and stress. Imaging variables were correlated with biomechanic alterations. Immobilized Achilles' tendons were weaker and showed decreased mechanical stress compared with their contralateral legs and controls (all PAchilles' tendons after immobilization. However, neither increased MRI nor US signal abnormality was found. BMD was lower in immobilized calcanei and larger in contralateral legs than controls. Only BMD correlated with both the decreased peak load (R2=.42, PAchilles' tendon. This study established weakened mechanical properties of immobilized Achilles' tendons. BMD of the calcaneus, but not MRI and US, was predictive of the mechanical alterations in immobilized Achilles' tendons. BMD may be a useful biomarker to monitor disease and recovery in Achilles' tendons.

  20. Lowest instrumented vertebra selection in Lenke 3C and 6C scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Bünger, Cody; Zhang, Yanqun

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not post-op curve behaviour differs due to different choices of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) with reference to lumbar apical vertebra (LAV) in Lenke 3C and 6C scoliosis. METHODS: We reviewed all the AIS cases surgically treated...... it can yield similar correction while preserving more lumbar mobility and growth potential....

  1. Excitation energy of the lowest 2+ and 3- levels in 32Mg and 146Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    1978-06-01

    The excitation energy of the lowest 2 + and 3 - levels are calculated for neutron rich Mg-isotopes as well as for N=82 isotones. The calculations are made by assuming quadrupole-quadrupole and octupole-octupole forces. The quasi-particles energies and occupation numbers are taken from the energy density method

  2. The DTU15 MSS (Mean Sea Surface) and DTU15LAT (Lowest Astronomical Tide) reference surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Piccioni, Gaia

    in the Arctic Ocean for DTU10MSS and DTU13MSS.A new reference surface for off-shore vertical referencing is introduced. This is called the DTU15LAT.The surface is derived from the DTU15MSS and the DTU10 Global ocean tide to give a 19 year Lowest Astronomical Tide referenced to either the Mean sea surface...

  3. How Effective Are Community College Remedial Math Courses for Students with the Lowest Math Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Dadgar, Mina

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the effectiveness of remediation for community college students who are identified as having the lowest skills in math. Method: We use transcript data from a state community college system and take advantage of a regression discontinuity design that compares statistically identical students who are assigned to the…

  4. Degeneracy of the lowest Landau level and suq(2) on the Poincare half plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, A.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of the quantum group symmetry su q (2) in the quantum Hall effect on the Poincare upper half plane the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level. It is also shown that the relation between the degeneracy and the cyclic representation of su q (2) appears in accordance with q being a kth root of unity. (Authors)

  5. Fine structure of the lowest Landau level in suspended trilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elferen, H. J.; Veligura, A.; Tombros, N.; Kurganova, E. V.; van Wees, B. J.; Maan, J. C.; Zeitler, U.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotransport experiments on ABC-stacked suspended trilayer graphene reveal a complete splitting of the 12-fold degenerated lowest Landau level, and, in particular, the opening of an exchange-driven gap at the charge neutrality point. A quantitative analysis of distinctness of the quantum Hall

  6. Award of Construction Contracts: Public Institutions' Authority to Select the Lowest Responsible Bidder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elsa Kircher; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the responsibilities of public colleges and universities to award construction contracts to the lowest responsible bidder; discusses the purpose of bid statutes; and lists the factors institutions should consider in determining a bidder's responsibility. Also covered are the standard of review and due process rights of the…

  7. Structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band of /sup 16/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikebata, Yasuhiko; Suekane, Shota

    1983-10-01

    The structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band is investigated by using the extended Nilsson model wave functions with angular momentum projection and the B1 interaction, two-body LS-force of the Skyrme type and the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained show good agreement with energy interval in this band.

  8. Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nijmeijer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems discusses the phenomenon of parametric resonance and its occurrence in mechanical systems,vehicles, motorcycles, aircraft and marine craft, and micro-electro-mechanical systems. The contributors provide an introduction to the root causes of this phenomenon and its mathematical equivalent, the Mathieu-Hill equation. Also included is a discussion of how parametric resonance occurs on ships and offshore systems and its frequency in mechanical and electrical systems. This book also: Presents the theory and principles behind parametric resonance Provides a unique collection of the different fields where parametric resonance appears including ships and offshore structures, automotive vehicles and mechanical systems Discusses ways to combat, cope with and prevent parametric resonance including passive design measures and active control methods Parametric Resonance in Dynamical Systems is ideal for researchers and mechanical engineers working in application fields such as MEM...

  9. Energy Distributions from Three-Body Decaying Many-Body Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, R.; Jensen, A. S.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Garrido, E.

    2007-01-01

    We compute energy distributions of three particles emerging from decaying many-body resonances. We reproduce the measured energy distributions from decays of two archetypal states chosen as the lowest 0 + and 1 + resonances in 12 C populated in β decays. These states are dominated by sequential, through the 8 Be ground state, and direct decays, respectively. These decay mechanisms are reflected in the ''dynamic'' evolution from small, cluster or shell-model states, to large distances, where the coordinate or momentum space continuum wave functions are accurately computed

  10. Remote viewing with the artist Ingo Swann: neuropsychological profile, electroencephalographic correlates, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persinger, M A; Roll, W G; Tiller, S G; Koren, S A; Cook, C M

    2002-06-01

    In the present study, the artist Ingo Swann, who helped develop the process of remote viewing (awareness of distant objects or places without employing normal senses), was exposed during a single setting of 30 min. to specific patterns of circumcerebral magnetic fields that significantly altered his subjective experiences. Several times during subsequent days, he was asked to sit in a quiet chamber and to sketch and to describe verbally distant stimuli (pictures or places) beyond his normal senses. The proportions of unusual 7-Hz spike and slow wave activity over the occipital lobes per trial were moderately correlated (rho=.50) with the ratings of accuracy between these distal, hidden stimuli and his responses. A neuropsychological assessment and Magnetic Resonance Imaging indicated a different structural and functional organization within the parieto-occipital region of the subject's right hemisphere from organizations typically noted. The results suggest that this type of paranormal phenomenon, often dismissed as methodological artifact or accepted as proofs of spiritual existence, is correlated with neurophysiological processes and physical events. Remote viewing may be enhanced by complex experimentally generated magnetic fields designed to interact with the neuromagnetic "binding factor" of consciousness.

  11. Pathways of low carbon transition at the lowest cost. Pathways of low carbon transition in France at the lowest cost - Dynamics and average abatement costs (MACC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste; Foussard, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The objective to divide greenhouse gas emissions in France by a factor four by 2050 implies the mobilisation at the lowest cost of the whole set of known sources of reduction of emissions in all economic sectors. In this context, this report is based on a methodology (D-CAM in French for dynamics - average abatement costs, MACC in English for Medium Abatement Cost Curves) which relies on a theoretical business-as-usual scenario, on a database on the potential, rate of development, and cost of mobilizable sources, and on a dynamic model of cost minimisation. The MACC tool is used to explore, for each sector, scenarios of de-carbonation which allow objectives of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to be reached at different time horizons. An aggregated approach of this tool modifies the distribution of efforts of emission reduction between sectors with respect to a sector-based approach. Thus, a macro-assessment of low carbon transition does not reveal any obvious over-cost with respect to the business-as-usual scenario. A second document is a Power Point presentation which contains the same information, curves and graphs

  12. Mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in proteins from nuclear magnetic resonance studies of individual tryptophan indole NH hydrogens in lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedin, R.E.; Delepierre, M.; Dobson, C.M.; Poulsen, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The individual rates of solvent exchange of the six tryptophan indole NH hydrogens of lysozyme in 2 H 2 O have been measured over a wide range of temperatures by using 1 H NMR. Two distinct mechanisms for exchange have been identified, one characterized by a high activation energy and the other by a much lower activation energy. The high-energy process has been shown to be associated directly with the cooperative thermal unfolding of the protein and is the dominant mechanism for exchange of the most slowly exchanging hydrogen even 15 0 C below the denaturation temperature. Rate constants and activation energies for the folding and unfolding reactions were obtained from the experimental exchange rates. At low temperatures, a lower activation energy mechanism is dominant for all hydrogens, and this can be associated with local fluctuations in the protein structure which allow access of solvent. The relative exchange rates and activation energies can only qualitatively be related to the different environments of the residues in the crystal structure. There is provisional evidence that a mechanism intermediate between these two extremes may be significant for some hydrogens under restricted conditions

  13. Excitation of giant resonances in heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, W.

    1991-01-01

    Introduction: What are Giant Resonances? General Features of Giant Resonances, Macroscopic Description and Classification, Basic Excitation Mechanisms, Decay Modes, Giant Resonances Built on Excited States, Relativistic Coulomb Excitation of Giant Resonances, Experimental Situation. (orig.)

  14. Backward resonance production of pi minus plus proton goes to neutron pi plus pi minus at 8 GeV/c. [Production mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the interaction ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. n..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is reported where the neutron was produced fast and forward in the laboratory. The data were obtained using an 8 GeV/c ..pi../sup -/ beam that was focused on a liquid hydrogen target located inside the University of Illinois--Argonne National laboratory streamer chamber. The chamber was triggered on the interaction of a fast, forward neutral hadron in thick plate optical spark chambers. A total of 866 events had an acceptable 3-constraint fit to ..pi../sup -/p ..-->.. n..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ and satisfied other selection criteria. The data were characterized by backward production of the final states n rho/sup 0/, nf/sup 0/, and ..delta../sup -/(1232)..pi../sup +/. Differential cross sections and decay angular distributions for these resonant states are presented and the implications for the production mechanisms discussed. 20 references.

  15. Radiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging at 0.5 Tesla of mechanically induced osteoarthritis in rabbit knees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torelli, S.R.; Rahal, R.S.; Volpi, R.S.; Yamashita, S.; Mamprim, M.J.; Crocci, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the present experimental study we assessed induced osteoarthritis data in rabbits, compared three diagnostic methods, i.e., radiography (XR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and correlated the imaging findings with those obtained by macroscopic evaluation. Ten young female rabbits of the Norfolk breed were used. Seven rabbits had the right knee immobilized in extension for a period of 12 weeks (immobilized group), and three others did not have a limb immobilized and were maintained under the same conditions (control group). Alterations observed by XR, CT and MRI after the period of immobilization were osteophytes, osteochondral lesions, increase and decrease of joint space, all of them present both in the immobilized and non-immobilized contralateral limbs. However, a significantly higher score was obtained for the immobilized limbs (XT: P = 0.016, CT: P 0.031, MRI: P = 0.0156). All imaging methods were able to detect osteoarthritis changes after the 12 weeks of immobilization. Macroscopic evaluation identified increased thickening of joint capsule, proliferative and connective tissue in the femoropatellar joint, and irregularities of articular cartilage, especially in immobilized knees. The differences among XR, CT and MRI were not statistically significant for the immobilized knees. However, MRI using a 0.5 Tesla scanner was statistically different from CT and XR for the non-immobilized contralateral knees. We conclude that the three methods detected osteoarthritis lesions in rabbit knees, but MRI was less sensitive than XR and CT in detecting lesions compatible with initial osteoarthritis. Since none of the techniques revealed all the lesions, it is important to use all methods to establish an accurate diagnosis. (author)

  16. Neural Mechanism of Cognitive Control Impairment in Patients with Hepatic Cirrhosis: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Many studies have claimed the existence of attention alterations in cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE). No functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in this respect has been published. Purpose: To investigate the neural basis of cognitive control deficiency in cirrhotic patients using fMRI. Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis and 14 healthy volunteers were included in the study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus, and block-design fMRI was used to acquire resource data, including four stimulus blocks and five control blocks, each presented alternatively. Image analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping 99. After fMRI examinations were complete, behavior tests of Stroop interference were performed for all subjects. Overall reaction time and error numbers were recorded. Results: Both healthy volunteers and patients with hepatic cirrhosis had Stroop interference effects. Patients with hepatic cirrhosis had more errors and longer reaction time in performing an incongruous color-naming task than healthy volunteers (P<0.001); there was no significant difference in performing an incongruous word-reading task (P 0.066). Compared with controls, patients with hepatic cirrhosis had greater activation of the bilateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex when performing the incongruous word-reading task. With increased conflict, activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), parietal lobe, and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) was decreased when patients with hepatic cirrhosis performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with hepatic cirrhostic have cognitive control deficiency. The abnormal brain network of the ACC-PFC-parietal lobe-TFG is the neural basis of cognitive control impairment in cirrhotic patients

  17. Neural Mechanism of Cognitive Control Impairment in Patients with Hepatic Cirrhosis: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jiang Zhang; Guifen Yang; Jianzhong Yin; Yawu Liu; Ji Qi [Dept. of Radiology, Tianjin First Central Hospital of Tianjin Medical Univ, Tianjin (China)

    2007-07-15

    Background: Many studies have claimed the existence of attention alterations in cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE). No functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in this respect has been published. Purpose: To investigate the neural basis of cognitive control deficiency in cirrhotic patients using fMRI. Material and Methods: 14 patients with hepatic cirrhosis and 14 healthy volunteers were included in the study. A modified Stroop task with Chinese characters was used as the target stimulus, and block-design fMRI was used to acquire resource data, including four stimulus blocks and five control blocks, each presented alternatively. Image analysis was performed using statistical parametric mapping 99. After fMRI examinations were complete, behavior tests of Stroop interference were performed for all subjects. Overall reaction time and error numbers were recorded. Results: Both healthy volunteers and patients with hepatic cirrhosis had Stroop interference effects. Patients with hepatic cirrhosis had more errors and longer reaction time in performing an incongruous color-naming task than healthy volunteers (P<0.001); there was no significant difference in performing an incongruous word-reading task (P 0.066). Compared with controls, patients with hepatic cirrhosis had greater activation of the bilateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex when performing the incongruous word-reading task. With increased conflict, activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), parietal lobe, and temporal fusiform gyrus (TFG) was decreased when patients with hepatic cirrhosis performed the incongruous color-naming task. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that patients with hepatic cirrhostic have cognitive control deficiency. The abnormal brain network of the ACC-PFC-parietal lobe-TFG is the neural basis of cognitive control impairment in cirrhotic patients.

  18. Electro-mechanical energy conversion system having a permanent magnet machine with stator, resonant transfer link and energy converter controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeist, S. Merrill; Baker, Richard H.

    2006-01-10

    An electro-mechanical energy conversion system coupled between an energy source and an energy load comprising an energy converter device including a permanent magnet induction machine coupled between the energy source and the energy load to convert the energy from the energy source and to transfer the converted energy to the energy load and an energy transfer multiplexer to control the flow of power or energy through the permanent magnetic induction machine.

  19. A q-Schroedinger algebra, its lowest weight representations and generalized q-deformed heat equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, V.K.; Doebner, H.D.; Mrugalla, C.

    1995-12-01

    We give a q-deformation S-perpendicular q of the centrally extended Schroedinger algebra. We construct the lowest weight representations of S-perpendicular q , starting from the Verma modules over S-perpendicular q , finding their singular vectors and factoring the Verma submodules built on the singular vectors. We also give a vector-field realization of S-perpendicular q which provides polynomial realization of the lowest weight representations and an infinite hierarchy of q-difference equations which may be called generalized q-deformed heat equations. We also apply our methods to the on-shell q-Schroedinger algebra proposed by Floreanini and Vinet. (author). 12 refs

  20. Lowest-order constrained variational method for simple many-fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, I.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Wong, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The authors study the potential energy of many-fermion systems calculated by the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method of Pandharipande. Two simple two-body interactions are used. For a simple hard-core potential in a dilute Fermi gas, they find that the Huang-Yang exclusion correction can be used to determine a healing distance. The result is close to the older Pandharipande prescription for the healing distance. For a hard core plus attractive exponential potential, the LOCV result agrees closely with the lowest-order separation method of Moszkowski and Scott. They find that the LOCV result has a shallow minimum as a function of the healing distance at the Moszkowski-Scott separation distance. The significance of the absence of a Brueckner dispersion correction in the LOCV result is discussed. (Auth.)

  1. Three-point Green's function of massless QED in position space to lowest order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Indrajit

    2009-01-01

    The transverse part of the three-point Green's function of massless QED is determined to the lowest order in position space. Taken together with the evaluation of the longitudinal part in Mitra (2008) (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41 315401), this gives a relation for QED which is analogous to the star-triangle relation. We relate our result to conformal-invariant three-point functions

  2. N-representability of the Jastrow wave function pair density of the lowest-order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Masahiko

    2017-08-08

    Conditions for the N-representability of the pair density (PD) are needed for the development of the PD functional theory. We derive sufficient conditions for the N-representability of the PD that is calculated from the Jastrow wave function within the lowest order. These conditions are used as the constraints on the correlation function of the Jastrow wave function. A concrete procedure to search the suitable correlation function is also presented.

  3. Interface losses in multimaterial resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, L.G.; Amato, B.; Larsen, Tom

    2014-01-01

    We present an extensive study shedding light on the role of surface and bulk losses in micromechanical resonators. We fabricate thin silicon nitride membranes of different sizes and we coat them with different thicknesses of metal. We later characterize the 81 lowest out-of-plane flexural vibrati...

  4. Chern-Simons field theory of two-dimensional electrons in the lowest Landau level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a fermion Chern-Simons field theory describing two-dimensional electrons in the lowest Landau level. This theory is constructed with a complete set of states, and the lowest-Landau-level constraint is enforced through a δ functional described by an auxiliary field λ. Unlike the field theory constructed directly with the states in the lowest Landau level, this theory allows one, utilizing the physical picture of open-quote open-quote composite fermion,close-quote close-quote to study the fractional quantum Hall states by mapping them onto certain integer quantum Hall states; but, unlike its application in the unconstrained theory, such a mapping is sensible only when interactions between electrons are present. An open-quote open-quote effective mass,close-quote close-quote which characterizes the scale of low energy excitations in the fractional quantum Hall systems, emerges naturally from our theory. We study a Gaussian effective theory and interpret physically the dressed stationary point equation for λ as an equation for the open-quote open-quote mass renormalization close-quote close-quote of composite fermions. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. People In Sub-Saharan Africa Rate Their Health And Health Care Among Lowest In World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Angus S.; Tortora, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The health of people in sub-Saharan Africa is a major global concern. However, data are weak, and little is known about how people in the region perceive their health or their health care. We used data from the Gallup World Poll in 2012 to document sub-Saharan Africans’ perceived health status, their satisfaction with health care, their contact with medical professionals, and the priority they attach to health care. In comparison to other regions of the world, sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest ratings for well-being and the lowest satisfaction with health care. It also has the second lowest perception of personal health, after only the former Soviet Union and its satellites. HIV prevalence is positively correlated with perceived improvements in health care in countries with high prevalence. This is consistent with an improvement in at least some health care services as a result of the largely aid-funded rollout of antiretroviral treatment. Even so, sub-Saharan Africans do not prioritize health care as a matter of policy, although donors are increasingly shifting their aid efforts in sub-Saharan Africa toward health. PMID:25715657

  6. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-12-01

    A survey of past case reports concerning radiation-induced breast cancer was carried out in order to find the lowest irradiation dose. The search of literature published since 1951 revealed 10 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer. Only 5 cases had precise descriptions of the irradiation dose. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1470 rads in the case of external X-ray irradiation for tuberous angioma. All of cases of radiation-induced breast cancer had received radiation for the treatment of nonmalignant tumors, such as pulmonary tuberculosis, mastitis, and tuberous angioma. There also were three statistical studies. The first concerned atomic bomb survivors, the second, pulmoanry tuberculous patients subjected to frequent fluoroscopies, and the third, patients of acute post partum mastitis. These statistical studies had revealed a significant increase in the incidence of breast cancer in the irradiated group, but there was little information about the lowest irradiation dose. It was noticed that radiation-induced breast cancer was more numerous in the upper inner quadrant of the breast. Most histopathological findings of radiation-induced breast cancer involved duct cell carcinoma. The latent period was about 15 years.

  7. Lowest-lying even-parity anti B{sub s} mesons: heavy-quark spin-flavor symmetry, chiral dynamics, and constituent quark-model bare masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaladejo, M.; Fernandez-Soler, P.; Nieves, J.; Ortega, P.G. [Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC), Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Aptd. 22085, Valencia (Spain)

    2017-03-15

    The discovery of the D{sup *}{sub s0}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) resonances in the charmed-strange meson spectra revealed that formerly successful constituent quark models lose predictability in the vicinity of two-meson thresholds. The emergence of non-negligible effects due to meson loops requires an explicit evaluation of the interplay between Q anti q and (Q anti q)(q anti q) Fock components. In contrast to the c anti s sector, there is no experimental evidence of J{sup P} = 0{sup +}, 1{sup +} bottom-strange states yet. Motivated by recent lattice studies, in this work the heavy-quark partners of the D{sub s0}{sup *}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460) states are analyzed within a heavy meson chiral unitary scheme. As a novelty, the coupling between the constituent quark-model P-wave anti B{sub s} scalar and axial mesons and the anti B{sup (*)}K channels is incorporated employing an effective interaction, consistent with heavy-quark spin symmetry, constrained by the lattice energy levels. (orig.)

  8. The lowest excited singlet state of isolated 1-phenyl-butadiene and 1-phenyl-hexatriene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohler, B.E.; Shaler, T.A.; Buma, W.J.; Song, K.; Nuss, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    We report vibrationally resolved S0S1 excitation spectra and vibronic level decay times for the phenyl-substituted polyenes 1-phenylbutadiene and 1-phenylhexatriene seeded in supersonic He expansions. This information was obtained using one- and two-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization

  9. Potential energies for the two lowest 1A' electronic states of H3+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichihara, Akira; Yokoyama, Keiichi; Iwamoto, Osamu

    1998-11-01

    Potential energies for the two lowest 1 A' states of H 3 + at 701 different spatial geometries are tabulated. These energies have been calculated by the ab initio full configuration interaction method with a (8s6p2d1f) Gaussian type basis set. Features of avoided crossing of two surfaces as well as the potential well in the ground state can be produced by interpolating calculated energies. These ab initio energies are expressed as a function of three internuclear distances in the range from 0.6 to 10.0 bohr, and they are applicable to the molecular dynamics study for the H + + H 2 system. (author)

  10. A Theoretical Study of the Photodissociation Mechanism of Cyanoacetylene in Its Lowest Singlet and Triplet Excited States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cheng; Du, Wei-Na; Duan, Xue-Mei; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2008-11-01

    Cyanoacetylene (H5-C4 ≡ C3-C2 ≡ N1) is a minor constituent of the atmosphere of Titan, and its photochemistry plays an important role in the formation of the haze surrounding the satellite. In this paper, the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and multiconfigurational second-order perturbation (CASPT2) approaches are employed to investigate the photochemical processes for cyanoacetylene in its first singlet and triplet excited states with the cc-pVTZ basis set. Fissions of the C4-H5 and C2-C3 bonds in S1 yield H(2S) + CCCN(A2Π) and HCC(A2Π) + CN(X2Σ+), respectively. In T1, the corresponding dissociation products are H(2S) + CCCN(X2Σ+) and HCC(X2Σ) + CN(X2Σ+). At the CASPT2(14,13)//CASSCF(14,13) + ZPE level, the barriers for the adiabatic dissociation of the C4-H5 and C2-C3 bonds are 6.11 and 6.94 eV in S1 and 5.71 and 6.39 eV in T1, respectively, taking the energy of S0 minimum as reference. Based on the calculated potential energy surfaces, the existence of a metastable excited molecule is anticipated upon 260-230 nm photoexcitation, which provides a probable approach for cyanoacetylene to polymerize. The internal conversion (IC) process through vibronic interaction followed by C4-H5 fission in the ground state is found to account for the observed diffuse character in the UV absorption spectrum below 240 nm.

  11. Mechanical characterization of articular cartilage by combining magnetic resonance imaging and finite-element analysis-a potential functional imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julkunen, P; Korhonen, R K; Nissi, M J; Jurvelin, J S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method for non-invasive characterization of cartilage composition and structure. We aimed to see whether T 1 and T 2 relaxation times are related to proteoglycan (PG) and collagen-specific mechanical properties of articular cartilage. Specifically, we analyzed whether variations in the depthwise collagen orientation, as assessed by the laminae obtained from T 2 profiles, affect the mechanical characteristics of cartilage. After MRI and unconfined compression tests of human and bovine patellar cartilage samples, fibril-reinforced poroviscoelastic finite-element models (FEM), with depthwise collagen orientations implemented from quantitative T 2 maps (3 laminae for human, 3-7 laminae for bovine), were constructed to analyze the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (PG specific), fibril modulus (collagen specific) and permeability of the samples. In bovine cartilage, the non-fibrillar matrix modulus (R = -0.64, p 1 . In bovine cartilage, T 2 correlated positively with the initial fibril modulus (R = 0.62, p = 0.05). In human cartilage, the initial fibril modulus correlated negatively (R = -0.61, p 2 . Based on the simulations, cartilage with a complex collagen architecture (5 or 7 laminae), leading to high bulk T 2 due to magic angle effects, provided higher compressive stiffness than tissue with a simple collagen architecture (3 laminae). Our results suggest that T 1 reflects PG-specific mechanical properties of cartilage. High T 2 is characteristic to soft cartilage with a classical collagen architecture. Contradictorily, high bulk T 2 can also be found in stiff cartilage with a multilaminar collagen fibril network. By emerging MRI and FEM, the present study establishes a step toward functional imaging of articular cartilage

  12. Pinning of fullerene lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge at the interface with standing up copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chenggong; Irfan, Irfan; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure evolution of interfaces of fullerene (C 60 ) with copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and on native silicon oxide has been investigated with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C 60 was found to be pinned at the interface with CuPc on SiO 2 . A substantial difference in the electron affinity of CuPc on the two substrates was observed as the orientation of CuPc is lying flat on HOPG and standing up on SiO 2 . The ionization potential and electron affinity of C 60 were not affected by the orientation of CuPc due to the spherical symmetry of C 60 molecules. We observed band bending in C 60 on the standing-up orientation of CuPc molecules, while the energy levels of C 60 on the flat lying orientation of CuPc molecules were observed to be flat. - Highlights: ► Orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on ordered graphite and silicon oxide. ► Pinning of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C60 to the Fermi level on CuPc. ► No C60 pinning or band bending was observed on flat laying CuPc. ► Results are useful for organic photovoltaic and organic light emitting diode research.

  13. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1975-01-01

    A survey of past case reports on radiation-induced cancer of the uterus was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of literature published since 1912 revealed 548 cases of radiation-induced cancer of the uterus. All of these cases of radiation-induced cancer had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant disease. The primary gynecological conditions which were the object of radiation therapy were functional bleeding, endometrial hyperplasia, myoma, endometritis, and polyps. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1000-1450 rad in the case of external X-ray irradiation, and 100 mg.hr for intrauterine radium therapy, which corresponds to 100-1000 rad. It was noted that were more cases of corpus cancer than cervical cancer. Histopathological findings of radiation-induced uterine cancer were carcinoma, sarcoma, and mixed mesodermal tumors. The latent period was distributed in the range of 1 to 40 years, with the average of 10.1 years. (auth.)

  14. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1976-01-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups. (auth.)

  15. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1976-05-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups.

  16. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced bone tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T; Morimoto, K [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1977-04-01

    A survey of past case reports of bone tumor induced by external radiation was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1922 revealed 262 cases of radiation-induced bone tumor. These patients, except a patient with occupational exposure, had received radiation for treatment. The primary conditions as object of radiation therapy were nonmalignan bone diseases such as tuberclosis, giant cell tumor, fibrous dysplasia and bone cyst, and extra-skeletal diseases such as retinoblastoma, breast cancer and uterus cancer. The ratio of male to female patients with radiation-induced bone tumor was 1:1.3. The age of the patient ranged between 5 and 98 years, with an average of 37.6 years. Skeletal distribution of radiation-induced bone tumor was as follows: 20% the frontal and face bones, 17% the femur, 10% the humerus, 9% the vertebral column, and 44% other. The lowest absorbed dose reported was 800 rads in patients irradiated for the treatment of bone disease, but 1800 rads in patients with extra-skeletal disease. The latent period ranged between 2 and 42 years, with an average of 11.7 years. The histopathological findings were as follows: 60% osteosarcoma, 25% fibrosarcoma, 7% chondrosarcoma, and 8% other.

  17. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Joël; Besson, Marie-Hélène; Hampshire, Rachel; Tapert, Lisa; Chirenje, Mike; Saba, Joseph

    2012-05-23

    Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP). The GAP provides free HPV vaccine to organizations and institutions in lowest income countries. The HPV vaccination programs were entirely developed, implemented and managed by local institutions. Institutions submitted application forms with institution characteristics, target population, communication delivery strategies. After completion of the vaccination campaign (3 doses), institutions provided a final project report with data on doses administered and vaccination models. Two indicators were calculated, the program vaccination coverage and adherence. Qualitative data were also collected in the following areas: government and community involvement; communication, and sensitization; training and logistics resources, and challenges. A total of eight programs were implemented in seven countries. The eight programs initially targeted a total of 87,580 girls, of which 76,983 received the full 3-dose vaccine course, with mean program vaccination coverage of 87.8%; the mean adherence between the first and third doses of vaccine was 90.9%. Three programs used school-based delivery models, 2 used health facility-based models, and 3 used mixed models that included schools and health facilities. Models that included school-based vaccination were most effective at reaching girls aged 9-13 years. Mixed models comprising school and health facility-based vaccination had better overall performance compared with models using just one of the methods. Increased rates of program coverage and adherence were positively correlated with the number of

  18. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladner Joël

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP. Methods The GAP provides free HPV vaccine to organizations and institutions in lowest income countries. The HPV vaccination programs were entirely developed, implemented and managed by local institutions. Institutions submitted application forms with institution characteristics, target population, communication delivery strategies. After completion of the vaccination campaign (3 doses, institutions provided a final project report with data on doses administered and vaccination models. Two indicators were calculated, the program vaccination coverage and adherence. Qualitative data were also collected in the following areas: government and community involvement; communication, and sensitization; training and logistics resources, and challenges. Results A total of eight programs were implemented in seven countries. The eight programs initially targeted a total of 87,580 girls, of which 76,983 received the full 3-dose vaccine course, with mean program vaccination coverage of 87.8%; the mean adherence between the first and third doses of vaccine was 90.9%. Three programs used school-based delivery models, 2 used health facility-based models, and 3 used mixed models that included schools and health facilities. Models that included school-based vaccination were most effective at reaching girls aged 9-13 years. Mixed models comprising school and health facility-based vaccination had better overall performance compared with models using just one of the methods. Increased rates of program coverage and

  19. Direct observation of the lowest indirect exciton state in the bulk of hexagonal boron nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, R.; Habenicht, C.; Ahmad, M.; Knupfer, M.; Büchner, B.

    2018-01-01

    We combine electron energy-loss spectroscopy and first-principles calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT) to identify the lowest indirect exciton state in the in-plane charge response of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) single crystals. This remarkably sharp mode forms a narrow pocket with a dispersion bandwidth of ˜100 meV and, as we argue based on a comparison to our DFT calculations, is predominantly polarized along the Γ K direction of the hexagonal Brillouin zone. Our data support the recent report by Cassabois et al. [Nat. Photonics 10, 262 (2016), 10.1038/nphoton.2015.277] who indirectly inferred the existence of this mode from the photoluminescence signal, thereby establishing h-BN as an indirect semiconductor.

  20. The advantageous way of getting the lowest uncertainty values of elemental concentration by INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cincu, Em.; Manea, I.; Manu, V.; Barbos, D.

    2007-01-01

    Analysts in a NAA accredited laboratory bear full responsibility for the report on the material they investigated. The document has to contain the most accurate values that can be, as confidence to further use of the material on the market. To this end, analysts are expected to use the standardization method providing the lowest element concentration uncertainty and carefully quantify every factor that may contribute to the validity of the results. The question is which method is the most advantageous one from this perspective and in what conditions. This paper presents a comparison between results of the elemental analysis of a CRM sample by INAA, as obtained through two standardization methods and three calculations variants applied to the same experimental data. The results were discussed in terms of uncertainty and of the E n statistical criterion recommended for inter-comparison exercises. The influence of the nuclear reaction and decay data was studied in several cases. (author)

  1. Change in Body Mass Index Associated With Lowest Mortality in Denmark, 1976-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-05-10

    Research has shown a U-shaped pattern in the association of body mass index (BMI) with mortality. Although average BMI has increased over time in most countries, the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors may also be decreasing among obese individuals over time. Thus, the BMI associated with lowest all-cause mortality may have changed. To determine whether the BMI value that is associated with the lowest all-cause mortality has increased in the general population over a period of 3 decades. Three cohorts from the same general population enrolled at different times: the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976-1978 (n = 13,704) and 1991-1994 (n = 9482) and the Copenhagen General Population Study in 2003-2013 (n = 97,362). All participants were followed up from inclusion in the studies to November 2014, emigration, or death, whichever came first. For observational studies, BMI was modeled using splines and in categories defined by the World Health Organization. Body mass index was calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared. Main outcome was all-cause mortality and secondary outcomes were cause-specific mortality. The number of deaths during follow-up was 10,624 in the 1976-1978 cohort (78% cumulative mortality; mortality rate [MR], 30/1000 person-years [95%CI, 20-46]), 5025 in the 1991-1994 cohort (53%; MR, 16/1000 person-years [95%CI, 9-30]), and 5580 in the 2003-2013 cohort (6%;MR, 4/1000 person-years [95%CI, 1-10]). Except for cancer mortality, the association of BMI with all-cause, cardiovascular, and other mortality was curvilinear (U-shaped). The BMI associated with the lowest all-cause mortality increased by 3.3 from the 1976-1978 cohort compared with the 2003-2013 cohort. [table: see text] The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios for all-cause mortality for BMI of 30 or more vs BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 were 1.31 (95%CI, 1.23-1.39;MR, 46/1000 person-years [95%CI, 32-66] vs 28/1000 person-years [95%CI, 18-45]) in the 1976

  2. Lowest-order average effect of turbulence on atmospheric profiles derived from radio occultation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshleman, V.R.; Haugstad, B.S.

    1977-01-01

    Turbulence in planetary atmospheres and ionospheres causes changes in angles of refraction of radio waves used in occultation experiments. Atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles, and ionospheric electron concentration profiles, derived from radio occultation measurements of Doppler frequency contain errors due to such angular offsets. The lowest-order average errors are derived from a geometrical-optics treatment of the radio-wave phase advance caused by the addition of uniform turbulence to an initially homogeneous medium. It is concluded that the average profile errors are small and that precise Doppler frequency measurements at two or more wavelengths could be used to help determine characteristics of the turbulence, as well as accuracy limits and possible correction terms for the profiles. However, a more detailed study of both frequency and intensity characteristics in radio and optical occultation measurements of turbulent planetary atmospheres and ionospheres is required to realize the full potential of such measurements

  3. Preparations for an optical access to the lowest nuclear excitation in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The isomeric lowest excited nuclear level of {sup 229}Th has been indirectly measured to be 7.6±0.5 eV (163±11 nm). In order to improve the accuracy as prerequisite of an all-optical control, {sup 229m}Th is populated via a 2% decay branch in the α decay of {sup 233}U. The Thorium ions are extracted and cooled with the help of a buffer gas stopping cell and an RFQ-cooler. In order to suppress accompanying α decay chain products other than {sup 229}Th, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is used, performance and extraction efficiency measurements were performed. Following the QMS, the Thorium isomers will be collected on a 50 μm micro electrode. The decay of these isomers can then be detected using deep UV optics, presently in the phase of preparation and adjustment. Newest results are presented.

  4. Rotational structure of the five lowest frequency fundamental vibrational states of dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Drumel, Marie-Aline Martin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Sadovskií, Dmitrií A.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the successful extended analysis of the high-frequency (200-700 GHz) part of the gas phase (sub)mm-wave spectra of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The spectrum was recorded at 100 kHz resolution using a solid state subTHz spectrometer. The five lowest energy fundamental vibrational states of DMSO with frequencies below 400 cm-1 were observed as sidebands along with the main 0←0 band. Neglecting the internal rotation of methyls, our rotational Hamiltonian reproduced the spectrum to the subMHz accuracy. We have found that the asymmetric bending state ν23 is the only low frequency fundamental vibrational state with the "anomalous" rotational structure uncovered in Cuisset et al. [1]. dmsomw 2013-09-04 15:03

  5. THE LOWEST-MASS MEMBER OF THE β PICTORIS MOVING GROUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Emily L.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Cruz, Kelle L.

    2010-01-01

    We present spectral and kinematic evidence that 2MASS J06085283-2753583 (M8.5γ) is a member of the β Pictoris Moving Group (BPMG, age ∼12 Myr), making it the latest-type known member of this young, nearby association. We confirm low-gravity spectral morphology at both medium and high resolutions in the near-infrared. We present new radial velocity and proper motion measurements, and use these to calculate galactic location and space motion consistent with other high-probability members of the BPMG. The predicted mass range consistent with the object's effective temperature, surface gravity, spectral type, and age is 15-35 M Jup , placing 2MASS 0608-27 well within the brown dwarf mass regime. 2MASS J06085283-2753583 is thus confidently added to the short list of very low mass, intermediate age benchmark objects that inform ongoing searches for the lowest-mass members of nearby young associations.

  6. Determination of the lowest critical power levels of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Ngo Quang [Centre for Nuclear Technique Application, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Thong, Ha Van; Long, Vu Hai; Binh, Do Quang; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Vien, Luong Ba; Vinh, Le Vinh [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents the experimental methods for determining critical states of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor containing an extraneous neutron source induced by gamma ray reactions on beryllium in the reactor. The lowest critical power levels are measured at various moments after the reactor is shut down following 100 hours of its continuous operation. Th power levels vary from (0.5-1.2) x 10{sup -4} of P{sub n}, i.e. (25-60)W to (1.1-1.6) x 10{sup -5} of P{sub n}, i.e. (5.5-8)W at corresponding times of 4 days to 13 days after the reactor is shut down. However the critical power must be chosen greater than 500 W to sustain the steady criticality of the reactor for a long time. (author). 3 refs. 4 figs. 1 tab.

  7. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  8. All Electron ab initio Investigations of the Three Lowest Lying Electronic States of the RuC Molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Irene; Gingerich, K. A.

    2000-01-01

    The three lowest-lying electronic states of RuC, (1)Sigma(+), (3)Delta, and (1)Delta, have been investigated by performing all-electron ab initio multi-configuration self-consistent-field (CASSCF) and multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations including relativistic corrections....... The electronic ground state is derived as (1)Sigma(+) with the spectroscopic constants r(e) = 1.616 Angstrom and omega(e) = 1085 cm(-1). The lowest-lying excited state, (3)Delta, has r(e) = 1.632 Angstrom, omega(e) = 1063 cm(-1), and T-e = 912 cm(-1). These results are consistent with recent spectroscopic values....... The chemical bonds in all three lowest-lying states are triple bonds composed of one sigma and two pi bonds. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  9. Sleep Duration Associated with the Lowest Risk of Depression/Anxiety in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojio, Yasutaka; Nishida, Atsushi; Shimodera, Shinji; Togo, Fumiharu; Sasaki, Tsukasa

    2016-08-01

    To investigate sleep duration associated with the least depression/anxiety in adolescence. Grades 7-12 Japanese students (n = 18,250, aged 12-18 y) from public junior high/high schools were studied in a cross-sectional design. Due to missing/implausible data, 15,637 out of the 18,250 students were statistically analyzed. Relationship between sleep duration on school nights and depression/anxiety, measured using self-report questionnaires, including the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), were studied by sex and grade, controlling for bedtime regularity. When sleep duration was classified by 1-h intervals, rate of adolescents with a GHQ-12 score ≥ 4 was the lowest in males and females who slept 8.5-9.5 h and 7.5-8.5 h, respectively, (designated "references") in both grades 7-9 and 10-12. The rate was significantly higher than the references in both males and females who slept Sleep duration for the minimum GHQ-12 score was estimated to be 8.8 and 8.5 h in males, and 8.0 and 7.5 h in females, in grades 7-9 and 10-12, respectively, using the General Additive Model. Sleep duration of ≥ 8.5 h on school nights may be associated with the lowest risk of depression/anxiety on average in male adolescents. Although the duration was estimated to be shorter in females (≥ 7.5 h) than males, this should be interpreted carefully. Most adolescents may currently be sleeping less than the optimal duration. A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1491. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. POSSIBILITIES OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY AND MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING IN FORENSIC MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF MECHANICAL TRAUMA AND SUDDEN DEATH (A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kokov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. The review analyzes the possibility of multislice computed tomography (MSCT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI use in the forensic examination of corpses of adults. We present the critical analysis of literature on post-mortem imaging in terms of forensic thanatology. The review is based on basic Internet resources: Scientific Electronic Library (elibrary, Scopus, PubMed. The review includes articles that discuss both advantages and limitations of post-mortem MSCT and MRI imaging in forensic examination of the corpse.Through studying the available literature, the authors attempted to answer two questions: 1 which method was more suitable for the purposes of forensic examination of the corpse - MSCT or MRI; 2 whether the virtual autopsy replaced the traditional autopsy in the near future?Conclusion: comprehensive study of the corpse often requires both imaging methods; in cases of death under mechanical damage, MSCT exceeds the range of possibilities of MRI; today, virtual autopsy cannot completely replace traditional autopsy in forensic science, since there are no convincing evidence-based comparative studies, as well as the legal framework of the method. 

  11. A preliminary study of patient-specific mechanical properties of diabetic and healthy plantar soft tissue from gated magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Evan D; Stebbins, Michael J; Cavanagh, Peter R; Haynor, David R; Chu, Baocheng; Fassbind, Michael J; Isvilanonda, Vara; Ledoux, William R

    2017-07-01

    Foot loading rate, load magnitude, and the presence of diseases such as diabetes can all affect the mechanical properties of the plantar soft tissues of the human foot. The hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer instrument was designed to gain insight into which variables are the most significant in determining these properties. It was used with gated magnetic resonance imaging to capture three-dimensional images of feet under dynamic loading conditions. Custom electronics controlled by LabVIEW software simultaneously recorded system pressure, which was then translated to applied force values based on calibration curves. Data were collected for two subjects, one without diabetes (Subject A) and one with diabetes (Subject B). For a 0.2-Hz loading rate, and strains 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22, Subject A's average tangential heel pad stiffness was 10 N/mm and Subject B's was 24 N/mm. Maximum test loads were approximately 200 N. Loading rate and load magnitude limitations (both were lower than physiologic values) will continue to be addressed in the next version of the instrument. However, the current hydraulic plantar soft tissue reducer did produce a data set for healthy versus diabetic tissue stiffness that agrees with previous trends. These data are also being used to improve finite element analysis models of the foot as part of a related project.

  12. Online quench-flow electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for elucidating kinetic and chemical enzymatic reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, David J; Stokes, Adam A; Langridge-Smith, Pat; Mackay, C Logan

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an automated quench-flow microreactor which interfaces directly to an electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometer. We have used this device in conjunction with ESI Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS) to demonstrate the potential of this approach for studying the mechanistic details of enzyme reactions. For the model system chosen to test this device, namely, the pre-steady-state hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl acetate by the enzyme chymotrypsin, the kinetic parameters obtained are in good agreement with those in the literature. To our knowledge, this is the first reported use of online quench-flow coupled with FTICR MS. Furthermore, we have exploited the power of FTICR MS to interrogate the quenched covalently bound enzyme intermediate using top-down fragmentation. The accurate mass capabilities of FTICR MS permitted the nature of the intermediate to be assigned with high confidence. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) fragmentation allowed us to locate the intermediate to a five amino acid section of the protein--which includes the known catalytic residue, Ser(195). This experimental approach, which uniquely can provide both kinetic and chemical details of enzyme mechanisms, is a potentially powerful tool for studies of enzyme catalysis.

  13. Synthesis and Mechanical Characterization of Binary and Ternary Intermetallic Alloys Based on Fe-Ti-Al by Resonant Ultrasound Vibrational Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanbi, Daoud; Ogam, Erick; Amara, Sif Eddine; Fellah, Z E A

    2018-05-07

    Precise but simple experimental and inverse methods allowing the recovery of mechanical material parameters are necessary for the exploration of materials with novel crystallographic structures and elastic properties, particularly for new materials and those existing only in theory. The alloys studied herein are of new atomic compositions. This paper reports an experimental study involving the synthesis and development of methods for the determination of the elastic properties of binary (Fe-Al, Fe-Ti and Ti-Al) and ternary (Fe-Ti-Al) intermetallic alloys with different concentrations of their individual constituents. The alloys studied were synthesized from high purity metals using an arc furnace with argon flow to ensure their uniformity and homogeneity. Precise but simple methods for the recovery of the elastic constants of the isotropic metals from resonant ultrasound vibration data were developed. These methods allowed the fine analysis of the relationships between the atomic concentration of a given constituent and the Young’s modulus or alloy density.

  14. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-15

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  15. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  16. Structure and reactivity of thiazolium azo dyes: UV-visible, resonance Raman, NMR, and computational studies of the reaction mechanism in alkaline solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Laurence C; Batchelor, Stephen N; Moore, John N

    2013-03-07

    UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman, and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, allied with density functional theory (DFT) calculations, have been used to study the structure, bonding, and alkaline hydrolysis mechanism of the cationic thiazloium azo dye, 2-[2-[4-(diethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-3-methyl-thiazolium (1a), along with a series of six related dyes with different 4-dialkylamino groups and/or other phenyl ring substituents (2a-c, 3a-c) and the related isothiazolium azo dye, 5-[2-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]diazenyl]-2-methyl-isothiazolium (4). These diazahemicyanine dyes are calculated to have a similar low-energy structure that is cis, trans at the (iso)thiazolium-azo group, and for which the calculated Raman spectra provide a good match with the experimental data; the calculations on these structures are used to assign and discuss the transitions giving rise to the experimental spectra, and to consider the bonding and its variation between the dyes. UV-visible, Raman, and NMR spectra recorded from minutes to several weeks after raising the pH of an aqueous solution of 1a to ca. 11.5 show that the dominant initial step in the reaction is loss of diethylamine to produce a quinonimine (ca. hours), with subsequent reactions occurring on longer time scales (ca. days to weeks); kinetic analyses give a rate constant of 2.6 × 10(-2) dm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) for reaction of 1a with OH(-). UV-visible spectra recorded on raising the pH of the other dyes in solution show similar changes that are attributed to the same general reaction mechanism, but with different rate constants for which the dependence on structure is discussed.

  17. Consumer Airfare Report: Table 5 - Detailed Fare Information For Highest and Lowest Fare Markets Under 750 Miles

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Provides detailed fare information for highest and lowest fare markets under 750 miles. For a more complete explanation, please read the introductory information at...

  18. Resonance phenomena near thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, E.; Mueller, M.; Rotter, I.; Technische Univ. Dresden

    1995-12-01

    The trapping effect is investigated close to the elastic threshold. The nucleus is described as an open quantum mechanical many-body system embedded in the continuum of decay channels. An ensemble of compound nucleus states with both discrete and resonance states is investigated in an energy-dependent formalism. It is shown that the discrete states can trap the resonance ones and also that the discrete states can directly influence the scattering cross section. (orig.)

  19. Synchrotron far-infrared spectroscopy of the two lowest fundamental modes of 1,1-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andy; Thompson, Christopher D.; Appadoo, Dominique R. T.; Plathe, Ruth; Roy, Pascale; Manceron, Laurent; Barros, Joanna; McNaughton, Don

    2013-08-01

    The far-infrared (FIR) spectrum (50-600 cm-1) of 1,1-difluoroethane was recorded using the high-resolution infrared AILES beamline at the Soleil synchrotron. A ro-vibrational assignment was performed on the lowest wavenumber, low intensity 181 0 and 171 0 modes, yielding band centres of 224.241903 (10) cm-1 and 384.252538 (13) cm-1, respectively. A total of 965 and 2031 FIR transitions were assigned to the 181 0 and 171 0 fundamentals, respectively. Previously measured pure rotational transitions from the upper states were included into the respective fits to yield improved rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. The 182 1 hot band was observed within the fundamental band, with 369 FIR transitions assigned and co-fitted with the fundamental to give a band centre of 431.956502 (39) cm-1 for ν 18 = 2. The 182 0 overtone was observed with 586 transitions assigned and fitted to give a band centre of 431.952763 (23) cm-1 for ν 18 = 2. The difference in energy is attributed to a torsional splitting of 0.003740 (45) cm-1 in the ν 18 = 2 state. Two hot bands originating from the ν 18 = 1 and ν 17 = 1 states were observed within the 171 0 fundamental.

  20. Operator product expansion of the lowest weight CPOs in N=4 SYM4 at strong coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Frolov, Sergey; Petkou, Anastasios C.

    2000-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the 4-point functions of the lowest weight chiral primary operators O I ∼tr(phi (i phi j) ) in N=4 SYM 4 at strong coupling and show that their structure is compatible with the predictions of AdS/CFT correspondence. In particular, all power-singular terms in the 4-point functions exactly coincide with the contributions coming from the conformal blocks of the CPOs, the R -symmetry current and the stress tensor. Operators dual to string modes decouple at strong coupling. We compute the anomalous dimensions and the leading 1/N 2 corrections to the normalization constants of the 2- and 3-point functions of scalar and vector double-trace operators with approximate dimensions 4 and 5, respectively. We also find that the conformal dimensions of certain towers of double-trace operators in the 105 , 84 and 175 irreps are non-renormalized. We show that, despite the absence of a non-renormalization theorem for the double-trace operator in the 20 irrep, its anomalous dimension vanishes. As by-products of our investigation, we derive explicit expressions for the conformal block of the stress tensor, and for the conformal partial wave amplitudes of a conserved current and of a stress tensor in d dimensions

  1. Preparations for an optical access to the lowest nuclear excitation in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The isomeric lowest excited nuclear level of {sup 229}Th has been indirectly measured to be 7.6±0.5 eV (163±11 nm). This low transition energy, compared to energies typically involved in nuclear processes, would allow for the application of laser-spectroscopic methods. Also considering the isomeric lifetime of the excited state (estimated to be 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} s), which leads to an extremely sharp linewidth of Δω/ω ∝ 10{sup -20}, the isomer becomes a strong candidate for a nuclear-based frequency standard. In order to directly detect the isomeric ground-state decay and improve the accuracy of its energy as a prerequisite for an all-optical control, {sup 229m}Th is populated via a 2% decay branch in the α decay of {sup 233}U. The Thorium ions are extracted and cooled with the help of a buffer-gas stopping cell and an RFQ-cooler. In order to suppress accompanying α decay chain products other than {sup 229}Th, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is used. Following the QMS, the Thorium isomeric decay is expected to be detectable. Internal conversion as well as photonic decay is probed via different detection techniques. Latest results are presented.

  2. Failures of TDDFT in describing the lowest intramolecular charge-transfer excitation in para-nitroanilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J.J.; Sauer, S.P.A.; Mikkelsen, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the failure of Time{Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) with the CAM{B3LYP exchange{correlation (xc) functional coupled to the Polarizable Embedding (PE) scheme (PE-CAM-B3LYP) in reproducing the solvatochromic shift of the lowest intense charge{transfer excitation in para...... the electric dipole moments in the gas phase and for 100 solvent congurations. We find that CAM-B3LYP overestimates the amount of charge separation inherent in the ground state and TDDFT/CAM-B3LYP drastically underestimates this amount in the excited charge-transfer state. As the errors in the solvatochromatic...... to benchmark results of TDDFT calculations with CAM-B3LYP for intramolecular charge{transfer excitations in molecular systems similar to pNA against higher{level ab initio wave function methods, like, e.g., CCSD, prior to their use. Using the calculated change in dipole moment upon excitation as a measure...

  3. Behavioral heterogeneity affects individual performances in experimental and computational lowest unique integer games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    This study computationally examines (1) how the behaviors of subjects are represented, (2) whether the classification of subjects is related to the scale of the game, and (3) what kind of behavioral models are successful in small-sized lowest unique integer games (LUIGs). In a LUIG, N (>= 3) players submit a positive integer up to M(> 1) and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. For this purpose, the author considers four LUIGs with N = {3, 4} and M = {3, 4} and uses the behavioral data obtained in the laboratory experiment by Yamada and Hanaki (Physica A 463, pp. 88–102, 2016). For computational experiments, the author calibrates the parameters of typical learning models for each subject and then pursues round robin competitions. The main findings are in the following: First, the subjects who played not differently from the mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE) prediction tended to made use of not only their choices but also the game outcomes. Meanwhile those who deviated from the MSE prediction took care of only their choices as the complexity of the game increased. Second, the heterogeneity of player strategies depends on both the number of players (N) and the upper limit (M). Third, when groups consist of different agents like in the earlier laboratory experiment, sticking behavior is quite effective to win.

  4. Perturbative Power Counting, Lowest-Index Operators and Their Renormalization in Standard Model Effective Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi; Ma, Xiao-Dong

    2018-03-01

    We study two aspects of higher dimensional operators in standard model effective field theory. We first introduce a perturbative power counting rule for the entries in the anomalous dimension matrix of operators with equal mass dimension. The power counting is determined by the number of loops and the difference of the indices of the two operators involved, which in turn is defined by assuming that all terms in the standard model Lagrangian have an equal perturbative power. Then we show that the operators with the lowest index are unique at each mass dimension d, i.e., (H † H) d/2 for even d ≥ 4, and (LT∈ H)C(LT∈ H) T (H † H)(d-5)/2 for odd d ≥ 5. Here H, L are the Higgs and lepton doublet, and ∈, C the antisymmetric matrix of rank two and the charge conjugation matrix, respectively. The renormalization group running of these operators can be studied separately from other operators of equal mass dimension at the leading order in power counting. We compute their anomalous dimensions at one loop for general d and find that they are enhanced quadratically in d due to combinatorics. We also make connections with classification of operators in terms of their holomorphic and anti-holomorphic weights. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11025525, 11575089, and by the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  5. Solar Cycle 24 UV Radiation: Lowest in more than 6 Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, Klaus-Peter; Mittag, Marco; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Using spectra taken by the robotic telescope ``TIGRE'' (see Fig. 1 and the TIGRE-poster presented by Schmitt et al. at this conference) and its mid-resolution (R=20,000) HEROS double-channel echelle spectrograph, we present our measurements of the solar Ca II H&K chromospheric emission. Using moonlight, we applied the calibration and definition of the Mt. Wilson S-index , which allows a direct comparison with historic observations, reaching back to the early 1960's. At the same time, coming from the same EUV emitting plage regions, the Ca II H&K emission is a good proxy for the latter, which is of interest as a forcing factor in climate models. Our measurements probe the weak, asynchronous activity cycle 24 around its 2nd maximum during the past winter. Our S-values suggest that this maximum is the lowest in chromospheric emission since at least 60 years -- following the longest and deepest minimum since a century. Our observations suggest a similarly long-term (on a scale of decades) low of the far-UV radiation, which should be considered by the next generation of climate models. The current, very interesting activity behaviour calls for a concerted effort on long-term solar monitoring.

  6. Behavioral Heterogeneity Affects Individual Performances in Experimental and Computational Lowest Unique Integer Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study computationally examines (1 how the behaviors of subjects are represented, (2 whether the classification of subjects is related to the scale of the game, and (3 what kind of behavioral models are successful in small-sized lowest unique integer games (LUIGs. In a LUIG, N (≥ 3 players submit a positive integer up to M(> 1 and the player choosing the smallest number not chosen by anyone else wins. For this purpose, the author considers four LUIGs with N = {3, 4} and M = {3, 4} and uses the behavioral data obtained in the laboratory experiment by Yamada and Hanaki [1]. For computational experiments, the author calibrates the parameters of typical learning models for each subject and then pursues round robin competitions. The main findings are in the following: First, the subjects who played not differently from the mixed-strategy Nash equilibrium (MSE prediction tended to made use of not only their choices but also the game outcomes. Meanwhile those who deviated from the MSE prediction took care of only their choices as the complexity of the game increased. Second, the heterogeneity of player strategies depends on both the number of players (N and the upper limit (M. Third, when groups consist of different agents like in the earlier laboratory experiment, sticking behavior is quite effective to win.

  7. Validity of the lowest-Landau-level approximation for rotating Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Alexis G.; Feder, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The energy spectrum for an ultracold rotating Bose gas in a harmonic trap is calculated exactly for small systems, allowing the atoms to occupy several Landau levels. Two vortexlike states and two strongly correlated states (the Pfaffian and Laughlin) are considered in detail. In particular, their critical rotation frequencies and energy gaps are determined as a function of particle number, interaction strength, and the number of Landau levels occupied (up to three). For the vortexlike states, the lowest-Landau-level (LLL) approximation is justified only if the interaction strength decreases with the number of particles; nevertheless, the constant of proportionality increases rapidly with the angular momentum per particle. For the strongly correlated states, however, the interaction strength can increase with particle number without violating the LLL condition. The results suggest that, in large systems, the Pfaffian and Laughlin states might be stabilized at rotation frequencies below the centrifugal limit for sufficiently large interaction strengths, with energy gaps a significant fraction of the trap energy

  8. NO NEUTRON STAR COMPANION TO THE LOWEST MASS SDSS WHITE DWARF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agueeros, Marcel A.; Camilo, Fernando; Heinke, Craig; Kilic, Mukremin; Anderson, Scott F.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Freire, Paulo; Kleinman, Scot J.; Liebert, James W.

    2009-01-01

    SDSS J091709.55+463821.8 (hereafter J0917+4638) is the lowest surface gravity white dwarf (WD) currently known, with log g = 5.55 ± 0.05 (M ∼ 0.17 M sun ). Such low-mass white dwarfs (LMWDs) are believed to originate in binaries that evolve into WD/WD or WD/neutron star (NS) systems. An optical search for J0917+4638's companion showed that it must be a compact object with a mass ≥0.28 M sun . Here we report on Green Bank Telescope 820 MHz and XMM-Newton X-ray observations of J0917+4638 intended to uncover a potential NS companion to the LMWD. No convincing pulsar signal is detected in our radio data. Our X-ray observation also failed to detect X-ray emission from J0917+4638's companion, while we would have detected any of the millisecond radio pulsars in 47 Tuc. We conclude that the companion is almost certainly another WD.

  9. Electro-mechanical characteristics of myocardial infarction border zones and ventricular arrhythmic risk: novel insights from grid-tagged cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Dennis T.L.; Weightman, Michael J.; Baumert, Mathias; Tayeb, Hussam; Richardson, James D.; Puri, Rishi; Bertaso, Angela G.; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Worthley, Matthew I.; Worthley, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    To investigate whether grid-tag myocardial strain evaluation can characterise 'border-zone' peri-infarct region and identify patients at risk of ventricular arrhythmia as the peri-infarct myocardial zone may represent an important contributor to ventricular arrhythmia following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Forty-five patients with STEMI underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging on days 3 and 90 following primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Circumferential peak circumferential systolic strain (CS) and strain rate (CSR) were calculated from grid-tagged images. Myocardial segments were classified into 'infarct', 'border-zone', 'adjacent' and 'remote' regions by late-gadolinium enhancement distribution. The relationship between CS and CSR and these distinct myocardial regions was assessed. Ambulatory Holter monitoring was performed 14 days post myocardial infarction (MI) to estimate ventricular arrhythmia risk via evaluation of heart-rate variability (HRV). We analysed 1,222 myocardial segments. Remote and adjacent regions had near-normal parameters of CS and CSR. Border-zone regions had intermediate CS (-9.0 ± 4.6 vs -5.9 ± 7.4, P < 0.001) and CSR (-86.4 ± 33.3 vs -73.5 ± 51.4, P < 0.001) severity compared with infarct regions. Patients with 'border-zone' peri-infarct regions had reduced very-low-frequency power on HRV analysis, which is a surrogate for ventricular arrhythmia risk (P = 0.03). Grid-tagged CMR-derived myocardial strain accurately characterises the mechanical characteristics of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region. Presence of 'border-zone' peri-infarct region correlated with a surrogate marker of heightened arrhythmia risk following STEMI. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging zygapophyseal joint space changes (gapping) in low back pain patients following spinal manipulation and side-posture positioning: a randomized controlled mechanisms trial with blinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gregory D; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Cantu, Joe A; Dexheimer, Jennifer M; Pocius, Judith D; Gregerson, Douglas; Fergus, Michael; McKinnis, Ray; Grieve, Thomas J

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify lumbar zygapophyseal (Z) joint space separation (gapping) in low back pain (LBP) subjects after spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) or side-posture positioning (SPP). This was a controlled mechanisms trial with randomization and blinding. Acute LBP subjects (N = 112; four n = 28 magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] protocol groups) had 2 MRI appointments (initial enrollment and after 2 weeks of chiropractic treatment, receiving 2 MRI scans of the L4/L5 and L5/S1 Z joints at each MRI appointment. After the first MRI scan of each appointment, subjects were randomized (initial enrollment appointment) or assigned (after 2 weeks of chiropractic treatment appointment) into SPP (nonmanipulation), SMT (manipulation), or control MRI protocol groups. After SPP or SMT, a second MRI was taken. The central anterior-posterior joint space was measured. Difference between most painful side anterior-posterior measurements taken postintervention and preintervention was the Z joint "gapping difference." Gapping differences were compared (analysis of variance) among protocol groups. Secondary measures of pain (visual analog scale, verbal numeric pain rating scale) and function (Bournemouth questionnaire) were assessed. Gapping differences were significant at the first (adjusted, P = .009; SPP, 0.66 ± 0.48 mm; SMT, 0.23 ± 0.86; control, 0.18 ± 0.71) and second (adjusted, P = .0005; SPP, 0.65 ± 0.92 mm; SMT, 0.89 ± 0.71; control, 0.35 ± 0.32) MRI appointments. Verbal numeric pain rating scale differences were significant at first MRI appointment (P = .04) with SMT showing the greatest improvement. Visual analog scale and Bournemouth questionnaire improved after 2 weeks of care in all groups (both P posture positioning showed greatest gapping at baseline. After 2 weeks, SMT resulted in greatest gapping. Side-posture positioning appeared to have additive therapeutic benefit to SMT. Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences

  11. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  12. Membrane Disruption Mechanism of a Prion Peptide (106-126) Investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy, Raman and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Sahoo, Prasana K; Dalzini, Annalisa; Hayati, Zahra; Aryal, Chinta M; Teng, Peng; Cai, Jianfeng; Rodriguez Gutierrez, Humberto; Song, Likai

    2017-05-18

    A fragment of the human prion protein spanning residues 106-126 (PrP106-126) recapitulates many essential properties of the disease-causing protein such as amyloidogenicity and cytotoxicity. PrP106-126 has an amphipathic characteristic that resembles many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Therefore, the toxic effect of PrP106-126 could arise from a direct association of monomeric peptides with the membrane matrix. Several experimental approaches are employed to scrutinize the impacts of monomeric PrP106-126 on model lipid membranes. Porous defects in planar bilayers are observed by using solution atomic force microscopy. Adding cholesterol does not impede defect formation. A force spectroscopy experiment shows that PrP106-126 reduces Young's modulus of planar lipid bilayers. We use Raman microspectroscopy to study the effect of PrP106-126 on lipid atomic vibrational dynamics. For phosphatidylcholine lipids, PrP106-126 disorders the intrachain conformation, while the interchain interaction is not altered; for phosphatidylethanolamine lipids, PrP106-126 increases the interchain interaction, while the intrachain conformational order remains similar. We explain the observed differences by considering different modes of peptide insertion. Finally, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy shows that PrP106-126 progressively decreases the orientational order of lipid acyl chains in magnetically aligned bicelles. Together, our experimental data support the proposition that monomeric PrP106-126 can disrupt lipid membranes by using similar mechanisms found in AMPs.

  13. Lowest Q2 Measurement of the γ*p→ Δ Reaction: Probing the Pionic Contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stave, Sean C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-06-01

    The first excited state of the proton, the Delat, can be reached through a magnetic dipole spin flip of one of the quarks (M1) or through electric and Coulomb quadrupole terms (E2 and C2) which indicate a deviation from spherical symmetry. The quark models using the color hyperfine interaction underestimate the size of the quadrupole terms by more than an order of magnitude. Models using the pion cloud do a much better job of describing the data. This is expected due to the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry which leads to a cloud of virtual p wave pions which introduce the non-spherical amplitudes. The data presented in this work fill gaps in the low Q², long distance region where the pion cloud is expected to dominate and to produce significant Q2 variation. The p(e¯, ép)π° reaction was measured in the Δ region at Q² = 0.060 (GeV/c)², the lowest Q² to date for pion electroproduction, utilizing out-of-plane magnetic spectrometers at the Mainz Microtron in Germany. This work reports results for the dominant transition magnetic dipole amplitude and the quadrupole to dipole ratios obtained from fitting the new data with models using a three parameter, resonant multipole fit: M³/²1+ = (40.33 +- 0.63stat+syst +-model)(10-³/mπ+), E2/M1=Re(E³/²1+M³/²1+) = (-2.28+- 0.29stat+syst +- 0.20model)%, and C2/M1 =Re(S³/²1+/M³/²1+) poles disagree with predictions of the quark models but are in reasonable agreement with a chiral extrapolation of lattice QCD, chiral effective field theory and dynamical model results confirming the dominance and general Q² variation of the long range pionic contribution. While there is qualitative agreement with the models, there is no quantitative agreement thus indicating the need for further improvement of the models.

  14. The Leoncino Dwarf: The Lowest Metallicity Star-Forming Galaxy in the Nearby Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuinn, Kristen

    2017-08-01

    Extremely metal-poor (XMP) galaxies are dwarf irregular galaxies with very low metallicities, traced by their gas-phase oxygen abundance. Galaxy evolution scenarios suggest three pathways to form an XMP: (1) secular evolution at low galaxy masses, (2) slow evolution in voids, or (3) dilution of measured abundances from infall of pristine gas. These scenarios have proven challenging to test because, despite concerted efforts, XMP galaxies in the nearby universe have proven hard to find. A notable exception is the recently discovered dwarf galaxy Leoncino. Leoncino has the lowest gas-phase oxygen abundance ever measured in a galaxy in the local Universe. From optical spectroscopy, the oxygen abundance is 12+log(O/H)=7.02+/-0.03, more than 40% lower than the iconic low-metallicity galaxy I Zw 18 and less than 2% Z_sun. Despite a precision oxygen abundance measurement, the evolutionary context of Leoncino remains uncertain without a secure distance. We propose HST WFC3 high-resolution optical imaging of Leoncino to accurately measure the distance to the galaxy using the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method. The distance will determine whether Leoncino is located in a typical field environment or in a void, and whether the galaxy is consistent with the luminosity-metallicity relation at low galaxy masses. The detailed study of Leoncino will provide benchmark results for future XMP discoveries in the nearby Universe, and an exceptionally timely comparison for studies of chemically primitive, high-redshift galaxies that will be observable in the JWST era.

  15. Testing ΛCDM at the lowest redshifts with SN Ia and galaxy velocities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huterer, Dragan; Shafer, Daniel L. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Scolnic, Daniel M. [University of Chicago, Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Schmidt, Fabian, E-mail: huterer@umich.edu, E-mail: dshafer2@jhu.edu, E-mail: dscolnic@kicp.uchicago.edu, E-mail: fabians@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-01

    Peculiar velocities of objects in the nearby universe are correlated due to the gravitational pull of large-scale structure. By measuring these velocities, we have a unique opportunity to test the cosmological model at the lowest redshifts. We perform this test, using current data to constrain the amplitude of the ''signal'' covariance matrix describing the velocities and their correlations. We consider a new, well-calibrated ''Supercal'' set of low-redshift SNe Ia as well as a set of distances derived from the fundamental plane relation of 6dFGS galaxies. Analyzing the SN and galaxy data separately, both results are consistent with the peculiar velocity signal of our fiducial ΛCDM model, ruling out the noise-only model with zero peculiar velocities at greater than 7σ (SNe) and 8σ (galaxies). When the two data sets are combined appropriately, the precision of the test increases slightly, resulting in a constraint on the signal amplitude of A = 1.05{sub −0.21}{sup +0.25}, where A = 1 corresponds to our fiducial model. Equivalently, we report an 11% measurement of the product of the growth rate and amplitude of mass fluctuations evaluated at z {sub eff} = 0.02, f σ{sub 8} = 0.428{sub −0.045}{sup +0.048}, valid for our fiducial ΛCDM model. We explore the robustness of the results to a number of conceivable variations in the analysis and find that individual variations shift the preferred signal amplitude by less than ∼0.5σ. We briefly discuss our Supercal SN Ia results in comparison with our previous results using the JLA compilation.

  16. TRACING THE LOWEST PROPELLER LINE IN MAGELLANIC HIGH-MASS X-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M.; Laycock, Silas G. T.; Yang, Jun; Fingerman, Samuel, E-mail: dimitris_christodoulou@uml.edu, E-mail: silas_laycock@uml.edu, E-mail: jun_yang@uml.edu, E-mail: fingerman.samuel@gmail.com [Lowell Center for Space Science and Technology, 600 Suffolk Street, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We have combined the published observations of high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds with a new processing of the complete archival data sets from the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories in an attempt to trace the lowest propeller line below which accretion to polar caps is inhibited by the centrifugal force and the pulsations from the most weakly magnetized pulsars cease. Previously published data reveal that some of the faster-spinning pulsars with spin periods of P {sub S} < 12 s, detected at relatively low X-ray luminosities L {sub X} , appear to define such a line in the P {sub S} – L {sub X} diagram, characterized by a magnetic moment of μ = 3 × 10{sup 29} G cm{sup 3}. This value implies the presence of surface magnetic fields of B ≥ 3 × 10{sup 11} G in the compact objects of this class. Only a few quiescent HMXBs are found below the propeller line: LXP4.40 and SXP4.78, for which XMM-Newton and Chandra null detections respectively placed firm upper limits on their X-ray fluxes in deep quiescence; and A0538-66, for which many sub-Eddington detections have never measured any pulsations. On the other hand, the data from the XMM-Newton and Chandra archives show clearly that, during routine observation cycles, several sources have been detected below the propeller line in extremely faint, nonpulsating states that can be understood as the result of weak magnetospheric emission when accretion to the poles is centrifugally stalled or severely diminished. We also pay attention to the anomalous X-ray pulsar CXOU J010043.1-721134 that was reported in HMXB surveys. Its pulsations and locations near and above the propeller line indicate that this pulsar could be accreting from a fossil disk.

  17. HH 1158: THE LOWEST LUMINOSITY EXTERNALLY IRRADIATED HERBIG–HARO JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, B.; Whelan, E. T.

    2015-01-01

    We have identified a new externally irradiated Herbig–Haro (HH) jet, HH 1158, within ∼2 pc of the massive OB type stars in the σ Orionis cluster. At an L bol  ∼ 0.1 L ⊙ , HH 1158 is the lowest luminosity irradiated HH jet identified to date in any cluster. Results from the analysis of high-resolution optical spectra indicate asymmetries in the brightness, morphology, electron density, velocity, and the mass outflow rates for the blue and redshifted lobes. We constrain the position angle of the HH 1158 jet at 102° ± 5°. The mass outflow rate and the mean accretion rate for HH 1158 using multiple diagnostics are estimated to be (5.2 ± 2.6) × 10 −10 M ⊙ yr −1 and (3.0 ± 1.0) × 10 −10 M ⊙ yr −1 , respectively. The properties for HH 1158 are notably similar to the externally irradiated HH 444–HH 447 jets previously identified in σ Orionis. In particular, the morphology is such that the weaker jet beam is tilted toward the massive stars, indicating a higher extent of photo-evaporation. The high value for the Hα/[S ii] ratio is also consistent with the ratios measured in other irradiated jets, including HH 444–HH 447. The presence of an extended collimated jet that is bipolar and the evidence of shocked emission knots make HH 1158 the first unique case of irradiated HH jets at the very low-luminosity end, and provides an opportunity to learn the physical properties of very faint HH jet sources

  18. Air-coupled method to investigate the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb mode in stubbed and air-drilled phononic plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbo Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we applied a robust and fully air-coupled method to investigate the propagation of the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb (A0 mode in both a stubbed and an air-drilled phononic-crystal (PC plate. By measuring simply the radiative acoustic waves of A0 mode close to the plate surface, we observed the band gaps for the stubbed PC plate caused by either the local resonance or the Bragg scattering, in frequency ranges in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We measured then the complete band gap of A0 mode for the air-drilled PC plate, in good agreement with the band structures. Finally, we compared the measurements made using the air-coupled method with those obtained by the laser ultrasonic technique.

  19. Air-coupled method to investigate the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb mode in stubbed and air-drilled phononic plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongbo; Zhao, Jinfeng, E-mail: jinfeng.zhao@tongji.edu.cn; Li, Libing; Pan, Yongdong; Zhong, Zheng [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, 100 Zhangwu Road, 200092, Shanghai (China); Bonello, Bernard [CNRS, UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, F-75005, Paris (France); Wei, Jianxin [State Key Laboratory of Petroleum Resources and Prospecting, China University of Petroleum, 18 Xuefu Road, 102249, Pekin (China)

    2016-08-15

    In this work, we applied a robust and fully air-coupled method to investigate the propagation of the lowest-order antisymmetric Lamb (A{sub 0}) mode in both a stubbed and an air-drilled phononic-crystal (PC) plate. By measuring simply the radiative acoustic waves of A{sub 0} mode close to the plate surface, we observed the band gaps for the stubbed PC plate caused by either the local resonance or the Bragg scattering, in frequency ranges in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We measured then the complete band gap of A{sub 0} mode for the air-drilled PC plate, in good agreement with the band structures. Finally, we compared the measurements made using the air-coupled method with those obtained by the laser ultrasonic technique.

  20. The mechanism of vortex switching in magnetic nanodots under circular magnetic field. I. The resonance action of the field on the nanodot eigenmodes

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalev, A S

    2002-01-01

    The resonance activation of eigenmodes for a finite 2D easy-plane ferromagnet is considered to treat theoretically by the vortex switching in magnetic nanodots due to the action of external circular magnetic field. It is shown analytically that if the anisotropy is weak, i.e. the vortex has a nonzero polarity (total magnization along the z-axis), the process of the field action has a complicated nature. The circular field acts in a resonance way upon azimuthal system eigenmodes, in which magnetization depends on the azimuthal coordinate (as a direct resonance at the eigenfrequencies of these modes). The interaction of the azimuthal and symmetric modes (in which the magnetization does not depend on the azimuthal coordinate) via the applied field gives rise to complex parametric resonance at multifrequencies. The results obtained are compared with the data of previous numerical calculations.

  1. A study of relaxation mechanisms in the A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} state of nitric oxide by time resolved double resonant polarization spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampanoni-Panariello, A; Bombach, R; Hemmerling, B; Hubschmid, W [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    Double resonant polarization labeling spectroscopy is applied to detect nitric oxide in flames and to characterize rotational energy transfer and orientation changing collisions in its first excited electronic state. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  2. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  3. Multiple photon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, C.J.; Feldman, B.J.

    1979-02-01

    A detailed theoretical analysis is presented of the interaction of intense near-resonant monochromatic radiation with an N-level anharmonic oscillator. In particular, the phenomenon of multiple photon resonance, the process by which an N-level system resonantly absorbs two or more photons simultaneously, is investigated. Starting from the Schroedinger equation, diagrammatic techniques are developed that allow the resonant process to be analyzed quantitatively, in analogy with well-known two-level coherent phenomena. In addition, multiple photon Stark shifts of the resonances, shifts absent in two-level theory, are obtained from the diagrams. Insights into the nature of multiple photon resonances are gained by comparing the quantum mechanical system with classical coupled pendulums whose equations of motion possess identical eigenvalues and eigenvectors. In certain limiting cases, including that of the resonantly excited N-level harmonic oscillator and that of the equally spaced N-level system with equal matrix elements, analytic results are derived. The influence of population relaxation and phase-disrupting collisions on the multiple photon process are also analyzed, the latter by extension of the diagrammatic technique to the density matrix equations of motion. 11 figures

  4. Bonding wood-saxon potential and the mechanism of resonance states in the ''1''2C+''1''2C system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, G.; Khaydarov, R.R.

    2001-01-01

    In present work the ''1''2C+''1''2C system are investigated in the realistic Woods--Saxon potential with Coulomb interaction. The comparison of the calculated states with the experimental data has shown, that the observed (identified) resonances may be explained by the single-channel description, i.e., as potential resonances. The quadrupole moments and transition probabilities for low-laying states have been calculated

  5. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  6. Depolarization due to the resonance tail during a fast resonance jump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruth, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of depolarization due to a fast resonance jump is studied. The dominant effect for cases of interest is not dependent on the rate of passage through resonance, but rather on the size of the resonance jump as compared to the width, epsilon, of the resonance. The results are applied to a calculation of depolarization in the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  7. Isoscalar giant resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, D. H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station (USA). Cyclotron Inst.; Ikegami, H.; Muraoka, M. [eds.

    1980-01-01

    The current status of the knowledges of giant quadrupole resonance (GQR), low energy octupole resonance (LEOR), and giant monopole resonance (GMR), is described. In the lowest order of multipole resonance, both isoscalar and isovector modes can occur. The characteristics of the GQR in light nuclei are apparent in the experimental result for Mg-24. All of the isoscalar E2 strength are known in Mg-24. The Goldhaber-Teller model is preferred over the Steinwedel-Jensen model for the giant dipole resonance (GDR) transition density. A few interesting and puzzling features have been seen in Pb-208. There is some conflict between inelastic alpha and electron scatterings. About LEOR, the RPA calculation of Liu and Brown was compared to the data for 3/sup -/ strength in Ca-40, Zr-90 and Pb-208. The calculation was employed the residual interaction of the Skyrme type. The agreement in Zr-90 was excellent. The effect of quadrupole deformation on the LEOR in Sm isotopes was large. The inelastic alpha scattering data on Al-27, Ca-40, Ti-48, Ni-58, Zn-64 and 66, Zr-90, Sn-116, 118, 120 and 124, Sm-144, 148 and 154, and Pb-208 were utilized in order to identify the GMR, and the GMR parameters were obtained. The GMR exhausting a large fraction of the sum rule was apparent in the nuclei with mass larger than 90. The splitting of the GDR and the broadening of the GQR in permanently deformed nuclei were established. The splitting of GMR was seen in Sm-154. The studies with heavy ions are also described.

  8. RED DWARF DYNAMO RAISES PUZZLE OVER INTERIORS OF LOWEST-MASS STARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has uncovered surprising evidence that powerful magnetic fields might exist around the lowest mass stars in the universe, which are near the threshold of stellar burning processes. 'New theories will have to be developed to explain how these strong fields are produced, since conventional models predict that these low mass red dwarfs should have very weak or no magnetic fields,' says Dr. Jeffrey Linsky of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics (JILA) in Boulder, Colorado. 'The Hubble observations provide clear evidence that very low mass red dwarf stars must have some form of dynamo to amplify their magnetic fields.' His conclusions are based upon Hubble's detection of a high-temperature outburst, called a flare, on the surface of the extremely small, cool red dwarf star Van Biesbroeck 10 (VB10) also known as Gliese 752B. Stellar flares are caused by intense, twisted magnetic fields that accelerate and contain gasses which are much hotter than a star's surface. Explosive flares are common on the Sun and expected for stars that have internal structures similar to our Sun's. Stars as small as VB10 are predicted to have a simpler internal structure than that of the Sun and so are not expected to generate the electric currents required for magnetic fields that drive flares. Besides leading to a clearer understanding of the interior structure of the smallest red dwarf stars known, these unexpected results might possibly shed light on brown dwarf stars. A brown dwarf is a long-sought class of astronomical object that is too small to shine like a star through nuclear fusion processes, but is too large to be considered a planet. 'Since VB10 is nearly a brown dwarf, it is likely brown dwarfs also have strong magnetic fields,' says Linsky. 'Additional Hubble searches for flares are needed to confirm this prediction.' A QUARTER-MILLION DEGREE TORCH The star VB10 and its companion star Gliese 752A make up a binary system located 19 light

  9. The Lowest Spin and Parity Levels on Two Particle System for Odd-oddNuclei 60Co and 46K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardhani, VIS; Siagian, Toga

    2000-01-01

    For obtaining the lowest spin and parity levels of odd-odd nuclei, theanalyzing of the nuclei 60 Co and 46 K has been done using delta forcemodel. The calculation is done by theoretically and compared with experiment.To get a result optimally, the data analyzed using least square method. It isshown that the lowest spin and parity level from calculation result and theexperiment result are similar. (author)

  10. Lyman alpha emission in nearby star-forming galaxies with the lowest metallicities and the highest [OIII]/[OII] ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Yuri

    2017-08-01

    The Lyman alpha line of hydrogen is the strongest emission line in galaxies and the tool of predilection for identifying and studying star-forming galaxies over a wide range of redshifts, especially in the early universe. However, it has become clear over the years that not all of the Lyman alpha radiation escapes, due to its resonant scattering on the interstellar and intergalactic medium, and absorption by dust. Although our knowledge of the high-z universe depends crucially on that line, we still do not have a complete understanding of the mechanisms behind the production, radiative transfer and escape of Lyman alpha in galaxies. We wish here to investigate these mechanisms by studying the properties of the ISM in a unique sample of 8 extreme star-forming galaxies (SFGs) that have the highest excitation in the SDSS spectral data base. These dwarf SFGs have considerably lower stellar masses and metallicities, and higher equivalent widths and [OIII]5007/[OII]3727 ratios compared to all nearby SFGs with Lyman alpha emission studied so far with COS. They are, however, very similar to the dwarf Lyman alpha emitters at redshifts 3-6, which are thought to be the main sources of reionization in the early Universe. By combining the HST/COS UV data with data in the optical range, and using photoionization and radiative transfer codes, we will be able to study the properties of the Lyman alpha in these unique objects, derive column densities of the neutral hydrogen N(HI) and compare them with N(HI) obtained from the HeI emission-line ratios in the optical spectra. We will derive Lyman alpha escape fractions and indirectly Lyman continuum escape fractions.

  11. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, M. J., E-mail: mweaver@physics.ucsb.edu; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de [Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Bouwmeester, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratorium, Universiteit Leiden, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2016-01-18

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  12. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, M. J.; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Perock, B.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Heeck, K.; Man, S. de; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si 3 N 4 with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators

  13. Nested trampoline resonators for optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, M. J.; Pepper, B.; Luna, F.; Buters, F. M.; Eerkens, H. J.; Welker, G.; Perock, B.; Heeck, K.; de Man, S.; Bouwmeester, D.

    2016-01-01

    Two major challenges in the development of optomechanical devices are achieving a low mechanical and optical loss rate and vibration isolation from the environment. We address both issues by fabricating trampoline resonators made from low pressure chemical vapor deposition Si3N4 with a distributed Bragg reflector mirror. We design a nested double resonator structure with 80 dB of mechanical isolation from the mounting surface at the inner resonator frequency, and we demonstrate up to 45 dB of isolation at lower frequencies in agreement with the design. We reliably fabricate devices with mechanical quality factors of around 400 000 at room temperature. In addition, these devices were used to form optical cavities with finesse up to 181 000 ± 1000. These promising parameters will enable experiments in the quantum regime with macroscopic mechanical resonators.

  14. Method to obtain resonances and virtual states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Fonseca, A.C.; Tomio, L.

    1982-01-01

    A naive method is proposed for the calculation of resonance position and-residue at low energies and of virtual states localized in the non-physical sheet associated to the lowest threshold of two body breaking. This method is applied to the study of some virtual states of the few nucleon system. (L.C.) [pt

  15. Acoustic Fano resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    The resonances with asymmetric Fano line-shapes were originally discovered in the context of quantum mechanics (U. Fano, Phys. Rev., 124, 1866-1878, 1961). Quantum Fano resonances were generated from destructive interference of a discrete state with a continuum one. During the last decade this concept has been applied in plasmonics where the interference between a narrowband polariton and a broader one has been used to generate electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) (M. Rahmani, et al., Laser Photon. Rev., 7, 329-349, 2013).

  16. Giant nuclear resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snover, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    Giant nuclear resonances are elementary mods of oscillation of the whole nucleus, closely related to the normal modes of oscillation of coupled mechanical systems. They occur systematically in most if not all nuclei, with oscillation energies typically in the range 10-30 MeV. One of the best - known examples is the giant electric dipole (El) resonance, in which all the protons and all the neutrons oscillate with opposite phase, producing a large time - varying electric dipole moment which acts as an effective antenna for radiating gamma ray. This paper discusses this mode as well as quadrupole and monopole modes

  17. Stratospheric ozone chemistry in the Antarctic: what determines the lowest ozone values reached and their recovery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-U. Grooß

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Balloon-borne observations of ozone from the South Pole Station have been reported to reach ozone mixing ratios below the detection limit of about 10 ppbv at the 70 hPa level by late September. After reaching a minimum, ozone mixing ratios increase to above 1 ppmv on the 70 hPa level by late December. While the basic mechanisms causing the ozone hole have been known for more than 20 yr, the detailed chemical processes determining how low the local concentration can fall, and how it recovers from the minimum have not been explored so far. Both of these aspects are investigated here by analysing results from the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS. As ozone falls below about 0.5 ppmv, a balance is maintained by gas phase production of both HCl and HOCl followed by heterogeneous reaction between these two compounds in these simulations. Thereafter, a very rapid, irreversible chlorine deactivation into HCl can occur, either when ozone drops to values low enough for gas phase HCl production to exceed chlorine activation processes or when temperatures increase above the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC threshold. As a consequence, the timing and mixing ratio of the minimum ozone depends sensitively on model parameters, including the ozone initialisation. The subsequent ozone increase between October and December is linked mainly to photochemical ozone production, caused by oxygen photolysis and by the oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane.

  18. Lowest-energy cage structures of medium-sized (ZnO){sub n} clusters with n = 15 − 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lingli; Sai, Linwei [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China and College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Jijun, E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [College of Advanced Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China and Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Dalian University of Technology), Ministry of Education, Dalian 116024 (China); Qiu, Ruifeng [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2015-01-22

    Fullerene-like cage structures of medium-sized (ZnO){sub n} clusters with n = 15 − 24 were generated by spiral algorithm and optimized using density functional theory calculations. Most of these lowest-energy cage structures contain only four-membered and six-membered rings, whereas eight-membered rings were found in the lowest-energy cages of (ZnO){sub n} (n = 19, 20, 23, 24). Our best cage configurations either reproduce or prevail the previously reported ones. The size-dependent electronic properties were also discussed.

  19. Charge-Transfer Dynamics in the Lowest Excited State of a Pentacene–Fullerene Complex: Implications for Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Joseph, Saju

    2017-10-02

    We characterize the dynamic nature of the lowest excited state in a pentacene/C60 complex on the femtosecond time scale, via a combination of ab initio molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory. We analyze the correlations between the molecular vibrations of the complex and the oscillations in the electron-transfer character of its lowest excited state, which point to vibration-induced coherences between the (pentacene-based) local-excitation (LE) state and the complex charge-transfer (CT) state. We discuss the implications of our results on this model system for the exciton-dissociation process in organic solar cells.

  20. Spin-3/2 Pentaquark Resonance Signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Lasscock; John Hedditch; Derek Leinweber; Anthony Williams; Waseem Kamleh; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anthony Thomas; Ross Young; James Zanotti

    2005-01-01

    We search for the standard lattice resonance signature of attraction between the resonance constituents which leads to a bound state at quark masses near the physical regime. We study a variety of spin-1/2 interpolators and for the first time, interpolators providing access to spin-3/2 pentaquark states. In looking for evidence of binding, a precise determination of the mass splitting between the pentaquark state and its lowest-lying decay channel is performed by constructing the effective mass splitting from the various two-point correlation functions. While the binding of the pentaquark state is not a requirement, the observation of such binding would provide compelling evidence for the existence of the theta+ pentaquark resonance. Evidence of binding is observed in the isoscalar spin-3/2 positive parity channel, making it an interesting state for further research

  1. Algorithm of resonance orders for the objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, YongGang; Zhang, JianXue

    2018-03-01

    In mechanical engineering, the object resonance phenomena often occur when the external incident wave frequency is close to object of the natural frequency. Object resonance phenomena get the maximum value when the external incident frequency is equal to object the natural frequency. Experiments found that resonance intension of the object is changed, different objects resonance phenomena present different characteristics of ladders. Based on object orders resonance characteristics, the calculation method of object orders resonance is put forward in the paper, and the application for the light and sound waves on the seven order resonance characteristics by people feel, the result error is less than 1%.Visible in this paper, the method has high accuracy and usability. The calculation method reveals that some object resonance occur present order characteristic only four types, namely the first-orders resonance characteristics, third-orders characteristics, five orders characteristic, and seven orders characteristic.

  2. Resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Wenjuan; Li, Rui; Ma, Teng; Li, Jiawen; Kirk Shung, K.; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-01-01

    We report on a resonant acoustic radiation force optical coherence elastography (ARF-OCE) technique that uses mechanical resonant frequency to characterize and identify tissues of different types. The linear dependency of the resonant frequency on the square root of Young's modulus was validated on silicone phantoms. Both the frequency response spectrum and the 3D imaging results from the agar phantoms with hard inclusions confirmed the feasibility of deploying the resonant frequency as a mec...

  3. Total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and the vertical profiles of atmospheric parameters in the lowest 200M

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Sastry, J.S.

    Vertical profiles of air temperature, wind and humidity at Raichur (16 degrees 12'N and 77 degrees 21'E) in the lowest 200m of the atmosphere are presented for the period 15-18 February 1980. The effect of the total solar eclipse, on 16 February...

  4. Lowest-order corrections to the RPA polarizability and GW self-energy of a semiconducting wire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, de H.J.; Ummels, R.T.M.; Bobbert, P.A.; van Haeringen, W.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of the addition of lowest-order vertex and self-consistency corrections to the RPA polarizability and the GW self-energy for a semiconducting wire. It is found that, when starting from a local density approximation zeroth-order Green function and systematically including these

  5. Motivated for Leisure in the Future: A Person-Centred Longitudinal Study in the Lowest Level of Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veen, Ineke; Peetsma, Thea

    2011-01-01

    Long-term future time perspective on leisure has been found to relate negatively to school effort. This was studied further by recognizing types of students based on developments in long-term leisure perspectives and comparing their development in motivation and academic achievement. Around 1200 12-13 year old students attending the lowest level…

  6. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  7. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  8. Effects of Colored Noise on Stochastic Resonance in Sensory Neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, D.; Mar, D.J.; Collins, J.J.; Grigg, P.

    1999-01-01

    Noise can assist neurons in the detection of weak signals via a mechanism known as stochastic resonance (SR). We demonstrate experimentally that SR-type effects can be obtained in rat sensory neurons with white noise, 1/f noise, or 1/f 2 noise. For low-frequency input noise, we show that the optimal noise intensity is the lowest and the output signal-to-noise ratio the highest for conventional white noise. We also show that under certain circumstances, 1/f noise can be better than white noise for enhancing the response of a neuron to a weak signal. We present a theory to account for these results and discuss the biological implications of 1/f noise. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  9. Screening Resonances In Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, P.

    1998-01-01

    When it was suggested that a new recombination mechanism (Resonant Radiative Recombination (RRR)) which, based on very general physical arguments, should happen in dense plasmas and promises to provide useful information for the local temperature and density diagnostics of plasmas, they assumed the existence of screening resonances. For model potentials the existence of screening resonances has been demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt in a number of calculations. The key question, how well those potentials describe the dominant effects of a real plasma remains open. The relation of theoretical predictions to experimentally measurable effects is an important issue at the present stage of their research. In particular, RRR is expected to account for enhanced recombination rates of low energetic electrons with their ions, since the first stage is the resonant capture of a slow electron by an atom or ion. The mechanism that traps an electron is a combination of complicated many-body interactions of the ions and electrons. For clarity they start here, however, with a discussion in terms of local potential traps the shapes of which are determined predominantly and in an average way by two factors: the degree of screening present at the ionic site and the degree of short-range order in the immediate neighborhood of this ion

  10. Cyclotron resonance in bilayer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, E A; Jiang, Z; Tung, L-C; Schwartz, M E; Takita, M; Wang, Y-J; Kim, P; Stormer, H L

    2008-02-29

    We present the first measurements of cyclotron resonance of electrons and holes in bilayer graphene. In magnetic fields up to B=18 T, we observe four distinct intraband transitions in both the conduction and valence bands. The transition energies are roughly linear in B between the lowest Landau levels, whereas they follow square root[B] for the higher transitions. This highly unusual behavior represents a change from a parabolic to a linear energy dispersion. The density of states derived from our data generally agrees with the existing lowest order tight binding calculation for bilayer graphene. However, in comparing data to theory, a single set of fitting parameters fails to describe the experimental results.

  11. 996 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    996. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 2. 997. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 3. 998. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 4. 999. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 5. 1000. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 6. 1001. RESONANCE. November 2013. Page 7. 1002. RESONANCE. November 2013 ...

  12. 817 RESONANCE September 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    817. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 2. 818. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 3. 819. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 4. 820. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 5. 821. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 6. 822. RESONANCE ⎜ September 2013. Page 7. 823. RESONANCE ⎜ September ...

  13. 369 RESONANCE April 2016

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    369. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 2. 370. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 3. 371. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 4. 372. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 5. 373. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 6. 374. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016. Page 7. 375. RESONANCE ⎜ April 2016.

  14. Autostereogram resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavey, Sean; Rae, Katherine; Murray, Adam; Courtial, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Autostereograms, or "Magic Eye" pictures, are repeating patterns designed to give the illusion of depth. Here we discuss optical resonators that create light patterns which, when viewed from a suitable position by a monocular observer, are autostereograms of the three-dimensional shape of one of the mirror surfaces.

  15. Resonance of curved nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering and Geotechnics, Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Ding, W [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States); Ruoff, R S [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208-3111 (United States)

    2006-08-23

    The effects of non-ideal experimental configuration on the mechanical resonance of boron (B) nanowires (NWs) were studied to obtain the corrected value for the Young's modulus. The following effects have been theoretically considered: (i) the presence of intrinsic curvature (ii) non-ideal clamps (iii) spurious masses (iv) coating layer, and (v) large displacements. An energy-based analytical analysis was developed to treat such effects and their interactions. Here, we focus on treating the effect of the intrinsic curvature on the mechanical resonance. The analytical approach has been confirmed by numerical FEM analysis. A parallax method was used to obtain the three-dimensional geometry of the NW.

  16. Millimeter-wave and Submillimeter-wave Spectra of Aminoacetonitrile in the Three Lowest Vibrational Excited States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Kobayashi, Kaori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Fujita, Chiho; Ozeki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ozeki@env.sci.toho-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, 274-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    It is important to study possible precursors of amino acids such as glycine to enable future searches in interstellar space. Aminoacetonitrile (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CN) is one of the most feasible molecules for this purpose. This molecule was already detected toward Sgr B2(N). Aminoacetonitrile has a few low-lying vibrational excited states, and transitions within these states may be found in space. In this study, the pure-rotational transitions in the three lowest vibrational states in the 80–450 GHz range have been assigned and analyzed. It was found to be very important to include Coriolis coupling between the two lowest vibrational fundamentals, while the third one was unperturbed. The partition function was evaluated considering these new results.

  17. Computer simulation of 2D grain growth using a cellular automata model based on the lowest energy principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yizhu; Ding Hanlin; Liu Liufa; Shin, Keesam

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, topology and kinetics of normal grain growth in two-dimension were studied by computer simulation using a cellular automata (Canada) model based on the lowest energy principle. The thermodynamic energy that follows Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics has been introduced into this model for the calculation of energy change. The transition that can reduce the system energy to the lowest level is chosen to occur when there is more than one possible transition direction. The simulation results show that the kinetics of normal grain growth follows the Burke equation with the growth exponent m = 2. The analysis of topology further indicates that normal grain growth can be simulated fairly well by the present CA model. The vanishing of grains with different number of sides is discussed in the simulation

  18. Lowest excited-state impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW: magnetic field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddou El Ghazi; Anouar Jorio; Izeddine Zorkani

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the magnetic field effect on the lowest excited-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. The calculations are performed within the framework of the effective mass approximation. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is taken into account to describe the lateral confinement strength. The numerical results show that: (i) the probability density is the largest on a circularity whose radius is the effective radius and (ii) the lowest excited-state binding energy is the largest when an impurity is located on this circularity while it starts to decrease as the impurity is away from the circularity. (author)

  19. The role of resonances in chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecker, G.; Rafael, E. de

    1988-09-01

    The strong interactions of low-lying meson resonances (spin ≤ 1) with the octet of pseudoscalar mesons (π,Κ,η) are considered to lowest order in the derivative expansion of chiral SU(3). The resonance contributions to the coupling constants of the O(p 4 ) effective chiral lagrangian involving pseudoscalar fields only are determined. These low-energy coupling constants are found to be dominated by the resonance contributions. Although we do not treat the vector and axial-vector mesons as gauge bosons of local chiral symmetry, vector meson dominance emerges as a prominent result of our analysis. As a further application of chiral resonance couplings, we calculate the electromagnetic pion mass difference to lowest order in chiral perturbation theory with explicit resonance fields. 29 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  20. Helicity amplitudes and electromagnetic decays of hyperon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauteren, T. van; Ryckebusch, J.; Metsch, B.; Petry, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    We present results for the helicity amplitudes of the lowest-lying hyperon resonances Y * , computed within the framework of the Bonn Constituent-Quark model, which is based on the Bethe-Salpeter approach. The seven parameters entering the model were fitted to the best-known baryon masses. Accordingly, the results for the helicity amplitudes are genuine predictions. Some hyperon resonances are seen to couple more strongly to a virtual photon with finite Q 2 than to a real photon. Other Y * 's, such as the S 01 (1670) Λ-resonance or the S 11 (1620) Σ-resonance, couple very strongly to real photons. We present a qualitative argument for predicting the behaviour of the helicity asymmetries of baryon resonances at high Q 2 . (orig.)

  1. People in sub-Saharan Africa rate their health and health care among the lowest in the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Angus S; Tortora, Robert

    2015-03-01

    The health of people in sub-Saharan Africa is a major global concern. However, data are weak, and little is known about how people in the region perceive their health or their health care. We used data from the Gallup World Poll in 2012 to document sub-Saharan Africans' perceived health status, their satisfaction with health care, their contact with medical professionals, and the priority they attach to health care. In comparison to other regions of the world, sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest ratings for well-being and the lowest satisfaction with health care. It also has the second-lowest perception of personal health, after only the former Soviet Union and its Eastern European satellites. HIV prevalence is positively correlated with perceived improvements in health care in countries with high prevalence. This is consistent with an improvement in at least some health care services as a result of the largely aid-funded rollout of antiretroviral treatment. Even so, sub-Saharan Africans do not prioritize health care as a matter of policy, although donors are increasingly shifting their aid efforts in the region toward health. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. Resonating Statements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelholt, Morten; Jensen, Tina Blegind

    2015-01-01

    IT projects are often complex arrangements of technological components, social actions, and organizational transformation that are difficult to manage in practice. This paper takes an analytical discourse perspective to explore the process of legitimizing IT projects. We introduce the concept...... of resonating statements to highlight how central actors navigate in various discourses over time. Particularly, the statements and actions of an IT project manager are portrayed to show how individuals can legitimize actions by connecting statements to historically produced discourses. The case study...... as part of a feedback loop to re-attach the localized IT project to the broader national discourse. The paper concludes with reflections on how to actively build on resonating statements as a strategic resource for legitimizing IT projects...

  3. Shape resonances in molecular fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    A shape resonance is a quasibound state in which a particle is temporarily trapped by a potential barrier (i.e., the shape of the potential), through which it may eventually tunnel and escape. This simple mechanism plays a prominent role in a variety of excitation processes in molecules, ranging from vibrational excitation by slow electrons to ionization of deep core levels by x-rays. Moreover, their localized nature makes shape resonances a unifying link between otherwise dissimilar circumstances. One example is the close connection between shape resonances in electron-molecule scattering and in molecular photoionization. Another is the frequent persistence of free-molecule shape resonant behavior upon adsorption on a surface or condensation into a molecular solid. The main focus of this article is a discussion of the basic properties of shape resonances in molecular fields, illustrated by the more transparent examples studied over the last ten years. Other aspects to be discussed are vibrational effects of shape resonances, connections between shape resonances in different physical settings, and examples of shape resonant behavior in more complex cases, which form current challenges in this field

  4. Gravitoelectromagnetic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsagas, Christos G.

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between gravitational and electromagnetic radiation has a rather long research history. It is well known, in particular, that gravity-wave distortions can drive propagating electromagnetic signals. Since forced oscillations provide the natural stage for resonances to occur, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances have been investigated as a means of more efficient gravity-wave detection methods. In this report, we consider the coupling between the Weyl and the Maxwell fields on a Minkowski background, which also applies to astrophysical environments where gravity is weak, at the second perturbative level. We use covariant methods that describe gravitational waves via the transverse component of the shear, instead of pure-tensor metric perturbations. The aim is to calculate the properties of the electromagnetic signal, which emerges from the interaction of its linear counterpart with an incoming gravitational wave. Our analysis shows how the wavelength and the amplitude of the gravitationally driven electromagnetic wave vary with the initial conditions. More specifically, for certain initial data, the amplitude of the induced electromagnetic signal is found to diverge. Analogous, diverging, gravitoelectromagnetic resonances were also reported in cosmology. Given that, we extend our Minkowski space study to cosmology and discuss analogies and differences in the physics and in the phenomenology of the Weyl-Maxwell coupling between the aforementioned two physical environments.

  5. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  6. Design of a β=0.175 2-gap spoke resonator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krawczyk, F.L.; Chan, K.C.D.; Garnett, R.; Gentzlinger, R.; LaFave, R.P.; Kelley, J.P.; Schrage, D.L.; Tajima, T.; Roybal, P.L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic and structural design of a low-β superconducting spoke resonator for a beam-test in the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). This test is part of the Advanced Accelerator Applications (AAA) project. Recently, the sole use of superconducting resonators from 6.7 MeV on has been approved for this project. The beam test will use the lowestresonator from this accelerator design. The choices of the cavity dimensions are driven by its use immediately after the LEDA Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ). The frequency is 350 MHz, the length corresponds to a geometric β (β g ) of 0.175. Our design approach has been to carry out an integrated RF and mechanical design from the start. The final cavity is well understood in terms of RF and mechanical properties. The RF properties, like Q, R/Q, peak surface fields and acceleration efficiency are very reasonable for such a low-β structure. The design also includes power coupler, vacuum and pick-up ports and their influences. The mechanical design added tuning sensitivities, tuning forces, stiffening schemes and the understanding of stresses under various load conditions. This presentation reflects changes in the coupling port and the beam aperture compared to a previously presented design [1]. (author)

  7. Theoretical treatment of the processes involving the dipole transitions to the lowest exciton states in hexagonal semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, L. E.

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of the two-photon transitions to the An=1 exciton level and the resonant Raman scattering of light by LO-phonons is given for the hexagonal semiconductors A2B6, taking into account the influence of the complex top valence band and anisotropy of the exciton effective mass.

  8. 1004 RESONANCE November 2013

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    1004. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 2. 1005. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 3. 1006. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 4. 1007. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 5. 1008. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 6. 1009. RESONANCE │ November 2013. Page 7. 1010. RESONANCE ...

  9. Even order snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    We found that the perturbed spin tune due to the imperfection resonance plays an important role in beam depolarization at snake resonances. We also found that even order snake resonances exist in the overlapping intrinsic and imperfection resonances. Due to the perturbed spin tune shift of imperfection resonances, each snake resonance splits into two

  10. Miniaturization of metamaterial electrical resonators at the terahertz spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamanos, Theodosios D.; Kantartzis, Nikolaos V.

    2014-05-01

    An efficient methodology for the modification of electrical resonators in order to be readily applicable at the terahertz regime is developed in this paper. To this aim, the proposed miniaturization technique starts from the conventional resonator which, without any change, exhibits the lowest possible electrical resonance for minimum dimensions. Subsequently, a set of interdigital capacitors is embedded in the original structure to increase capaci- tance, while their impact on the main resonance is investigated through computational simulations. Furthermore, to augment the inductance of the initial resonator, and, hence reduce the resonance frequency, the concept of spiral inductor elements is introduced. Again, results for the featured configuration with the additional elements are numerically obtained and all effects due to their presence are carefully examined. Finally, the new alterations are combined together and their in influence on the resonance position and quality is thoroughly studied.

  11. The optimal value of BMI for the lowest risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women aged 40-88 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzek, A; Kozieł, S; Ignasiak, Z

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to establish the optimal values of the body mass index (BMI) which would indicate the most favourable preservation of the bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. The material consists of the data of 369 healthy women aged between 40 and 88 years (mean age 67.84, SD=6.70) inhabitants of Wrocław, which were followed up between 2001 and 2006. The absolute measure of bone mineral density (BMD) of the femoral neck was assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), expressed in g/(100mm(2)) and was transformed to T-score values. According to the value of BMI, the women were divided into eight groups, the reference group with value between 18.0 and 21.9kg/m(2) and seven other groups beginning with the value 22.0 with a 2-point interval. Postmenopausal status was defined according to the occurrence of menstruation within the last 360 days. The women with osteopenia and osteoporosis were pooled together and comprised the risk group, whereas the other women comprised the normal group (T-score values above -1.0). The adjusted odds ratio showed the highest value for intervals between 24.0 and 25.9 units of BMI, and the lowest value for interval 26.0-27.9 units of BMI. The Youden index showed the lowest value in the 26.0-27.9BMI kg/m(2) interval. For our sample the optimal value of BMI, with the lowest risk of osteopenia and/or osteoporosis was the value of 26.9kg/m(2). A further increase of BMI does not result in a favourable effect on the bones, it rather intensifies negative phenomena in the body resulting in the onset of many diseases. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Electron mobility on the surface of liquid Helium: influence of surface level atoms and depopulation of lowest subbands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Dyugaev, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility is examined. We calculate the contribution to the electron scattering rate from the surface level atoms (SLAs), proposed in [10]. This contribution is substantial at low temperatures T < 0.5, when the He vapor concentration is exponentially small. We also study the effect of depopulation of the lowest energy subband, which leads to an increase in the electron mobility at high temperature. The results explain certain long-standing discrepancies between the existing theory and experiment on electron mobility on the surface of liquid helium

  13. The constraint for the lowest Landau level and the effective field theory approach for the fractional quantum hall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongshui; Su Zhaobin.

    1992-09-01

    By applying the Dirac quantization method, we build the constraint that all electrons are in the lowest Landau level into the Chern-Simons field theory approach for the fractional quantum Hall system and show that the constraint can be transmuted from hierarchy to hierarchy. For a finite system, we derive that the action for each hierarchy can be split into two parts: a surface part provides the action for the edge excitations while the remaining part is precisely the bulk action for the next hierarchy. An the action for the edge could be decoupled from the bulk only at the hierarchy filling. (author). 16 refs

  14. Whole body traveling wave magnetic resonance imaging at high field strength: homogeneity, efficiency, and energy deposition as compared with traditional excitation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bei; Sodickson, Daniel K; Lattanzi, Riccardo; Duan, Qi; Stoeckel, Bernd; Wiggins, Graham C

    2012-04-01

    In 7 T traveling wave imaging, waveguide modes supported by the scanner radiofrequency shield are used to excite an MR signal in samples or tissue which may be several meters away from the antenna used to drive radiofrequency power into the system. To explore the potential merits of traveling wave excitation for whole-body imaging at 7 T, we compare numerical simulations of traveling wave and TEM systems, and juxtapose full-wave electrodynamic simulations using a human body model with in vivo human traveling wave imaging at multiple stations covering the entire body. The simulated and in vivo traveling wave results correspond well, with strong signal at the periphery of the body and weak signal deep in the torso. These numerical results also illustrate the complicated wave behavior that emerges when a body is present. The TEM resonator simulation allowed comparison of traveling wave excitation with standard quadrature excitation, showing that while the traveling wave B +1 per unit drive voltage is much less than that of the TEM system, the square of the average B +1 compared to peak specific absorption rate (SAR) values can be comparable in certain imaging planes. Both systems produce highly inhomogeneous excitation of MR signal in the torso, suggesting that B(1) shimming or other parallel transmission methods are necessary for 7 T whole body imaging. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET as a Tool for Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms for Maturation of the Shigella Type III Secretion Needle Tip Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Picking

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET provides a powerful tool for monitoring intermolecular interactions and a sensitive technique for studying Å-level protein conformational changes. One system that has particularly benefited from the sensitivity and diversity of FRET measurements is the maturation of the Shigella type III secretion apparatus (T3SA needle tip complex. The Shigella T3SA delivers effector proteins into intestinal cells to promote bacterial invasion and spread. The T3SA is comprised of a basal body that spans the bacterial envelope and a needle with an exposed tip complex that matures in response to environmental stimuli. FRET measurements demonstrated bile salt binding by the nascent needle tip protein IpaD and also mapped resulting structural changes which led to the recruitment of the translocator IpaB. At the needle tip IpaB acts as a sensor for host cell contact but prior to secretion, it is stored as a heterodimeric complex with the chaperone IpgC. FRET analyses showed that chaperone binding to IpaB’s N-terminal domain causes a conformational change in the latter. These FRET analyses, with other biophysical methods, have been central to understanding T3SA maturation and will be highlighted, focusing on the details of the FRET measurements and the relevance to this particular system.

  16. Magnetoelectric coupling mechanisms in YMn2-xFexO5 and NdFe3(BO3)4 revealed by resonant X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partzsch, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Multiferroic materials with a coupled ordering of electric and magnetic moments could be used to build energy-efficient, magnetic computer memory that is written with an electrical field. To understand the interaction between the magnetic and electric ordering in such materials, two examples, namely yttrium manganate YMn 2 O 5 and neodymium iron borate NdFe 3 (BO 3 ) 4 , are studied by means of resonant x-ray diffraction. The important role of a pure electronic contribution to the ferroelectric polarization is shown in YMn 2 O 5 . Furthermore, substitution of Fe can change the magnetic order of YMn 2 O 5 from antiferromagnetic into ferrimagnetic, allowing the storage of easily readable magnetic information. Therefore the change of the magnetic structure upon small Fe substitution is studied. Although most of the magnetic structure of the parent compound is kept, the Fe moments have larger components along the c-direction. In NdFe 3 (BO 3 ) 4 the microscopic origin of the magnetoelectric coupling is addressed as the consequence of the frustration of the Fe and Nd magnetic sublattices. The application of an electrical field shifts the balance from the helical to the collinear magnetic domains, revealing again the strong magnetoelectric coupling.

  17. Multichannel calculation of Ds* vector states and the DsJ+(2632) resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beveren, Eef van; Rupp, George

    2004-01-01

    We study bound states below threshold and resonances above threshold in the D 0 K + and D s + η systems, using a many-coupled-channel model for nonexotic meson-meson scattering applied to states with the quantum numbers of cs-bar quark-antiquark vector mesons. We fit the ground state at 2.112 GeV, whence the lowest resonances in D 0 K + come out at 2.61, 2.72, 3.03, and 3.08 GeV. The resonance at 2.61 GeV acquires a width of about 8 MeV, while its partial P wave cross section is up to 6 times larger in D s η than in D 0 K + , provided a mechanism accounting for Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-forbidden decays is included. The latter finding is in agreement with the observations of the SELEX Collaboration with respect to the recently reported D sJ + (2632) resonance. Therefore, we conclude that the D sJ + (2632) is probably the first recurrence of the D s *(2112) meson

  18. Optimal design of resonant-mass gravitational wave antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    A new generation of resonant-mass gravitational wave antennas, to be operated at ultralow temperatures, is under development by several research groups. This paper presents a theory for the optimal design of the new antennas. First, a general sensitivity limit is derived, which may be applied to any linear instrument for which the design figure of merit is the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). By replacing the amplifier by its noise resistance and considering the energy dissipated in the noise resistance when a signal is applied, it is possible to show that the optimally filtered SNR is less than or equal to E/sub r//(kT/sub n/), the energy dissipated in the noise resistance divided by Boltzmann's constant times the amplifier noise temperature. This sensitivity limit will be achieved if the instrument is lossless, in which case the energy dissipated in the noise resistance is equal to the energy deposited in the system by the signal. For resonant-mass gravitational wave antennas, if the amplifier is identified as the mechanical amplifier (transducer and electronic amplifier together), then the lossless limit is accessible in practice. A useful point of view is that optimal antenna designs are those that are most loss tolerant: those that achieve the limiting SNR with the lowest possible mechanical Q values. The techniques of network synthesis may be used to design mechanical networks for matching the main antenna mass to the mechanical amplifier that are optimal in this sense. A class of loss-tolerant networks has been synthesized; their properties are summarized in a set of design charts that give the Q requirements and bandwidth as a function of the number of modes, the temperature, and the amplifier noise resistance and noise temperature

  19. ACCELERATING COMPACT OBJECT MERGERS IN TRIPLE SYSTEMS WITH THE KOZAI RESONANCE: A MECHANISM FOR 'PROMPT' TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE, GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND OTHER EXOTICA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Todd A.

    2011-01-01

    White dwarf-white dwarf (WD-WD) and neutron star-neutron star (NS-NS) mergers may produce Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), respectively. A general problem is how to produce binaries with semi-major axes small enough to merge in significantly less than the Hubble time (t H ), and thus accommodate the observation that these events closely follow episodes of star formation. I explore the possibility that such systems are not binaries at all, but actually coeval, or dynamical formed, triple systems. The tertiary induces Kozai oscillations in the inner binary, driving it to high eccentricity, and reducing its gravitational wave (GW) merger timescale. This effect significantly increases the allowed range of binary period P such that the merger time is t merge H . In principle, Chandrasekhar-mass binaries with P ∼ 300 days can merge in ∼ H if they contain a prograde solar-mass tertiary at high enough inclination. For retrograde tertiaries, the maximum P such that t merge ∼ H is yet larger. In contrast, P ∼< 0.3 days is required in the absence of a tertiary. I discuss implications of these findings for the production of transients formed via compact object binary mergers. Based on the statistics of solar-type binaries, I argue that many such binaries should be in triple systems affected by the Kozai resonance. If true, expectations for the mHz GW signal from individual sources, the diffuse background, and the foreground for GW experiments like LISA are modified. This work motivates future studies of triples systems of A, B, and O stars, and new types of searches for WD-WD binaries in triple systems.

  20. Separable expansions for virtual states and resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.; Fonseca, A.C.; Tomio, L.

    1983-01-01

    Finite rank expansions for two- and three-body t matrices are analytically continued to the unphysical sheet of the complex energy plane associated with the lowest two-body scattering threshold in order to obtain the position and residue of the virtual state and resonance poles. The present method is applied to study the 1 S 0 virtual state of two nucleons, the Efimov virtual states of three identical bosons, and the doublet virtual state of three nucleons

  1. High quality factor gigahertz frequencies in nanomechanical diamond resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Gaidarzhy, Alexei; Imboden, Matthias; Mohanty, Pritiraj; Rankin, Janet; Sheldon, Brian W.

    2007-01-01

    We report actuation and detection of gigahertz-range resonance frequencies in nano-crystalline diamond mechanical resonators. High order transverse vibration modes are measured in coupled-beam resonators exhibiting frequencies up to 1.441 GHz. The cantilever-array design of the resonators translates the gigahertz-range resonant motion of micron-long cantilever elements to the displacement of the central supporting structure. Use of nano-crystalline diamond further increases the frequency comp...

  2. Detection of bacteria based on the thermomechanical noise of a nanomechanical resonator: origin of the response and detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, D; Tamayo, J; Mertens, J; Calleja, M; Villanueva, L G; Zaballos, A

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the effect of bacteria adsorption on the resonant frequency of microcantilevers as a function of the adsorption position and vibration mode. The resonant frequencies were measured from the Brownian fluctuations of the cantilever tip. We found that the sign and amount of the resonant frequency change is determined by the position and extent of the adsorption on the cantilever with regard to the shape of the vibration mode. To explain these results, a theoretical one-dimensional model is proposed. We obtain analytical expressions for the resonant frequency that accurately fit the data obtained by the finite element method. More importantly, the theory data shows a good agreement with the experiments. Our results indicate that there exist two opposite mechanisms that can produce a significant resonant frequency shift: the stiffness and the mass of the bacterial cells. Based on the thermomechanical noise, we analyse the regions of the cantilever of lowest and highest sensitivity to the attachment of bacteria. The combination of high vibration modes and the confinement of the adsorption to defined regions of the cantilever allows the detection of single bacterial cells by only measuring the Brownian fluctuations. This study can be extended to smaller cantilevers and other biological systems such as proteins and nucleic acids

  3. Resonance sensitivity of hydropower and pumping stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, M.; Halanay, A.

    1984-09-01

    Comparative analysis of resonance diagrams for several hydropower and pumping stations with surge tanks and air chambers shows large differences in the maximum resonance pressures. A strategy is advocated which consists of hydraulic resonance computations coupled with practical surveillance measures during the operation of resonance sensitive hydraulic systems. A fundamental hydraulic scheme is considered consisting of a reservoir, a pressure tunnel, a surge tank, a penstock and a turbine combined into a hydropower station. It is suggested that for each hydraulic surge system it is necessary to carry out special resonance analyses following the normal procedure to obtain the resonance sensitivity. For hydraulic systems which are resonance sensitive, mechanical electronic equipment should be used to measure non-stationary pressures of the water in the conduit as a way of continuous surveillance during functioning. 6 references, 6 figures.

  4. Hyperdynamic CSF motion profiles found in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease assessed by fluid mechanics derived from magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, Ken; Matsumae, Mitsunori; Hayashi, Naokazu; Hirayama, Akihiro; Yatsushiro, Satoshi; Kuroda, Kagayaki

    2017-10-18

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) does not only ascertain morphological features, but also measures physiological properties such as fluid velocity or pressure gradient. The purpose of this study was to investigate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in patients with morphological abnormalities such as enlarged brain ventricles and subarachnoid spaces. We used a time-resolved three dimensional phase contrast (3D-PC) MRI technique to quantitatively evaluate CSF dynamics in the Sylvian aqueduct of healthy elderly individuals and patients with either idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) or Alzheimer's disease (AD) presenting with ventricular enlargement. Nineteen healthy elderly individuals, ten iNPH patients, and seven AD patients (all subjects ≥ 60 years old) were retrospectively evaluated 3D-PC MRI. The CSF velocity, pressure gradient, and rotation in the Sylvian aqueduct were quantified and compared between the three groups using Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Mann-Whitney U tests. There was no statistically significant difference in velocity among the three groups. The pressure gradient was not significantly different between the iNPH and AD groups, but was significantly different between the iNPH group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001), and similarly, between the AD group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001). Rotation was not significantly different between the iNPH and AD groups, but was significantly different between the iNPH group and healthy controls (p < 0.001), and similarly, between the AD group and the healthy controls (p < 0.001). Quantitative analysis of CSF dynamics with time resolved 3D-PC MRI revealed differences and similarities in the Sylvian aqueduct between healthy elderly individuals, iNPH patients, and AD patients. The results showed that CSF motion is in a hyperdynamic state in both iNPH and AD patient groups compared to healthy elderly individuals, and that iNPH patients and AD patients display similar CSF motion profiles.

  5. Extra-large pore zeolite (ITQ-40) with the lowest framework density containing double four- and double three-rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabañas, M. J.; Jiang, J.; Afeworki, M.; Dorset, D. L.; Soled, S. L.; Strohmaier, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    The first zeolite structure (ITQ-40) that contains double four (D4) and double three (D3) member ring secondary building units has been synthesized by introducing Ge and NH4F and working in concentrated synthesis gels. It is the first time that D3-Rs have been observed in a zeolite structure. As was previously analyzed [Brunner GO, Meier, WM (1989) Nature 337:146–147], such a structure has a very low framework density (10.1 T/1,000 Å3). Indeed, ITQ-40 has the lowest framework density ever achieved in oxygen-containing zeolites. Furthermore, it contains large pore openings, i.e., 15-member rings parallel to the [001] hexagonal axis and 16-member ring channels perpendicular to this axis. The results presented here push ahead the possibilities of zeolites for uses in electronics, control delivery of drugs and chemicals, as well as for catalysis. PMID:20660773

  6. Effects of Pop III to PopII transition on the lowest metallicity stars in dwarf galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yimiao; Keres, Dusan; FIRE Team

    2018-01-01

    We examine the effects of the enrichments from Population III (Pop III) stars on the formation and properties of the first generation of the Population II (Pop II) stars. Pop III stars begin to transition towards Pop II stars when the metals dispersed in Pop III supernovae pollute the nearby gas. However, details of this transition are still largely unknown. We use dwarf galaxy simulations from the Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) project to identify the star-forming gas that is likely to be pre-enriched by Pop III supernovae and follow the stars that form in such gas. This pre-enrichment will leave the signature in the lowest metallicity stars that can be used to better constrain the details of the Pop III-to-Pop II transition.

  7. Consistency of the Hamiltonian formulation of the lowest-order effective action of the complete Horava theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellorin, Jorge; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2011-01-01

    We perform the Hamiltonian analysis for the lowest-order effective action, up to second order in derivatives, of the complete Horava theory. The model includes the invariant terms that depend on ∂ i lnN proposed by Blas, Pujolas, and Sibiryakov. We show that the algebra of constraints closes. The Hamiltonian constraint is of second-class behavior and it can be regarded as an elliptic partial differential equation for N. The linearized version of this equation is a Poisson equation for N that can be solved consistently. The preservation in time of the Hamiltonian constraint yields an equation that can be consistently solved for a Lagrange multiplier of the theory. The model has six propagating degrees of freedom in the phase space, corresponding to three even physical modes. When compared with the λR model studied by us in a previous paper, it lacks two second-class constraints, which leads to the extra even mode.

  8. Non-mineralized fibrocartilage shows the lowest elastic modulus in the rabbit supraspinatus tendon insertion: measurement with scanning acoustic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Hirotaka; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Kokubun, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    The acoustic properties of rabbit supraspinatus tendon insertions were measured by scanning acoustic microscopy. After cutting parallel to the supraspinatus tendon fibers, specimens were fixed with 10% neutralized formalin, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. Both the sound speed and the attenuation constant were measured at the insertion site. The 2-dimensional distribution of the sound speed and that of the attenuation constant were displayed with color-coded scales. The acoustic properties reflected both the histologic architecture and the collagen type. In the tendon proper and the non-mineralized fibrocartilage, the sound speed and attenuation constant gradually decreased as the predominant collagen type changed from I to II. In the mineralized fibrocartilage, they increased markedly with the mineralization of the fibrocartilaginous tissue. These results indicate that the non-mineralized fibrocartilage shows the lowest elastic modulus among 4 zones at the insertion site, which could be interpreted as an adaptation to various types of biomechanical stress.

  9. Lowest lying 2+ and 3- vibrational states in Pb, Sn, and Ni isotopes in relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.; Ring, P.

    2006-01-01

    The excitation energies and electric multipole decay rates of the lowest lying 2 + and 3 - vibrational states in Pb, Sn, and Ni nuclei are calculated following relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation formalism based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov mean field. Two sets of Lagrangian parameters, NL1 and NL3, are used to investigate the effect of the nuclear force. Overall there is good agreement with the available experimental data for a wide range of mass numbers considered here, and the NL3 set seems to be a better choice. However, strictly speaking, these studies point toward the need of a new set of force parameters that could produce more realistic single-particle levels, at least in vicinity of the Fermi surface, of a wide range of nuclear masses

  10. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1980-01-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (author)

  11. Applied neutron resonance theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.

    1978-07-01

    Utilisation of resonance theory in basic and applications-oriented neutron cross section work is reviewed. The technically important resonance formalisms, principal concepts and methods as well as representative computer programs for resonance parameter extraction from measured data, evaluation of resonance data, calculation of Doppler-broadened cross sections and estimation of level-statistical quantities from resonance parameters are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Resonant MEMS tunable VCSEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Chung, Il-Sug; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how resonant excitation of a microelectro-mechanical system can be used to increase the tuning range of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser two-fold by enabling both blue- and red-shifting of the wavelength. In this way a short-cavity design enabling wide tuning range can...... be realized. A high-index-contrast subwavelength grating verticalcavity surface-emitting laser with a monolithically integrated anti-reflection coating is presented. By incorporating an antireflection coating into the air cavity, higher tuning efficiency can be achieved at low threshold current. The first...

  13. Resonant Tunneling Spin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.

    2007-01-01

    The resonant tunneling spin pump is a proposed semiconductor device that would generate spin-polarized electron currents. The resonant tunneling spin pump would be a purely electrical device in the sense that it would not contain any magnetic material and would not rely on an applied magnetic field. Also, unlike prior sources of spin-polarized electron currents, the proposed device would not depend on a source of circularly polarized light. The proposed semiconductor electron-spin filters would exploit the Rashba effect, which can induce energy splitting in what would otherwise be degenerate quantum states, caused by a spin-orbit interaction in conjunction with a structural-inversion asymmetry in the presence of interfacial electric fields in a semiconductor heterostructure. The magnitude of the energy split is proportional to the electron wave number. Theoretical studies have suggested the possibility of devices in which electron energy states would be split by the Rashba effect and spin-polarized currents would be extracted by resonant quantum-mechanical tunneling.

  14. Electrochemical and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of the Mechanism of Oxidation of Phenazine-di-N-oxide in the Presence of Isopropyl alcohol at Glassy Carbon and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakovskaya, S.I.; Kulikov, A.V.; Sviridova, L.N.; Stenina, E.V.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The mechanism of oxidation of phenazine-di-N-oxide in the presence of isopropyl alcohol was studied. • The results are explained in terms of the E 1 C 1 E 2 C 2 mechanism of the two-stage electrode process. • The total two-electron catalytic oxidation of i-PrOH in the complex with the phenazine-di-N-oxide radical cation was assumed to occur. - Abstract: The mechanism of oxidation of phenazine-di-N-oxide in the presence of isopropyl alcohol was studied by cyclic voltammetry at glassy carbon (GC) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) electrodes in 0.1 M LiClO 4 solutions in acetonitrile. The adsorption of phenazine-di-N-oxide at SWCNT electrode in 0.1 M LiClO 4 solution in acetonitrile was investigated by measurement of the dependence of the differential double layer capacitance of the electrode C on potential E. The effect of isopropyl alcohol on the shape of cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of phenazine-di-N-oxide and the intensity of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) signal of its radical cation was investigated. The catalytic currents were recorded at the oxidation of phenazine-di-N-oxide at SWCNT and GC electrodes in the presence of isopropyl alcohol. The results were explained in terms of the E 1 C 1 E 2 C 2 mechanism of two-stage electrode process characterized by catalytic current recorded at the second electrode stage. The overall two-electron catalytic oxidation of isopropyl alcohol in complex with the phenazine-di-N-oxide radical cation was assumed to occur. It was shown that SWCNT electrodes can be used in the electrocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds in the presence of electrochemically generated phenazine-di-N-oxide radical cation

  15. Ultraminiature resonator accelerometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, D.R.; Kravitz, S.H.; Vianco, P.T.

    1996-04-01

    A new family of microminiature sensors and clocks is being developed with widespread application potential for missile and weapons applications, as biomedical sensors, as vehicle status monitors, and as high-volume animal identification and health sensors. To satisfy fundamental technology development needs, a micromachined clock and an accelerometer have initially been undertaken as development projects. A thickness-mode quartz resonator housed in a micromachined silicon package is used as the frequency-modulated basic component of the sensor family. Resonator design philosophy follows trapped energy principles and temperature compensation methodology through crystal orientation control, with operation in the 20--100 MHz range, corresponding to quartz wafer thicknesses in the 75--15 micron range. High-volume batch-processing manufacturing is utilized, with package and resonator assembly at the wafer level. Chemical etching of quartz, as well as micromachining of silicon, achieves the surface and volume mechanical features necessary to fashion the resonating element and the mating package. Integration of the associated oscillator and signal analysis circuitry into the silicon package is inherent to the realization of a size reduction requirement. A low temperature In and In/Sn bonding technology allows assembly of the dissimilar quartz and silicon materials, an otherwise challenging task. Unique design features include robust vibration and shock performance, capacitance sensing with micromachined diaphragms, circuit integration, capacitance-to-frequency transduction, and extremely small dimensioning. Accelerometer sensitivities were measured in the 1--3 ppm/g range for the milligram proof-mass structures employed in the prototypes evaluated to date.

  16. Electron impact excitation of the lowest doublet and quartet core-excited autoionizing states in Rb atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovik, A; Roman, V; Zatsarinny, O; Bartschat, K

    2013-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of the (4p 5 5s 2 ) 2 P 3/2,1/2 and (4p 5 4d5s) 4 P 1/2,3/2,5/2 autoionizing states in rubidium atoms was studied experimentally by measuring the ejected-electron excitation functions and theoretically by employing a fully relativistic Dirac B-spline R-matrix (close-coupling) model. The experimental data were collected in an impact energy range from the respective excitation thresholds up to 50 eV with an incident electron energy resolution of 0.2 eV and an observation angle of 54.7°. Absolute values of the excitation cross sections were obtained by normalizing to the theoretical predictions. The observed near-threshold resonance structures were also analysed by comparison with theory. For the 2 P 3/2,1/2 doublet states, a detailed analysis of the R-matrix results reveals that the most intense resonances are related to odd-parity negative-ion states with dominant configurations 4p 5 5s5p 2 and 4p 5 4d5s6s. The measured excitation functions for the 2 P 1/2 and 4 P J states indicate a noticeable cascade population due to the radiative decay from high-lying autoionizing states. A comparative analysis with similar data for other alkali atoms is also presented.

  17. Narrow dibaryon resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajdalov, A.B.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental data on np interactions indicating to existence of narrow resonances in pp-system are discussed. Possible theoretical interpretations of these resonances are given. Experimental characteristics of the dibaryon resonances with isospin I=2 are considered

  18. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  19. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 3. Symmetries and Conservation Laws in Classical and Quantum Mechanics - Quantum Mechanics. K S Mallesh S Chaturvedi V ... Keywords. Quantum mechanics; unitary trans formations; symmetry groups; generators; broken symmetry.

  20. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  1. Resonances, resonance functions and spectral deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balslev, E.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper is aimed at an analysis of resonances and resonance states from a mathematical point of view. Resonances are characterized as singular points of the analytically continued Lippman-Schwinger equation, as complex eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian with a purely outgoing, exponentially growing eigenfunction, and as poles of the S-matrix. (orig./HSI)

  2. Synthesis of highly anti-HIV active sulfated poly- and oligo-saccharides and analysis of their action mechanisms by NMR [nuclear magnetic resonance] spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uryu, Toshiyuki

    1998-01-01

    We have been synthesizing sulfated polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with highly anti-HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) activities. It has been known that sulfated polysaccharides such as dextran sulfate and pentosan polysulfate have biological activities such as anticoagulant activity and recently anti-HIV activity. Curdlan sulfate having 1,3-β-linked glucan backbone had high anti-HIV activity but low anticoagulant activity. Phase I/II test for the curdlan sulfate as an AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) drug was carried out in the United States. In this study, regioselectivity sulfatec curdlan sulfates were prepared in order to study effects of sulfate groups and conformation of curdlan sulfates. In addition, action mechanisms of curdlan sulfate as anti-AIDS drug and of heparin as an anticoagulant were examined by means of NMR spectroscopy. 1. Structure dependence of anti-HIV and anticoagulant activities of sulfated polysaccharides. Curdlan with M n 9000 was regioselectively sulfated on its hydroxyl groups at 6, 4, and 2 positions. Those were a curdlan sulfate 62S in which 100% of 6-OH, and about 50% of 2-OH was sulfated, a curdlan sulfate 42S in which 4- and 2-OH's were sulfated, and a curdlan sulfate in which 6, 4, and 2-OH's were partially sulfated. All curdlan sulfates had very high anti-HIV activities exhibited by the drug concentration of 50% inhibition of infection, i.e., EC 50 of 0.04 - 0.25 μg/mL. However, there was almost no difference in the activity among the samples. Therefore, it was revealed that the degree of sulfation and putative conformation of the curdlan sulfates but not the position of sulfate groups have large effects on the anti-HIV activity. On the other hand, the anticoagulant activity increased with increasing molecular weight of the curdlan sulfates. As a result, it is assumed that the size of reaction sites of the virus protein reacting with curdlan sulfate is different from that of the proteins related to anticoagulant

  3. Density functional theory, comparative vibrational spectroscopic studies, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis of Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, K.; Gunasekaran, S.; Kumaresan, S.

    2015-06-01

    The Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra of Linezolid have been recorded in the regions 4,000-400 and 4,000-100 cm-1, respectively. Utilizing the observed Fourier transform infrared spectra and Fourier transform Raman spectra data, a complete vibrational assignment and analysis of the fundamental modes of the compound have been carried out. The optimum molecular geometry, harmonic vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities, have been calculated by density functional theory with 6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d,p) and M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) levels. The difference between the observed and scaled wavenumber values of most of the fundamentals is very small. A detailed interpretation of the infrared and Raman spectra of Linezolid is reported. Mulliken's net charges have also been calculated. Ultraviolet-visible spectrum of the title molecule has also been calculated using time-dependent density functional method. Besides, molecular electrostatic potential, highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital analysis and several thermodynamic properties have been performed by the density functional theoretical method.

  4. Emergence of liquid crystalline order in the lowest Landau level of a quantum Hall system with internal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2018-05-01

    It has now become evident that interplay between internal anisotropy parameters (such as electron mass anisotropy and/or anisotropic coupling of electrons to the substrate) and electron-electron correlation effects can create a rich variety of possibilities especially in quantum Hall systems. The electron mass anisotropy or material substrate effects (for example, the piezoelectric effect in GaAs) can lead to an effective anisotropic interaction potential between electrons. For lack of knowledge of realistic ab-initio potentials that may describe such effects, we adopt a phenomenological approach and assume that an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential mimics the internal anisotropy of the system. In this work we investigate the emergence of liquid crystalline order at filling factor ν = 1/6 of the lowest Landau level, a state very close to the point where a transition from the liquid to the Wigner solid happens. We consider small finite systems of electrons interacting with an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential and study the energy stability of an anisotropic liquid crystalline state relative to its isotropic Fermi-liquid counterpart. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation results in disk geometry show stabilization of liquid crystalline order driven by an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential at all values of the interaction anisotropy parameter studied.

  5. On the theoretical analysis of the lowest many-electron states for cyclic zigzag graphene nano-ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez-Collado, José R; Cantarero, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    We have calculated the optical and magnetic properties of the four lowest many-body states for cyclic zigzag graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs). The results have been obtained within the semi-empirical restricted frozen Hartree–Fock approximation. Firstly, we obtained one-determinant numerical and analytical coincident results. We detected the existence of two degenerate open-shell molecular orbitals (MOs) o, o’. Due to this degeneracy, some of the mentioned results do depend on any (arbitrary) orthogonal transformation between these two MOs. We have improved these preliminary results by using linear combinations of two determinants, which are eigenfunctions of the operators, which commute with the electronic Hamiltonian. These eigenfunctions represent properly the wave functions of these four electronic states. These calculations show that there are two degenerate ground states. One of them is ferromagnetic and the other state is non magnetic. Finally, we have calculated these four states to full configuration interaction level studying the dependence of their properties on the size of the GNRs. (paper)

  6. On the theoretical analysis of the lowest many-electron states for cyclic zigzag graphene nano-ribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Collado, José R.; Cantarero, Andrés

    2014-09-01

    We have calculated the optical and magnetic properties of the four lowest many-body states for cyclic zigzag graphene nano-ribbons (GNRs). The results have been obtained within the semi-empirical restricted frozen Hartree-Fock approximation. Firstly, we obtained one-determinant numerical and analytical coincident results. We detected the existence of two degenerate open-shell molecular orbitals (MOs) o, o’. Due to this degeneracy, some of the mentioned results do depend on any (arbitrary) orthogonal transformation between these two MOs. We have improved these preliminary results by using linear combinations of two determinants, which are eigenfunctions of the operators, which commute with the electronic Hamiltonian. These eigenfunctions represent properly the wave functions of these four electronic states. These calculations show that there are two degenerate ground states. One of them is ferromagnetic and the other state is non magnetic. Finally, we have calculated these four states to full configuration interaction level studying the dependence of their properties on the size of the GNRs.

  7. Solid hydrogen and deuterium. I. Ground-state energy calculated by a lowest order constrained-variation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, G.; Oestgaard, E.

    1988-01-01

    The ground-state energy of solid hydrogen and deuterium is calculated by means of a modified variational lowest order constrained-variation (LOCV) method. Both fcc and hcp H 2 and D 2 are considered, and the calculations are done for five different two-body potentials. For solid H 2 we obtain theoretical results for the ground-state binding energy per particle from -74.9 K at an equilibrium particle density of 0.700 σ -3 or a molar volume of 22.3 cm 3 /mole to -91.3 K at a particle density of 0.725 σ -3 or a molar volume of 21.5 cm 3 /mole, where σ = 2.958 A. The corresponding experimental result is -92.3 K at a particle density of 0.688 σ -3 or a molar volume of 22.7 cm 3 /mole. For solid D 2 we obtain theoretical results for the ground-state binding energy per particle from -125.7 K at an equilibrium particle density of 0.830 σ -3 or a molar volume of 18.8 cm 3 /mole to -140.1 K at a particle density of 0.843 σ -3 or a molar volume of 18.5 cm 3 /mole. The corresponding experimental result is -137.9 K at a particle density of 0.797 σ -3 or a molar volume of 19.6 cm 3 /mole

  8. Going beyond best technology and lowest price: on renewable energy investors’ preference for service-driven business models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loock, Moritz

    2012-01-01

    Renewable energy is becoming increasingly important for economies in many countries. But still in an emerging industry, renewable energy requires supportive energy policy helping firms to develop and protect competitive advantages in global competition. As a guideline for designing such policy, we consult well-informed stakeholders within the renewable energy industry: investors. Their preferences serve as explorative indicator for assessing which business models might succeed in competition. To contribute to only limited research on renewable energy investors’ preferences, we ask, which business models investment managers for renewable energy prefer to invest in. We report from an explorative study of 380 choices of renewable energy investment managers. Based on the stated preferences, we modelled three generic business models to calculate the share of investors’ preferences. We find exiting evidence: a “customer intimacy” business model that proposes best services is much more preferred by investors than business models that propose lowest price or best technology. Policy-makers can use those insights for designing policy that supports service-driven business models for renewable energy with a scope on customer needs rather than technology or price. Additionally, we state important implications for renewable energy entrepreneurs, managers and research.

  9. Nonlinear optical spectra having characteristics of Fano interferences in coherently coupled lowest exciton biexciton states in semiconductor quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Gotoh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Optical nonlinear effects are examined using a two-color micro-photoluminescence (micro-PL method in a coherently coupled exciton-biexciton system in a single quantum dot (QD. PL and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (PLE are employed to measure the absorption spectra of the exciton and biexciton states. PLE for Stokes and anti-Stokes PL enables us to clarify the nonlinear optical absorption properties in the lowest exciton and biexciton states. The nonlinear absorption spectra for excitons exhibit asymmetric shapes with peak and dip structures, and provide a distinct contrast to the symmetric dip structures of conventional nonlinear spectra. Theoretical analyses with a density matrix method indicate that the nonlinear spectra are caused not by a simple coherent interaction between the exciton and biexciton states but by coupling effects among exciton, biexciton and continuum states. These results indicate that Fano quantum interference effects appear in exciton-biexciton systems at QDs and offer important insights into their physics.

  10. ON THE BINARY FREQUENCY OF THE LOWEST MASS MEMBERS OF THE PLEIADES WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, E. V.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Allers, Katelyn N.; Liu, Michael C.; Deacon, Niall R.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) imaging survey of 11 of the lowest mass brown dwarfs in the Pleiades known (25–40 M Jup ). These objects represent the predecessors to T dwarfs in the field. Using a semi-empirical binary point-spread function (PSF)-fitting technique, we are able to probe to 0.″ 03 (0.75 pixel), better than 2x the WFC3/UVIS diffraction limit. We did not find any companions to our targets. From extensive testing of our PSF-fitting method on simulated binaries, we compute detection limits which rule out companions to our targets with mass ratios of ≳0.7 and separations ≳4 AU. Thus, our survey is the first to attain the high angular resolution needed to resolve brown dwarf binaries in the Pleiades at separations that are most common in the field population. We constrain the binary frequency over this range of separation and mass ratio of 25–40 M Jup Pleiades brown dwarfs to be <11% for 1σ (<26% at 2σ). This binary frequency is consistent with both younger and older brown dwarfs in this mass range

  11. Resonant Electromagnetic Shunt Damping of Flexible Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic transducers convert mechanical energy to electrical energy and vice versa. Effective passive vibration damping of flexible structures can therefore be introduced by shunting with an accurately calibrated resonant electrical network thatcontains a capacitor to create the desired...

  12. Overtones of isoscalar giant resonances studied in direct particle decay measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunyadi, M; van den Berg, AM; Csatlos, M; Csige, L; Davids, B; Garg, U; Gulyas, J; Harakeh, MN; de Huu, MA; Krasznahorkay, A; Sohler, D; Wortche, HJ

    The isoscalar giant dipole resonance (ISGDR), which is the lowest-energy overtone mode of the isoscalar giant resonances, has been studied in some medium-heavy and heavy nuclei in coincidence measurements. The observation of the direct nucleon decay channels significantly helped to enhance giant

  13. Stochastic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellens, Thomas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    We are taught by conventional wisdom that the transmission and detection of signals is hindered by noise. However, during the last two decades, the paradigm of stochastic resonance (SR) proved this assertion wrong: indeed, addition of the appropriate amount of noise can boost a signal and hence facilitate its detection in a noisy environment. Due to its simplicity and robustness, SR has been implemented by mother nature on almost every scale, thus attracting interdisciplinary interest from physicists, geologists, engineers, biologists and medical doctors, who nowadays use it as an instrument for their specific purposes. At the present time, there exist a lot of diversified models of SR. Taking into account the progress achieved in both theoretical understanding and practical application of this phenomenon, we put the focus of the present review not on discussing in depth technical details of different models and approaches but rather on presenting a general and clear physical picture of SR on a pedagogical level. Particular emphasis will be given to the implementation of SR in generic quantum systems-an issue that has received limited attention in earlier review papers on the topic. The major part of our presentation relies on the two-state model of SR (or on simple variants thereof), which is general enough to exhibit the main features of SR and, in fact, covers many (if not most) of the examples of SR published so far. In order to highlight the diversity of the two-state model, we shall discuss several examples from such different fields as condensed matter, nonlinear and quantum optics and biophysics. Finally, we also discuss some situations that go beyond the generic SR scenario but are still characterized by a constructive role of noise

  14. An Elimination of Resonance in Electric Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Malek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flexible couplings together with resonance phenomenon are present mainly in the field of servodrives where high accuracy and dynamic requirements are crucial. When dynamics doesn’t correlate with mechanical system design, unwanted frequencies in the system are exited. Sometimes we haven’t conditions (whether material or space to design mechanical system with resonant frequencies too high to be exited. In that case we must choose compensating methods which can eliminate these phenomenons. This paper is dedicated to them.

  15. Nanoelectromechanical resonator for logic operations

    KAUST Repository

    Kazmi, Syed N. R.

    2017-08-29

    We report an electro-thermally tunable in-plane doubly-clamped nanoelectromechanical resonator capable of dynamically performing NOR, NOT, XNOR, XOR, and AND logic operations. Toward this, a silicon based resonator is fabricated using standard e-beam lithography and surface nanomachining of a highly conductive device layer of a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The performance of this logic device is examined at elevated temperatures, ranging from 25 °C to 85 °C, demonstrating its resilience for most of the logic operations; thereby paving the way towards nano-elements-based mechanical computing.

  16. A model of the transverse modes of stable and unstable porro-prism resonators using symmetry considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Liesl; Forbes, Andrew

    2007-09-01

    A simple model of a Porro prism laser resonator has been found to correctly predict the formation of the "petal" mode patterns typical of these resonators. A geometrical analysis of the petals suggests that these petals are the lowest-order modes of this type of resonator. Further use of the model reveals the formation of more complex beam patterns, and the nature of these patterns is investigated. Also, the output of stable and unstable resonator modes is presented.

  17. Solid hydrogen and deuterium. II. Pressure and compressibility calculated by a lowest-order constrained-variation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettersen, G.; Ostgaard, E.

    1988-01-01

    The pressure and the compressibility of solid H 2 and D 2 are obtained from ground-state energies calculated by means of a modified variational lowest order constrained-variation (LOCV) method. Both fcc and hcp structures are considered, but results are given for the fcc structure only. The pressure and the compressibility are calculated or estimated from the dependence of the ground-state energy on density or molar volume, generally in a density region of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 0.65σ -3 to 1.3σ -3 , corresponding to a molar volume of 12-24 cm 3 mole, where σ = 2.958 angstrom, and the calculations are done for five different two-body potentials. Theoretical results for the pressure are 340-460 atm for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 370-490 atm for solid 4 He at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 /mole. The corresponding experimental results are 650 and 700 atm, respectively. Theoretical results for the compressibility are 210 times 10 -6 to 260 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid H 2 at a particle density of 0.82σ -3 or a molar volume of 19 cm 3 /mole, and 150 times 10 -6 to 180 times 10 -6 atm -1 for solid D 2 at a particle density of 0.92σ -3 or a molar volume of 17 cm 3 mole. The corresponding experimental results are 180 times 10 -6 and 140 times 10 -6 atm -1 , respectively. The agreement with experimental results is better for higher densities

  18. Erbium-doped fiber ring resonator for resonant fiber optical gyro applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunming; Zhao, Rui; Tang, Jun; Xia, Meijing; Guo, Huiting; Xie, Chengfeng; Wang, Lei; Liu, Jun

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports a fiber ring resonator with erbium-doped fiber (EDF) for resonant fiber optical gyro (RFOG). To analyze compensation mechanism of the EDF on resonator, a mathematical model of the erbium-doped fiber ring resonator (EDFRR) is established based on Jones matrix to be followed by the design and fabrication of a tunable EDFRR. The performances of the fabricated EDFRR were measured and the experimental Q-factor of 2 . 47 × 108 and resonant depth of 109% were acquired separately. Compared with the resonator without the EDF, the resonant depth and Q-factor of the proposed device are increased by 2.5 times and 14 times, respectively. A potential optimum shot noise limited resolution of 0 . 042∘ / h can be obtained for the RFOG, which is promising for low-cost and high precise detection.

  19. Resonant coupling applied to superconducting accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, James M.; Krawczyk, Frank L.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of resonant coupling and the benefits that accrue from its application is well known in the world of room temperature coupled cavity linacs. Design studies show that it can be applied successfully between sections of conventional elliptical superconducting coupled cavity accelerator structures and internally to structures with spoked cavity resonators. The coupling mechanisms can be designed without creating problems with high field regions or multipactoring. The application of resonant coupling to superconducting accelerators eliminates the need for complex cryogenic mechanical tuners and reduces the time needed to bring a superconducting accelerator into operation.

  20. An assessment of the Crossed Porro Prism Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, B. A.; Fueloep, K.; Seymour, R.

    1980-08-01

    Lasers with crossed porro prism resonators for military laser rangefinder and designator applications are studied. Properties of these devices are reviewed and advantages over normal mirror resonators are examined. The theory of operating is treated and the mechanical stability and other features of the laser are examined and compared to standard mirror resonators.

  1. The quarter wave resonator as a superconducting linac element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Brennan, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    The electrical and mechanical properties of quarter wave resonators are derived. A procedure for optimal design of a quarter wave resonator for use in a superconducting heavy ion linac is given. It is concluded that a quarter wave resonator has significant advantages for this application. (orig.)

  2. Mechanism of the negative force-frequency relationship in physiologically intact rat ventricular myocardium. Studies by intracellular Ca2+ monitor with iodo-1 and by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Isao; Kihara, Yasuki; Sasayama, Shigetake; Konishi, Takashi; Inubushi, Toshiro.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the subcellular mechanisms of the negative force-frequency relationship in rat myocardium by measuring intracellular Ca 2+ transients by indo-1 fluorometry and intracellular pH (pH i ) and phosphate compounds with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The data were compared with those from guinea pig hearts, which show a positive force-frequency relationship. By increasing the pacing rate from 3 Hz to 5 Hz, the peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LVdP/dt) in rat heart decreased by 10±1% (n=6). In contrast to this negative inotropic response, simultaneously measured peak Ca 2+ transients increased by 6±1%. Guinea pig heart (n=6) showed an increase in peak positive LVdP/dt (33±1%) which was associated with an increase in peak Ca 2+ transients (8±1%). Under equivalent experimental conditions in an NMR spectrometer, this increase in the pacing rate did not affect intracellular levels of phosphate compounds in either rat (n=6) or guinea pig heart (n=6). In contrast, pH i showed a decrease of 0.031±0.006 pH units in rat heart, while no changes were observed in guinea pig heart. These results suggest that in physiological rat myocardium, pH i is susceptible to changes in the stimulus frequency and may affect the Ca 2+ -responsiveness of contractile proteins, which results in the negative force-frequency relationship. (author)

  3. Hydrogen Production on Ag-Pd/TiO2 Bimetallic Catalysts: Is there a Combined Effect of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Schottky Mechanism on the Photo-Catalytic Activity?

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Muhammad A.; Al-Oufi, Maher; Wahab, Ahmed K.; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Idriss, Hicham

    2017-01-01

    Despite many observations that plasmonics can enhance photocatalytic reactions, their relative role in the overall reaction rate is not thoroughly investigated. Here we report that silver nanoparticles contribution in the reaction rate by its plasmonic effect is negligible when compared to that of Pd (Schottky effect). To conduct the study a series of Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production from water in the presence of an organic sacrificial agent. Pd was chosen as a standard high work function metal needed for the Schottky junction to pump away electrons from the conduction band of the semiconductor and Ag (whose work function is ca. 1 eV lower than that of Pd) for its high plasmonic resonance response at the edge of the bandgap of TiO2. While H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag in the Pd−Ag series, the system performed less than that of pure Pd. In other words, the plasmonic contribution of Ag in the Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalyst for hydrogen production, while confirmed using different excitation energies, is small. Therefore, the “possible” synergistic effect of plasmonic (in the case of Ag) and Schottky-mechanism (in the case of Pd) is minor when compared to that of Schottky-effect alone.

  4. Hydrogen Production on Ag-Pd/TiO2 Bimetallic Catalysts: Is there a Combined Effect of Surface Plasmon Resonance with Schottky Mechanism on the Photo-Catalytic Activity?

    KAUST Repository

    Nadeem, Muhammad A.

    2017-03-28

    Despite many observations that plasmonics can enhance photocatalytic reactions, their relative role in the overall reaction rate is not thoroughly investigated. Here we report that silver nanoparticles contribution in the reaction rate by its plasmonic effect is negligible when compared to that of Pd (Schottky effect). To conduct the study a series of Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalysts have been prepared, characterized and tested for H2 production from water in the presence of an organic sacrificial agent. Pd was chosen as a standard high work function metal needed for the Schottky junction to pump away electrons from the conduction band of the semiconductor and Ag (whose work function is ca. 1 eV lower than that of Pd) for its high plasmonic resonance response at the edge of the bandgap of TiO2. While H2 production rates showed linear dependency on plasmonic response of Ag in the Pd−Ag series, the system performed less than that of pure Pd. In other words, the plasmonic contribution of Ag in the Ag−Pd/TiO2 catalyst for hydrogen production, while confirmed using different excitation energies, is small. Therefore, the “possible” synergistic effect of plasmonic (in the case of Ag) and Schottky-mechanism (in the case of Pd) is minor when compared to that of Schottky-effect alone.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigations of resonant acoustic waves in near-critical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Nusair; Farouk, Bakhtier

    2015-10-01

    Flow and transport induced by resonant acoustic waves in a near-critical fluid filled cylindrical enclosure is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Supercritical carbon dioxide (near the critical or the pseudo-critical states) in a confined resonator is subjected to acoustic field created by an electro-mechanical acoustic transducer and the induced pressure waves are measured by a fast response pressure field microphone. The frequency of the acoustic transducer is chosen such that the lowest acoustic mode propagates along the enclosure. For numerical simulations, a real-fluid computational fluid dynamics model representing the thermo-physical and transport properties of the supercritical fluid is considered. The simulated acoustic field in the resonator is compared with measurements. The formation of acoustic streaming structures in the highly compressible medium is revealed by time-averaging the numerical solutions over a given period. Due to diverging thermo-physical properties of supercritical fluid near the critical point, large scale oscillations are generated even for small sound field intensity. The strength of the acoustic wave field is found to be in direct relation with the thermodynamic state of the fluid. The effects of near-critical property variations and the operating pressure on the formation process of the streaming structures are also investigated. Irregular streaming patterns with significantly higher streaming velocities are observed for near-pseudo-critical states at operating pressures close to the critical pressure. However, these structures quickly re-orient to the typical Rayleigh streaming patterns with the increase operating pressure.

  6. Resonance frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv K Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial stability at the placement and development of osseointegration are two major issues for implant survival. Implant stability is a mechanical phenomenon which is related to the local bone quality and quantity, type of implant, and placement technique used. The application of a simple, clinically applicable, non-invasive test to assess implant stability and osseointegration is considered highly desirable. Resonance frequency analysis (RFA is one of such techniques which is most frequently used now days. The aim of this paper was to review and analyze critically the current available literature in the field of RFA, and to also discuss based on scientific evidence, the prognostic value of RFA to detect implants at risk of failure. A search was made using the PubMed database to find all the literature published on "Resonance frequency analysis for implant stability" till date. Articles discussed in vivo or in vitro studies comparing RFA with other methods of implant stability measurement and articles discussing its reliability were thoroughly reviewed and discussed. A limited number of clinical reports were found. Various studies have demonstrated the feasibility and predictability of the technique. However, most of these articles are based on retrospective data or uncontrolled cases. Randomized, prospective, parallel-armed longitudinal human trials are based on short-term results and long-term follow up are still scarce in this field. Nonetheless, from available literature, it may be concluded that RFA technique evaluates implant stability as a function of stiffness of the implant bone interface and is influenced by factors such as bone type, exposed implant height above the alveolar crest. Resonance frequency analysis could serve as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for detecting the implant stability of dental implants during the healing stages and in subsequent routine follow up care after treatment. Future studies, preferably randomized

  7. Thermally actuated resonant silicon crystal nanobalances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajjam, Arash

    As the potential emerging technology for next generation integrated resonant sensors and frequency references as well as electronic filters, micro-electro-mechanical resonators have attracted a lot of attention over the past decade. As a result, a wide variety of high frequency micro/nanoscale electromechanical resonators have recently been presented. MEMS resonators, as low-cost highly integrated and ultra-sensitive mass sensors, can potentially provide new opportunities and unprecedented capabilities in the area of mass sensing. Such devices can provide orders of magnitude higher mass sensitivity and resolution compared to Film Bulk Acoustic resonators (FBAR) or the conventional quartz and Surface Acoustic Wave (SAW) resonators due to their much smaller sizes and can be batch-fabricated and utilized in highly integrated large arrays at a very low cost. In this research, comprehensive experimental studies on the performance and durability of thermally actuated micromechanical resonant sensors with frequencies up to tens of MHz have been performed. The suitability and robustness of the devices have been demonstrated for mass sensing applications related to air-borne particles and organic gases. In addition, due to the internal thermo-electro-mechanical interactions, the active resonators can turn some of the consumed electronic power back into the mechanical structure and compensate for the mechanical losses. Therefore, such resonators can provide self-sustained-oscillation without the need for any electronic circuitry. This unique property has been deployed to demonstrate a prototype self-sustained sensor for air-borne particle monitoring. I have managed to overcome one of the obstacles for MEMS resonators, which is their relatively poor temperature stability. This is a major drawback when compared with the conventional quartz crystals. A significant decrease of the large negative TCF for the resonators has been attained by doping the devices with a high

  8. Ion-cyclotron-resonance- and Fourier-transform-ion-cyclotron-resonance spectroscopy: technology and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luederwald, I.

    1977-01-01

    Instrumentation and technology of Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance and Fourier-Transform-Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Spectroscopy are described. The method can be applied to studies of ion/molecule reactions in gas phase, to obtain thermodynamic data as gas phase acidity or basicity, proton and electron affinity, and to establish reaction mechanisms and ion structures. (orig.) [de

  9. Circular High-Q Resonating Isotropic Strain Sensors with Large Shift of Resonance Frequency under Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilmi Volkan Demir

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We present circular architecture bioimplant strain sensors that facilitate a strong resonance frequency shift with mechanical deformation. The clinical application area of these sensors is for in vivo assessment of bone fractures. Using a rectangular geometry, we obtain a resonance shift of 330 MHz for a single device and 170 MHz for its triplet configuration (with three side-by-side resonators on chip under an applied load of 3,920 N. Using the same device parameters with a circular isotropic architecture, we achieve a resonance frequency shift of 500 MHz for the single device and 260 MHz for its triplet configuration, demonstrating substantially increased sensitivity.

  10. Quantum resonances and regularity islands in quantum maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov; Zhirov; Alonso; Casati

    2000-05-01

    We study analytically as well as numerically the dynamics of a quantum map near a quantum resonance of an order q. The map is embedded into a continuous unitary transformation generated by a time-independent quasi-Hamiltonian. Such a Hamiltonian generates at the very point of the resonance a local gauge transformation described by the unitary unimodular group SU(q). The resonant energy growth is attributed to the zero Liouville eigenmodes of the generator in the adjoint representation of the group while the nonzero modes yield saturating with time contribution. In a vicinity of a given resonance, the quasi-Hamiltonian is then found in the form of power expansion with respect to the detuning from the resonance. The problem is related in this way to the motion along a circle in a (q2 - 1)-component inhomogeneous "magnetic" field of a quantum particle with q intrinsic degrees of freedom described by the SU(q) group. This motion is in parallel with the classical phase oscillations near a nonlinear resonance. The most important role is played by the resonances with the orders much smaller than the typical localization length q < l. Such resonances master for exponentially long though finite times the motion in some domains around them. Explicit analytical solution is possible for a few lowest and strongest resonances.

  11. A cyclotron resonance laser accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprangle, P.; Tang, C.M.; Vlahos, L.

    1983-01-01

    A laser acceleration mechanism which utilizes a strong static, almost uniform, magnetic field together with an intense laser pulse is analyzed. The interaction and acceleration mechanism relies on a self resonance effect. Since the laser field is assumed to be diffraction limited, the magnetic field must be spatially varied to maintain resonance. The effective accelerating gradient is shown to scale like 1/√E /SUB b/ , where E /SUB b/ is the electron energy. For a numerical illustration the authors consider a 1 x 10 13 W/cm 2 , CO 2 laser and show that electrons can be accelerated to more than 500 MeV in a distance of 15 m (approximately two Rayleigh lengths)

  12. Mapping of the Underlying Neural Mechanisms of Maintenance and Manipulation in Visuo-Spatial Working Memory Using An n-back Mental Rotation Task: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamp, Gemma; Alexander, Bonnie; Laycock, Robin; Crewther, David P; Crewther, Sheila G

    2016-01-01

    Mapping of the underlying neural mechanisms of visuo-spatial working memory (WM) has been shown to consistently elicit activity in right hemisphere dominant fronto-parietal networks. However to date, the bulk of neuroimaging literature has focused largely on the maintenance aspect of visuo-spatial WM, with a scarcity of research into the aspects of WM involving manipulation of information. Thus, this study aimed to compare maintenance-only with maintenance and manipulation of visuo-spatial stimuli (3D cube shapes) utilizing a 1-back task while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans were acquired. Sixteen healthy participants (9 women, M = 23.94 years, SD = 2.49) were required to perform the 1-back task with or without mentally rotating the shapes 90° on a vertical axis. When no rotation was required (maintenance-only condition), a right hemispheric lateralization was revealed across fronto-parietal areas. However, when the task involved maintaining and manipulating the same stimuli through 90° rotation, activation was primarily seen in the bilateral parietal lobe and left fusiform gyrus. The findings confirm that the well-established right lateralized fronto-parietal networks are likely to underlie simple maintenance of visuo-spatial stimuli. The results also suggest that the added demand of manipulation of information maintained online appears to require further neural recruitment of functionally related areas. In particular mental rotation of visuospatial stimuli required bilateral parietal areas, and the left fusiform gyrus potentially to maintain a categorical or object representation. It can be concluded that WM is a complex neural process involving the interaction of an increasingly large network.

  13. Does the Lowest Bid Price Evaluation Criterion Make for a More Efficient Public Procurement Selection Criterion? (Case of the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochrana František

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Through the institute of public procurement a considerable volume of financial resources is allocated. It is therefore in the interest of contracting entities to seek ways of how to achieve an efficient allocation of resources. Some public contract-awarding entities, along with some public-administration authorities in the Czech Republic, believe that the use of a single evaluation criterion (the lowest bid price results in a more efficient tender for a public contract. It was found that contracting entities in the Czech Republic strongly prefer to use the lowest bid price criterion. Within the examined sample, 86.5 % of public procurements were evaluated this way. The analysis of the examined sample of public contracts proved that the choice of an evaluation criterion, even the preference of the lowest bid price criterion, does not have any obvious impact on the final cost of a public contract. The study concludes that it is inappropriate to prefer the criterion of the lowest bid price within the evaluation of public contracts that are characterised by their complexity (including public contracts for construction works and public service contracts. The findings of the Supreme Audit Office related to the inspection of public contracts indicate that when using the lowest bid price as an evaluation criterion, a public contract may indeed be tendered with the lowest bid price, but not necessarily the best offer in terms of supplied quality. It is therefore not appropriate to use the lowest bid price evaluation criterion to such an extent for the purpose of evaluating work and services. Any improvement to this situation requires a corresponding amendment to the Law on Public Contracts and mainly a radical change in the attitude of the Office for the Protection of Competition towards proposed changes, as indicated within the conclusions and recommendations proposed by this study.

  14. Crossing simple resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances

  15. Neutron resonance averaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chrien, R.E.

    1986-10-01

    The principles of resonance averaging as applied to neutron capture reactions are described. Several illustrations of resonance averaging to problems of nuclear structure and the distribution of radiative strength in nuclei are provided. 30 refs., 12 figs

  16. Crossing simple resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, T.

    1985-08-01

    A simple criterion governs the beam distortion and/or loss of protons on a fast resonance crossing. Results from numerical integrations are illustrated for simple sextupole, octupole, and 10-pole resonances.

  17. Investigation of a delayed feedback controller of MEMS resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Karim M.; Younis, Mohammad I.; Shao, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    Controlling mechanical systems is an important branch of mechanical engineering. Several techniques have been used to control Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) resonators. In this paper, we study the effect of a delayed feedback controller

  18. A MEMS coupled resonator for frequency filtering in air

    KAUST Repository

    Ilyas, Saad; Jaber, Nizar; Younis, Mohammad I.

    2018-01-01

    We present design, fabrication, and characterization of a mechanically coupled MEMS H resonator capable of performing simultaneous mechanical amplification and filtering in air. The device comprises of two doubly clamped polyimide microbeams joined

  19. Resonant magnetic pumping at very low frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canobbio, Ernesto

    1978-01-01

    We propose to exploit for plasma heating purposes the very low frequency limit of the Alfven wave resonance condition, which reduces essentially to safety factor q=m/n, a rational number. It is shown that a substantial fraction of the total RF-energy can be absorbed by the plasma. The lowest possible frequency value is determined by the maximum tolerable width of the RF-magnetic islands which develop near the singular surface. The obvious interest of the proposed scheme is the low frequency value (f<=10 KHz) which allows the RF-coils to be protected by stainless steel or even to be put outside the liner

  20. Noise in nonlinear nanoelectromechanical resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra Vidal, Diego N.

    Nano-Electro-Mechanical Systems (NEMS), due to their nanometer scale size, possess a number of desirable attributes: high sensitivity to applied forces, fast response times, high resonance frequencies and low power consumption. However, ultra small size and low power handling result in unwanted consequences: smaller signal size and higher dissipation, making the NEMS devices more susceptible to external and intrinsic noise. The simplest version of a NEMS, a suspended nanomechanical structure with two distinct excitation states, can be used as an archetypal two state system to study a plethora of fundamental phenomena such as Duffing nonlinearity, stochastic resonance, and macroscopic quantum tunneling at low temperatures. From a technical perspective, there are numerous applications such nanomechanical memory elements, microwave switches and nanomechanical computation. The control and manipulation of the mechanical response of these two state systems can be realized by exploiting a (seemingly) counterintuitive physical phenomenon, Stochastic Resonance: in a noisy nonlinear mechanical system, the presence of noise can enhance the system response to an external stimulus. This Thesis is mainly dedicated to study possible applications of Stochastic Resonance in two-state nanomechanical systems. First, on chip signal amplification by 1/falpha is observed. The effectiveness of the noise assisted amplification is observed to decrease with increasing a. Experimental evidence shows an increase in asymmetry between the two states with increasing noise color. Considering the prevalence of 1/f alpha noise in the materials in integrated circuits, the signal enhancement demonstrated here, suggests beneficial use of the otherwise detrimental noise. Finally, a nanomechanical device, operating as a reprogrammable logic gate, and performing fundamental logic functions such as AND/OR and NAND/NOR is presented. The logic function can be programmed (from AND to OR) dynamically, by

  1. Resonant transfer of excitons and quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovett, Brendon W.; Reina, John H.; Nazir, Ahsan; Kothari, Beeneet; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2003-01-01

    Resonant energy transfer mechanisms have been observed in the sensitized luminescence of solids, and in quantum dots, molecular nanostructures, and photosynthetic organisms. We demonstrate that such mechanisms, together with the exciton-exciton binding energy shift typical of these nanostructures, can be used to perform universal quantum logic and generate quantum entanglement

  2. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  3. Resonant thermonuclear reaction rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubold, H.J.; Mathai, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    Basic physical principles for the resonant and nonresonant thermonuclear reaction rates are applied to find their standard representations for nuclear astrophysics. Closed-form representations for the resonant reaction rate are derived in terms of Meijer's G-function. Analytic representations of the resonant and nonresonant nuclear reaction rates are compared and the appearance of Meijer's G-function is discussed in physical terms

  4. MSW-resonant fermion mixing during reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Tsuneto; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2003-10-01

    We study the dynamics of reheating in which an inflaton field couples two flavor fermions through Yukawa-couplings. When two fermions have a mixing term with a constant coupling, we show that the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW)-type resonance emerges due to a time-dependent background in addition to the standard fermion creation via parametric resonance. This MSW resonance not only alters the number densities of fermions generated by a preheating process but also can lead to the larger energy transfer from the inflaton to fermions. Our mechanism can provide additional source terms for the creation of superheavy fermions which may be relevant for the leptogenesis scenario.

  5. MSW-resonant fermion mixing during reheating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Tsuneto; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    We study the dynamics of reheating in which an inflaton field couples two flavor fermions through Yukawa-couplings. When two fermions have a mixing term with a constant coupling, we show that the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW)-type resonance emerges due to a time-dependent background in addition to the standard fermion creation via parametric resonance. This MSW resonance not only alters the number densities of fermions generated by a preheating process but also can lead to the larger energy transfer from the inflaton to fermions. Our mechanism can provide additional source terms for the creation of superheavy fermions which may be relevant for the leptogenesis scenario

  6. Dissipation in graphene and nanotube resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoánez, C.; Guinea, F.; Castro Neto, A. H.

    2007-09-01

    Different damping mechanisms in graphene nanoresonators are studied: charges in the substrate, ohmic losses in the substrate and the graphene sheet, breaking and healing of surface bonds (Velcro effect), two level systems, attachment losses, and thermoelastic losses. We find that, for realistic structures and contrary to semiconductor resonators, dissipation is dominated by ohmic losses in the graphene layer and metallic gate. An extension of this study to carbon nanotube-based resonators is presented.

  7. Dissipation in graphene and nanotube resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Seoanez, C.; Guinea, F.; Neto, A. H. Castro

    2007-01-01

    Different damping mechanisms in graphene nanoresonators are studied: charges in the substrate, ohmic losses in the substrate and the graphene sheet, breaking and healing of surface bonds (Velcro effect), two level systems, attachment losses, and thermoelastic losses. We find that, for realistic structures and contrary to semiconductor resonators, dissipation is dominated by ohmic losses in the graphene layer and metallic gate. An extension of this study to carbon nanotube-based resonators is ...

  8. Resonance controlled transport in phase space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Vasiliev, Alexei; Artemyev, Anton

    2018-02-01

    We consider the mechanism of controlling particle transport in phase space by means of resonances in an adiabatic setting. Using a model problem describing nonlinear wave-particle interaction, we show that captures into resonances can be used to control transport in momentum space as well as in physical space. We design the model system to provide creation of a narrow peak in the distribution function, thus producing effective cooling of a sub-ensemble of the particles.

  9. Parametric resonance in an expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlatev, I.; Huey, G.; Steinhardt, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Parametric resonance has been discussed as a mechanism for copious particle production following inflation. Here we present a simple and intuitive calculational method for estimating the efficiency of parametric amplification as a function of parameters. This is important for determining whether resonant amplification plays an important role in the reheating process. We find that significant amplification occurs only for a limited range of couplings and interactions. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Resonant interaction of photons with gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J.T.; Drury, L. O'C.

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of photons with a low-amplitude gravitational wave propagating in a flat space-time is studied by using an exact model of photon dynamics. The existence of nearly resonant interactions between the photons and the gravitational waves, which can take place over large distances, can lead to a strong photon acceleration. Such a resonant mechanism can eventually be useful to build consistent new models of gamma-ray emitters

  11. Transverse electron resonance accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse (to the velocity, v-bar, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasms by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v-bar. The generating field oscillates with frequency ω = ω/sub p/, where ω/sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d≅2πc/ω/sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ω/sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E 2 /sub L/). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E

  12. Transverse electron resonance accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csonka, P.L.

    1985-01-01

    Transverse (to the velocity, v, of the particles to be accelerated) electron oscillations are generated in high (e.g. solid) density plasmas by either an electromagnetic wave or by the field of charged particles traveling parallel to v. The generating field oscillates with frequency ω = ω/sub p/, where ω/sub p/ is the plasma frequency. The plasma is confined to a sequence of microstructures with typical dimensions of d approx. = 2πc/ω/sub p/, allowing the generating fields to penetrate. Since ω/sub p/ is now high, the time scales, T, are correspondingly reduced. The microstructures are allowed to explode after t = T, until then they are confined by ion inertia. As a result of resonance, the electric field, E, inside the microstructures can exceed the generating field E/sub L/. The generating force is proportional to E/sub L/ (as opposed to E/sub L/ 2 ). Phase matching of particles is possible by appropriate spacing of the microstructures or by a gas medium. The generating beam travels outside the plasma, filamentation is not a problem. The mechanism is relatively insensitive to the exact shape and position of the microstructures. This device contains features of various earlier proposed acceleration mechanisms and may be considered as the limiting case of several of those for small d, T and high E

  13. Impurity binding energy of lowest-excited state in (In,Ga)N–GaN spherical QD under electric field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    External electric field effect on the lowest-excited state in wurtzite (In,Ga)N–GaN spherical quantum dot is considered. By means of a traditional Ritz variational method within the effective-mass approximation and finite potential barrier, the lowest-excited state energy with and without the presence of the impurity is investigated. The normalized binding energy under electric field effect is also performed. Our numerical results are compared with the previous theoretical findings and show a good agreement with those concerning especially the ground-state for different semiconductors materials and different QDs-shapes

  14. Impurity binding energy of lowest-excited state in (In,Ga)N–GaN spherical QD under electric field effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazi, Haddou El, E-mail: hadghazi@gmail.com [LPS, Faculty of Sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas, Fez (Morocco); Special Mathematics, CPGE Kénitra (Morocco); Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine [LPS, Faculty of Sciences, Dhar EL Mehrez, B.P 1796 Atlas, Fez (Morocco)

    2013-10-01

    External electric field effect on the lowest-excited state in wurtzite (In,Ga)N–GaN spherical quantum dot is considered. By means of a traditional Ritz variational method within the effective-mass approximation and finite potential barrier, the lowest-excited state energy with and without the presence of the impurity is investigated. The normalized binding energy under electric field effect is also performed. Our numerical results are compared with the previous theoretical findings and show a good agreement with those concerning especially the ground-state for different semiconductors materials and different QDs-shapes.

  15. Baryons and baryon resonances in nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenske, Horst; Dhar, Madhumita; Gaitanos, Theodoros; Cao, Xu

    2018-01-01

    Theoretical approaches to the production of hyperons and baryon resonances in elementary hadronic reactions and heavy ion collisions are reviewed. The focus is on the production and interactions of baryons in the lowest SU(3) flavor octet and states from the next higher SU(3) flavor decuplet. Approaches using the SU(3) formalism for interactions of mesons and baryons and effective field theory for hyperons are discussed. An overview of application to free space and in-medium baryon-baryon interactions is given and the relation to a density functional theory is indicated. The intimate connection between baryon resonances and strangeness production is shown first for reactions on the nucleon. Pion-induced hypernuclear reactions are shown to proceed essentially through the excitation of intermediate nucleon resonances. Transport theory in conjunction with a statistical fragmentation model is an appropriate description of hypernuclear production in antiproton and heavy ion induced fragmentation reactions. The excitation of subnuclear degrees of freedom in peripheral heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies is reviewed. The status of in-medium resonance physics is discussed.

  16. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A. C.; Mayer Alegre, T. P.; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G.

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5×1010 spins/GHz1/2 despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  17. Microstrip resonators for electron paramagnetic resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrezan, A C; Mayer Alegre, T P; Medeiros-Ribeiro, G

    2009-07-01

    In this article we evaluate the performance of an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) setup using a microstrip resonator (MR). The design and characterization of the resonator are described and parameters of importance to EPR and spin manipulation are examined, including cavity quality factor, filling factor, and microwave magnetic field in the sample region. Simulated microwave electric and magnetic field distributions in the resonator are also presented and compared with qualitative measurements of the field distribution obtained by a perturbation technique. Based on EPR experiments carried out with a standard marker at room temperature and a MR resonating at 8.17 GHz, the minimum detectable number of spins was found to be 5 x 10(10) spins/GHz(1/2) despite the low MR unloaded quality factor Q0=60. The functionality of the EPR setup was further evaluated at low temperature, where the spin resonance of Cr dopants present in a GaAs wafer was detected at 2.3 K. The design and characterization of a more versatile MR targeting an improved EPR sensitivity and featuring an integrated biasing circuit for the study of samples that require an electrical contact are also discussed.

  18. Power spectral estimation of high-harmonics in echoes of wall resonances to improve resolution in non-invasive measurements of wall mechanical properties in rubber tube and ex-vivo artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, I; Ramos, A; Balay, G; Negreira, C

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a new type of ultrasonic analysis of the mechanical properties of an arterial wall with improved resolution, and to confirm its feasibility under laboratory conditions. it is expected that this would facilitate a non-invasive path for accurate predictive diagnosis that enables an early detection & therapy of vascular pathologies. In particular, the objective is to detect and quantify the small elasticity changes (in Young's modulus E) of arterial walls, which precede pathology. A submicron axial resolution is required for this analysis, as the periodic widening of the wall (under oscillatory arterial pressure) varies between ±10 and 20 μm. This high resolution represents less than 1% of the parietal thickness (e.g., harmonics of the wall internal resonance f 0 . This was attained via the implementation of an autoregressive parametric algorithm that accurately detects parietal echo-dynamics during a heartbeat. Thus, it was possible to measure the punctual elasticity of the wall, with a higher resolution (> an order of magnitude) compared to conventional approaches. The resolution of a typical ultrasonic image is limited to several hundred microns, and thus, such small changes are undetected. The proposed procedure provides a non-invasive and direct measure of elasticity by doing an estimation of changes in the Nf 0 harmonics and wall thickness with a resolution of 0.1%, for first time. The results obtained by using the classic temporal cross-correlation method (TCC) were compared to those obtained with the new procedure. The latter allowed the evaluation of alterations in the elastic properties of arterial walls that are 30 times smaller than those being detectable with TCC; in fact, the depth resolution of the TCC approach is limited to ≈20 μm for typical SNRs. These values were calculated based on echoes obtained using a reference pattern (rubber tube). The application of the proposed procedure was also confirmed via

  19. Low-level exposure of guinea pigs and marmosets to sarin vapour in air: Lowest-observable-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) for miosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, H.P.M. van; Trap, H.C.; Kuijpers, W.C.; Oostdijk, J.P.; Benschop, H.P.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to indicate, for low-level exposure of conscious guinea pigs and marmoset monkeys to sarin vapour in air, the lowest-observable-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of sarin for miosis. This is the concentration × time (C·t) value (t = 5 h) of exposure at which miosis

  20. Electron Dynamics in the Core-Excited CS 2 Molecule Revealed through Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Marchenko , T; Carniato , S; Journel , L; Guillemin , R; Kawerk , E; Žitnik , M; Kavčič , M; Bučar , K; Bohinc , R; Petric , M; Vaz Da Cruz , V; Gel 'mukhanov , F; Simon , Marielle

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We present an experimental and theoretical study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) in the carbon disulphide CS 2 molecule near the sulfur K-absorption edge. We observe a strong evolution of the RIXS spectral profile with the excitation energy tuned below the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) absorption resonance. The reason for this is twofold. Reducing the photon energy in the vicinity of the LUMO absorption resonance leads to a relative suppressi...

  1. Spin asymmetry in resonant electron-hydrogen elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, I.E.; Shang, Bo.

    1993-02-01

    Differential cross sections and asymmetries at 90 deg. and 30 deg are calculated for electron-hydrogen elastic scattering over the energies of the lowest 1 S and 3 P resonances using a nine-state coupled-channels calculation with and without continuum effects, which are represented by an equivalent-local polarization potential. The polarization potential improves agreement with experiment in general for the spin-averaged cross sections. It is suggested that continuum effects would be critically tested by asymmetry measurement at 30 deg over the 1 S resonance. 7 refs., 4 figs

  2. Terahertz Magnetoelectric Resonance Enhanced by Mutual Coupling of Electromagnons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yamasaki, Y.; Tokura, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Both electric- and magnetic-dipole active spin excitations, i.e., electromagnons, which mediate the dynamical magnetoelectric effect, have been investigated for a multiferroic perovskite of manganite by optical spectroscopy at terahertz frequencies. Upon the magnetoelectric resonance at 1 meV in the multiferroic phase with the bc-plane spin cycloidal order, a gigantic dynamical magnetoelectric effect has been observed as a nonreciprocal directional dichroism or birefringence. The light k-vector-dependent difference (Δκ=κ+-κ-) of the extinction coefficient (κ±) is as large as Δκ˜1 or 2Δκ/(κ++κ-)˜0.7 at the lowest-lying electromagnon energy. We clarified the mutual coupling of the Eω∥a-polarized electromagnons of the different origins, leading to the enhancement of the magnetoelectric resonance.

  3. Magnetic moments of the lowest-lying singly heavy baryons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ghil-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Chul

    2018-06-01

    A light baryon is viewed as Nc valence quarks bound by meson mean fields in the large Nc limit. In much the same way a singly heavy baryon is regarded as Nc - 1 valence quarks bound by the same mean fields, which makes it possible to use the properties of light baryons to investigate those of the heavy baryons. A heavy quark being regarded as a static color source in the limit of the infinitely heavy quark mass, the magnetic moments of the heavy baryon are determined entirely by the chiral soliton consisting of a light-quark pair. The magnetic moments of the baryon sextet are obtained by using the parameters fixed in the light-baryon sector. In this mean-field approach, the numerical results of the magnetic moments of the baryon sextet with spin 3/2 are just 3/2 larger than those with spin 1/2. The magnetic moments of the bottom baryons are the same as those of the corresponding charmed baryons.

  4. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  5. Nonlinearity and nonclassicality in a nanomechanical resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teklu, Berihu [Clermont Universite, Blaise Pascal University, CNRS, PHOTON-N2, Institut Pascal, Aubiere Cedex (France); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy); Ferraro, Alessandro; Paternostro, Mauro [Queen' s University, Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Belfast (United Kingdom); Paris, Matteo G.A. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Milano (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    We address quantitatively the relationship between the nonlinearity of a mechanical resonator and the nonclassicality of its ground state. In particular, we analyze the nonclassical properties of the nonlinear Duffing oscillator (being driven or not) as a paradigmatic example of a nonlinear nanomechanical resonator. We first discuss how to quantify the nonlinearity of this system and then show that the nonclassicality of the ground state, as measured by the volume occupied by the negative part of the Wigner function, monotonically increases with the nonlinearity in all the working regimes addressed in our study. Our results show quantitatively that nonlinearity is a resource to create nonclassical states in mechanical systems. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehnholm, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an electron spin resonance enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (ESREMRI) apparatus able to generate a primary magnetic field during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection. This allows the generation of ESREMRI images of a subject. A primary magnetic field of a second and higher value generated during periods of nuclear spin transition excitation and magnetic resonance signal detection can be used to generate conventional MR images of a subject. The ESREMRI and native MR images so generated may be combined, (or superimposed). (author)

  7. Electron paramagnetic resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Al'tshuler, S A

    2013-01-01

    Electron Paramagnetic Resonance is a comprehensive text on the field of electron paramagnetic resonance, covering both the theoretical background and the results of experiment. This book is composed of eight chapters that cover theoretical materials and experimental data on ionic crystals, since these are the materials that have been most extensively studied by the methods of paramagnetic resonance. The opening chapters provide an introduction to the basic principles of electron paramagnetic resonance and the methods of its measurement. The next chapters are devoted to the theory of spectra an

  8. Ramifide resonators for cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, Yu.V.

    2000-01-01

    The resonators with the conductors ramified form for cyclotrons are systematized and separated into the self-contained class - the ramified resonators for cyclotrons (Carr). The ramified resonators are compared with the quarter-wave and half-wave nonramified resonators, accomplished from the transmitting lines fragments. The CRR are classified into two types: ones with the additional structural element, switched in parallel and in series. The CRR may include several additional structural elements. The CRR calculations may be concluded by analytical methods - the method of matrix calculation or the method of telegraph equations and numerical methods - by means of the ISFEL3D, MAFIA and other programs [ru

  9. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2016-01-11

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  10. Resonance control of mid-infrared metamaterials using arrays of split-ring resonator pairs

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng; Wang, Zhihong; Whittaker, John; Schedin, Fredrik; Wu, Zhipeng; Han, Jiaguang

    2016-01-01

    We present our design, fabrication and characterization of resonance-controllable metamaterials operating at mid-infrared wavelengths. The metamaterials are composed of pairs of back-to-back or face-to-face U-shape split-ring resonators (SRRs). Transmission spectra of the metamaterials are measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that the transmission resonance is dependent on the distance between the two SRRs in each SRR pair. The dips in the transmission spectrum shift to shorter wavelengths with increasing distance between the two SRRs for both the back-to-back and face-to-face SRR pairs. The position of the resonance dips in the spectrum can hence be controlled by the relative position of the SRRs. This mechanism of resonance control offers a promising way of developing metamaterials with tunability for optical filters and bio/chemical sensing devices in integrated nano-optics.

  11. Effect of metal coating and residual stress on the resonant frequency ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CranesSci MEMS Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian. Institute of ... Finally, it is found that the analytical models give an error of ... As a resonator, the most important characteristics are the resonant frequency and.

  12. Resonance ionization spectroscopy 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, J.E.; Omenetto, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Fifth International Symposium on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) and its Applications was held in Varese, Italy, 16-21 September 1990. Interest in RIS and its applications continues to grow, and RIS is expanding into a more diverse and mature field of study. This maturity was evident in this meeting both in the basic science and understanding of RIS processes and in the number of new and improved applications and techniques. The application of RIS techniques to molecular detection problems made remarkable progress since the last meeting two years ago. Subtle effects pertaining to isotopic discrimination received more theoretical attention, and there now seems to be good understanding of these effects, which can lead to correction procedures and/or methods to avoid isotopic effects. RIS applications were presented in which significant, real world problems were addressed, demonstrating its capability to solve problems that previously could not be accurately solved by other more traditional techniques. The contributions to the conference are grouped under the following major topic headings: physics applications of rare atoms; laser ionization mechanisms - spectroscopy; atomic, molecular and ion sources; molecular RIS; atomic RIS - Rydberg states; environmental trace analysis; biological and medical applications; state selected chemistry; new laser sources and techniques; ultra-high resolution and isotopic selectivity; surface and bulk analysis. (Author)

  13. Multistrange Meson-Baryon Dynamics and Resonance Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemchandani, K. P.; Martínez Torres, A.; Hosaka, A.; Nagahiro, H.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.

    2018-05-01

    In this talk I review our recent studies on meson-baryon systems with strangeness - 1 and - 2. The motivation of our works is to find resonances generated as a consequence of coupled channel meson-baryon interactions. The coupled channels are all meson-baryon systems formed by combining a pseudoscalar or a vector meson with an octet baryon such that the system has the strange quantum number equal to - 1 or - 2. The lowest order meson-baryon interaction amplitudes are obtained from Lagrangians based on the chiral and the hidden local symmetries related to the vector mesons working as the gauge bosons. These lowest order amplitudes are used as an input to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation and a search for poles is made in the resulting amplitudes, in the complex plane. In case of systems with strangeness - 1, we find evidence for the existence of some hyperons such as: Λ(2000), Σ(1750), Σ(1940), Σ(2000). More recently, in the study of strangeness - 2 systems we have found two narrow resonances which can be related to Ξ (1690) and Ξ(2120). In this latter work, we have obtained the lowest order amplitudes relativistically as well as in the nonrelativistic approximation to solve the scattering equations. We find that the existence of the poles in the complex plane does not get affected by the computation of the scattering equation with the lowest order amplitudes obtained in the nonrelativistic approximation.

  14. A silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Zhangyang; Fan Shangchun; Cai Chenguang

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and test of a silicon micromachined resonant pressure sensor. A square membrane and a doubly clamped resonant beam constitute a compound structure. The former senses the pressure directly, while the latter changes its resonant frequency according to deformation of the membrane. The final output relation between the resonant frequency and the applied pressure is deducted according to the structure mechanical properties. Sensors are fabricated by micromachining technology, and then sealed in vaccum. These sensors are tested by open-loop and close-loop system designed on purpose. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor has a sensitivity of 49.8Hz/kPa and repeatability of 0.08%.

  15. EGR technology for lowest emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baert, R.S.G.; Beckman, D.E.; Veen, A.

    1996-01-01

    An EGR system for turbocharged and aftercooled HD diesel engines has been demonstrated on a 12 litre 315 kW engine with 4 valves per cylinder and a high pressure injection system. In this system exhaust gas is tapped off before the turbine, run through a cooler and mixed with the intake air after

  16. String Resonances at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Dai, De-Chang; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Lust, Dieter; Stojkovic, Dejan; Taylor, Tomasz R

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] We consider extensions of the standard model based on open strings ending on D-branes. Assuming that the fundamental string mass scale M_s is in the TeV range and that the theory is weakly coupled, we discuss possible signals of string physics at the upcoming HL-LHC run (3000 fb^{-1}) with \\sqrt{s} = 14 TeV, and at potential future pp colliders, HE-LHC and VLHC, operating at \\sqrt{s} = 33 and 100 TeV, respectively. In such D-brane constructions, the dominant contributions to full-fledged string amplitudes for all the common QCD parton subprocesses leading to dijets and \\gamma + jet are completely independent of the details of compactification, and can be evaluated in a parameter-free manner. We make use of these amplitudes evaluated near the first (n=1) and second (n=2) resonant poles to determine the discovery potential for Regge excitations of the quark, the gluon, and the color singlet living on the QCD stack. We show that for string scales as large as 7.1 TeV (6.1 TeV), lowest massive Regge exc...

  17. Optically detected cyclotron resonance in a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Gregor

    2011-09-23

    Optically detected far-infrared cyclotron resonance (FIR-ODCR) in GaAs/AlGaAs HJs is interpreted in the frame of an exciton-dissociation mechanism. It is possible to explain the ODR mechanism by an exciton drag, mediated by ballistically propagating phonons. Furthermore, very narrow resonances are presented and realistic electron mobility values can be calculated. The exceptionally narrow ODCRs allow to measure conduction-band nonparabolicity effects and resolve satellite resonances, close to the main cyclotron resonance line.

  18. A 2:1 MUX Based on Multiple MEMS Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al

    2017-01-09

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. This paper reports a realization of a 2:1 MUX, a concatenable digital logic element, based on electrothermal frequency tuning of electrically connected multiple arch resonators. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  19. Pulse sequences for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graves, Martin J.

    2007-01-01

    The theory and application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pulse sequences following the administration of an exogenous contrast agent are discussed. Pulse sequences are categorised according to the contrast agent mechanism: changes in proton density, relaxivity, magnetic susceptibility and resonant frequency shift. Applications in morphological imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, dynamic imaging and cell labelling are described. The importance of optimising the pulse sequence for each application is emphasised

  20. A 2:1 MUX Based on Multiple MEMS Resonators

    KAUST Repository

    Hafiz, Md Abdullah Al; Kosuru, Lakshmoji; Younis, Mohammad I.; Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Micro/nano-electromechanical resonator based mechanical computing has recently attracted significant attention. This paper reports a realization of a 2:1 MUX, a concatenable digital logic element, based on electrothermal frequency tuning of electrically connected multiple arch resonators. Toward this, shallow arch shaped microresonators are electrically connected and their resonance frequencies are tuned based on an electrothermal frequency modulation scheme. This study demonstrates that by reconfiguring the same basic building block, the arch microresonator, complex logic circuits can be realized.

  1. Nanomechanical resonant structures in single-crystal diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Burek, Michael J.; Ramos, Daniel; Patel, Parth; Frank, Ian W.; Lončar, Marko

    2013-01-01

    With its host of outstanding material properties, single-crystal diamond is an attractive material for nanomechanical systems. Here, the mechanical resonance characteristics of freestanding, single-crystal diamond nanobeams fabricated by an angled-etching methodology are reported. Resonance frequencies displayed evidence of significant compressive stress in doubly clamped diamond nanobeams, while cantilever resonance modes followed the expected inverse-length-squared trend. Q-factors on the o...

  2. Controlling Parametric Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galeazzi, Roberto; Pettersen, Kristin Ytterstad

    2012-01-01

    the authors review the conditions for the onset of parametric resonance, and propose a nonlinear control strategy in order to both induce the resonant oscillations and to stabilize the unstable motion. Lagrange’s theory is used to derive the dynamics of the system and input–output feedback linearization...

  3. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 11. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biological Applications. B G Hegde. General Article Volume 20 Issue 11 November 2015 pp 1017-1032. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Electromagnetic resonance waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaba, J.M.; Manjon, F.J.; Guirao, A.; Andres, M.V.

    1994-01-01

    We describe in this paper a set of experiments designed to make qualitative and quantitative measurements on electromagnetic resonances of several simple systems. The experiments are designed for the undergraduate laboratory of Electricity and Magnetism in Physics. These experiments can help the students understanding the concept of resonance, which appears in different fields of Physics. (Author) 8 refs

  5. Laser magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The technique of laser resonance magnetic resonance allows one to study the high-resolution spectroscopy of transient paramagnetic species, viz, atoms, radicals, and molecular ions. This article is a brief exposition of the method, describing the principles, instrumentation and applicability of the IR and FIR-LMR and shows results of HF + . (Author) [pt

  6. Resonance and Fractal Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broer, Henk W.

    The phenomenon of resonance will be dealt with from the viewpoint of dynamical systems depending on parameters and their bifurcations. Resonance phenomena are associated to open subsets in the parameter space, while their complement corresponds to quasi-periodicity and chaos. The latter phenomena

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Susanta Das. General Article Volume 9 Issue 1 January 2004 pp 34-49. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/009/01/0034-0049. Keywords.

  8. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  9. Comparison of nuclear electric resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance in integer and fractional quantum Hall states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimatsu, Toru; Shirai, Shota; Hashimoto, Katsushi; Sato, Ken; Hirayama, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Electric-field-induced nuclear resonance (NER: nuclear electric resonance) involving quantum Hall states (QHSs) was studied at various filling factors by exploiting changes in nuclear spins polarized at quantum Hall breakdown. Distinct from the magnetic dipole interaction in nuclear magnetic resonance, the interaction of the electric-field gradient with the electric quadrupole moment plays the dominant role in the NER mechanism. The magnitude of the NER signal strongly depends on whether electronic states are localized or extended. This indicates that NER is sensitive to the screening capability of the electric field associated with QHSs

  10. Multimachine subsynchronous resonance: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahoud, M.A.; Harley, R.G.; Levy, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical investigation into the subsynchronous resonance (SSR) behaviour of a power system containing synchronous generators, induction motors and series capacitors. By applying eigenvalue techniques, attention is paid to the effect of replacing the induction motor by an equivalent fixed resistor-inductor (R-L) load. Nonlinear transient simulations and their Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT's) are also used to investigate the effects of the complexity of the mechanical model of the generator on the SSR predictions. The results show that the model used for the induction motor has a significant effect on the SSR behaviour of a multimachine system

  11. Resonant primordial gravitational waves amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunshan Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a mechanism to evade the Lyth bound in models of inflation. We minimally extend the conventional single-field inflation model in general relativity (GR to a theory with non-vanishing graviton mass in the very early universe. The modification primarily affects the tensor perturbation, while the scalar and vector perturbations are the same as the ones in GR with a single scalar field at least at the level of linear perturbation theory. During the reheating stage, the graviton mass oscillates coherently and leads to resonant amplification of the primordial tensor perturbation. After reheating the graviton mass vanishes and we recover GR.

  12. Micro-optomechanical trampoline resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Brian; Kleckner, Dustin; Sonin, Petro; Jeffrey, Evan; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2011-03-01

    Recently, micro-optomechanical devices have been proposed for implementation of experiments ranging from non-demolition measurements of phonon number to creation of macroscopic quantum superpositions. All have strenuous requirements on optical finesse, mechanical quality factor, and temperature. We present a set of devices composed of dielectric mirrors on Si 3 N4 trampoline resonators. We describe the fabrication process and present data on finesse and quality factor. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from NSF PHY-0804177 and Marie Curie EXT-CT-2006-042580.

  13. Radio refractivity gradients in the lowest 100m of the atmosphere over Lagos, Nigeria in the rainy-harmattan transition phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dairo, O. F.; Kolawole, L. B.

    2018-01-01

    Radio engineers and researchers in conjunction with the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) have established the pivotal role of radio refractivity to the propagation of electromagnetic energy in the troposphere. In particular, the refractivity gradient statistics for the lowest 100m in the troposphere are used to determine the probability of occurrence of anomalous propagation conditions known as ducting. The major challenge to characterising the propagation condition over any environment is accessing the data of the lowest boundary layer of the atmosphere, which is highly dynamic and turbulent in evolution. High resolution radiosonde data from the Nigerian Meteorological Agency (NiMet) were used for a synoptic study of the rain-harmattan transition phase. The rain-harmattan transition phase marks the onset of the dry season due to the movement of the intertropical convergence zone interplay between (north-easterly and south-westerly) trade winds and monsoonal circulation. The lowest 100m data were analysed to determine the frequency of ducting per month. Progressive increase in the occurrence of ducting was observed during the rain-harmattan transition phase, which coincides with the West African Monsoon retreat. The results show significant divergence from previous studies, which reported that the tropospheric condition over Lagos (Geo. 6 . 5 °N, 3 . 3 °E), Nigeria, is predominantly super-refractive.

  14. Resonant snubber inverter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jih-Sheng; Young, Sr., Robert W.; Chen, Daoshen; Scudiere, Matthew B.; Ott, Jr., George W.; White, Clifford P.; McKeever, John W.

    1997-01-01

    A resonant, snubber-based, soft switching, inverter circuit achieves lossless switching during dc-to-ac power conversion and power conditioning with minimum component count and size. Current is supplied to the resonant snubber branches solely by the main inverter switches. Component count and size are reduced by use of a single semiconductor switch in the resonant snubber branches. Component count is also reduced by maximizing the use of stray capacitances of the main switches as parallel resonant capacitors. Resonance charging and discharging of the parallel capacitances allows lossless, zero voltage switching. In one embodiment, circuit component size and count are minimized while achieving lossless, zero voltage switching within a three-phase inverter.

  15. Basic dynamics at a multiple resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraz-Mello, S.; Yokoyama, T.

    The problem of multiple resonance is dealt with as it occurs in Celestial Mechanics and in non-linear Mechanics. In perturbation theory small divisors occur as a consequence of the fact that the flows in the phase space of the real system and the flows in the phase space of the so-called undisturbed system are not homeomorphic at all. Whatever the perturbation technique we adopt, the first step is to correct the topology of the undisturbed flows. It is shown that at a multiple resonance we are led to dynamical systems that are generally non-integrable. The basic representatives of these systems are the n-pendulums theta sup(:) sub(k) = σ sub(j)A sub(jk) sin theta sub(j). Multiple resonances are classified as syndetic or asyndetic following the eigenvalues of a quadratic form. Some degenerate cases are also presented. (Author) [pt

  16. Active cooling of an audio-frequency electrical resonator to microkelvin temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinante, A.; Bonaldi, M.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.

    2010-11-01

    We have cooled a macroscopic LC electrical resonator using feedback-cooling combined with an ultrasensitive dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) current amplifier. The resonator, with resonance frequency of 11.5 kHz and bath temperature of 135 mK, is operated in the high coupling limit so that the SQUID back-action noise overcomes the intrinsic resonator thermal noise. The effect of correlations between the amplifier noise sources clearly show up in the experimental data, as well as the interplay of the amplifier noise with the resonator thermal noise. The lowest temperature achieved by feedback is 14 μK, corresponding to 26 resonator photons, and approaches the limit imposed by the noise energy of the SQUID amplifier.

  17. Search for heavy resonances in vector boson fusion

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00423270; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    If the Higgs boson discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is not exactly the one in the Standard Model, an alternative mechanism is needed to restore unitarity in the scattering amplitude of longitudinal gauge bosons, and new resonances may appear. This paper presents a search for new heavy neutral resonances ($R$) produced through vector boson fusion process $qq \\rightarrow Rqq \\rightarrow \\ell^+ \

  18. An above-barrier narrow resonance in F-15

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grancey, F.; Mercenne, A.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Davinson, T.; Sorlin, O.; Angelique, J. C.; Assie, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Celikovic, I.; Chudoba, V.; Daugas, J. M.; Dumitru, G.; Fadil, M.; Grévy, S.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Michel, N.; Mrázek, Jaromír; Negoita, F.; Okolowicz, J.; Pantelica, D.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrot, L.; Ploszajczak, M.; Randisi, G.; Ray, I.; Roig, O.; Rotaru, F.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Smimova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Subotic, K.; Tatischeff, V.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujic, P.; Wolski, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 758, JUL (2016), s. 26-31 ISSN 0370-2693 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : resonances * elastic proton scattering * lifetimes width * F-15 * unbound states * overbarrier resonance Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016

  19. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. R Simon. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 11 Issue 3 March 2006 pp 6-24 General Article. The Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen Paper - An Important Event in the History of Quantum Mechanics · S Chaturvedi N Mukunda R Simon.

  20. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Sovan Sarkar. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 7 Issue 2 February 2002 pp 33-45 General Article. Untangling the Mystery of Alzheimer's Disease - Understanding Molecular Mechanisms for Novel Therapeutic Approaches.

  1. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. M D Deshpande. Articles written in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 9 Issue 4 April 2004 pp 50-60 General Article. The No-Slip Boundary Condition in Fluid Mechanics - 1.The Riddle of Fluid Sticking to the Wall in Flow · Sandeep Prabhakara ...

  2. Quantum manifestations of classical resonance zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leon, N.; Davis, M.J.; Heller, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    We examine the concept of nodal breakup of wave functions as a criterion for quantum mechanical ergodicity. We find that complex nodal structure of wave functions is not sufficient to determine quantum mechanical ergodicity. The influence of classical resonances [which manifest themselves as classical resonance zones (CRZ)] may also be responsible for the seeming complexity of nodal structure. We quantify this by reexamining one of the two systems studied by Stratt, Handy, and Miller [J. Chem. Phys. 71, 3311 (1974)] from both a quantum mechanical and classical point of view. We conclude that quasiperiodic classical motion can account for highly distorted quantum eigenstates. One should always keep this in mind when addressing questions regarding quantum mechanical ergodicity

  3. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 8. Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms-Secondary Kinetic Isotope Effect. Uday Maitra J Chandrasekhar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 8 August 1997 pp 18-25 ...

  4. Collider Tests of (Composite) Diphoton Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molinaro, Emiliano; Sannino, Francesco; Vignaroli, Natascia

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider sensitivity to new pseudoscalar resonances decaying into diphoton with masses up to scales of few TeVs. We focus on minimal scenarios where the production mechanisms involve either photon or top-mediated gluon fusion, partially motivated by the tantalizing...

  5. Properties of spiral resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeuser, J.

    1989-10-01

    The present thesis deals with the calculation and the study of the application possibilities of single and double spiral resonators. The main aim was the development and the construction of reliable and effective high-power spiral resonators for the UNILAC of the GSI in Darmstadt and the H - -injector for the storage ring HERA of DESY in Hamburg. After the presentation of the construction and the properties of spiral resonators and their description by oscillating-circuit models the theoretical foundations of the bunching are presented and some examples of a rebuncher and debuncher and their influence on the longitudinal particle dynamics are shown. After the description of the characteristic accelerator quantities by means of an oscillating-circuit model and the theory of an inhomogeneous λ/4 line it is shown, how the resonance frequency and the efficiency of single and double spiral resonators can be calculated from the geometrical quantities of the structure. In the following the dependence of the maximal reachable resonator voltage in dependence on the gap width and the surface of the drift tubes is studied. Furthermore the high-power resonators are presented, which were built for the different applications for the GSI in Darmstadt, DESY in Hamburg, and for the FOM Institute in Amsterdam. (orig./HSI) [de

  6. Compact HTS bandpass filter employing CPW quarter-wavelength resonators with strongly-coupled open stubs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, K; Koizumi, D; Narahashi, S [Research Laboratories, NTT DoCoMo, Inc., 3-5 Hikari-no-oka, Yokosuka, Kanagwa, 239-8536 (Japan)], E-mail: satokei@nttdocomo.co.jp

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a novel compact high temperature superconducting (HTS) bandpass filter (BPF) that employs a newly developed miniaturized coplanar-waveguide (CPW) quarter-wavelength resonators with strongly-coupled open stubs. The proposed resonator has a structure in which the open stubs are aligned close to the center conductor of the resonator. This is because strongly-coupled resonators have widely-split resonant frequencies, and the lowest resonant frequency is employed as the fundamental resonant frequency of the resonator in order to achieve miniaturization. The proposed resonator is 1.7 mm or less in length for use in the 5-GHz band, whereas the conventional straight resonator is approximately 6.4 mm long. A four-pole Chebyshev HTS BPF is designed and fabricated using the proposed CPW resonators. The entire length of the proposed four-pole filter is 15 mm. The frequency response of the fabricated filter agrees well with the electromagnetic simulation results. The proposed filter achieves a size reduction of at least 50% compared to previously reported filters without any degradation in the frequency characteristics.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy (MRFM) system, developed by ARL, is the world's most sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis tool,...

  8. Stochastic resonance in models of neuronal ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chialvo, D.R.; Longtin, A.; Mueller-Gerkin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Two recently suggested mechanisms for the neuronal encoding of sensory information involving the effect of stochastic resonance with aperiodic time-varying inputs are considered. It is shown, using theoretical arguments and numerical simulations, that the nonmonotonic behavior with increasing noise of the correlation measures used for the so-called aperiodic stochastic resonance (ASR) scenario does not rely on the cooperative effect typical of stochastic resonance in bistable and excitable systems. Rather, ASR with slowly varying signals is more properly interpreted as linearization by noise. Consequently, the broadening of the open-quotes resonance curveclose quotes in the multineuron stochastic resonance without tuning scenario can also be explained by this linearization. Computation of the input-output correlation as a function of both signal frequency and noise for the model system further reveals conditions where noise-induced firing with aperiodic inputs will benefit from stochastic resonance rather than linearization by noise. Thus, our study clarifies the tuning requirements for the optimal transduction of subthreshold aperiodic signals. It also shows that a single deterministic neuron can perform as well as a network when biased into a suprathreshold regime. Finally, we show that the inclusion of a refractory period in the spike-detection scheme produces a better correlation between instantaneous firing rate and input signal. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  9. Resonant power converters

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2012-01-01

    This book is devoted to resonant energy conversion in power electronics. It is a practical, systematic guide to the analysis and design of various dc-dc resonant inverters, high-frequency rectifiers, and dc-dc resonant converters that are building blocks of many of today's high-frequency energy processors. Designed to function as both a superior senior-to-graduate level textbook for electrical engineering courses and a valuable professional reference for practicing engineers, it provides students and engineers with a solid grasp of existing high-frequency technology, while acquainting them wit

  10. Excitation of Nucleon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2001-01-01

    I discuss developments in the area of nucleon resonance excitation, both necessary and feasible, that would put our understanding of nucleon structure in the regime of strong QCD on a qualitatively new level. They involve the collection of high quality data in various channels, a more rigorous approach in the search for ''missing'' resonances, an effort to compute some critical quantities in nucleon resonance excitations from first principles, i.e. QCD, and a proposal focused to obtain an understanding of a fundamental quantity in nucleon structure

  11. Dihadronic and dileptonic resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Barabanov, M.Yu.; Kazacha, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    Simple phenomenological rules are suggested for calculation of dihadron and dilepton resonance masses. A general interpretation is given for different exotic resonances in nuclear physics: Darmstadt-effect, dibaryon, dipion and other resonances. Information about the inner structure of e ± , proton, neutron, pions and so on can be obtained from the usual reactions of the type e + + e - =>γγ, e ± +γ=>e ± γ, e ± μ ± , e ± N... at low, intermediate and high energies using existing experimental devices

  12. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  13. Resonant halide perovskite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiguntseva, Ekaterina Y.; Ishteev, Arthur R.; Komissarenko, Filipp E.; Zuev, Dmitry A.; Ushakova, Elena V.; Milichko, Valentin A.; Nesterov-Mueller, Alexander; Makarov, Sergey V.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.

    2017-09-01

    The hybrid halide perovskites is a prospective material for fabrication of cost-effective optical devices. Unique perovskites properties are used for solar cells and different photonic applications. Recently, perovskite-based nanophotonics has emerged. Here, we consider perovskite like a high-refractive index dielectric material, which can be considered to be a basis for nanoparticles fabrication with Mie resonances. As a result, we fabricate and study resonant perovskite nanoparticles with different sizes. We reveal, that spherical nanoparticles show enhanced photoluminescence signal. The achieved results lay a cornerstone in the field of novel types of organic-inorganic nanophotonics devices with optical properties improved by Mie resonances.

  14. Writing with resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Ninna; Wegener, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we explore what organization and management scholars can do to write with resonance and to facilitate an emotional, bodily, or in other ways sensory connection between the text and the reader. We propose that resonance can be relevant for organization and management scholars in two......, and thus bring forward the field of research in question. We propose that writing with resonance may be a way to further the impact of academic work by extending the modalities with which our readers can relate to and experience our work....

  15. Doubly resonant multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crance, M.

    1978-01-01

    A particular case of doubly resonant multiphoton ionization is theoretically investigated. More precisely, two levels quasi-resonant with two successive harmonics of the field frequency are considered. The method used is based on the effective operator formalism first introduced for this problem by Armstrong, Beers and Feneuille. The main result is to show the possibility of observing large interference effects on the width of the resonances. Moreover this treatment allows us to make more precise the connection between effective operator formalism and standard perturbation theory

  16. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina GRIDINA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Performed in this paper is numerical modeling of the angular dependence for light reflectivity R(F in surface plasmon-polariton resonance (SPR realized in Kretschmann geometry when studying the interface gold/suspension of spherical particles (cells in the assumption that the dielectric permittivity of particles suspension is described by the theory of effective medium. It has been shown that availability of suspended particles in solution inevitably results in appearance of an intermediate layer with the ε gradient between gold surface and suspension bulk, as a result of which the SPR angle shifts to lower values. Near the critical angle, the first derivative dR/dF demonstrates a clearly pronounced peak, which allows determining the value for suspension bulk and the gradient in the intermediate layer. Obtained in our experiments were SPR curves for two suspensions of erythrocytes – the dense one (erythrocyte mass after centrifuging and loose solution (whole blood. In the case of erythrocyte mass, fitting the experimental and calculated curves enabled us to quantitatively determine the bulk value for this erythrocyte mass (εb =1.96, thickness of the intermediate layer dm (300…400 nm and gradient in the intermediate layer. On the contrary, the SPR curve for whole blood appeared to be close to that of pure plasma. This fact allows only estimation of the thickness dm~2000...3000 nm as well as minimum ε value in the intermediate layer, which is close to that of plasma (ε = 1.79. Also, discussed is the mechanism of influence of the cell shape near the gold surface on the SPR effect.

  17. The Resonance Absorption of Uranium Metal and Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstrand, E; Lundgren, G

    1962-06-15

    The resonance integrals for uranium metal and uranium oxide have been determined for a 1/E flux. The following results were obtained Metal RI 2.95 + 25.8{radical}(S/M); Oxide RI = 4.15 + 26.6{radical}(S/M). The oxide value agrees with the expression found earlier at this laboratory. But the result for the metal is 4. 5 % larger than the earlier one. In addition, the resonance absorption in a R1 fuel rod has been compared with that for a cadmium-covered rod placed in an approximate cell boundary flux. The former came out 3 % larger than the latter. A comparison of the fuel rod absorption with that for a 1/E flux yields a corresponding figure of 7 %. The neutron flux was monitored below the lowest resonance in uranium.

  18. High Rydberg resonances in dielectronic recombination of pb(79+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandau, C; Bartsch, T; Hoffknecht, A; Knopp, H; Schippers, S; Shi, W; Müller, A; Grün, N; Scheid, W; Steih, T; Bosch, F; Franzke, B; Kozhuharov, C; Mokler, P H; Nolden, F; Steck, M; Stöhlker, T; Stachura, Z

    2002-07-29

    Dielectronic recombination resonances of Pb (79+) associated with 2s(1/2)-->2p(1/2) excitations were measured at the heavy-ion storage ring ESR at GSI. The fine structure of the energetically lowest resonance manifold Pb (78+)(1s(2)2p(1/2)20l(j)) at around 18 eV could partially be resolved, and rate coefficients on an absolute scale were obtained. A comparison of the experimental data with results of a fully relativistic theoretical approach shows that high-angular-momentum components up to j=31/2 significantly contribute to the total resonance strength demonstrating the necessity to revise the widespread notion of negligible high-angular-momentum contributions at least for very highly charged ions.

  19. The direct neutron decay of giant resonances in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, A.

    1988-01-01

    The neutron decay of the giant multipole resonance region from 9 to 15 MeV of excitation energy in 208 Pb has been studied. Neutron branching ratios for the decay to the ground state and to the low-lying excited states of 207 Pb were measured as a function of the excitation energy of 208 Pb and compared to Hauser-Feshbach calculations. While the neutron branching ratios from the energy region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance are reproduced by the calculations, the ratios from the energy region of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance show a conspicuous excess with respect to the statistical model predictions. The neutron yield from this energy region was analysed in terms of a multistep model of the compound nucleus which includes collective doorway channels. The total direct escape width as well as the associated direct partial escape widths to the lowest five valence hole states of 207 Pb were determined. (orig.)

  20. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  1. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of ±0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  2. Competing Turing and Faraday Instabilities in Longitudinally Modulated Passive Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copie, François; Conforti, Matteo; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Mussot, Arnaud; Trillo, Stefano

    2016-04-08

    We experimentally investigate the interplay of Turing (modulational) and Faraday (parametric) instabilities in a bistable passive nonlinear resonator. The Faraday branch is induced via parametric resonance owing to a periodic modulation of the resonator dispersion. We show that the bistable switching dynamics is dramatically affected by the competition between the two instability mechanisms, which dictates two completely novel scenarios. At low detunings from resonance, switching occurs between the stable stationary lower branch and the Faraday-unstable upper branch, whereas at high detunings we observe the crossover between the Turing and Faraday periodic structures. The results are well explained in terms of the universal Lugiato-Lefever model.

  3. Determination of the lowest concentrations of aldehyde fixatives for completely fixing various cellular structures by real-time imaging and quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fangfa; Yang, Wen; Huang, Jie; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Yong

    2013-05-01

    The effectiveness of fixatives for fixing biological specimens has long been widely investigated. However, the lowest concentrations of fixatives needed to completely fix whole cells or various cellular structures remain unclear. Using real-time imaging and quantification, we determined the lowest concentrations of glutaraldehyde (0.001-0.005, ~0.005, 0.01-005, 0.01-005, and 0.01-0.1 %) and formaldehyde/paraformaldehyde (0.01-0.05, ~0.05, 0.5-1, 1-1.5, and 0.5-1 %) required to completely fix focal adhesions, cell-surface particles, stress fibers, the cell cortex, and the inner structures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells within 20 min. With prolonged fixation times (>20 min), the concentration of fixative required to completely fix these structures will shift to even lower values. These data may help us understand and optimize fixation protocols and understand the potential effects of the small quantities of endogenously generated aldehydes in human cells. We also determined the lowest concentration of glutaraldehyde (0.5 %) and formaldehyde/paraformaldehyde (2 %) required to induce cell blebbing. We found that the average number and size of the fixation-induced blebs per cell were dependent on both fixative concentration and cell spread area, but were independent of temperature. These data provide important information for understanding cell blebbing, and may help optimize the vesiculation-based technique used to isolate plasma membrane by suggesting ways of controlling the number or size of fixation-induced cell blebs.

  4. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  5. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Special Relativity, Causality and Quantum Mechanics - 2. Guruprasad Kar Samir Kunkri Sujit K Choudhary. General Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 43-54 ...

  6. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 8. Various Quantum Mechanical Concepts for Confinements in Semiconductor Nanocrystals. Jayakrishna Khatei Karuna Kar Nanda. Classroom Volume 18 Issue 8 August 2013 pp 771-776 ...

  7. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. Issue front cover ... Use of Isotopes for Studying Reaction Mechanisms Primary Kinetic Isotope Effect · Uday Maitra J ... Teaching Biodiversity · Madhav Gadgil.

  8. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 8. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Classical Mechanics and Electromagnetism. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 8 August 2014 pp 775-775 ...

  9. Communication: Systematic shifts of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital peak in x-ray absorption for a series of 3d metal porphyrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    García Lastra, Juan Maria; Cook, P. L.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2010-01-01

    Porphyrins are widely used as dye molecules in solar cells. Knowing the energies of their frontier orbitals is crucial for optimizing the energy level structure of solar cells. We use near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to obtain the energy of the lowest unoccupied...... molecular orbital (LUMO) with respect to the N-1s core level of the molecule. A systematic energy shift of the N-1s to LUMO transition is found along a series of 3d metal octaethylporphyrins and explained by density functional theory. It is mainly due to a shift of the N-1s level rather than a shift...

  10. Improved Apnea-Hypopnea Index and Lowest Oxygen Saturation After Maxillomandibular Advancement With or Without Counterclockwise Rotation in Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben B.; Laulund, Anne Sofie; Ingerslev, Janne

    2015-01-01

    - and postsurgical values of pharyngeal volume measured on computed tomogram or cone-beam computed tomogram and changes in Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) and lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) values after surgery. Datawere subjected to a meta-analysis based on odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and P...... between pharyngeal volume changes and surgical method used. Postoperative parameters included an AHI lower than 5 (OR = 14.9; 95% CI, 2.7-83.5; P = .002), an AHI lower than 20 (OR = 114.8; 95% CI, 23.5-561.1; P

  11. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Defecography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a CD or uploaded to a digital cloud server. Magnetic resonance (MR) defecography is a special ... with you. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits MR defecography helps assess pelvic ...

  12. Quantum Proximity Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that at long wavelengths λ an s-wave scatterer can have a scattering cross section σ on the order of λ 2 , much larger than its physical size, as measured by the range of its potential. Very interesting phenomena can arise when two or more identical scatterers are placed close together, well within one wavelength. We show that, for a pair of identical scatterers, an extremely narrow p-wave open-quote open-quote proximity close-quote close-quote resonance develops from a broader s-wave resonance of the individual scatterers. A new s-wave resonance of the pair also appears. The relation of these proximity resonances (so called because they appear when the scatterers are close together) to the Thomas and Efimov effects is discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  13. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F.M., E-mail: m.lutz@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Lange, Jens Sören, E-mail: Soeren.Lange@exp2.physik.uni-giessen.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Pennington, Michael, E-mail: michaelp@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Bettoni, Diego [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara, 44122 Ferrara (Italy); Brambilla, Nora [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Crede, Volker [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Eidelman, Simon [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Budker Istitute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Gillitzer, Albrecht [Institut für Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Gradl, Wolfgang [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Lang, Christian B. [Institut für Physik, Universität Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Metag, Volker [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Nakano, Takashi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting ‘Resonances in QCD’, which took place at GSI October 12–14, 2015. A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions: • What is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD? • Where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers? • What experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy–light and heavy–heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus. This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  14. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arlart, I.P.; Guhl, L.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given in this paper of the physical and technical principles underlying the 'time-of-flight' technique for imaging of vessels by magnetic resonance tomography. Major indications for the new procedure of magnetic resonance angiography at present are intracerebral and extracerebral vessels, with digital subtraction angiography quite often being required to cope with minor alterations (small aneurysms, small occlusions). Magnetic resonance angiography and digital subtraction angiography are compared to each other for advantages and disadvantages. Basically, replacement of radiological angiography by magnetic resonance angiography appears to be possible only within limits, since X-ray diagnostics primarily provides morphological information about vessels, whereas flow dynamics is visualized by the 'time-of-flight' technique. (orig.) [de

  15. Magnetic Resonance Cholangiopancreatography (MRCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radio waves and a computer to evaluate the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct for disease. It is ... of the hepatobiliary and pancreatic systems, including the liver, gallbladder, bile ducts, pancreas and pancreatic duct . Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ...

  16. Piezoelectric MEMS resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces piezoelectric microelectromechanical (pMEMS) resonators to a broad audience by reviewing design techniques including use of finite element modeling, testing and qualification of resonators, and fabrication and large scale manufacturing techniques to help inspire future research and entrepreneurial activities in pMEMS. The authors discuss the most exciting developments in the area of materials and devices for the making of piezoelectric MEMS resonators, and offer direct examples of the technical challenges that need to be overcome in order to commercialize these types of devices. Some of the topics covered include: Widely-used piezoelectric materials, as well as materials in which there is emerging interest Principle of operation and design approaches for the making of flexural, contour-mode, thickness-mode, and shear-mode piezoelectric resonators, and examples of practical implementation of these devices Large scale manufacturing approaches, with a focus on the practical aspects associate...

  17. Lattices of dielectric resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Trubin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This book provides the analytical theory of complex systems composed of a large number of high-Q dielectric resonators. Spherical and cylindrical dielectric resonators with inferior and also whispering gallery oscillations allocated in various lattices are considered. A new approach to S-matrix parameter calculations based on perturbation theory of Maxwell equations, developed for a number of high-Q dielectric bodies, is introduced. All physical relationships are obtained in analytical form and are suitable for further computations. Essential attention is given to a new unified formalism of the description of scattering processes. The general scattering task for coupled eigen oscillations of the whole system of dielectric resonators is described. The equations for the  expansion coefficients are explained in an applicable way. The temporal Green functions for the dielectric resonator are presented. The scattering process of short pulses in dielectric filter structures, dielectric antennas  and lattices of d...

  18. Resonances in QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Matthias F. M.; Lange, Jens Sören; Pennington, Michael; Bettoni, Diego; Brambilla, Nora; Crede, Volker; Eidelman, Simon; Gillitzer, Albrecht; Gradl, Wolfgang; Lang, Christian B.; Metag, Volker; Nakano, Takashi; Nieves, Juan; Neubert, Sebastian; Oka, Makoto; Olsen, Stephen L.; Pappagallo, Marco; Paul, Stephan; Pelizäus, Marc; Pilloni, Alessandro; Prencipe, Elisabetta; Ritman, Jim; Ryan, Sinead; Thoma, Ulrike; Uwer, Ulrich; Weise, Wolfram

    2016-04-01

    We report on the EMMI Rapid Reaction Task Force meeting 'Resonances in QCD', which took place at GSI October 12-14, 2015 (Fig.~1). A group of 26 people met to discuss the physics of resonances in QCD. The aim of the meeting was defined by the following three key questions; what is needed to understand the physics of resonances in QCD?; where does QCD lead us to expect resonances with exotic quantum numbers?; and what experimental efforts are required to arrive at a coherent picture? For light mesons and baryons only those with up, down and strange quark content were considered. For heavy-light and heavy-heavy meson systems, those with charm quarks were the focus.This document summarizes the discussions by the participants, which in turn led to the coherent conclusions we present here.

  19. Accidental degeneracy of resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, E.; Mondragon, A.; Jauregui, A.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: It will be shown that a degeneracy of resonances is associated with a second rank pole in the scattering matrix and a Jordan cycle of generalized eigenfunctions of the radial Schrodinger equation. The generalized Gamow-Jordan eigenfunctions are basis elements of an expansion in complex resonance energy eigenfunctions. In this orthonormal basis, the Hamiltonian is represented by a non-diagonal complex matrix with a Jordan block of rank two. Some general properties of the degeneracy of resonances will be exhibited and discussed in an explicit example of degeneracy of resonant states and double poles in the scattering matrix of a double barrier potential. The cross section, scattering wave functions and Jordan-Gamow eigenfunctions are computed at degeneracy and their properties as functions of the control parameters of the system are discussed. (Author)

  20. Resonant diphoton phenomenology simplified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panico, Giuliano; Vecchi, Luca; Wulzer, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    A framework is proposed to describe resonant diphoton phenomenology at hadron colliders in full generality. It can be employed for a comprehensive model-independent interpretation of the experimental data. Within the general framework, few benchmark scenarios are defined as representative of the various phenomenological options and/or of motivated new physics scenarios. Their usage is illustrated by performing a characterization of the 750 GeV excess, based on a recast of available experimental results. We also perform an assessment of which properties of the resonance could be inferred, after discovery, by a careful experimental study of the diphoton distributions. These include the spin J of the new particle and its dominant production mode. Partial information on its CP-parity can also be obtained, but only for J≥2. The complete determination of the resonance CP properties requires studying the pattern of the initial state radiation that accompanies the resonant diphoton production.