WorldWideScience

Sample records for lowest dose level

  1. The lowest Landau level in QCD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruckmann Falk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamics of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD in external (electro-magnetic fields shows some unexpected features like inverse magnetic catalysis, which have been revealed mainly through lattice studies. Many effective descriptions, on the other hand, use Landau levels or approximate the system by just the lowest Landau level (LLL. Analyzing lattice configurations we ask whether such a picture is justified. We find the LLL to be separated from the rest by a spectral gap in the two-dimensional Dirac operator and analyze the corresponding LLL signature in four dimensions. We determine to what extent the quark condensate is LLL dominated at strong magnetic fields.

  2. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-12-01

    A survey of past case reports concerning radiation-induced breast cancer was carried out in order to find the lowest irradiation dose. The search of literature published since 1951 revealed 10 cases of radiation-induced breast cancer. Only 5 cases had precise descriptions of the irradiation dose. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1470 rads in the case of external X-ray irradiation for tuberous angioma. All of cases of radiation-induced breast cancer had received radiation for the treatment of nonmalignant tumors, such as pulmonary tuberculosis, mastitis, and tuberous angioma. There also were three statistical studies. The first concerned atomic bomb survivors, the second, pulmoanry tuberculous patients subjected to frequent fluoroscopies, and the third, patients of acute post partum mastitis. These statistical studies had revealed a significant increase in the incidence of breast cancer in the irradiated group, but there was little information about the lowest irradiation dose. It was noticed that radiation-induced breast cancer was more numerous in the upper inner quadrant of the breast. Most histopathological findings of radiation-induced breast cancer involved duct cell carcinoma. The latent period was about 15 years.

  3. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1975-01-01

    A survey of past case reports on radiation-induced cancer of the uterus was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of literature published since 1912 revealed 548 cases of radiation-induced cancer of the uterus. All of these cases of radiation-induced cancer had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant disease. The primary gynecological conditions which were the object of radiation therapy were functional bleeding, endometrial hyperplasia, myoma, endometritis, and polyps. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 1000-1450 rad in the case of external X-ray irradiation, and 100 mg.hr for intrauterine radium therapy, which corresponds to 100-1000 rad. It was noted that were more cases of corpus cancer than cervical cancer. Histopathological findings of radiation-induced uterine cancer were carcinoma, sarcoma, and mixed mesodermal tumors. The latent period was distributed in the range of 1 to 40 years, with the average of 10.1 years. (auth.)

  4. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, Yasuo; Kusama, Tomoko

    1976-01-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups. (auth.)

  5. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced cancer in gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1976-05-01

    A survey of past case reports about radiation-induced cancer in the gastrointestinal tract was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1923 revealed 80 cases of radiation-induced large intestine cancer and one case of stomach cancer. The cases of radiation-induced cancer in the large intestine had received radiation for the treatment of non-malignant conditions, fibroma, ovarial cyste, myoma, endometritis and duodenal ulcer. The lowest irradiation dose was estimated at 460 rads. Adenocarcinoma was the histopathological finding in all cases of radiation-induced cancer in the caecum, colon and rectum, and squamous cell carcinoma in the cases of anal cancer. The latent period ranged from 1 to 31 years, with the average of 13.6 years. There were some reports of statistical studies of radiation-induced stomach cancer. Three groups were the subjects of these studies. The first group was composed of atomic bomb survivors, the second of patients who had undergone radiation treatment for ankylosing spondilitis, and the third of duodenal ulcer patients subjected to radiation treatment for the purpose of suppressing gastric acid secretion. These statistical studies showed no significant increase of the incidence of stomach cancer in the irradiated groups.

  6. Search for the lowest irradiation dose from literatures on radiation-induced bone tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kusama, T; Morimoto, K [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1977-04-01

    A survey of past case reports of bone tumor induced by external radiation was carried out with the main object of finding the lowest irradiation dose. Search of the literature published since 1922 revealed 262 cases of radiation-induced bone tumor. These patients, except a patient with occupational exposure, had received radiation for treatment. The primary conditions as object of radiation therapy were nonmalignan bone diseases such as tuberclosis, giant cell tumor, fibrous dysplasia and bone cyst, and extra-skeletal diseases such as retinoblastoma, breast cancer and uterus cancer. The ratio of male to female patients with radiation-induced bone tumor was 1:1.3. The age of the patient ranged between 5 and 98 years, with an average of 37.6 years. Skeletal distribution of radiation-induced bone tumor was as follows: 20% the frontal and face bones, 17% the femur, 10% the humerus, 9% the vertebral column, and 44% other. The lowest absorbed dose reported was 800 rads in patients irradiated for the treatment of bone disease, but 1800 rads in patients with extra-skeletal disease. The latent period ranged between 2 and 42 years, with an average of 11.7 years. The histopathological findings were as follows: 60% osteosarcoma, 25% fibrosarcoma, 7% chondrosarcoma, and 8% other.

  7. Excitation energy of the lowest 2+ and 3- levels in 32Mg and 146Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, M.; Lombard, R.J.

    1978-06-01

    The excitation energy of the lowest 2 + and 3 - levels are calculated for neutron rich Mg-isotopes as well as for N=82 isotones. The calculations are made by assuming quadrupole-quadrupole and octupole-octupole forces. The quasi-particles energies and occupation numbers are taken from the energy density method

  8. Degeneracy of the lowest Landau level and suq(2) on the Poincare half plane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellal, A.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the presence of the quantum group symmetry su q (2) in the quantum Hall effect on the Poincare upper half plane the degeneracy of the lowest Landau level. It is also shown that the relation between the degeneracy and the cyclic representation of su q (2) appears in accordance with q being a kth root of unity. (Authors)

  9. Fine structure of the lowest Landau level in suspended trilayer graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elferen, H. J.; Veligura, A.; Tombros, N.; Kurganova, E. V.; van Wees, B. J.; Maan, J. C.; Zeitler, U.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetotransport experiments on ABC-stacked suspended trilayer graphene reveal a complete splitting of the 12-fold degenerated lowest Landau level, and, in particular, the opening of an exchange-driven gap at the charge neutrality point. A quantitative analysis of distinctness of the quantum Hall

  10. Chern-Simons field theory of two-dimensional electrons in the lowest Landau level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.

    1996-01-01

    We propose a fermion Chern-Simons field theory describing two-dimensional electrons in the lowest Landau level. This theory is constructed with a complete set of states, and the lowest-Landau-level constraint is enforced through a δ functional described by an auxiliary field λ. Unlike the field theory constructed directly with the states in the lowest Landau level, this theory allows one, utilizing the physical picture of open-quote open-quote composite fermion,close-quote close-quote to study the fractional quantum Hall states by mapping them onto certain integer quantum Hall states; but, unlike its application in the unconstrained theory, such a mapping is sensible only when interactions between electrons are present. An open-quote open-quote effective mass,close-quote close-quote which characterizes the scale of low energy excitations in the fractional quantum Hall systems, emerges naturally from our theory. We study a Gaussian effective theory and interpret physically the dressed stationary point equation for λ as an equation for the open-quote open-quote mass renormalization close-quote close-quote of composite fermions. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Insignificant levels of dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.; McLean, A.S.

    1977-01-01

    The procedures recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for making decisions concerning controllable sources of radiation exposure of the public include 'justification' and 'optimisation'. The tool recommended by the ICRP for reaching these decisions is collective dose or dose commitment supplemented by consideration of doses to individuals. In both these considerations the practical problem arises of whether very small doses to large numbers of people should contribute to the final decision-making process. It may be that at levels of dose which are small increments on natural background, the relationship between dose and effect is linear even though the slope may be close to zero. If so, collective dose is a meaningful concept and the calculation of total detriment for the purpose of justification could legitimately include all doses. In the calculation of collective doses for the purpose of optimisation, which involves decisions on how much money or resource should be allocated to dose reduction, it is necessary to appraise radiation detriment realistically. At low levels of dose to the individual such as those small by comparison with variations in natural background within the UK, the risk to the individual is such that his well-being will not be significantly changed by the presence or absence of the radiation dose. These small doses, which are well below the point at which an individual attaches significance, should not carry a societal significance. Societal acceptance of risk is analysed with a view to assessing a level of possible risk, and hence dose, below which resources should not in general be diverted to secure further reduction. A formulation for collective dose commitment is proposed incorporating a cut-off to exclude insignificant doses. The implications of this formulation in practical situations are discussed

  12. Determination of the lowest critical power levels of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Ngo Quang [Centre for Nuclear Technique Application, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Thong, Ha Van; Long, Vu Hai; Binh, Do Quang; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Vien, Luong Ba; Vinh, Le Vinh [Nuclear Research Inst., Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents the experimental methods for determining critical states of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor containing an extraneous neutron source induced by gamma ray reactions on beryllium in the reactor. The lowest critical power levels are measured at various moments after the reactor is shut down following 100 hours of its continuous operation. Th power levels vary from (0.5-1.2) x 10{sup -4} of P{sub n}, i.e. (25-60)W to (1.1-1.6) x 10{sup -5} of P{sub n}, i.e. (5.5-8)W at corresponding times of 4 days to 13 days after the reactor is shut down. However the critical power must be chosen greater than 500 W to sustain the steady criticality of the reactor for a long time. (author). 3 refs. 4 figs. 1 tab.

  13. Validity of the lowest-Landau-level approximation for rotating Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, Alexis G.; Feder, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The energy spectrum for an ultracold rotating Bose gas in a harmonic trap is calculated exactly for small systems, allowing the atoms to occupy several Landau levels. Two vortexlike states and two strongly correlated states (the Pfaffian and Laughlin) are considered in detail. In particular, their critical rotation frequencies and energy gaps are determined as a function of particle number, interaction strength, and the number of Landau levels occupied (up to three). For the vortexlike states, the lowest-Landau-level (LLL) approximation is justified only if the interaction strength decreases with the number of particles; nevertheless, the constant of proportionality increases rapidly with the angular momentum per particle. For the strongly correlated states, however, the interaction strength can increase with particle number without violating the LLL condition. The results suggest that, in large systems, the Pfaffian and Laughlin states might be stabilized at rotation frequencies below the centrifugal limit for sufficiently large interaction strengths, with energy gaps a significant fraction of the trap energy

  14. The Lowest Spin and Parity Levels on Two Particle System for Odd-oddNuclei 60Co and 46K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardhani, VIS; Siagian, Toga

    2000-01-01

    For obtaining the lowest spin and parity levels of odd-odd nuclei, theanalyzing of the nuclei 60 Co and 46 K has been done using delta forcemodel. The calculation is done by theoretically and compared with experiment.To get a result optimally, the data analyzed using least square method. It isshown that the lowest spin and parity level from calculation result and theexperiment result are similar. (author)

  15. Oscillator strengths for transitions among Fe III levels belonging to the three lowest configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deb, N C; Hibbert, A

    2008-01-01

    Accurate oscillator strengths and Einstein A-coefficients for some El and E2 transitions among 3d 6 , 3d 5 4s and 3d 5 4p levels of FeIII are presented and compared with other available results. The present results comprise by far the largest configuration interaction calculation for this astrophysically important ion, and include relativistic effects through the Breit-Pauli operator. The core-valence effects from a large number of 3d 6 and 3d 5 cores are carefully treated by optimising 4d, 4f, 5s, 5p, 5d, 5f and 6p orbitals either as a correction or as a correlation orbital while 1s, 2s, 2p, 3s, 3p and 3d Hartree-Fock functions are used. The 4s and 4p functions are optimised as spectroscopic orbitals. Fine-tuning of the ab initio energies was done through adjusting by a small amount some diagonal elements of the Hamiltonian matrix. It is found that for many of the relatively strong dipole transitions, our calculated oscillator strengths agree with available calculations, while for the weaker transitions our results often disagree with the previously determined results. We also present gA values for five E2 transitions for the multiplets 3d 6 5 DJ → 3d 5 ( 6 S)4s 5 S 2. The present results for these transitions show a 30-40% increase over the results previously published.

  16. Guidance levels, achievable doses and expectation levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lianbo; Meng, Bing

    2002-01-01

    The National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) published their guidance levels and reference doses for typical X-ray examination and nuclear medicine in their documents in 1993, 1994 and 1996 respectively. From then on, the concept of guidance levels or reference doses have been applied to different examinations in the field of radiology and proved to be effective for reduction of patient doses. But the guidance levels or reference doses are likely to have some shortcomings and can do little to make further reduction of patient dose in the radiology departments where patient dose are already below them. For this reason, the National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB) proposed a concept named achievable doses which are based on the mean dose observed for a selected sample of radiology departments. This paper will review and discuss the concept of guidance levels and achievable doses, and propose a new concept referred to as Expectation Levels that will encourage the radiology departments where patient dose are already below the guidance levels to keep patient dose as low as reasonably achievable. Some examples of the expectation levels based on the data published by a few countries are also illustrated in this paper

  17. Electron mobility on the surface of liquid Helium: influence of surface level atoms and depopulation of lowest subbands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoriev, P. D.; Dyugaev, A. M.; Lebedeva, E. V.

    2008-01-01

    The temperature dependence of electron mobility is examined. We calculate the contribution to the electron scattering rate from the surface level atoms (SLAs), proposed in [10]. This contribution is substantial at low temperatures T < 0.5, when the He vapor concentration is exponentially small. We also study the effect of depopulation of the lowest energy subband, which leads to an increase in the electron mobility at high temperature. The results explain certain long-standing discrepancies between the existing theory and experiment on electron mobility on the surface of liquid helium

  18. The constraint for the lowest Landau level and the effective field theory approach for the fractional quantum hall system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongshui; Su Zhaobin.

    1992-09-01

    By applying the Dirac quantization method, we build the constraint that all electrons are in the lowest Landau level into the Chern-Simons field theory approach for the fractional quantum Hall system and show that the constraint can be transmuted from hierarchy to hierarchy. For a finite system, we derive that the action for each hierarchy can be split into two parts: a surface part provides the action for the edge excitations while the remaining part is precisely the bulk action for the next hierarchy. An the action for the edge could be decoupled from the bulk only at the hierarchy filling. (author). 16 refs

  19. Low-level exposure of guinea pigs and marmosets to sarin vapour in air: Lowest-observable-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) for miosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helden, H.P.M. van; Trap, H.C.; Kuijpers, W.C.; Oostdijk, J.P.; Benschop, H.P.; Langenberg, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to indicate, for low-level exposure of conscious guinea pigs and marmoset monkeys to sarin vapour in air, the lowest-observable-adverse-effect level (LOAEL) of sarin for miosis. This is the concentration × time (C·t) value (t = 5 h) of exposure at which miosis

  20. Emergence of liquid crystalline order in the lowest Landau level of a quantum Hall system with internal anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2018-05-01

    It has now become evident that interplay between internal anisotropy parameters (such as electron mass anisotropy and/or anisotropic coupling of electrons to the substrate) and electron-electron correlation effects can create a rich variety of possibilities especially in quantum Hall systems. The electron mass anisotropy or material substrate effects (for example, the piezoelectric effect in GaAs) can lead to an effective anisotropic interaction potential between electrons. For lack of knowledge of realistic ab-initio potentials that may describe such effects, we adopt a phenomenological approach and assume that an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential mimics the internal anisotropy of the system. In this work we investigate the emergence of liquid crystalline order at filling factor ν = 1/6 of the lowest Landau level, a state very close to the point where a transition from the liquid to the Wigner solid happens. We consider small finite systems of electrons interacting with an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential and study the energy stability of an anisotropic liquid crystalline state relative to its isotropic Fermi-liquid counterpart. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation results in disk geometry show stabilization of liquid crystalline order driven by an anisotropic Coulomb interaction potential at all values of the interaction anisotropy parameter studied.

  1. Motivated for Leisure in the Future: A Person-Centred Longitudinal Study in the Lowest Level of Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Veen, Ineke; Peetsma, Thea

    2011-01-01

    Long-term future time perspective on leisure has been found to relate negatively to school effort. This was studied further by recognizing types of students based on developments in long-term leisure perspectives and comparing their development in motivation and academic achievement. Around 1200 12-13 year old students attending the lowest level…

  2. Sixty women a day examined with world-unique mammography system from Sectra. Breast disease centre in Sweden offers lowest radiation dose in the world

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Sectra's digital mammography system, Sectra MicroDose Mammography(TM), has been used to examine more than 1,500 women in the Helsingborg Hospital mammography screening program. This was accomplished in the record time of two months in clinical operation. The system is now being used to examine more than sixty women every day" (1 page).

  3. Low Level Exposure to GB Vapor in Air: Diagnosis/Dosimetry, Lowest Observable Effect Levels, Performance-Incapacitation, and Possible Delayed Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    ...: (I) A glass exposure chamber for whole-body exposure of unanesthetized guinea pigs and marmosets to low levels of OB vapor in air has been designed and constructed, and is in the implementation stage...

  4. Low Level Exposure to GB Vapor in Air: Diagnosis/Dosimetry, Lowest Observable Effect Levels, Performance-Incapacitation, and Possible Delayed Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Helden, Herman

    2002-01-01

    .... 2001 under experimental conditions similar to those in Nov. 2000 when they were first 5 h exposed to air followed by 5 h exposure to low levels of GB vapor in air in a concentration range of 7.5 - 150 micron/m3...

  5. Introduction of guidance dose levels inpaediatrics CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdun, F.R.; Valley, J.F.; Bernasconi, M.; Schnyder, P.; Gudinchet, F.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to present a methodology in order to define reference levels for chest or abdominal CT examinations performed on children. For children aged from 0 to 6 the CTDI w measured in the head test object (i.e. diameter 16 cm) should be used as a dose indicator. For children older than 12 years old the CTDI w measured in the body test object (i.e. 32 cm) should be used as a dose indicator. For children aged between 6 to 12 we propose to use an intermediate CTDI w in order to avoid an over or underestimation of the dose delivered in the slices. Finally a set of dose length products (DLP) measured in our centre for standard abdominal acquisitions will be given. (author)

  6. Luminescence property and lowest excited singlet state level of various carotenes; Shuju no karochinrui no hako tokusei to saitei reiki -juko jotai jun'i

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, T. [Miyagi Midical Univ., Miyagi (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    Specification of the lowest excited singlet state (S{sub l}) of the butadiene which is the simplest {pi} electron conjugated system molecule has not sufficiently clarified at present. Recently, Andersson et al. found the weak light emission which was considered to be the S{sub 1} fluorescence in a near infrared region in a room temperature solution of {beta}- carotene (n=11), and specified the S{sub 1} level in 14,200{+-}500cm {sup -1}. And, Fujii et al. reported the S{sub 1} fluorescence of spheroidine (n=10). In very recent, Christensen et al. measured the comparatively clear fluorescence spectrum of carotenes n=5 to 11 separated by HPLC in EPA glass at 77K, and systematically examined the unique luminescence property observed in polyene. Christensen et al. issued the warning for the rough conventional method that the S{sub 1} level was estimated from the S{sub 1} fluorescence lifetime of the polyene molecule using the comprehensive energy gap law, because the ratio of quantum yield of the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} fluorescence is different by the substituent type of the polyene end even if n is same. (NEDO)

  7. Diagnostic radiography dose and guidance levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuadros, M.; Augusto, A.

    2001-01-01

    This work shows a study done on conventional radiodiagnostic equipment. The evaluation was implemented throughout different areas of Bolivia, covering not only single equipment radiographs used in the cities, but also the ones used in rural areas. There have been more than 90 equipment pieces evaluated of which the dose received by a patient for a given exam has been considered an essential element. For this purpose two types of examinations have been selected, these being considered the more frequent. Not only the dose aspect was taken into consideration but the technique used as well. These elements that support very important information have been related to orientative levels. (author)

  8. Natural external radiation level and population dose in Hunan province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A survey of the natural external radiation level in Hunan Province is reported. The measurements were performed with FD-71 scintillation radiometers. On the basis of measurements at about 1,600 locations, the contribution from cosmic radiation is found to be 3.0 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 , and the average absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial γ-radiation for outdoors, indoors and roads are determined to be 9.2, 13.1 and 9.0 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 , respectively. The γ-radiation indoors is markedly higher than that outdoors by a factor of 1.42. The lowest γ-radiation level is found in the sedimentary plain around Donting Lake, while the highest absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial radiation are observed in some areas with exposed granites. The indoor γ-radiation in brick houses is markedly higher than that in wooden houses. Tarred roads have evidently lower radiation level than sand-gravel roads or concrete roads. The annual effective dose equivalents to the population from cosmic and terrestrial sources are 0.256 and 0.756 mSv, respectively, with a total value of 1.012 mSv

  9. Dose level of occupational exposure in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Zhang, L.; Ju, Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the dose level of Chinese occupational exposures during 1986-2000. Data on occupational exposures from the main categories in nuclear fuel cycle (uranium enrichment and conversion, fuel fabrication, reactor operation, waste management and research activity, except for uranium mining and milling because of the lack of data), medical uses of radiation (diagnostic radiation, nuclear medicine and radiotherapy) and industrial uses of radiation (industrial radiography and radioisotope production) are presented and summarised in detail. These are the main components of occupational exposures in China. In general, the average annual effective doses show a steady decreasing trend over periods: from 2.16 to 1.16 mSv in medical uses of radiation during 1990-2000; from 1.92 to 1.18 mSv in industrial radiography during 1990-2000; from 8.79 to 2.05 mSv in radioisotope production during the period 1980-2000. Almost all the average annual effective doses in discussed occupations were lower than 5 mSv in recent years (except for well-logging: 6.86 mSv in 1999) and no monitored workers were found to have received the occupational exposure exceeding 50 mSv in a single year or 100 mSv in a five-year period. So the Chinese protection status of occupation exposure has been improved in recent years. However, the average annual effective doses in some occupations, such as diagnostic radiology and coal mining, were still much higher than that of the whole world. There are still needs for further improvement and careful monitoring of occupational exposure to protect every worker from excessive occupational exposure, especially for the workers who were neglected before. (authors)

  10. The lowest-dose, extended-cycle combined oral contraceptive pill with continuous ethinyl estradiol in the United States: a review of the literature on ethinyl estradiol 20 µg/levonorgestrel 100 µg + ethinyl estradiol 10 µg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Krishnan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Sheila Krishnan, Jessica KileyDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USAAbstract: Extended-cycle oral contraceptives (OCs are increasing in popularity in the United States. A new extended-cycle OC that contains the lowest doses of ethinyl estradiol (EE and levonorgestrel (LNG + continuous EE throughout the cycle is now available. It provides 84 days of a low-dose, combined active pill containing levonorgestrel 100 µg and ethinyl estradiol 20 µg. Instead of 7 days of placebo following the active pills, the regimen delivers 7 days of ethinyl estradiol 10 µg. Existing studies reveal a similar efficacy and adverse effect profile compared with other extended-regimen OCs. Specifically, the unscheduled bleeding profile is similar to other extended-cycle OCs and improves with the increase in the duration of use. Although lower daily doses of hormonal exposure have potential benefit, to our knowledge, there are no published studies indicating that this specific regimen offers a lower incidence of hormone-related side effects or adverse events. In summary, this new extended-cycle OC provides patients a low-dose, extended-regimen OC option without sacrificing efficacy or tolerability.Keywords: continuous regimen, ethinyl estradiol, extended cycle, oral contraceptive

  11. Supplementary comparison CCRI(I)-S2 of standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at radiation processing dose levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burns, D. T.; Allisy-Roberts, P. J.; Desrosiers, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    Eight national standards for absorbed dose to water in 60Co gamma radiation at the dose levels used in radiation processing have been compared over the range from 1 kGy to 30 kGy using the alanine dosimeters of the NIST and the NPL as the transfer dosimeters. The comparison was organized...... by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, who also participated at the lowest dose level using their radiotherapy-level standard for the same quantity. The national standards are in general agreement within the standard uncertainties, which are in the range from 1 to 2 parts in 102. Evidence of a dose...

  12. Avoidance-oriented students' development in motivation for maths, self-regulated learning behaviour and achievement: a person-centred study in the lowest level of secondary education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetsma, T.; van der Veen, I.

    2013-01-01

    Performance-avoidance orientation has been found to undermine students’ academic motivation and achievement. Recognising groups of students with different levels and developments of performance-avoidance orientation makes it possible to try to intervene early in their school careers. In this study,

  13. Dose levels in conventional X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra M, J. A.; Gonzalez G, J. A.; Pinedo S, A.; Salas L, M. A.; Vega C, H. R.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    2009-10-01

    There were a series of measures in the General Hospital of Fresnillo in the X-ray Department in the areas of X-1 and X-2-ray rooms and in the neonatal intensive care unit 2, was determined the dose surface entry in eyes, thyroid and gonads for patients undergoing to X-ray study of chest Tele by thermoluminescent dosimetry. Five dosemeters were used in each one of the scans; so find the following dose ranges 20 + - 23 mGy to 350 + - 41 mGy. With the results obtained we can conclude that the procedures used and the equipment calibration is adequate. (Author)

  14. Radioactivity levels of basic foodstuffs and dose estimates in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemada, H. E. F.

    2009-03-01

    In this work a comprehensive study was carried out for the determination of different radionuclides activities in foodstuff consumed and evaluation of dose levels in different food stuffs were collected from eight States in Sudan (cereals, vegetables, meat, fruits, milk, and fermented milk, baby milk, cans, spices, additives, others). The concentrations of different radionuclides in the food samples were determined by gamma spectrometry using an HPGe detector. Radionuclides observed include: Bi-212, Bi-214, Cs-134, Cs-137, K-40, Pb-212, Pb-214, Ra-224, Ra-226, Th-228, Ac-228, TI-208, Th-232, and U-238. The activity concentration of these radionuclides were found in the following ranges: 0.51 - 19.42 Bq/Kg, 0.47 - 12.13 Bq/kg, 0.5 - 1.29 Bq/kg, 0.001 - 3.41 Bq/kg, 19.25 -2521.82 Bq/kg, 0.08 - 6.84 Bq/kg, 0.02 - 6.87 Bq/kg, 6.08 - 32.02 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 21. 53 Bq/kg, 0.92 - 26.77 Bq/kg, 0.91 - 1200 Bq/kg, 0.14 - 2.58 Bq/Kg, 0.03 - 9.65 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 9.65 Bq/kg and 0.82 - 5.27 Bq/kg respectively. High concentrations were typically found in portulaca, the lowest concentrations were found in barley and bread additives. The annual effective dose due to the different foodstuff estimated was found to be 2.78±0.44 mSv/y and 1.18±mSv/y for age categories 7-12 y and> 17y respectively. (Author)

  15. Low level dose induced chromosome aberrations in human blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl-Rueling, J.

    1992-01-01

    Unstable structural aberrations in chromosomes of human blood lymphocytes cannot be used as biological dosemeters in the low dose range, when extrapolating from high doses using a linear dose response, as required by the original formula of the dual radiation action theory. A survey is given of experimental dose-response curves of chromosome aberrations, obtained in investigations not only by this institute, in cooperation with many other laboratories, but also by various authors in different areas of the world. The results are not compatible with the predicted linear dose relationships at in vivo dose ranges up to 30 mGy.y -1 . The aberration frequencies rise sharply with dose within the normal environmental exposure up to about twice that level. At higher doses, aberration frequencies increase less rapidly and reach a plateau. Some in vitro experiments of various authors with higher doses of low LET radiations, up to about 400 mGy have found dose responses with steps. (author)

  16. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehni, T.

    1995-01-01

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF 2 with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  17. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehni, T

    1996-12-31

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF{sub 2} with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. External doses from radioactive fallout. Dosimetry and levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehni, T.

    1995-12-31

    The design, manufacture and calibration of a TL-based dosemeter for measurement of low level external photon radiation are presented. The dosemeter is based on CaF{sub 2} with 2 mm brass filter for energy compensation. It is able to resolve a 8% dose increase relative to natural background radiation. With this dosemeter external dose measurements were made in 6 villages in a heavily contaminated region in Russia (Chernobyl fallout), in order to assess external doses to the population. The results were analyzed in the light of additional existing information on radioactive deposition, social habits, decontamination measures and other influencing technical and physical factors. The observed dose values were lower than theoretical estimates of external doses based on published values for external dose levels relative to the level of contamination. 84 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Using Population Dose to Evaluate Community-level Health Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Lisa T; Kuo, Elena S; Cheadle, Allen; Rauzon, Suzanne; Schwartz, Pamela M; Parnell, Barbara; Kelly, Cheryl; Solomon, Loel

    2018-05-01

    Successful community-level health initiatives require implementing an effective portfolio of strategies and understanding their impact on population health. These factors are complicated by the heterogeneity of overlapping multicomponent strategies and availability of population-level data that align with the initiatives. To address these complexities, the population dose methodology was developed for planning and evaluating multicomponent community initiatives. Building on the population dose methodology previously developed, this paper operationalizes dose estimates of one initiative targeting youth physical activity as part of the Kaiser Permanente Community Health Initiative, a multicomponent community-level obesity prevention initiative. The technical details needed to operationalize the population dose method are explained, and the use of population dose as an interim proxy for population-level survey data is introduced. The alignment of the estimated impact from strategy-level data analysis using the dose methodology and the data from the population-level survey suggest that dose is useful for conducting real-time evaluation of multiple heterogeneous strategies, and as a viable proxy for existing population-level surveys when robust strategy-level evaluation data are collected. This article is part of a supplement entitled Building Thriving Communities Through Comprehensive Community Health Initiatives, which is sponsored by Kaiser Permanente, Community Health. Copyright © 2018 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nordic Guidance Levels for Patient Doses in Diagnostic Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxebol, G.; Olerud, H.M.; Hjardemaal, O.; Leitz, W.; Servomaa, A.; Walderhaug, T.

    1998-01-01

    Within the framework of Nordic authoritative cooperation in radiation protection and nuclear safety, recommendations have been prepared dealing with dose constraints in diagnostic radiology. A working group with participants from all the Nordic countries has met and discussed possible implementations of the ICRP dose constraint for medical radiology. Dose constraints, expressed as guidance levels, were specified for six different radiological examinations, i.e. chest, pelvis, lumbar spine, urography, barium meal and enema in units of kerma-area product and entrance surface dose. The recommendations are described in report No 5 in the series 'Report on Nordic Radiation Protection Cooperation'. Examples of dose distributions and factors affecting the patient dose are described in the report. (author)

  1. 1997 N-Basin Administrative Control Level Dose Extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellesen, A.L.

    1997-04-01

    This document provides justification for extending the Administrative Control Level of 500 mrem per year to 1,000 mrem per year Total Effective Dose Equivalent for workers involved with N-Reactor Basin Deactivation in accordance with established procedures

  2. Natural dose level determination at Johor State with thermoluminescence dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Termizi Ramli; Yusof Jasman

    1995-01-01

    This paperwork presented the results of using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD) method in measuring background dose level, which is done at State of Johor, South Malaysia. The problems faced also discussed

  3. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK FOR MANAGING RADIATION DOSE TO PATIENTS IN DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY USING REFERENCE DOSE LEVELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almén, Anja; Båth, Magnus

    2016-06-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. A conceptual framework for managing radiation dose to patients in diagnostic radiology using reference dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almen, Anja; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of the present work was to develop a conceptual framework for managing radiation dose in diagnostic radiology with the intention to support optimisation. An optimisation process was first derived. The framework for managing radiation dose, based on the derived optimisation process, was then outlined. The outset of the optimisation process is four stages: providing equipment, establishing methodology, performing examinations and ensuring quality. The optimisation process comprises a series of activities and actions at these stages. The current system of diagnostic reference levels is an activity in the last stage, ensuring quality. The system becomes a reactive activity only to a certain extent engaging the core activity in the radiology department, performing examinations. Three reference dose levels-possible, expected and established-were assigned to the three stages in the optimisation process, excluding ensuring quality. A reasonably achievable dose range is also derived, indicating an acceptable deviation from the established dose level. A reasonable radiation dose for a single patient is within this range. The suggested framework for managing radiation dose should be regarded as one part of the optimisation process. The optimisation process constitutes a variety of complementary activities, where managing radiation dose is only one part. This emphasises the need to take a holistic approach integrating the optimisation process in different clinical activities. (authors)

  5. Cosmic radiation doses at flight level altitudes of airliners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viragh, E.; Petr, I.

    1985-01-01

    Changes are discussed in flux density of cosmic radiation particles with time as are the origin of cosmic radiation, the level of cosmic radiation near the Earth's surface, and the determination of cosmic radiation doses in airliners. Doses and dose rates are given measured on different flight routes. In spite of the fact that the flight duration at an altitude of about 10 km makes for about 80% of the total flight time, the overall radiation burden of the crews at 1000 flight hours a year is roughly double that of the rest of the population. (J.C.)

  6. Radiation dose from solar flares at ground level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, K.

    1979-01-01

    Wdowczyk and Wolfendale (Nature, 268, 510, 1977) concluded that a very large solar flare producing exposure of 10 4 rad at ground level (lethal to almost any organism) has a possible frequency of once per 10 5 -10 8 yr. In the work reported similar results were obtained using a more elaborate model. Flares occuring from February 1956 to August 1972 were analyzed. The flare size distribution above the earth's atmosphere, and neutron flux, dose and dose equivalent at ground level at the latitude of Deep River, Canada, were calculated. The probable frequency of flares delivering various doses are given. Doses larger than 100 rad which have significant somatic effects on man and other animals may be delivered once in 10 6 years. The probability of 10 4 rad was found to be 10 -8 /yr. These calculations apply only to high geomagnetic latitudes. Field reversals during which the geomagnetic field is much weaker than current values total about 10% of the past 4 million years. This suggests that a very large flare delivering a large dose worldwide at ground level cannot be ruled out. (author)

  7. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Hamid, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  8. Effect of radiation dose level on accuracy and precision of manual size measurements in chest tomosynthesis evaluated using simulated pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soederman, Christina; Allansdotter Johnsson, Aase; Vikgren, Jenny; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Molnar, David; Svalkvist, Angelica; Maansson, Lars Gunnar; Baath, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the dependency of the accuracy and precision of nodule diameter measurements on the radiation dose level in chest tomosynthesis. Artificial ellipsoid-shaped nodules with known dimensions were inserted in clinical chest tomosynthesis images. Noise was added to the images in order to simulate radiation dose levels corresponding to effective doses for a standard-sized patient of 0.06 and 0.04 mSv. These levels were compared with the original dose level, corresponding to an effective dose of 0.12 mSv for a standard-sized patient. Four thoracic radiologists measured the longest diameter of the nodules. The study was restricted to nodules located in high-dose areas of the tomosynthesis projection radiographs. A significant decrease of the measurement accuracy and intra-observer variability was seen for the lowest dose level for a subset of the observers. No significant effect of dose level on the interobserver variability was found. The number of non-measurable small nodules (≤5 mm) was higher for the two lowest dose levels compared with the original dose level. In conclusion, for pulmonary nodules at positions in the lung corresponding to locations in high-dose areas of the projection radiographs, using a radiation dose level resulting in an effective dose of 0.06 mSv to a standard-sized patient may be possible in chest tomosynthesis without affecting the accuracy and precision of nodule diameter measurements to any large extent. However, an increasing number of non-measurable small nodules (≤5 mm) with decreasing radiation dose may raise some concerns regarding an applied general dose reduction for chest tomosynthesis examinations in the clinical praxis. (authors)

  9. Dose area product measurement for diagnostic reference levels and analysis of patient dose in dental radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S.; Lee, B.; Shin, G.; Choi, J.; Kim, J.; Park, C.; Park, H.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were suggested and patient doses were analysed through the dose-area product value in dental radiography. In intraoral radiography, at three sites, i.e. molar, premolar and incisor on the maxilla and acquired third quartile values: 55.5, 46 and 36.5 mGy cm 2 , respectively, were measured. In panoramic, cephalo-metric and cone beam computed tomography, the values were 120.3, 146 and 3203 mGy cm 2 (16 x 18 cm), respectively. It has been shown that, in intraoral radiography, the patient dose changes proportionally to the value of mA s, but the change in extra-oral radiography in response to mA s could not be confirmed. The authors could confirm, however, the difference in dose according to the manufacturer in all dental radiography examinations, except for panoramic radiography. Depending on the size of hospital, there were some differences in patient dose in intraoral radiography, but no difference in patient dose in extra-oral radiography. (authors)

  10. Dose response curves for effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    The linear dose-response model used by international committees to assess the genetic and carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation appears to be the most reasonable interpretation of the available scientific data that are relevant to this topic. There are, of course, reasons to believe that this model may overestimate radiation hazards in certain instances, a fact acknowledged in recent reports of these committees. The linear model is now also being utilized to estimate the potential carcinogenic hazards of other agents such as asbestos and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This model implies that there is no safe dose for any of these agents and that potential health hazards will increase in direct proportion to total accumulated dose. The practical implication is the recommendation that all exposures should be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account'. (auth)

  11. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.A. Ziegler

    2000-11-20

    The purpose of this calculation is to provide a dose consequence analysis of high-level waste (HLW) consisting of plutonium immobilized in vitrified HLW to be handled at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain for a beyond design basis event (BDBE) under expected conditions using best estimate values for each calculation parameter. In addition to the dose calculation, a plutonium respirable particle size for dose calculation use is derived. The current concept for this waste form is plutonium disks enclosed in cans immobilized in canisters of vitrified HLW (i.e., glass). The plutonium inventory at risk used for this calculation is selected from Plutonium Immobilization Project Input for Yucca Mountain Total Systems Performance Assessment (Shaw 1999). The BDBE examined in this calculation is a nonmechanistic initiating event and the sequence of events that follow to cause a radiological release. This analysis will provide the radiological releases and dose consequences for a postulated BDBE. Results may be considered in other analyses to determine or modify the safety classification and quality assurance level of repository structures, systems, and components. This calculation uses best available technical information because the BDBE frequency is very low (i.e., less than 1.0E-6 events/year) and is not required for License Application for the Monitored Geologic Repository. The results of this calculation will not be used as part of a licensing or design basis.

  12. Patient dose with quality image under diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akula, Suresh Kumar; Singh, Gurvinder; Chougule, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Need to set Diagnostic Reference Level (DRL) for locations for all diagnostic procedures in local as compared to National. The review of DRL's should compare local with national or referenced averages and a note made of any significant variances to these averages and the justification for it. To survey and asses radiation doses to patient and reduce the redundancy in patient imaging to maintain DRLs

  13. Analysis of the personal doses lower than the reporting level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askounis, P.; Papadomarkaki, E.; Kirgiakou, H.; Dimitropoulou, F.; Carinou, E.; Maltezos, A.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2008-01-01

    The personnel dosimetry department of Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the only laboratory in the country that assures the individual monitoring of more than 10,500 workers with whole body dosemeters and 100 workers with extremity dosemeters at 1300 establishments. Every year a statistical analysis of the results is performed that provides data for epidemiological studies and assists the evaluation of the radiation protection system of the country. The aim of this study is to perform an analysis of the doses that are lower than the reporting level. The vast majority (92%) of the evaluated H p (10) doses has been reported and recorded as zero. The mean H p (10) (of the non-reported doses) per dosemeter and per monitoring period has been calculated for every geographical department of Greece. The results were compared with the ones produced by the external gamma rate measurements performed by GAEC's telemetric network. The conclusion that can be drawn is that the part of the TL signal of the personal dosemeters is due to the natural background radiation and this can affect the evaluation of the low doses

  14. Dose inhomogeneities at various levels of biological organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1988-01-01

    Dose inhomogeneities in both tumor and normal tissue, inherent to the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), can be the result not only of ununiform distribution of 10 B at various levels of biological organization, but also of the distribution of the thermal neutrons and of the energy depositions from more energetic neutrons and other radiations comprising the externally-applied beams. The severity of the problems resulting from such inhomogeneities, and approaches to evaluating them, are illustrated by three examples, at the macro, micro and intermediate levels

  15. Alternatives to dose, quality factor and dose equivalent for low level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sondhaus, C.A.; Bond, V.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1988-01-01

    Randomly occurring energy deposition events produced by low levels of ionizing radiation interacting with tissue deliver variable amounts of energy to the sensitive target volumes within a small fraction of the cell population. A model is described in which an experimentally derived function relating event size to cell response probability operates mathematically on the microdosimetric event size distribution characterizing a given irradiation and thus determines the total fractional number of responding cells; this fraction measures the effectiveness of the given radiation. Normalizing to equal numbers of events produced by different radiations and applying this cell response or hit size effectiveness function (HSEF) should define radiation quality, or relative effectiveness, on a more nearly absolute basis than do the absorbed dose and dose evaluation, which are confounded when applied to low level irradiations. Examples using both calculation and experimental data are presented. 15 refs., 18 figs

  16. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard-Stroel, Claudia; Hachenburger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Peter, Josef

    2013-07-01

    The annual report 2011 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following issues: Part A: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. Part B; Current data and their evaluation: Natural environmental radioactivity, artificial radioactivity in the environment, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure from medical applications, the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. The Appendix includes Explanations of terms, radiation doses and related units, external and internal radiation exposure, stochastic and deterministic radiation effects, genetic radiation effects, induction of malignant neoplasm, risk assessment, physical units and glossary, laws, ordinances, guidelines, recommendations and other regulations concerning radiation protection, list of selected radionuclides.

  17. Establishment of dose reference levels for mammography in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalathaki, M.; Hourdakis, C.J.; Economides, S.; Tritakis, P.; Manousaridis, G.; Kalyvas, N.; Simantirakis, G.; Kipouros, P.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Diagnostic Reference Levels (D.R.L.) are dose levels established in medical practices for typical x-ray examinations concerning groups of standard size patients or standard phantoms and broadly defined types of equipment. When good and normal practice is performed, these levels are not expected to be exceeded. This work is an attempt to establish for the first time the D.R.L. for mammography in Greece. At present, there are 402 mammographic systems in clinical use all over the country. This study that lasted 3 years (2000-2003), includes 117 of these systems, 85% of which are installed in private and 15% in public sector countrywide. Measurements of entrance surface dose (E.S.D.) were performed as a part of the regular inspections performed by the Licensing and Inspections Department of Greek Atomic Energy Commission on the basis of the laboratories licensing procedure. Moreover, the entire performance of the mammographic units was assessed by quantitative and qualitative measurements of specific parameters. In order to establish the national D.R.L., a standard phantom was used during the quality control of the mammographic units and E.S.D. measurements were performed based on the clinical practice of each laboratory. The D.R.L. for this type of examination was established according to the 75. percentile of the E.S.D. curve and found equal to 7 mGy per single view. The comparison of this value with the one reported by the European Commission (10 mGy per view), indicates that the D.R.L. for mammography is lower in Greece. However, the primary concern of a mammographic examination is to keep breast dose as low as reasonably achievable while providing images with the maximum amount of diagnostic information. The quality of the produced images was therefore assessed for all systems examined, regardless of meeting or exceeding the quality criteria reference surface entrance dose. The results showed that the average total score of the

  18. Dose levels in the hot cells area ININ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, J. De la; Ramirez, J.M.; Solis, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    The Laboratory of Hot Cells (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) is an institution, it is an area where radioactive material is managed with different activity values, in function of its original design for 10,000 curies of Co-60. Managing this materials in the installation, it implies to measure and to analyze the dose levels that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of appropriate measures of radiological protection and radiological safety, so that that is completed settled down by the concept ALARA. In this work they are carried out mensurations of the levels of the dose to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of the obtained results is made comparing them with the effective international norms as well as the application of the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that are carry out in the installation. (Author)

  19. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m 3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB) [de

  20. Patient radiation doses and reference levels in pediatric interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Lachaux, Julie; Boddaert, Nathalie; Brunelle, Francis [Hopital Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Bak, Adeline; Ozanne, Augustin; Saliou, Guillaume [Hopital Bicetre, Hopitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, Department of Neuroradiology, Le Kremlin Bicetre (France); Naggara, Olivier [Hopital Universitaire Necker Enfants Malades, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Paris (France); Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Universite Paris Descartes Sorbonne Paris Cite, Centre de Psychiatrie et Neurosciences, INSERM S894, DHU Neurovasculaire, Paris (France); Centre Hospitalier Sainte-Anne, Department of Neuroradiology, Universite Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cite, INSERM UMR894, Paris (France)

    2017-09-15

    To describe, in a multicentric paediatric population, reference levels (RLs) for three interventional radiological procedures. From January 2012 to March 2015, children scheduled for an interventional radiological procedure in two French tertiary centres were retrospectively included and divided into four groups according to age: children younger than 2 years (A1), aged 2-7 years (A5), 8-12 years (A10) and 13-18 years (A15). Three procedures were identified: cerebral digital subtraction angiography (DSA), brain arteriovenous malformation (bAVM) embolization, and head and neck superficial vascular malformation (SVM) percutaneous sclerotherapy. Demographic and dosimetric data, including dose area product (DAP), were collected. 550 procedures were included. For DSA (162 procedures), the proposed RL values in DAP were 4, 18, 12 and 32 Gy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. For bAVM embolization (258 procedures), values were 33, 70, 105 and 88 Gy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. For SVM sclerotherapy (130 procedures), values were 350, 790, 490 and 248 mGy.cm{sup 2} in groups A1, A5, A10 and A15, respectively. Consecutive data were available to permit a proposal of reference levels for three major paediatric interventional radiology procedures. (orig.)

  1. Protection dose level in industrial non-destructive radiographic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Xieming; Deng Daping; Hou Jinpeng

    1992-01-01

    The relationship between scattered beams in radiation field, different tube-voltages, and thickness of steel plates was studied by experiments. The results show that radio parent ratio increases with increasing tube-voltage and decreases with the increasing thickness of steel plates. As scattering angle rises, the scattering ratio decreases slowly, and the lowest ratio is at 180 degree

  2. Reference dose levels for dental periapical radiography in Chonnam Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Mi Ra; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Jae Seo; Kim, Young Hee

    2009-01-01

    To establish reference doses of periapical radiography in Chonnam Province, Korea. The target-skin distances were measured for dental patient's 1235 exposures including 345 mandibular molar areas. Each periapical radiation exposure was simulated with exactly the same patients exposure parameters and the simulated radiation doses were measured utilizing Mult-O-Meter (Unfors Instruments, Billadal, Sweden). The measurements were done in 44 dental clinics with 49 dental x-ray sets in Chonnam Province for one or two weeks at each dental clinic during year 2006. The third quartile patient surface doses were 2.8 mGy for overall periapical exposures and 3.2 mGy for periapical mandibular molar exposures. The third quartile patient surface doses in Chonnam Province can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice to reduce patient radiation exposure for the surveyed reference doses were below the recommended dental periapical radiography dose of 7 mGy by IAEA.

  3. Reference dose levels for dental periapical radiography in Chonnam Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi Ra; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Dental Science Research Institute, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Seo [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chonnan National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hee [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    To establish reference doses of periapical radiography in Chonnam Province, Korea. The target-skin distances were measured for dental patient's 1235 exposures including 345 mandibular molar areas. Each periapical radiation exposure was simulated with exactly the same patients exposure parameters and the simulated radiation doses were measured utilizing Mult-O-Meter (Unfors Instruments, Billadal, Sweden). The measurements were done in 44 dental clinics with 49 dental x-ray sets in Chonnam Province for one or two weeks at each dental clinic during year 2006. The third quartile patient surface doses were 2.8 mGy for overall periapical exposures and 3.2 mGy for periapical mandibular molar exposures. The third quartile patient surface doses in Chonnam Province can be used as a guide to accepted clinical practice to reduce patient radiation exposure for the surveyed reference doses were below the recommended dental periapical radiography dose of 7 mGy by IAEA.

  4. Assessment of coverage levels of single dose measles vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, P.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the consequences of low coverage levels of a single dose of measles vaccine. Results: mean age observed in measles cases was 2 years and 8 months with a range from 3 months to 8 years. Maximum number of cases reported were <1 year of age (n=22,32%). Fifty percent of cases were seen among vaccinated children. Seventy-five percent (n=51) had history of contact with a measles case. Pneumonia was the commonest complication followed by acute gastroenteritis, encephalitis, febrile convulsions, oral ulcers, oral thrush, eye changes of vitamin-A deficiency and pulmonary tuberculosis (T.B.) in descending order of frequency. Fifty four cases were successfully treated for complications of measles and discharged. Nine cases left against medical advice. Five patients died all of them had encephalitis either alone (n=1) or in combination with pneumonia and acute gastroenteritis (n=4). Conclusion: There is a dire need to increase the immunization coverage to reduce the rate of vaccine failure and achieve effective control of measles.(author)

  5. Europe the continent with the lowest fertility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baird, D. T.; Collins, J.; Evers, J. L. H.; Leridon, H.; Lutz, W.; Velde, E. Te; Thevenon, O.; Crosignani, P. G.; Devroey, P.; Diedrich, K.; Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Fraser, L.; Geraedts, J. P. M.; Gianaroli, L.; Glasier, A.; Sunde, A.; Tarlatzis, B.; Van Steirteghem, A.; Veiga, A.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although fertility rates are falling in many countries, Europe is the continent with the lowest total fertility rate (TFR). This review assesses trends in fertility rates, explores possible health and social factors and reviews the impact of health and social interventions designed to

  6. Uncertainty and power at low levels of incurred radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M; Jackson, D

    2005-01-01

    It is common practice when calculating dose to exposed populations to average the variables that go into the dose calculation (e.g. environmental concentrations, air kerma, consumption rates, occupancy rates). This approach is simple and can be useful where data are obtained over different periods (weekly, monthly, quarterly), where samples may be bulked for some analyses but not others and where gaps in the data are present. However, such an approach does not yield information on the degree of uncertainty around the average dose calculated. An alternative approach is to estimate the dose to each individual and to obtain an average from this data set, which can then also be used to derive a measure of uncertainty around the central dose estimate. In this study, we demonstrate the variability in dose estimates using a hypothetical data set and consider the implications for sample size to achieve fixed confidence or resolving power. We recommend calculating the dose to every individual sampled, in order both to obtain the average dose and to estimate its variability. We argue that it is best practice to obtain information as complete as possible from the available sample of individuals

  7. SU-E-T-573: Normal Tissue Dose Effect of Prescription Isodose Level Selection in Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Lei, Y; Zheng, D; Zhu, X; Wahl, A; Lin, C; Zhou, S; Zhen, W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate dose fall-off in normal tissue for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) cases planned with different prescription isodose levels (IDLs), by calculating the dose dropping speed (DDS) in normal tissue on plans computed with both Pencil Beam (PB) and Monte-Carlo (MC) algorithms. Methods: The DDS was calculated on 32 plans for 8 lung SBRT patients. For each patient, 4 dynamic conformal arc plans were individually optimized for prescription isodose levels (IDL) ranging from 60% to 90% of the maximum dose with 10% increments to conformally cover the PTV. Eighty non-overlapping rind structures each of 1mm thickness were created layer by layer from each PTV surface. The average dose in each rind was calculated and fitted with a double exponential function (DEF) of the distance from the PTV surface, which models the steep- and moderate-slope portions of the average dose curve in normal tissue. The parameter characterizing the steep portion of the average dose curve in the DEF quantifies the DDS in the immediate normal tissue receiving high dose. Provided that the prescription dose covers the whole PTV, a greater DDS indicates better normal tissue sparing. The DDS were compared among plans with different prescription IDLs, for plans computed with both PB and MC algorithms. Results: For all patients, the DDS was found to be the lowest for 90% prescription IDL and reached a highest plateau region for 60% or 70% prescription. The trend was the same for both PB and MC plans. Conclusion: Among the range of prescription IDLs accepted by lung SBRT RTOG protocols, prescriptions to 60% and 70% IDLs were found to provide best normal tissue sparing

  8. Natural radiation level and doses to population in Anhui province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The absorbed dose rates in air 1 m above the ground from natural radiation and terrestrial gamma radiation in Anhui Province were surveyed. One measurement was made in every area of 90 km 2 . The absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial radiation range from 54 to 90 nGy.h -1 with an average of 70 nGy.h -1 . The ratios of indoors-to-outdoors and of roads-to-outdoors are 1.5 and 0.9 respectively. The annual effective dose equivalent from external radiation is 0.68-1.05 mSv. The population-weighted average values for mountain area, plain, hilly land, and the Changjiang River basin as well as the annual collective effective dose equivalent were calculated

  9. The lowest surface brightness disc galaxy known

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, J.I.; Phillipps, S.; Disney, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    The discovery of a galaxy with a prominent bulge and a dominant extremely low surface brightness disc component is reported. The profile of this galaxy is very similar to the recently discovered giant low surface brightness galaxy Malin 1. The disc central surface brightness is found to be ∼ 26.4 Rμ, some 1.5 mag fainter than Malin 1 and thus by far the lowest yet observed. (author)

  10. Evaluation of image quality and radiation dose by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction technique level for chest CT examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun Suk; Lee, Jong-Woong; Seo, Jeong Beom; Jung, Jae-Eun; Choi, Jiwon; Kweon, Dae Cheol

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) level that enables optimal image quality and dose reduction in the chest computed tomography (CT) protocol with ASIR. A chest phantom with 0-50 % ASIR levels was scanned and then noise power spectrum (NPS), signal and noise and the degree of distortion of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) and the root-mean-square error (RMSE) were measured. In addition, the objectivity of the experiment was measured using the American College of Radiology (ACR) phantom. Moreover, on a qualitative basis, five lesions' resolution, latitude and distortion degree of chest phantom and their compiled statistics were evaluated. The NPS value decreased as the frequency increased. The lowest noise and deviation were at the 20 % ASIR level, mean 126.15 ± 22.21. As a result of the degree of distortion, signal-to-noise ratio and PSNR at 20 % ASIR level were at the highest value as 31.0 and 41.52. However, maximum absolute error and RMSE showed the lowest deviation value as 11.2 and 16. In the ACR phantom study, all ASIR levels were within acceptable allowance of guidelines. The 20 % ASIR level performed best in qualitative evaluation at five lesions of chest phantom as resolution score 4.3, latitude 3.47 and the degree of distortion 4.25. The 20 % ASIR level was proved to be the best in all experiments, noise, distortion evaluation using ImageJ and qualitative evaluation of five lesions of a chest phantom. Therefore, optimal images as well as reduce radiation dose would be acquired when 20 % ASIR level in thoracic CT is applied.

  11. 2-deoxyglucose tissue levels and insulin levels following tolazamide dosing in normal and obese mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skillman, C.A.; Fletcher, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of tolazamide (TZ), a sulfonylurea, on 14 C-2-deoxyglucose ( 14 C-2DG) tissue distribution and insulin levels of normal and obese mice was investigated using an in vivo physiological method. Acute doses of TZ (50 mg/kg ip) increased 14 C-2DG levels in gastrocnemius muscle and retroperitoneal fat and produced a transient elevation of insulin which most likely accounts for the increased 14 C-2DG levels in muscle and fat. The results demonstrate that the in vivo 14 C-2DG method produced results consistent with known actions of sulfonylureas on in vitro hexose assimilation in muscle and fat. Subchronic treatment (7 days) with TZ 50 mg/kg ip twice daily did not result in increased insulin-stimulated 14 C-2DG tissue levels in normal mice when compared to saline treated controls. However, insulin levels were lower in mice treated subchronically with TZ compared to saline controls suggesting an enhancement of insulin action. Viable yellow obese mice represent a model of maturity onset obesity presenting with insulin resistance. The insulin resistance of this obese strain appears to reside in the fat tissue as assessed by comparing 14 C-2DG tissue levels of obese mice with lean littermate controls. Subchronic TZ treatment had no effect on 14 C-2DG uptake in fat or muscle tissue of viable yellow obese mice and did not alter their plasma insulin levels. It appears that genetically obese viable mice may be resistant to subchronic treatment with TZ. (author)

  12. Reference dose levels for dental panoramic radiography in Anyang City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Mi Ra; Kang, Byung Cheol; Yoon, Suk Ja; Lee, Jae Seo; Kim, Young Hee

    2009-01-01

    To measure dose-width product (DWP) values used for dental panoramic radiography in Anyang city, Korea. Thirty-six panoramic dental radiographic sets (17 analogue panoramic sets and 19 digital panoramic sets) in 36 dental clinics in Anyang city were included in the study. Each patient's panoramic exposure parameters were simulated and the panoramic radiation doses were measured at the secondary collimator using a Mult-O-Meter (Unfors Instruments, Billdal, Sweden) at each dental clinic during 2006. The third quartile DWP was determined from 310 surface dose measurements on adult. The third quartile DWP for adult panoramic radiograph was 106.7 mGy mm. For analogue and digital panoramic radiograph, 3/4 DWP were 116.8 mGy mm and 72 mGy mm respectively. The overall third quartile DWP of panoramic radiography was 106.7 mGy mm. The measured 3/4 DWPs were higher than the 3/4 DWP of 65 mGy mm recommended by NRPB. Dentists who are operating above the reference dose should lower their panoramic exposure doses below the recommended reference value by changing the exposure parameters and/or their panoramic equipment.

  13. A comparison of patient dose levels between 3/4 vessel conventional angiography and computed tomography angiography during examinations to investigate subarachnoid haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spanton, David; Strudwick, Ruth M.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the levels of ionising radiation dose received by patients whilst undergoing radiological examination for Subarachnoid haemorrhage by conventional angiography (single and bi plane) and computed tomography angiography. The results obtained from previous examinations have been compared to consider which method of investigation delivers the lowest ionising radiation dose to the patient. Consideration was also given to comparing single plane angiography to bi plane angiography as empirical evidence suggested that radiologists received no formal training and only a small amount of informal training on newly installed equipment at the hospital in which the research was carried out. Would this lead to patients being inadvertently exposed to increased radiation as radiologists familiarised themselves with the equipment? The dose received by 30 patients examined for SAH by each modality was converted to effective dose (mSv) for comparison. These results were then further compared by removing the lowest and highest recorded doses to eliminate any bias that may have been caused by skewed data. The results showed that CTA consistently delivered a lower dose to patients than single or bi plane angiography and that bi plane delivered a lower mean average dose than single plane angiography, with or without any skewed data

  14. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB) [de

  15. Pediatric chest HRCT using the iDose4 Hybrid Iterative Reconstruction Algorithm: Which iDose level to choose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smarda, M; Alexopoulou, E; Mazioti, A; Kordolaimi, S; Ploussi, A; Efstathopoulos, E; Priftis, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study is to determine the appropriate iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithm level that combines image quality and diagnostic confidence, for pediatric patients undergoing high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). During the last 2 years, a total number of 20 children up to 10 years old with a clinical presentation of chronic bronchitis underwent HRCT in our department's 64-detector row CT scanner using the iDose IR algorithm, with almost similar image settings (80kVp, 40-50 mAs). CT images were reconstructed with all iDose levels (level 1 to 7) as well as with filtered-back projection (FBP) algorithm. Subjective image quality was evaluated by 2 experienced radiologists in terms of image noise, sharpness, contrast and diagnostic acceptability using a 5-point scale (1=excellent image, 5=non-acceptable image). Artifacts existance was also pointed out. All mean scores from both radiologists corresponded to satisfactory image quality (score ≤3), even with the FBP algorithm use. Almost excellent (score <2) overall image quality was achieved with iDose levels 5 to 7, but oversmoothing artifacts appearing with iDose levels 6 and 7 affected the diagnostic confidence. In conclusion, the use of iDose level 5 enables almost excellent image quality without considerable artifacts affecting the diagnosis. Further evaluation is needed in order to draw more precise conclusions. (paper)

  16. Blueberry Galaxies: The Lowest Mass Young Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Junxian

    2017-09-01

    Searching for extreme emission line galaxies allows us to find low-mass metal-poor galaxies that are good analogs of high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies. These low-mass extreme emission line galaxies are also potential Lyman-continuum leakers. Finding them at very low redshifts (z≲ 0.05) allows us to be sensitive to even lower stellar masses and metallicities. We report on a sample of extreme emission line galaxies at z≲ 0.05 (blueberry galaxies). We selected them from SDSS broadband images on the basis of their broadband colors and studied their properties with MMT spectroscopy. From the entire SDSS DR12 photometric catalog, we found 51 photometric candidates. We spectroscopically confirm 40 as blueberry galaxies. (An additional seven candidates are contaminants, and four remain without spectra.) These blueberries are dwarf starburst galaxies with very small sizes (<1 kpc) and very high ionization ([O III]/[O II] ˜ 10-60). They also have some of the lowest stellar masses ({log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 6.5{--}7.5) and lowest metallicities (7.1< 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})< 7.8) of starburst galaxies. Thus, they are small counterparts to green pea galaxies and high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies.

  17. Studies on chronic effects of lower dose level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.G.; Yun, Y.S.; Yun, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    This experiment is being carried out to elucidate the chronic effects of Co 60 (γ-ray) - low doses irradiation on JCR mice at 3rd week, 6th week, and 5th month after their birth. Experimental mice at 3rd week of age have been irradiated with Co 60 - 60mR weekly, Co 60 - 500mR weekly and Co 60 - 61R biweekly at the dose rate of 60mR per second for 23 weeks until now. Co 60 - 61R irradiated mice were subdivided into Co 60 - alone group and Co 60 combined with red ginseng extracts group. In their survivor's rate and their body weight etc., no significant differences between control groups and test groups in these experimental mice. Experimented mice at 6 weeks and 5 months of age are also being irradiated with Co 60 in the same doses as the above for 14 weeks and 8 weeks until present. In these experimental groups, there are also no significant differences between control groups and experimental groups in their survivor's rate and their body weight

  18. Effect of radiation dose level on the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asplund, Sara A.; Svalkvist, Angelica; Maansson, Lars Gunnar; Baath, Magnus [University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiation Physics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Gothenburg (Sweden); Johnsson, Aase A.; Vikgren, Jenny; Flinck, Agneta; Boijsen, Marianne; Fisichella, Valeria A. [University of Gothenburg, Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    To investigate the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis at reduced radiation dose levels. Eighty-six patients were included in the study and were examined with tomosynthesis and computed tomography (CT). Artificial noise was added to simulate that the tomosynthesis images were acquired at dose levels corresponding to 12, 32, and 70 % of the default setting effective dose (0.12 mSv). Three observers (with >20, >20 and three years of experience) read the tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a free-response receiver operating characteristics (FROC) study. CT served as reference. Differences between dose levels were calculated using the jack-knife alternative FROC (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM). The JAFROC FOM was 0.45, 0.54, 0.55, and 0.54 for the 12, 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels, respectively. The differences in FOM between the 12 % dose level and the 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels were 0.087 (p = 0.006), 0.099 (p = 0.003), and 0.093 (p = 0.004), respectively. Between higher dose levels, no significant differences were found. A substantial reduction from the default setting dose in chest tomosynthesis may be possible. In the present study, no statistically significant difference in detectability of pulmonary nodules was found when reducing the radiation dose to 32 %. (orig.)

  19. Effect of radiation dose level on the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asplund, Sara A.; Svalkvist, Angelica; Maansson, Lars Gunnar; Baath, Magnus; Johnsson, Aase A.; Vikgren, Jenny; Flinck, Agneta; Boijsen, Marianne; Fisichella, Valeria A.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis at reduced radiation dose levels. Eighty-six patients were included in the study and were examined with tomosynthesis and computed tomography (CT). Artificial noise was added to simulate that the tomosynthesis images were acquired at dose levels corresponding to 12, 32, and 70 % of the default setting effective dose (0.12 mSv). Three observers (with >20, >20 and three years of experience) read the tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a free-response receiver operating characteristics (FROC) study. CT served as reference. Differences between dose levels were calculated using the jack-knife alternative FROC (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM). The JAFROC FOM was 0.45, 0.54, 0.55, and 0.54 for the 12, 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels, respectively. The differences in FOM between the 12 % dose level and the 32, 70, and 100 % dose levels were 0.087 (p = 0.006), 0.099 (p = 0.003), and 0.093 (p = 0.004), respectively. Between higher dose levels, no significant differences were found. A substantial reduction from the default setting dose in chest tomosynthesis may be possible. In the present study, no statistically significant difference in detectability of pulmonary nodules was found when reducing the radiation dose to 32 %. (orig.)

  20. INFLUENCE OF HIGH CORTISOL DOSES UPON THE SERUM IMMUNOGLOBULIN LEVEL

    OpenAIRE

    Voja Pavlovic; Zoran Pavlovic

    2001-01-01

    The effects of Cortisol upon the serum immunoglobulin concentration areexamined. The experiment involved male guinea pigs of the body weight from 300 to400 g that were nonnally fed and lived under the common laboratory conditions. Theguinea pigs were divided into an experimental and a control group. The experimentalgroup's guinea pigs were given every day (in a 6 days' period) a subcutaneous dose of80 g of corti sol/kg/per day, while the control group ones were given only one ml ofthe physiol...

  1. Studies on the chronic effect of lower dose level irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, T.G.; Yun, E.S.; Chung, I.Y.; Yun, M.S.; Chae, H.S.; Lee, J.Y.

    1982-01-01

    This experiment was carried out to evaluate the chronic hazard of Co-60 low dose radiation on ICR mice. There is now considerable evidence from human studies that age, both at exposure to radiation and at observation for risk, can be major determinant of radiation induced cancer risk. For this reason, ICR mice at different ages such as below were exposed to 60m rads/week, 500m rads/week and 60 rads/biweek whole body Co-60 radiation at a dose rate of 3.6 rads/min. ICR mice were irradiated during pregnant period, from 1st week to 3rd week, from 3rd week to 52nd week, from 6th week to 52nd week, and from 22nd week to 52nd week after the birth. All experimental mice were autopsied immediately after being sacrificed at 52nd week. All major organs were examined grossly and weighed. After fixation histo-pathological preparations were made for microscopical study. Blood cells W.B.C., R.B.C., Hb-from eye's vein were counted by hemocytometer and hemometer. (Author)

  2. Effect of radiation dose level on the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Sara A; Johnsson, Åse A; Vikgren, Jenny; Svalkvist, Angelica; Flinck, Agneta; Boijsen, Marianne; Fisichella, Valeria A; Månsson, Lars Gunnar; Båth, Magnus

    2014-07-01

    To investigate the detectability of pulmonary nodules in chest tomosynthesis at reduced radiation dose levels. Eighty-six patients were included in the study and were examined with tomosynthesis and computed tomography (CT). Artificial noise was added to simulate that the tomosynthesis images were acquired at dose levels corresponding to 12, 32, and 70% of the default setting effective dose (0.12 mSv). Three observers (with >20, >20 and three years of experience) read the tomosynthesis cases for presence of nodules in a free-response receiver operating characteristics (FROC) study. CT served as reference. Differences between dose levels were calculated using the jack-knife alternative FROC (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM). The JAFROC FOM was 0.45, 0.54, 0.55, and 0.54 for the 12, 32, 70, and 100% dose levels, respectively. The differences in FOM between the 12% dose level and the 32, 70, and 100% dose levels were 0.087 (p = 0.006), 0.099 (p = 0.003), and 0.093 (p = 0.004), respectively. Between higher dose levels, no significant differences were found. A substantial reduction from the default setting dose in chest tomosynthesis may be possible. In the present study, no statistically significant difference in detectability of pulmonary nodules was found when reducing the radiation dose to 32%. • A substantial radiation dose reduction in chest tomosynthesis may be possible. • Pulmonary nodule detectability remained unchanged at 32% of the effective dose. • Tomosynthesis might be performed at the dose of a lateral chest radiograph.

  3. Dose-response relationships and threshold levels in skin and respiratory allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.H.E.; Mommers, C.; Heer, C.de

    2006-01-01

    A literature study was performed to evaluate dose-response relationships and no-effect levels for sensitization and elicitation in skin- and respiratory allergy. With respect to the skin, dose-response relationships and no-effect levels were found for both intradermal and topical induction, as well

  4. Dose-response association between hepatitis B surface antigen levels and liver cancer risk in Chinese men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Gao, Jing; Li, Hong-Lan; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Gong; Zhang, Wei; Ma, Xiao; Tan, Yu-Ting; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Xiang, Yong-Bing

    2016-07-15

    We aimed at evaluating the risk of liver cancer in different levels of HBsAg among Chinese men and women. We carried out a nested case-control study including 363 cases and 3,511 controls in two population-based cohorts in Shanghai. Plasma samples collected at enrollment were quantified for HBsAg levels using the Architect QT assay. Conditional logistic regression was performed to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for liver cancer, with adjustment for potential confounders. HBsAg was detected in 6.29% of control subjects overall (7.02% in men and 4.98% in women). HBsAg levels were positively associated with liver cancer risk in a dose-response manner (ptrend  women. In men, the adjusted ORs increased from 7.27 (95% CI: 3.49-15.15) at the lowest detectable level of HBsAg (5-9 IU/ml) to 7.16 (95% CI: 3.21-15.96), 34.30 (95% CI: 16.94-69.44), and 47.33 (95% CI: 23.50-95.34) at the highest level of HBsAg (≥1,000 IU/ml) compared to those negative for HBsAg. The corresponding ORs were much lower for women, from 1.37 (95% CI: 0.25-7.47), 3.81 (95% CI: 1.09-13.28), 7.36 (95% CI: 2.41-22.46) and 16.86 (95% CI: 7.24-39.27), respectively. HBsAg quantification has potential to distinguish individuals at different risks of liver cancer. Men with the lowest detectable level of HBsAg should still pay attention to their liver cancer risks, but those with a higher level may be given a higher priority in future liver cancer surveillance program. © 2016 UICC.

  5. Saharan dust levels in Greece and received inhalation doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mitsakou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The desert of Sahara is one of the major sources of mineral dust on Earth, producing around 2×108 tons/yr. Under certain weather conditions, dust particles from Saharan desert get transported over the Mediterranean Sea and most of Europe. The limiting values set by the directive EC/30/1999 of European Union can easily be exceeded by the transport of desert dust particles in the south European Region and especially in urban areas, where there is also significant contribution from anthropogenic sources. In this study, the effects of dust transport on air quality in several Greek urban areas are quantified. PM10 concentration values from stationary monitoring stations are compared to dust concentrations for the 4-year period 2003–2006. The dust concentration values in the Greek areas were estimated by the SKIRON modelling system coupled with embedded algorithms describing the dust cycle. The mean annual dust contribution to daily-averaged PM10 concentration values was found to be around or even greater than 10% in the urban areas throughout the years examined. Natural dust transport may contribute by more than 20% to the annual number of exceedances – PM10 values greater than EU limits – depending on the specific monitoring location. In a second stage of the study, the inhaled lung dose received by the residents in various Greek locations is calculated. The particle deposition efficiency of mineral dust at the different parts of the human respiratory tract is determined by applying a lung dosimetry numerical model, which incorporates inhalation dynamics and aerosol physical processes. The inhalation dose from mineral dust particles was greater in the upper respiratory system (extrathoracic region and less significant in the lungs, especially in the sensitive alveolar region. However, in cases of dust episodes, the amounts of mineral dust deposited along the human lung are comparable to those

  6. Radiation Dose Contribution To The Worker Health Level At Serpong Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuwono, Indro

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of internal and external radiation doses received for radiation and non-radiation workers of P2TBDU have been done. In the period of 1997/1998 and 1998/1999 there were no significant increasing level of radiation doses received that was 0.55 mSv and highest received radiation dose was 2.66% from dose limit value. Increasing of healthy difference on the same period was 5.76%. Increasing of healthy difference no cause by increasing of radiation dose received but maybe the food consumption design

  7. Theoretical study of the lowest-lying electronic states of Aluminium monoiodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taher, F.; Kabbani, A.; Ani-El Houte, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text.The spectroscopic study of Aluminium monohalides, especially the Aluminium monoiodide, is important for monitoring such species in high temperature fast-flow reactors. Theoretical calculations of AlI are not available, whereas several studies have been done for the other aluminium monohalides. In this work, CAS-SCF/MRCI calculations are performed for the lowest-lying electronic states of AlI in a range of internuclear distance between 2.30 A and 2.80 A. Ab-initio calculations have been effectuated by using the computational chemistry program Molpro. The basis set used in this study for aluminium atom is that used by Langhoff for aluminium monohalides, of contractions using atomic natural orbitals and a pseudopotential is used for iode. Accurate theoretical spectroscopic constants and potential curves are obtained for the ground state X 1 Σ + and the first excited states a 3 Π and A 1 Π. The calculated values of Te, ωe, ωexe and re of these states are compatible with the experimental results. An ordering of states is represented for the lowest five predicted singlet and lowest five predicted triplet states. These results provide a big support to determine the analogy in the ordering of the electronic states in AlF, AlBr and AlI respectively at lower energies. These theoretical results identify a set of electronic singlet and triplet states unobserved experimentally

  8. The impact of diagnostic reference levels on patient doses from X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, W.; Almen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of diagnostic reference levels (DRL). For this study patient doses for the years 1999 and 2006 were available. Patient doses on a national level for eleven specified X-ray examinations were assessed. For the conventional examinations DRL have been used after the first survey in 1999, for computed tomography no DRL were used and for mammography DRL have been used for more than 20 years. Whereas the patient doses for conventional examinations were 30% lower in 2006 compared to 1999 the doses remained essentially the same for computed tomography and mammography. The widths of the dose distributions had only slightly decreased for conventional examinations and remained the same for computed tomography and mammography. This study has shown that after implementation of DRL a considerable dose reduction can be expected. Practices exceeding DRL will perform remedial actions with the aim to reduce dose, as demonstrated for the conventional examinations. Despite the fact that practices for computed tomography could compare doses with others practices, in the absence of DRL no actions to reduce doses were performed. The margin for further dose reductions in mammography is small due to the long term use of DRL. The impact of DRL on patient doses is changing with time. When introduced large dose reductions can be expected. After long term use DRL will counteract the introduction of new technique with unjustified high patient doses. Despite the merits in terms of dose saving it must be recognized that DRL has its limits - it has to be amended with other radiological protection activities. Other means and measures have to be developed, for example by the authorities, in order to ensure that optimisation is continued even when the patient doses are below the DRL. (author)

  9. High dose ESAs are associated with high iPTH levels in hemodialysis patients with end-stage kidney disease: a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anemia and secondary hyperparathyroidism are the two most common complications associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs are widely used in the management of anemia in hemodialysis patients. A reverse correlation has been established between hyperparathyroidism and hemoglobin levels. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the relationship of high dose ESAs and hyperparathyroidism in hemodialysis patients with anemia. Methods: A total of 240 uremic patients maintained on regular hemodialysis were enrolled into this study. Among them, 142 patients were treated with Epiao® (epoetin-alfa and 98 patients were treated with Recormon® (epoetin-beta. The target hemoglobin concentration was 110-130 g/L. Laboratory measurements including hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorus, albumin, intact-parathyroid hormone (iPTH, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation were collected. Results: Hemoglobin concentration increased as iPTH level decreased by stratification. However, no significant association between anemia and calcium or phosphorus level was found. Patients with iPTH levels within 150-300 pg/mL had the highest levels of hemoglobin, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation. Patients treated with Recormon and Epiao had similar hemoglobin concentrations. However, the dose of Recormon for anemia treatment was significantly less than that the dose of Epiao (P<0.05. The level of iPTH in the Recormon group was significantly lower than in the Epiao group. In patients with hemoglobin levels between 110-130 g/L (P<0.05, iPTH level was found to be significantly lower in patients treated with lower doses of ESAs than in patients treated with higher doses of ESAs, no matter which ESA was used (Recormon or Epiao, P<0.05. Conclusions: The dose of ESAs might be positively associated with iPTH level, suggesting that a reasonable hemoglobin target can be achieved by using the lowest possible ESA dose.

  10. Do the UK workplace Radon Action Levels reflect the radiation dose received by the occupants?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denman, A.R.; Parkinson, S.; Barker, S.P.; Marley, F.; Phillips, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    In the UK, Action Levels for radon have been established at 400 Bq m -3 for the workplace and 200 Bq m -3 for the home. We have estimated the dose received by occupants of rooms with radon levels near or above the Action Level, using hourly radon readings, and a questionnaire to record occupancy. In the workplace, results for 73 staff suggest that doses are lower than expected, partly due to part-time working and partly due to the mobility of staff. The 75% quantile for the series, corrected to a 37 hour week, is 5.2 mSv at 400 Bq m -3 . Compared to the current annual limit for radiation workers, the Action Level could be increased, but the current Action Level is compatible with the recent EEC Directive requiring a lower dose limit. However, when raised radon levels in the workplace were reduced by remediation in the series we studied, the dose reduction to staff was consistently around half of the radon level reduction. Although it would be appropriate to study more locations, this suggests an Action Level for remediated workplaces of 200 Bq m -3 . Finally, in a limited series of dose assessments in domestic properties, we found that doses could considerably exceed 5 mSv at the 200 Bq m -3 Action Level, primarily because the sample included an example of high occupancy, in our case several Asian wives in purdah, whose occupancy was almost total. (author)

  11. Diagnostic accuracy at several reduced radiation dose levels for CT imaging in the diagnosis of appendicitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun; Jude, Matilda; Zaragoza, Edward; Lee, Margaret; Patel, Maitraya; Poon, Cheryce; Douek, Michael; Andrews-Tang, Denise; Doepke, Laura; McNitt-Gray, Shawn; Cagnon, Chris; DeMarco, John; McNitt-Gray, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: While several studies have investigated the tradeoffs between radiation dose and image quality (noise) in CT imaging, the purpose of this study was to take this analysis a step further by investigating the tradeoffs between patient radiation dose (including organ dose) and diagnostic accuracy in diagnosis of appendicitis using CT. Methods: This study was IRB approved and utilized data from 20 patients who underwent clinical CT exams for indications of appendicitis. Medical record review established true diagnosis of appendicitis, with 10 positives and 10 negatives. A validated software tool used raw projection data from each scan to create simulated images at lower dose levels (70%, 50%, 30%, 20% of original). An observer study was performed with 6 radiologists reviewing each case at each dose level in random order over several sessions. Readers assessed image quality and provided confidence in their diagnosis of appendicitis, each on a 5 point scale. Liver doses at each case and each dose level were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation based methods. Results: Overall diagnostic accuracy varies across dose levels: 92%, 93%, 91%, 90% and 90% across the 100%, 70%, 50%, 30% and 20% dose levels respectively. And it is 93%, 95%, 88%, 90% and 90% across the 13.5-22mGy, 9.6-13.5mGy, 6.4-9.6mGy, 4-6.4mGy, and 2-4mGy liver dose ranges respectively. Only 4 out of 600 observations were rated "unacceptable" for image quality. Conclusion: The results from this pilot study indicate that the diagnostic accuracy does not change dramatically even at significantly reduced radiation dose.

  12. Comparison of Hemoglobin Levels Before and After Hemodialysis and Their Effects on Erythropoietin Dosing and Cost

    OpenAIRE

    Sagheb; Fallahzadeh; Moaref; Fallahzadeh; Dormanesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin levels measured after hemodialysis, as compared to hemoglobin levels measured before hemodialysis, are suggested to be a more accurate reflection of the hemoglobin levels between hemodialysis sessions, and to be a better reference point for adjusting erythropoietin dosing. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the hemoglobin levels before and after hemodialysis, to calculate the required erythropoie...

  13. The establishment and use of dose reference levels in general paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsden, P.J.; Hardwick, J.; Mencik, C.; McLaren, C.; Young, C.; Mashford, P.

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels for general paediatric radiology have been established in terms of delivered exposure parameters rather than skin dose or dose-area product. With supporting measurements from equipment quality assurance and assumptions of standard patient sizes it was possible to derive reference levels in terms of entrance surface dose. This allowed comparison to be made with other published data. The reference levels for common examinations are presented for different age bands. There is a notable variation with patient age for some examinations which is not apparent in other published data. (author)

  14. Decline of HIV antigen levels in cerebrospinal fluid during treatment with low-dose zidovudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gans, J.; Lange, J. M.; Derix, M. M.; de Wolf, F.; Eeftinck Schattenkerk, J. K.; Danner, S. A.; Ongerboer de Visser, B. W.; Cload, P.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Six HIV-antigenaemic patients with AIDS or AIDS-related complex were studied to assess the effect of treatment with low-dose zidovudine (250 mg) in 6-hourly doses on HIV antigen (HIV-Ag) levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HIV-Ag was detected in CSF of three patients before treatment. These

  15. Pulmonary Nodule Volumetry at Different Low Computed Tomography Radiation Dose Levels With Hybrid and Model-Based Iterative Reconstruction: A Within Patient Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Harder, Annemarie M; Willemink, Martin J; van Hamersvelt, Robbert W; Vonken, Evertjan P A; Schilham, Arnold M R; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Luijk, Bart; Budde, Ricardo P J; Leiner, Tim; de Jong, Pim A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of dose reduction and iterative reconstruction (IR) on pulmonary nodule volumetry. In this prospective study, 25 patients scheduled for follow-up of pulmonary nodules were included. Computed tomography acquisitions were acquired at 4 dose levels with a median of 2.1, 1.2, 0.8, and 0.6 mSv. Data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid IR, and model-based IR. Volumetry was performed using semiautomatic software. At the highest dose level, more than 91% (34/37) of the nodules could be segmented, and at the lowest dose level, this was more than 83%. Thirty-three nodules were included for further analysis. Filtered back projection and hybrid IR did not lead to significant differences, whereas model-based IR resulted in lower volume measurements with a maximum difference of -11% compared with FBP at routine dose. Pulmonary nodule volumetry can be accurately performed at a submillisievert dose with both FBP and hybrid IR.

  16. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-01-01

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both

  17. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; David Baxter, G.; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  18. The Dose That Works: Low Level Laser Treatment of Tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumilty, Steve; Munn, Joanne; McDonough, Suzanne; Hurley, Deirdre A.; Basford, Jeffrey R.; David Baxter, G.

    2010-05-01

    Background: Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is used in the treatment of tendon injuries. However, the clinical effectiveness of this modality remains controversial with limited agreement on the most efficacious dosage and parameter choices. Purpose: To assess the clinical effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy and the validity of current dosage recommendations for treatment. Method: Medical databases were searched from inception to 1st August 2008. Controlled clinical trials evaluating LLLT as a primary intervention for any tendinopathy were included in the review. Methodological quality was classified using the PEDro scale. Appropriateness of treatment parameters were assessed using established guidelines. Results: Twenty five trials met the inclusion criteria. There was conflicting findings from multiple trials: 12 showed positive effects and 13 were inconclusive or showed no effect. Dosages used in the 12 positive studies support the existence of an effective dosage window that closely resembled current guidelines. Where pooling of data was possible, LLLT showed a positive effect size; in high quality studies of lateral epicondylitis, participants' grip strength was 9.59 Kg higher than the control group; for participants with Achilles tendinopathy, the effect was 13.6 mm less pain on a 100 mm visual analogue scale. Conclusion: This study found conflicting evidence as to the effectiveness of LLLT in the treatment of tendinopathy. However, an effective dosage window emerged showing benefit in the treatment of tendinopathy. Strong evidence exists from the 12 positive studies that positive outcomes are associated with the use of current dosage recommendations for the treatment of tendinopathy.

  19. PLUTONIUM/HIGH-LEVEL VITRIFIED WASTE BDBE DOSE CALCULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.C. Richardson

    2003-03-19

    In accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, Yucca Mountain was designated as the site to be investigated as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The Yucca Mountain site is an undeveloped area located on the southwestern edge of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), about 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas. The site currently lacks rail service or an existing right-of-way. If the Yucca Mountain site is found suitable for the repository, rail service is desirable to the Office of Civilian Waste Management (OCRWM) Program because of the potential of rail transportation to reduce costs and to reduce the number of shipments relative to highway transportation. A Preliminary Rail Access Study evaluated 13 potential rail spur options. Alternative routes within the major options were also developed. Each of these options was then evaluated for potential land use conflicts and access to regional rail carriers. Three potential routes having few land use conflicts and having access to regional carriers were recommended for further investigation. Figure 1-1 shows these three routes. The Jean route is estimated to be about 120 miles long, the Carlin route to be about 365 miles long, and Caliente route to be about 365 miles long. The remaining ten routes continue to be monitored and should any of the present conflicts change, a re-evaluation of that route will be made. Complete details of the evaluation of the 13 routes can be found in the previous study. The DOE has not identified any preferred route and recognizes that the transportation issues need a full and open treatment under the National Environmental Policy Act. The issue of transportation will be included in public hearings to support development of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) proceedings for either the Monitored Retrievable Storage Facility or the Yucca Mountain Project or both.

  20. Mercure IV code application to the external dose computation from low and medium level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomassini, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the present work the external dose from low and medium level wastes is calculated using MERCURE IV code. The code utilizes MONTECARLO method for integrating multigroup line of sight attenuation Kernels

  1. Patient dose, gray level and exposure index with a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, T. R.; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computed radiography (CR) is gradually replacing conventional screen-film system in Brazil. To assess image quality, manufactures provide the calculation of an exposure index through the acquisition software of the CR system. The objective of this study is to verify if the CR image can be used as an evaluator of patient absorbed dose too, through a relationship between the entrance skin dose and the exposure index or the gray level values obtained in the image. The CR system used for this study (Agfa model 30-X with NX acquisition software) calculates an exposure index called Log of the Median (lgM), related to the absorbed dose to the IP. The lgM value depends on the average gray level (called Scan Average Level (SAL)) of the segmented pixel value histogram of the whole image. A Rando male phantom was used to simulate a human body (chest and head), and was irradiated with an X-ray equipment, using usual radiologic techniques for chest exams. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (LiF, TLD100) were used to evaluate entrance skin dose and exit dose. The results showed a logarithm relation between entrance dose and SAL in the image center, regardless of the beam filtration. The exposure index varies linearly with the entrance dose, but the angular coefficient is beam quality dependent. We conclude that, with an adequate calibration, the CR system can be used to evaluate the patient absorbed dose.

  2. Foehn at the lowest place on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Georg; Metzger, Jutta; Mayr, Raphael

    2017-04-01

    Foehn occurs at the Dead Sea. Measurements from weather stations at the valley floor and on the slope show that the prime season for foehn is summer and the prime time late afternoon and evening (using the objective classification algorithm of Plavcan et al (2014)[1]). During summer synoptic scale forcing with cross-barrier winds is rare and thus the gravity-wave-driven concept cannot be used to explain the occurrence of foehn. The density-driven foehn concept [2], on the other hand, with denser air at crest level upstream than in the valley can explain the occurrence of foehn. It also explains the differences in foehn frequency between the slope and valley bottom station. References: [1] Plavcan, D., Mayr, G. J., & Zeileis, A. (2014). Automatic and probabilistic foehn diagnosis with a statistical mixture model. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 53(3), 652-659. [2] Mayr, G. J., & Armi, L. (2010). The influence of downstream diurnal heating on the descent of flow across the Sierras. Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 49(9), 1906-1912.

  3. Hydroxychloroquine Blood Levels in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Clarifying Dosing Controversies and Improving Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Laura; Clarke, William A; Magder, Laurence S; Petri, Michelle

    2015-11-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is used for its effect on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and longterm benefits. This can be limited by adherence. One way to assess adherence is to measure blood levels. Conflicting data exist regarding blood levels and disease activity. There is disagreement about dosing; rheumatologists recommend weight-based dosing while some other specialists advocate height-based "ideal body weight" dosing. Patients were prescribed HCQ not exceeding 6.5 mg/kg (max 400 mg/day). In hemodialysis, the dose was 200 mg after each session, and in renal insufficiency it was 200 mg/day. Levels were measured at each visit with a therapeutic range of 500-2000 ng/ml. Patients were divided according to baseline blood level. To assess the effect of measurement and counseling on adherence, we compared the proportion of patients with a level of 500 ng/ml or higher based on the number of prior assessments. The proportion of patients with HCQ levels in the therapeutic range differed significantly by age, sex, and Vitamin D level. There was a trend toward lower levels with renal failure. Blood levels were similar regardless of height and ideal body weight. Comparing those with undetectable, subtherapeutic, and therapeutic levels, disease activity decreased (SLE Disease Activity Index 2.92, 2.36, and 2.20, p = 0.04 for trend). At first, 56% were therapeutic, and by the third measurement this increased to 80% (p ≤ 0.0001). There was a trend toward higher disease activity with lower HCQ levels. Renal failure dosing led to suboptimum levels. We show that weight-based dosing (max 400 mg daily) is appropriate and that height does not appear to influence levels. Measurement, counseling, and repeated testing can increase adherence rates.

  4. A simple method for conversion of airborne gamma-ray spectra to ground level doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    A new and simple method for conversion of airborne NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra to dose rates at ground level has been developed. By weighting the channel count rates with the channel numbers a spectrum dose index (SDI) is calculated for each spectrum. Ground level dose rates then are determined...... by multiplying the SDI by an altitude dependent conversion factor. The conversion factors are determined from spectra based on Monte Carlo calculations. The results are compared with measurements in a laboratory calibration set-up. IT-NT-27. June 1996. 27 p....

  5. Electromagnetic structure of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, L. S.; Camalich, J. Martin; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2009-01-01

    We present a calculation of the leading SU(3)-breaking O(p 3 ) corrections to the electromagnetic moments and charge radius of the lowest-lying decuplet resonances in covariant chiral perturbation theory. In particular, the magnetic dipole moment of the members of the decuplet is predicted fixing the only low-energy constant (LEC) present up to this order with the well-measured magnetic dipole moment of the Ω - . We predict μ Δ ++ =6.04(13) and μ Δ + =2.84(2), which agree well with the current experimental information. For the electric quadrupole moment and the charge radius, we use state-of-the-art lattice QCD results to determine the corresponding LECs, whereas for the magnetic octupole moment there is no unknown LEC up to the order considered here, and we obtain a pure prediction. We compare our results with those reported in large N c , lattice QCD, heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, and other models.

  6. Intraocular levels of methotrexate after oral low-dose treatment in chronic uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchta, Joachim; Hattenbach, Lars-Olof; Baatz, Holger

    2005-01-01

    To determine the intraocular levels of methotrexate in low-dose treatment of noninfectious uveitis. One day after oral administration, the methotrexate level was measured in the aqueous humor and serum of a patient with noninfectious uveitis, who underwent cataract surgery. A fluorescence polarization immunoassay was used for determination. After oral administration, methotrexate was only measurable in aqueous humor but not in serum. In uveitis, orally administered low-dose methotrexate reaches detectable levels in aqueous humor, even in the absence of detectable levels in serum. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  8. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Joël; Besson, Marie-Hélène; Hampshire, Rachel; Tapert, Lisa; Chirenje, Mike; Saba, Joseph

    2012-05-23

    Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP). The GAP provides free HPV vaccine to organizations and institutions in lowest income countries. The HPV vaccination programs were entirely developed, implemented and managed by local institutions. Institutions submitted application forms with institution characteristics, target population, communication delivery strategies. After completion of the vaccination campaign (3 doses), institutions provided a final project report with data on doses administered and vaccination models. Two indicators were calculated, the program vaccination coverage and adherence. Qualitative data were also collected in the following areas: government and community involvement; communication, and sensitization; training and logistics resources, and challenges. A total of eight programs were implemented in seven countries. The eight programs initially targeted a total of 87,580 girls, of which 76,983 received the full 3-dose vaccine course, with mean program vaccination coverage of 87.8%; the mean adherence between the first and third doses of vaccine was 90.9%. Three programs used school-based delivery models, 2 used health facility-based models, and 3 used mixed models that included schools and health facilities. Models that included school-based vaccination were most effective at reaching girls aged 9-13 years. Mixed models comprising school and health facility-based vaccination had better overall performance compared with models using just one of the methods. Increased rates of program coverage and adherence were positively correlated with the number of

  9. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladner Joël

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP. Methods The GAP provides free HPV vaccine to organizations and institutions in lowest income countries. The HPV vaccination programs were entirely developed, implemented and managed by local institutions. Institutions submitted application forms with institution characteristics, target population, communication delivery strategies. After completion of the vaccination campaign (3 doses, institutions provided a final project report with data on doses administered and vaccination models. Two indicators were calculated, the program vaccination coverage and adherence. Qualitative data were also collected in the following areas: government and community involvement; communication, and sensitization; training and logistics resources, and challenges. Results A total of eight programs were implemented in seven countries. The eight programs initially targeted a total of 87,580 girls, of which 76,983 received the full 3-dose vaccine course, with mean program vaccination coverage of 87.8%; the mean adherence between the first and third doses of vaccine was 90.9%. Three programs used school-based delivery models, 2 used health facility-based models, and 3 used mixed models that included schools and health facilities. Models that included school-based vaccination were most effective at reaching girls aged 9-13 years. Mixed models comprising school and health facility-based vaccination had better overall performance compared with models using just one of the methods. Increased rates of program coverage and

  10. Hydroxychloroquine Blood Levels in SLE: Clarifying dosing controversies and improving adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcan, Laura; Clarke, William A; Magder, Laurence S.; Petri, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Hydroxychloroquine is used for its effect on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) disease activity and long-term benefits. This can be limited by adherence. One way to assess adherence is to measure blood levels. Conflicting data exist regarding blood levels and disease activity. There is dosing controversy; rheumatologists recommend weight-based, while ophthalmologists advocate height-based ‘ideal body weight’ dosing. METHODS Patients were prescribed hydroxychloroquine not to exceed 6.5mg/kg (max400mg/day). In hemodialysis, the dose was 200mg after each session, in renal insufficiency it was 200mg/day. Levels were measured at each visit with a therapeutic range of 500-2000 ng/ml. Patients were divided according to baseline blood level. To assess the impact of measurement and counseling on adherence, we compared the proportion of patients with a level of 500ng/ml or higher based on how many prior assessments the patient had. RESULTS The proportion of patients with hydroxychloroquine levels in the therapeutic range differed significantly by age, gender and vitamin D level. There was a trend toward lower levels with renal failure. Blood levels were similar regardless of height and ideal body weight. Comparing those with undetectable, sub-therapeutic and therapeutic levels, disease activity decreased (SLEDAI 2.92, 2.36 and 2.20)(P=0.04, for trend). At first, 56% were therapeutic and by the third measurement this increased to 80% (p =hydroxychloroquine levels. Renal failure dosing led to sub-optimum levels. We show that weight-based dosing (max 400mg daily) is appropriate and that height does not appear to influence levels. Measurement, counseling and repeated testing can increase adherences rates. PMID:26428205

  11. Levels of external natural radiation and doses to population in Heilongjiang province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yicheng; He Yongjiang; Wang Lu

    1985-01-01

    The external natural radiation level in Heilongjiang Province was measured by using China-made FD-71 scintillation radiometers and RSS-111 high pressure ionization chambers. The doses of external radiation to population were also calculated. The population-weighted average value of the absorbed dose rate from terrestrial γ-radiation was 7.2 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 for outdoors, and 10.8 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 for indoors. The population-weighted average absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic rays was 3.3 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 . The annual population-weighted average effective dose equivalent and the annual collective effective dose equivalent from the environmental γ-radiation were 620 μSv and 20.1 x 10 3 man.Sv, respectively. The corresponding figures from cosmic rays were 260 μSv and 8.7 x 10 3 man.Sv, respectively

  12. Pre-1989 epidemiological surveys of low-level dose pre-conception irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Information from 59 pre-1989 epidemiological surveys concerning pre-conception irradiation at doses less than 0.1 Gy has been collated to determine whether any consistent patterns of health effects emerge. The surveys are considered in three groups: childhood malignancies, Down's syndrome and indicators of reproductive damage. Although a pattern is observed for Down's syndrome, no reliable associations are apparent for childhood malignancies (where all surveys pre-date the Gardner survey at Sellafield) or indications of reproductive damage. The twelve surveys of Down's syndrome in relation to maternal pre-conception irradiation received for medical reasons show a pattern consistent with a doubling dose of about 20 mGy. This doubling dose value is, however, not based on individual measurements of ovarian dose and is inconsistent with results from high-level dose surveys. There is no association between paternal irradiation and Down's syndrome. (author)

  13. Giant angular resonance and the structure of the lowest-lying nuclear states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.; Usmanov, P.N.; Yuldashbaeva, Eh.Kh.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is given of the Hamiltonian of the two-rotor model, which is based on the assumption that the giant angular resonance exists, i.e. that it is possible to rotate the neutron component of a deformed nucleus as a whole with respect to the proton component. The realization of the projections on the intrinsic axes of the angular momentum operators is found, the Hamiltonian matrix is determined in the basis convenient for the case of strong neutron-proton coupling. The spectrum of the two-rotor model is determined taking into account the nondiagonal matrix elements in the lowest order of the perturbation theory. The g factors and the probabilities of the M1 transitions are discussed

  14. Reference dose levels for dental panoramic radiography in Gwangju (South Korea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Yoon, S. J.; Kang, B. C.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the reference dose levels for dental panoramic radiography in Gwangju city (South Korea) based on the dose width product (DWP) and compared them with those already established elsewhere. A total of 44 panoramic dental radiographic sets (36 digital and 8 analogue panoramic sets) in 41 dental clinics in Gwangju city were chosen. The third quartile DWP was determined from 429 surface dose measurements of the adult surface dose in panoramic dental radiography. The third quartile DWP for panoramic radiography was 60.1 mGy mm. The proposed DWP reference levels of 60.1 mGy mm were less than or equal to those previously reported in other countries, such as Italy and UK, and acceptable for panoramic radiography in Gwangju (KR). (authors)

  15. Center of cancer systems biology second annual workshop--tumor metronomics: timing and dose level dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Klement, Giannoula Lakka

    2013-05-15

    Metronomic chemotherapy, the delivery of doses in a low, regular manner so as to avoid toxic side effects, was introduced over 12 years ago in the face of substantial clinical and preclinical evidence supporting its tumor-suppressive capability. It constituted a marked departure from the classic maximum-tolerated dose (MTD) strategy, which, given its goal of rapid eradication, uses dosing sufficiently intense to require rest periods between cycles to limit toxicity. Even so, upfront tumor eradication is frequently not achieved with MTD, whereupon a de facto goal of longer-term tumor control is often pursued. As metronomic dosing has shown tumor control capability, even for cancers that have become resistant to the same drug delivered under MTD, the question arises whether it may be a preferable alternative dosing approach from the outset. To date, however, our knowledge of the coupled dynamics underlying metronomic dosing is neither sufficiently well developed nor widely enough disseminated to establish its actual potential. Meeting organizers thus felt the time was right, armed with new quantitative approaches, to call a workshop on "Tumor Metronomics: Timing and Dose Level Dynamics" to explore prospects for gaining a deeper, systems-level appreciation of the metronomics concept. The workshop proved to be a forum in which experts from the clinical, biologic, mathematical, and computational realms could work together to clarify the principles and underpinnings of metronomics. Among other things, the need for significant shifts in thinking regarding endpoints to be used as clinical standards of therapeutic progress was recognized. ©2013 AACR.

  16. Serum level modifications of female sex hormones after radiocastration with different total doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naujokat, B.; Rohloff, R.; Willich, N.; Eiermann, W.

    1988-01-01

    We determined serum level of estradiol, FSH and LH over a period of six to eight weeks after ovarian irradiation for castration with different doses (2x2.5 Gy/3x2.5 Gy/4x2.5 Gy) in 15 patients with metastatic breast cancer as compared to changes after ovarectomy in five patients. The time course of the changing estradiol-, FSH and LH-serum levels sigificantly depends on the ovarian dose. After radiological castration with a dose of 4x2.5 Gy = 10 Gy in four days the estrogen levels decrease within two to three weeks, and the FSH- and LH-levels increase after three to four weeks into the postmenopausal range. Therefore, the time course is not very different from changes after ovarectomy. (orig.) [de

  17. Lethal doses of ionizing radiation versus endogenous level of superoxide dismutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipecka, K; Domanski, T; Dniaszewska, K; Grabowska, B; Pietrowicz, D; Lindner, P; Cisowska, B; Gorski, H [Military Medical Academy, Lodz (Poland). Inst. of Occupational Medicine

    1982-06-22

    The stability of superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as its activity distribution in a human population were investigated. The SOD activity level of the erythrocytes proved to be an index for the endogenous SOD activity in the whole body. In a rat population, having similar SOD frequency distribution as a human population, the mortality due to acute irradiation depended on the SOD level; after a single acute dose approximating the lethal dose (LD/sub 50/30/) the survival depended distinctly on the endogenous SOD activity level.

  18. The need for national diagnostic reference levels: entrance surface dose measurement in intraoral radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Shareghi, A.; Kavousi, A.; Ghiassi-Nejad, M.; Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Mozdarani, H.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Intraoral radiographies are the most frequent X-ray examinations in humans. According to International Commission on Radiation Protection recommendations, the selection of a diagnostic reference level should be specific to a country or region. Critical organs such as thyroid gland are exposed to X-rays in intraoral radiography and these exposures should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. To assist the development of DRLs for intraoral radiography, a National Radiation Protection Department-sponsored pilot study was carried out. Materials and methods: thermoluminescent dosimetry is widely acknowledged to be the recommended method for measuring entrance surface doses. In this study, entrance surface doses was measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters on the skin (either mandibular or maxillary arcs) of 40 patients. Three thermoluminescent dosimetry chips were placed on the skin of each patient. The doses were averaged for each radiography and mean entrance surface doses of all patients calculated. Results: the mean ±SD entrance surface dose at the center of the beam on the patient's skin in intraoral radiography was 1.173 ±0.606 mGy (ranged from 0.01 o 0.40 m Gy). The mean entrance surface doses for male and female patients were 1.380± 0.823, and 1.004± 0.258 respectively. No statistically significant difference was found between these means. Despite its necessity , in national level , there is no published data on the diagnostic reference levels for intraoral radiography. However, the results obtained in this study are lower than those reported by investigators in other countries. Conclusion: in IR Iran , due to lack of large scale studies, no diagnostic reference levels have been set for X-ray diagnostic procedures. Due to lack of national diagnostic reference levels, it is not possible to clarify whether in intraoral radiographies any dose reduction techniques are needed. We intend to perform similar nationwide studies to set the

  19. Influence of Erythropoietin Dose and Albumin Level on the Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsuwaida Abdulkareem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP levels increase in patients with congestive heart failure. Theoretically, BNP levels can be helpful in the determination of the "dry weight" of hemodialysis patients. To evaluate the effect of hemodialysis on the plasma concentration of BNP and to determine the factors that affect BNP levels during hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal failure, we studied five stable patients with chronic renal failure. A total of 15 blood samples were obtained for BNP levels at 24, 48 and 72 hours after the last hemodialysis session. The plasma BNP levels did not change significantly either with ultrafiltration volume or with time since last dialysis. However, the BNP levels correlated positively with the erythropoietin (EPO dose (r=0.98, P< 0.001 and negatively with the serum albumin levels (r = 0.94, P=0.02. Univariate analysis showed that the EPO dose (P=0.001 and the albumin level (P=0.02 were significant predictors of BNP level. Adjusted multivariate analysis showed significant interaction between the EPO dose and the albumin level (P=0.01, P=0.03 respectively. In conclusion: the plasma BNP levels were not significantly influenced by ultrafiltration volume or time since last dialysis. However, the BNP levels may be a useful prognostic parameter for assessing the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients.

  20. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. V. E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    These tables present data on the effects of low-level radiation dose for the following effects:- pre-conception irradiation and Down's Syndrome, pre-conception irradiation and reproductive damage, surveys of effect in relation to the source of radiation, distribution by maternal preconception exposure of the 7 most common major congenital abnormalities in the Japanese, pre-conception irradiation and childhood malignancies, parental gonadal dose at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in relation to leukemia, sex chromosome aneuploids in children of A-bomb survivors, untoward pregnancy outcomes by parental gonad dose, pre-conception irradiation and chromosomal abnormalities, and intra-uterine irradiation and intelligence. (author).

  1. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. V. E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1990-01-01

    These tables present data on the effects of low-level radiation dose for the following effects:- pre-conception irradiation and Down's Syndrome, pre-conception irradiation and reproductive damage, surveys of effect in relation to the source of radiation, distribution by maternal preconception exposure of the 7 most common major congenital abnormalities in the Japanese, pre-conception irradiation and childhood malignancies, parental gonadal dose at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in relation to leukemia, sex chromosome aneuploids in children of A-bomb survivors, untoward pregnancy outcomes by parental gonad dose, pre-conception irradiation and chromosomal abnormalities, and intra-uterine irradiation and intelligence. (author)

  2. Using the Concept of "Population Dose" in Planning and Evaluating Community-Level Obesity Prevention Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, Allen; Schwartz, Pamela M.; Rauzon, Suzanne; Bourcier, Emily; Senter, Sandra; Spring, Rebecca; Beery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When planning and evaluating community-level initiatives focused on policy and environment change, it is useful to have estimates of the impact on behavioral outcomes of particular strategies (e.g., building a new walking trail to promote physical activity). We have created a measure of estimated strategy-level impact--"population dose"--based on…

  3. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose

  4. Serum tocopherol levels in very preterm infants after a single dose of vitamin E at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Edward F; Hansen, Nellie I; Brion, Luc P; Ehrenkranz, Richard A; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Walsh, Michele C; Shankaran, Seetha; Acarregui, Michael J; Johnson, Karen J; Hale, Ellen C; Messina, Lynn A; Crawford, Margaret M; Laptook, Abbot R; Goldberg, Ronald N; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Carlo, Waldemar A; Poindexter, Brenda B; Faix, Roger G; Carlton, David P; Watterberg, Kristi L; Ellsbury, Dan L; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to examine the impact of a single enteral dose of vitamin E on serum tocopherol levels. The study was undertaken to see whether a single dose of vitamin E soon after birth can rapidly increase the low α-tocopherol levels seen in very preterm infants. If so, this intervention could be tested as a means of reducing the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. Ninety-three infants vitamin E or placebo by gastric tube within 4 hours of birth. The vitamin E group received 50 IU/kg of vitamin E as dl-α-tocopheryl acetate (Aquasol E). The placebo group received sterile water. Blood samples were taken for measurement of serum tocopherol levels by high-performance liquid chromatography before dosing and 24 hours and 7 days after dosing. Eighty-eight infants received the study drug and were included in the analyses. The α-tocopherol levels were similar between the groups at baseline but higher in the vitamin E group at 24 hours (median 0.63 mg/dL vs. 0.42 mg/dL, P = .003) and 7 days (2.21 mg/dL vs 1.86 mg/dL, P = .04). There were no differences between groups in γ-tocopherol levels. At 24 hours, 30% of vitamin E infants and 62% of placebo infants had α-tocopherol levels vitamin E raised serum α-tocopherol levels, but to consistently achieve α-tocopherol levels >0.5 mg/dL, a higher dose or several doses of vitamin E may be needed.

  5. Effects of irradiation source and dose level on quality characteristics of processed meat products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Choi, Yun-Sang; Song, Beom-Seok; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2017-01-01

    The effect of irradiation source (gamma-ray, electron-beam, and X-ray) and dose levels on the physicochemical, organoleptic and microbial properties of cooked beef patties and pork sausages was studied, during 10 days of storage at 30±1 °C. The processed meat products were irradiated at 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 kGy by three different irradiation sources. The pH of cooked beef patties and pork sausages was unaffected by irradiation sources or their doses. The redness of beef patties linearly decreased with increasing dose level (Pchanges in overall acceptability were observed for pork sausages regardless of irradiation source (P>0.05), while gamma-ray irradiated beef patties showed significantly decreased overall acceptability in a dose-dependent manner (Poxidation of samples was accelerated by irradiation depending on irradiation sources and dose levels during storage at 30 °C. E-beam reduced total aerobic bacteria of beef patties more effectively, while gamma-ray considerably decreased microbes in pork sausages as irradiation dose increased. The results of this study indicate that quality attributes of meat products, in particular color, lipid oxidation, and microbial properties are significantly influenced by the irradiation sources.

  6. Adduction of acrylamide with biomacromolecules at environmental dose level measured by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Q.Y.; Sun, H.F.; Liu, Y.F.; Ding, X.F.; Fu, D.P.; Liu, K.X.

    2005-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a well-known neurotoxin, which also has developmental, reproductive as well as genetic toxicity. AA has been classified as a probable human carcinogen by IARC in 1994 since its carcinogenic effects in animals were reported after repetitive high level dosing. Over the last 10 years, there have been a large number of studies investigating the effects of AA on rodent reproductive performance. In 2002, the Swedish Food Administration reported the presence of AA in the heat-treated food products. which again elicited great concern on the toxicity of AA. However most of these studies were investigated at a dose level of mg/kg b.w and above, which is much higher than the actual human relevant dose. In this study we investigate the adduction of environmental level AA with biomacromolecules by the ultra-sensitive AMS technique. This may provide some information on the reproductive toxicity of AA under extremely low level exposure. A series doses of [2, 3- 14 C] AA (0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 250, 1000 μg/kg bw) were administrated with a single intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) to ICR adult male mice. The blood and spermatozoon were collected 24 h post dosing. Hemoglobin (Hb), serum albumin (SA), protamine, spermatozoon DNA, spermatozoon head and tail were isolated respectively, and then transformed into graphite following our previous procedure, The adduct levels were determined by a 0.6 MV compact AMS facility at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics of Peking University. The results indicate that: (1) AA adduct number increases with the doses within 0.1-1000 μg/kg b.w. range in a log/log linear mode, except for DNA within 10-1000 μg/kg b.w. range. (2) Comparing protamine, Hb, and SA adducts with that of spermatozoon DNA (see Fig. 1), AA mainly adducts to proteins. For instance, at 1000 μg/kg b.w. dose level, spermatozoon DNA adducts only account for about 0.71%, 1.36% and 0.82% of protamine, Hb and SA adducts, respectively. (3) AA-protamine adducts, AA

  7. Determination of high level absorbed dose in a 60Co gamma ray field with ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhongying Li; Benjiang Mao; Lu Zhang

    1995-01-01

    This paper relates to the principles and methods for determining the absorbed dose of high energy photons radiation with ionization chambers, and its shows the doserate results of high level 60 Co γ-rays in water measured with Farmer chambers. The results with two kinds of chambers at a same point are consistent within 0.3%, and the total uncertainty is less than ± 4%. In the domestic intercomparison on determining high level absorbed dose in which 12 laboratories participated, the deviation of our result from the mean result of the intercomparison is -0.04% [Chen Yundong (1992). Summing up report on a high level absorbed dose intercomparison (in Chinese)]. (author)

  8. Estimating the population dose from nuclear medicine examinations towards establishing diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niksirat, Fatemeh; Monfared, Ali Shabestani; Deevband, Mohammad Reza; Amiri, Mehrangiz; Gholami, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This study conducted a review on nuclear medicine (NM) services in Mazandaran Province with a view to establish adult diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and provide updated data on population radiation exposure resulting from diagnostic NM procedures. The data were collected from all centers in all cities of Mazandaran Province in the North of Iran from March 2014 to February 2015. The 75 th percentile of the distribution and the average administered activity (AAA) were calculated and the average effective dose per examination, collective effective dose to the population and annual effective dose per capita were estimated using dose conversion factors. The gathered data were analyzed via SPSS (version 18) software using descriptive statistics. Based on the data of this study, the collective effective dose was 95.628 manSv, leading to a mean effective dose of 0.03 mSv per capita. It was also observed that the myocardial perfusion was the most common procedure (50%). The 75 th percentile of the distribution of administered activity (AA) represents the DRL. The AAA and the 75 th percentile of the distribution of AA are slightly higher than DRL of most European countries. Myocardial perfusion is responsible for most of the collective effective dose and it is better to establish national DRLs for myocardial perfusion and review some DRL values through the participation of NM specialists in the future

  9. Yield and Chemical Composition of Cucumber Treated by Nitrogen Levels and Doses of Gamma Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath El-Bab, T.Sh.; Abo El-Khier, Om.M.; Abdallah, A.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Two field experiments were performed at the Atomic Energy Authority, Experimental farm, Inshas, Egypt during 2010 and 2011 summer growing seasons in sandy soil. The experiments were conducted to study the effect of pre-sowing seeds which treated by gamma irradiation with different doses of 0, 2, 4 and 6 Gy. This was in combination with three rates of nitrogen, fertilizer i.e., 30, 60 and 90 Kg N/fed. The experiments were laid out using drip irrigation system. The obtained results indicated that gamma rays doses showed significant differences on cucumber yield per plot or per Fed., increasing doses of gamma rays gradually increased cucumber yield per plot up to highest dose, i.e., (6 Gy). The highest value of total yield was obtained with the highest nitrogen rate (90 Kg N/fed.). Doses of gamma rays significantly increased total soluble solids (T.S.S.), total Carbohydrates, fats, total protein, NPK and Ca of cucumber fruits. Application of 60 Kg N/fed. recorded the highest values of all above mentioned chemical characters except of total protein with 90 kg N/fed. every all dose treatments. The effect of interaction between doses and fertilizer levels on chemical characters were significant therefore, the highest values was found at 4 Gy and 60 Kg N/fed. treatment for protein, fat, nitrogen and potassium contents while the carbohydrate and calcium contents had the highest value with the treatment of 6 Gy and 60 Kg N/fed

  10. Background levels and radiation dose yield of o-tyrosine in chicken meat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuaqui-Offermanns, N.; McDougall, T.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of o-tyrosine levels in poultry meat is a potential method for postirradiation dosimetry of poultry. The validity of using o-tyrosine for this purpose has not yet been established. As part of the validation process, the o-tyrosine content in unirradiated chicken meat, the radiation dose response curve, and the effects of postirradiation storage on o-tyrosine levels are examined. In 18 individual samples, the mean background level of o-tyrosine was 0.18 +/- 0.11 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture), and the most frequent background level (60% of the cases) was between 0.05 and 0.15 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture). In pooled samples of 10 chickens, the mean background level was 0.12 +/- 0.03 ppm (wet weight, 70% moisture). The levels were not significantly affected by storage at 5 degrees C (7 d) or by freezing the sample. The radiation dose response curve was linear within the dose range studied (0 to 10 kGy), with a slope of 0.127 + 0.003 ppm (wet weight)/kGy. Although there was some variation in the intercept (0.132 + 0.013), the slope was the same in all samples tested. Postirradiation storage at either 4 or 8 degrees C until spoilage did not affect the levels of o-tyrosine. These data indicate that o-tyrosine level may be useful for determining the absorbed dose in chicken meat gamma-irradiated to doses greater than 0.6 kGy. Further validation studies are continuing

  11. Surveys of radon levels in homes in the United States: A test of the linear-no-threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The University of Pittsburgh Radon Project for large scale measurements of radon concentrations in homes is described. Its principal research is to test the linear-no threshold dose-response relationship for radiation carcinogenesis by determining average radon levels in the 25 U.S. counties (within certain population ranges) with highest and lowest lung cancer rates. The theory predicts that the former should have about 3 times higher average radon levels than the latter, under the assumption that any correlation between exposure to radon and exposure to other causes of lung cancer is weak. The validity of this assumption is tested with data on average radon level vs replies to items on questionnaires; there is little correlation between radon levels in houses and smoking habits, educational attainment, or economic status of the occupants, or with urban vs rural environs which is an indicator of exposure to air pollution

  12. Eye lens dosimetry in interventional cardiology: Results of staff dose measurements and link to patient dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antic, V.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Rehani, M.; Aleksandric, S.; Arandjic, D.; Ostojic, M.

    2013-01-01

    Workers involved in interventional cardiology procedures receive high eye lens dose if protection is not used. Currently, there is no suitable method for routine use for the measurement of eye dose. Since most angiography machines are equipped with suitable patient dosemeters, deriving factors linking staff eye doses to the patient doses can be helpful. In this study the patient kerma-area product, cumulative dose at an interventional reference point and eye dose in terms of Hp(3) of the cardiologists, nurses and radiographers for interventional cardiology procedures have been measured. Correlations between the patient dose and the staff eye dose were obtained. The mean eye dose was 121 mSv for the first operator, 33 mSv for the second operator/nurse and 12 mSv for radiographer. Normalised eye lens doses per unit kerma-area product were 0.94 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the first operator, 0.33 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for the second operator/nurse and 0.16 mSv Gy -1 cm -2 for radiographers. Statistical analysis indicated that there is a weak but significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product for all three staff categories. These values are based on a local practice and may provide useful reference for other studies for validation and for wider utilisation in assessing the eye dose using patient dose values. (authors)

  13. Regional Diagnostic Reference Levels and Collective Effective Doses from Computed Tomography (CT) Scanners in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingstone, R.S.; Dinakaran, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnostic examinations performed using computed tomography (CT) are on the increase, and the use of this modality needs to be monitored periodically. The aim of this study was to formulate regional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) and assess collective effective doses from CT scanners in Tamil Nadu, India. In-site CT dose measurements were performed for 127 CT scanners in Tamil Nadu as a part of the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board (AERB) funded project for a period of two years. Regional DRLs were formulated at third quartile level for three CT protocols such as thorax, abdomen and pelvis and were found to be 557 mGy.cm, 521 mGy.cm and 294 mGy.cm, respectively. The collective effective dose in Tamil Nadu was found to be 14.93 man Sv per day. (author)

  14. Radiation doses and possible radiation effects of low-level, chronic radiation in vegetation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, W.A.; Franks, L.A.

    1975-01-01

    Measurements were made of radiation doses in soil and vegetation in Pu-contaminated areas at the Nevada Test Site with the objective of investigating low-level, low-energy gamma radiation (with some beta radiation) effects at the cytological or morphological level in native shrubs. In this preliminary investigation, the exposure doses to shrubs at the approximate height of stem apical meristems were estimated from 35 to 140 R for a ten-year period. The gamma exposure dose estimated for the same period was 20.7 percent +- 6.4 percent of that recorded by the dosimeters used in several kinds of field instrument surveys. Hence, a survey instrument reading made at about 25 cm in the tops of shrubs should indicate about 1 / 5 the dosimeter-measured exposures. No cytology has yet been undertaken because of the drought since last winter. (auth)

  15. Dose levels due to neutrons in the vicinity of high energy medical accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinley, P.H.; Wood, M.; Sohrabi, M.; Mills, M.; Rodriguez, R.

    1976-01-01

    High energy photons are generated for use in radiation therapy by the decelleration of electrons in metal targets. Fast neutrons are also generated as a result of (γ, n) and (e, e'n) interactions in the target, beam compensator filter, and collimator material. In this work the adsorbed dose to neutrons was measured at the center of a 10 x 10 cm photon beam and 5 cm outside of the beam edge for a number of treatment units. Dose levels due to slow and fast neutrons were also established outside of the treatment rooms and a Bonner sphere neutron spectrometer system was employed to determine the neutron energy spectrum due to stray neutron radiation at each accelerator. For the linac it was found that the neutron dose at the beam center was 0.0039% of the photon dose and values of 0.049% and 0.053% were observed for the Allis Chalmers betatron and the Brown Boveri Betatron. Dose equivalent rates in the range of 0.3 to 22.5 mrem/hr were measured for points outside the treatment rooms when the accelerators were operated at a photon dose rate of 100 rad/min at the treatment position

  16. Epidemiological survey of the effects of low level radiation dose: a comparative assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1993-10-01

    This volume presents the collations tables of a six volume comparative epidemiological survey of the effects of low level radiation dose. Data are collated for the effects observed in the following irradiated groups:- Preconception irradiation, intra-uterine irradiation, childhood irradiation, adult irradiation. (UK).

  17. Operator dependency of the radiation exposure in cardiac interventions: feasibility of ultra low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emre Ozpelit, Mehmet; Ercan, Ertugrul; Pekel, Nihat; Tengiz, Istemihan; Yilmaz, Akar; Ozpelit, Ebru; Ozyurtlu, Ferhat

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Mean radiation exposure in invasive cardiology varies greatly between different centres and interventionists. The International Commission on Radiological Protection and the EURATOM Council stipulate that, despite reference values, 'All medical exposure for radiodiagnostic purposes shall be kept as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA). The purpose of this study is to establish the effects of the routine application of ALARA principles and to determine operator and procedure impact on radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Materials and methods: A total of 240 consecutive cardiac interventional procedures were analysed. Five operators performed the procedures, two of whom were working in accordance with ALARA principles (Group 1 operators) with the remaining three working in a standard manner (Group 2 operators). Radiation exposure levels of these two groups were compared. Results: Total fluoroscopy time and the number of radiographic runs were similar between groups. However, dose area product and cumulative dose were significantly lower in Group 1 when compared with Group 2. Radiation levels of Group 1 were far below even the reference levels in the literature, thus representing an ultra-low-dose radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Conclusion: By use of simple radiation reducing techniques, ultra-low-dose radiation exposure is feasible in interventional cardiology. Achievability of such levels depends greatly on operator awareness, desire, knowledge and experience of radiation protection. (authors)

  18. Effects of bud loading levels and nitrogen doses on yield, physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of several bud loading levels in winter pruning and nitrogen doses on yield and physical and chemical properties of fresh vine-leaves of grape cultivar “Narince”. Vines trained with bilateral cordon system was pruned to yield 35000 to 53000 buds/ha (16 or 24 buds/vine) ...

  19. Measurement of extremely low level dose with LiF(Mg,Cu,P) TL chips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Ziying; Wang Shoushan; Wu Fang; Chen Guolong; Li Yuanfang; Zhu Jianhuan

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents some of the dosimetric characteristics of newly developed LiF(Mg,Cu,P) TL chips with high signal-to-noise ratio for measurement at the 10 -7 to 10 -4 Gy dose level. Measuring techniques and optimum procedures for annealing and readout are also presented. (author)

  20. Level of terrestrial gamma radiation and doses to population in Jiangsu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation level in Jiangsu Province are reported and the population doses due to this radiation are estimated. The sketch map of the geographical distribution of the terrestrial gamma radiation level is given. In this investigation FD-71 portable scintillation counters and RSS-111 high pressure ionization chambers were used. The results showed that the terrestrial gamma absorbed dose rates in air for indoors and outdoors were 10.7 x 10 -8 Gy/h and 6.5 x 10 -8 Gy/h (weighted values) respectively. The indoors-to-outdoors ratio was 1.65. The total (indoor plus outdoor) annual effective dose equivalent from terrestrial gamma radiation, averaged over the population in this province, was 6.0 x 10 -4 Sv. The collective annual effective dose equivalent was 3.6 x 10 4 man.Sv. Therefore, the absorbed dose to population in Jiangsu Province is in the range of the normal background

  1. Plasma, salivary and urinary cortisol levels following physiological and stress doses of hydrocortisone in normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Caroline; Greco, Santo; Nguyen, Hanh H T; Ho, Jui T; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J; Inder, Warrick J

    2014-11-26

    Glucocorticoid replacement is essential in patients with primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency, but many patients remain on higher than recommended dose regimens. There is no uniformly accepted method to monitor the dose in individual patients. We have compared cortisol concentrations in plasma, saliva and urine achieved following "physiological" and "stress" doses of hydrocortisone as potential methods for monitoring glucocorticoid replacement. Cortisol profiles were measured in plasma, saliva and urine following "physiological" (20 mg oral) or "stress" (50 mg intravenous) doses of hydrocortisone in dexamethasone-suppressed healthy subjects (8 in each group), compared to endogenous cortisol levels (12 subjects). Total plasma cortisol was measured half-hourly, and salivary cortisol and urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio were measured hourly from time 0 (between 0830 and 0900) to 5 h. Endogenous plasma corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) levels were measured at time 0 and 5 h, and hourly from time 0 to 5 h following administration of oral or intravenous hydrocortisone. Plasma free cortisol was calculated using Coolens' equation. Plasma, salivary and urine cortisol at 2 h after oral hydrocortisone gave a good indication of peak cortisol concentrations, which were uniformly supraphysiological. Intravenous hydrocortisone administration achieved very high 30 minute cortisol concentrations. Total plasma cortisol correlated significantly with both saliva and urine cortisol after oral and intravenous hydrocortisone (P cortisol and urinary cortisol:creatinine ratio may provide useful alternatives to plasma cortisol measurements to monitor replacement doses in hypoadrenal patients.

  2. Recent results on the linearity of the dose-response relationship for radiation-induced mutations in human cells by low dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traut, H.

    1987-01-01

    Five studies made by various authors in the last years are discussed, which are significant in that the response of human cells to low-dose irradiation is determined directly and not by extrapolation, and which also provide information on the mutagenic effects of low radiation doses. The results of these studies do not indicate any other than a linear response for induction of mutations by low-dose irradiation, nor are there any reasons observable for assuming the existence of a threshold dose. It is very likely therefore that cancer initiation at the low dose level also is characterized by a linear relationship. Although threshold dose levels cannot generally be excluded, and maybe are only too low to be detected by experiment, there is no plausible biophysical argument for assuming the existence of such microdose threshold. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Contemporary Australian dose area product levels in the fluoroscopic investigation of paediatric congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.; Brennan, P.C.; Mello-Thoms, C.; Ryan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines radiation dose levels delivered to children from birth to 15 y of age in the investigation of congenital heart disease (CHD) at a major Sydney children's hospital. The aims are to compare values with those derived from similar studies, to provide a template for more consistent dose reporting, to establish local and national diagnostic reference levels and to contribute to the worldwide paediatric dosimetry database. A retrospective review of 1007 paediatric procedural records was undertaken. The cohort consisted of 795 patients over a period from January 2007 to December 2012 who have undergone cardiac catheterisation for the investigation of CHD. The age range included was from the day of birth to 15 y. Archived dose area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time (FT) readings were retrieved and analysed. The mean, median, 25. and 75. percentile DAP levels were calculated for six specific age groupings. The 75. percentile DAP values for the specific age categories were as follows: 0-30 d-1.9 Gy cm 2 , 1-12 months-2.9 Gy cm 2 , 1-3 y-5.3 Gy cm 2 , 3-5 y-6.2 Gy cm 2 , 5-10 y-7.5 Gy cm 2 and 10-15 y-17.3 Gy cm 2 . These levels were found to be lower than the values reported in comparable overseas studies. Individual year-specific levels were determined, and it is proposed that these are more useful than the common grouping method. The age-specific 75. percentile DAP levels outlined in this study can be used as baseline local diagnostic reference levels. The needs for the standardisation of DAP reporting and for a greater range of age-specific diagnostic reference levels have been highlighted. For the first time, Australian dose values for paediatric cardiac catheterisation are presented. (authors)

  4. The Impact of Different Levels of Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D on Image Quality of 320-Row Coronary CT Angiography: A Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Feger

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the systematic image quality evaluation of coronary CT angiography (CTA, reconstructed with the 3 different levels of adaptive iterative dose reduction (AIDR 3D and compared to filtered back projection (FBP with quantum denoising software (QDS.Standard-dose CTA raw data of 30 patients with mean radiation dose of 3.2 ± 2.6 mSv were reconstructed using AIDR 3D mild, standard, strong and compared to FBP/QDS. Objective image quality comparison (signal, noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR, contour sharpness was performed using 21 measurement points per patient, including measurements in each coronary artery from proximal to distal.Objective image quality parameters improved with increasing levels of AIDR 3D. Noise was lowest in AIDR 3D strong (p ≤ 0.001 at 20/21 measurement points; compared with FBP/QDS. Signal and contour sharpness analysis showed no significant difference between the reconstruction algorithms for most measurement points. Best coronary SNR and CNR were achieved with AIDR 3D strong. No loss of SNR or CNR in distal segments was seen with AIDR 3D as compared to FBP.On standard-dose coronary CTA images, AIDR 3D strong showed higher objective image quality than FBP/QDS without reducing contour sharpness.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00967876.

  5. Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett; E.Lopez

    2003-01-01

    Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions

  6. Relationship between Optimum Mini-doses of Glucagon and Insulin Levels when Treating Mild Hypoglycaemia in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes - A Simulation Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Schmidt, Signe

    2017-01-01

    -treated type 1 diabetes. In each simulation, one of ten different and individualized subcutaneous insulin boluses was administered to decrease plasma glucose (PG) from 7.0 to ≤3.9 mmol/l. Insulin levels were estimated as ratio of actual to baseline serum insulin concentration (se/ba-insulin), insulin on board...... (IOB) or percentage of IOB to total daily insulin dose (IOB/TDD). Insulin bolus sizes were chosen to provide pre-defined insulin levels when PG reached 3.9 mmol/l, where one of 17 subcutaneous glucagon boluses was administered. Optimum glucagon bolus to treat mild hypoglycaemia at varying insulin...... levels was the lowest dose that in most patients caused PG peak between 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/l and sustained PG ≥ 3.9 mmol/l for 2 hr after the bolus. PG response to glucagon declined with increasing insulin levels. The glucagon dose to optimally treat mild hypoglycaemia depended exponentially on insulin...

  7. Levels of dose in head exams by TAC in Cuba. Interrelation with parameters of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleitas Estevez, Ileana; Mora Machado, Roxana de la; Guevara Ferrer, Carmen R.

    2001-01-01

    In the last years an increment in the use of Computer Tomography (CT) has been observed as an efficient diagnostic method. On the other hand, this type of study involves high doses levels which are imparted to the patient. In Cuba, there are not reported values of that doses levels for typical CT studies. The National Control Center for Medical Devices has been developing for several years investigations for knowing the guidance doses levels for different examinations in radiodiagnosis, taking into account the recommendations made for The International Basic Safety Standards, which have been adopted in Cuba. This paper presents an study of imparted doses for typical head examinations in 10 CT scanners (6 are helical and 3 axial technology). Values of CTDI, CTDIw (weighed) and nCTDIw (weighted and normalized) were calculated. The relation between CTDI at surface and CTDI in the center of the phantom for the highest slice width was calculated for each CT scanner. Others parameters, such as CT number and its special uniformity, noise, contrast scale, sensibility profiles, MTF evaluation, table movement and alignment between lasers and radiation field, have also obtained. These parameters were evaluated by means of the manufacturer's phantom (Siemens). (author)

  8. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, S; Chambers, D B; Lowe, L M; Bontoux, J G

    1999-09-01

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media (water, sediments, and aquatic organisms) of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed (whole body) dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 microGy h(-1). These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations (about 400 microGy h(-1)), and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations (about 100 microGy h(-1)). As a result, chronic levels of radioactivity, artificial and natural, measured in aquatic media downstream of Marcoule are unlikely to result in adverse health impacts on the categories and species of aquatic organisms studied. Thus, based on the screening level analysis discussed in this paper, a more detailed evaluation of the dose rates does not appear to be warranted.

  9. The cost and benefit analysis of a contaminated area remediation: case study of dose level selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauria, D.C.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Without radiological rules, these industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of installations and sites. Depending on the potential hazardous to the environment and public health, the radioactive contaminated sites may require remediation. The extent of the site cleanup is a function of the size, localization, complexity, potential risks and on possible future uses envisioned for the site. Since worker and public health, public anxiety and economics factors are involved; the selection of an appropriate dose level can be quite complicated. This paper discusses the selection of a dose level criterion to remedy a site, which was contaminated by wastes from monazite processing. The site is located in the Sao Paulo city; the most densely populated Brazilian City. In its 60,000 square meters of area, a preliminary survey showed contaminated zones covering an area of 6,500 square meters. In some places, contamination was found below the superficial layer of the soil, being the radionuclide vertical distribution not uniform. The 228 Ra soil activity concentration reached values up to 33,000 Bq/kg while those for 226 Ra reached values up to 6,700 Bq/kg. Based on pathway analysis model and considering both the current land use and a hypothetical residential scenario, the residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil have been derived for dose values of 10 mSv/y (dose level for intervention), 5 mSv/y, 3 mSv/y, 1 mSv/y (dose limit for practices) and 0.3 mSv/y (dose constraint for practices). An optimized value o f annual dose of about 5 mSv/y would be a good option for intervention level, but taking into account the public concern and anxiety, the site location and size, and the remediation costs, it is suggested the

  10. The cost and benefit analysis of a contaminated area remediation: case study of dose level selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauria, D.C. [Instituto de Radioproteccion e Dosimetria- IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Barra de Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro- RJ (Brazil)]. e-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br

    2006-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Without radiological rules, these industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of installations and sites. Depending on the potential hazardous to the environment and public health, the radioactive contaminated sites may require remediation. The extent of the site cleanup is a function of the size, localization, complexity, potential risks and on possible future uses envisioned for the site. Since worker and public health, public anxiety and economics factors are involved; the selection of an appropriate dose level can be quite complicated. This paper discusses the selection of a dose level criterion to remedy a site, which was contaminated by wastes from monazite processing. The site is located in the Sao Paulo city; the most densely populated Brazilian City. In its 60,000 square meters of area, a preliminary survey showed contaminated zones covering an area of 6,500 square meters. In some places, contamination was found below the superficial layer of the soil, being the radionuclide vertical distribution not uniform. The {sup 228} Ra soil activity concentration reached values up to 33,000 Bq/kg while those for {sup 226} Ra reached values up to 6,700 Bq/kg. Based on pathway analysis model and considering both the current land use and a hypothetical residential scenario, the residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil have been derived for dose values of 10 mSv/y (dose level for intervention), 5 mSv/y, 3 mSv/y, 1 mSv/y (dose limit for practices) and 0.3 mSv/y (dose constraint for practices). An optimized value o f annual dose of about 5 mSv/y would be a good option for intervention level, but taking into account the public concern and anxiety, the site location and size, and the remediation costs, it is suggested

  11. Design of shared unit-dose drug distribution network using multi-level particle swarm optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linjie; Monteiro, Thibaud; Wang, Tao; Marcon, Eric

    2018-03-01

    Unit-dose drug distribution systems provide optimal choices in terms of medication security and efficiency for organizing the drug-use process in large hospitals. As small hospitals have to share such automatic systems for economic reasons, the structure of their logistic organization becomes a very sensitive issue. In the research reported here, we develop a generalized multi-level optimization method - multi-level particle swarm optimization (MLPSO) - to design a shared unit-dose drug distribution network. Structurally, the problem studied can be considered as a type of capacitated location-routing problem (CLRP) with new constraints related to specific production planning. This kind of problem implies that a multi-level optimization should be performed in order to minimize logistic operating costs. Our results show that with the proposed algorithm, a more suitable modeling framework, as well as computational time savings and better optimization performance are obtained than that reported in the literature on this subject.

  12. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation on Bcl-2 transcription level of Peyer's patches in mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jiamei; Chen Dong; Zheng Yongchen; Liu Shuzheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of whole body irradiation (WBI) with different doses of X-rays on apoptosis in cells of mouse Peyer's patches and its molecular mechanism. Methods: RT-PCR was used to detect the changes of Bcl-2 transcription level. Agarose electrophoresis and flow cytometry were used to detect the changes of DNA and apoptotic bodies in Peyer's patches after WBI with different doses of X-rays. Results: The apoptotic was increased and Bcl-2 transcription level was decreased in Peyer's patches after 2 Gy X-rays. The apoptotic rate was decreased and Bcl-2 transcription level was increased in Peyer's patches after 75 mGy X-rays. Conclusion: Bcl-2 participates in the regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis in Peyer's patches

  13. Single Enteral Loading Dose of Phenobarbital for Achieving Its Therapeutic Serum Levels in Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turhan, Ali H.; Atici, Aytug; Okuyaz, Cetin; Uysal, Sercan

    2010-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether therapeutic serum drug levels may be achieved with a single enteral loading dose of phenobarbital. Methods The study was performed at the Mersin University Hospital in Turkey between April 2004 and August 2006, and included 29 newborn babies with seizure. After the acute treatment of the seizure with midazolam at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg, phenobarbital was administered by orogastric route at a loading dose of 20 mg/kg. Serum phenobarbital concentrations were measured at 0.5, 3, 6, and 12 hours after the loading. Serum phenobarbital levels between 10-30 μg/mL were considered as the therapeutic range. Results The serum phenobarbital levels reached therapeutic values in 9 (31%), 19 (66%), 21 (72%), and 23 (79%) patients at 0.5, 3, 6, and 12 hours after loading, respectively, while they did not reach therapeutic values in 6 patients (21%) after 12 hours. Four of the patients in whom there was no increase in serum phenobarbital levels had hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusion Enteral loading of phenobarbital can achieve therapeutic serum levels in the large majority of newborn babies with seizure and may be safely used in babies with the intact gastrointestinal tract. PMID:20564764

  14. Radiation dose of aircrews during a solar proton event without ground-level enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kataoka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A significant enhancement of radiation doses is expected for aircrews during ground-level enhancement (GLE events, while the possible radiation hazard remains an open question during non-GLE solar energetic particle (SEP events. Using a new air-shower simulation driven by the proton flux data obtained from GOES satellites, we show the possibility of significant enhancement of the effective dose rate of up to 4.5 μSv h−1 at a conventional flight altitude of 12 km during the largest SEP event that did not cause a GLE. As a result, a new GOES-driven model is proposed to give an estimate of the contribution from the isotropic component of the radiation dose in the stratosphere during non-GLE SEP events.

  15. Preliminary results of measurement of natural environmental radiation levels and doses to population in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qiliang; He Miaoting; Shu Qi

    1985-01-01

    In this paper the preliminary results of measurement of natural environmental radiation levels in China with RSS-111 high pressure ionization chamber and estimated doses to population are reported. A total of 2,723 indoor locales throughout China were measured. The results showed that the average absorbed dose rates in air due to gamma radiation for indoors and outdoors were 11.0 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 and 7.4 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 , respectively, and those due to cosmic rays were 3.2 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 and 3.7 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 , respectively. The annual average effective dose equivalent to population was 919 μSv, including 630 μSv from natural gamma radiation and 289 μSv from cosmic rays

  16. Level of radon and its daughters, and internal exposure doses in Shaanxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Xin; Zhang Yawei; Yu Huilian

    1992-01-01

    About 4500 indoor and outdoor air samples were collected with FDT-84 sampler throughout Shaanxi Province in various seasons, and the concentrations of radon and its daughters in the air were determined with FD-3016 scintillator. Meanwhile, the diurnal, seasonal and altitudinal variation of radon and its progeny in Xi'an area were observed. The annual effective dose equivalent for individual adult resident was estimated to be 1.73 mSv·a -1 and the annual collective effective dose equivalent for the residents- in the whole province was estimated to be 5.09 ± 10 4 man.Sv·a -1 . The concentration levels and the doses are within the range of the data published in UNSCEAR reports in recent years, and all of them are in the normal range of the natural background

  17. Alanine dosimetry at NPL - the development of a mailed reference dosimetry service at radiotherapy dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharpe, P.H.G.; Sephton, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we describe the work that has been carried out at National Physical Laboratory (NPL) to develop a mailed alanine reference dosimetry service for radiotherapy dose levels. The service is based on alanine/paraffin wax dosimeters produced at NPL. Using a data analysis technique based on spectrum fitting, it has been possible to achieve a precision of dose measurement better than ±0.05 Gy (1σ). A phantom set has been developed for use in high energy photon beams, which enables simultaneous irradiation of alanine dosimeters and ionisation chambers in a well defined geometry. Studies in photon beams of energies between 60 Co and 20 MeV have shown no significant energy dependence (<1%) for alanine relative to dose determination using a graphite calorimeter. Work is underway to extend the service to electron beams, and preliminary results are presented on the direct calibration of alanine in electron beams using a graphite calorimeter. (author)

  18. What happens at very low levels of radiation exposure ? Are the low dose exposures beneficial ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniz, Dalji

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Radiation is naturally present in our environment and has been since the birth of this planet. The human population is constantly exposed to low levels of natural background radiation, primarily from environmental sources, and to higher levels from occupational sources, medical therapy, and other human-mediated events. Radiation is one of the best-investigated hazardous agents. The biological effects of ionizing radiation for radiation protection consideration are grouped into two categories: The deterministic and the stochastic ones. Deterministic radiation effects can be clinically diagnosed in the exposed individual and occur when above a certain t hreshold a n appropriately high dose is absorbed in the tissues and organs to cause the death of a large number of cells and consequently to impair tissue or organ functions early after exposure. A clinically observable biological effect (Acute Radiation Sendromes, ARS) occurs days to months after an acute radiation dose. Stochastic radiation effects are the chronic effects of radiation result from relatively low exposure levels delivered over long periods of time. These are sort of effects that might result from occupational exposure, or to the background exposure levels. Such late effects might be the development of malignant (cancerous) disease and of the hereditary consequences. These effects may be observed many years after the radiation exposure. There is a latent period between the initial radiation exposure and the development of the biological effect. For this reason, a stochastic effect is called a Linear or Zero-Threshold (LNT) Dose-Response Effect. There is a stochastic correlation between the number of cases of cancers or genetic defects developed inside a population and the dose received by the population at relatively large levels of radiation. These changes in gene activation seem to be able to modify the response of cells to subsequent radiation exposure, termed the a daptive response

  19. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the health effects of low-level doses of radiation are considered by reference to published epidemiological surveys. The work was carried out with three objectives in mind: 1. to provide a comprehensive and critical review of the subject; 2. to seek consistent indications of particular health effects by collating results and comparing with those from surveys at moderate-level doses; 3. to provide an authoritative view on the epidemiology of low-level radiation-induced health effects. Vol E (DRAFT A) is appended and contains group collation tables. Epidemiological surveys can be conveniently divided into four classes (A, B, C, D) according to the phase of life when irradiation occurs or the effect is diagnosed. The first of the classes (A) is addressed here; this class is concerned with possible effects arising from radiation received by a parent before conception. Possible effects of preconception irradiation were identified under four broad groupings. These are Down's syndrome, ''Indicators of Reproductive Damage'' (mainly Primary Sterility, Congenital Abnormalities, Sex Ratio, Fetal Mortality, Infant Mortality), Childhood Malignancies, and Chromosomal Changes in Abortuses. Information about each survey, and comparisons with results from moderate-level dose surveys, are contained in synopses that are set out in the Appendix. (author)

  20. The effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and species on tissue and blood levels of benzene metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, R.F.; Sabourin, P.J.; Bechtold, W.E.; Griffith, W.C.; Medinsky, M.A.; Birnbaum, L.S.; Lucier, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Studies were completed in F344/N rats and B6C3F 1 mice to determine the effect of dose, dose rate, route of administration, and rodent species on formation of total and individual benzene metabolites. Oral doses of 50 mg/kg or higher saturated the capacity for benzene metabolism in both rats and mice, resulting in an increased proportion of the administered dose being exhaled as benzene. The saturating air concentration for benzene metabolism during 6-hr exposures was between 130 and 900 ppm. At the highest exposure concentration, rats exhaled approximately half of the internal dose retained at the end of the 6-hr exposure as benzene; mice exhaled only 15% as benzene. Mice were able to convert more of the inhaled benzene to metabolites than were rats. In addition, mice metabolized more of the benzene by pathways leading to the putative toxic metabolites, benzoquinone and muconaldehyde, than did rats. In both rats and mice, the effect of increasing dose, administered orally or by inhalation, was to increase the proportion of the total metabolites that were the products of detoxification pathways relative to the products of pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. This indicates low-affinity, high-capacity pathways for detoxification and high-affinity, low-capacity pathways leading to putative toxic metabolites. If the results of rodent studied performed at high doses were used to assess the health risk at low-dose exposures to benzene, the toxicity of benzene would be underestimated

  1. Establishment of institutional diagnostic reference level for computed tomography with automated dose-tracking software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chong R; Chen, Priscilla X H; Kapur, Jeevesh; Ong, Michael K L; Quek, Swee T; Kapur, Subhash C

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish institutional diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) by summarising doses collected across the five computed tomography (CT) system in our institution. CT dose data of 15940 patients were collected retrospectively from May 2015 to October 2015 in five institutional scanners. The mean, 75th percentile and 90th percentile of the dose spread were calculated according to anatomic region. The common CT examinations such as head, chest, combined abdomen/pelvis (A/P), and combined chest/abdomen/pelvis (C/A/P) were reviewed. Distribution of CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP) and effective dose (ED) were extracted from the data for single-phasic and multiphasic examinations. The institutional DRL for our CT units were established as mean (50th percentile) of CTDIvol (mGy), DLP (mGy.cm) and ED (mSv) for single and multiphasic studies using the dose-tracking software. In single phasic examination, Head: (49.0 mGy), (978.0 mGy.cm), (2.4 mSv) respectively; Chest: (6.0 mGy), (254.0 mGy.cm), (4.9 mSv) respectively; CT A/P (10.0 mGy), (514.0 mGy.cm), (8.9 mSv) respectively; CT C/A/P (10.0 mGy), (674.0 mGy.cm), (11.8 mSv) respectively. In multiphasic studies: Head (45.0 mGy), (1822.0 mGy.cm), (5.0 mSv) respectively; Chest (8.0 mGy), (577.0 mGy.cm), (10.0 mSv) respectively; CT A/P: (10.0 mGy), (1153.0 mGy.cm), (20.2 mSv) respectively; CT C/A/P: (11.0 mGy), (1090.0 mGy.cm), (19.2 mSv) respectively. The reported metrics offer a variety of information that institutions can use for quality improvement activities. The variations in dose between scanners suggest a large potential for optimisation of radiation dose. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  2. A comparison of the suitability of patient dosimetry methods for establishing diagnostic dose reference levels and optimisation strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfirtner, Hans; Moores, B. Michael; Stieve, Friedrich E.

    2008-01-01

    For 50 adult patients referred for chest radiography, air kerma at the diaphragm KD, dose area product and entrance skin dose were measured. The air kerma at the diaphragm and the dose area product were determined using Diamentor M4KDK(PTW) which allows measuring air kerma and dose area product simultaneously. For the measurement of entrance skin dose TLDs are used. A 50% variation in dose, incident dose as well as entrance skin dose, was registered for the same patient thickness. The recommendation of ICRP to perform the measurements for DRLs at 'representative patients' and that of the CEC to use 'standard-sized patients' seem to make little sense in the case of chest radiography. It could be demonstrated, that the dose area product is the least appropriate dose quantity for patient measurements and to define dose reference levels. For some radiological examinations like chest, pelvis and lumbar spine the dose area product is even sex dependent. Incident dose and entrance surface dose are of equal quality for patient dose measurements in diagnostic radiography. (author)

  3. Assessment of natural radioactivity concentrations and gamma dose levels around Shorapur, Karnataka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajesh, S.; Avinash, P.; Kerur, B. R., E-mail: kerurpbk@rediffmail.com.com [Department of Physics, Gulbarga University Kalaburagi – 585 106 India (India); Anilkumar, S. [Radiation Safety Systems Division, BARC, Mumbai - 400 085 (India)

    2015-08-28

    This study assesses the level of background radiation around Shorapur. The study region locates the western part of the Yadgir district of Karnataka. Shorapur and Shahapur talukas are mostly composed of clay, shale sandstone, granite rock and part of study area is black soil. Thirty sample locations were selected along the length and breadth of Shorapur and Shahapur taluka. Natural radionuclide activity concentrations in soil samples were determined using 4'X4' NaI (Tl) gamma spectroscopy. Outdoor gamma dose measurements in air at 1 m above ground level were determined using Rad Eye PRD survey meter. Estimated dose values are compared with the survey meter values and found to be good agreement between them and also with the data obtained from different other areas of Karnataka and India. The average values were found to be slightly higher in the present investigation.

  4. Estimation of natural radiation background level and population dose in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe in general the natural radiation background level in China, and based on available data present an estimated annual effective dose equivalent of the population to natural radiation that is some 2.3 mSv, of which about 0.54 mSv is from original γ radiation and about 0.8 mSv from radon and its short-lived daughters

  5. Application of geometry correction factors for low-level waste package dose measurements. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, M.C.; Parish, B.

    1995-01-01

    Plans are to determine the Cs-137 content of low-level waste packages generated in High-Level Waste by measuring the radiation level at a specified distance from the package with a hand-held radiation instrument. The measurement taken at this specified distance, either 3 or 5 feet, is called the far-field measurement. This report documents a method for adjusting the gamma exposure rate (mR/hr) reading used in dose-to-curie determinations when the far-field measurement equals the background reading. This adjustment is necessary to reduce the conservatism resulting from using a minimum detection limit exposure rate for the dose-to-curie determination for the far-field measurement position. To accomplish this adjustment, the near-field (5 cm) measurement is multiplied by a geometry correction factor to obtain an estimate of the far field exposure rate (which is below instrument sensitivity). This estimate of the far field exposure rate is used to estimate the Cs-137 curie content of the package. This report establishes the geometry correction factors for the dose-to-curie determination when the far-field gamma exposure measurement equals the background reading. This report also provides a means of demonstrating compliance to 1S Manual requirements for exposure rate readings at different locations from waste packages while specifying only two measurement positions. This demonstration of compliance is necessary to minimize the number of locations exposure rate measurements that are required, i.e., ALARA

  6. Lowest cost due to highest productivity and highest quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenk, Daniel

    2003-03-01

    Since global purchasing in the automotive industry has been taken up all around the world there is one main key factor that makes a TB-supplier today successful: Producing highest quality at lowest cost. The fact that Tailored Blanks, which today may reach up to 1/3 of a car body weight, are purchased on the free market but from different steel suppliers, especially in Europe and NAFTA, the philosophy on OEM side has been changing gradually towards tough evaluation criteria. "No risk at the stamping side" calls for top quality Tailored- or Tubular Blank products. Outsourcing Tailored Blanks has been starting in Japan but up to now without any quality request from the OEM side like ISO 13919-1B (welding quality standard in Europe and USA). Increased competition will automatically push the quality level and the ongoing approach to combine high strength steel with Tailored- and Tubular Blanks will ask for even more reliable system concepts which enables to weld narrow seams at highest speed. Beside producing quality, which is the key to reduce one of the most important cost driver "material scrap," in-line quality systems with true and reliable evaluation is going to be a "must" on all weld systems. Traceability of all process related data submitted to interfaces according to customer request in combination with ghost-shift-operation of TB systems are tomorrow's state-of-the-art solutions of Tailored Blank-facilities.

  7. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.

    2000-01-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant > for processing and temporary storage of

  8. The evaluation of radiation level and dose of workers in Guangzhou metro line 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Hu Canyun; Meng Xiaolian; He Zhan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out the level of radiation and effective dose of workers in Guangzhou Metro line 1. Methods: In metro stations, external Gamma-ray exposure rates were obtained by FD-71A radiance measurer, 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentrations were obtained by using Rn-Tn solid state nuclear track detectors developed by The National Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Chinese Centre for Disease Control. The annual Effective dose from Gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn were calculated. Results: The external Gamma-ray exposure average rate is 17.74 x 10 -8 Gy/h. The average concentration of 222 Rn is 59.8 Bq/m 3 . The average concentration of 220 Rn is 32.1 Bq/m 3 . The total annual effective dose from Gamma, 222 Rn and 220 Rn is 2.878 mSv/a. Conclusion: In the stations of Guangzhou in metro line 1, no more effective radiation dose to the workers has measured. (authors)

  9. Patient doses in CT examinations in Switzerland: Implementation of national diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treier, R.; Aroua, A.; Verdun, F. R.; Samara, E.; Stuessi, A.; Trueb, P. R.

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were established for 21 indication-based CT examinations for adults in Switzerland. One hundred and seventy-nine of 225 computed tomography (CT) scanners operated in hospitals and private radiology institutes were audited on-site and patient doses were collected. For each CT scanner, a correction factor was calculated expressing the deviation of the measured weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDI) to the nominal weighted CTDI as displayed on the workstation. Patient doses were corrected by this factor providing a realistic basis for establishing national DRLs. Results showed large variations in doses between different radiology departments in Switzerland, especially for examinations of the petrous bone, pelvis, lower limbs and heart. This indicates that the concept of DRLs has not yet been correctly applied for CT examinations in clinical routine. A close collaboration of all stakeholders is mandatory to assure an effective radiation protection of patients. On-site audits will be intensified to further establish the concept of DRLs in Switzerland. (authors)

  10. Establishment of computed tomography reference dose levels in Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Kyrozi, E.; Syrigou, T.; Mastorakou, I.; Kottou, S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to apply European Commission (EC) Reference Dose Levels (RDL) in Computed Tomography (CT) examinations at Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center (OCSC). These are weighted CT Dose Index (CTDI w ) for a single slice and Dose-Length Product (DLP) for a complete examination. During the period 1998-1999, the total number of CT examinations, every type of CT examination, patient related data and technical parameters of the examinations were recorded. The most frequent examinations were chosen for investigation which were the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis. CTDI measurements were performed and CTDI w and DLP were calculated. Third Quartile values of CTDI w were chosen to be 43mGy for head, 8mGy for chest, and 22mGy for abdomen and pelvis examinations. Third quartile values of DLP were chosen to be 740mGycm for head, 370mGycm for chest, 490mGycm for abdomen and 420mGycm for pelvis examination. Results confirm that OCSC follows successfully the proposed RDL for the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis examinations in terms of radiation dose. (author)

  11. Evaluation of multiple scan average dose (MSAD) levels in computerized tomography in Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Thessa C.; Vieira, Leandro de A.; Barbosa, Nayra V.; Oliveira, Jeyselaine R. de; Cesar, Adriana C.Z.; Silva, Teogenes A. da

    2014-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The present study aims to conduct a survey of levels of MSAD of Minas Gerais following the procedures recommended by current Brazilian law. (author)

  12. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong; Zhuang, Jian; Huang, Meiping; Liu, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose"4 and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose"4 levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose"4-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose"4 level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose"4 level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose"4 level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose"4 level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  13. Optimization of hybrid iterative reconstruction level and evaluation of image quality and radiation dose for pediatric cardiac computed tomography angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Lin; Liang, Changhong [Southern Medical University, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Zhuang, Jian [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Cardiac Surgery, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Huang, Meiping [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Catheterization Lab, Guangdong Cardiovascular Inst., Guangdong Provincial Key Lab. of South China Structural Heart Disease, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Hui [Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Dept. of Radiology, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou (China)

    2017-01-15

    Hybrid iterative reconstruction can reduce image noise and produce better image quality compared with filtered back-projection (FBP), but few reports describe optimization of the iteration level. We optimized the iteration level of iDose{sup 4} and evaluated image quality for pediatric cardiac CT angiography. Children (n = 160) with congenital heart disease were enrolled and divided into full-dose (n = 84) and half-dose (n = 76) groups. Four series were reconstructed using FBP, and iDose{sup 4} levels 2, 4 and 6; we evaluated subjective quality of the series using a 5-grade scale and compared the series using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. For FBP and iDose{sup 4}-optimal images, we compared contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE) using a Student's t-test. We also compared diagnostic-accuracy of each group using a Kruskal-Wallis H test. Mean scores for iDose{sup 4} level 4 were the best in both dose groups (all P < 0.05). CNR was improved in both groups with iDose{sup 4} level 4 as compared with FBP. Mean decrease in SSDE was 53% in the half-dose group. Diagnostic accuracy for the four datasets were in the range 92.6-96.2% (no statistical difference). iDose{sup 4} level 4 was optimal for both the full- and half-dose groups. Protocols with iDose{sup 4} level 4 allowed 53% reduction in SSDE without significantly affecting image quality and diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  14. Dose evaluation and establishment of reference levels in activity for nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Julio Cesar de Souza

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has emphasized the importance of accurately determining the mean dose levels, or administered activity, received by the patients for each medical procedure that uses ionizing radiation. However, the number of bibliographic references addressing the need to know and optimize these levels is insufficient, or rather limited, which may lead to non-standardizes techniques, a lack of exposures control, and also the increase of associated radiological risks of these procedures. In this context, a software in Visual Basic® of Microsoft© language was developed whose function is to elaborate a method of obtaining the Reference Levels in Activity (RLA) for nuclear medicine patients by determining the third quartile of the examinations carried out. The program also allows obtaining absorbed dose values in critical organs based on patient specificities as age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI) in order to evaluate the risk involved in each procedure. The main nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures were evaluated through the database of two public hospitals and a private clinic, obtaining the NRAs of each facility, where the software was validated by comparison with the traditionally accepted calculation methods. Due to the results obtained in each installation, in addition to NRA determination, gaps in treatment capacities and unjustified dose variations for the same procedure were identified, indicating the need for optimization. Thus, the developed program is able to provide the estimated values of effective and absorbed doses involved in each procedure, for each patient, providing reference values for nuclear medicine field, not available in the national scenario so far. (author)

  15. Investigation of cortisole levels at exposure to small doses of ionizing radiation at working out and identification of mathematical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yishkhanova, M.A.; Anyipko, O.B.; Myitryajeva, N.A.; Gubs'kij, V.Yi.

    1993-01-01

    The authors report primary data to create the model of animals irradiation in the doses of 0.13 - 1.15 Gy during 0.5 - 42 days. Dependence of blood cortisole level on the dose of irradiation (0.13 - 1.15 Gy) during 0.5 - 1.5 days was determined. The dependence of cortisole level on the doses and the length of the period after the irradiation was found to be a complicated function. Within the dose range of 0.13 - 1.15 Gy during 0.5 -1.5 days cortisole level does not depend on the dose value. The study of influence of the terms duration on cortisole level has showed that within 0.5 - 1.5 days it increases irrespective of the dose of irradiation, and within 4 - 42 days it decreases

  16. The role and impact of reference doses on diagnostic radiology, how to use them at the national level?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikodemova, D.; Horvathova, M.; Karkus, R.

    2003-01-01

    Results of patient dose audits reported in this paper for several types of examinations and various technical units have shown the importance of applications of reference dose levels in radiological practice. On the basis of national surveys slightly lower or higher standard dose reference levels (DRL) values could be justified. Continuing revision of DRL values and their extension to other types of radiographic and fluoroscopic examinations is needed

  17. Developing patient-specific dose protocols for a CT scanner and exam using diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    The management of image quality and radiation dose during pediatric CT scanning is dependent on how well one manages the radiographic techniques as a function of the type of exam, type of CT scanner, and patient size. The CT scanner's display of expected CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) after the projection scan provides the operator with a powerful tool prior to the patient scan to identify and manage appropriate CT techniques, provided the department has established appropriate diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). This paper provides a step-by-step process that allows the development of DRLs as a function of type of exam, of actual patient size and of the individual radiation output of each CT scanner in a department. Abdomen, pelvis, thorax and head scans are addressed. Patient sizes from newborns to large adults are discussed. The method addresses every CT scanner regardless of vendor, model or vintage. We cover adjustments to techniques to manage the impact of iterative reconstruction and provide a method to handle all available voltages other than 120 kV. This level of management of CT techniques is necessary to properly monitor radiation dose and image quality during pediatric CT scans. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Joshua, E-mail: grimes.joshua@mayo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada); Celler, Anna [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  19. Radiation doses in alternative commercial high-level waste management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, K.J.; Pelto, P.J.; Lavender, J.C.; Daling, P.M.; Fecht, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    In the commercial high-level waste management system, potential changes are being considered that will augment the benefits of an integral monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized that alternative options could be implemented in the authorized waste management system (i.e., without an integral MRS facility) to potentially achieve some of the same beneficial effects of the integral MRS system. This paper summarizes those DOE-sponsored analyses related to radiation doses resulting from changes in the waste management system. This report presents generic analyses of aggregated radiation dose impacts to the public and occupational workers, of nine postulated changes in the operation of a spent-fuel management system without an MRS facility

  20. Comparison of predicted versus measured dose rates for low-level radioactive waste cask shipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macher, Martin S.

    1992-01-01

    Shippers of low-level radioactive waste must select casks which will provide sufficient shielding to keep dose rates below the federal limit of 10 mr/hr at 2 meters from the vehicle. Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. uses a cask selection methodology which is based on shielding analysis code predictions with an additional factor of safety applied to compensate for inhomogeneities in the waste, uncertainties in waste characterization, and inaccuracy in the calculational methods. This proven cask selection methodology is explained and suggested factors of safety are presented based on comparisons of predicted and measured dose rates. A safety factor of 2 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively homogeneous waste and a safety factor of between 3 and 4 is shown to be generally appropriate for relatively inhomogeneous wastes. (author)

  1. Dose limits, constraints, reference levels. What does it mean for radiation protection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.

    2016-01-01

    The established concept of radiation protection with its basic principles justification, optimization, and limitation has proved its value and is going to be continued. In its deeper meaning, however, the concept is rather subtle and complex. Furthermore, in some aspects there remain some breaches or inconsistencies. This is just true for the terms dose limit, reference lever, and constraint that are tightly associated with the radiation protection principles. In order to guarantee the ability of radiation protection in whole extent, the subtle differences of meaning have to be communicated. There is a permanent need to defend the conceptual function of these terms against deliberate or undeliberate misinterpretations. Reference levels are definitely not the same as dose limits and they may not be misused as such. Any attempt to misinterpret fundamental radiation protection principles for selfish purposes should discouraged vigorously.

  2. Indoor radon levels and inhalation doses in dwellings near the some sites of Himachal Pradesh, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, S.; Virk, H.S.

    2005-01-01

    In view of the fact that radon and its daughters are a major source of natural radiation exposure, the measurement of radon concentration levels in dwellings has assumed ever-increasing importance. Keeping this in view, the indoor radon level measurements were carried out in the dwellings of different villages known to be located in the vicinity of uranium-mineralized pockets of Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh. Track-etch technique, a passive method using the Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs), LR-115 type II, was utilized for these measurements. An attempt has been made to assess the levels of the indoor radon in the dwellings and inhalation dose rates of the population living in these villages. The radon concentrations were found to be varying with seasonal changes, building materials and mode of construction of houses. The radon concentrations were found to be higher in houses made from local sandstone and with mud floor in comparison to the houses having cemented brick floors. The annual indoor radon concentration and thus annual effective dose in most of the dwellings of these villages is certainly quite higher and even in some of the dwellings it even exceeds the upper limit of the proposed action level of ICRP, 1993. The inhalation dose rates in dwellings of these villages located in the vicinity of uranium mineralized pockets of Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh have been found to be quite higher than dose rate in the dwellings in the Amritsar city, Punjab, which is located in a completely uranium free zone. The radon survey in the dwellings of these villages has also been carried out using the Alpha-Guard technique, which is based on the pulse ionization chamber. The indoor radon concentration levels measured using the active technique of Alpha Guard have been found to be quite different from those measured in these dwellings by the passive technique of SSNTDs; indicating the importance of the SSNTDs in the long-term integrated measurement

  3. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawl, Richard R [ORNL; Scofield, Patricia A [ORNL; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level

  4. Concept for lowest emissions of a hydrogen internal combustion engine; Niedrigstemissionskonzept fuer einen wasserstoffbetriebenen Verbrennungsmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Marcel Christian Thomas

    2012-03-15

    This paper describes a concept with lowest emissions for a hydrogen internal combustion engine for passenger cars. With optimisation of the combustion concept the level of nitrogen oxide is below 90%, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide below 99% of the SULEV target (CARB). This concept enables a potential in power density that is comparable to current supercharged combustion engines at lowest emission level without catalytic aftertreatment. Additionally with a catalytic aftertreatment system, the emission level of a current hydrogen combustion engine (mono-fuel) is lowered to a level, that this car can be labeled as air cleaning vehicle for hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  5. Radon-thoron levels and inhalation dose distribution patterns in India dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, T.V.; Eappen, K.P.; Nair, R.N.; Mayya, Y.S.; Sadasivan, S.

    2003-09-01

    A countrywide survey on radon and thoron levels has been carried out in Indian dwellings under a Coordinated Research Project sponsored by the Board of Research in Nuclear Sciences (BRNS), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE). Eight universities and a few research institutions from different parts of the country participated in this project. Under this project, radon and thoron levels were measured using Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) -spark counter based passive technique. A plastic twin chamber radon -thoron dosimeter was developed and standardized for the survey. This radon-thoron discriminating dosimeter uses three SSNTDs; two of which are exposed in cup modes and the third one is exposed in bare mode. Calibration factors (CF) are obtained for cup and bare mode SSNTDs through controlled experiments in a calibration facility. Calibration factors obtained from experiments showed very good agreement with the calibration factors derived from theoretical models. Four nodal centres were set up each at Kalpakkam, Jodhpur, Jaduguda and Mumbai for calibration and standardization of the dosimeter system. Inter calibration of the dosimeters were also carried out for comparison purpose. Nearly 4500 measurements in about 1400 dwellings were made during the survey period. An analysis of the data shows that the indoor radon gas concentrations at different locations vary between 4.6 and 147.0 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 23.0 Bq.m -3 (GSD 2.61). Indoor thoron gas concentrations, in general, are found to be less than the radon concentrations and vary from 3.6 to 42.8 Bq.m -3 with a geometric mean of 12.2 Bq.m -3 (GSD 3.22). The mean annual inhalation dose rate due to radon, thoron and their progeny in the dwellings is estimated to be 0.97 mSv.y -1 (GSD 2.49). It is observed that the major contribution to the indoor inhalation dose is due to radon and its progeny. However, the contribution due to thoron and its progeny is not trivial as it is about 20 % of the total

  6. Diagnostic Reference Levels for Patient Radiation Doses in Pelvis and Lumbar spine Radiography in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Yong; Lee, Byung Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Hyun Koo; Jung, Seunbg Hwan; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Hyeog Ju; Kim, Dong Sup [Radiation Safety Division National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Pelvis and lumbar spine radiography, among various types of diagnostic radiography, include gonads of the human body and give patients high radiation dose. Nevertheless, diagnostic reference levels for patient radiation dose in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography has not yet been established in Korea. Therefore, the radiation dose that patients receive from pelvis and lumbar radiography is measured and the diagnostic reference level on patient radiation dose for the optimization of radiation protection of patients in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography was established. The conditions and diagnostic imaging information acquired during the time of the postero-anterior view of the pelvis and the postero-anterior and lateral view of the lumbar spine at 125 medical institutions throughout Korea are collected for analysis and the entrance surface dose received by patients is measured using a glass dosimeter. The diagnostic reference levels for patient radiation dose in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography to be recommended to the medical institutes is arranged by establishing the dose from the patient radiation dose that corresponds to the 3rd quartile values as the appropriate diagnostic reference level for patient radiation dose. According to the results of the assessment of diagnostic imaging information acquired from pelvis and lumbar spine radiography and the measurement of patient entrance surface dose taken at the 125 medical institutes throughout Korea, the tube voltage ranged between 60-97 kVp, with the average use being 75 kVp, and the tube current ranged between 8-123 mAs, with the average use being 30 mAs. In the posteroanterior and lateral views of lumbar spine radiography, the tube voltage of each view ranged between 65-100 kVp (average use: 78 kVp) and 70-109 kVp (average use: 87 kVp), respectively, and the tube current of each view ranged between 10-100 mAs(average use: 35 mAs) and between 8.9-300 mAs(average use: 64 mAs), respectively. The measurements of

  7. Diagnostic Reference Levels for Patient Radiation Doses in Pelvis and Lumbar spine Radiography in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kwang Yong; Lee, Byung Young; Lee, Jung Eun; Lee, Hyun Koo; Jung, Seunbg Hwan; Kim, Byung Woo; Kim, Hyeog Ju; Kim, Dong Sup

    2009-01-01

    Pelvis and lumbar spine radiography, among various types of diagnostic radiography, include gonads of the human body and give patients high radiation dose. Nevertheless, diagnostic reference levels for patient radiation dose in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography has not yet been established in Korea. Therefore, the radiation dose that patients receive from pelvis and lumbar radiography is measured and the diagnostic reference level on patient radiation dose for the optimization of radiation protection of patients in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography was established. The conditions and diagnostic imaging information acquired during the time of the postero-anterior view of the pelvis and the postero-anterior and lateral view of the lumbar spine at 125 medical institutions throughout Korea are collected for analysis and the entrance surface dose received by patients is measured using a glass dosimeter. The diagnostic reference levels for patient radiation dose in pelvis and lumbar spine radiography to be recommended to the medical institutes is arranged by establishing the dose from the patient radiation dose that corresponds to the 3rd quartile values as the appropriate diagnostic reference level for patient radiation dose. According to the results of the assessment of diagnostic imaging information acquired from pelvis and lumbar spine radiography and the measurement of patient entrance surface dose taken at the 125 medical institutes throughout Korea, the tube voltage ranged between 60-97 kVp, with the average use being 75 kVp, and the tube current ranged between 8-123 mAs, with the average use being 30 mAs. In the posteroanterior and lateral views of lumbar spine radiography, the tube voltage of each view ranged between 65-100 kVp (average use: 78 kVp) and 70-109 kVp (average use: 87 kVp), respectively, and the tube current of each view ranged between 10-100 mAs(average use: 35 mAs) and between 8.9-300 mAs(average use: 64 mAs), respectively. The measurements of

  8. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-05-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis: assessment with chest CT at chest radiography dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Caroline W; Basten, Ines A; Ilsen, Bart; Buls, Nico; Van Gompel, Gert; De Wachter, Elke; Nieboer, Koenraad H; Verhelle, Filip; Malfroot, Anne; Coomans, Danny; De Maeseneer, Michel; de Mey, Johan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate a computed tomographic (CT) protocol with iterative reconstruction at conventional radiography dose levels for the assessment of structural lung abnormalities in patients with cystic fibrosis ( CF cystic fibrosis ). In this institutional review board-approved study, 38 patients with CF cystic fibrosis (age range, 6-58 years; 21 patients 18 years) underwent investigative CT (at minimal exposure settings combined with iterative reconstruction) as a replacement of yearly follow-up posteroanterior chest radiography. Verbal informed consent was obtained from all patients or their parents. CT images were randomized and rated independently by two radiologists with use of the Bhalla scoring system. In addition, mosaic perfusion was evaluated. As reference, the previous available conventional chest CT scan was used. Differences in Bhalla scores were assessed with the χ(2) test and intraclass correlation coefficients ( ICC intraclass correlation coefficient s). Radiation doses for CT and radiography were assessed for adults (>18 years) and children (chest CT protocol can replace the two yearly follow-up chest radiographic examinations without major dose penalty and with similar diagnostic quality compared with conventional CT.

  10. Radon level and radon effective dose rate determination in Moroccan dwellings using SSNTDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oufni, L.; Misdaq, M.A.; Amrane, M.

    2005-01-01

    Inhalation of radon ( 222 Rn) and its daughter product are a major source of natural radiation exposure. The measurement of radon activity in dwelling is assuming ever increasing importance. It is known from recent surveys in many countries that radon and its progeny contribute significantly to total inhalation dose and it is fairly established that radon when inhaled in large quantity causes lung disorder. Keeping this in view, the indoor radon activity level and radon effective dose rate were carried out in the dwellings of Beni-Mellal, Khouribgra and Ben Guerir cities, Morocco, using the solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) technique. Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 and 0.4 for the equilibrium factor of radon indoors, we found that the 222 Rn effective dose rate in the studied dwellings ranges from 1.01 to 7.90mSvy -1 . The radon activity in the corresponding dwellings was found to vary from 40 to 532Bqm -3 . The radon activity has not only been found to vary with seasonal changes, but also with the age, the construction mode of houses, the ventilation conditions and with specific sites and geological materials

  11. The scientific basis for the establishment of threshold levels and dose response relationships of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency hosted a two day Symposium from 2-3 December 1974 at its Headquarters, organized by the 'International Academy for Environmental Safety and the Forum fur Wissenschaft, Wirtschaft und Politik' on the subject 'Scientific Basis for the Establishment of Threshold. Levels and Dose Response Relationships of Carcinogenesis'. Following an introductory paper by the Radiation Biology Section of the Agency on 'Radiation Carcinogenesis - Dose Response Relationship, Threshold and Risk Estimates', a series of papers dealt with this problem in chemical carcinogenesis.It was suggested that more experiments should be done using non-human primates for tests of carcinogens, especially chemicals. Preliminary experiments using monkeys with a potent carcinogen - nitrosoamine - indicate that there could possibly be a dose where no effect can be observed during the 5 year period of study. It was also pointed out that the overall cost/benefit and risk/ benefit relationships should be taken into consideration in determining limits for chemicals which are potentially carcinogenic but are used routinely by the public and industries; these considerations have been weighed in setting exposure limits for radiation

  12. Lowest order Virtual Element approximation of magnetostatic problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão da Veiga, L.; Brezzi, F.; Dassi, F.; Marini, L. D.; Russo, A.

    2018-04-01

    We give here a simplified presentation of the lowest order Serendipity Virtual Element method, and show its use for the numerical solution of linear magneto-static problems in three dimensions. The method can be applied to very general decompositions of the computational domain (as is natural for Virtual Element Methods) and uses as unknowns the (constant) tangential component of the magnetic field $\\mathbf{H}$ on each edge, and the vertex values of the Lagrange multiplier $p$ (used to enforce the solenoidality of the magnetic induction $\\mathbf{B}=\\mu\\mathbf{H}$). In this respect the method can be seen as the natural generalization of the lowest order Edge Finite Element Method (the so-called "first kind N\\'ed\\'elec" elements) to polyhedra of almost arbitrary shape, and as we show on some numerical examples it exhibits very good accuracy (for being a lowest order element) and excellent robustness with respect to distortions.

  13. Effect of low dose radiation on POMC transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Hong; Liu Shuzheng

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To disclose the changes in mRNA transcription level of POMC in the hypothalamus and immune organs after low dose radiation. Method: In situ hybridization was used to examine the changes of POMC mRNA transcription level in mouse hypothalamus and immune organs following whole body irradiation (WBI) with 75 mGy X-rays. Results: There was a basal expression of POMC mRNA in both the hypothalamus and immune organs. POMC mRNA-positive neutron were located in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus. WBI with 75 mGy X-rays could significantly down-regulate the POMC transcription level that was remarkable within 1h and remained low in the observation period of 12h. POMC transcription level in mouse immune organs increased with time within 8h after irradiation and then began to decrease but still remained at a higher than normal level. The changes of POMC transcription level were more marked in the spleen than in other immune organs. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the immediate decrease of POMC transcription level in the hypothalamus might be the direct cause of the down-regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenocortical axis after WBI with 75 mGy X-rays, accompanied with an increase in POMC transcription in immune organs

  14. Some problems in the action level and dose assesment of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    2007-01-01

    In the recent past, remarkable progresses has been made in radon epidemiological investigation for human populations, with the radon-induced excess relative risk being 0.16%/100 Bq m -3 . It should be noted, for implementing radon action standards, that the action levels are differently implicated for population dwellings and workplaces. The dose limits and the derived air concentration are provided for the individuals, both of which can not be used as the main basis for con- trolling workplaces (sources). The controlling of radon concentrations should be based primarily on radiation protection optimization and constraints. (authors)

  15. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses. Annual report 2014; Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung. Jahresbericht 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef (comps.) [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    The annual report 2014 on ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses covers the following topics: (1) Actual data and their evaluation: natural environmental radioactivity, artificial environmental radioactivity, occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposures from medical applications, handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation. (2) Fundamentals and general information: legal basis and explanations, basic information on natural environmental radioactivity, basic information on artificial radioactivity in the environment, basic information on occupational radiation exposure, basic information on radiation exposures from medical applications, basic information on the handling of radioactive materials and sources of ionizing radiation, basic information on non-ionizing radiation. (3) Tables.

  16. Levels of daily light doses under changed day-night cycles regulate temporal segregation of photosynthesis and N2 Fixation in the cyanobacterium Trichodesmium erythraeum IMS101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaoni; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-01-01

    While the diazotrophic cyanobacterium Trichodesmium is known to display inverse diurnal performances of photosynthesis and N2 fixation, such a phenomenon has not been well documented under different day-night (L-D) cycles and different levels of light dose exposed to the cells. Here, we show differences in growth, N2 fixation and photosynthetic carbon fixation as well as photochemical performances of Trichodesmium IMS101 grown under 12L:12D, 8L:16D and 16L:8D L-D cycles at 70 μmol photons m-2 s-1 PAR (LL) and 350 μmol photons m-2 s-1 PAR (HL). The specific growth rate was the highest under LL and the lowest under HL under 16L:8D, and it increased under LL and decreased under HL with increased levels of daytime light doses exposed under the different light regimes, respectively. N2 fixation and photosynthetic carbon fixation were affected differentially by changes in the day-night regimes, with the former increasing directly under LL with increased daytime light doses and decreased under HL over growth-saturating light levels. Temporal segregation of N2 fixation from photosynthetic carbon fixation was evidenced under all day-night regimes, showing a time lag between the peak in N2 fixation and dip in carbon fixation. Elongation of light period led to higher N2 fixation rate under LL than under HL, while shortening the light exposure to 8 h delayed the N2 fixation peaking time (at the end of light period) and extended it to night period. Photosynthetic carbon fixation rates and transfer of light photons were always higher under HL than LL, regardless of the day-night cycles. Conclusively, diel performance of N2 fixation possesses functional plasticity, which was regulated by levels of light energy supplies either via changing light levels or length of light exposure.

  17. Cumulative effective and individual organ dose levels in paediatric patients undergoing multiple catheterizations for congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.P.; Brennan, P.C.; Ryan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the cumulative radiation dose levels received by a group of children who underwent multiple cardiac catheterisation procedures during the investigation and management of congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose is to calculate cumulative doses, identify higher dose individuals, outline the inconsistencies with risk assessment and encourage the establishment of dose databases in order to facilitate the longitudinal research necessary to better understand health risks. A retrospective review of patient records for 117 paediatric patients who have undergone two or more cardiac catheterizations for the investigation of CHD was undertaken. This cohort consisted of patients who were catheterised over a period from September 2002 to August 2014. The age distribution was from newborn to 17 y. Archived kerma-area product (P KA ) and fluoroscopy time (T) readings were retrieved and analysed. Cumulative effective and individual organ doses were determined. The cumulative P KA levels ranged from 1.8 to 651.2 Gycm 2 , whilst cumulative effective dose levels varied from 2 to 259 mSv. The cumulative fluoroscopy time was shown to vary from 8.1 to 193.5 min. Median cumulative organ doses ranged from 3 to 94 mGy. Cumulative effective dose levels are highly variable but may exceed 250 mSv. Individual organ and effective dose measurements remain useful for comparison purposes between institutions although current methodologies used for determining lifetime risks are inadequate. (authors)

  18. Effect of low level doses of fast neutrons on the activity of the snake venom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanafy, Magda S.; Amin, Aida M.

    1998-01-01

    In this work, the effect of low level doses of fast neutrons from 252 Cf on snake venom (Cerastes cerastes) was studied through measurements of biophysical and haematological changes. The absorption spectrum (200-700 nm) of haemoglobin (Hb) collected from the blood of rats after 3 and 24 hours post injection with irradiated and non-irradiated snake venom with neutron fluences of 3x10 6 , 2.8x10 7 and 3X10 8 n/cm 2 was measured. The results indicated that injection of animals with either non- irradiated or irradiated venom ( with different neutron fluences) resulted into the decrease of the absorption band intensities of Hb. These changes in the properties of the characteristic band showed to be a marker for irradiated venom and is dose dependent. It was concluded that neutron irradiation of the venom leads to the decrease of its toxicity and, consequently, to the increase of the chance of repair mechanism in livings. Obvious changes of most haematological erythrocytic values of Hb, packed cell volume (PCV), red blood counts (RBC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCHb) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were observed in the blood of the rats injected with non-irradiated venom (as a first group) and those injected with the irradiated venom (as a second group). The microcytic haemolytic anemia was more acute in the first group than in the second one which showed lesser extent. It is concluded from this study that low level doses of fast neutrons could postpone and lower acute haematological action induced by the venom. (authors)

  19. Air Pathway Dose Modeling for the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Minter, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-06

    Dose-release factors (DRFs) were calculated for potential atmospheric releases of several radionuclides from the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF). The ELLWF receives solid low-level radioactive waste from across the Savannah River Site (SRS) and offsite for disposal. These factors represent the maximum dose a receptor would receive if standing at either 100 m or 11,410 m (Site Boundary) from the edge of an ELLWF disposal unit which are points of assessment (POA) for Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 performance assessments (PA). The DRFs were calculated for 1 Ci of the specified radionuclide being released from the ground surface to the atmosphere (mrem per curie released). The calculation conservatively represented the ELLWF as a point source, and conservatively assumed the receptor was positioned at the center of the contaminant plume and continuously exposed for a period of one year. These DRFs can be refined to take into consideration disposal unit size, proximity and timing of peak dose to establish less conservative radionuclide specific disposal limits. DRFs were calculated for H-3 and C-14 in Revision 0 of this report. H-3 as HTO and C-14 as CO2 were identified as volatile radionuclides of potential concern in earlier radionuclide screening studies. In Revision 1, DRFs were calculated for eight additional radionuclides identified by an updated screening analysis as potentially important volatile radionuclides. These include Ar-37, Ar-39, Ar-42, Hg-194, Hg- 203, Kr-81, Kr-85, and Xe-127.

  20. 48 CFR 47.306-2 - Lowest overall transportation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation costs. 47.306-2 Section 47.306-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.306-2 Lowest overall transportation costs. (a) For the evaluation of offers, the transportation officer shall give to the contracting...

  1. Is action potential threshold lowest in the axon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, Maarten H. P.; Stuart, Greg J.

    2008-01-01

    Action potential threshold is thought to be lowest in the axon, but when measured using conventional techniques, we found that action potential voltage threshold of rat cortical pyramidal neurons was higher in the axon than at other neuronal locations. In contrast, both current threshold and voltage

  2. Critical reevaluation of the dose-response relationships for carcinogenic effects of low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    In recent decades, it has been customary, for radiation protection purposes, to assume that the overall risk of radiation-induced cancer increases as a linear-nonthreshold function of the dose. The existing data do not exclude the existence of a threshold, however, and the dose-response relationship is known to vary, depending on the type of cancer in queation, the dose, dose rate, and LET of the radiation, the age, sex, and physiological state of the exposed individuals, and other variables, including the potential influence of adaptive responses and bystander effects at low doses. In light of advncing knowledge, therefore, the dose-response relationship for carcinogenic effects of low-level radiation has been reevaluated periodically by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the International Commission of Radiological Protection, the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and other organizations. The most recent such reviews have generally found the weight of evidence to suggest that lesions which are precursors to cancer (i.e., mutations and chromosome aberrations), and certain types of cancer as well, may increase in frequency linearly with the dose in the low-dose domain. On this basis, it is concluded that no alternative dose-response model for the carcinogenic effects of low-level radiation is more plausible than the linear-nonthreshold model, although other dose-response relationships cannot be excluded. (authors)

  3. Correlation between radon level and confounders of cancer. A note on epidemiological inference at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajnal, M.A.; Toth, E.; Hamori, K.; Minda, M.; Koteles, Gy.J.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective. The aim of this study was to examine and further clarify the extent of radon and progeny induced carcinogenesis, both separated from and combined with other confounders and health risk factors. This work was financed by National Development Agency, Hungary, with GVOP-3.1.1.-2004-05-0384/3.0. Methods. A case-control study was conducted in a Hungarian countryside region where the proportion of houses with yearly average radon level above 200 Bq.m -3 was estimated to be higher than 20% by our preceding regional surveys. Radon levels were measured with CR39 closed etched detectors for three seasons separately yielding yearly average by estimating the low summer level. The detectors were placed in the bedrooms, where people were expected to spend one third of a day. 520 patients with diagnosed cancers were included in these measurements, amongst which 77 developed lung or respiratory cancers. The control group consisted 6333 individuals, above 30 years of age. Lifestyle risk factors of cancers were collected by surveys including social status, pollution from indoor heating, smoking and alcohol history, nutrition, exercise and mental health index 5. Except smoking and alcohol habits, these cofactors were only available for the control group. Comparing disease occurrences the authors selected the multivariate generalised linear models. The case and control proportions along a given factor are binomially distributed, thus the logit link function was used. For radon both log and linear terms were probed for. Results. Many known health confounders of cancers correlated with radon levels, with an estimated total net increase of 50-150 Bq m -3 with increased risks. For lung cancers the model with the terms radon, age, gender and smoking was found to have the lowest Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Heavy dependency on age, gender and smoking contribute largely to observed lung cancer incidence. However log linear relationship

  4. [Electroconvulsive therapy and level of evidence: From causality to dose-effect relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Quilès, C; Cermolacce, M; Belzeaux, R; Adida, M; Fakra, E; Azorin, J-M

    2016-12-01

    The first objective of this article is to summarize the history of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in psychiatry in order to highlight the transition from clinical level of evidence based on phenomenological descriptions to controlled trial establishing causal relationship. The second objective is to apply the criteria of causation for ECT, to focus on the dose-effect relationship criteria, and thus to analyze the conditions of application of these criteria for ECT. A literature review exploring the use of electricity, ECT and electroencephalography (EEG) in psychiatry was conducted. The publications were identified from the Pubmed and GoogleScholar electronic databases. The scientific literature search of international articles was performed in July 2016. In 1784, a Royal commission established in France by King Louis XVI tested Mesmer's claims concerning animal magnetism. By doing that, the commission, including such prominent scientists as the chemist Anton Lavoisier and the scientist and researcher on electricity and therapeutics Benjamin Franklin, played a central role in establishing the criteria needed to assess the level of evidence of electrical therapeutics in psychiatry. Surprisingly, it is possible to identify the classical Bradford Hill criteria of causation in the report of the commission, except the dose-effect relationship criteria. Since then, it has been conducted blinded randomized controlled trials that confirmed the effectiveness of ECT against ECT placebos for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. At present, the dose-effect relationship criteria can be analyzed through an EEG quality assessment of ECT-induced seizures. EEG quality assessment includes several indices: TSLOW (time to onset of seizure activity ≤5Hz, seconds), peak mid-ictal amplitude (mm), regularity (intensity or morphology of the seizure (0-6)), stereotypy (global seizure patterning, 0-3) and post-ictal suppression (0-3). A manual rating sheet is needed to score theses

  5. Optimal dose levels in screening chest CT for unimpaired detection and volumetry of lung nodules, with and without computer assisted detection at minimal patient radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Christe

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this phantom study was to minimize the radiation dose by finding the best combination of low tube current and low voltage that would result in accurate volume measurements when compared to standard CT imaging without significantly decreasing the sensitivity of detecting lung nodules both with and without the assistance of CAD. METHODS: An anthropomorphic chest phantom containing artificial solid and ground glass nodules (GGNs, 5-12 mm was examined with a 64-row multi-detector CT scanner with three tube currents of 100, 50 and 25 mAs in combination with three tube voltages of 120, 100 and 80 kVp. This resulted in eight different protocols that were then compared to standard CT sensitivity (100 mAs/120 kVp. For each protocol, at least 127 different nodules were scanned in 21-25 phantoms. The nodules were analyzed in two separate sessions by three independent, blinded radiologists and computer-aided detection (CAD software. RESULTS: The mean sensitivity of the radiologists for identifying solid lung nodules on a standard CT was 89.7% ± 4.9%. The sensitivity was not significantly impaired when the tube and current voltage were lowered at the same time, except at the lowest exposure level of 25 mAs/80 kVp [80.6% ± 4.3% (p = 0.031]. Compared to the standard CT, the sensitivity for detecting GGNs was significantly lower at all dose levels when the voltage was 80 kVp; this result was independent of the tube current. The CAD significantly increased the radiologists' sensitivity for detecting solid nodules at all dose levels (5-11%. No significant volume measurement errors (VMEs were documented for the radiologists or the CAD software at any dose level. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest a CT protocol with 25 mAs and 100 kVp is optimal for detecting solid and ground glass nodules in lung cancer screening. The use of CAD software is highly recommended at all dose levels.

  6. Absorbed dose in CT. Comparison by CT dose index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kenji; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Andou, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    Few reports have discussed the absorbed dose on CT units with increased scanning capacity even with the current widespread adoption of multi-slice CT units. To compare and investigate the dose indexes among CT units, we measured the absorbed dose on CT units operating in Nagano Prefecture Japan. The measurements showed proportionality between phantom absorbed dose and the exposured mAs values in conventional scanning operation. Further, the measurements showed that the absorbed dose in the center of the phantom differed by about 2.1-fold between the highest and lowest levels on individual CT units. Within a single company, multi-slice CT units of the same company gave absorbed doses of about 1.3 to 1.5 times those of conventional single-slice CT units under the same exposured conditions of conventional scanning. When the scanning pitch was reduced in helical scanning, the absorbed dose at the center of the phantom increased. (author)

  7. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly H.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  8. Patient dose measurements in fluoroscopic examinations, aiming to the establishment of reference levels in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canevaro, L.; Drexler, G.

    2001-01-01

    This work was performed to investigate the actual exposure levels of the patients submitted to fluoroscopic procedures in diagnostic radiology. The data will be useful for a baseline in the establishment of local reference levels for fluoroscopic procedures, as recommended by the European Commission and IAEA. At present time there are no internationally accepted definitions for references levels for fluoroscopic complex procedures. Dose-area product (DAP) meters were employed in a pilot survey expressing the radiation exposures in terms of this quantity. This class of instrumentation has not yet been employed in Brazil. Parameters recorded were radiographic technique, fluoroscopy time, number of images, fluoroscopic and radiographic field sizes and DAPs. For fluoroscopy practice, a reference parameters set is recommended, instead of one diagnostic reference level. High patient exposures were found, calling for joined actions of health authorities, physicians, medical physicists, technicians and manufacturers. Monitoring of patient exposure, optimizing the radiation protection and establishing quantitative assessments of the exposition to the population in Brazil in this kind of procedure is important. (author)

  9. Dose estimation for nuclear power plant 4 accident in Taiwan at Fukushima nuclear meltdown emission level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Mei-Ling; Tsuang, Ben-Jei; Kuo, Pei-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    An advanced Gaussian trajectory dispersion model is used to evaluate the evacuation zone due to a nuclear meltdown at the Nuclear Power Plant 4 (NPP4) in Taiwan, with the same emission level as that occurred at Fukushima nuclear meltdown (FNM) in 2011. Our study demonstrates that a FNM emission level would pollute 9% of the island's land area with annual effective dose ≥50 mSv using the meteorological data on 11 March 2011 in Taiwan. This high dose area is also called permanent evacuation zone (denoted as PEZ). The PEZ as well as the emergency-planning zone (EPZ) are found to be sensitive to meteorological conditions on the event. In a sunny day under the dominated NE wind conditions, the EPZ can be as far as 100 km with the first 7-day dose ≥20 mSv. Three hundred sixty-five daily events using the meteorological data from 11 March 2011 to 9 March 2012 are evaluated. It is found that the mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the PEZ is 11%. Especially, the probabilities of the northern counties/cities (Keelung, New Taipei, Taipei, Taoyuan, Hsinchu City, Hsinchu County and Ilan County) to be PEZs are high, ranging from 15% in Ilan County to 51% in Keelung City. Note that the total population of the above cities/counties is as high as 10 million people. Moreover, the western valleys of the Central Mountain Range are also found to be probable being PEZs, where all of the reservoirs in western Taiwan are located. For example, the probability can be as high as 3% in the far southern-most tip of Taiwan Island in Pingtung County. This shows that the entire populations in western Taiwan can be at risk due to the shortage of clean water sources under an event at FNM emission level, especially during the NE monsoon period. - Highlights: • An advanced Gaussian-type trajectory model to evaluate the evacuation zone at Nuclear Power Plant 4 in Taiwan. • Mean land area of Taiwan in becoming the permanent evacuation zone is 11%. • The probabilities of the northern

  10. Patient dose audit of the most frequent radiographic examinations and the proposed local diagnostic reference levels in southwestern Nigeria: Imperative for dose optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Jibiri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostic reference levels (DRLs is a veritable tool for dose optimisation and patient protection in diagnostic radiology. However, it is essential to have information on the local situation especially in a large hospital with several units or a cluster of healthcare centres within a geographical region with several X-ray units. In the present study, entrance surface doses (ESDs were measured in twelve (12 healthcare centres consisting of 15 radiological units using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs. Seven radiological procedures such as; chest PA, abdomen AP, pelvis AP, lumbar spine AP, skull AP, knee AP, and hand AP frequently carried out in Nigeria were included in the study, and their local diagnostic reference levels (LDRLs were determined. The values of the determined LDRLs were compared with established NDRLs in UK, US, Slovenia, Italy and Brazil. The LDRLs determined in the two groups (healthcare centres studied ranged from 1.78 to 3.01, 2.71 to 2.84, 2.11 to 3.79, 3.93 to 8.79, 1.06 to 1.73 and 1.10 to 1.44 mGy for chest PA, pelvis AP, lumbar spine AP, skull AP, knee AP and hand AP respectively. Large variations were found among the X-ray units studied even within the same centre. Entrance surface doses obtained in pelvis AP and lumbar spine AP in both GROUP A and were found to be lower than the NRPB-HPA 2010 review for UK, while in all other five examinations, value of the measured entrance surface dose (ESD are higher than the doses reported in the UK review. The relative higher doses found in the study are attributable to higher tube load (mAs used and indicative of the need for dose optimisation in Nigerian radiological practice.

  11. Derivation of a reference dose and drinking water equivalent level for 1,2,3-trichloropropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiff, Robert G; Carson, M Leigh

    2010-06-01

    In some US potable water supplies, 1,2,3-trichloropropane (TCP) has been present at ranges of non-detect to less than 100 ppb, resulting from past uses. In subchronic oral studies, TCP produced toxicity in kidneys, liver, and other tissues. TCP administered by corn oil gavage in chronic studies produced tumors at multiple sites in rats and mice; however, interpretation of these studies was impeded by substantial premature mortality. Drinking water equivalent levels (DWELs) were estimated for a lifetime of consumption by applying biologically-based safety/risk assessment approaches, including Monte Carlo techniques, and with consideration of kinetics and modes of action, to possibly replace default assumptions. Internationally recognized Frameworks for human relevance of animal data were employed to interpret the findings. Calculated were a reference dose (=39 microg/kg d) for non-cancer and Cancer Values (CV) (=10-14 microg/kg d) based on non-linear dose-response relationships for mutagenicity as a precursor of cancer. Lifetime Average Daily Intakes (LADI) are 3130 and 790-1120 microg/person-d for non-cancer and cancer, respectively. DWELs, estimated by applying a relative source contribution (RSC) of 50% to the LADIs, are 780 and 200-280 microg/L for non-cancer and cancer, respectively. These DWELs may inform establishment of formal/informal guidelines and standards to protect public health. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The ground level event 70 on december 13, 2006 and related effective doses at aviation altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthia, D.; Heber, B.; Reitz, G.; Sihver, L.; Berger, T.; Meier, M.

    2009-01-01

    The 70. ground level event in the records of the Neutron Monitor network occurred on 13 December 2006 reaching a maximum count rate increase at the Oulu station of more than 90% during the 5 min interval 3.05-3.10 UTC. Thereafter, count rates gradually decreased registering increases of a few per cent above the galactic cosmic ray background after a few hours. The primary proton spectrum during the first 6 h after the onset of the event is characterised in this work by fitting the energy and angular distribution by a power law in rigidity and a linear dependence in the pitch angle using a minimisation technique. The results were obtained by analysing the data from 28 Neutron Monitor stations. At very high northern and southern latitudes, the effective dose rates were estimated to reach values of 25-30 μSv h -1 at atmospheric depth of 200 g cm -2 during the maximum of the event. The increase in effective dose during north atlantic and polar flights was estimated to be in the order of 20%. (authors)

  13. A biological basis for the linear non-threshold dose-response relationship for low-level carcinogen exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    This chapter examines low-level dose-response relationships in terms of the two-stage mouse tumorigenesis model. Analyzes the feasibility of the linear non-threshold dose-response model which was first adopted for use in the assessment of cancer risks from ionizing radiation and more recently from chemical carcinogens. Finds that both the interaction of B(a)P with epidermal DNA of the mouse skin and the dose-response relationship for the initiation stage of mouse skin tumorigenesis showed a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship. Concludes that low level exposure to environmental carcinogens has a linear non-threshold dose-response relationship with the carcinogen acting as an initiator and the promoting action being supplied by the factors that are responsible for the background cancer rate in the target tissue

  14. Excitation of lowest electronic states of thymine by slow electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, I. V.; Kontros, E. J.; Markush, P. P.; Shpenik, O. B.

    2013-11-01

    Excitation of lowest electronic states of the thymine molecules in the gas phase is studied by elec- tron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition to dipole-allowed transitions to singlet states, transitions to the lowest triplet states were observed. The low-energy features of the spectrum at 3.66 and 4.61 eV are identified with the excitation of the first triplet states 13 A' (π → π*) and 13 A″ ( n → π*). The higher-lying features at 4.96, 5.75, 6.17, and 7.35 eV are assigned mainly to the excitation of the π → π* transitions to the singlet states of the molecule. The excitation dynamics of the lowest states is studied. It is found that the first triplet state 13 A'(π → π*) is most efficiently excited at a residual energy close to zero, while the singlet 21 A'(π → π*) state is excited with almost identical efficiency at different residual energies.

  15. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.). IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v.) prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical) given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. PMID:22114930

  16. Increased interleukin-1β levels following low dose MDMA induces tolerance against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by challenge MDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayado Andrea

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preconditioning is a phenomenon by which tolerance develops to injury by previous exposure to a stressor of mild severity. Previous studies have shown that single or repeated low dose MDMA can attenuate 5-HT transporter loss produced by a subsequent neurotoxic dose of the drug. We have explored the mechanism of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA. Methods Male Dark Agouti rats were given low dose MDMA (3 mg/kg, i.p. 96 h before receiving neurotoxic MDMA (12.5 mg/kg, i.p.. IL-1β and IL1ra levels and 5-HT transporter density in frontal cortex were quantified at 1 h, 3 h or 7 days. IL-1β, IL-1ra and IL-1RI were determined between 3 h and 96 h after low dose MDMA. sIL-1RI combined with low dose MDMA or IL-1β were given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA and toxicity assessed 7 days later. Results Pretreatment with low dose MDMA attenuated both the 5-HT transporter loss and elevated IL-1β levels induced by neurotoxic MDMA while producing an increase in IL-1ra levels. Low dose MDMA produced an increase in IL-1β at 3 h and in IL-1ra at 96 h. sIL-1RI expression was also increased after low dose MDMA. Coadministration of sIL-1RI (3 μg, i.c.v. prevented the protection against neurotoxic MDMA provided by low dose MDMA. Furthermore, IL-1β (2.5 pg, intracortical given 96 h before neurotoxic MDMA protected against the 5-HT neurotoxicity produced by the drug, thus mimicking preconditioning. Conclusions These results suggest that IL-1β plays an important role in the development of delayed preconditioning by low dose MDMA.

  17. Serum Creatinine Versus Plasma Methotrexate Levels to Predict Toxicities in Children Receiving High-dose Methotrexate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Priya; Thomas, M K; Pathania, Subha; Dhawan, Deepa; Gupta, Y K; Vishnubhatla, Sreenivas; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Facilities for measuring methotrexate (MTX) levels are not available everywhere, potentially limiting administration of high-dose methotrexate (HDMTX). We hypothesized that serum creatinine alteration after HDMTX administration predicts MTX clearance. Overall, 122 cycles in 50 patients of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or acute lymphoblastic leukemia aged ≤18 years receiving HDMTX were enrolled prospectively. Plasma MTX levels were measured at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours; serum creatinine was measured at baseline, 24, 48, and 72 hours. Correlation of plasma MTX levels with creatinine levels and changes in creatinine from baseline (Δ creatinine) were evaluated. Plasma MTX levels at 72 hours showed positive correlation with serum creatinine at 48 hours (P = .011) and 72 hours (P = .013) as also Δ creatinine at 48 hours (P = .042) and 72 hours (P = .045). However, cut-off value of either creatinine or Δ creatinine could not be established to reliably predict delayed MTX clearance. Greater than 50% Δ creatinine at 48 and 72 hours significantly predicted grade 3/4 leucopenia (P = .036 and P = .001, respectively) and thrombocytopenia (P = .012 and P = .009, respectively) but not mucositis (P = .827 and P = .910, respectively). Delayed MTX elimination did not predict any grade 3/4 toxicity. In spite of demonstration of significant correlation between serum creatinine and Δ creatinine with plasma MTX levels at 72 hours, cut-off value of either variable to predict MTX delay could not be established. Thus, either of these cannot be used as a surrogate for plasma MTX estimation. Interestingly, Δ creatinine effectively predicted hematological toxicities, which were not predicted by delayed MTX clearance.

  18. Dose-Response of High-Intensity Training (HIT) on Atheroprotective miRNA-126 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Boris; Schelleckes, Katrin; Nedele, Johanna; Thorwesten, Lothar; Klose, Andreas; Lenders, Malte; Krüger, Michael; Brand, Eva; Brand, Stefan-Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aim: MicroRNA-126 (miR-126) exerts beneficial effects on vascular integrity, angiogenesis, and atherosclerotic plaque stability. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the dose-response relationship of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on miR-126-3p and -5p levels. Methods: Sixty-one moderately trained individuals (females = 31 [50.8%]; 22.0 ± 1.84 years) were consecutively recruited and allocated into three matched groups using exercise capacity. During a 4-week intervention a HIIT group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out), a progressive HIIT (proHIIT) group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out) with one extra session every week (up to 7 × 30 s) and a low-intensity training (LIT) control group performed three exercise sessions/week for 25 min HIIT groups (after 4 min of high-intensity running). After the intervention, the LIT group presented an increase in miR-126-3p, while in the HIIT group, miR-126-3p levels were still reduced (all p HIIT (−1.05 ± 2.6 units). Conclusions: LIT and proHIIT may be performed to increase individual miR-126 levels. HIIT without progression was less effective in increasing miR-126. PMID:28611681

  19. Radioactive levels and doses of 3H and 14C in white spirits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, G.

    1992-01-01

    'Full Text:' White (and yeast) spirits is a general name for strong alcoholic beverages in China. The paper reports levels and doses of 3 H and 14 C in 65 spirits samples between 1986 and 1987. Experiments were made by measuring end analyzing each sample, using a low background liquid scintillation spectrometer. Radioactive levels of 65 spirits samples are as follows: Variant range of 3 H activity is 98.2 - 170.6Bq.dm -3 and its average is 149.2 ± 17.3Bq.dm -3 ; Variant range of 14 C activity is 38.8-80.2Bq.dm -3 and its average is 57.4±8.2Bq.dm -3 . If the man drinks 200cm 3 of spirits daily, the annual dose equivalents will be 0.19uSv of 3 H and 2.5uSv of 14 C . In ordinary strong alcoholic beverages that contain 57-60% alcohol, the mean 3 H and 14 C activities are 153.8Bq.dm -3 and 60.3Bq.dm -3 , respectively, but in spirits of lower alcoholic content (38-40%), the mean 3H activity is 114.6Bq.dm -3 , that is 25.5% less than ordinary spirits, and the mean 14 C activity is 46.1Bq.dm -3 , that is 23.5% less than ordinary spirits. We compared the 3 H and 14 C contents of five kinds of staple grains from both Sichuan and Guangdong provinces. We learned that the level of activity in spirits is ten times higher than in grains and water, and the level of 14 C activity in spirits is equivalent to that in grains. White spirits has fully concentrated 3 H and 14 C from both grain and water, and activities increase with increasing alcoholic content. 3 H in spirits probably is averaged from both water and grain, and 14 C is averaged mostly from grain. (author)

  20. Mixing of the lowest-lying qqq configurations with JP =1/2- in different hyperfine interaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; An, Chunsheng; Chen, Hong

    2018-02-01

    We investigate mixing of the lowest-lying qqq configurations with JP = 1/2- caused by the hyperfine interactions between quarks mediated by Goldstone Boson Exchange, One Gluon Exchange, and both Goldstone Boson and One Gluon exchange, respectively. The first orbitally excited nucleon, Σ, Λ and Ξ states are considered. Contributions of both the contact term and tensor term are taken into account. Our numerical results show that mixing of the studied configurations in the two employed hyperfine interaction models are very different. Therefore, the present results, which should affect the strong and electromagnetic decays of baryon resonances, may be used to examine the present employed hyperfine interaction models. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11675131,11645002), Chongqing Natural Science Foundation (cstc2015jcyjA00032) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (SWU115020)

  1. Diagnostic reference levels for common computed tomography (CT) examinations: results from the first Nigerian nationwide dose survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpo, Ernest U; Adejoh, Thomas; Akwo, Judith D; Emeka, Owujekwe C; Modu, Ali A; Abba, Mohammed; Adesina, Kudirat A; Omiyi, David O; Chiegwu, Uche H

    2018-01-29

    To explore doses from common adult computed tomography (CT) examinations and propose national diagnostic reference levels (nDRLs) for Nigeria. This retrospective study was approved by the Nnamdi Azikiwe University and University Teaching Hospital Institutional Review Boards (IRB: NAUTH/CS/66/Vol8/84) and involved dose surveys of adult CT examinations across the six geographical regions of Nigeria and Abuja from January 2016 to August 2017. Dose data of adult head, chest and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations were extracted from patient folders. The median, 75th and 25th percentile CT dose index volume (CTDI vol ) and dose-length-product (DLP) were computed for each of these procedures. Effective doses (E) for these examinations were estimated using the k conversion factor as described in the ICRP publication 103 (E DLP  =  k × DLP ). The proposed 75th percentile CTDI vol for head, chest, and abdomen/pelvis are 61 mGy, 17 mGy, and 20 mGy, respectively. The corresponding DLPs are 1310 mGy.cm, 735 mGy.cm, and 1486 mGy.cm respectively. The effective doses were 2.75 mSv (head), 10.29 mSv (chest), and 22.29 mSv (abdomen/pelvis). Findings demonstrate wide dose variations within and across centres in Nigeria. The results also show CTDI vol comparable to international standards, but considerably higher DLP and effective doses.

  2. Low dose multi-detector CT of the chest (iLEAD Study): Visual ranking of different simulated mAs levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Krummenauer, Frank; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Detailed evaluation of the lung parenchyma might be impaired by use of low dose CT as image noise increases and subsequently image quality decreases. The aim of our study was to determine the accuracy of visual perception of differences in image quality and noise at low dose chest CT. Materials and methods: Forty-four patients suffering from emphysema underwent CT (Aquilion-16, 120 kV, 150 mAs, 1 mm-collimation). Original raw data were used for simulation of 10 different mAs settings from 10 mAs to 100 mAs in 10 mAs increments. Three representative hard copy images (carina, 4 cm above, 5 cm below) were printed for evaluation of lung parenchyma (high-resolution kernel, lung window) and mediastinum (soft-kernel, soft tissue window). Ranking of expected low mAs level was performed for lung and soft tissue separately based on visual perception by three-blinded chest radiologist independently. Results were compared to the real simulated mAs. Results: The accuracy for correct ranking of the original 150 mAs scan was 89% for lung and 86% for soft tissue while it was 99% for the simulated 10 mAs for both windows. In comparison to the lowest mAs a significant error increase was found for the lung at 60-100 mAs (with error increase of 30-47%) for reader-I; 60-100 mAs for (33-64%) for reader-II and 70-100 mAs (38-57%) for reader-III. For the soft tissue: 60-150 mAs (with error increase of 28-63%) for reader-I; 50-100 mAs (35-56%) for reader-II and 50-90 mAs (35-40%) for reader-III. Conclusion: Simulated dose levels below 60 mAs (=42 mAs eff ) were clearly differentiated from higher dose levels by all readers. Therefore, imaging doses could be lowered down to 60 mAs without a diagnostically relevant increase in noise impairing image quality.

  3. Quality and Dose Optimized CT Trauma Protocol - Recommendation from a University Level-I Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Johannes; Kaul, David; Böning, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H; Renz, Diane Miriam; Streitparth, Florian

    2017-09-01

    Purpose  As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods  61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50 %). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85 s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. Results  The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40 % (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGyxcm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. Conclusion  A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR

  4. Optimization of the dose level for a given treatment plan to maximize the complication-free tumor cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, B.K.; Mavroidis, P.; Hyoedynmaa, S.; Kappas, C.

    1999-01-01

    During the past decade, tumor and normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy have been increasingly quantified in radiobiological terms. For this purpose, response models describing the dependence of tumor and normal tissue reactions on the irradiated volume, heterogeneity of the delivered dose distribution and cell sensitivity variations can be taken into account. The probability of achieving a good treatment outcome can be increased by using an objective function such as P + , the probability of complication-free tumor control. A new procedure is presented, which quantifies P + from the dose delivery on 2D surfaces and 3D volumes and helps the user of any treatment planning system (TPS) to select the best beam orientations, the best beam modalities and the most suitable beam energies. The final step of selecting the prescribed dose level is made by a renormalization of the entire dose plan until the value of P + is maximized. The index P + makes use of clinically established dose-response parameters, for tumors and normal tissues of interest, in order to improve its clinical relevance. The results, using P + , are compared against the assessments of experienced medical physicists and radiation oncologists for two clinical cases. It is observed that when the absorbed dose level for a given treatment plan is increased, the treatment outcome first improves rapidly. As the dose approaches the tolerance of normal tissues the complication-free curve begins to drop. The optimal dose level is often just below this point and it depends on the geometry of each patient and target volume. Furthermore, a more conformal dose delivery to the target results in a higher control rate for the same complication level. This effect can be quantified by the increased value of the P + parameter. (orig.)

  5. Estimation of low-level neutron dose-equivalent rate by using extrapolation method for a curie level Am–Be neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Xu, Jiayun; Zhang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Neutron radiation protection is an important research area because of the strong radiation biological effect of neutron field. The radiation dose of neutron is closely related to the neutron energy, and the connected relationship is a complex function of energy. For the low-level neutron radiation field (e.g. the Am–Be source), the commonly used commercial neutron dosimeter cannot always reflect the low-level dose rate, which is restricted by its own sensitivity limit and measuring range. In this paper, the intensity distribution of neutron field caused by a curie level Am–Be neutron source was investigated by measuring the count rates obtained through a 3 He proportional counter at different locations around the source. The results indicate that the count rates outside of the source room are negligible compared with the count rates measured in the source room. In the source room, 3 He proportional counter and neutron dosimeter were used to measure the count rates and dose rates respectively at different distances to the source. The results indicate that both the count rates and dose rates decrease exponentially with the increasing distance, and the dose rates measured by a commercial dosimeter are in good agreement with the results calculated by the Geant4 simulation within the inherent errors recommended by ICRP and IEC. Further studies presented in this paper indicate that the low-level neutron dose equivalent rates in the source room increase exponentially with the increasing low-energy neutron count rates when the source is lifted from the shield with different radiation intensities. Based on this relationship as well as the count rates measured at larger distance to the source, the dose rates can be calculated approximately by the extrapolation method. This principle can be used to estimate the low level neutron dose values in the source room which cannot be measured directly by a commercial dosimeter. - Highlights: • The scope of the affected area for

  6. Assessment of dose inhomogeneity at target level by in vivo dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leunens, G.; Verstraete, J.; Dutreix, A.; Schueren, E. van der

    1992-01-01

    Inhomogeneity of dose delivered to the target volume due to irregular body surface and tissue densities remains in many cases unknown, since dose distribution is calculated for most radiation treatments in only one transverse section and assuming the patient to be water equivalent. In this study transmission and target absorbed dose homogeneity is assessed for 11 head-and-neck cancer treatments by in vivo measurements with silicon diodes. Besides the dose to specification point, the dose delivered to 2-4 off-axis points in midline sagittal plane is estimated from entrance and exit dose measurements. Simultaneously made portal films allow to identify anatomical structures passed by the beam before reaching exit diode. Mean deviation from expected transmission is -6.8% for bone, +6% for air cavities and -2.5% for soft tissue. At midplane, mean deviations from expected target dose are respectively -3.5%, +2.3% and -1.9%. Deviations from prescribed dose are larger than 5% in 12/39 target points. Accuracy requirements in target dose delivery of plus or minus 5%, as proposed by ICRU, cannot be fulfilled in 7/11 patients and is mostly due to irregular body contour and tissue densities. as only a limited number of points are considered, inhomogeneity in dose delivered throughout whole irradiated volume is underestimated, as is illustrated from exit dose profiles obtained from portal image. Besides its tremendous value as a quality assurance procedure, in vivo dose measurements are shown to be a valid method for assessing dose delivered to irradiated tissues when dose computations are assumed to be inaccurate or even impossible in current practice. (author). 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Kaul, David [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schwabe, Philipp [Charite School of Medicine and Univ. Hospital Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Trauma Surgery; Maurer, Martin H. [Inselspital Bern (Switzerland). Dept. of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology; Renz, Diane Miriam [Univ. Hospital Jena (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-09-15

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  8. Quality and dose optimized CT trauma protocol. Recommendation from a university level-I trauma center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, Johannes; Boening, Georg; Rotzinger, Roman; Freyhardt, Patrick; Streitparth, Florian; Kaul, David; Schwabe, Philipp; Maurer, Martin H.; Renz, Diane Miriam

    2017-01-01

    As a supra-regional level-I trauma center, we evaluated computed tomography (CT) acquisitions of polytraumatized patients for quality and dose optimization purposes. Adapted statistical iterative reconstruction [(AS)IR] levels, tube voltage reduction as well as a split-bolus contrast agent (CA) protocol were applied. Materials and Methods 61 patients were split into 3 different groups that differed with respect to tube voltage (120 - 140 kVp) and level of applied ASIR reconstruction (ASIR 20 - 50%). The CT protocol included a native acquisition of the head followed by a single contrast-enhanced acquisition of the whole body (64-MSCT). CA (350 mg/ml iodine) was administered as a split bolus injection of 100 ml (2 ml/s), 20 ml NaCl (1 ml/s), 60 ml (4 ml/s), 40 ml NaCl (4 ml/s) with a scan delay of 85s to detect injuries of both the arterial system and parenchymal organs in a single acquisition. Both the quantitative (SNR/CNR) and qualitative (5-point Likert scale) image quality was evaluated in parenchymal organs that are often injured in trauma patients. Radiation exposure was assessed. The use of IR combined with a reduction of tube voltage resulted in good qualitative and quantitative image quality and a significant reduction in radiation exposure of more than 40% (DLP 1087 vs. 647 mGy x cm). Image quality could be improved due to a dedicated protocol that included different levels of IR adapted to different slice thicknesses, kernels and the examined area for the evaluation of head, lung, body and bone injury patterns. In synopsis of our results, we recommend the implementation of a polytrauma protocol with a tube voltage of 120 kVp and the following IR levels: cCT 5mm: ASIR 20; cCT 0.625 mm: ASIR 40; lung 2.5 mm: ASIR 30, body 5 mm: ASIR 40; body 1.25 mm: ASIR 50; body 0.625 mm: ASIR 0. A dedicated adaptation of the CT trauma protocol (level of reduction of tube voltage and of IR) according to the examined body region (head, lung, body, bone) combined with a

  9. Dose-Response of High-Intensity Training (HIT on Atheroprotective miRNA-126 Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Schmitz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: MicroRNA-126 (miR-126 exerts beneficial effects on vascular integrity, angiogenesis, and atherosclerotic plaque stability. The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the dose-response relationship of high-intensity interval training (HIIT on miR-126-3p and -5p levels.Methods: Sixty-one moderately trained individuals (females = 31 [50.8%]; 22.0 ± 1.84 years were consecutively recruited and allocated into three matched groups using exercise capacity. During a 4-week intervention a HIIT group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out, a progressive HIIT (proHIIT group performed three exercise sessions/week of 4 × 30 s at maximum speed (all-out with one extra session every week (up to 7 × 30 s and a low-intensity training (LIT control group performed three exercise sessions/week for 25 min <75% of maximum heart rate. Exercise miR-126-3p/-5p plasma levels were determined using capillary blood from earlobes.Results: No exercise-induced increase in miR-126 levels was detected at baseline, neither in the LIT (after 25 min low-intensity running nor the HIIT groups (after 4 min of high-intensity running. After the intervention, the LIT group presented an increase in miR-126-3p, while in the HIIT group, miR-126-3p levels were still reduced (all p < 0.05. An increase for both, miR-126-3p and -5p levels (all p < 0.05, pre- vs. during and post-exercise was detected in the proHIIT group. Between group analysis revealed that miR-126-3p levels after LIT and proHIIT increased by 2.12 ± 2.55 and 1.24 ± 2.46 units (all p < 0.01, respectively, compared to HIIT (−1.05 ± 2.6 units.Conclusions: LIT and proHIIT may be performed to increase individual miR-126 levels. HIIT without progression was less effective in increasing miR-126.

  10. Determination of gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) and resveratrol cytotoxicity level in tumor cells line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a disease with high incidence and it is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a polyphenol occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. This polyphenol possesses a pharmacological activity of carcinogenesis inhibition in multiple levels. It also protects cells by scavenging the free radicals which are considered toxic products. These free radicals are formed of natural process of cell aging and also by incidence of ionizing radiation in the organism. Thus, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol may be considered as a radiosensitizing. The aim of this work was the determination of radiation lethal dose (LD 50 ) and also verifies the cytotoxicity level of resveratrol in tumor cells line: muco epidermoid pulmonary carcinoma cells (NCI-H292) and rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD). The cytotoxicity test was performed by neutral red uptake assay. The results of resveratrol IC 50% in NCI-H292 cells was 192μM and in RD cells was 128μM; and RD cells gamma radiation LD 50 was 435Gy. (author)

  11. Application of intervention dose levels and derived intervention levels in the event of a major nuclear accident: review of present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This information is based on the report submitted by the Secretariat to the IAEA Board of Governors, together with a summary of the advice and recommendations made by an IAEA Advisory Group which met in February 1987 to review the IAEA's existing guidance in the area of intervention dose levels and derived intervention levels. 7 refs, 3 tabs

  12. Rationality, irrationality and escalating behavior in lowest unique bid auctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Baronchelli, Andrea; Amaral, Luís A N

    2012-01-01

    Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions--lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of "bid space". The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets.

  13. Rationality, irrationality and escalating behavior in lowest unique bid auctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Radicchi

    Full Text Available Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions--lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of "bid space". The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets.

  14. Rationality, Irrationality and Escalating Behavior in Lowest Unique Bid Auctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Baronchelli, Andrea; Amaral, Luís A. N.

    2012-01-01

    Information technology has revolutionized the traditional structure of markets. The removal of geographical and time constraints has fostered the growth of online auction markets, which now include millions of economic agents worldwide and annual transaction volumes in the billions of dollars. Here, we analyze bid histories of a little studied type of online auctions – lowest unique bid auctions. Similarly to what has been reported for foraging animals searching for scarce food, we find that agents adopt Lévy flight search strategies in their exploration of “bid space”. The Lévy regime, which is characterized by a power-law decaying probability distribution of step lengths, holds over nearly three orders of magnitude. We develop a quantitative model for lowest unique bid online auctions that reveals that agents use nearly optimal bidding strategies. However, agents participating in these auctions do not optimize their financial gain. Indeed, as long as there are many auction participants, a rational profit optimizing agent would choose not to participate in these auction markets. PMID:22279553

  15. Critical reevaluation of the dose-response relationships for carcinogenic effects of low-level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, Arthur C.

    2002-01-01

    In recent decades, it has been customary, for radiation protection purposes, to assume that the overall risk of radiation- included cancer increases as a linear-nonthreshold function of the dose. The existing data do not exclude the existence of a threshold, however, and the dose-response relationship is known to vary depending on the type of cancer in question, the dose, dose rate and LET of the radiation, the age, sex and physiological state of the exposed individuals, and other variables, including the potential influence of adaptive responses and bystander effects at low doses. In light of advancing knowledge, therefore, the dose-response relationship for carcinogenic effects of low-level radiation has been reevaluated periodically by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the International Commission of Radiological Protection, the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and other organizations. The most recent such reviews have generally found the weight of evidence to suggest that lesions which are precursors to cancer (i.e., mutations and chromosome aberrations), and certain types of cancer as well, may increase in frequency linearly aberrations), and certain types of cancer as well, may increase in frequency linearly with the dose in the low-dose domain. On this basis, it is concluded that no alternative dose-response model for the carcinogenic effects of low-level radiation is ore plausible than the linear-nonthreshold model, although other dose-response relationships cannot be excluded. (author)

  16. Establishment of national diagnostic reference level for renal doses in nuclear medicine departments at Khartoum-Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameen, Suhaib; Hamid, Alhadi; Rushdi, M. A. H.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we established a diagnostic reference level (DRL) for patient dose focusing on the investigation of activity to the kidneys during(99mTc-DTPA) kidney scan, selected two department nuclear medicine in main hospitals in Khartoum state. The DRLs is an investigational level used to identify unusually high radiation doses for common diagnostic medical in Nuclear Medicine procedures and suggested action levels above which a facility should review its methods and determine if acceptable image quality can be achieved at lower doses. The high specific activity of 99mTc makes it suitable as a first pass agent, for multiple or sequential studies, 99mTc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) is preferred to 99mTc-pertechnetate. Patients who had been prepared for the kidney scan 99mTc- DTPA were divided to three groups. The first group received dose less than 5 mCi, are represent (27.03%) from all patients, second group received dose 5 to 5.5 mCi are represent(66.67%) and the third group received dose from 5.6 to 6.2 mCi are represent (6.31%) from all patients 99mTc-DTPA. And according to the IAEA recommendation for adult doses(5-10mCi) this study show that about 93.1% of the sample examines by dose less than 5.5 mCi. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving reference doses for renal examinations for nuclear medicine departments in Sudan.(Author)

  17. Determination of absorbed dose calibration factors for therapy level electron beam ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, M R; Williams, A J; DuSautoy, A R

    2001-03-01

    Over several years the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has been developing an absorbed dose calibration service for electron beam radiotherapy. To test this service, a number of trial calibrations of therapy level electron beam ionization chambers have been carried out during the last 3 years. These trials involved 17 UK radiotherapy centres supplying a total of 46 chambers of the NACP, Markus, Roos and Farmer types. Calibration factors were derived from the primary standard calorimeter at seven energies in the range 4 to 19 MeV with an estimated uncertainty of +/-1.5% at the 95% confidence level. Investigations were also carried out into chamber perturbation, polarity effects, ion recombination and repeatability of the calibration process. The instruments were returned to the radiotherapy centres for measurements to be carried out comparing the NPL direct calibration with the 1996 IPEMB air kerma based Code of Practice. It was found that, in general, all chambers of a particular type showed the same energy response. However, it was found that polarity and recombination corrections were quite variable for Markus chambers-differences in the polarity correction of up to 1% were seen. Perturbation corrections were obtained and were found to agree well with the standard data used in the IPEMB Code. The results of the comparison between the NPL calibration and IPEMB Code show agreement between the two methods at the +/-1% level for the NACP and Farmer chambers, but there is a significant difference for the Markus chambers of around 2%. This difference between chamber types is most likely to be due to the design of the Markus chamber.

  18. Level of natural radiation and doses to population in Shanxi province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yi; Hao Hailiang; Wang Quanlu

    1985-01-01

    The exposure rates from natural radiation measured from August 1982 to January 1984 with a FD-71 Scintillation Radiometer in Shanxi Province are reported. The average absorbed dose rate in air of 1,842 open field sites was (10.78 +- 1.41) x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 . The mean value of area-weighted outdoor absorbed dose rates in air was 6.8 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 . The average absorbed dose rate in air from natural external radiation of 3,446 indoor sites was (14.02 +- 2.09) x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 and the indoor area-weighted dose rate from natural radiation was 10.48 x 10 -8 Gy.h -1 . The annual individual average effective dose equivalant to population in this province was 0.88 mSv, and the annual collective dose equivalent was 21,626.83 man.Sv

  19. Evaluation of alanine as a reference dosimeter for therapy level dose comparisons in megavoltage electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, Malcolm; Sharpe, Peter; Voros, Sandor

    2015-01-01

    When comparing absorbed dose standards from different laboratories (e.g. National Measurement Institutes, NMIs, for Key or Supplementary comparisons) it is rarely possible to carry out a direct comparison of primary standard instruments, and therefore some form of transfer detector is required. Historically, air-filled, unsealed ionization chambers have been used because of the long history of using these instruments, very good stability over many years, and ease of transport. However, the use of ion chambers for therapy-level comparisons is not without its problems. Findings from recent investigations suggest that ion chambers are prone to non-random variations, they are not completely robust to standard courier practices, and failure at any step in a comparison can render all measurements potentially useless. An alternative approach is to identify a transfer system that is insensitive to some of these concerns - effectively a dosimeter that is inexpensive, simple to use, robust, but with sufficient precision and of a size relevant to the disseminated quantity in question. The alanine dosimetry system has been successfully used in a number of situations as an audit dosimeter and therefore the purpose of this investigation was to determine whether alanine could also be used as the transfer detector for dosimetric comparisons, which require a lower value for the measurement uncertainty. A measurement protocol was developed for comparing primary standards of absorbed dose to water in high-energy electron beams using alanine pellets irradiated in a water-equivalent plastic phantom. A trial comparison has been carried out between three NMIs and has indicated that alanine is a suitable alternative to ion chambers, with the system used achieving a precision of 0.1%. Although the focus of the evaluation was on the performance of the dosimeter, the comparison results are encouraging, showing agreement at the level of the combined uncertainties (∼0.6%). Based on this

  20. Crystal growth in EPDM by chemi-crystallisation as a function of the neutron irradiation dose and flux level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambri, O.A.; Salvatierra, L.M.; Sanchez, F.A.; Matteo, C.L.; Sorichetti, P.A.; Celauro, C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron irradiation at room temperature were performed on EPDM (ethylene-propylene-diene monomer) in two different nuclear reactors at different fluxes. The effect of the irradiation on the chain arrangement in the polymer, as a function of the dose is discussed. Different crystal concentrations and crystal shapes, developed by chemi-crystallisation, are obtained depending on the neutron dose. In addition the radiation damage degree in the polymer depends both on the dose and the flux level. Dynamical mechanical analysis, swelling studies, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and infrared studies were employed as experimental techniques

  1. Effect of high-dose dexamethasone on perioperative lactate levels and glucose control : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottens, Thomas H; Nijsten, Maarten W N; Hofland, Jan; Dieleman, Stefan; Hoekstra, Miriam; van Dijk, Diederik; van der Maaten, Joost Maa

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Blood lactate levels are increasingly used to monitor patients. Steroids are frequently administered to critically ill patients. However, the effect of steroids on lactate levels has not been adequately investigated. We studied the effect of a single intraoperative high dose of

  2. Determination of Radon Level in Drinking Water in Mehriz Villages and Evaluation the Annual Effective Absorbed Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Malakootian

    2015-03-01

    Results: Radon concentrations of samples ranged from 0.187 BqL-1 to 14.8 BqL-1.These results were related to samples No.12 and 9 and also to aqueducts of Tang-e-chenar and Malekabad village respectively. Based on the amount of radon in the sample, the lowest annual effective absorbed dose through drinking water or breathing(In an environment where water was used was 0.0005msv/y and the maximum amount was 0.04msv/y. Conclusion: Apart from samples No.9 and 16 that were elated to the aqueduct of Malekabad village and a private well in Dare Miankoohvillagehaving48 persons as total population, Radon concentrations of other samples used by people of Mehriz villages as drinking water was low and less than permitted limit set by the Environmental Protection Agency of United States of America.

  3. Study of dose levels absorbed by members of the public in the nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Geovanna Oliveira de Mello

    2001-03-01

    In nuclear Medicine, radioisotopes are bound to various compounds (called radiopharmaceuticals) for use in various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. These unsealed sources are administered in various forms to patients, who remain radioactive for hours or days, and represent a source of potential radiation exposure for others. Thus, in nuclear medicine departments, radiation protection of workers and members of the public, especially persons accompanying patients, must consider, this exposure. In Brazil, the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) establishes that, in nuclear medicine departments, the patients and persons accompanying should be separated each other. However, this rule is not always followed due to many factors such as physical and emotional conditions of patients. In this context, the aim of this study was the investigation of dose levels, which the persons accompanying patients are exposed to. For monitoring, thermoluminescent dosimeters were employed. The dosimeters were given to 380 persons who were accompanying patients in nuclear medicine departments. Exposure results were lower than 1 mSv. On the basis of CNEN rules, issues regarding stay conditions for members of the public in these departments are discussed. (author)

  4. Estimate of safe human exposure levels for lunar dust based on comparative benchmark dose modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Santana, Patricia A; Scully, Robert R

    2013-04-01

    Brief exposures of Apollo astronauts to lunar dust occasionally elicited upper respiratory irritation; however, no limits were ever set for prolonged exposure to lunar dust. The United States and other space faring nations intend to return to the moon for extensive exploration within a few decades. In the meantime, habitats for that exploration, whether mobile or fixed, must be designed to limit human exposure to lunar dust to safe levels. Herein we estimate safe exposure limits for lunar dust collected during the Apollo 14 mission. We instilled three respirable-sized (∼2 μ mass median diameter) lunar dusts (two ground and one unground) and two standard dusts of widely different toxicities (quartz and TiO₂) into the respiratory system of rats. Rats in groups of six were given 0, 1, 2.5 or 7.5 mg of the test dust in a saline-Survanta® vehicle, and biochemical and cellular biomarkers of toxicity in lung lavage fluid were assayed 1 week and one month after instillation. By comparing the dose--response curves of sensitive biomarkers, we estimated safe exposure levels for astronauts and concluded that unground lunar dust and dust ground by two different methods were not toxicologically distinguishable. The safe exposure estimates were 1.3 ± 0.4 mg/m³ (jet-milled dust), 1.0 ± 0.5 mg/m³ (ball-milled dust) and 0.9 ± 0.3 mg/m³ (unground, natural dust). We estimate that 0.5-1 mg/m³ of lunar dust is safe for periodic human exposures during long stays in habitats on the lunar surface.

  5. Dose for background radioactivity in areas with high radioactivity levels in the Pinar del Rio province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaide Orpi, J.; Oliveira Acosta, J.; Valdes Hernadez, G.M.; Leal Ramirez, M.R.; Blanco Jorrin, N.

    1998-01-01

    The objective the work is to know the areas with high natural radiation doses, for they were used it the data obtained by the studies it has more than enough favorability for radioactive minerals carried out in different regions to the Pinar del Rio province in the 1986 to 1993 years and the doses calculations they were carried out according to the effective methodology

  6. A periodic-type dose effect of insulin in the blood glucose level of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated in this paper the effect of a periodic-type insulin dose on a diabetic patient. An appropriate matching condition is introduced in our problem by expressing the insulin dose using a Fourier series expansion. Our result gives insight to the state of the patient over a period of administration. Clearly, there is the ...

  7. Effects of humidity level and IBA dose application on the softwood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IBA) doses on softwood top cuttings of two black mulberry (Types 1 and 2) and one white mulberry (Type 3) types were studied. Cuttings were taken from early June (14 Haziran) and applied to the different IBA doses (0, 1000, 2000, 3000 and ...

  8. An FMEA evaluation of intensity modulated radiation therapy dose delivery failures at tolerance criteria levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faught, Jacqueline Tonigan; Balter, Peter A; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kry, Stephen F; Court, Laurence E; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this work was to assess both the perception of failure modes in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) when the linac is operated at the edge of tolerances given in AAPM TG-40 (Kutcher et al.) and TG-142 (Klein et al.) as well as the application of FMEA to this specific section of the IMRT process. An online survey was distributed to approximately 2000 physicists worldwide that participate in quality services provided by the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core - Houston (IROC-H). The survey briefly described eleven different failure modes covered by basic quality assurance in step-and-shoot IMRT at or near TG-40 (Kutcher et al.) and TG-142 (Klein et al.) tolerance criteria levels. Respondents were asked to estimate the worst case scenario percent dose error that could be caused by each of these failure modes in a head and neck patient as well as the FMEA scores: Occurrence, Detectability, and Severity. Risk probability number (RPN) scores were calculated as the product of these scores. Demographic data were also collected. A total of 181 individual and three group responses were submitted. 84% were from North America. Most (76%) individual respondents performed at least 80% clinical work and 92% were nationally certified. Respondent medical physics experience ranged from 2.5 to 45 yr (average 18 yr). A total of 52% of individual respondents were at least somewhat familiar with FMEA, while 17% were not familiar. Several IMRT techniques, treatment planning systems, and linear accelerator manufacturers were represented. All failure modes received widely varying scores ranging from 1 to 10 for occurrence, at least 1-9 for detectability, and at least 1-7 for severity. Ranking failure modes by RPN scores also resulted in large variability, with each failure mode being ranked both most risky (1st) and least risky (11th) by different respondents. On average MLC modeling had the highest RPN scores. Individual estimated percent dose errors and severity

  9. Evaluation of radionuclide levels and radiological dose in three populations of marine mammals in the eastern Canadian Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, C.R.; Ewing, L.L.; Wiewel, A.M.; Harris, D.A.; Stewart, R.E.A.

    1993-01-01

    Radionuclide levels were measured in beluga, walrus and ringed seal populations collected in 1992 to assess radiation dose and changes in dose with age and sex. The authors hypothesized that Arctic marine food chains accumulate high levels of naturally-occurring radionuclides such as polonium-210 and that radiation may pose a stress to animals which also accumulate metals such as cadmium. Liver, kidney, muscle and jawbone were analyzed by gamma spectrometry for cesium-137, cesium-134, lead-210, potassium-40 and radium-226 and fission-derived nuclides. Polonium-210 was analyzed by alpha spec after autodeposition onto a silver disk. Cesium-137 concentrations in muscle in all three populations were low, and ranged from below detection limits to 10 Bq/kg ww. There was no evidence of fission-derived radionuclides such as zinc-65 or cobalt-60. Lead-210 levels ranged from below detection limits in muscle of ringed seal and walrus to a mean of 82.3 Bq/kg ww in walrus bone. Polonium-210 in the three population ranged from 10 to 30 Bq/kg ww in bone and kidney. The major contributor to dose in the animals was polonium-210 because it is an alpha emitter and accumulates to moderate levels in liver and kidney. Radiological dose is approximately 20--30 times higher than background in humans, and is considerably lower than the dose observed in terrestrial food chains in the Arctic

  10. Assessment of bioequivalence of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide in a four drug fixed dose combination with separate formulations at the same dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shrutidevi; Kaur, Kanwal Jit; Singh, Inderjit; Bhade, Shantaram R; Kaul, Chaman Lal; Panchagnula, Ramesh

    2002-02-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) needs treatment with three to five different drugs simultaneously, depending on the patient category. These drugs can be given as single drug preparations or fixed dose combinations (FDCs) of two more drugs in a single formulation. World Health Organization and International Union against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) recommend FDCs only of proven bioavailability. The relative bioavailability of rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH) and pyrazinamide (PYZ) was assessed on a group of 13 healthy male subjects from a four drug FDC versus separate formulations at the same dose levels. The study was designed to be an open, crossover experiment. A total of nine blood samples each of 3 ml volume were collected over a period of 24-h. The concentrations of RIF, its main metabolite desacetyl RIF (DRIF), INH and PYZ in plasma were assessed by HPLC analysis. Pharmacokinetic parameters namely AUC(0-24), AUC(0-inf), C(max), T(max), were calculated and subjected to different statistical tests (Hauschke analysis, two way ANOVA, normal and log transformed confidence interval) at 90% confidence interval. In addition, elimination rate constant (K(el)) and absorption efficiencies for each drug were also calculated. It was concluded that four drugs FDC tablet is bioequivalent for RIF, INH and PYZ to separate formulation at the same dose levels.

  11. Deriving staff and public doses in a PET/CT facility from measured radiation levels using thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haj, A. N.; Lobriguito, A. M.; Arafah, A.; Parker, R.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of PET/CT at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre for whole body and brain imaging has become favourable for diagnosis of cancer. There is no data available on the PET/CT dose to staff and members of the public for different activities of 18 F [fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)] and for longer patient holding time. The study aims to determine and evaluate staff and public doses by using thermoluminescent dosemeters monthly readings for a 7-month deployment period and by using direct measurements of dose rates at 30 cm and 1 m distances from the patients after injection. The whole body doses per procedure and per administered activity of 18 F (FDG) were estimated. A dose map inside the PET/CT was generated to provide information of the dose levels in different locations. The Pearson correlation showed a strong correlation (r 2 = 0.71) between the dose per activity and the number of patients. Optimisation of radiation protection of staff and members of the public was investigated and recommendations were given. (authors)

  12. Initial dose of vancomycin based on body weight and creatinine clearance to minimize inadequate trough levels in Japanese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, N; Ohkuchi, A; Tashiro, Y; Kim, M R; Le, M; Sakamoto, T; Matsubara, S; Hakamata, Y

    2012-10-01

    Our aims were to elucidate the factors that affected vancomycin (VCM) serum trough levels and to find the optimal initial dose based on creatinine clearance (CrCl) and body weight (BW) to minimize inadequate trough levels in a retrospective observational study among Japanese adults. One hundred and six inpatients, in whom VCM trough levels were measured after completing the third dosing, were consecutively recruited into our study in a tertiary hospital. We considered the frequency of initial VCM total daily dose, CrCl, and BW were independent risk factors of VCM trough levels. In patients with CrCl ≥30 and level of ≥20 mcg/mL, regardless of BW. In patients with CrCl ≥50 mL/min, 2 g/day yielded low frequencies of a trough level of initial total daily dose may be 1 g/day in patients with CrCl ≥30 and <50 mL/min regardless of BW and 2 g/day in patients weighing <55 kg with CrCl ≥50 mL/min among Japanese adults.

  13. The effect of sub-lethal doses on the ploidy level in rats hepatocytes with aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A. M.

    2004-11-01

    It has been shown that the polyploidization levels in rat's hepatocytes increased with aging. The high LET ionizing radiation also induce cell polyploidization by two different means: cells and nuclei fusion, and mitosis restriction after DNA replication. The purpose of the present study was to determine the kinetic of rat's hepatocytes polyploidization with ageing, and the late effects of low doses of gamma irradiation on polyploidization. To this end, three groups of rats were used. Each group composed of 175 four weeks old animals. The first was served as a control, the second and the third groups were irradiated with 4 and 2 Gy respectively, of gamma irradiation at the age of one month. Of each group, 7-8 animals were monthly scarified (for two years), and their liver tissues were used to obtain cell suspensions which were further fixed in gradual series concentrations of ethanol. After staining with Propidum Iodide 'PI' (10 6 cells per ml of PI used at 10 - 5 M final concentration), the cells were analyzed on a FACS Vantage Flow Cytometer (Becton Dickinson). In the control, the results showed: 1) A decrease of cell fraction that contained normal diploid until steady level. 2) Biphasic changes of fraction tetraploidy cells (increase until age of 4 month followed by decrease). 3) The fraction of octaploidy cells appeared at age of 3-4 month and increased continuously with the aging. In accompanied to life-span reductions of 4 Gy irradiated animals, the DNA contents were similar to those in control groups in addition to some quantities variation due to a programmed cell death (Apoptosis) induced by irradiation and regenerations. These variations persisted till the age of 7 month, in additional to reduce the spin-life of irradiated animals. The irradiation with 2 Gy induced some quantities variation in comparison with nonirradiated group, appeared in the reduction of rate conversion from one ploidy class to another, and in shift with 2-3 months of the second pike

  14. Level of patient and operator dose in the largest cardiac centre in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Patsilinakos, S.; Voudris, V.; Magginas, A.; Pavlidis, S.; Maounis, T.; Theodorakis, G.; Koutelou, M.; Vrantza, T.; Nearchou, M.; Nikolaki, N.; Kollaros, N.; Kyrozi, E.; Kottou, S.; Karaiskos, P.; Neofotistou, E.; Cokkinos, D.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the patient and staff doses in the most frequent interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed in Onassio, the largest Cardiac Centre in Greece. Data were collected from three digital X-ray systems for 212 coronary angiographies, 203 percutaneous transluminal coronary angio-plasties (PTCA) and 134 various electrophysiological studies. Patient skin dose was measured using suitably calibrated slow radiotherapy films and cardiologist dose using suitably calibrated thermoluminescent dosemeters placed on left arm, hand and foot. Patient median dose area product (DAP) (all examinations) ranged between 6.7 and 83.5 Gy cm 2 . Patient median skin dose in PTCA was 799 mGy (320-1660 mGy) and in RF ablation 160 mGy (35-1920 mGy). Median arm, hand and foot dose to the cardiologist were 12.6, 27 and 13 μSv, respectively, per procedure. The great range of radiation doses received by both patients and operators confirms the need for continuous monitoring of all IC techniques. (authors)

  15. Twice-monthly administration of a lower dose of epoetin beta pegol can maintain adequate hemoglobin levels in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikami, Yuki; Fujimori, Akira; Okada, Shioko; Kumei, Mai; Mizobuchi, Noriko; Sakai, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    Epoetin beta pegol is a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA) with a long half-life. Although CERA has been shown to maintain adequate hemoglobin (Hb) levels at prolonged dosing intervals, the optimal dosing schedule remains unclear. We therefore compared the efficacy of maintaining hemoglobin levels with administration of twice-monthly CERA (TWICE) versus once-monthly CERA (ONCE). Twenty hemodialysis patients receiving epoetin beta (EPO) were enrolled in this crossover study. Patients were assigned to either the TWICE or the ONCE group based on matching Hb levels and EPO doses. After 6 months of treatment, the CERA dosage was interchanged between the groups and the study was continued for an additional 6 months. The effect of the different regimens on iron metabolism was also assessed during the first 6 months of the study. Hb levels significantly increased in the TWICE group, allowing for a reduction in CERA dosage, while the dose of CERA required to maintain Hb levels in the ONCE group remained unchanged. After the interchange, a decrease in Hb levels with incremental increase in CERA dosage was observed in the TWICE→ONCE group, with the opposite effect observed in the ONCE→TWICE group. Although increases in ferritin and hepcidin-25 levels in the ONCE group were noted at one month, they disappeared at 6 months. Although Hb levels were maintained in both the ONCE and TWICE groups, a twice-monthly administration was advantageous, as it required a lower dose of CERA. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  16. Patient dose measurement in common medical X-ray examinations and propose the first local dose reference levels to diagnostic radiology in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasuli, Behrouz; Tabari Juybari, Raheleh; Forouzi, Meysam; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study was to investigate patient dose in pelvic and abdomen x-ray examinations. This work also provided the LDRLs (local diagnostic reference levels) in Khuzestan region, southwest of Iran to help establish the NDRLs (national diagnostic reference levels). Methods: Patient doses were assessed from patient's anatomical data and exposure parameters based on the IAEA indirect dosimetry method. With regard to this method, exposure parameters such as tube output, kVp, mAs, FFD and patient anatomical data were used for calculating ESD (entrance skin dose) of patients. This study was conducted on 250 standard patients (50% men and 50% women) at eight high-patient-load imaging centers. Results: The results indicate that mean ESDs for the both pelvic and abdomen examinations were lower than the IAEA and EC reference levels, 2.3 and 3.7 mGy, respectively. Mean applied kVps were 67 and 70 and mean FFDs were 103 and 109, respectively. Tube loadings obtained in this study for pelvic examination were lower than all the corresponding values in the reviewed literature. Likewise, the average annual patient load across all hospitals were more than 37000 patients, i.e. more than 100 patients a day. Conclusions: The authors recommend that DRLs (diagnostic reference levels) obtained in this region, which are the first available data, can be used as local DRLs for pelvic and abdomen procedures. This work also provides that on-the-job training programs for staffs and close cross collaboration between physicists and physicians should be strongly considered.

  17. Determination of dose to patient in different teams of TC and assessment with international reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Morales, C.; Fernandez lara, A. A.; Buades Forner, M. J.; Tobarra Gonzalez, B. M.

    2013-01-01

    The increase in CT studies and the differences observed between the different equipment used in our hospital prompted us to determine the doses to patients in different studies and check the results obtained with the reference values published internationally. (Author)

  18. Application of Key Events Dose Response Framework to defining the upper intake level of leucine in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencharz, Paul B; Russell, Robert M

    2012-12-01

    Leucine is sold in large doses in health food stores and is ingested by weight-training athletes. The safety of ingestion of large doses of leucine is unknown. Before designing chronic high-dose leucine supplementation experiments, we decided to determine the effect of graded doses of leucine in healthy participants. The Key Events Dose Response Framework is an organizational and analytical framework that dissects the various biologic steps (key events) that occur between exposure to a substance and an eventual adverse effect. Each biologic event is looked at for its unique dose-response characteristics. For nutrients, there are a number of biologic homeostatic mechanisms that work to keep circulating/tissue levels in a safe, nontoxic range. If a response mechanism at a particular key event is especially vulnerable and easily overwhelmed, this is known as a determining event, because this event drives the overall slope or shape of the dose-response relationship. In this paper, the Key Events Dose Framework has been applied to the problem of leucine toxicity and leucine's tolerable upper level. After analyzing the experimental data vis a vis key events for leucine leading to toxicity, it became evident that the rate of leucine oxidation was the determining event. A dose-response study has been conducted to graded intakes of leucine in healthy human adult male volunteers. All participants were started at the mean requirement level of leucine [50 mg/(kg · d)] and the highest leucine intake was 1250 mg/( kg · d), which is 25 times the mean requirement. No gut intolerance was seen. Blood glucose fell progressively but remained within normal values without any changes in plasma insulin. Maximal leucine oxidation levels occurred at an intake of 550 mg leucine/( kg · d), after which plasma leucine progressively increased and plasma ammonia also increased in response to leucine intakes >500 mg/( kg · d). Thus, the "key determining event" appears to be when the

  19. Effect of the supply dose on the 15N enrichment level of cow's milk nitrogenous fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, O.; Laurent, F.; Vignon, B.; Antoine, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Production of cow milk 15 N-labelled proteins is necessary for the study of their digestion by man. An adequate enrichment is required for compatibility with utilization constraints (application dose, studied fractions...). A test was conducted with five cows in order to optimize the utilization of labelled ammonium sulphate in the cow diet for 15 N enrichment of the milk nitrogenous matter. Doses and supply timing of labelled compounds are discussed. 3 figs., 3 refs

  20. Radiation-related operator's dose distribution according to LLD(recording level)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Duck

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the area of radiation usage is being enlarged by the industry's advancement over the world. And, the usage of radiation generator and radioisotope is increasing every year. So, they are researching actively how to protect operators from the radiation that causes direct or indirect harmfulness to radiation-related operators of the related institutions. Therefore, in case of operator's dose, not only the main dosimeter's correctness but also the reasonal evaluation to the read values becomes the important factor. From this view, LLD's application to the read dose value is being embossed more importantly than any other thing. So, this study tried to find out what change was generated in the personal dose and the group dose when LLD was applied based on the internal real operator's read value, for 3 years, 2005 - 2007, and find out the personal dose change after dividing them into the exposure group and the supervising group based on the common people's personal dose (1 mSv/y)

  1. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ge, Y [University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH

  2. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A; Ge, Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH

  3. Evidence of dose saving in routine CT practice using iterative reconstruction derived from a national diagnostic reference level survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, P; Hayton, A; Beveridge, T; Marks, P; Wallace, A

    2015-09-01

    To assess the influence and significance of the use of iterative reconstruction (IR) algorithms on patient dose in CT in Australia. We examined survey data submitted to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) National Diagnostic Reference Level Service (NDRLS) during 2013 and 2014. We compared median survey dose metrics with categorization by scan region and use of IR. The use of IR results in a reduction in volume CT dose index of between 17% and 44% and a reduction in dose-length product of between 14% and 34% depending on the specific scan region. The reduction was highly significant (p sum test) for all six scan regions included in the NDRLS. Overall, 69% (806/1167) of surveys included in the analysis used IR. The use of IR in CT is achieving dose savings of 20-30% in routine practice in Australia. IR appears to be widely used by participants in the ARPANSA NDRLS with approximately 70% of surveys submitted employing this technique. This study examines the impact of the use of IR on patient dose in CT on a national scale.

  4. Achieving uniform dose with the use of a custom tissue compensator and a leveled beam for tangential breast fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbury, L.; Luttrell, L.; Lake, D.

    1989-01-01

    In order to achieve uniform dose distribution in intact breast treatments, wedges can be employed. This paper will describe a custom compensator made from brass chips used in conjunction with a leveled beam and a custom cast to treat breast shapes that are less suited to a standard wedge set up. Materials and design, dosimetry, criteria, efficacy and results will be described

  5. Effects of maximal doses of atorvastatin versus rosuvastatin on small dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximal doses of atorvastatin and rosuvastatin are highly effective in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglyceride levels; however, rosuvastatin has been shown to be significantly more effective than atorvastatin in lowering LDL cholesterol and in increasing high-density lipo...

  6. Planning and delivering high doses to targets surrounding the spinal cord at the lower neck and upper mediastinal levels: static beam-segmentation technique executed with a multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neve, W. de; Wagter, C. de; Jaeger, K. de; Thienpont, M.; Colle, C.; Derycke, S.; Schelfhout, J.

    1996-01-01

    Background and purpose. It remains a technical challenge to limit the dose to the spinal cord below tolerance if, in head and neck or thyroid cancer, the planning target volume reaches to a level below the shoulders. In order to avoid these dose limitations, we developed a standard plan involving Beam Intensity Modulation (BIM) executed by a static technique of beam segmentation. In this standard plan, many machine parameters (gantry angles, couch position, relative beam and segment weights) as well as the beam segmentation rules were identical for all patients. Materials and methods. The standard plan involved: the use of static beams with a single isocenter; BIM by field segmentation executable with a standard Philips multileaf collimator; virtual simulation and dose computation on a general 3D-planning system (Sherouse's GRATIS[reg]); heuristic computation of segment intensities and optimization (improving the dose distribution and reducing the execution time) by human intelligence. The standard plan used 20 segments spread over 8 gantry angles plus 2 non-segmented wedged beams (2 gantry angles). Results. The dose that could be achieved at the lowest target voxel, without exceeding tolerance of the spinal cord (50 Gy at highest voxel) was 70-80 Gy. The in-target 3D dose-inhomogeneity was ∼25%. The shortest time of execution of a treatment (22 segments) on a patient (unpublished) was 25 min. Conclusions. A heuristic model has been developed and investigated to obtain a 3D concave dose distribution applicable to irradiate targets in the lower neck and upper mediastinal regions. The technique spares efficiently the spinal cord and allows the delivery of higher target doses than with conventional techniques. It can be planned as a standard plan using conventional 3D-planning technology. The routine clinical implementation is performed with commercially available equipment, however, at the expense of extended execution times

  7. Biogenic amines in brain areas of rats and response to varying dose levels of whole body gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelhamid, F.M.; Elmossalamy, N.; Othman, S.A.; Roushdy, H.M.; Abdelraheem, K.

    1994-01-01

    The levels of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxy-tryptamine (5-HT) and 5-hydroxy-indole acetic acid (5-HIAA) were examined in the brain areas:cortex,: cerebellum, striatum and pons in rats exposed to whole body gamma-irradiation at the dose levels 6.5 and 10 Gy. The data obtained indicated that: 6.5 Gy induced in all brain areas, a slight increase in 5-HT concomitant with significant decrease in NE, DA levels, besides a significant increase in 5-HTAA in cerebellum and pons. After the dose 10 Gy the maximum excitation of 5-HT level was in striatum whereas declines in NE, DA were recorded in all brain areas. 5-HIAA displayed significant increase in cerebellum and pons and maximum decline in the cortex. 4 tab

  8. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Zhejiang Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yifang; Chen Guopei; Wang Zanxin; Ma Mingqiang

    1994-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Zhejiang Province was measured and the dose to population was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average values of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization were 3.0 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 2.7 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial γ-radiation were 9.1 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 14.9 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 17.2 Bq· -3 indoors and 12.7 Bq·m -8 outdoors. The contents of natural radionuclides in food and water were measured. The total annual individual average effective dose from natural background radiation was about 2.0 mSv. The contributions of cosmic rays, terrestrial radiation radon and thoron daughters exposure in air and internal exposure within the body were about 0.24, 0.77, 0.67 and 0.35 mSv, respectively. The annual collective effective dose to population in the province was estimated to be 8.5 x 10 4 man Sv·a -1

  9. Patient grouping for dose surveys and establishment of diagnostic reference levels in paediatric computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vassileva, J.; Rehani, M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been confusion in literature on whether paediatric patients should be grouped according to age, weight or other parameters when dealing with dose surveys. The present work aims to suggest a pragmatic approach to achieve reasonable accuracy for performing patient dose surveys in countries with limited resources. The analysis is based on a subset of data collected within the IAEA survey of paediatric computed tomography (CT) doses, involving 82 CT facilities from 32 countries in Asia, Europe, Africa and Latin America. Data for 6115 patients were collected, in 34.5 % of which data for weight were available. The present study suggests that using four age groups, <1, >1-5, >5-10 and >10-15 y, is realistic and pragmatic for dose surveys in less resource countries and for the establishment of DRLs. To ensure relevant accuracy of results, data for >30 patients in a particular age group should be collected if patient weight is not known. If a smaller sample is used, patient weight should be recorded and the median weight in the sample should be within 5-10 % from the median weight of the sample for which the DRLs were established. Comparison of results from different surveys should always be performed with caution, taking into consideration the way of grouping of paediatric patients. Dose results can be corrected for differences in patient weight/age group. (authors)

  10. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, Thomas P; Wilcox, Shea W; Aherne, Noel J

    2016-01-01

    Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT) and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3-6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered.

  11. Determination of dose levels for chest (PA), lumbar spine (AP and LAT) and mammography (CC and MLO) for Latin america

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, P.; Ramirez, R.; Blanco, D. E.; Benavente, T. A.; Ortiz Lopez, P.; Giannone, C. A.; Gherco, J. T.; Mecca, F.; Kodlulovich, S.; Ramirez, A.; Anselmo Puerta, J. A.; Fonseca, L.; Cardenas, J.; Martinez, A.; Zorin, F. J.; Roas, N.; Garcia, F.; Caldeira, M. E.; Salazar, G.

    2006-01-01

    Under the auspices of the ARCAL Technical Cooperation Program of the IAEA, 11 countries in Latin American (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela) motivated by the necessity to optimize the doses in diagnostic procedures, started the first regional pilot study to determine the guidance dose levels for chest (PA), lumbar spine (AP and LAT) and mammography (CC and MLO) procedures. A total of 33 hospitals participated with 54 diagnostic X-ray equipment and 18 mammography units. The entrance kerma and mean glandular doses were obtained through the output of the X-rays. A TLD intercomparison was carried out as a means to do quality control of all the process. A total of 2120 doses were estimated with the information of each patient (kVp, mAs, distance, etc.). Parallel to this, the image quality of the studies was evaluated using the criteria established by the European Community. The values of the entrance kerma an mean glandular doses for the 75% percentile are in general very compatible with the ones in Schedule III of the NBS. Although this study did not allow the establishment of guidance levels for the region, it did lay the foundations for optimization processes and the necessity of making better efforts that will improve medical practices. (Author)

  12. Factors influencing changes in levels of radiation doses received by patients during gastroduodenal series procedures in the Hospital Dr. Max Peralta de Cartago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman Campos, Jeremy; Vargas Navarro, Jonnathan

    2009-01-01

    A measurement was made of the number of radiation doses emitted by fluoroscopy equipment used in Hospital Dr. Max Peralta, specifically at the Centro de Deteccion de Cancer Gastrico. The analysis has included the factors could be influencing on increase of the total dose to the patient, by means of indicators that directly affect the unnecessary increase in dose, such as: the procedure, sequences of images, indicators of dosage levels, varying conditions of actual studies, variations dose levels and production process factors. [es

  13. The scientific basis for the establishment of threshold levels and dose response relationships of carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    and Biological Tissues was held in Bombay, India, in December 1974, to summarize and critically review all the current information and experiences on the practices including the regulatory aspects of the processes involved as well as the safety assurance of the final products. The topics of discussion during the symposium were carried out under the following sessions: (i) Microbiological control aspects of radiation sterilization (ii) Dosimetry aspects of radiation sterilization (iii) Effects of sterilizing radiation dose on the constituents of medical products (iv) Application of radiation sterilization on medical products of biological origin (v) Application on Pharmaceuticals (vi) Technological aspects of radiation sterilization facilities (vii) Review of the current status of radiation sterilization of medical products in the developing and developed Member States. mportant considerations on the microbiological control aspects of radiation sterilization focussed on the role of pre-sterilization contamination levels, radio-resistance of the contaminants, choice of sterilizing radiation dose, the use of standardized microbiological indicators, and the feasibility of combination radiation treatments with heat and hydrostatic pressure. The data were presented in support of the model for application of sub-sterilizing radiation dose in the routine control and safety assurance determination for medical products. The practical dosimetry systems for the process calibration and control were evaluated as supported by the data from the various national experiences. Suitability of application of radiation sterilization method for the Pharmaceuticals and biological tissue preparations were reviewed. esigning and operations of radiation sterilization facilities in keeping with the conditions (market size, nature of products and volume, available technical expertise) of the developing countries were discussed and appropriate steps recommended. ince its inception the radiation

  14. External exposure level from natural radiation and population dose in Gansu province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Shanxiang; Li Fuzeng; Jiao Yufang

    1985-01-01

    The resultts of measurement of absorbed dose rate in air from natural gamma radiation in Gansu measured with FD-71 scintillation radiometers are reported in this paper. Sketch maps of distribution of absorbed dose rates from natural radiation in this province are also presented. The mean values of absorbed rates in air from terrestrial gamma radiation for outdoors and indoors are 0.7 mGy/a (range 0.32 to 1.11 mGy/a) and 1.02 mGy/a (range 0.73 to 1.4 mGy/a), respectively. The annual effective dose equivalent from terrestrial gamma radiation to population in this province is estimated to be 1,14 mSv

  15. Dose levels from thoracic and pelvic examinations in two pediatric radiological departments in Norway - a comparison study of dose-area product and radiographic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjernlie Saether, Hilde; Traegde Martinsen, Anne Catrine; Lagesen, Bente; Platou Holsen, Eva; Oevreboe, Kirsti Marie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pediatric doses expressed in dose-area product (DAP) can be retrieved from only a few publications; most of which correlate DAP to patient size or large age spans. In clinical practice age is often the only available parameter describing the patient, and thus, evaluation of dose levels in pediatric radiology on the basis of DAP related to age alone would be useful in optimization work. Purpose: To provide comparable data on age-related DAP from thoracic and pelvic radiological examinations of children, and evaluate the usefulness of comparing age-related DAP and radiographic technique between systems to identify areas with potential for optimization. Material and Methods: DAP, age, and radiographic technique were registered for 575 thoracic examinations and 371 pelvic examinations of children from newborn up to 14 years of age in groups with an age span of 1 year, performed with two digital flat-panel systems and one computed radiography system. Results: DAP varies from 2.2 to 54.0 mGycm2 for thoracic examinations, and from 4.6 to 532.5 mGycm2 for pelvic examinations. There are significant differences in DAP between systems and departments due to differences in technique, equipment, and staff. Conclusion: This study provides comparable data on age-related DAP from thoracic and pelvic radiological examinations of children, which could be used as an input to estimate diagnostic reference levels. The comparison between systems of DAP and radiographic technique has proven useful in identifying areas where there may be a potential for optimization.

  16. Baseline studies of terrestrial outdoor gamma dose rate levels in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farai, I.P.; Jibiri, N.N.

    2000-01-01

    The outdoor γ radiation exposure dose rates due to the radioactivity concentration of 40 K, 238 U and 232 Th in the soil across different environments in Nigeria have been carried out using the low-cost method of in situ γ ray spectrometry. Measurements were made in 18 cities, spread across the three major zones of the country. The radioactivity concentrations of these radionuclides in the soil were used to determine their γ radiation absorbed dose rates in the air. The range of average total dose rate due to the three radionuclides in the Eastern zone is between 0.025 and 0.081 μGy.h -1 with an average of 0.040 ± 0.006 μGy.h -1 , 0.041 and 0.214 μGy.h -1 with a mean of 0.089 ± 0.014 μGy.h -1 for the Western zone and between 0.066 and 0.222 μGy.h -1 with a mean of 0.102 ± 0.032 μGy.h -1 for the Northern zone. The average annual outdoor effective dose equivalents of 51 ± 8 μSv.y -1 , 114 ± 18 μSv.y -1 and 130 ± 41 μSv.y -1 have been estimated for the Eastern, Western and Northern zones, respectively. The average annual effective dose equivalent for the country has been estimated to be 98 ± 15 μSv.y -1 and the collective effective dose equivalent as 9.7 x 103 man.Sv.y -1 . Measurements have been taken as representing the baseline values of natural radioactivity as no artificial radionuclide was detected at any of the sites surveyed. (author)

  17. Thyroid hormone levels and hepatic enzyme activity in lactating dams after gestational exposure to low dose PBDE 47

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyama, S.N.; Grande, S.W.; Akkoc, Z.; Souza, C.A.M. de; Chahoud, I. [Charite Univ. Medical School Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dept. Toxicology, Campus Benjamin Franklin; Fidalgo-Neto, A.A. [Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Lab. of Environmental Toxicology

    2004-09-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), a class of widely used flame retardants, are found extensively in the environment (shown by several studies on sentinel animal species), as well as in humans. In rodents, technical commercial PBDE mixtures and individual congeners have shown to interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis, produce a mix-type induction of hepatic microsomal enzymes, disrupt spontaneous behaviour, impair learning and memory and alter the cholinergic transmitter system. In rat and mice, some technical PBDE commercial mixtures such as DE-71 and Bromkal 70 and the congener PBDE 47 have shown to decrease circulating thyroid hormone levels. PBDEs are also able to induce both hepatic phase I and phase II detoxification enzymes, demonstrated by several investigations in laboratory animals. For example, induction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), pentoxyresorufin-Odespenthylase (PROD) and uridinediphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGT) has been shown in rodents and cell lines after exposure to technical mixtures or individual congeners. However, these studies deal with doses much higher than that found in human tissues, highlighting the importance of assessing the adverse effects of doses close to human exposure levels. PBDE 47 is the most predominant congener found in environmental and human samples (including human milk) and, therefore, hazard identification is extremely important for human risk assessment. We administered a single dose to gravid dams on gestation day 6 of either 140 {mu}g/kg BW or 700 {mu}g/kg BW of the congener, 2,2'4,4'-tetrabromo diphenyl ether (PBDE 47). These doses are pertinent to human exposure levels because a study by She et al. found a mean level of 33.3 {mu}g PBDE 47 /kg fat in human breast adipose tissue with a range from 7.01 to 196 {mu}g PBDE 47 /kg fat. In this study, thyroid hormone levels and hepatic enzyme activity were evaluated in lactating dams after in utero administration of low dose PBDE 47.

  18. Can we avoid high levels of dose escalation for high-risk prostate cancer in the setting of androgen deprivation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakespeare TP

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas P Shakespeare,1,2 Shea W Wilcox,1 Noel J Aherne1,2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, North Coast Cancer Institute, 2Rural Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Coffs Harbour, NSW, Australia Aim: Both dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (DE-EBRT and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT improve outcomes in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. However, there is little evidence specifically evaluating DE-EBRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving ADT, particularly for EBRT doses >74 Gy. We aimed to determine whether DE-EBRT >74 Gy improves outcomes for patients with high-risk prostate cancer receiving long-term ADT. Patients and methods: Patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated on an institutional protocol prescribing 3–6 months neoadjuvant ADT and DE-EBRT, followed by 2 years of adjuvant ADT. Between 2006 and 2012, EBRT doses were escalated from 74 Gy to 76 Gy and then to 78 Gy. We interrogated our electronic medical record to identify these patients and analyzed our results by comparing dose levels. Results: In all, 479 patients were treated with a 68-month median follow-up. The 5-year biochemical disease-free survivals for the 74 Gy, 76 Gy, and 78 Gy groups were 87.8%, 86.9%, and 91.6%, respectively. The metastasis-free survivals were 95.5%, 94.5%, and 93.9%, respectively, and the prostate cancer-specific survivals were 100%, 94.4%, and 98.1%, respectively. Dose escalation had no impact on any outcome in either univariate or multivariate analysis. Conclusion: There was no benefit of DE-EBRT >74 Gy in our cohort of high-risk prostate patients treated with long-term ADT. As dose escalation has higher risks of radiotherapy-induced toxicity, it may be feasible to omit dose escalation beyond 74 Gy in this group of patients. Randomized studies evaluating dose escalation for high-risk patients receiving ADT should be considered. Keywords: radiotherapy, IMRT, dose

  19. Use of high-dose, twice-yearly albendazole and ivermectin to suppress Wuchereria bancrofti microfilarial levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Benoit; Coulibaly, Yaya I; Dolo, Housseini; Konate, Siaka; Coulibaly, Siaka Y; Sanogo, Dramane; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Michel E; Doumbia, Salif Seriba; Diallo, Abdallah A; Traore, Sekou F; Diaman Keita, Adama; Fay, Michael P; Nutman, Thomas B; Klion, Amy D

    2010-12-01

    Annual mass treatment with albendazole and ivermectin is the mainstay of current strategies to interrupt transmission of Wuchereria bancrofti in Africa. More-effective microfilarial suppression could potentially reduce the time necessary to interrupt transmission, easing the economic burden of mass treatment programs in countries with limited resources. To determine the effect of increased dose and frequency of albendazole-ivermectin treatment on microfilarial clearance, 51 W. bancrofti microfilaremic residents of an area of W. bancrofti endemicity in Mali were randomized to receive 2 doses of annual, standard-dose albendazole-ivermectin therapy (400 mg and 150 μg/kg; n = 26) or 4 doses of twice-yearly, increased-dose albendazole-ivermectin therapy (800 mg and 400 μg/kg; n = 25). Although microfilarial levels decreased significantly after therapy in both groups, levels were significantly lower in the high-dose, twice-yearly group at 12, 18, and 24 months. Furthermore, there was complete clearance of detectable microfilariae at 12 months in the 19 patients in the twice-yearly therapy group with data available at 12 months, compared with 9 of 21 patients in the annual therapy group (P < .001, by Fisher's exact test). This difference between the 2 groups was sustained at 18 and 24 months, with no detectable microfilariae in the patients receiving twice-yearly treatment. Worm nests detectable by ultrasonography and W. bancrofti circulating antigen levels, as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were decreased to the same degree in both groups at 24 months, compared with baseline. These findings suggest that increasing the dosage and frequency of albendazole-ivermectin treatment enhances suppression of microfilariae but that this effect may not be attributable to improved adulticidal activity.

  20. Relationship of cumulative low-level dose of ionizing radiation on human eye lens and occurrence of cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deolalikar, Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), issued a statement on Tissue Reaction, lowering the equivalent dose limit for eye lens for occupational exposure to 20 mSv per year. With a view to determine presence of any relationship between the cumulative low-level occupational radiation dose to the eye lens and occurrence of cataract, departmental records of the annual medical examination of employees of Narora Atomic Power Plant were examined along with the NAPS eye camps and surgical records of the employees. Analysis of the data showed no demonstrable definite relationship between the two. The analysis of the data and the observations are discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. A study of indoor radon levels and radon effective dose in dwellings of some cities of Gezira State in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzain Abd-Elmoniem Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to natural sources of radiation, especially 222Rn and its short-lived daughter products has become an important issue throughout the world because sustained exposure of humans to indoor radon may cause lung cancer. The indoor radon concentration level and radon effective dose rate were carried out in the dwellings of Medani, El Hosh, Elmanagil, Haj Abd Allah, and Wad Almahi cities, Gezira State - Central Sudan, in 393 measurements, using passive integrated solid-state nuclear track devices containing allyl diglycol carbonate plastic detectors. The radon concentration in the corresponding dwellings was found to vary from (57 ± 8 Bq/m3 in Medani to 41 ± 9 Bq/m3 in Wad Almahi, with an average of 49 ± 10 Bq/m3. Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 and 0.4 for the equilibrium factor of radon indoors, we found that the annual effective dose rate from 222Rn in the studied dwellings ranges from 1.05 to 1.43 mSv per year and the relative lung cancer risk for radon exposure was 1.044%. In this research, we also correlated the relationship of radon concentration and building age. From our study, it is clear that the annual effective dose rate is larger than the “normal” background level as quoted by UNSCEAR, lower than the recommended action level of ICRP, and less than the maximum permissible dose defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

  2. Positioning and number of nutritional levels in dose-response trials to estimate the optimal-level and the adjustment of the models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Augusto de Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of the number and position of nutrient levels used in dose-response trials in the estimation of the optimal-level (OL and the goodness of fit on the models: quadratic polynomial (QP, exponential (EXP, linear response plateau (LRP and quadratic response plateau (QRP. It was used data from dose-response trials realized in FCAV-Unesp Jaboticabal considering the homogeneity of variances and normal distribution. The fit of the models were evaluated considered the following statistics: adjusted coefficient of determination (R²adj, coefficient of variation (CV and the sum of the squares of deviations (SSD.It was verified in QP and EXP models that small changes on the placement and distribution of the levels caused great changes in the estimation of the OL. The LRP model was deeply influenced by the absence or presence of the level between the response and stabilization phases (change in the straight to plateau. The QRP needed more levels on the response phase and the last level on stabilization phase to estimate correctly the plateau. It was concluded that the OL and the adjust of the models are dependent on the positioning and the number of the levels and the specific characteristics of each model, but levels defined near to the true requirement and not so spaced are better to estimate the OL.

  3. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Jilin Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wanxi; Chen Huiying; Ju Cuixiang; Li Fulin; Li Xianggao

    1994-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Jilin Province was measured and the population dose was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average value of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization was 3.2 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 . The average absorbed dose rates in air from terrestrial γ radiation were 7.7 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 9.8 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 8.7 Bq·m -3 outdoors and 5.8 Bq·m -3 indoors. The average concentration of natural radionuclides U, Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K were 3.7 x 10 -2 , 2.4 x 10 -2 , 14.7 x 10 -2 and 81.5 Bq·kg -1 in food, and 2.3, 0.1, 1.1 and 0.3 Bq·L -1 in drinking water, respectively. The total annual individual average effective dose equivalent from natural background radiation was about 1.5 mSv

  4. 42 CFR 82.19 - How will NIOSH address uncertainty about dose levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... characterized with a probability distribution that accounts for the uncertainty of the estimate. This information will be used by DOL in the calculation of probability of causation, under HHS guidelines for... THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000 Dose Reconstruction Process...

  5. Nerve conduction and antioxidant levels in experimentally diabetic rats: effects of streptozotocin dose and diabetes duration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Dam, P.S. van; Asbeck, B.S. van; Bravenboer, B.; Oirschot, J.F.L.M. van; Marx, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Oxidative stress supposedly plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. We have studied whether a variation in the streptozotocin (STZ) dose or diabetes duration affects the outcome of measurements of oxidative damage in relation to nerve conduction. In experiment 1, we induced diabetes

  6. Dose-dependent effects of oral tyrosine administration on plasma tyrosine levels and cognition in aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, van de Ondine; Bloemendaal, Mirjam; Heus, De Rianne; Aarts, Esther

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  7. Dose-Dependent Effects of Oral Tyrosine Administration on Plasma Tyrosine Levels and Cognition in Aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rest, O. van de; Bloemendaal, M.; Heus, R.A.A. de; Aarts, E.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of tyrosine on plasma response and cognition in aging are unknown. We assessed the dose-dependent response to tyrosine administration in older adults in both plasma tyrosine concentrations and working memory performance. In this double blind randomized cross-over trial 17 older adults

  8. Professional exposure of medical workers: radiation levels, radiation risk and personal dose monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Guang

    2005-01-01

    The application of radiation in the field of medicine is the most active area. Due to the rapid and strong development of intervention radiology at present near 20 years, particularly, the medical workers become a popularize group which most rapid increasing and also receiving the must high of professional exposure dose. Because, inter alias, radiation protection management nag training have not fully follow up, the aware of radioactive protection and appropriate approach have tot fully meet the development and need, the professional exposure dose received by medical workers, especially those being engaged in intervention radiology, are more higher, as well as have not yet fully receiving the complete personal dose monitoring, the medical workers become the population group which should be paid the most attention to. The writer would advice in this paper that all medical workers who being received a professional radiation exposure should pay more attention to the safety and healthy they by is strengthening radiation protection and receiving complete personal dose monitoring. (authors)

  9. High-dose vitamin B6 decreases homocysteine serum levels in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodownik, Chanoch; Lerner, Vladimir; Vishne, Tali; Sela, Ben-Ami; Levine, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin B6 plays an essential role in the normal functioning of the central nervous system. Normal homocysteine (Hcy) serum level is maintained by remethylation of Hcy to methionine by enzymes that require folic acid and vitamin B12 and by catabolism to cysteine by a vitamin B6-dependent enzyme. These findings may be consistent with the hypothesis that the vitamin B6 status may influence plasma Hcy levels. The aims of this preliminary study were (1) to determine whether a correlation exists between Hcy and vitamin B6 levels in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders and (2) to investigate whether treatment with high-dose vitamin B6 may reduce Hcy levels in these patients. In this preliminary study, we enrolled 11 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorders (7 men and 4 women; mean age +/- SD, 50 +/- 12 years) receiving high doses of vitamin B6 treatment (1200 mg/d) for 12 weeks. Blood samples for the assessment of pyridoxal-5-phosphate and Hcy serum levels were obtained at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Age was significantly positively correlated with Hcy levels at baseline (r = 0.392, P = 0.004). All other parameters, including diagnosis, disease duration, and pyridoxal-5-phosphate serum level, were not correlated with Hcy serum levels at baseline. After vitamin B6 treatment, Hcy serum levels significantly decreased (14.2 +/- 3.4 vs. 11.8 +/- 2.0 micromol/L, respectively, t = 2.679, P = 0.023); this decrease being statistically significant in men but not in women. High doses of vitamin B6 lead to a decrease in Hcy serum level in male patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

  10. Retrospective Analysis of Dose Titration and Serum Testosterone Level Assessments in Patients Treated With Topical Testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muram, David; Kaltenboeck, Anna; Boytsov, Natalie; Hayes-Larson, Eleanor; Ivanova, Jasmina; Birnbaum, Howard G; Swindle, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    Patterns of care following topical testosterone agent (TTA) initiation are poorly understood. This study aimed to characterize care following TTA initiation and compare results between patients with and without a serum testosterone (T) assay within 30 days before and including TTA initiation. Adult men (N=4,146) initiating TTAs from January 1, 2011, to March 31, 2012, were identified from a commercially insured database. Patients were included if they initiated at recommended starting dose (RSD) and had ≥12 and ≥6 months of continuous eligibility preinitiation (baseline) and postinitiation (study period), respectively. Patients were stratified by preinitiation T assay. Maintenance dose attainment month was determined using unadjusted generalized estimating equations regression to compare dose relative to RSD month by month. Outcomes included maintenance dose attainment month, time to stopping of index TTA refills or a claim for nonindex testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), and proportion of patients with study period T assay or diagnosis of hypogonadism (HG) or another low testosterone condition, and were compared using chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Maintenance dose was attained in Month 4 postinitiation, at 115.2% of RSD. Approximately 46% of patients had a preinitiation T assay; these men were more likely to receive a diagnosis of HG or another low testosterone condition, to have a follow-up T assay, to continue treatment by filling a nonindex TRT, and less likely to stop refilling treatment with their index TTA. Differences in care following TTA initiation suggest that preinitiation T assays (i.e., guideline-based care) may be helpful in ensuring treatment benefits. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Computer-aided pulmonary nodule detection. Performance of two CAD systems at different CT dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, Patrick Alexander; Rogalla, P.; Klessen, C.; Lembcke, A.; Romano, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of dose reduction on the performance of computer-aided lung nodule detection systems (CAD) of two manufacturers by comparing respective CAD results on ultra-low-dose computed tomography (ULD-CT) and standard dose CT (SD-CT). Materials and Methods: Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) data sets of 26 patients (13 male and 13 female, patients 31 - 74 years old) were retrospectively selected for CAD analysis. Indication for CT examination was staging of a known primary malignancy or suspected pulmonary malignancy. CT images were consecutively acquired at 5 mAs (ULD-CT) and 75 mAs (SD-CT) with 120kV tube voltage (1 mm slice thickness). The standard of reference was determined by three experienced readers in consensus. CAD reading algorithms (pre-commercial CAD system, Philips, Netherlands: CAD-1; LungCARE, Siemens, Germany: CAD-2) were applied to the CT data sets. Results: Consensus reading identified 253 nodules on SD-CT and ULD-CT. Nodules ranged in diameter between 2 and 41 mm (mean diameter 4.8 mm). Detection rates were recorded with 72% and 62% (CAD-1 vs. CAD-2) for SD-CT and with 73% and 56% for ULD-CT. Median also positive rates per patient were calculated with 6 and 5 (CAD-1 vs. CAD-2) for SD-CT and with 8 and 3 for ULD-CT. After separate statistical analysis of nodules with diameters of 5 mm and greater, the detection rates increased to 83% and 61% for SD-CT and to 89% and 67% for ULD-CT (CAD-1 vs. CAD-2). For both CAD systems there were no significant differences between the detection rates for standard and ultra-low-dose data sets (p>0.05). Conclusion: Dose reduction of the underlying CT scan did not significantly influence nodule detection performance of the tested CAD systems. (orig.)

  12. Metabolites Identified during Varied Doses of Aspergillus Species in Zea mays Grains, and Their Correlation with Aflatoxin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titilayo D. O. Falade

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxin contamination is associated with the development of aflatoxigenic fungi such as Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus on food grains. This study was aimed at investigating metabolites produced during fungal development on maize and their correlation with aflatoxin levels. Maize cobs were harvested at R3 (milk, R4 (dough, and R5 (dent stages of maturity. Individual kernels were inoculated in petri dishes with four doses of fungal spores. Fungal colonisation, metabolite profile, and aflatoxin levels were examined. Grain colonisation decreased with kernel maturity: milk-, dough-, and dent-stage kernels by approximately 100%, 60%, and 30% respectively. Aflatoxin levels increased with dose at dough and dent stages. Polar metabolites including alanine, proline, serine, valine, inositol, iso-leucine, sucrose, fructose, trehalose, turanose, mannitol, glycerol, arabitol, inositol, myo-inositol, and some intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA—also known as citric acid or Krebs cycle were important for dose classification. Important non-polar metabolites included arachidic, palmitic, stearic, 3,4-xylylic, and margaric acids. Aflatoxin levels correlated with levels of several polar metabolites. The strongest positive and negative correlations were with arabitol (R = 0.48 and turanose and (R = −0.53, respectively. Several metabolites were interconnected with the TCA; interconnections of the metabolites with the TCA cycle varied depending upon the grain maturity.

  13. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-12-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h(-1) up to 1.5 Gy h(-1). Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h(-1). A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR10) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h(-1), followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h(-1) and 169 ± 12 mGy h(-1) on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h(-1), antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h(-1) which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic stress conditions

  14. Environmental radon level and radiation dose to residents in Shanghai municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haoran; Chen Peihua; Wen Yin

    1992-01-01

    From 1987 to 1990 we observed the diurnal and seasonal changes of radon concentrations indoors and outdoors in Shanghai Municipality. The average equilibrium factors for radon decay products indoors and outdoors were 0.5 and 0.7, respectively. The indoor radon concentrations at city proper, town and rural area were 11.2, 10.5 and 13.6 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The outdoor radon concentration was 5.1 Bq/m 3 . The occupancy factors in the city proper were 0.82 and 0.18 in the adults, 0.87 and 0.13 in the children for indoor and outdoor exposures, respectively. In 1989 the population weighted means of the annual effective dose equivalent amounted to approximately 0.53 mSv. The collective dose equivalent was 6800 man. Sv

  15. Dose level investigation in tests with gastrointestinal fluoroscopy as a part of a quality control program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canevaro, L.V.; Borges, J.C.; Kocj, H.A.

    1995-01-01

    The Radiation Protection and Dosimetry Institute of the National Nuclear Energy Commission (IRD/CNEN) Brazilian and the Radiodiagnostic Service of the Rio de Janeiro Federal University Hospital, (Brazil), have been engaged in the development of quality control programs applied to radiodiagnostics, one of them concerning gastrointestinal fluoroscopy. Since fluoroscopic examinations normally deals with high doses, they represent an important fraction of public exposure. They deserve special attention and risks to patients should be considered individually, not only as a population statistics. This work describes steps followed and results obtained in the estimation of doses for patients and physicians. Examinations investigated were esofagography, gastroduodenal seriography and colon with double contrast media, using conventional equipment with fluorescent screens, carried on by physicians engaged in the first year of medical residence. (author). 14 refs., 2 tabs

  16. Stereotactic radiosurgery for newly diagnosed brain metastases. Comparison of three dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rades, Dirk; Hornung, Dagmar; Blanck, Oliver; Martens, Kristina; Khoa, Mai Trong; Trang, Ngo Thuy; Hueppe, Michael; Terheyden, Patrick; Gliemroth, Jan; Schild, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Three doses were compared for local control of irradiated metastases, freedom from new brain metastases, and survival in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for one to three newly diagnosed brain metastases. In all, 134 patients were assigned to three groups according to the SRS dose given to the margins of the lesions: 13-16 Gy (n = 33), 18 Gy (n = 18), and 20 Gy (n = 83). Additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age (≤ 60 vs. > 60 years), gender, Karnofsky Performance Scale score (70-80 vs. 90-100), tumor type (non-small-cell lung cancer vs. melanoma vs. others), number of brain metastases (1 vs. 2-3), lesion size ( 24 months). For 13-16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy, the 1-year local control rates were 31, 65, and 79 %, respectively (p [de

  17. Epidemiological survey of the effects of low level radiation dose: a comparative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1993-10-01

    This is the fifth of six volumes containing synopses of surveys, notably from the U.K., U.S.A., Canada, Japan and New Zealand, that have studied the effects of low dose irradiation of adults. The effects of radon are also considered. Incidence and mortality of cancer of the following sites are included:-Prostate, Testis, Bladder, Urinogenital tract, uterus and cervix, pancreas, liver, gall bladder, skin, connective tissue, eyes. Melanomas are also listed. (UK)

  18. Determination of the optimal dose reduction level via iterative reconstruction using 640-slice volume chest CT in a pig model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Liu

    Full Text Available To determine the optimal dose reduction level of iterative reconstruction technique for paediatric chest CT in pig models.27 infant pigs underwent 640-slice volume chest CT with 80kVp and different mAs. Automatic exposure control technique was used, and the index of noise was set to SD10 (Group A, routine dose, SD12.5, SD15, SD17.5, SD20 (Groups from B to E to reduce dose respectively. Group A was reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP, and Groups from B to E were reconstructed using iterative reconstruction (IR. Objective and subjective image quality (IQ among groups were compared to determine an optimal radiation reduction level.The noise and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR in Group D had no significant statistical difference from that in Group A (P = 1.0. The scores of subjective IQ in Group A were not significantly different from those in Group D (P>0.05. There were no obvious statistical differences in the objective and subjective index values among the subgroups (small, medium and large subgroups of Group D. The effective dose (ED of Group D was 58.9% lower than that of Group A (0.20±0.05mSv vs 0.48±0.10mSv, p <0.001.In infant pig chest CT, using iterative reconstruction can provide diagnostic image quality; furthermore, it can reduce the dosage by 58.9%.

  19. Resolving the limitations of using glycine as EPR dosimeter in the intermediate level of gamma dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelezz, E.; Hassan, G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The dosimetric properties of the simplest amino acid "glycine"- using EPR technique- were investigated in comparison to reference standard alanine dosimeter. The EPR spectrum of glycine at room temperature is complex, but immediately after irradiation, it appears as a triplet hyperfine structure probably due to the dominant contribution of the (•CH2COO-) radical. The dosimetric peak of glycine is at g-factor 2.0026 ± 0.0015 and its line width is 9 G at large modulation amplitude (7 G). The optimum microwave was studied and was found to be as alanine 8 mW; the post-irradiation as well as the dose rate effects were discussed. Dosimetric peak intensity of glycine fades rapidly to be about one quarter of its original value during 20 days for dried samples and it stabilizes after that. The dose response study in an intermediate range (2-1000 Gy) reveals that the glycine SNR is about 2 times more than that of alanine pellets when measured immediately after irradiation and 4 times more than that of glycine itself after 22 days of irradiation. The effect of energy dependence was studied and interpreted theoretically by calculation of mass energy absorption coefficient. The calculated combined uncertainties for glycine and alanine are nearly the same and were found to be 2.42% and 2.33%, respectively. Glycine shows interesting dosimetric properties in the range of ionizing radiation doses investigated.

  20. Level of natural background radiation and dose to population in Heilongjiang province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Yicheng; Wang Lu; He Yongjiang

    1992-01-01

    The natural background radiation in Heilongjiang Province was measured and the population dose was estimated. The results showed that the population-weighted average values of the absorbed dose rate in air from cosmic ray ionization were 3.3 ± 10 -8 Gy·h -1 outdoors and 3.0 x 10 -8 Gy·h -1 indoors. The average values of radon in air were 11.3 Bq·m -3 outdoors and 20.8 Bq·m -3 indoors. The average concentrations of natural radionuclides U, Th, 226 Ra, and 40 K were 6.1 x 10 -2 , 1.1 x 10 -2 , 8.4 x 10 -2 , and 68.9 Bq·kg -1 respectively in food, and 4.8 x 10 -2 , 2.0 x 10 -4 , 1.2 x 10 -2 and 4.6 x 10 -2 Bq·L -1 respectively in drinking water. The total annual individual average effective dose equivalents from natural background radiation were about 2200 μSv. Among them the contributions of cosmic rays, terrestrial radiation, radon and thoron daughters exposure in air, internal exposure within the body were about 320, 630, 860, and 390 μSv, respectively

  1. Effect of low dose gamma-radiation upon Newcastle disease virus antibody level in chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilic, M.; Gottstein, Z.; Ciglar Grozdanic, I.; Matanovic, K.; Miljanic, S.; Mazija, H.; Kraljevic, P.

    2009-01-01

    The specific antibody response against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs exposed to low dose gamma-radiation was studied. Materials and methods: Two groups of eggs of commercial meat chicken lines were irradiated with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation, respectively. The same number of eggs unexposed to gamma-radiation served as controls. After hatching the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation was not vaccinated while the group of chicken hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation was vaccinated on the 14 day. Specific serum anti-Newcastle disease virus antibodies were quantified by the hemagglutination inhibition assay with 4 HA units of Newcastle disease virus La Sota strain. Result: Specific antibody titres against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated before incubation and vaccinated on the 14 th day significantly increased on the 28 th day. Specific antibody titre against Newcastle disease virus in the blood serum of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19 th day of incubation and non-vaccinated was significantly higher on the 1 st and 14 th day. Conclusion: Acute irradiation of heavy breeding chicken eggs with the dose of 0.30 Gy 60 Co gamma-rays before incubation and on the 19 th day of incubation could have a stimulative effect on humoral immunity in chickens.

  2. Levels of doses to radiological workers in Ethiopia: 1977-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayou, Teshome.

    1991-01-01

    During the period 1977 to 1988, a total of 10,494 Eastman Kodak type 2 film badges and 19,236 Vinten lithium fluoride thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDS) were delivered to medical workers in Ethiopia of which 5,135 (48.93%) film badges and 19,177 (99.69%) TLDS were evaluated. The annual average occupational doses to the workers were estimated to be of 1.44 and 4.51 man-Sv with corresponding collective dose equivalents to 0.29 and 4.51 man-Sv respectively. Comparisons of doses to similar workers in different countries were compiled from the literature. Based on the TLD results and the 1977 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) risk coefficients it is estimated that the occurrence of extra fatal and non-fatal cancer cases is in the order of 74 per million radiological workers per year. The hereditary defects expected are 18 and 36 cases in the next two and in all future generations respectively. During these periods, the number of institutions monitored rose from 35 to 88 while the workers monitored increased from 100 to 450

  3. Effect of administered radioactive dose level on image quality of brain perfusion imaging with 99mTc-HMPAO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.Armeniakos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain perfusion imaging by means of 99mTc-labeled hexamethyl propylene amine oxime (HMPAO is a well-established Nuclear Medicine diagnostic procedure. The administered dose range recommended by the supplying company and reported in bibliography is rather wide (approximately 9.5-27 mCi. This fact necessitates further quantitative analysis of the technique, so as to minimise patient absorbed dose without compromising the examination diagnostic value. In this study, a quantitative evaluation of the radiopharmaceutical performance for different values of administered dose (10, 15, 20 mCi was carried out. Subsequently, a generic image quality index was correlated with the administered dose, to produce an overall performance indicator. Through this cost-to-benefit type analysis, the necessity of administration of higher radioactive dose levels in order to perform the specific diagnostic procedure was examined.Materials & methods: The study was based on a sample of 78 patients (56 administered with 10 mCi, 10 with 15 mCi and 12 with 20 mCi. Some patients were classified as normal, while others presented various forms of pathology. Evaluation of image quality was based on contrast, noise and contrast-to-noise ratio indicators, denoted CI, NI and CNR respectively. Calculation of all indicators was based on wavelet transform. An overall performance indicator (denoted PI, produced by the ratio of CNR by administered dose, was also calculated.Results: Calculation of skewness parameter revealed the normality of CI, NI and non-normality of CNR, PI populations. Application of appropriate statistical tests (analysis of variance for normal and Kruskal-Wallis test for non-normal populations showed that there is a statistically significant difference in CI (p0.05 values. Application of Tukey test for normal populations CI, NI led to the conclusion that CI(10 mCi = CI(20 mCiNI(20 mCi, while NI(15 mCi can not be characterised. Finally, application of non

  4. Análise da dose do laser de baixa potência em equipamentos nacionais Analysis of low-level laser therapy doses in Brazilian equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TY Fukuda

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A laserterapia de baixa potência vem sendo cada vez mais utilizada, e o crescente interesse por seus efeitos relaciona-se com a grande quantidade de publicações científicas. Muitos terapeutas e pesquisadores têm-se baseado na definição da dose do laser pela densidade energética (deltaE; porém, a grande variedade de equipamentos de laser pode levar a diferença nos resultados terapêuticos encontrados, por fornecerem parâmetros que variam de acordo com o fabricante. OBJETIVO: Analisar a energia final transmitida ao tecido ao aplicar-se a mesma deltaE em equipamentos de diferentes marcas nacionais. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados sete equipamentos nacionais, com potência média (Pm diferentes, e foram realizadas simulações aplicando deltaE de 1J/cm² em cada aparelho, para avaliar possíveis diferenças na energia final. RESULTADOS: A mesmadeltaE aplicada em diferentes aparelhos nacionais forneceu energia final que variou entre 10 e 90mJ. Esta variação na energia deveu-se principalmente a diferenças na Pm, sendo encontrados valores entre 5,4 e 75mW. CONCLUSÃO: Esta variabilidade na energia final, que é transmitida ao tecido, indica que a deltaE parece não ser o parâmetro que melhor descreve a dose a ser utilizada. É preciso mencionar não só a deltaE, mas também a energia final, para que se possa estabelecer a dose para obtenção do melhor resultado terapêutico.INTRODUCTION: Low-level laser therapy is becoming more popular and there is a growing interest in its effects, as reflected in the increased number of articles published about the subject. Many therapists and researchers have used a laser dose definition based on energy density (deltaE. However, the variety of laser equipments may lead to differences in the therapeutic results found, since the parameters supplied by these equipments vary according to the manufacturer. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the final energy transmitted to the tissue when

  5. Characterizing dose response relationships: Chronic gamma radiation in Lemna minor induces oxidative stress and altered polyploidy level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hoeck, Arne; Horemans, Nele; Van Hees, May; Nauts, Robin; Knapen, Dries; Vandenhove, Hildegarde; Blust, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    The biological effects and interactions of different radiation types in plants are still far from understood. Among different radiation types, external gamma radiation treatments have been mostly studied to assess the biological impact of radiation toxicity in organisms. Upon exposure of plants to gamma radiation, ionisation events can cause, either directly or indirectly, severe biological damage to DNA and other biomolecules. However, the biological responses and oxidative stress related mechanisms under chronic radiation conditions are poorly understood in plant systems. In the following study, it was questioned if the Lemna minor growth inhibition test is a suitable approach to also assess the radiotoxicity of this freshwater plant. Therefore, L. minor plants were continuously exposed for seven days to 12 different dose rate levels covering almost six orders of magnitude starting from 80 μGy h"−"1 up to 1.5 Gy h"−"1. Subsequently, growth, antioxidative defence system and genomic responses of L. minor plants were evaluated. Although L. minor plants could survive the exposure treatment at environmental relevant exposure conditions, higher dose rate levels induced dose dependent growth inhibitions starting from approximately 27 mGy h"−"1. A ten-percentage growth inhibition of frond area Effective Dose Rate (EDR_1_0) was estimated at 95 ± 7 mGy h"−"1, followed by 153 ± 13 mGy h"−"1 and 169 ± 12 mGy h"−"1 on fresh weight and frond number, respectively. Up to a dose rate of approximately 5 mGy h"−"1, antioxidative enzymes and metabolites remained unaffected in plants. A significant change in catalase enzyme activity was found at 27 mGy h"−"1 which was accompanied with significant increases of other antioxidative enzyme activities and shifts in ascorbate and glutathione content at higher dose rate levels, indicating an increase in oxidative stress in plants. Recent plant research hypothesized that environmental genotoxic

  6. Low-dose spironolactone reduces plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolzenburg Oxlund, Christina; Cangemi, Claudia; Henriksen, J E

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic patients with hypertension are at particularly high risk of vascular damage and consequently cardiovascular and renal disease. Fibulin-1, an extracellular matrix glycoprotein, is increased in arterial tissue and plasma from individuals with type 2 diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate...... whether antihypertensive treatment with spironolactone changes plasma fibulin-1 levels. In a multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 119 patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension were included. A dose of spironolactone 25 mg or matching placebo was added to previous....... Treatment with low-dose spironolactone reduced plasma fibulin-1 levels in patients with type 2 diabetes and resistant hypertension. This supports the hypothesis that the antihypertensive effect of the mineralocorticoid receptor blocker in part may be due to regression of vascular remodeling....

  7. The Effect of Increasing Doses of Saw Palmetto Fruit Extract on Serum PSA Levels: Analysis of the CAMUS Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Gerald L.; McCullum-Hill, Christie; Sandhu, Gurdarshan S.; Crawford, E. David; Barry, Michael J.; Cantor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Saw palmetto extracts are used for treating lower urinary tract symptoms in men despite level I evidence concluding that saw palmetto was ineffective in reducing lower urinary symptoms. We sought to determine whether higher doses of saw palmetto as studied in CAMUS affect serum PSA levels. Materials and Methods The CAMUS trial was a randomized, placebo-controlled double blind multi-centered North American trial conducted between June 5, 2008 and October 10, 2012 in which 369 men >45 years of age with AUA symptom score ≥ 8 and ≤ 24 were randomly assigned to placebo or dose escalation saw palmetto, which consisted of 320mg for first 24 weeks to 640mg for next 24 weeks to 960mg for last 24 weeks of this 72 week trial. Serum PSA levels (Beckman-Coulter) were obtained at baseline and at weeks 24, 48 and 72 and were compared between treatment groups using the pooled t and Fisher's exact tests. Results Serum PSA levels were similar at baseline for the placebo (1.93 ± 1.59 ng/ml) and saw palmetto groups (2.20 ± 1.95, p = 0.16). Changes in PSA levels over the course of the study were similar: placebo group mean change 0.16 ± 1.08 ng/ml and saw palmetto group mean change 0.23 ± 0.83 ng/ml (p value 0.50). Additionally, no differential effect on serum PSA levels was observed between treatment arms when groups were stratified by baseline PSA values. Conclusions Saw palmetto extract does not affect serum PSA levels more than placebo even at relatively high doses. PMID:23253958

  8. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-02-01

    To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences in child size. These DRLs were obtained at the largest pediatric hospital in Chile, with an active optimization program, and could be used by other hospitals in the Latin America region to compare their current patient dose values and determine whether corrective action is appropriate. © 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  9. Stereotactic radiosurgery for newly diagnosed brain metastases. Comparison of three dose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, Dirk [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); Hornung, Dagmar [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Blanck, Oliver [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); CyberKnife Center Northern Germany, Guestrow (Germany); Martens, Kristina [University of Luebeck, Department of Radiation Oncology, Luebeck (Germany); University of Luebeck, Center for Integrative Psychiatry, Luebeck (Germany); Khoa, Mai Trong [Hanoi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Trang, Ngo Thuy [Bach Mai Hospital, Nuclear Medicine and Oncology Center, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hueppe, Michael [University of Luebeck, Department of Anesthesiology, Luebeck (Germany); Terheyden, Patrick [University of Luebeck, Department of Dermatology, Luebeck (Germany); Gliemroth, Jan [University of Luebeck, Department of Neurosurgery, Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Radiation Oncology, Scottsdale (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Three doses were compared for local control of irradiated metastases, freedom from new brain metastases, and survival in patients receiving stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) alone for one to three newly diagnosed brain metastases. In all, 134 patients were assigned to three groups according to the SRS dose given to the margins of the lesions: 13-16 Gy (n = 33), 18 Gy (n = 18), and 20 Gy (n = 83). Additional potential prognostic factors were evaluated: age (≤ 60 vs. > 60 years), gender, Karnofsky Performance Scale score (70-80 vs. 90-100), tumor type (non-small-cell lung cancer vs. melanoma vs. others), number of brain metastases (1 vs. 2-3), lesion size (< 15 vs. ≥ 15 mm), extracranial metastases (no vs. yes), RPA class (1 vs. 2), and interval of cancer diagnosis to SRS (≤ 24 vs. > 24 months). For 13-16 Gy, 18 Gy, and 20 Gy, the 1-year local control rates were 31, 65, and 79 %, respectively (p < 0.001). The SRS dose maintained significance on multivariate analysis (risk ratio: 2.25; 95 % confidence interval: 1.56-3.29; p < 0.001). On intergroup comparisons of local control, 20 Gy was superior to 13-16 Gy (p < 0.001) but not to 18 Gy (p = 0.12); 18 Gy showed a strong trend toward better local control when compared with 13-16 Gy (p = 0.059). Freedom from new brain metastases (p = 0.57) and survival (p = 0.15) were not associated with SRS dose in the univariate analysis. SRS doses of 18 Gy and 20 Gy resulted in better local control than 13-16 Gy. However, 20 Gy and 18 Gy must be compared again in a larger cohort of patients. Freedom from new brain metastases and survival were not associated with SRS dose. (orig.) [German] Drei Dosislevel bei der alleinigen stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) von 1 bis 3 neu diagnostizierten Hirnmetastasen wurden hinsichtlich lokaler Kontrolle der bestrahlten Metastasen, Nichtauftreten neuer Hirnmetastasen und Gesamtueberleben verglichen. Nach der am Rand der Metastasen applizierten SRS-Dosis wurden 134 Patienten den Gruppen 13

  10. Teratogenic radiation effects: Phenomena, dose-response relationships and risk levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konermann, G.

    1991-01-01

    The report in hand informs about a study performed within the framework of the research project 'Animal experiments with albino mice for establishing a model for the detection and assessment of radiation-induced, developmental risks in man due to low-dose irradiation'. The subjects investigated in this study are: (1) Dose-response relationships for postnatal developmental disturbances of the brain as a result of prenatal X-ray treatment. (2) Biokinetics, distribution patterns and effects of inorganically and organically bonded radioiodine (I-125) during the phase of development of the brain. For investigation of the first-mentioned subject, computerized microphotograph analysis was applied for detecting and assessing disturbances of the alignment of axons, as well as deviations from normal cross-sectional data of the Cortex layer, and cerebral commissures as final locations of neurogenetic damage. With all parameters studied, the slope of the relevant curves was found to decrease as a function of age of the fetus at the time of exposure. In addition, time factor effects were investigated. For the parameter cross-sectional area of the Cortex, a clear decrease of effect was found, but for all other parameters, reactions were ambiguous. The study into the second subject was done with cell cultures, showing that the I-125 bonded to the cell nucleus has a much stronger radiotoxic effect than I-125 bonded to the cytoplasma. This difference in effect was studied in mice after incorporation of equal doses administered by way of (I-125)-sodium iodide or (I-125)-iododesoxyuridine. Long-term effects on Cortex cross-sectional areas, cerebral commissures or the texture of axons were quantified by microphotograph analysis. Acute cell death and initial disturbances of the neuronal cell growth were evident after incorporation of (I-125)-IdUR, but not detectable after administration of (I-125)-NaI. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Study of the radiation levels in low dose rate brachytherapy zones of the National Institute of Neoplastic Illnesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa J, N.; Mora Y, B.

    2006-01-01

    The present study has as objective to evaluate the radiation levels of the Brachytherapy work areas of low dose rate (Gammateque, nurses station and of hospitalization rooms of patients RIC of 4th, 5th Floor-East) and to estimate the effective dose of the occupationally exposed personnel and the public in general. The measurements of the dose rate in these areas, were registered with a radiations monitor Inspector trademark, during a period of 60 days, without altering the routinary work conditions. The more high levels of environmental dose equivalent rate registered in the different work areas its are of 1.41 and 47.78 μSv/h rooms 1 and 2 in the Gammateque environments, in the hospitalization rooms of the 4th and 5th floor in the point 1 are of 40.77 and 23.67, μSv/h respectively and in the point 2 are of 129.19 and 39.93, μSv/h respectively, and in the nurses station of the 4th and 5th floor its are respectively of 7.62 u Sv/h and 0.45 u Sv/h. According to the carried out measurements and the permanency in the work place is possible to estimate the effective dose involved to the occupationally exposed personnel. The personnel that works in Gammateque could be receiving respectively as maximum dose 0.61 mSv/month, and the personnel that works in the nurses station of 13.17 and 0.78 mSv/year in the 4th and 5th floor. These registered differences among the two floors are due to that the 5th floor counts with the shielding systems (screen) contrary to the 4th, another of the factors is the distribution form of the patient beds RIC. We should have present that the radiation levels although in some cases it is very high, however, they are below of the permissible limits according to standards, but it is still possible to reduce even more, the radiation levels in the critical points fulfilling with the ALARA principle. (Author)

  12. Impact of radiation dose on achieving nadir PSA levels after 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Leibel, Steven A.; Kelson, Suzanne; Fuks, Zvi

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Several reports have documented the prognostic value of a post-irradiation nadir PSA of ≤1 ng/ml in prostatic cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to determine which pre-treatment and treatment-related variables impact upon achieving such nadir levels. Materials and Methods: Between January 1987 and June 1995, 740 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). 214 (29%) patients were treated with neo-adjuvant androgen ablation prior to therapy and were excluded from this analysis. Among the 526 evaluable patients, the clinical stage were as follows: T 1 C=128 (24%); T 2 A=76 (14%); T 2 B=116 (22%); T 2 C=99 (19%) and T 3 =107 (21%). The prescription dose to the planning target volume (PTV) was 64.8-68.4 Gy in 87 patients (17%); 70.2 Gy in 191 (36%); 75.6 Gy in 209 (40%) and 81 Gy in 39 (7%). The median pre-treatment PSA value was 11.2 ng/ml (range 0.3-114). The median follow-up was 20 months (range: 6-76 months). Results: 242 patients (46%) had PSA levels which declined to ≤1.0 ng/ml. The median time to a nadir level of ≤1.0 was 15.6 months (range: 1-43 months) from completion of 3D-CRT. 154 (29%) patients continued to show declining PSA levels within the first 2 years after therapy, and 130 patients (25%) failed to nadir at PSA levels of ≤1.0 ng/ml. Among patients with nadir PSA levels ≤1, the 3 year PSA relapse-free survival was 91% compared to 29% for patients with nadir PSA levels >1 ng/ml (p<0.0001). A Cox-regression analysis demonstrated that nadir PSA ≤1 was the strongest predictor of PSA relapse-free survival (p<0.001) followed by Gleason score ≤ 6 (p<0.001) and stage< T3 (p=0.004). Among patients who received doses of ≥75.6 Gy, the likelihood of achieving PSA nadir levels ≤1.0 at 24 and 36 months was 86% and 93%, respectively, compared to 74 and 80%, respectively, among those who received lower doses (p<0.001). Doses of ≥75.6 Gy was the strongest

  13. Dose-to-risk conversion factors for low-level tritium exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, T.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, a large number of radiobiological studies have become available for tritium-many of them focusing on the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of tritium beta rays. These and previous studies indicate that tritium in body water produces the same spectrum of radiogenic effects, e.g., cancer, genetic effects, developmental abnormalities, and reproductive effects, observed following whole-body exposure to penetrating radiations such as gamma rays and x rays. The only significant difference in biological response between tritium beta-rays and the other common low linear-energy transfer (LET) radiations, such as gamma rays and x rays, appears to be the greater biological effectiveness of tritium beta rays. For example, tritium in the oxide form (HTO) is about 2 to 3 times more effective at low doses or low dose rates than gamma rays from 137 Cs or 60 CO (Straume, 1991). When tritium is bound to organic molecules, RBE values may be somewhat larger than those for HTO. It is now clear from the wealth of tritium data available that RBEs for tritium beta rays are higher than the quality factor of unity generally used in radiation protection

  14. Mycorrhizal dependency of mangaba tree under increasing phosphorus levels Dependência micorrízica de mangabeira em doses crescentes de fósforo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlio Alves Cardoso Filho

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the mycorrhizal dependency of mangaba tree (Hancornia speciosa plantlets, under increasing levels of phosphorus fertilization. The experimental design was completely randomized in a 4×5 factorial arrangement with three mycorrhizal fungi inocula - Gigaspora margarita, Glomus etunicatum, or a pool of native mycorrhizal fungi (Acaulospora longula, Glomus clarum, Gigaspora albida, Paraglomus sp. -, and a nonmycorrhizal control, in combination with five levels of phosphorus applied to the substrate: 0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 mg kg-1. After 180 days of growth, plantlets with inoculation of native mycorrhizal pool produced more shoot and root dry biomass and had higher shoot phosphorus content and accumulation. The noninoculated control showed the lowest values, independently of the phosphorus level. The highest relative mycorrhizal dependency occurred with the inoculation of native mycorrhizal fungi. Plants with mycorrhizal fungi did not respond to phosphorus addition above 50 mg kg-1. Mangaba tree is highly dependent on mycorrhiza, but the degree of dependency varies according to phosphorus levels and fungal inocula. In general, mangaba tree is more responsive to mycorrhizal fungi inoculation than to phosphorus addition.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a dependência micorrízica de mudas de mangaba (Hancornia speciosa, em doses crescentes de fósforo. O delineamento experimental foi inteiramente casualizado, em arranjo fatorial 4´5 com três inóculos de fungos micorrízicos - Gigaspora margarita, Glomus etunicatum, ou uma mistura de espécies de fungos micorrízicos nativos (Acaulospora longula, Glomus clarum, Gigaspora albida e Paraglomus sp. -, e um controle não micorrízico, combinados a cinco doses de fósforo no substrato: 0, 25, 50, 75 e 100 mg kg-1. Após 180 dias, as mudas com inoculação dos fungos micorrízicos nativos produziram mais biomassa seca de parte aérea e raízes e apresentaram

  15. The absorbed dose in air of photons generated from secondary cosmic rays at sea level at Nagoya, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad, Y.R.

    1995-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out to determine the absorbed dose in air of photons generated from secondary cosmic radiation at sea level at Nagoya, Japan. To isolate the contribution from cosmic photons, the pulse-height distributions due to μ particles and electrons were eliminated from the observed pulse-height distribution of a measurement with a 3'' diam. spherical NaI(Tl) detector. The pulse height due to μ particles and electrons was inferred from the coincidence technique using two types of scintillation detectors with different sensitivities to photons. To obtain the photon fluence rate for further dose calculation, the pulse-height distribution of cosmic photons was unfolded by the iterative method. The mean and its standard deviation of the absorbed dose in air and fluence rate due to cosmic photons calculated from a one year observation are 2.86±0.05 nGy.h -1 and 0.1342±0.0015 photons.cm -2 .s -1 , respectively. The absorbed dose in air from cosmic photons was 0.5% lower during autumn to winter and 0.6% higher during spring to summer than the mean taken over the year. (author)

  16. Comparative bioavailability of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide from a four drug fixed dose combination with separate formulations at the same dose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Shrutidevi; Singh, Inderjit; Kaur, Kanwal Jit; Bhade, Shantaram R; Kaul, Chaman Lal; Panchagnula, Ramesh

    2004-05-19

    Fixed dose combination (FDC) formulations became popular in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) because of the better patient compliance, reduced risk of monotherapy and emergence of drug resistance in contrast to treatment with separate formulations of two to four first-line drugs. However, its successful implementation in national programs is limited by probable bioinequivalency of rifampicin if present in FDC form. In this regard, World Health Organization (WHO) and International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (IUATLD) recommend FDCs only of proven bioavailability. Hence, bioequivalence study of four drug FDC tablet was conducted using 22 healthy male volunteers according to WHO recommended protocol to determine bioavailability of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide compared to standard separate combination at the same dose level. The study was designed as two period, two treatment crossover experiment with a washout period of 1 week. Bioequivalence of rifampicin was estimated by plasma and urinary method for both rifampicin and its active metabolite, des-acetyl rifampicin whereas isoniazid and pyrazinamide were estimated from plasma. Mean concentration time profiles and all the pharmacokinetic parameters of rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide from FDC tablet were comparable to individual formulations and passed the bioequivalence test with power of the test above 95%. Further, bioequivalence of both rifampicin and isoniazid shows that in vitro interaction of rifampicin and isoniazid is clinically insignificant. Thus, it was concluded that FDC formulation is bioequivalent for rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide and ensures the successful treatment of TB without compromising therapeutic efficacy of any of these components of anti-TB therapy.

  17. Determination of indoor radon concentration levels and the associated annual effective dose rate in some Ghanaian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nsiah-Akoto, I.

    2010-01-01

    Radon and its decay products in indoor air are the main source of natural internal irradiation of man. In this present work, the indoor radon concentration, the annual exposure, the annual effective dose and the annual dose equivalent to the lung received by the population were estimated in the dwellings at Dome in the Ga-East District of the Greater Accra Region, Ghana using time-integrated passive radon detectors; LR-115 Type II solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) technique. The primary objective of this project was to assess the annual effective dose rate due to the indoor radon concentration levels and the associated level of risk. Measurements were carried out from December 2009 to March 2010. After the 3 months exposure, the detectors were subjected to chemical etching in a 2.5M analytical grade sodium hydroxide solution at (60 ±1) o C, for 90mins in a constant temperature water bath to enlarge the latent tracks produced by alpha particles from the decay of radon. The etched tracks were magnified using the microfiche reader and counted with a tally counter. The mean indoor radon concentration was found to be (466.9±1.2) Bqm -3 and the mean annual exposure was (2.03±0.08) WLM. Assuming an indoor occupancy factor of 0.4 and 0.4 for equilibrium factor for radon indoors, we found out that the mean Rn-222 effective dose rate and the annual equivalent dose rate to the lung in the present study dwellings was (14.13±0.22)mSvy -1 and (3.74 E-07 ±3.50 E-06)Svy -1 respectively. The mean values of radon concentrations at Dome, Kwabenya, Biakpa, and South-Eastern part of Ghana, Prestea and Kassena-Nakana District in the previous research ranged from (9.4±0.5) to (518.7±4.0) Bqm -3 . The mean annual exposure, annual effective dose rate and the annual equivalent for the previous work ranged from (0.04±0.03)WLM to (0.58±0.05)WLM, (0.28±0.08) to (15.54±0.69mSvy -1 ), (8.23E-12±4.33E-07) to (4.15E-07± 1.13E-04) respectively. Odds ratios (ORs) for lung

  18. Damage structure in Nimonic PE16 alloy ion bombarded to high doses and gas levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Packan, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    The Nimonic PE16 alloy in solution-treated-and-aged condition was bombarded simultaneously with nickel ions and α and deuteron beams at 625 0 C to doses of 80 to 313 dpa at He/dpa = 10 and D/dpa = 25. Microstructural changes consisted of the introduction of dislocations and of cavities, and the redistribuion of γ' precipitates to these defects. Cavitational swelling remained below 1%. Cavities were represented by several distinct size classes, the smaller ones believed to be gas bubbles, and some larger ones associated with preferred growth of precipitate. Formation of bubbles at grain boundaries, and large cavities at incoherent twins intensified the possibility of mechanical separation of interfaces under high-gas irradiation conditions

  19. IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose audit service and high precision measurements for radiotherapy level dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Bera, P.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency, together with the World Health Organization, has performed postal TLD audits to verify calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. The TLD programme also monitors activities of Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs). The programme has checked approximately 4000 clinical beams in over 1100 hospitals, and in many instances significant errors have been detected in the beam calibration. Subsequent follow-up actions help to resolve the discrepancies, thus preventing further mistreatment of patients. The audits for SSDLs check the implementation of the dosimetry protocol in order to assure proper dissemination of dosimetry standards to the end-users. The TLD audit results for SSDLs show good consistency in the basic dosimetry worldwide. New TLD procedures and equipment have recently been introduced by the IAEA that include a modified TLD calibration methodology and computerised tools for automation of dose calculation from TLD readings. (author)

  20. Glucocorticoid treatment earlier in childhood and adolescence show dose-response associations with diurnal cortisol levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Holm, Sara K; Uldall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    or diurnal cortisol output; however, sex-dependent group differences were observed. Specifically, female patients had a higher CAR relative to female controls, while male patients had higher daily cortisol levels compared to male controls. Notably, CAR in female patients and daily cortisol levels in male...... for males and females....

  1. Calculation of Water Levels in Spent Fuel Pool and Effective Dose Followed by the Worker Geometrically Exposed to Radiation using Gamma-ray Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Donghee; Park, Kwangheon; Yoon, Hyoungju

    2013-01-01

    If the total effective dose value is lower than the surface dose rate of the water, the worker is able to work in a safe environment. In the case that the level of spent fuel pool is up to 550cm, there exists the limitation for workers to access to the storage pool because the result value is about 8 times higher than surface dose rate. In the case that the level of spent fuel pool is higher than 600cm, however, it can be safe work environment because the result value is lower than surface dose rate. Therefore, in the case of ISO geometry which is the same with practical situation, when considering Gamma-ray emission from spent fuel, effective dose is much higher than surface dose rate when the level of storage pool is lower than the height of fuel, 452.8cm. On the other hand, the level of effective dose decreases rapidly when the level of storage pool is higher than the level of the fuel. This means that it is not the safe environment when the level of fuel below 140cm is lower than surface dose rate. That is why the access of workers should be limited. Whereas, in the case of the level of storage pool above 600cm which is about 140cm higher than the level of the fuel, it is the safe environment for workers because the result value becomes lower than surface dose rate As a result, the level of wet storage of spent fuel should be at least 600cm for workers to work in safe environment because lower dose than surface dose rate makes less radiation exposure

  2. Uncertainties in contamination level and in doses after exposure to actinide aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, P.; Berard, P.; Frank, D.; Ansoborlo, E.; Fottorino, R.; Challeton-Devatayre, C.; Miele, A.; Blanchin, N.; Raynaud, P.; Piechowski, J. [CEA Cadarache, MEDOR, A. Miele, SST, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2006-07-01

    A task group named 'Methodes Dosimetriques de Reference' (M.E.D.O.R.) has been created recently to provide didactic tools for dose estimation from bioassay data obtained after occupational exposure. This task group is focused on 1) application limits of the available models, 2) uncertainties in radionuclide biokinetics and in doses, and 3) identification of the main parameters involved in these uncertainties. First, uncertainties in biokinetics of {sup 239}Pu (thoracic retention and excretion) and in doses have been estimated after acute inhalation of PuO{sub 2} (A.M.A.D. 5{mu}m, type S). This was performed either when the activity of the inhaled aerosol (case 1) or the thoracic retention on day 1 (case 2) could be measured. Variability assigned to the different parameters of the ICRP models was that previously reported. After simulation, a lognormal distribution of the results was observed so that uncertainties can be expressed as 95 % Confidence interval Ratio (C.R.={sigma}{sub g}{sup 4}). In case 1, most of the uncertainties were due to aerosol deposition and remained nearly constant for 1000 days after exposure (thoracic, faecal and urinary C.R. of 8, 6 -30 and 10, respectively). In contrast, in case 2, thoracic C.R. gradually increased from 1.5 to 5, faecal C.R. was similar to that of case 1 up to 20 days and then sharply decreased to about 3, whereas C.R. of urinary excretion remained similar to case 1 throughout the 1000 day period. Uncertainties in D.P.U.I. were much higher in case 1 (C.R.=7) than in case 2 (C.R.=2) and were both mainly due to the uncertainties in thoracic equivalent doses. Second, different bioassay data were analysed to verify if the observed results were within the C.R. previously calculated for case 2. Two cases are provided as examples which appeared out of this range. The first one corresponds to an acute exposure to PuO{sub 2} aerosols which was followed for about 20 years. Fit analysis has shown a low value of the slow

  3. Uncertainties in contamination level and in doses after exposure to actinide aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsch, P.; Berard, P.; Frank, D.; Ansoborlo, E.; Fottorino, R.; Challeton-Devatayre, C.; Miele, A.; Blanchin, N.; Raynaud, P.; Piechowski, J.

    2006-01-01

    A task group named 'Methodes Dosimetriques de Reference' (M.E.D.O.R.) has been created recently to provide didactic tools for dose estimation from bioassay data obtained after occupational exposure. This task group is focused on 1) application limits of the available models, 2) uncertainties in radionuclide biokinetics and in doses, and 3) identification of the main parameters involved in these uncertainties. First, uncertainties in biokinetics of 239 Pu (thoracic retention and excretion) and in doses have been estimated after acute inhalation of PuO 2 (A.M.A.D. 5μm, type S). This was performed either when the activity of the inhaled aerosol (case 1) or the thoracic retention on day 1 (case 2) could be measured. Variability assigned to the different parameters of the ICRP models was that previously reported. After simulation, a lognormal distribution of the results was observed so that uncertainties can be expressed as 95 % Confidence interval Ratio (C.R.=σ g 4 ). In case 1, most of the uncertainties were due to aerosol deposition and remained nearly constant for 1000 days after exposure (thoracic, faecal and urinary C.R. of 8, 6 -30 and 10, respectively). In contrast, in case 2, thoracic C.R. gradually increased from 1.5 to 5, faecal C.R. was similar to that of case 1 up to 20 days and then sharply decreased to about 3, whereas C.R. of urinary excretion remained similar to case 1 throughout the 1000 day period. Uncertainties in D.P.U.I. were much higher in case 1 (C.R.=7) than in case 2 (C.R.=2) and were both mainly due to the uncertainties in thoracic equivalent doses. Second, different bioassay data were analysed to verify if the observed results were within the C.R. previously calculated for case 2. Two cases are provided as examples which appeared out of this range. The first one corresponds to an acute exposure to PuO 2 aerosols which was followed for about 20 years. Fit analysis has shown a low value of the slow dissolution rate of the compound and an

  4. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messerli, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Messerli@usz.ch [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Rengier, Fabian [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Warschkow, René [Department of Surgery, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Leschka, Sebastian [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, University Zurich (Switzerland); Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W. [Division of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  5. Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules in chest x-ray equivalent ultralow dose chest CT - first in-vivo results at dose levels of 0.13 mSv

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messerli, Michael; Kluckert, Thomas; Knitel, Meinhard; Rengier, Fabian; Warschkow, René; Alkadhi, Hatem; Leschka, Sebastian; Wildermuth, Simon; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Computer-aided detection (CAD) of solid pulmonary nodules was compared in 202 patients in standard dose and ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD was 70% in standard dose CT and 68% in ultralow dose CT. • The per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose CT was similar to ultralow dose CT in all size subgroups (all p > 0.05). • Adding CAD markings in ultralow dose CT significantly improved the sensitivity of two radiologists from 77% to 88% and from 66% to 79%, respectively. • CAD can serve as an excellent second reader for nodule detection in CT even at dose levels similar to chest X-ray. - Abstract: Objectives: To determine the value of computer-aided detection (CAD) for solid pulmonary nodules in ultralow radiation dose single-energy computed tomography (CT) of the chest using third-generation dual-source CT at 100 kV and fixed tube current at 70 mAs with tin filtration. Methods: 202 consecutive patients undergoing clinically indicated standard dose chest CT (1.8 ± 0.7 mSv) were prospectively included and scanned with an additional ultralow dose CT (0.13 ± 0.01 mSv) in the same session. Standard of reference (SOR) was established by consensus reading of standard dose CT by two radiologists. CAD was performed in standard dose and ultralow dose CT with two different reconstruction kernels. CAD detection rate of nodules was evaluated including subgroups of different nodule sizes (<5, 5–7, >7 mm). Sensitivity was further analysed in multivariable mixed effects logistic regression. Results: The SOR included 279 solid nodules (mean diameter 4.3 ± 3.4 mm, range 1–24 mm). There was no significant difference in per–nodule sensitivity of CAD in standard dose with 70% compared to 68% in ultralow dose CT both overall and in different size subgroups (all p > 0.05). CAD led to a significant increase of sensitivity for both radiologists reading the ultralow dose CT scans (all p < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, the use

  6. Effects of acute doses of prosocial drugs methamphetamine and alcohol on plasma oxytocin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Anya K; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Seiden, Jacob A; de Wit, Harriet

    2015-06-01

    Many drugs, including alcohol and stimulants, demonstrably increase sociability and verbal interaction and are recreationally consumed in social settings. One drug, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy), seems to produce its prosocial effects by increasing plasma oxytocin levels, and the oxytocin system has been implicated in responses to several other drugs of abuse. Here, we sought to investigate the effects of 2 other "social" drugs on plasma oxytocin levels--methamphetamine and alcohol. Based on their shared capacity to enhance sociability, we hypothesized that both methamphetamine and alcohol would increase plasma oxytocin levels. In study 1, 11 healthy adult volunteers attended 3 sessions during which they received methamphetamine (10 mg or 20 mg) or placebo under double-blind conditions. Subjective drug effects, cardiovascular effects, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals throughout the sessions. In study 2, 8 healthy adult volunteers attended a single session during which they received 1 beverage containing placebo, and then a beverage containing alcohol (0.8 g/kg). Subjective effects, breath alcohol levels, and plasma oxytocin levels were measured at regular intervals. Both methamphetamine and alcohol produced their expected physiological and subjective effects, but neither of these drugs increased plasma oxytocin levels. The neurobiological mechanisms mediating the prosocial effects of drugs such as alcohol and methamphetamine remain to be identified.

  7. Dose reference levels in Spanish intraoral dental radiology: stabilisation of the incorporation of digital systems in dental clinical practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcaraz, M.; Velasco, F.; Olivares, A.; Velasco, E.; Canteras, M.

    2016-01-01

    A total of 34 044 official quality assurance reports in dental radiodiagnostic surgery from 16 regions of Spain, compiled from 2002 to 2014, were studied in order to determine the progress of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for obtaining diagnostic images under normal conditions for clinical practice in Spanish dental clinics. A DRL of 2.8 mGy was set in 2014, which represents a 41.7 % decrease compared with that of 2002 (4.8 mGy). Over the same time period, the mean dose fell by 55.2 %. However, over the last 3 y, the stabilisation of the mean dose administered to patients has been observed with only a 6.7 % reduction in DRLs, which corresponds to the stabilisation of dental radiodiagnostic surgery on replacing the use of radiographic film with digital imaging systems. (authors)

  8. Estimation of radiological dose from radon, thoron and their progeny levels in the dwellings of Shivamogga district, Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaswamvi, D.R.; Sannappa, J.; Srinivasa, E.

    2018-01-01

    Among all natural radiation exposure to man, inhalation of radon, thoron and their progenies are the major contributor (50 %) to the dose from ionizing radiation received by the general population. Based on the results of epidemiological studies in Europe and North America, the World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended reducing the indoor radon reference level from 200 to 100 Bq.m -3 . In view of this, focus has now been given for simultaneous measurement of radon, thoron and their progeny concentration in indoor air and also to estimate radiological dose in the dwellings of the Shivamogga district. The geology of the Shivamogga district comprises different types of rock formation such as granites, schists, magnetites and gneisses, Meta basalt, laterites, quartz and chlorite schist, Graywacke etc. Present study was concentrating more in granite bed rock regions along with their surrounding regions

  9. effects of bud loading levels and different nitrogen doses on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... in 100 g samples, leaf area for physical properties; dry matter, ash, pH and titratable ... Keywords: Brined-grape leaves, nitrogen, bud loading level, narince grape cultivar, Turkey. ..... Agriculture Organization (2010). www.

  10. Effect of high-dose lidocaine treatment on superoxide dismutase and malon dialdehyde levels in seven diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, H; Bozkirli, F; Günaydin, B; Bilgihan, A

    2000-01-01

    We report on the use of intravenous (IV) high-dose lidocaine to relieve diabetic neuropathic pain, and the technique's effects on clinical measures of lipid peroxidation. Under continuous electrocardiogram monitoring, IV lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1) in 100 mL saline) was administered over 30 minutes to 7 non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients suffering from neuropathic pain who reported increased pain within the preceding 6 months. This treatment was performed once a week for 1 month. Blood samples were collected from the contralateral limb to determine plasma superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels on admission and following the final lidocaine administration. Plasma MDA concentrations significantly decreased after the final IV lidocaine treatment (P < .05, paired t-test), whereas SOD levels did not show a statistically significant difference compared with baseline levels. High-dose lidocaine treatment lessens MDA levels, a marker of free-radical-mediated cell damage. This suggests that one of lidocaine's mechanism of action may be its effect on oxygen free radicals, which in turn impacts lipid peroxidation.

  11. Iodine-129 Dose in LLW Disposal Facility Performance Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine-129 has the lowest Performance Assessment derived inventory limit in SRS disposal facilities. Because iodine is concentrated in the body to one organ, the thyroid, it has been thought that dilution with stable iodine would reduce the dose effects of 129I.Examination of the dose model used to establish the Dose conversion factor for 129I shows that, at the levels considered in performance assessments of low-level waste disposal facilities, the calculated 129I dose already accounts for ingestion of stable iodine. At higher than normal iodine ingestion rates, the uptake of iodine by the thyroid itself decrease, which effectively cancels out the isotopic dilution effect

  12. Radioactivity Levels And Gamma Dose Rate In Soil Samples From Federation Of Bosnia And Herzegovina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deljkic, D.; Kadic, I.; Ilic, Z.; Vidic, A.

    2015-01-01

    Activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in soil samples collected from different regions of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina have been measured by gamma-ray spectrometry. The measured activity concentrations for these radionuclides are compared with the reported data from different other countries and it is found that measured activity concentrations are comparable with the worldwide measured average values reported by the UNSCEAR. Experimental results were obtained by using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and gamma - ray spectrometry analysis system at Institute for Public Health FBiH (Radiation Protection Center). The measuring time of all soil samples was 86000 seconds. It was found that the soil specific activity ranges from 24.59 to 161.20 Bq/kg for 226Ra, from 17.60 to 66.45 Bq/kg for 232Th, from 179.50 to 598.04 Bq kg-1 for 40K and from 11.13 to 108.69 Bq/kg for 137Cs with the mean values of 62.34; 46.97; 392.76 and 51.49 Bq/kg, respectively. The radium equivalent activity in all the soil samples is lower than the safe limit (370 Bq/kg), ranges from 63.58 to 287.03 Bq/kg with the mean value of 159.71 Bq/kg. Man-made radionuclide 137Cs is also present in detectable amount in all soil samples. Presence of 137Cs indicates that the samples in this area also receive some fallout from nuclear accident in Chernobyl power plant in 1986. The value of external radiation hazard indices is found to be less than unity (mean value of 0.43). Absorbed dose rates and effective dose equivalents are also determined for the samples. The concentration of radionuclides found in the soil samples during the present study does not pose any potential health hazard to the general public. (author).

  13. Determination of Effect of Low Dose Vs Moderate Dose of Clofibrate on the Decreasing in Serum Bilirubin Level in the Term Healthy Neonate

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Ashkan Moslehi; Narges Pishva

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to determine the effect of low doses (25 mg/Kg) vs. moderate doses (50 mg/Kg) of clofibrate in treatment of non-hemolytic hyperbilirubin¬emia in healthy term neonates. Material & Methods: A clinical randomized controlled trial was performed in three groups of healthy term neonates. One group was treated with a single low dose of clofibrate (25 mg/Kg) while another group received a single moderate dose (50mg/kg) both orally plus phototherapy; the results wer...

  14. Absorbed dose at subcellular level by Monte Carlo simulation for a {sup 99m}Tc-peptide with nuclear internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas C, E. L.; Ferro F, G. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Santos C, C. L., E-mail: leticia.rojas@inin.gob.m [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Tollocan esquina Paseo Colon s/n, Toluca 50120, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    The utility of radiolabeled peptides for the early and specific diagnosis of cancer is being investigated around the world. Recent investigations have demonstrated the specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-bombesin conjugates to target breast and prostate cancer cells. The novel idea of adding the Tat (49-57) peptide to the radiopharmaceutical in order to penetrate the cell nucleus is a new proposal for therapy at cellular level. {sup 99m}Tc radionuclide produces Auger energy of 0.9 keV/decay and internal conversion electron energy of 15.4 keV/decay, which represent 11.4% of the total {sup 99m}Tc energy released per decay. It is expected that the dose delivered at specific microscopic levels in cancer cells induce a therapeutic effect. The aim of this research was to assess in vitro internalization kinetics in breast and prostate cancer cells of {sup 99m}Tc-Tat(49-57)-bombesin and to evaluate the radiation absorbed dose at subcellular level simulating the electron transport. The pen main program from the 2006 version of the Penelope code was used to simulate and calculate the absorbed dose by Auger and internal conversion electron contribution in the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus of Pc-3 prostate cancer and MCF7 and MDA human breast cancer cell lines. Nuclear data were obtained from the 2002 BNM-LNHB {sup 99m}Tc decay scheme. The spatial distribution of the absorbed doses to the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus were calculated using a geometric model built from real images of cancer cells. The elemental cell composition was taken from the literature. The biokinetic data were obtained evaluating total disintegrations in each subcellular compartment by integration of the time-activity curves acquired from experimental data. Results showed that 61, 63 and 46% of total disintegrations per cell-bound {sup 99m}Tc-Tat-Bn activity unit occurred in the nucleus of Pc-3, MCF7 and MDA-MB231 respectively. {sup 99m}Tc--Tat-Bn absorbed doses were 1.78, 5.76 and 2.59 Gy/Bq in the nucleus of

  15. Residual radioactive contamination from decommissioning: Technical basis for translating contamination levels to annual dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    This document describes the generic modeling of the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) to an individual in a population from a unit concentration of residual radioactive contamination. Radioactive contamination inside buildings and soil contamination are considered. Unit concentration TEDE factors by radionuclide, exposure pathway, and exposure scenario are calculated. Reference radiation exposure scenarios are used to derive unit concentration TEDE factors for about 200 individual radionuclides and parent-daughter mixtures. For buildings, these unit concentration factors list the annual TEDE for volume and surface contamination situations. For soil, annual TEDE factors are presented for unit concentrations of radionuclides in soil during residential use of contaminated land and the TEDE per unit total inventory for potential use of drinking water from a ground-water source. Because of the generic treatment of potentially complex ground-water systems, the annual TEDE factors for drinking water for a given inventory may only indicate when additional site data or modeling sophistication are warranted. Descriptions are provided of the models, exposure pathways, exposure scenarios, parameter values, and assumptions used. An analysis of the potential annual TEDE resulting from reference mixtures of residual radionuclides is provided to demonstrate application of the TEDE factors. 62 refs., 5 figs., 66 tabs

  16. Environmental dose level survey of radiotherapy center in large cancer hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Bin; Zhong Hailuo; Wu Dake; Li Jian; Wang Pei; Qi Guohai; Huang Renbing; Lang Jinyi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the radiation dosage around the working environment in radiotherapy centre affiliated to Sichuan cancer hospital in the western China. Methods: In 60 days, we have continuously monitored the accumulated dose that absorbed by doctors, nurses, technicians, physicists and engineers, and investigated the working environment ( 60 Co unit, accelerator, after loading unit, X-ray simulator, CT simulator, gamma knife, MRI and doctor's office) and external environment by using TLD, and compared our results to those released by relevant departments. Results: The average dosage in the working environment is 1.96 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 , 1.61 μC ·kg -1 ·month -1 in external environment. Conclusion: In the past 25 years, the radiotherapy center constructed strictly by the criterions of environment and protection departments required, so the radiation dosage in or outside the radiotherapy center has reached the national standard, which is safe for the staff and patients. Its instatement that the radiotherapy sites constructed by the related laws well accorded with the safety standards regulated. (authors)

  17. Reproducibility study of TLD-100 micro-cubes at radiotherapy dose level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Luiz Antonio R. da; Regulla, Dieter F.; Fill, Ute A.

    1999-01-01

    The precision of the thermoluminescent response of Harshaw micro-cube dosimeters (TLD-100), evaluated in both Harshaw thermoluminescent readers 5500 and 3500, for 1 Gy dose value, was investigated. The mean reproducibility for micro-cubes, pre-readout annealed at 100 deg. C for 15 min, evaluated with the manual planchet reader 3500, is 0.61% (1 standard deviation). When micro-cubes are evaluated with the automated hot-gas reader 5500, reproducibility values are undoubtedly worse, mean reproducibility for numerically stabilised dosimeters being equal to 3.27% (1 standard deviation). These results indicate that the reader model 5500, or, at least, the instrument used for the present measurements, is not adequate for micro-cube evaluation, if precise and accurate dosimetry is required. The difference in precision is apparently due to geometry inconsistencies in the orientation of the imperfect micro-cube faces during readout, requiring careful and manual reproducible arrangement of the selected micro-cube faces in contact with the manual reader planchet

  18. Association between water fluoride and the level of children's intelligence: a dose-response meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Q; Jiao, J; Chen, X; Wang, X

    2018-01-01

    Higher fluoride concentrations in water have inconsistently been associated with the levels of intelligence in children. The following study summarizes the available evidence regarding the strength of association between fluoridated water and children's intelligence. Meta-analysis. PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases were systematically analyzed from November 2016. Observational studies that have reported on intelligence levels in relation to high and low water fluoride contents, with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were included. Further, the results were pooled using inverse variance methods. The correlation between water fluoride concentration and intelligence level was assessed by a dose-response meta-analysis. Twenty-six studies reporting data on 7258 children were included. The summary results indicated that high water fluoride exposure was associated with lower intelligence levels (standardized mean difference : -0.52; 95% CI: -0.62 to -0.42; P intelligence (P intelligence levels. Greater exposure to high levels of fluoride in water was significantly associated with reduced levels of intelligence in children. Therefore, water quality and exposure to fluoride in water should be controlled in areas with high fluoride levels in water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Doses of low level ionizing radiation; a misunderstood risk, however unavoidable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolli, D.

    1988-01-01

    The treatment given by international organizations and associations to the problems of radiation exposures, and the recommendations and norms for calculating risks of low level radiation are analysed. It is shown that there are not zero risks for nuclear energy, and emphasis is given to the risks of natural radiation from environment. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on circulating microparticles levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.; Aljapawe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause disruption of cytoskeleton. Cytoskeleton disorganization results in circulating microvesicles (MVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the exposure to low-radiation and MVs levels in the peripheral blood of individuals working in radiation technology field.(author)

  1. Cuban typical doses for 99mTc-DMSA renal gammagraphy studies: a methodology for the establishment of reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Barreto, M.; Varela Corona, C.; Lopez Bejerano, G.M.; Perea Diaz, M.; Paz Viera, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Since a handful of years ago, international rules on Radiological Protection include the principle of optimization of given dose to patients, if this procedure doesn't lessen diagnosis quality, and the establishment of reference levels of activity. For these reasons, the Radiological Protection staff of Cuban Institute of Nephrology's Nuclear Medicine Service, where morpho functional renal studies are carried out, 70% on infants and young children, started a research on that way. Thus, because their biggest incidence, 99m Tc -DMSA renal gammagraphy studies were chosen, using a General Electric 400 AT Planar Gamma Camera. Studied sample was randomly selected, including adults (12 peoples) and children (23); divided into 4 groups, lessen given dose step by step. Other items were kept in mind in the research, such age, weight, time delayed between administrations and image getting, getting time of each view and total time of the study, as well as radiopharmaceuticals quality and Gamma Camera performance. Image quality was evaluated for each case, using both, objective and subjective criteria. Objective evaluation was done by using contrast/noise ratios and variance of the random noise. They were used to develop clustering and discriminant analysis over the independent variables to detect groups with differentiated image quality from the physical and mathematical point of view. Subjective evaluation was performed using the criteria of two expert observers who had no information about the activity levels used. They evaluated image quality separately, giving a good, regular or bad evaluation for each image. As a conclusion, we found that it is possible to reduce the given activities in 50% and thus, indirectly, to reduce doses for workers and for the public. Additionally, we propose a methodology for the establishment of reference levels for 99m Tc -DMSA renal gammagraphy studies in Cuba, both, for adults and paediatric patients. (author)

  2. Dose-dependent effects of an immune challenge at both ultimate and proximate levels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrand, M; Dowling, D K

    2014-05-01

    Immune responses are highly dynamic. The magnitude and efficiency of an immune response to a pathogen can change markedly across individuals, and such changes may be influenced by variance in a range of intrinsic (e.g. age, genotype, sex) and external (e.g. abiotic stress, pathogen identity, strain) factors. Life history theory predicts that up-regulation of the immune system will come at a physiological cost, and studies have confirmed that increased investment in immunity can reduce reproductive output and survival. Furthermore, males and females often have divergent reproductive strategies, and this might drive the evolution of sex-specific life history trade-offs involving immunity, and sexual dimorphism in immune responses per se. Here, we employ an experiment design to elucidate dose-dependent and sex-specific responses to exposure to a nonpathogenic immune elicitor at two scales--the 'ultimate' life history and the underlying 'proximate' immune level in Drosophila melanogaster. We found dose-dependent effects of immune challenges on both male and female components of reproductive success, but not on survival, as well as a response in antimicrobial activity. These results indicate that even in the absence of the direct pathogenic effects that are associated with actual disease, individual life histories respond to a perceived immune challenge--but with the magnitude of this response being contingent on the initial dose of exposure. Furthermore, the results indicate that immune responses at the ultimate life history level may indeed reflect underlying processes that occur at the proximate level. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. Defining the "dose" of altitude training: how high to live for optimal sea level performance enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robert F; Karlsen, Trine; Resaland, Geir K; Ge, R-L; Harber, Matthew P; Witkowski, Sarah; Stray-Gundersen, James; Levine, Benjamin D

    2014-03-15

    Chronic living at altitudes of ∼2,500 m causes consistent hematological acclimatization in most, but not all, groups of athletes; however, responses of erythropoietin (EPO) and red cell mass to a given altitude show substantial individual variability. We hypothesized that athletes living at higher altitudes would experience greater improvements in sea level performance, secondary to greater hematological acclimatization, compared with athletes living at lower altitudes. After 4 wk of group sea level training and testing, 48 collegiate distance runners (32 men, 16 women) were randomly assigned to one of four living altitudes (1,780, 2,085, 2,454, or 2,800 m). All athletes trained together daily at a common altitude from 1,250-3,000 m following a modified live high-train low model. Subjects completed hematological, metabolic, and performance measures at sea level, before and after altitude training; EPO was assessed at various time points while at altitude. On return from altitude, 3,000-m time trial performance was significantly improved in groups living at the middle two altitudes (2,085 and 2,454 m), but not in groups living at 1,780 and 2,800 m. EPO was significantly higher in all groups at 24 and 48 h, but returned to sea level baseline after 72 h in the 1,780-m group. Erythrocyte volume was significantly higher within all groups after return from altitude and was not different between groups. These data suggest that, when completing a 4-wk altitude camp following the live high-train low model, there is a target altitude between 2,000 and 2,500 m that produces an optimal acclimatization response for sea level performance.

  4. Pinning of fullerene lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge at the interface with standing up copper phthalocyanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chenggong; Irfan, Irfan; Turinske, Alexander J.; Gao, Yongli

    2012-01-01

    The electronic structure evolution of interfaces of fullerene (C 60 ) with copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG) and on native silicon oxide has been investigated with ultra-violet photoemission spectroscopy and inverse photoemission spectroscopy. The lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C 60 was found to be pinned at the interface with CuPc on SiO 2 . A substantial difference in the electron affinity of CuPc on the two substrates was observed as the orientation of CuPc is lying flat on HOPG and standing up on SiO 2 . The ionization potential and electron affinity of C 60 were not affected by the orientation of CuPc due to the spherical symmetry of C 60 molecules. We observed band bending in C 60 on the standing-up orientation of CuPc molecules, while the energy levels of C 60 on the flat lying orientation of CuPc molecules were observed to be flat. - Highlights: ► Orientation of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) on ordered graphite and silicon oxide. ► Pinning of lowest unoccupied molecular orbital edge of C60 to the Fermi level on CuPc. ► No C60 pinning or band bending was observed on flat laying CuPc. ► Results are useful for organic photovoltaic and organic light emitting diode research.

  5. Measurement of the lowest dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Donald A.; Stanwood, Gregg D.; Patel, Bhavesh N.; Pragada, Sreenivasa R.; Gordon, M. Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Accurate measurement of the threshold dosage of phenobarbital that can produce drug discrimination (DD) may improve our understanding of the mechanisms and properties of such discrimination. Objectives Compare three methods for determining the threshold dosage for phenobarbital (D) versus no drug (N) DD. Methods Rats learned a D versus N DD in 2-lever operant training chambers. A titration scheme was employed to increase or decrease dosage at the end of each 18-day block of sessions depending on whether the rat had achieved criterion accuracy during the sessions just completed. Three criterion rules were employed, all based on average percent drug lever responses during initial links of the last 6 D and 6 N sessions of a block. The criteria were: D%>66 and N%50 and N%33. Two squads of rats were trained, one immediately after the other. Results All rats discriminated drug versus no drug. In most rats, dosage decreased to low levels and then oscillated near the minimum level required to maintain criterion performance. The lowest discriminated dosage significantly differed under the three criterion rules. The squad that was trained 2nd may have benefited by partially duplicating the lever choices of the previous squad. Conclusions The lowest discriminated dosage is influenced by the criterion of discriminative control that is employed, and is higher than the absolute threshold at which discrimination entirely disappears. Threshold estimations closer to absolute threshold can be obtained when criteria are employed that are permissive, and that allow rats to maintain lever preferences. PMID:19082992

  6. GROWTH AND LEVELS OF N, P AND K IN ROOTSTOCKS OF TAMARIND TREES USING ORGANIC SUBSTRATES AND DOSES OF PHOSPHORUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EDUARDO CASTRO PEREIRA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate different organic substrates and phosphorus doses on the growth and leaf content of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium in rootstocks of Tamarindus indica L. The experiment was performed in a greenhouse nursery located on the campus of the Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Árido (UFERSA, from March to October 2013. The treatments consisted of three organic sources at a concentration of 40% (v/v (bovine manure, goat manure and a commercial organic compound and four doses of simple superphosphate (0, 0 kg m-3, 2.5 kg m-3, 5.0 kg m-3 and 7.5 kg m-3. The experiment was conducted in a randomized block design (RBD, with 12 treatments (substrates, four replications and 10 plants per plot, totaling 480 plants. The goat manure and the organic compound were the most suitable treatments for the production of rootstocks of the tamarind tree. The maximum dose of 7.5 g kg-1 of simple superphosphate caused the highest levels of phosphorus and potassium in the dry mass of shoots. The nutrients in the dry matter of shoots accumulated in the following order: N > K > P.

  7. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.cl [Medical Technology Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty, Tarapaca University, Arica 1000000 (Chile); Miranda, Patricia [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago 7500539 (Chile); Vano, Eliseo [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University and IdIS, San Carlos Hospital, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  8. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Miranda, Patricia; Vano, Eliseo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm 2 for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm 2 for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm 2 for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm 2 for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm 2 /kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there may be large differences

  9. Study on dose calculation method for operational intervention Level. Evaluation of the intake of foods and drinks for OIL6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    In the guideline for nuclear disaster countermeasures, the operational intervention level (OIL) is an index for decision making of protective measures to be applied in an urgent protective action planning zone (UPZ) and in the zone immediately outside it, for the period starting several hours after a general emergency is declared to within a week after this. In this guideline, the initialization value of OIL6 is set as the protective measure index for intake of foods and drinks. OIL is observed by using actual measurement values in a nuclear emergency, and OIL6 is the measured activity concentration of radioactive materials (Bq/kg) in foods and drinks. On the other hand, the IAEA sets the generic criteria for protective measures from the viewpoint of the radiation effects to the human body. Therefore, it has been necessary to prepare an expression for the OIL6 dose and a dose conversion factor in order to confirm whether the dose does not exceed the generic criteria from the annual intake data of foods and drinks in Japan when contaminated foods and drinks are consumed continuously for 1 year. In this work, we examined the problem about the uncertainty of the annual intake data of foods and drinks. We took the annual intake data of foods and drinks for OIL6 based on the national health and nutrition survey results by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare and we calculated a OIL6 dose when foods and drinks were contaminated at the same level as the initialization value of the restricted consumption of foods and drinks, taking into account the influences for age, gender and local area. As a result, we found the 95% upper limit value of the intake data of foods and drinks for OIL6 obtained by this study could be used. The OIL6 intake data of foods and drinks prepared by previous studies were underestimating vegetables and cereals, etc. The OIL6 dose was sufficiently below IAEA generic criteria, and the intake data of foods and drinks between the local areas had no

  10. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Santangelo, Teresa [CHU Lille (EA 2694) University of Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette, Lille (France); Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Department of Imaging, Rome (Italy); Duhamel, Alain [University of Lille (EA 2694), Department of Biostatistics, CHU Lille, Lille (France); Deschildre, Antoine [CHU Lille - University of Lille, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Lille (France)

    2017-02-15

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol{sub 32}) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP{sub 32} was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP{sub 32}, CTDI{sub vol32} and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP{sub 32}, 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI{sub vol32} and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  11. Radiation dose levels in pediatric chest CT: experience in 499 children evaluated with dual-source single-energy CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martine, Remy-Jardin; Colas, Lucie; Jean-Baptiste, Faivre; Remy, Jacques; Santangelo, Teresa; Duhamel, Alain; Deschildre, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    The availability of dual-source technology has introduced the possibility of scanning children at lower kVp with a high-pitch mode, combining high-speed data acquisition and high temporal resolution. To establish the radiation dose levels of dual-source, single-energy chest CT examinations in children. We retrospectively recorded the dose-length product (DLP) of 499 consecutive examinations obtained in children <50 kg, divided into five weight groups: group 1 (<10 kg, n = 129); group 2 (10-20 kg, n = 176); group 3 (20-30 kg, n = 99), group 4 (30-40 kg, n = 58) and group 5 (40-49 kg, n = 37). All CT examinations were performed with high temporal resolution (75 ms), a high-pitch mode and a weight-adapted selection of the milliamperage. CT examinations were obtained at 80 kVp with a milliamperage ranging between 40 mAs and 90 mAs, and a pitch of 2.0 (n = 162; 32.5%) or 3.0 (n = 337; 67.5%). The mean duration of data acquisition was 522.8 ± 192.0 ms (interquartile range 390 to 610; median 490). In the study population, the mean CT dose index volume (CTDIvol 32 ) was 0.83 mGy (standard deviation [SD] 0.20 mGy; interquartile range 0.72 to 0.94; median 0.78); the mean DLP 32 was 21.4 mGy.cm (SD 9.1 mGy.cm; interquartile range 15 to 25; median 19.0); and the mean size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) was 1.7 mGy (SD 0.4 mGy; interquartile range 1.5 to 1.9; median 1.7). The DLP 32 , CTDI vol32 and SSDE were found to be statistically significant in the five weight categories (P < 0.0001). This study establishes the radiation dose levels for dual-source, single-kVp chest CT from a single center. In the five weight categories, the median values varied 15-37 mGy.cm for the DLP 32 , 0.78-1.25 mGy for the CTDI vol32 and 1.6-2.1 mGy for the SSDE. (orig.)

  12. Quality assurance in CT: implementation of the updated national diagnostic reference levels using an automated CT dose monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, E; Kröpil, P; Bethge, O T; Aissa, J; Thomas, C; Antoch, G; Boos, J

    2018-03-20

    To evaluate the implementation of the updated computed tomography (CT) diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection into clinical routine using an automatic CT dose monitoring system. CT radiation exposure was analysed before and after implementing the updated national DRLs into routine clinical work in 2016. After the implementation process, institutional CT protocols were mapped to the anatomical regions for which DRLs were provided. Systematically, protocols that exceeded the thresholds were optimised and analysed in detail. The CT radiation output parameters analysed were volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP). Three radiologists evaluated subjective image quality using a three-point Likert scale. The study included 94,258 CT series (from 27,103 CT examinations) in adult patients performed in 2016. When averaged over all body regions with available DRL, institutional CTDIvol/DLP values were always below the DRLs (65.2±32.9%/67.3±41.5% initially; 59.4±32%/60.5±39.9% after optimisation). Values exceeding the national DRLs were found for pelvis (n=268; CTDIvol 107.7±65.7%/DLP 106.3±79.3%), lumbar spine (n=91; 160.8±74.7%/175.2±104.1%), and facial bones (n=527; 108±39%/152.7±75.7%). After optimisation, CTDIvol and DLP were 87.9±73%/87.8±80.8% for the pelvis, 67.8±33.2%/74.5±50.6% for the lumbar spine and 95.1±45.8%/133.3±74.6% for the viscerocranium. An automatic CT dose monitoring system enabled not only comprehensive monitoring of a DRL implementation process but can also help to optimise radiation exposure. Copyright © 2018 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The influence of low dose irradiation on intracellular pH level, synthesizing activity and ATP level in cultured chinese fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhomenko, I.M.; Perishvili, G.V.; Turovetskij, V.B.; Kudryashov, Yu.B.; Rubin, A.B.; Brovko, L.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    X-irradiation of Chinese fibroblasts with doses of 0.05-0.15 Gy was shown to cause intracellular pH (pH i ) changes: its diminishing during the first 40-60 min by 0.16-0.18 pH units, then the return to the control level 120 min after irradiation and, finally, the increase by 0.18-0.20 pH units. Simultaneously, the synthesizing activity of the cells changed in the same way. The ATP level changed in the opposite way: increased when pH fell and decreased when pH grew. It was shown that pH i changes were connected with the changes in Na + /H + -exchange system, and they seemed to be primary in the chain of the alterations observed

  14. Submaximal doses of ghrelin do not inhibit gonadotrophin levels but stimulate prolactin secretion in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messini, Christina I; Malandri, Maria; Anifandis, George; Dafopoulos, Konstantinos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis; Sveronis, Georgios; Garas, Antonios; Daponte, Alexandros; Messinis, Ioannis E

    2017-07-01

    An inhibitory effect of ghrelin on gonadotrophin secretion has been reported in normally menstruating women possibly modulated by endogenous oestrogen. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ghrelin on gonadotrophin and prolactin (PRL) secretion in oestrogen-deprived postmenopausal women. Prospective intervention study. Ten healthy postmenopausal volunteer women were studied during two 15-days periods of oestrogen treatment (A and B) a month apart. Four experiments (Exp) were performed in total, two on day 1 (Exp 1A and Exp 1B) and two on day 15 (Exp 15A and Exp 15B) of the two periods. The women received in Exp 1A and in Exp 15A two iv injections of ghrelin (0.15 μg/kg at time 0 minute and 0.30 μg/kg at time 90 minutes) and in Exp1B and in Exp 15B normal saline (2 mL), respectively. Blood samples were taken at -15, 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 minutes. After oestrogen treatment, late follicular phase serum oestradiol levels were attained on day 15 of periods A and B. Ghrelin administration did not affect serum levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), whereas it increased significantly those of growth hormone (GH) and PRL. In Exp 15A, serum PRL increment in response to ghrelin (area under the curve, net increment) was significantly greater than in Exp 1A (Pghrelin administration affects neither FSH nor LH levels but stimulates PRL secretion, that is amplified by exogenous oestrogen administration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Two-dose-level confirmatory study of the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jappe Annette

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This phase I, randomized, multicenter, open-label study investigated the pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of the oral mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods A total of 24 patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 6, gastric cancer (n = 6, non-small cell lung cancer (n = 6, or renal cell carcinoma (n = 6 who were refractory to/unsuitable for standard therapy were randomized 1:1 to oral everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day. Primary end points were pharmacokinetic parameters and safety and tolerability. Pharmacokinetic 24-h profiles were measured on day 15; trough level was measured on days 2, 8, 15, 16, and 22. Tolerability was assessed continuously. This final analysis was performed after all patients had received 6 months of study drug or had discontinued. Results Everolimus was absorbed rapidly; median Tmax was 3 h (range, 1-4 and 2 h (range, 0.9-6 in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Pharmacokinetic parameters increased dose proportionally from the 5 and 10 mg/day doses. Steady-state levels were achieved by day 8 or earlier. The most common adverse events suspected to be related to everolimus therapy were increased blood glucose (16.7% and 41.7% and fatigue (16.7% and 33.3% in the everolimus 5 and 10 mg/day dose cohorts, respectively. Best tumor response was stable disease in 10 (83% and 6 (50% patients in the 5 and 10 mg/day groups, respectively. Conclusions Everolimus 5 or 10 mg/day was well tolerated in Chinese patients with advanced solid tumors. The observed safety and pharmacokinetic profile of everolimus from this study were consistent with previous studies. Trial registration Chinese Health Authorities 2008L09346

  16. Dose levels in the hot cells area ININ; Niveles de dosis en el area de celdas calientes-ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre, J. De la; Ramirez, J.M. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Solis, M.L. [UAEM, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: jto@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    The Laboratory of Hot Cells (LCC) located in the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) is an institution, it is an area where radioactive material is managed with different activity values, in function of its original design for 10,000 curies of Co-60. Managing this materials in the installation, it implies to measure and to analyze the dose levels that the POE will receive as well as the implementation of appropriate measures of radiological protection and radiological safety, so that that is completed settled down by the concept ALARA. In this work they are carried out mensurations of the levels of the dose to receive for the POE when managing radionuclides with maximum activities that can be allowed in function of the current conditions of the cells and an evaluation of the obtained results is made comparing them with the effective international norms as well as the application of the program of surveillance and radiological protection implemented for the development of the works that are carry out in the installation. (Author)

  17. Effect of Exposure to Pill Contraceptive Low-dose Levels of Homocysteine and Nitric Oxide in Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is one of the public health priorities. Consumption of oral contraceptives increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and it still remains a concern. This study aimed to investigate the effect of exposure on pill contraceptive low-dose  levels on homocysteine and nitric oxide. methods: In this cohort ( retrospective+ prospective study, 100 women with normal menstrual cycle aged betwen 20-35 years old refered to health care centers of Yazd, Iran in 2015.  This study was conducted through face to face interviews by the researcher who asked for demographic and anthropometric characteristics. Anthropometic indices  was measured and the levels of homosysteine and nitric oxide was determined. The data were analyzed using t-test, chi- square test and ANOVA by SPSS 21. Results: The mean and standard deviation of homocysteine levels in the exposed group acompared to non-exposed group were (3/848±2/357 μmol/L and (3/284±1/616 μmol/L as well as the mean and standard deviation of nitric oxide in the exposed group were (p-value=0/41 and (181/360±90/44μM and in the non-exposed group were (162/654±90/913 μM and (p-value=0/29 , respectively.According to these results, there was not found any statistical significant  difference among these results. Conclusion: Taking low dose oral contraceptives in healthy women did not change any differences in homocysteine and nitric oxide levels as a modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

  18. Computed Tomography (CT) radiation dose in children: A survey to propose regional diagnostic reference levels in Greater Accra-Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addo, Patience

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the doses delivered to paediatric patients during computed tomography (CT) examinations of the head, chest and abdomen, and establishing regional diagnostic reference levels (RDRLs) for four age groups. The patient data, technique parameters and dose descriptors collected include: age, sex, tube voltage, tube current, rotation time, slice thickness, scan length, volume CT dose index (CTDI_v_o_l) and dose length product (DLP). Currently, paediatric CT examinations account for 11% of radiation exposure. For the paediatric age groups; < 1 year, (1-5 years), (6-10 years) and (11-15 years), the proposed RDRLs for head in terms of CTDI_v_o_l are (28, 38, 48 and 86 mGy) and in terms of DLP; (395, 487, 601, 1614 mGy cm) respectively. For Chest examinations, proposed RDRLs in terms of CTDI_v_o_l are (1 and 5 mGy) and in terms of DLP; (18 and 110 mGy cm) for age groups; < 1 year and (1-5 years) respectively. For Abdomino-pelvic examinations, proposed RDRLs in terms of CTDI_v_o_l are (3, 3 and 10 mGy) and in terms of DLP; (71, 120 and 494 mGy cm) for age groups; < 1 year, (1-5 years) and (6-10 years) respectively. For abdomen examinations, proposed RDRLs in terms of CTDI_v_o_l are (3, 5 and 5 mGy) and in terms of DLP; (83, 124 and 233 mGy cm) for age groups; < 1 year, (1-5 years) and (11-15 years) respectively. RDRLs have been proposed for CTDI_v_o_l and DLP for head, chest, abdomen and Abdomino-pelvic paediatric CT examinations in this study. An optimisation is required for 11-15 years age group for the DLP values which was higher than their corresponding international DRLs. For an effective optimization of patient protection a trade-off between image quality and patients doses studies should be investigated. (au)

  19. Proposition for restriction dose levels for occupational exposition in medical practices; Propuesta de niveles de restriccion de dosis para la exposicion ocupacional en las practicas medicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Ernesto; Cornejo, Nestor; Lopez, Gladys; Capote, Eduardo; Diaz Bernal, Efren [Centro de Proteccion y Higiene de las Radiaciones, La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: ernesto@cphr.edu.cu; Domenech, Haydee

    2001-07-01

    A study was carried out in order to propose restriction levels for occupational exposures in nuclear medicine and teletherapy. The initial data were the annual doses of occupational exposed workers reported by external dosimetry of 23 institutions since 1990 to 1999, which were analyzed by statistical processing to obtain the variation ranges of this magnitude. Dose values corresponding to the 75-percentile were then considered in this study. Simultaneously, a model of the exposure scenarios was used for the estimation of the annual effective doses, this estimation was supported with measurements of dose rates carried out in the institutions. The restriction levels were obtained by multiplying the sum of the annual doses (normal and potential) by a reserve coefficient defined in the present work. The determined restriction levels are in the range of those obtained by other similar studies. (author)

  20. Single doses of Panax ginseng (G115) reduce blood glucose levels and improve cognitive performance during sustained mental activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reay, Jonathon L; Kennedy, David O; Scholey, Andrew B

    2005-07-01

    Single doses of the traditional herbal treatment Panax ginseng have recently been shown to elicit cognitive improvements in healthy young volunteers. The mechanisms by which ginseng improves cognitive performance are not known. However, they may be related to the glycaemic properties of some Panax species. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, balanced crossover design, 30 healthy young adults completed a 10 min test battery at baseline, and then six times in immediate succession commencing 60 min after the day's treatment (placebo, 200mg G115 or 400mg G115). The 10 min battery comprised a Serial Threes subtraction task (2 min); a Serial Sevens task (2 min); a Rapid Visual Information Processing task (5 min); then a 'mental fatigue' visual analogue scale. Blood glucose was measured prior to each day's treatment, and before, during and after the post-dose completions of the battery. Both the 200mg and 400mg treatments led to significant reductions in blood glucose levels at all three post-treatment measurements (p 0.005 in all cases). The most notable behavioural effects were associated with 200mg of ginseng and included significantly improved Serial Sevens subtraction task performance and significantly reduced subjective mental fatigue throughout all (with the exception of one time point in each case) of the post-dose completions of the 10 min battery (p 0.05). Overall these data suggest that Panax ginseng can improve performance and subjective feelings of mental fatigue during sustained mental activity. This effect may be related to the acute gluco-regulatory properties of the extract.

  1. Assessment of natural radioactivity levels and associated dose rates in soil samples from historical city Panipat, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanjeet

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The natural radioactivity levels have been determined by means of gamma ray spectroscopy in surface soil samples collected from the historical city Panipat and its surrounding areas. The activity concentrations are estimated for 238U (range from 14.82 ± 0.26 to 42.82 ± 0.84 Bq/kg, 232Th (from 12.94 ± 0.32 to 43.48 ± 0.96 Bq/kg and 40K (from 238.05 ± 0.28 to 348.50 ± 0.95 Bq/kg. Radium equivalent activities are calculated to be in the range of 82.24–108.49 Bq/kg with an average value of 92.21 Bq/kg. Absorbed dose rates in air outdoors are measured in the range of 32.01–56.47 nGy/h with an average value of 44.16 nGy/h. The corresponding effective dose rates (indoor and outdoor are calculated to be in the range of 0.09–0.158 mSv/y and 0.039–0.069 mSv/y respectively. The internal and external hazard index varies from 0.234 to 0.339 and 0.207 to 0.286 respectively. The activities of radium equivalent in all the soil samples are lesser than the limit (370 Bq/kg recommended in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD report and the annual effective dose was within the safe limit of 1 mSv/y.

  2. Ionizing Radiation Effects on the Noise of 65 nm CMOS Transistors for Pixel Sensor Readout at Extreme Total Dose Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Re, V.; Manghisoni, M.; Riceputi, E.; Traversi, G.; Ratti, L.

    2018-01-01

    This paper is focused on the study of the noise performance of 65 nm CMOS transistors at extremely high total ionizing dose (TID) levels of the order of several hundreds of Mrad(SiO2). Noise measurements are reported and discussed, analyzing radiation effects on 1/ f noise and channel thermal noise. In nMOSFETs, up to 10 Mrad(SiO2), the experimental behavior is consistent with a damage mechanism mainly associ- ated with lateral isolation oxides, and can be modeled by parasitic transistors turning on after irradiation and contributing to the total noise of the device. At very high dose, these parasitic transistors tend to be turned off by negative charge accumulating in interface states and compensating radiation-induced positive charge building up inside thick isolation oxides. Effects associated with ionization and hydrogen transport in spacer oxides may become dominant at 600 Mrad(SiO2) and may explain the observed noise behavior at extremely high TID. The results of this analysis provide an understanding o...

  3. Preparations for an optical access to the lowest nuclear excitation in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The isomeric lowest excited nuclear level of {sup 229}Th has been indirectly measured to be 7.6±0.5 eV (163±11 nm). In order to improve the accuracy as prerequisite of an all-optical control, {sup 229m}Th is populated via a 2% decay branch in the α decay of {sup 233}U. The Thorium ions are extracted and cooled with the help of a buffer gas stopping cell and an RFQ-cooler. In order to suppress accompanying α decay chain products other than {sup 229}Th, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is used, performance and extraction efficiency measurements were performed. Following the QMS, the Thorium isomers will be collected on a 50 μm micro electrode. The decay of these isomers can then be detected using deep UV optics, presently in the phase of preparation and adjustment. Newest results are presented.

  4. Dose-related gene expression changes in forebrain following acute, low-level chlorpyrifos exposure in neonatal rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Anamika; Liu Jing; Ayoubi, Patricia; Pope, Carey

    2010-01-01

    /synaptic transmission and transcription/translation. Nine genes were differentially affected in all four CPF dosing groups. We conclude that the most robust, consistent changes in differential gene expression in neonatal forebrain across a range of acute CPF dosages occurred at an exposure level associated with the classical marker of OP toxicity, AChE inhibition. Disruption of multiple cellular pathways, in particular cell adhesion, may contribute to the developmental neurotoxicity potential of this pesticide.

  5. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to levels of pulsed fluoroscopy: a comparative study with technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: The sacroiliac (SI joint is frequently the primary source of low back pain. Over the past decades, a number of different SI injection techniques have been used in its diagnosis and therapy. Despite the concerns regarding exposure to radiation, image-guided injection techniques are the preferred method to achieve safe and precise intra-articular needle placement. The following study presents a comparison of radiation doses, calculated for fluoroscopy and CT-guided SI joint injections in standard and low-dose protocol and presents the technical possibility of CT-guidance with maximum radiation dose reduction to levels of fluoroscopic-guidance for a precise intra-articular injection technique.Objective: To evaluate the possibility of dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels and to compare the doses of pulsed-fluoroscopy-, CT-guidance, and low-dose CT-guidance for intra-articular SI joint injections.Study design: Comparative study with technical considerations.Methods: A total of 30 CT-guided intra-articular SI joint injections were performed in January 2012 in a developed low-dose mode and the radiation doses were calculated. They were compared to 30 pulsed-fluoroscopy-guided SI joint injections, which were performed in the month before, and to five injections, performed in standard CT-guided biopsy mode for spinal interventions. The statistical significance was calculated with the SPSS software using the Mann–Whitney U-Test. Technical details and anatomical considerations were provided.Results: A significant dose reduction of average 94.01% was achieved using the low-dose protocol for CT-guided SI joint injections. The radiation dose could be approximated to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels.Conclusion: Radiation dose of CT-guided SI joint injections can be

  6. Assessment of serum magnesium levels and its outcome in neonates of eclamptic mothers treated with low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Monalisa; Chaudhuri, Patralekha Ray; Mondal, Badal C.; Mitra, Sukumar; Bandyopadhyay, Debasmita; Pramanik, Sushobhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Magnesium historically has been used for treatment and/or prevention of eclampsia. Considering the low body mass index of Indian women, a low-dose magnesium sulfate regime has been introduced by some authors. Increased blood levels of magnesium in neonates is associated with increased still birth, early neonatal death, birth asphyxia, bradycardia, hypotonia, gastrointestinal hypomotility. The objective of this study was to assess safety of low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen in neonates of eclamptic mothers treated with this regimen. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional observational study of 100 eclampsia patients and their neonates. Loading dose and maintenance doses of magnesium sulfate were administered to patients by combination of intravenous and intramuscular routes. Maternal serum and cord blood magnesium levels were estimated. Neonatal outcome was assessed. Results: Bradycardia was observed in 18 (19.15%) of the neonates, 16 (17.02%) of the neonates were diagnosed with hypotonia. Pearson Correlation Coefficient showed Apgar scores decreased with increase in cord blood magnesium levels. Unpaired t-test showed lower Apgar scores with increasing dose of magnesium sulfate. The Chi-square/Fisher's exact test showed significant increase in hypotonia, birth asphyxia, intubation in delivery room, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) care requirement, with increasing dose of magnesium sulfate. (P ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: Several neonatal complications are significantly related to increasing serum magnesium levels. Overall, the low-dose magnesium sulfate regimen was safe in the management of eclamptic mothers, without toxicity to their neonates. PMID:26600638

  7. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed

  8. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  9. Variation of annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air in Marwar region of Rajasthan, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rani, Asha, E-mail: ashasachdeva78@gmail.com [Department of Applied Science, Ferozepur College of Engineering and Technology, Farozshah, Ferozepur-142052, Punjab (India); Mittal, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirmittal03@gmail.com [Department of Applied Sciences, Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar-144601, Punjab (India); Mehra, Rohit [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R.Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar-144011 (India)

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, indoor radon and thoron measurements have been carried out from different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India using RAD7, a solid state alpha detector. The radon and thoron concentration in indoor air varies from 8.75 to 61.25 Bq m{sup −3} and 32.7 to 147.2 Bq m{sup −3} with the mean value of 32 and 73 Bq m{sup −3} respectively. The observed indoor radon concentration values are well below the action level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (200-300 Bq m{sup −3}) and Environmental Protection Agency (148 Bq m{sup −3}). The survey reveals that the thoron concentration values in the indoor air are well within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005). The calculated total annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air varies from 0.22 to 1.54 mSv y{sup −1} with the mean value of 0.81 mSv y{sup −1} which is less than even the lower limit of action level 3-10 mSv y{sup −1} recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005)

  10. Follicular and endocrine dose responses according to anti-Müllerian hormone levels in IVF patients treated with a novel human recombinant FSH (FE 999049)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Ernesto; Nyboe Andersen, Anders; Barri, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytop......OBJECTIVE: To study the association between serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels and follicular development and endocrine responses induced by increasing doses (5·2-12·1 μg/day) of a novel recombinant human FSH (rhFSH, FE 999049) in patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF...... for these hormones, and no clear dose-related increase was observed for the number of follicles in these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dose-response relationships between rhFSH and follicular development and endocrine parameters are significantly different for IVF/ICSI patients with lower and higher serum AMH levels...

  11. Methodology for setting the reference levels in the measurements of the dose rate absorbed in air due to the environmental gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez Ley, Orlando; Capote Ferrera, Eduardo; Caveda Ramos, Celia; Alonso Abad, Dolores

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The methodology for setting the reference levels of the measurements of the gamma dose rate absorbed in the air is described. The registration level was obtained using statistical methods. To set the alarm levels, it was necessary to begin with certain affectation level, which activates the investigation operation mode when being reached. It is was necessary to transform this affectation level into values of the indicators selected to set the appearance of an alarm in the network, allowing its direct comparison and at the same time a bigger operability of this one. The affectation level was assumed as an effective dose of 1 mSv/y, which is the international dose limit for public. The conversion factor obtained in a practical way as a consequence of the Chernobyl accident was assumed, converting the value of annual effective dose into values of effective dose rate in air. These factors are the most important in our work, since the main task of the National Network of Environmental Radiological Surveillance of the Republic of Cuba is detecting accidents with a situations regional affectation, and this accident is precisely an example of pollution at this scale. The alarm level setting was based on the results obtained in the first year of the Chernobyl accident. For this purpose, some transformations were achieved. In the final results, a correction factor was introduced depending on the year season the measurement was made. It was taken into account the influence of different meteorological events on the measurement of this indicator. (author)

  12. The optimal dose reduction level using iterative reconstruction with prospective ECG-triggered coronary CTA using 256-slice MDCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Yang; Xu, Shu; Guo, Wenli; Vembar, Mani; Guo, Qiyong

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the image quality (IQ) of an iterative reconstruction (IR) technique (iDose 4 ) from prospective electrocardiography (ECG)-triggered coronary computed tomography angiography (coronary CTA) on a 256-slice multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner and determine the optimal dose reduction using IR that can provide IQ comparable to filtered back projection (FBP). Method and materials: 110 consecutive patients (69 men, 41 women; age: 54 ± 10 years) underwent coronary CTA on a 256-slice MDCT (Brilliance iCT, Philips Healthcare). The control group (Group A, n = 21) were scanned using the conventional tube output (120 kVp, 210 mAs) and reconstructed using FBP. The other 4 groups were scanned with the same kVp but successively reduced tube output as follows: B[n = 15]: 125 mAs; C[n = 22]: 105 mAs; D[n = 36]: 84 mAs: E[n = 16]: 65 mAs) and reconstructed using IR levels of L3 (Group B), L4 (Group C) and L5 (Groups D and E), to compensate for the noise increase. All images were reconstructed using the same kernel (XCB). Two radiologists graded IQ in a blinded fashion on a 4-point scale (4 – excellent, 3 – good, 2 – fair and 1 – poor). Quantitative measurements of CT values, image noise and contrast-to-noise (CNR) were measured in each group. A receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine a radiation reduction threshold up to which excellent IQ was maintained. Results: There were no significant differences in objective noise, SNR and CNR values among Groups A, B, C, D, and E (P = 0.14, 0.09, 0.17, respectively). There were no significant differences in the scores of the subjective IQ between Group A, and Groups B, C, D, E (P = 0.23–0.97). Significant differences in image sharpness and study acceptability were observed between groups A and E (P < 0.05). Using the criterion of excellent IQ (score 4), the ROC curve of dose levels and IQ acceptability established a reduction of 60% of tube output (Group D) as optimum cutoff point (AUC

  13. Determination of gamma radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and resveratrol cytotoxicity level in tumor cells line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Vanessa D.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz (IAL-SP) Secao de Culturas Celulares, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Cancer is a disease with high incidence and it is considered a worldwide public health problem. Resveratrol is a polyphenol occurring naturally in a wide variety of plants according to response of ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposition or according to mechanical stress resulting of pathogens or chemical and physical agents. This polyphenol possesses a pharmacological activity of carcinogenesis inhibition in multiple levels. It also protects cells by scavenging the free radicals which are considered toxic products. These free radicals are formed of natural process of cell aging and also by incidence of ionizing radiation in the organism. Thus, resveratrol is considered as a cell radioprotector. On the other hand, in some elevated concentrations resveratrol may be considered as a radiosensitizing. The aim of this work was the determination of radiation lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) and also verifies the cytotoxicity level of resveratrol in tumor cells line: muco epidermoid pulmonary carcinoma cells (NCI-H292) and rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD). The cytotoxicity test was performed by neutral red uptake assay. The results of resveratrol IC{sub 50%} in NCI-H292 cells was 192{mu}M and in RD cells was 128{mu}M; and RD cells gamma radiation LD{sub 50} was 435Gy. (author)

  14. Optimum modellings of atmospheric diffusion of radioactive effluents and exposure doses in the accident consequence assessment (Level 3 PSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Woo; Lee, Young Bok; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae

    1992-12-01

    Atmospheric diffusion and exposure strongly dependent on the environment were firstly considered in the full spectrum of accident consequence assessment to establish based on Korean conditions. An optimum weather category based on Korean climate and site-specific meteorology of Kori region was established by statistical analysis of measured data for 10 years. And a trajectory model was selected as the optimal one in the ACA by reviewing several existing diffusion models. Following aspects were considered in this selection as availability of meteorological data, ability to treat the change to wind direction, easy applicability of the model, and restriction of CPU time and core memory in current computers. Numerical integration method of our own was selected as the optimal dose assessment tool of external exposure. Unit dose rate was firstly computed with this method as the function of energy level of radionuclide, size of lattice, and distance between source and receptor, and then the results were rearranged as the data library for the rapid access to the ACA run. Dynamic ecosystem modelling has been done in order to estimate the seasonal variation of radioactivity for the assessment of ingestion exposure, considering Korean ingestion behavior, agricultural practice and the transportation. There is a lot of uncertainty in a countermeasure model due to the assumed values of parameters such as fraction of population with different shielding factor and driving speed. A new countermeasure model was developed using the concept of fuzzy set theory, since it provided the mathematical tools which could characterize the uncertainty involved in countermeasure modelling. (Author)

  15. Expected dose for the early failure scenario classes in the 2008 performance assessment for the proposed high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helton, J.C.; Hansen, C.W.; Sallaberry, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. In support of this development and an associated license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the DOE completed an extensive performance assessment (PA) for the proposed YM repository in 2008. This presentation describes the determination of expected dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual (RMEI) specified in the NRC regulations for the YM repository for the early waste package (WP) failure scenario class and the early drip shield (DS) failure scenario class in the 2008 YM PA. The following topics are addressed: (i) properties of the early failure scenario classes and the determination of dose and expected dose the RMEI, (ii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early WP failure scenario class, (iii) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the early DS failure scenario class, (iv) expected dose and uncertainty in expected dose to the RMEI from the combined early WP and early DS failure scenario class with and without the inclusion of failures resulting from nominal processes, and (v) uncertainty in the occurrence of early failure scenario classes. The present article is part of a special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety devoted to the 2008 YM PA; additional articles in the issue describe other aspects of the 2008 YM PA. - Highlights: • Extensive work has been carried out by the U.S. DOE in the development of a proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. • Properties of the early failure scenario classes (i.e. early waste package failure and early drip shield failure) in the 2008 YM performance assessment are described. • Determination of dose, expected dose and expected (mean

  16. Dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitoussi, L.

    1987-12-01

    The dose limit is defined to be the level of harmfulness which must not be exceeded, so that an activity can be exercised in a regular manner without running a risk unacceptable to man and the society. The paper examines the effects of radiation categorised into stochastic and non-stochastic. Dose limits for workers and the public are discussed

  17. Contract Source Selection: An Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    using- spss - statistics.php Lamoureux, J., Murrow, M., & Walls, C. (2015). Relationship of source selection methods to contract outcomes: an analysis ...Contract Source Selection: an Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff Strategies 15 June 2016 LCDR Jamal M. Osman, USN...ACQUISITION RESEARCH PROGRAM SPONSORED REPORT SERIES Contract Source Selection: an Analysis of Lowest Price Technically Acceptable and Tradeoff

  18. Effect of dose rate on residual γ-H2AX levels and frequency of micronuclei in X-irradiated mouse lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, H C; Shuryak, I; Taveras, M; Bertucci, A; Perrier, J R; Chen, C; Elliston, C D; Johnson, G W; Smilenov, L B; Amundson, S A; Brenner, D J

    2015-03-01

    The biological risks associated with low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation exposures are not yet well defined. To assess the risk related to DNA damage, we compared the yields of two established biodosimetry end points, γ-H2AX and micronuclei (MNi), in peripheral mouse blood lymphocytes after prolonged in vivo exposure to LDR X rays (0.31 cGy/min) vs. acute high-dose-rate (HDR) exposure (1.03 Gy/min). C57BL/6 mice were total-body irradiated with 320 kVP X rays with doses of 0, 1.1, 2.2 and 4.45 Gy. Residual levels of total γ-H2AX fluorescence in lymphocytes isolated 24 h after the start of irradiation were assessed using indirect immunofluorescence methods. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay was used to determine apoptotic cell frequency in lymphocytes sampled at 24 h. Curve fitting analysis suggested that the dose response for γ-H2AX yields after acute exposures could be described by a linear dependence. In contrast, a linear-quadratic dose-response shape was more appropriate for LDR exposure (perhaps reflecting differences in repair time after different LDR doses). Dose-rate sparing effects (P effect across the dose range 24 h or 7 days post exposure. In conclusion, the γ-H2AX biomarker showed higher sensitivity to measure dose-rate effects after low-dose LDR X rays compared to MNi formation; however, confounding factors such as variable repair times post exposure, increased cell killing and cell cycle block likely contributed to the yields of MNi with accumulating doses of ionizing radiation.

  19. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a ‘health-care level I’ representative region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002–11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm2 were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05–0.27 mSv y−1) and the collective dose (5.8–35 man Sv y−1). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors’ institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10 % of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories. PMID:26012484

  20. Characterisation of Population Pharmacokinetics and Endogenous Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) Levels after Multiple Dosing of a Recombinant Human FSH, FE 999049, in Healthy Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Trine Høyer; Röshammer, Daniel; Erichsen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    : Longitudinal measurements of FSH, luteinising hormone, progesterone, estradiol, and inhibin B levels were collected after repeated subcutaneous dosing with 225 IU of FE 999049 in 24 gonadotropin downregulated healthy women. The FSH data were described using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. Results...... increased with body weight in accordance with an allometrically scaled power exponent of 0.75 and 1, respectively. Endogenous FSH levels were lower in individuals with higher progesterone levels at baseline and were further suppressed over time with increasing inhibin B levels. Conclusions......: This characterisation of FE 999049 population pharmacokinetics after repeated dosing is in line with previous findings after single-dose administration. The results provide a basis for study design and data evaluation in the future development of recombinant FSH products, and show it can be of importance to account...

  1. Dental radiography technique and equipment: How they influence the radiation dose received at the level of the thyroid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, E.R. [School of Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Belfast BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: emmaroserush@hotmail.com; Thompson, N.A. [School of Health Sciences, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Belfast BT37 0QB (United Kingdom)

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence that collimator and technique choice had on the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position, during intra-oral examinations of the upper and lower teeth. Radiation dose reduction from a different perspective, other than the application of lead-rubber shielding, was addressed. Methods: A study was performed at a regional dental school with the use of a phantom head/neck and a radiation dosemeter, to measure the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position. The radiation dose was assessed for two intra-oral techniques (paralleling and bisecting angle), and two collimators (rectangular and circular). The radiation dose was also assessed with and without the application of a thyroid shield. Standard descriptive statistics, followed by inferential statistics were applied to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position, when employing the paralleling technique (66.7%) and rectangular collimator (45.5%). Other factors, for example the tooth/teeth under examination, were also found to influence the radiation dose detected. Conclusion: Radiation dose reductions using the paralleling technique and rectangular collimator were outlined. The use of this low dose combination within dental practices remains limited, therefore, continued awareness and acceptance of radiation hazards need to be addressed.

  2. Dental radiography technique and equipment: How they influence the radiation dose received at the level of the thyroid gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rush, E.R.; Thompson, N.A.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the influence that collimator and technique choice had on the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position, during intra-oral examinations of the upper and lower teeth. Radiation dose reduction from a different perspective, other than the application of lead-rubber shielding, was addressed. Methods: A study was performed at a regional dental school with the use of a phantom head/neck and a radiation dosemeter, to measure the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position. The radiation dose was assessed for two intra-oral techniques (paralleling and bisecting angle), and two collimators (rectangular and circular). The radiation dose was also assessed with and without the application of a thyroid shield. Standard descriptive statistics, followed by inferential statistics were applied to the data. Results: There was a significant reduction in the radiation dose detected at the thyroid gland position, when employing the paralleling technique (66.7%) and rectangular collimator (45.5%). Other factors, for example the tooth/teeth under examination, were also found to influence the radiation dose detected. Conclusion: Radiation dose reductions using the paralleling technique and rectangular collimator were outlined. The use of this low dose combination within dental practices remains limited, therefore, continued awareness and acceptance of radiation hazards need to be addressed

  3. Comparative analysis of dose levels to patients in radiological procedures guided by fluoroscopy; Analisis comparativo de los niveles de dosis a paciente en procedimientos radiologicos guiados por fluoroscopia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Pablo Luis; Fernandez, Manuel; Ramos, Julio A.; Delgado, Jose Miguel; Cons, Nestor, E-mail: pablogll@eresmas.com [Hospital Universitario de Salamanca (Spain). Servicio de Radio fisica y Proteccion Radiologica

    2013-07-01

    This work presents the comparative data of the dose indicators for patient in radiological processes with respect to the values published in the ICRP document. It is analyzed the need for different strategies to communicate to different specialists mechanisms to optimize the radiation beginning with practice by training of second degree level in radiological protection and then, working with them the basics of equipment management to reduce doses without detriment to the welfare purpose.

  4. Efficacy and safety of weight-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen compared with glucose level- and current dose-based regimens in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Du, Tao; Li, Wangen; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haiyan; Xiong, Yifeng

    2014-09-01

    Insulin glargine is widely used as basal insulin. However, published dose titration regimens for insulin glargine are complex. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety profile of a user-friendly, weight-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen with 2 published regimens. A total of 160 hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia in 3 medical centers were screened. Our inclusion criteria included age 18 to 80 years and being conscious. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy or breast-feeding and hepatic or renal dysfunction. A total of 149 patients were randomly assigned to receive weight-based, glucose level-based, or dose-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen between January 2011 and February 2013. The initial dose of insulin glargine was 0.2 U/kg. In the weight-based regimen (n = 49), the dose was titrated by increments of 0.1 U/kg daily. In the glucose level-based regimen (n = 51), the dose was titrated by 2, 4, 6, or 8 U daily when fasting blood glucose (FBG) was, respectively, between 7.0 and 7.9, 8.0 and 8.9, 9.0 and 9.9, or ≥10 mmol/L. In the current dose-based regimen (n = 49), titration was by daily increments of 20% of the current dose. The target FBG in all groups was ≤7.0 mmol/L. The incidence of hypoglycemia was recorded. One-way ANOVA and χ(2) test were used to compare data between the 3 groups. All but 1 patient who required additional oral antidiabetic medication completed the study. The mean (SD) time to achieve target FBG was 3.2 (1.2) days with the weight-based regimen and 3.7 (1.5) days with the glucose level-based regimen (P = 0.266). These times were both shorter than that achieved with the current dose-based regimen (4.8 [2.8] days; P = 0.0001 and P = 0.005, respectively). The daily doses of insulin glargine at the study end point were 0.43 (0.13) U/kg with the weight-based regimen, 0.50 (0.20) U/kg with the glucose level-based regimen, and 0.47 (0.23) U/kg with the current dose-based regimen (P = 0.184). The incidence

  5. Dose calcium channel blocker verapamil decrease urinary VMA levels in sympathoadrenal hyperactive patients with posttraumatic stress disorder?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Munawar Alam Ansari; Shahida PAhmed; Zahida Memon

    2008-01-01

    Objective:The majority of the patients with posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD)embrace augmented urina-ry flow of Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA)than normal subjects owing to superior sympathetic doings,which steer to cardiovascular catastrophe.Urinary flow of VMA was evaluated as sympathoadrenal bustle marker in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.Calcium ion shows a noteworthy dependability in nervousness owing to its special effects on brain synaptosomes.So this study was conducted to explore the effects of Verapamil on sympathoadrenal motion in patients with PTSD.Methods:Placebo controlled clinical tryout was conducted. At first hundred (100)PTSD patients were chosen and enrolled in the study,from department of Psychological Medicine Dow University of Health Sciences,Karachi.Verapamil 120 mg/day was specified in divided doses to group-I (n =50)patients and group-II (n =50)patients received placebo therapy on a daily basis for nine weeks.Each and every patient was monitored weekly,all the way through extent of study.Results:Under-neath the posttraumatic stress disorder,urinary excretion of VMA was greater.Calcium channel blocker vera-pamil additionally abolished the embellished retort in urinary flow of VMA appreciably in patients with PTSD. Conclusion:Verapamil was experiential to be exceedingly effectual treatment.It reduces VMA levels in u-rine,and on the whole cardiovascular threat in PTSD patients.

  6. Strong relationship between oral dose and tenofovir hair levels in a randomized trial: hair as a potential adherence measure for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Y Liu

    Full Text Available Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP trials using tenofovir-based regimens have demonstrated that high levels of adherence are required to evaluate efficacy; the incorporation of objective biomarkers of adherence in trial design has been essential to interpretation, given the inaccuracy of self-report. Antiretroviral measurements in scalp hair have been useful as a marker of long-term exposure in the HIV treatment setting, and hair samples are relatively easy and inexpensive to collect, transport, and store for analysis. To evaluate the relationship between dose and tenofovir concentrations in hair, we examined the dose proportionality of tenofovir in hair in healthy, HIV-uninfected adults.A phase I, crossover pharmacokinetic study was performed in 24 HIV-negative adults receiving directly-observed oral tenofovir tablets administered 2, 4, and 7 doses/week for 6 weeks, with a ≥3-week break between periods. Small samples of hair were collected after each six-week period and analyzed for tenofovir concentrations. Geometric-mean-ratios compared levels between each pair of dosing conditions. Intensive plasma pharmacokinetic studies were performed during the daily-dosing period to calculate areas-under-the-time-concentration curves (AUCs.Over 90% of doses were observed per protocol. Median tenofovir concentrations in hair increased monotonically with dose. A log-linear relationship was seen between dose and hair levels, with an estimated 76% (95% CI 60-93% increase in hair level per 2-fold dose increase. Tenofovir plasma AUCs modestly predicted drug concentrations in hair.This study found a strong linear relationship between frequency of dosing and tenofovir levels in scalp hair. The analysis of quantitative drug levels in hair has the potential to improve adherence measurement in the PrEP field and may be helpful in determining exposure thresholds for protection and explaining failures in PrEP trials. Hair measures for adherence monitoring may also

  7. A comparative study of indoor radon levels and inhalation dose in some areas of Punjab and Haryana, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajwa, B.S.; Singh, Harmanjit; Singh, Joga; Singh, Surinder

    2009-01-01

    Indoor radon concentrations have been measured for two consecutive half-year periods in a wide range of dwellings of some regions of Punjab and Haryana states. The objective was to find correlation between the variations of indoor radon levels with the sub-soil, local geology, type of building materials, etc. of the two regions. So keeping this in view the indoor radon measurements have been carried out in the dwellings of different villages around the Tusham ring complex, Bhiwani District, Haryana, known to be composed of acidic volcanics and the associated granites along with some villages of Amritsar District, Punjab. The indoor radon concentration in the dwellings around Tusham (Haryana) have been found to be varying from 120.5±95 to 915.2±233 Bq m -3 , whereas it ranges from 60.0±37 to 235.6±96 Bq m -3 for the dwellings of Punjab. The 222 Rn concentration observed at most of locations particularly around Tusham ring complex region is higher than that of all the villages studied in Punjab region. Local geology including embedded granitic rocks, sub-soil, etc. as well as building materials having higher radioactive content are the major contributors for the higher indoor radon levels observed in the dwelling around Tusham, where few dwellings have higher radon concentrations than the ICRP, 1993 recommendations. The annual effective dose equivalent has also been estimated for each location of the both regions, which has been found to be varying from 1.0 to 17.2 mSv/y. (author)

  8. An open label, dose response study to determine the effect of a dietary supplement on dihydrotestosterone, testosterone and estradiol levels in healthy males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Mark L

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining endogenous testosterone (T levels as men age may slow the symptoms of sarcopenia, andropause and decline in physical performance. Drugs inhibiting the enzyme 5α-reductase (5AR produce increased blood levels of T and decreased levels of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. However, symptoms of gynecomastia have been reported due to the aromatase (AER enzyme converting excess T to estradiol (ES. The carotenoid astaxanthin (AX from Haematococcus pluvialis, Saw Palmetto berry lipid extract (SPLE from Serenoa repens and the precise combination of these dietary supplements, Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™, have been reported to have inhibitory effects on both 5AR and AER in-vitro. Concomitant regulation of both enzymes in-vivo would cause DHT and ES blood levels to decrease and T levels to increase. The purpose of this clinical study was to determine if patented Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™ could produce these effects in a dose dependent manner. Methods To investigate this clinically, 42 healthy males ages 37 to 70 years were divided into two groups of twenty-one and dosed with either 800 mg/day or 2000 mg/day of Alphastat® (Mytosterone(™ for fourteen days. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 3, 7 and 14 and assayed for T, DHT and ES. Body weight and blood pressure data were collected prior to blood collection. One-way, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA-RM was performed at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences from baseline within each group. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA-2 was performed after baseline subtraction, at a significance level of alpha = 0.05 to determine differences between dose groups. Results are expressed as means ± SEM. Results ANOVA-RM showed significant within group increases in serum total T and significant decreases in serum DHT from baseline in both dose groups at a significance level of alpha = 0.05. Significant decreases in serum ES are reported for the 2000

  9. Mercaptopurine metabolite levels are predictors of bone marrow toxicity following high-dose methotrexate therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vang, Sophia Ingeborg; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Frandsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    High-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) courses with concurrent oral low-dose MTX/6-mercaptopurine (6MP) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) are often followed by neutro- and thrombocytopenia necessitating treatment interruptions. Plasma MTX during HD-MTX therapy guides folinic acid rescue ...

  10. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Schullian, Peter; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Hörmann, Romed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A

    2017-05-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. • Ultra-low-dose MDCT protocols allowed more than 90 % reductions in dose. • Decreasing the dose generally increased density and noise. • Effect of IRT on density and noise varies with reconstruction kernel. • Accuracy of low-dose protocols for interpretation of bony anatomy not known. • Effect of low doses on accuracy of computer-aided design models unknown.

  11. Increasing doses of fiber do not influence short-term satiety or food intake and are inconsistently linked to gut hormone levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J. Willis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: People who eat more fiber often have a lower body weight than people who eat less fiber. The mechanism for this relationship has been explained, in part, by increased satiety, which may occur as a result of changes in appetite-suppressing gut hormone levels, and decreases in food intake at subsequent meals. Objective: We hypothesized that increasing doses of mixed fiber, consumed in muffins for breakfast, would proportionally influence satiety, gut hormone levels, and subsequent food intake. Design: This was a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Healthy men (n=10 and women (n=10 with a BMI of 24±2 (mean±SEM participated in this study. Fasting subjects consumed a muffin with 0, 4, 8, or 12 g of mixed fibers and approximately 500 kcal. Visual analog scales rated hunger and satiety for 3 h; blood was drawn to measure ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, and peptide YY3–36 (PYY3–36 at various intervals; and food intake was measured at an ad libitum lunch. Results: Responses to satiety-related questions did not differ among treatments. However, despite lack of differences in satiety, gut hormone levels differed among treatments. Ghrelin was higher after the 12 g fiber dose than after the 4 and 8 g fiber doses. GLP-1 was higher after the 0 g fiber dose than after the 12 and 4 g fiber doses, and PYY3–36 did not differ among fiber doses. Food intake was also indistinguishable among doses. Conclusion: Satiety, gut hormone response, and food intake did not change in a dose-dependent manner after subjects consumed 0, 4, 8, and 12 g of mixed fiber in muffins for breakfast.

  12. Survey of image quality and patient dose in simple radiographic examinations: establishing guidance levels and comparison with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manatrakul, N.; Bunsoong, T.; Krisanachinda, A.; Suwanpradit, P.; Rungruengthanakit, P.; Kanchart, S.; Chaiwong, Rajikorn; Tsapakig, V.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate image quality and patient dose for commonly radiographic examinations in Thailand, to establish national reference or guidance levels (GL) and compare with international standards, as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project on Radiation Protection of Patients and Medical Exposure Control (RAS/9/034 and RAS/9/047). Materials and Methods: Film reject rate analysis, image quality and patient dose assessment before and after Quality Control (QC) implementation were investigated in 8 X-ray machines in 4 hospitals. Air kerma (in mGy) at 1 meter focus-detector-distance for different kVp settings for each X-ray machines were measured using an ionization chamber under standardized condition. The entrance skin air kerma (ESAK) for Chest PA, Lumbar spine AP, Lumbar spine LAT, Pelvis AP, Abdomen AP, Skull AP and Skull LAT were calculated for at least 10 adult patients of average body mass (60 to 80 kg) for each projection. The obtained values were compared with international standards. Results: The highest film rejection rate reduction recorded after corrective actions from 9.15% to 6.8%. Mean ESAK values were less than international standards both before and after QC implementation in all projections but Chest PA projection. Maximum ESAK in Chest PA projection before corrective action was 0.55 mGy which was higher than the IAEA GL of 0.2 mGy. However, it was reduced to 0.25 mGy after QC tests on X- ray machine and using high kilovoltage (kV) technique. Conclusion: Proposed national GL of Thailand were obtained by estimating the 3rd quartile of the whole sample: Chest PA: 0.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine AP: 2.1 mGy, Lumbar Spine LAT: 6.3 mGy, Pelvis AP: 1.8 mGy, Abdomen: 1.5 mGy, Skull PA: 1.3 mGy and Skull LAT: 0.9 mGy. (author)

  13. Preparations for an optical access to the lowest nuclear excitation in {sup 229}Th

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wense, Lars v.d.; Seiferle, Benedict; Thirolf, Peter G. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Laatiaoui, Mustapha [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The isomeric lowest excited nuclear level of {sup 229}Th has been indirectly measured to be 7.6±0.5 eV (163±11 nm). This low transition energy, compared to energies typically involved in nuclear processes, would allow for the application of laser-spectroscopic methods. Also considering the isomeric lifetime of the excited state (estimated to be 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} s), which leads to an extremely sharp linewidth of Δω/ω ∝ 10{sup -20}, the isomer becomes a strong candidate for a nuclear-based frequency standard. In order to directly detect the isomeric ground-state decay and improve the accuracy of its energy as a prerequisite for an all-optical control, {sup 229m}Th is populated via a 2% decay branch in the α decay of {sup 233}U. The Thorium ions are extracted and cooled with the help of a buffer-gas stopping cell and an RFQ-cooler. In order to suppress accompanying α decay chain products other than {sup 229}Th, a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) is used. Following the QMS, the Thorium isomeric decay is expected to be detectable. Internal conversion as well as photonic decay is probed via different detection techniques. Latest results are presented.

  14. Failures of TDDFT in describing the lowest intramolecular charge-transfer excitation in para-nitroanilin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, J.J.; Sauer, S.P.A.; Mikkelsen, K.V.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the failure of Time{Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) with the CAM{B3LYP exchange{correlation (xc) functional coupled to the Polarizable Embedding (PE) scheme (PE-CAM-B3LYP) in reproducing the solvatochromic shift of the lowest intense charge{transfer excitation in para...... the electric dipole moments in the gas phase and for 100 solvent congurations. We find that CAM-B3LYP overestimates the amount of charge separation inherent in the ground state and TDDFT/CAM-B3LYP drastically underestimates this amount in the excited charge-transfer state. As the errors in the solvatochromatic...... to benchmark results of TDDFT calculations with CAM-B3LYP for intramolecular charge{transfer excitations in molecular systems similar to pNA against higher{level ab initio wave function methods, like, e.g., CCSD, prior to their use. Using the calculated change in dipole moment upon excitation as a measure...

  15. Serum total homocystein, folate and vitamin B12 levels and their correlation with antipsychotic drug doses in adult male patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Esin; Yeğin, Ayşenur; Yilmaz, Necat; Herken, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Elevated blood levels of homocysteine (hCY) have been associated with schizophrenic male patients. However, controversy remains regarding the association between lowered plasma folate and vitamin B12, hyperhomocysteinemia, and schizophrenia. Sixty-six (66) male patients with chronic schizophrenia were investigated to test the hypotheses that alterations in Hcy, folate, and vitamin B12 levels might be related to the antipsychotic drug doses used in treatment. Serum total homocysteine, folic acid, and vitamin B12 levels were determined by chemiluminescence methods in both patients and control subjects. The patients were grouped according to the antipsychotic drug doses used in their treatment. Patients had higher homocysteine levels but they did not differ from controls in terms of folate and vitamin B12 levels. On the other hand, only folate levels were negatively correlated in the patient group treated with higher therapeutic doses of chlorpromazine equivalents (> 400 mg/day) compared to the patient group with lower doses (< 400 mg/day). Our findings show that higher typical antipsychotic drugs may play a role as modifiying factor for folate metabolism in chronic schizoprenic male patients.

  16. The consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum annual dose equivalent level for an individual in a group of occupationally exposed workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, N.T.

    1980-02-01

    An analysis is described for predicting the consequences of a reduction in the administratively applied maximum dose equivalent level to individuals in a group of workers occupationally exposed to ionising radiations, for the situation in which no changes are made to the working environment. This limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent is accommodated by allowing the number of individuals in the working group to increase. The derivation of the analysis is given, together with worked examples, which highlight the important assumptions that have been made and the conclusions that can be drawn. The results are obtained in the form of the capacity of the particular working environment to accommodate the limitation of the maximum individual dose equivalent, the increase in the number of workers required to carry out the productive work and any consequent increase in the occupational collective dose equivalent. (author)

  17. Pricing strategies for combination pediatric vaccines based on the lowest overall cost formulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Banafsheh; Jacobson, Sheldon H; Sewell, Edward C

    2012-10-01

    This paper analyzes pricing strategies for US pediatric combination vaccines by comparing the lowest overall cost formularies (i.e., formularies that have the lowest overall cost). Three pharmaceutical companies compete pairwise over the sale of monovalent and combination vaccines. Particular emphasis is placed on examining the price of Sanofi Pasteur's DTaP-IPV/HIb under different conditions. The main contribution of the paper is to provide the lowest overall cost formularies for different prices of DTaP-IPV/HIb and other Sanofi Pasteur vaccines. The resulting analysis shows that DTaP-IPV/HIb could have been more competitively priced compared with the combination vaccine DTaP-HepB-IPV, for federal contract prices in 2009, 2010 and 2011. This study also proposes the lowest overall cost formularies when shortages of monovalent vaccines occur.

  18. Assessment of eight HPV vaccination programs implemented in lowest income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Ladner, Joël; Besson, Marie-Hélène; Hampshire, Rachel; Tapert, Lisa; Chirenje, Mike; Saba, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervix cancer, preventable, continues to be the third most common cancer in women worldwide, especially in lowest income countries. Prophylactic HPV vaccination should help to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. The purpose of the study was to describe the results of and key concerns in eight HPV vaccination programs conducted in seven lowest income countries through the Gardasil Access Program (GAP). Methods The GAP provides free HPV vaccin...

  19. An isotope dependent study of acetone in its lowest excited triplet state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrtz, M.; Brauchle, C.; Voitlaender, J.

    1984-01-01

    The lowest excited triplet state T 1 of acetone-h 6 and acetone-d 6 was investigated with a pulsed dye laser equipped ODMR spectrometer. Acetone is found to be bent in T 1 and the out-of-plane distortion angle is estimated to be approx.= 38 0 . The observed zero-field splitting (ZFS) is surprisingly small. Both the spin-spin and the spin-orbit (SO) contribution to the ZFS are evaluated. The SO tensor contribution is calculated from a correlation between the deuterium effects on the ZFS parameters and the population rates. The sub-level selective kinetics of the acetone T 1 is largely determined by the mixing of the x- and z-level characteristics owing to magnetic axis rotation caused by the excited state out-of-plane distortion. Considerable deuterium effects are observed on the kinetic data and on the microwave transition frequencies. In all cases the spin-specific isotope effects (due to the promoting modes) and the global effects (due to the Franck-Condon factors) are specified. For the population rates and the SO contribution to ZFS, the inverse global isotope effects (deuterium factor > 1) was found for the first time. Based on the isotope dependence of the rates, the mechanisms of (vibrationally induced) SO coupling in acetone are discussed. It is concluded that non-adiabatic contributions have to be taken into account for the smallest population rate only, but that otherwise the adiabatic SO coupling mechanisms by far dominates in the acetone photophysics. (author)

  20. Medical reference dosimetry using EPR measurements of alanine: Development of an improved method for clinical dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Andersen, Claus Erik; Rosendal, Flemming; Kofoed, Inger Matilde

    2009-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (EPR) is used to determine the absorbed dose of alanine dosimeters exposed to clinical photon beams in a solid-water phantom. Alanine is potentially suitable for medical reference dosimetry, because of its near water equivalence over a wide energy spectrum, low signal fading, non-destructive measurement and small dosimeter size. Material and Methods. A Bruker EMX-micro EPR spectrometer with a rectangular cavity and a measurement time of two minutes per dosimeter was used for reading of irradiated alanine dosimeters. Under these conditions a new algorithm based on scaling of known spectra was developed to extract the alanine signal. Results. The dose accuracy, including calibration uncertainty, is less than 2% (k=1) above 4 Gy (n=4). The measurement uncertainty is fairly constant in absolute terms (∼30 mGy) and the relative uncertainty therefore rises for dose measurements below 4 Gy. Typical reproducibility is <1% (k=1) above 10 Gy and <2% between 4 and 10 Gy. Below 4 Gy the uncertainty is higher. A depth dose curve measurement was performed in a solid-water phantom irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy at the maximum dose point (dmax) in 6 and 18 MV photon beams. The typical difference between the dose measured with alanine in solid water and the dose measured with an ion chamber in a water tank was about 1%. A difference of 2% between 6 and 18 MV was found, possibly due to non-water equivalence of the applied phantom. Discussion. Compared to previously published methods the proposed algorithm can be applied without normalisation of phase shifts caused by changes in the g-value of the cavity. The study shows that alanine dosimetry is a suitable candidate for medical reference dosimetry especially for quality control applications

  1. Computer simulation of 2D grain growth using a cellular automata model based on the lowest energy principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yizhu; Ding Hanlin; Liu Liufa; Shin, Keesam

    2006-01-01

    The morphology, topology and kinetics of normal grain growth in two-dimension were studied by computer simulation using a cellular automata (Canada) model based on the lowest energy principle. The thermodynamic energy that follows Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics has been introduced into this model for the calculation of energy change. The transition that can reduce the system energy to the lowest level is chosen to occur when there is more than one possible transition direction. The simulation results show that the kinetics of normal grain growth follows the Burke equation with the growth exponent m = 2. The analysis of topology further indicates that normal grain growth can be simulated fairly well by the present CA model. The vanishing of grains with different number of sides is discussed in the simulation

  2. Level and distribution of the radiation dose to the population from a mammography screening programme in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulling, S.M.; Nicoll, J.J. [Otago Univ., Dunedin (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics

    1995-12-31

    The Otago Southland Breast Screening Programme offers biennial mammography to 19,000 eligible women on the South Island of New Zealand. A Quality Assurance programme ensures that international performance standards are met, in particular the radiation dose for a mammogram of 5 cm CIRS-X phantom is 1.7 mGy and careful retake analysis undertaken. This however does not reveal the absorbed dose received by individuals, nor how this varies between individuals. Machine parameters and compressed breast thickness for each film were recorded for 310 women who attended one centre during the three months ending February 1993 and absorbed doses calculated using Monte Carlo data. The mean compressed breast thickness for the 310 women was 4.9 cm, doses received for individual films ranged from 0.7 to 8.5 mGy while patient total doses were in the range 4 to 29 mGy with 75% of women receiving a dose of 7.1 mGy or less. (Author).

  3. Dose- and time-dependent changes in tissue levels of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA and its sulfate and glucuronide conjugates following repeated administration to female Wistar Han Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Borghoff

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, a nongenotoxic flame retardant, causes uterine tumors in female rats. A proposed mode of action (MoA for these tumors involves an increase in the bioavailability of estradiol as a result of TBBPA inhibiting estrogen sulfotransferases (ES, the enzymes responsible for inactivating and enhancing the elimination of estradiol. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dose and repeated administration of TBBPA on the level of TBBPA, TBBPA-glucuronide (GA and TBBPA-sulfate (S conjugates in plasma, liver and uterus of female Wistar Han rats administered TBBPA (50, 100, 250, 500 or 1000 mg/kg for 28 consecutive days. In accordance with this objective, TBBPA sulfation was used as a surrogate for evaluating the potential for estradiol sulfation to be limited at high dose levels of TBBPA. Blood samples were collected at 4 and 8 h post-dosing on study day 7, 14, and 28, while liver and uterus were collected at the same time points following 28 days of dosing. Tissue samples were analyzed for TBBPA, TBBPA-GA and TBBPA-S by LC–MS/MS. A dose-related increase in the concentration of all three analytes occurred in plasma (day 7, 14, and 28 as well as liver and uterus tissue (day 28 at both 4 and 8 h post dose. The plasma concentration of TBBPA-GA and TBBPA-S was higher in animals dosed for 28 days compared to those dosed for 7 or 14 days showing an increase in systemic circulation of these conjugates with repeated administration. The balance of these conjugates was also different in tissues with TBBPA-S > TBBPA-GA at high doses in the liver and TBBPA-GA > TBBPA-S in both plasma and uterus. In all three tissues the ratio of TBBPA-S/TBBPA-GA showed a decreasing trend with dose, suggesting that at high TBBPA dose levels sulfation of TBBPA becomes limited. This effect was most apparent in the liver and plasma at 28 days of administration. Together these data show that administration of high doses of TBBPA

  4. Reduced lung dose and improved inspiration level reproducibility in visually guided DIBH compared to audio coached EIG radiotherapy for breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Sidsel Marie Skov; Aznar, Marianne Camille; Pedersen, Anders Navrsted

    2013-01-01

    Patients with left-sided breast cancer with lymph node involvement have routinely been treated with enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) for a decade at our institution. In a transition from EIG to deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) we compared the two techniques with focus on target coverage, dose...... to organs at risk and reproducibility of the inspiration level (IL)....

  5. Re-establishment of the air kerma and ambient dose equivalent standards for the BIPM protection-level 60Co beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, C.; Roger, P.

    2005-07-01

    The air kerma and ambient dose equivalent standards for the protection-level 60 Co beam have been re-established following the repositioning of the irradiator and modifications to the beam. Details concerning the standards and the new uncertainty budgets are described in this report with their implications for dosimetry comparisons and calibrations. (authors)

  6. A test of high-dose verbenone for stand-level protection of lodgepole and whitebark pine from mountain pine beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. J. Bentz; S. Kegley; K. Gibson; R. Their

    2005-01-01

    The effcacy of verbenone as a stand-level protectant against mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, attacks was tested in lodgepole and whitebark pine stands at five geographically separated sites, including three consecutive years at one site. Forty and 20 high-dose pouches, with a verbenone emission rate up to 50 mg/d per pouch, were spaced in a grid...

  7. Detection of sub micro Gray dose levels using OSL phosphor LiMgPO_4:Tb,B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawat, N.S.; Dhabekar, Bhushan; Muthe, K.P.; Koul, D.K.; Datta, D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • LiMgPO4:Tb,B has been studied and shown to possesses minimum measurable dose (MMD) in sub micro Gray region. • MMD as low as 0.49 µGy in readout time of less than 1 s at stimulation intensity of 32 mW/cm"2 has been achieved. • The OSL measurements for low doses has strengthened and validated this claim. • OSL spectrum shows several emission peaks and the prominent peak around 380 nm. - Abstract: Detection of sub micro Gray doses finds application in personnel and environmental monitoring, and nuclear forensics. Recently developed LiMgPO_4:Tb,B (LMP) is highly sensitive Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) phosphor with excellent dosimetric properties. The OSL emission spectrum of LMP consists of several peaks attributed to characteristic Tb"3"+ emission. The OSL emission peak at 380 nm is favorable for bi-alkali PMT used in RISO reader system. It is demonstrated that significant improvement in dose detection threshold can be realized for LMP by optimization of continuous wave (CW–) OSL parameters like stimulation intensity and readout time. The minimum measurable dose (MMD) as low as 0.49 µGy in readout time of less than 1 s at stimulation intensity of 32 mW/cm"2 has been achieved using this phosphor. The recommendations for choice of parameters for personnel and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

  8. Detection of sub micro Gray dose levels using OSL phosphor LiMgPO{sub 4}:Tb,B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawat, N.S., E-mail: naru@barc.gov.in [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Dhabekar, Bhushan [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Muthe, K.P. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Koul, D.K.; Datta, D. [Radiological Physics and Advisory Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • LiMgPO4:Tb,B has been studied and shown to possesses minimum measurable dose (MMD) in sub micro Gray region. • MMD as low as 0.49 µGy in readout time of less than 1 s at stimulation intensity of 32 mW/cm{sup 2} has been achieved. • The OSL measurements for low doses has strengthened and validated this claim. • OSL spectrum shows several emission peaks and the prominent peak around 380 nm. - Abstract: Detection of sub micro Gray doses finds application in personnel and environmental monitoring, and nuclear forensics. Recently developed LiMgPO{sub 4}:Tb,B (LMP) is highly sensitive Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) phosphor with excellent dosimetric properties. The OSL emission spectrum of LMP consists of several peaks attributed to characteristic Tb{sup 3+} emission. The OSL emission peak at 380 nm is favorable for bi-alkali PMT used in RISO reader system. It is demonstrated that significant improvement in dose detection threshold can be realized for LMP by optimization of continuous wave (CW–) OSL parameters like stimulation intensity and readout time. The minimum measurable dose (MMD) as low as 0.49 µGy in readout time of less than 1 s at stimulation intensity of 32 mW/cm{sup 2} has been achieved using this phosphor. The recommendations for choice of parameters for personnel and environmental monitoring are also discussed.

  9. A mouse model of cytogenetic analysis to evaluate caesium137 radiation dose exposure and contamination level in lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roch-Lefevre, Sandrine; Martin-Bodiot, Cecile; Gregoire, Eric; Roy, Laurence [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Dosimetrie Biologique (PRP-HOM/SRBE/LDB), Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Desbree, Aurelie [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), PRP-HOM/SDI, Laboratoire d' Evaluation de la Dose Interne, Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Barquinero, Joan Francesc [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Laboratoire de Dosimetrie Biologique (PRP-HOM/SRBE/LDB), Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France); Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Unitat d' Antropologia Biologica, Departament de Biologia Animal, Biologia Vegetal i Ecologia, Bellaterra (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    In case of external overexposure to ionizing radiation, an estimation of its genotoxic effects on exposed individuals can be made retrospectively by the measurement of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations on circulating lymphocytes. Compared with external irradiation, intakes of radionuclides may, however, lead to specific features influencing dose distribution at the scale of body, of tissue or even of cell. Therefore, in case of internal contamination by radionuclides, experimental studies, particularly using animal models, are required to better understand mechanisms of their genotoxic effects and to better estimate the absorbed dose. The present study was designed to evaluate a cytogenetic method in mouse peripheral blood lymphocytes that would allow determination of yields and complexities of chromosome aberrations after low-dose rate exposure to {sup 137}Cs delivered in vitro either by irradiation or by contamination. By using M-FISH analysis, we compared the low-dose rate responses observed in mouse to the high-dose rate responses observed both in mouse and in human. Promising similarities between the two species in the relative biological effect evaluation show that our cytogenetic model established in mouse might be useful to evaluate various radiation exposures, particularly relevant in case of intakes of radionuclides. (orig.)

  10. Cloud-based CT dose monitoring using the DICOM-structured report. Fully automated analysis in regard to national diagnostic reference levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, J.; Rubbert, C.; Heusch, P.; Lanzman, R.S.; Aissa, J.; Antoch, G.; Kroepil, P.

    2016-01-01

    To implement automated CT dose data monitoring using the DICOM-Structured Report (DICOM-SR) in order to monitor dose-related CT data in regard to national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs). Materials and Methods: We used a novel in-house co-developed software tool based on the DICOM-SR to automatically monitor dose-related data from CT examinations. The DICOM-SR for each CT examination performed between 09/2011 and 03/2015 was automatically anonymized and sent from the CT scanners to a cloud server. Data was automatically analyzed in accordance with body region, patient age and corresponding DRL for volumetric computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol ) and dose length product (DLP). Results: Data of 36 523 examinations (131 527 scan series) performed on three different CT scanners and one PET/CT were analyzed. The overall mean CTDI vol and DLP were 51.3 % and 52.8 % of the national DRLs, respectively. CTDI vol and DLP reached 43.8 % and 43.1 % for abdominal CT (n = 10 590), 66.6 % and 69.6 % for cranial CT (n = 16 098) and 37.8 % and 44.0 % for chest CT (n = 10 387) of the compared national DRLs, respectively. Overall, the CTDI vol exceeded national DRLs in 1.9 % of the examinations, while the DLP exceeded national DRLs in 2.9 % of the examinations. Between different CT protocols of the same body region, radiation exposure varied up to 50 % of the DRLs. Conclusion: The implemented cloud-based CT dose monitoring based on the DICOM-SR enables automated benchmarking in regard to national DRLs. Overall the local dose exposure from CT reached approximately 50 % of these DRLs indicating that DRL actualization as well as protocol-specific DRLs are desirable. The cloud-based approach enables multi-center dose monitoring and offers great potential to further optimize radiation exposure in radiological departments.

  11. Development of the 60Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water (ND,W)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Akifumi; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Fukahori, Mai; Sakata, Suoh

    2013-01-01

    A primary standard for the absorbed dose rate to water in a 60 Co gamma-ray field was established at National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ) in fiscal year 2011. Then, a 60 Co gamma-ray standard field for therapy-level dosimeter calibration in terms of absorbed dose to water was developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as a secondary standard dosimetry laboratory (SSDL). The results of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/World Health Organization (WHO) TLD SSDL audit demonstrated that there was good agreement between NIRS stated absorbed dose to water and IAEA measurements. The IAEA guide based on the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard was used to estimate the relative expanded uncertainty of the calibration factor for a therapy-level Farmer type ionization chamber in terms of absorbed dose to water (N D,W ) with the new field. The uncertainty of N D,W was estimated to be 1.1% (k=2), which corresponds to approximately one third of the value determined in the existing air kerma field. The dissemination of traceability of the calibration factor determined in the new field is expected to diminish the uncertainty of dose delivered to patients significantly. (author)

  12. Dosimetric analysis of testicular doses in prostate intensity-modulated and volumetric-modulated arc radiation therapy at different energy levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Cem, E-mail: hcemonal@hotmail.com; Arslan, Gungor; Dolek, Yemliha; Efe, Esma

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidental testicular doses during prostate radiation therapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) at different energies. Dosimetric data of 15 patients with intermediate-risk prostate cancer who were treated with radiotherapy were analyzed. The prescribed dose was 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Dosimetric analysis compared testicular doses generated by 7-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy with a single arc at 6, 10, and 15 MV energy levels. Testicular doses calculated from the treatment planning system and doses measured from the detectors were analyzed. Mean testicular doses from the intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy per fraction calculated in the treatment planning system were 16.3 ± 10.3 cGy vs 21.5 ± 11.2 cGy (p = 0.03) at 6 MV, 13.4 ± 10.4 cGy vs 17.8 ± 10.7 cGy (p = 0.04) at 10 MV, and 10.6 ± 8.5 cGy vs 14.5 ± 8.6 cGy (p = 0.03) at 15 MV, respectively. Mean scattered testicular doses in the phantom measurements were 99.5 ± 17.2 cGy, 118.7 ± 16.4 cGy, and 193.9 ± 14.5 cGy at 6, 10, and 15 MV, respectively, in the intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans. In the volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans, corresponding testicular doses per course were 90.4 ± 16.3 cGy, 103.6 ± 16.4 cGy, and 139.3 ± 14.6 cGy at 6, 10, and 15 MV, respectively. In conclusions, this study was the first to measure the incidental testicular doses by intensity-modulated radiotherapy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans at different energy levels during prostate-only irradiation. Higher photon energy and volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy plans resulted in higher incidental testicular doses compared with lower photon energy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans.

  13. Non-Linearity of dose-effect relationship on the example of cytogenetic effects in plant cells at low level exposure to ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, Alla; Geras'kin, Stanislav; Dikarev, Vladimir; Dikareva, Nina; Chernonog, Elena; Copplestone, David; Evseeva, Tatyana

    2006-01-01

    Over several decades, modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on biological system has relied on the target principle [Timofeeff-Ressovsky et al., 1935], which assumes that cell damage or modification to genes appear as a direct consequence of the exposure of biological macromolecules to charged particles. Furthermore, it is assumed that there is no threshold for the induction of biological damage and that the effects observed are proportional to the energy absorbed. Following this principle, the average number of hits per target should increase linearly with dose, and the yield of mutations per unit of dose is assumed to be the same at both low and high doses (linearity of response). This principle has served as the scientific background for the linear no-threshold (LNT) concept that forms the basis for the radiological protection for the public and the environment [ICRP, 1990]. It follows from the LNT that there is an additional risk for human health from exposure to any radiation level, even below natural background. Since the mid 50's, however, the scientific basis for the LNT concept has been challenged as experimental data have shown that, at low doses, there was a non linear relationship in the dose response. Luchnik and Timofeeff-Ressovsky were the first who showed a non-linear response to a low dose exposure [Luchnik, 1957; Timofeeff-Ressovsky and Luchnik, 1960]. Since then, many data have been accumulated which contradict the LNT model at low doses and dose rates. However, the hit-effect paradigm has become such a strong and indissoluble fact that it has persisted even under the growing pressure of scientific evidence for phenomena at low dose exposure that can not be successfully accounted for by the LNT concept. In recent years, additional information on non-targeted effects of radiation has been accumulated following the first reports of an adaptive response in human lymphocytes [Olivieri et al., 1984] as well as bystander mutagenic effect of alpha

  14. Non-Linearity of dose-effect relationship on the example of cytogenetic effects in plant cells at low level exposure to ionising radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oudalova, Alla; Geras' kin, Stanislav; Dikarev, Vladimir; Dikareva, Nina; Chernonog, Elena [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, RIARAE, 249032 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Copplestone, David [Environment Agency, Millbank Tower, 25th. Floor, 21/24 Millbank, London, SW1P 4XL (United Kingdom); Evseeva, Tatyana [Institute of Biology, Kommunisticheskaya st., 28 Syktyvkar 167610, Komi Republic (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    Over several decades, modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on biological system has relied on the target principle [Timofeeff-Ressovsky et al., 1935], which assumes that cell damage or modification to genes appear as a direct consequence of the exposure of biological macromolecules to charged particles. Furthermore, it is assumed that there is no threshold for the induction of biological damage and that the effects observed are proportional to the energy absorbed. Following this principle, the average number of hits per target should increase linearly with dose, and the yield of mutations per unit of dose is assumed to be the same at both low and high doses (linearity of response). This principle has served as the scientific background for the linear no-threshold (LNT) concept that forms the basis for the radiological protection for the public and the environment [ICRP, 1990]. It follows from the LNT that there is an additional risk for human health from exposure to any radiation level, even below natural background. Since the mid 50's, however, the scientific basis for the LNT concept has been challenged as experimental data have shown that, at low doses, there was a non linear relationship in the dose response. Luchnik and Timofeeff-Ressovsky were the first who showed a non-linear response to a low dose exposure [Luchnik, 1957; Timofeeff-Ressovsky and Luchnik, 1960]. Since then, many data have been accumulated which contradict the LNT model at low doses and dose rates. However, the hit-effect paradigm has become such a strong and indissoluble fact that it has persisted even under the growing pressure of scientific evidence for phenomena at low dose exposure that can not be successfully accounted for by the LNT concept. In recent years, additional information on non-targeted effects of radiation has been accumulated following the first reports of an adaptive response in human lymphocytes [Olivieri et al., 1984] as well as bystander mutagenic effect of

  15. Testicular radiation dose after multimodal curative therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Influence on hormone levels, quality of life, and sexual functioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, S.; Wolff, H.A.; Rave-Fraenk, M.; Hess, C.F.; Jung, K.; Gaedcke, J.; Ghadimi, M.; Becker, H.; Hermann, R.M.; Aerztehaus an der Ammerlandklinik, Westerstede; Christiansen, H.; Hannover Medical School

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the current work was to prospectively measure the influence of testicular radiation dose on hormone levels, quality of life (QoL), and sexual functioning following multimodal therapy (neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy) for rectal cancer. Patients and methods: From November 2007 to November 2009, 83 male patients were treated at the University of Goettingen with radiochemotherapy (RCT) for locally advanced rectal cancer [total dose 50.4 Gy, concomitant chemotherapy with two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (FU) or 5-FU and oxaliplatin]. Testicular radiation doses were analyzed and correlated with hormone levels [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone and free androgen index (FAI) serum levels], QoL, and sexual functioning, which were determined before and up to 1 year after RCT. Results: Mean dose at the testes was 3.9 Gy (range 0.28-11.98 Gy). It was higher for tumors located < 6 cm from the anocutaneous line (p < 0.05). One year after therapy, testosterone, the testosterone/LH ratio, and the FAI/LH ratio were significantly decreased (3.5-3.0 μg/l, 0.9-0.4, 7.9-4.5, respectively) while LH and FSH (4.2-8.5 IU/l, 6.0-21.9 IU/l) were increased. QoL and sexual functioning were significantly impaired. However, there was no statistical correlation between testicular radiation dose and changes in hormone levels, QoL, or sexual functioning. Conclusion: Multimodal treatment for rectal cancer including RCT leads to hormone level changes and to impaired QoL and sexual functioning. However, because there was no apparent correlation between the analyzed parameters, QoL is probably also influenced by other factors, e.g., psychosocial aspects. (orig.)

  16. Testicular radiation dose after multimodal curative therapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. Influence on hormone levels, quality of life, and sexual functioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, S.; Wolff, H.A.; Rave-Fraenk, M.; Hess, C.F. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Jung, K. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Medical Statistics; Gaedcke, J.; Ghadimi, M.; Becker, H. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of General Surgery; Hermann, R.M. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Aerztehaus an der Ammerlandklinik, Westerstede (Germany). Radiotherapy; Christiansen, H. [University Medicine Goettingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Hannover Medical School (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the current work was to prospectively measure the influence of testicular radiation dose on hormone levels, quality of life (QoL), and sexual functioning following multimodal therapy (neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy, surgery, and adjuvant chemotherapy) for rectal cancer. Patients and methods: From November 2007 to November 2009, 83 male patients were treated at the University of Goettingen with radiochemotherapy (RCT) for locally advanced rectal cancer [total dose 50.4 Gy, concomitant chemotherapy with two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (FU) or 5-FU and oxaliplatin]. Testicular radiation doses were analyzed and correlated with hormone levels [luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), total testosterone and free androgen index (FAI) serum levels], QoL, and sexual functioning, which were determined before and up to 1 year after RCT. Results: Mean dose at the testes was 3.9 Gy (range 0.28-11.98 Gy). It was higher for tumors located < 6 cm from the anocutaneous line (p < 0.05). One year after therapy, testosterone, the testosterone/LH ratio, and the FAI/LH ratio were significantly decreased (3.5-3.0 {mu}g/l, 0.9-0.4, 7.9-4.5, respectively) while LH and FSH (4.2-8.5 IU/l, 6.0-21.9 IU/l) were increased. QoL and sexual functioning were significantly impaired. However, there was no statistical correlation between testicular radiation dose and changes in hormone levels, QoL, or sexual functioning. Conclusion: Multimodal treatment for rectal cancer including RCT leads to hormone level changes and to impaired QoL and sexual functioning. However, because there was no apparent correlation between the analyzed parameters, QoL is probably also influenced by other factors, e.g., psychosocial aspects. (orig.)

  17. Outdoor radon levels and dose to the members of public residing in and around the new BARC campus, Visakhapatnam, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinod Kumar, A.; Sumesh, C.G.; Krishna, N.S.; Sahoo, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Puranik, V.D.

    2010-01-01

    Natural radiation is the largest contributor to the collective radiation dose to the world population. The greatest fraction of the natural radiation exposure to humans results from inhalation of the short-lived decay products of Radon ( 222 Rn) and Thoron ( 220 Rn), which occur in the free atmosphere and in higher concentrations in the room air of buildings. 222 Rn, being the most important radon isotope in terms of radiation exposure contributes about 55% of the annual radiation dose to the general population from natural radiation sources

  18. Thermally assisted OSL application for equivalent dose estimation; comparison of multiple equivalent dose values as well as saturation levels determined by luminescence and ESR techniques for a sedimentary sample collected from a fault gouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Şahiner, Eren, E-mail: sahiner@ankara.edu.tr; Meriç, Niyazi, E-mail: meric@ankara.edu.tr; Polymeris, George S., E-mail: gspolymeris@ankara.edu.tr

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Multiple equivalent dose estimations were carried out. • Additive ESR and regenerative luminescence were applied. • Preliminary SAR results employing TA-OSL signal were discussed. • Saturation levels of ESR and luminescence were investigated. • IRSL{sub 175} and SAR TA-OSL stand as very promising for large doses. - Abstract: Equivalent dose estimation (D{sub e}) constitutes the most important part of either trap-charge dating techniques or dosimetry applications. In the present work, multiple, independent equivalent dose estimation approaches were adopted, using both luminescence and ESR techniques; two different minerals were studied, namely quartz as well as feldspathic polymineral samples. The work is divided into three independent parts, depending on the type of signal employed. Firstly, different D{sub e} estimation approaches were carried out on both polymineral and contaminated quartz, using single aliquot regenerative dose protocols employing conventional OSL and IRSL signals, acquired at different temperatures. Secondly, ESR equivalent dose estimations using the additive dose procedure both at room temperature and at 90 K were discussed. Lastly, for the first time in the literature, a single aliquot regenerative protocol employing a thermally assisted OSL signal originating from Very Deep Traps was applied for natural minerals. Rejection criteria such as recycling and recovery ratios are also presented. The SAR protocol, whenever applied, provided with compatible D{sub e} estimations with great accuracy, independent on either the type of mineral or the stimulation temperature. Low temperature ESR signals resulting from Al and Ti centers indicate very large D{sub e} values due to bleaching in-ability, associated with large uncertainty values. Additionally, dose saturation of different approaches was investigated. For the signal arising from Very Deep Traps in quartz saturation is extended almost by one order of magnitude. It is

  19. Evaluation of multiple scan average dose (MSAD) levels in computerized tomography in Minas Gerais state, Brazil; Avaliacao dos niveis de dose media em cortes multiplos (MSAD) em tomografia computadorizada no estado de Minas Gerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Thessa C., E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento de Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vieira, Leandro de A.; Barbosa, Nayra V.; Oliveira, Jeyselaine R. de; Cesar, Adriana C.Z. [Secretaria de Vigilancia Sanitaria de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Teogenes A. da [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2014-07-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) grows every year and is a diagnostic method that has revolutionized radiology with advances in procedures for obtaining image. However, the indiscriminate use of this method generates relatively high doses in patients. The diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) is a practical tool to promote the evaluation of existing protocols. The optimization and the periodic review of the protocols are important to balance the risk of radiation. The present study aims to conduct a survey of levels of MSAD of Minas Gerais following the procedures recommended by current Brazilian law. (author)

  20. Dose evaluation and establishment of reference levels in activity for nuclear medicine; Avaliação de dose e estabelecimento de níveis de referência em atividade para a medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Julio Cesar de Souza

    2017-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) has emphasized the importance of accurately determining the mean dose levels, or administered activity, received by the patients for each medical procedure that uses ionizing radiation. However, the number of bibliographic references addressing the need to know and optimize these levels is insufficient, or rather limited, which may lead to non-standardizes techniques, a lack of exposures control, and also the increase of associated radiological risks of these procedures. In this context, a software in Visual Basic® of Microsoft© language was developed whose function is to elaborate a method of obtaining the Reference Levels in Activity (RLA) for nuclear medicine patients by determining the third quartile of the examinations carried out. The program also allows obtaining absorbed dose values in critical organs based on patient specificities as age, sex and Body Mass Index (BMI) in order to evaluate the risk involved in each procedure. The main nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures were evaluated through the database of two public hospitals and a private clinic, obtaining the NRAs of each facility, where the software was validated by comparison with the traditionally accepted calculation methods. Due to the results obtained in each installation, in addition to NRA determination, gaps in treatment capacities and unjustified dose variations for the same procedure were identified, indicating the need for optimization. Thus, the developed program is able to provide the estimated values of effective and absorbed doses involved in each procedure, for each patient, providing reference values for nuclear medicine field, not available in the national scenario so far. (author)

  1. Effect of gamma irradiation treatment at phytosanitary dose levels on the quality of ‘Lane Late’ navel oranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of this study were to determine the dose tolerance of ‘Lane Late’ navel oranges (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) to irradiation for phytosanitary purposes, identify the sensory attributes that may be affected by the treatment, and determine which changes, if any, influence consumer liking....

  2. Sequential measurements of cosmic-ray neutron spectrum and dose rate at sea level in Sendai, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi; Nunomiya, Tomoya; Abe, Shigeru; Terunuma, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01

    The cosmic-ray neutron energy spectrum and dose rate were measured sequentially for two years from April 2001 up to March 2003 by using three neutron detectors, a 3 He-loaded multi-moderator detector (Bonner ball), 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm long NE213 organic liquid scintillator, and high-sensitivity rem (dose equivalent) counter at the Kawauchi campus of Tohoku University in Sendai, Japan of geomagnetic latitude, 29degN, and cutoff rigidity, 10.43 GV. The neutron spectrum has three major peaks, thermal energy peak, evaporation peak around 1 MeV and cascade peak around 100 MeV. The ambient neutron dose equivalent rates measured by the rem counter, and the Bonner ball keep almost constant values of 4.0 and 6.5 (nSv/h), respectively, throughout this time period, after atmospheric pressure correction, and it often decreased about 30% after a large Solar Flare, that is called as the Forbush decrease. The total neutron flux was also obtained by the Bonner ball measurements to be 7.5x10 -3 (ncm -2 ·s -1 ) in average. The altitude variation of neutron flux and dose was also investigated by comparing the measured results with other results measured at Mt. Fuji area and aboard an airplane, where the cutoff rigidities are similar. (author)

  3. Changes in the levels of radioactive fall-out and the resulting radiation doses to man in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loutit, J.F.; Marley, W.G.; Mayneord, W.V.; Russell, R.S.

    1960-01-01

    In the period covered by the Council's 1956 report, that is, up to the spring of 1956, the radioactive debris falling in the United Kingdom had arisen from a large number of small nuclear explosions, chiefly in Nevada, and from a few large nuclear explosions mainly in the Pacific, especially in March, 1954. It was recognized that the doses of radiation to persons from the deposition of debris arising from the smaller nuclear explosions would be far outweighed by those from the larger explosions. The material reaching the U.K. from the latter at that time was found to have an apparent age (determined from the ratio of strontium 89 to strontium 90 which ranged from 7 to 14 months. In these circumstances the dose contributed by the isotopes of relatively short life (say, two months or less) was much less important than the dose from the long-lived isotopes such as caesium 137 and strontium 90. From the autumn of 1956 the pattern of testing changed. A high proportion of the explosions carried out were of megaton size and took place in higher latitudes in the northern hemisphere. As a result the short-lived isotopes became relatively more important and, with the heavy testing of nuclear devices in the Arctic in October, 1958, the contribution of radioactive fall-out to the background dose-rate in air in the open rose in the spring of 1959 so that, for a period of a month or two, it amounted to some 30 per cent of the natural background. This rise in dose-rate can be attributed to two main causes, namely, the increase in the rate of testing and the shorter time during which the fission products from the tests in the autumn in northern latitudes, particularly in the Arctic, have remained airborne

  4. Changes in the levels of radioactive fall-out and the resulting radiation doses to man in the United Kingdom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutit, J F; Marley, W G; Mayneord, W V; Russell, R S

    1960-12-01

    In the period covered by the Council's 1956 report, that is, up to the spring of 1956, the radioactive debris falling in the United Kingdom had arisen from a large number of small nuclear explosions, chiefly in Nevada, and from a few large nuclear explosions mainly in the Pacific, especially in March, 1954. It was recognized that the doses of radiation to persons from the deposition of debris arising from the smaller nuclear explosions would be far outweighed by those from the larger explosions. The material reaching the U.K. from the latter at that time was found to have an apparent age (determined from the ratio of strontium 89 to strontium 90 which ranged from 7 to 14 months. In these circumstances the dose contributed by the isotopes of relatively short life (say, two months or less) was much less important than the dose from the long-lived isotopes such as caesium 137 and strontium 90. From the autumn of 1956 the pattern of testing changed. A high proportion of the explosions carried out were of megaton size and took place in higher latitudes in the northern hemisphere. As a result the short-lived isotopes became relatively more important and, with the heavy testing of nuclear devices in the Arctic in October, 1958, the contribution of radioactive fall-out to the background dose-rate in air in the open rose in the spring of 1959 so that, for a period of a month or two, it amounted to some 30 per cent of the natural background. This rise in dose-rate can be attributed to two main causes, namely, the increase in the rate of testing and the shorter time during which the fission products from the tests in the autumn in northern latitudes, particularly in the Arctic, have remained airborne.

  5. Local diagnostic reference level based on size-specific dose estimates: Assessment of pediatric abdominal/pelvic computed tomography at a Japanese national children's hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Rumi; Miyazaki, Osamu; Kurosawa, Hideo; Nosaka, Shunsuke [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-03-01

    A child's body size is not accurately reflected by volume CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) and dose-length product (DLP). Size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) was introduced recently as a new index of radiation dose. However, it has not yet been established as a diagnostic reference level (DRL). To calculate the SSDE of abdominal/pelvic CT and compare the SSDE with CTDI{sub vol}. To calculate the DRLs of CTDI{sub vol} and SSDE. Our hypotheses are: SSDE values will be greater than CTDI{sub vol}, and our DRL will be smaller than the known DRLs of other countries. The CTDI{sub vol} and DLP of 117 children who underwent abdominal/pelvic CT were collected retrospectively. The SSDE was calculated from the sum of the lateral and anteroposterior diameters. The relationships between body weight and effective diameter and between effective diameter and CTDI{sub vol}/SSDE were compared. Further, the local DRL was compared with the DRLs of other countries. Body weight and effective diameter and effective diameter and SSDE were positively correlated. In children ages 1, 5 and 10 years, the SSDE is closer to the exposure dose of CTDI{sub vol} for the 16-cm phantom, while in children ages 15 years, the SSDE falls between CTDI{sub vol} for the 16-cm phantom and that for the 32-cm phantom. The local DRL was lower than those of other countries. With SSDE, the radiation dose increased with increasing body weight. Since SSDE takes body size into account, it proved to be a useful indicator for estimating the exposure dose. (orig.)

  6. Phase I study of intraoperative radiotherapy with photon radiosurgery system in children with recurrent brain tumors: Preliminary report of first dose level (10 Gy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalapurakal, John A.; Goldman, Stewart; Stellpflug, Wendy; Curran, John; Sathiaseelan, Vythialingam; Marymont, Maryanne H.; Tomita, Tadanori

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the preliminary results after intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with the photon radiosurgery system in children with recurrent brain tumors treated at the first dose level (10 Gy) of a Phase I protocol. Methods and Materials: A Phase I IORT dose escalation protocol was initiated at Children's Memorial Hospital to determine the maximal tolerated IORT dose in children with recurrent brain tumors. Results: Fourteen children have received IORT thus far. Eight had been previously irradiated. Thirteen children had ependymoma. The median follow-up was 16 months. Three patients (21%) developed radiation necrosis on follow-up MRI scans 6 to 12 months after IORT. They had not been previously irradiated and had received 10 Gy to a depth of 5 mm. One required surgery and the other two had resolution of their lesions without treatment. All 3 patients were asymptomatic at the last follow-up. No other late toxicity was observed at the last follow-up visit. Eight patients (57%) had tumor control within the surgical bed after IORT. Conclusion: Our findings have demonstrated the safety and feasibility of IORT to a dose of 10 Gy to 2 mm in children with previously irradiated brain tumors. IORT to a dose of 10 Gy at 5 mm was associated with a greater complication rate

  7. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter [Medical University of Innsbruck, Department of Radiology, Innsbruck (Austria); Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra' ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma' a A. [King Saud University, Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, College of Dentistry, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Hoermann, Romed [Medical University of Innsbruck, Division of Clinical and Functional Anatomy, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  8. Effect of ultra-low doses, ASIR and MBIR on density and noise levels of MDCT images of dental implant sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Al-Shawaf, Reema; Al-Sadhan, Ra'ed; Al-Ekrish, Asma'a A.; Hoermann, Romed

    2017-01-01

    Differences in noise and density values in MDCT images obtained using ultra-low doses with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR may possibly affect implant site density analysis. The aim of this study was to compare density and noise measurements recorded from dental implant sites using ultra-low doses combined with FBP, ASIR, and MBIR. Cadavers were scanned using a standard protocol and four low-dose protocols. Scans were reconstructed using FBP, ASIR-50, ASIR-100, and MBIR, and either a bone or standard reconstruction kernel. Density (mean Hounsfield units [HUs]) of alveolar bone and noise levels (mean standard deviation of HUs) was recorded from all datasets and measurements were compared by paired t tests and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Significant differences in density and noise were found between the reference dose/FBP protocol and almost all test combinations. Maximum mean differences in HU were 178.35 (bone kernel) and 273.74 (standard kernel), and in noise, were 243.73 (bone kernel) and 153.88 (standard kernel). Decreasing radiation dose increased density and noise regardless of reconstruction technique and kernel. The effect of reconstruction technique on density and noise depends on the reconstruction kernel used. (orig.)

  9. Lowest instrumented vertebra selection in Lenke 3C and 6C scoliosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yu; Bünger, Cody; Zhang, Yanqun

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate whether or not post-op curve behaviour differs due to different choices of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) with reference to lumbar apical vertebra (LAV) in Lenke 3C and 6C scoliosis. METHODS: We reviewed all the AIS cases surgically treated...... it can yield similar correction while preserving more lumbar mobility and growth potential....

  10. The DTU15 MSS (Mean Sea Surface) and DTU15LAT (Lowest Astronomical Tide) reference surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Piccioni, Gaia

    in the Arctic Ocean for DTU10MSS and DTU13MSS.A new reference surface for off-shore vertical referencing is introduced. This is called the DTU15LAT.The surface is derived from the DTU15MSS and the DTU10 Global ocean tide to give a 19 year Lowest Astronomical Tide referenced to either the Mean sea surface...

  11. How Effective Are Community College Remedial Math Courses for Students with the Lowest Math Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Di; Dadgar, Mina

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This article examines the effectiveness of remediation for community college students who are identified as having the lowest skills in math. Method: We use transcript data from a state community college system and take advantage of a regression discontinuity design that compares statistically identical students who are assigned to the…

  12. Award of Construction Contracts: Public Institutions' Authority to Select the Lowest Responsible Bidder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Elsa Kircher; Goldblatt, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    The article describes the responsibilities of public colleges and universities to award construction contracts to the lowest responsible bidder; discusses the purpose of bid statutes; and lists the factors institutions should consider in determining a bidder's responsibility. Also covered are the standard of review and due process rights of the…

  13. Structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band of /sup 16/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikebata, Yasuhiko; Suekane, Shota

    1983-10-01

    The structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band is investigated by using the extended Nilsson model wave functions with angular momentum projection and the B1 interaction, two-body LS-force of the Skyrme type and the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained show good agreement with energy interval in this band.

  14. Acute Oral Toxicity of Tetrodotoxin in Mice: Determination of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50 and No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Abal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxin (TTX is starting to appear in molluscs from the European waters and is a hazard to seafood consumers. This toxin blocks sodium channels resulting in neuromuscular paralysis and even death. As a part of the risk assessment process leading to a safe seafood level for TTX, oral toxicity data are required. In this study, a 4-level Up and Down Procedure was designed in order to determine for the first time the oral lethal dose 50 (LD50 and the No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL in mice by using an accurate well-characterized TTX standard.

  15. Development of a dose assessment computer code for the NPP severe accident at intermediate level - Korean case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, J.H.; Lee, K.J.; Cho, H.Y.; Lim, J.H.

    1993-01-01

    A real-time dose assessment computer code named RADCON (RADiological CONsequence analysis) has been developed. An approximation method describing the distribution of radionuclides in a puff was proposed and implemented in the code. This method is expected to reduce the time required to calculate the cloud shine (external dose from radioactive plumes). RADCON can simulate an NPP emergency situation by considering complex topography and continuous washout phenomena and provide a function of effective emergency planning. To verify the code results, RADCON has been compared with RASCAL, which was developed for the U.S. NRC by ORNL, for eight hypothetical accident scenarios. Sensitivity analysis was also performed for the important input parameters. (2 tabs., 3 figs.)

  16. Guidance levels for diagnostic radiology in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iacob, O.; Diaconescu, C.

    2002-01-01

    Over two decades surveys of radiological practice in Romania have demonstrated wide variations in patient dose levels between different hospitals. Local and national investigations revealed poor performances as well as of radiological equipment, darkroom procedure or technology of investigation. Hitherto, the annual collective effective dose to the population of Romania from diagnostic medical exposures attained a value of 13,820 manSv. Since the annual frequencies of radiological examinations remain unchanged over last ten years, this value is mostly attributed to the individual dose levels in different X-ray procedures. Notwithstanding the huge benefits to patients, the reduction of unnecessary exposures and individual doses are our principal concern and the establishment of national reference dose levels should solve this problem. British experience demonstrated that reference doses are a practical tool in this purpose and the adoption of national reference dose values indicated an overall improvement in patient exposure. Even the local of reference dose values proved a useful way to achieve patient dose reduction. In meantime the optimization of patient protection, each X-ray examination should be conducted with lowest necessary dose to achieve the clinical aim. This paper presents the first approach to establish local reference dose levels for some diagnostic examinations based on the measurements made in six (from the eighth of Eastern territory of Romania) districts, invited to cooperate in this end

  17. Transuranium element toxicity: dose-response relationships at low exposure levels. Summary and speculative interpretation relative to exposure limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.C.

    1975-01-01

    A summary is given of information on transuranium element toxicity and the correlation of this information with current established exposure limits. It is difficult to calculate a biologically relevant radiation dose from deposited plutonium; it is exposure that must be controlled in order to prevent biological effect, and if the relationship between exposure and effect is known, then radiation dose is of no concern. There are extensive data on the effects of plutonium in bone. Results of studies at the University of Utah indicate that plutonium in beagles may be as much as ten times more toxic than radium. It has been suggested that this toxicity ratio may be even higher in man than in the beagle dog because of differences in surface-to-volume ratios and differences in the rate of burial of surface-deposited plutonium. The present capabilities for extrapolating dose-effect relationships seem to be limited to the setting of upper limits, based on assumptions of linearity and considerations related to natural background

  18. Epidemiological surveys on the effects of low-level radiation dose: a comparative assessment. Vol. A: pre-conception irradiation effects. Vol. E (DRAFT A): group collation tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.S.B.

    1988-01-01

    In this report, the health effects of low-level doses of radiation are considered by reference to published epidemiological surveys. The work was carried out with three objectives in mind: 1. to provide a comprehensive and critical review of the subject; 2. to seek consistent indications of particular health effects by collating results and comparing with those from surveys at moderate-level doses; 3. to provide an authoritative view on the epidemiology of low-level radiation-induced health effects. Vol E (DRAFT A) is appended and contains group collation tables. Epidemiological surveys can be conveniently divided into four classes (A, B, C, D) according to the phase of life when irradiation occurs or the effect is diagnosed. The first of the classes (A) is addressed here; this class is concerned with possible effects arising from radiation received by a parent before conception. Possible effects of preconception irradiation were identified under four broad groupings. These are Down's syndrome, ''Indicators of Reproductive Damage'' (mainly Primary Sterility, Congenital Abnormalities, Sex Ratio, Fetal Mortality, Infant Mortality), Childhood Malignancies, and Chromosomal Changes in Abortuses. Information about each survey, and comparisons with results from moderate-level dose surveys, are contained in synopses that are set out in the Appendix.

  19. Non-linearity of dose-effect relationship at low level exposure on the example of cytogenetic effects in plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudalova, A.A.; Geras'kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Dikareva, N.S.; Chernonog, E.V.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. There has been an increasing concern in the current scientific society and among the public about the need to protect the environment in order to maintain the ecosystem sustainability and future well-being of man. The linear non-threshold (LNT) hypothesis as the most officially acknowledged concept of biological effect of radiation fails to explain many facts on effects at low level exposures (LLE) accumulated lately. Available information on the dose-effect relationship at low doses is scarce and incomplete for non-human species despite the fact that, under conditions of increased radiation exposure, some biota species occur at a risk of higher impact than humans because of differences in ecological niches occupied. Dose-effect relationships for cytogenetic damage in the range of LLE are studied in a series os experiments with plant (Hordeum vulgare L.) meristem cells. Dose-effect dependences obtained show an obvious non-linear behavior in the LLE region. A piecewise linear model (PLM) for dose-cytogenetic effect relationship that considers an existence of dose-independent part at LLE ('plateau') is developed and specified on the data obtained. An advantage of the PLM over linear model in approximating the frequency of cytogenetic disturbances is demonstrated. From an empirical probability distribution analysis, it is shown that the increase in cytogenetic damage level is tightly connected with changes in a process of absorbed energy distribution between target volumes in terms of fraction of cells experienced a radiation hit event. An appropriateness of the LNT hypothesis to the description of cytogenetic disturbances yield in plant meristem cells in the LLE region is discussed. The results support a conclusion about indirect mechanism of mutagenesis induced by low doses. New data obtained concern a perception of fundamental mechanisms governing cell response to LLE. These findings are of general biological interest, since

  20. Pathways of low carbon transition at the lowest cost. Pathways of low carbon transition in France at the lowest cost - Dynamics and average abatement costs (MACC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrissin Fabert, Baptiste; Foussard, Alexis

    2016-11-01

    The objective to divide greenhouse gas emissions in France by a factor four by 2050 implies the mobilisation at the lowest cost of the whole set of known sources of reduction of emissions in all economic sectors. In this context, this report is based on a methodology (D-CAM in French for dynamics - average abatement costs, MACC in English for Medium Abatement Cost Curves) which relies on a theoretical business-as-usual scenario, on a database on the potential, rate of development, and cost of mobilizable sources, and on a dynamic model of cost minimisation. The MACC tool is used to explore, for each sector, scenarios of de-carbonation which allow objectives of reduction of greenhouse gas emissions to be reached at different time horizons. An aggregated approach of this tool modifies the distribution of efforts of emission reduction between sectors with respect to a sector-based approach. Thus, a macro-assessment of low carbon transition does not reveal any obvious over-cost with respect to the business-as-usual scenario. A second document is a Power Point presentation which contains the same information, curves and graphs

  1. Level and dynamics of internal dose from 137Cs and 90Sr formation in connection with ecological diversity of polluted agrogenoses of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, A.P.; Grodzinsky, D.M.; Pavlenko, Yu.A.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of our calculations was estimation of quantitative influence of ecological diversity on levels and dynamics of internal doses formation from long-lived radionuclide such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr. Our estimations have radioecological nature that is they are based on registration of natural mechanisms of agricultural products pollution. It has been realized on the basis of three-module ecological model of assessment of radiological consequences (EMARC) of use of polluted agrocenoses

  2. [{sup 131}I]FIAU labeling of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive lymphocytes: cell-level dosimetry and dose-dependent toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzonico, Pat [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Koehne, Guenther; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; O' Reilly, Richard J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Allogeneic Transplantation Service, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Gallardo, Humilidad F. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Doubrovin, Mikhail; Blasberg, Ronald G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York, NY (United States); Finn, Ronald [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry and Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States); Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Immunology Program, New York, NY (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Gene Transfer and Somatic Cell Engineering Facility, New York, NY (United States); Larson, Steven M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Donor T cells have been shown to be reactive against and effective in adoptive immunotherapy of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) lymphomas which develop in some leukemia patients post marrow transplantation. These T cells may be genetically modified by incorporation of a replication-incompetent viral vector (NIT) encoding both an inactive mutant nerve growth factor receptor (LNGFR), as an immunoselectable surface marker, and a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), rendering the cells sensitive to ganciclovir. The current studies are based on the selective HSV-TK-catalyzed trapping (phosphorylation) of the thymidine analog [{sup 131}I]-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuransyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU) as a means of stably labeling such T cells for in vivo trafficking (including tumor targeting) studies. Because of the radiosensitivity of lymphocytes and the potentially high absorbed dose to the nucleus from intracellular {sup 131}I (even at tracer levels), the nucleus absorbed dose (D{sub n}) and dose-dependent immune functionality were evaluated for NIT {sup +} T cells labeled ex vivo in [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-containing medium. Based on in vitro kinetic studies of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU uptake by NIT {sup +} T cells, D{sub n} was calculated using an adaptation of the MIRD formalism and the recently published MIRD cellular S factors. Immune cytotoxicity of [{sup 131}I ]FIAU-labeled cells was assayed against {sup 51}Cr-labeled target cells [B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLCLs) ] in a standard 4-h release assay. At median nuclear absorbed doses up to 830 cGy, a {sup 51}Cr-release assay against BLCLs showed no loss of immune cytotoxicity, thus demonstrating the functional integrity of genetically transduced, tumor-reactive T cells labeled at this dose level for in vivo cell trafficking and tumor targeting studies. (orig.)

  3. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  4. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo, E-mail: lfaggioni@sirm.org [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Paolicchi, Fabio [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Bastiani, Luca [Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Research Council, Via Moruzzi 1, 56124, Pisa (Italy); Guido, Davide [Unit of Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100, Pavia (Italy); Caramella, Davide [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Medical students tend to overstate their knowledge of radiation protection (RP). • Overall RP knowledge of young doctors and students is suboptimal. • RP teaching to undergraduates and postgraduates needs to be substantially improved. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. Material and methods: A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Results: Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; P < 0.05), with no cases of perceived excellent knowledge among radiography students. However, the actual knowledge of essential radiation protection topics such as regulations, patient and tissue susceptibility to radiation damage, professional radiation risk and dose optimisation, as well as of radiation doses delivered by common radiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (P < 0.05). Those latter significantly outperformed radiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (P < 0.01). Overall, less than 50% of survey respondents correctly answered all questions of the survey. Conclusions: Radiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological

  5. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996; Umweltpolitik. Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Bericht ueber die `Umweltradioaktivitaet und Strahlenbelastung im Jahr 1996` richtet sich an Bundestag und Bundesrat und darueber hinaus an alle an Fragen des Strahlenschutzes interessierte Buerger. Der Bericht belegt, dass die Strahlenbelastung der Bevoelkerung im Jahr 1996 gering war und insgesamt durchschnittlich 4 Millisievert (mSv) betrug. Dieser Wert war zu 60% auf natuerliche und zu 40% auf kuenstliche Strahlenquellen zurueckzufuehren. Den wesentlichen Beitrag zur natuerlichen Strahlenbelastung lieferte das radioaktive Gas Radon in Wohnungen. Die zivilisatorische Strahlenexposition der Bevoelkerung wurde fast ausschliesslich durch die Anwendung radioaktiver Stoffe und ionisierender Strahlen in der Medizin im Rahmen der Diagnostik hervorgerufen. Hier bestehen nach wie vor Moeglichkeiten zur Reduktion der Strahlenbelastung. Im Jahre 1996 waren 340 000 Personen beruflich

  6. Level of coenzyme A and the activity of certain dehydrogenases under chronic low dose X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkasova, L A; Novik, V A; Tsychun, G F [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziologii

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term x ray irradiation (cumulative dose 50 R) on: the content of co-enzyme A (KoA) in the brain and liver, the activity of a number of oxydizing reducing enzymes in the brain mitochondria and heart muscle, and the blood glucocorticoid content. It was established that the metabolism of brain and liver KoA is quite stable, the enzymes of the brain tricarbonic acids and pyruvate-dehydrogenase cycle are labile.

  7. A q-Schroedinger algebra, its lowest weight representations and generalized q-deformed heat equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrev, V.K.; Doebner, H.D.; Mrugalla, C.

    1995-12-01

    We give a q-deformation S-perpendicular q of the centrally extended Schroedinger algebra. We construct the lowest weight representations of S-perpendicular q , starting from the Verma modules over S-perpendicular q , finding their singular vectors and factoring the Verma submodules built on the singular vectors. We also give a vector-field realization of S-perpendicular q which provides polynomial realization of the lowest weight representations and an infinite hierarchy of q-difference equations which may be called generalized q-deformed heat equations. We also apply our methods to the on-shell q-Schroedinger algebra proposed by Floreanini and Vinet. (author). 12 refs

  8. Lowest-order constrained variational method for simple many-fermion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, I.; Moszkowski, S.A.; Wong, C.W.

    1975-01-01

    The authors study the potential energy of many-fermion systems calculated by the lowest-order constrained variational (LOCV) method of Pandharipande. Two simple two-body interactions are used. For a simple hard-core potential in a dilute Fermi gas, they find that the Huang-Yang exclusion correction can be used to determine a healing distance. The result is close to the older Pandharipande prescription for the healing distance. For a hard core plus attractive exponential potential, the LOCV result agrees closely with the lowest-order separation method of Moszkowski and Scott. They find that the LOCV result has a shallow minimum as a function of the healing distance at the Moszkowski-Scott separation distance. The significance of the absence of a Brueckner dispersion correction in the LOCV result is discussed. (Auth.)

  9. Changing of expression level of fas-antigen (CD95), cytokines synthesis and production after irradiation in low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinina, N.M.; Solntceva, O.S.; Bytchkova, N.V.; Nikiforov, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow progenitor (CD34+), tymocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) are most radiosensitive than other cell types. Even low doses of radiation induce apoptosis. The investigators suggest that it is possible relationship between synthesis and production of cytokines and apoptotic process. With the purpose to determine correlation between expression of Fas-antigen and synthesis of cytokines after low doses irradiation the experiments by irradiation PBL of healthy persons in vitro were held. Cells were X-irradiated by 12,5, 25 and 50 cGy. In consequence of the experiments increasing of Fas-antigen was revealed. This increasing correlated with changing in synthesis and production of cytokines. Also the Chernobyl's accident liquidators (CAL) were investigated. After comparison data in the group CAL (I) with data in the control group (II) increasing of Fas-antigen expression was revealed. Also in I group was discovered increasing of the cell number sinthesied interleukine-4 (IL-4) and interleukine-6 (IL-6). Interleukine-lβ (IL-1 β) producing pell were decreased. These changes have been correlated with degree of immunodeficiency at CAL. These data allow to consider the apoptosis as cell mechanism included in pathogenesis of diseases, which can be showed later long time after irradiation. (author)

  10. Effect of a new functional CYP3A4 polymorphism on calcineurin inhibitors' dose requirements and trough blood levels in stable renal transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elens, Laure; van Schaik, Ron H; Panin, Nadtha; de Meyer, Martine; Wallemacq, Pierre; Lison, Dominique; Mourad, Michel; Haufroid, Vincent

    2011-10-01

    CYP3A4 is involved in the oxidative metabolism of many drugs and xenobiotics including the immunosuppressants tacrolimus (Tac) and cyclosporine (CsA). The objective of the study was to assess the potential influence of a new functional SNP in CYP3A4 on the pharmacokinetic parameters assessed by dose requirements and trough blood levels of both calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) in stable renal transplant patients. A total of 99 stable renal transplant patients receiving either Tac (n = 49) or CsA (n = 50) were genotyped for the CYP3A4 intron 6 C>T (rs35599367) and CYP3A5*3 SNPs. Trough blood levels ([Tac](0) or [CsA](0) in ng/ml), dose-adjusted [Tac](0) or [CsA](0) (ng/ml per mg/kg bodyweight) as well as doses (mg/kg bodyweight) required to achieve target concentrations were compared among patients according to allelic status for CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Dose-adjusted concentrations were 2.0- and 1.6-fold higher in T-variant allele carriers for the CYP3A4 intron 6 C>T SNP compared with homozygous CC for Tac and CsA, respectively. When CYP3A4/CYP3A5 genotypes were combined, the difference was even more striking as the so-defined CYP3A poor metabolizer group presented dose-adjusted concentration 1.6- and 4.1-fold higher for Tac, and 1.5- and 2.2-fold higher for CsA than the intermediate metabolizer and extensive metabolizer groups, respectively. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that, taken together, both CYP3A4 intron 6 and CYP3A5*3 SNPs explained more than 60 and 20% of the variability observed in dose-adjusted [Tac](0) and [CsA](0), respectively. The CYP3A4 intron 6 C>T polymorphism is associated with altered Tac and CsA metabolism. CYP3A4 intron 6 C>T along with CYP3A5*3 (especially for Tac) pharmacogenetic testing performed just before transplantation may help identifying patients at risk of CNI overexposure and contribute to limit CNI-related nephrotoxicity by refining the starting dose according to their genotype. Original submitted 5 May 2011; Revision

  11. Three-point Green's function of massless QED in position space to lowest order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Indrajit

    2009-01-01

    The transverse part of the three-point Green's function of massless QED is determined to the lowest order in position space. Taken together with the evaluation of the longitudinal part in Mitra (2008) (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 41 315401), this gives a relation for QED which is analogous to the star-triangle relation. We relate our result to conformal-invariant three-point functions

  12. N-representability of the Jastrow wave function pair density of the lowest-order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Katsuhiko; Higuchi, Masahiko

    2017-08-08

    Conditions for the N-representability of the pair density (PD) are needed for the development of the PD functional theory. We derive sufficient conditions for the N-representability of the PD that is calculated from the Jastrow wave function within the lowest order. These conditions are used as the constraints on the correlation function of the Jastrow wave function. A concrete procedure to search the suitable correlation function is also presented.

  13. People In Sub-Saharan Africa Rate Their Health And Health Care Among Lowest In World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Angus S.; Tortora, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The health of people in sub-Saharan Africa is a major global concern. However, data are weak, and little is known about how people in the region perceive their health or their health care. We used data from the Gallup World Poll in 2012 to document sub-Saharan Africans’ perceived health status, their satisfaction with health care, their contact with medical professionals, and the priority they attach to health care. In comparison to other regions of the world, sub-Saharan Africa has the lowest ratings for well-being and the lowest satisfaction with health care. It also has the second lowest perception of personal health, after only the former Soviet Union and its satellites. HIV prevalence is positively correlated with perceived improvements in health care in countries with high prevalence. This is consistent with an improvement in at least some health care services as a result of the largely aid-funded rollout of antiretroviral treatment. Even so, sub-Saharan Africans do not prioritize health care as a matter of policy, although donors are increasingly shifting their aid efforts in sub-Saharan Africa toward health. PMID:25715657

  14. Effect of low dose radiation on somatic intrachromosomal recombination in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooker, A.M.; Cormack, J.; Morley, A.A.; Sykes, P.J.; Bhat, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: High doses of ionising radiation are mutagenic in a wide range of mutation assays. The majority of radiation exposure studies in in vivo mouse mutation assays have been performed at high doses, eg greater than 1 Gy. However, these doses are not relevant to the low doses of ionising radiation that the majority of the population might likely come into contact with. Radiation protection levels tend to be based on a simple linear no-threshold model which suggests that any radiation above zero is potentially harmful. The pKZ1 recombination mutagenesis mouse model has proven to be a sensitive assay for the detection of mutations caused by low doses of chemical agents. In pKZ1 mice, somatic intrachromosomal recombination (SICR) inversion events can be detected in cells using histochemistry for the E. coli LacZ transgene. We exposed pKZ1 mice to a single radiation dose ranging from 0.001 to 2 Gy. A significant increase in SICR was observed in spleen at the two highest doses of 0.1 and 2 Gy and a significant reduction in SICR below the endogenous frequency was observed at the two lowest doses of 0.01 and 0.001 Gy. After exposing a pKZ1 cell line to the same dose range, a similar J curve response was observed with significant increases in SICR observed at the 3 highest doses and a significant decrease below the endogenous frequency at the lowest dose (0.001 Gy). The next experiments will be to determine the dose where the SICR frequency returns to the endogenous level. The important question posed by these results is 'Is a reduction below the endogenous SICR level caused by low doses of ionising radiation anti-mutagenic?' Studies now need to be performed to investigate the effect of low doses of radiation on other mutation end-points, and the mechanism for the reduction in SICR

  15. Daily low-dose/continuous capecitabine combined with neo-adjuvant irradiation reduces VEGF and PDGF-BB levels in rectal carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, David; B e'Ery, Einat; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Koren, Claude; Sulkes, Aaron; Fenig, Eyal; Lavi, Idit; Shaked, Yuval

    2008-01-01

    Metronomic low-dose chemotherapy regimen was found to have an antiangiogenic effect in tumors. However, its effect on levels of circulating pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors is not fully explored. Materials and methods. The levels of both VEGF and PDGF-BB were measured in three time points, in the serum of 32 rectal carcinoma patients receiving daily reduced-dose/continuous capecitabine in combination with preoperative pelvic irradiation. Results. We found a significant decrease in VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels during the combination treatment (p<0.0001), followed by an increase in the successive rest-period (p<0.0001). In addition, substantial changes in platelets counts were observed during treatment in correlation with the changes of VEGF and PDGF-BB serum levels. Discussion. These results suggest that combined chemo-irradiation affect levels of pro-angiogenic factors during treatment, and may reflect an anti-angiogenic window induced during this treatment. The potential implications of this inducible phenomenon, including a possible clinical benefit from the administration of long lasting metronomic chemotherapy immediately following combined chemo-irradiation, would warrant further investigation

  16. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer reduces volume of bowel treated to high dose levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero; Henrys, Anthony J.; Adams, Elisabeth J.; Norman, Andrew R.; Bedford, James L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.; Dearnaley, David P.; Tait, Diana M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the bowel in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: The targets (pelvic nodal and rectal volumes), bowel, and bladder were outlined in 5 patients. All had conventional, three-dimensional conformal RT and forward-planned multisegment three-field IMRT plans compared with inverse-planned simultaneous integrated boost nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans. Equally spaced seven-field and five-field and five-field, customized, segmented IMRT plans were also evaluated. Results: Ninety-five percent of the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of both planning target volumes using all but the conventional plan (mean primary and pelvic planning target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was 32.8 ± 13.7 Gy and 23.7 ± 4.87 Gy, respectively), reflecting a significant lack of coverage. The three-field forward planned IMRT plans reduced the volume of bowel irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy by 26% ± 16% and 42% ± 27% compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Additional reductions to 69 ± 51 cm 3 to 45 Gy and 20 ± 21 cm 3 to 50 Gy were obtained with the nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans-64% ± 11% and 64% ± 20% reductions compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Reducing the number of beams and customizing the angles for the five-field equally spaced IMRT plan did not significantly reduce bowel sparing. Conclusion: The bowel volume irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy was significantly reduced with IMRT, which could potentially lead to less bowel toxicity. Reducing the number of beams did not reduce bowel sparing and the five-field customized segmented IMRT plan is a reasonable technique to be tested in clinical trials

  17. 210Po and 210Pb levels in mussels and fish from Slovenian market and the related dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planinšek, Petra; Smodiš, Borut; Benedik, Ljudmila

    2013-01-01

    Polonium-210 (t 1/2 = 138 d) is a decay product of uranium-radium decay chain and consequently widely spread in the environment. It enters organisms through direct uptake, ingestion or inhalation. It is a pure alpha emitter and its radiotoxicity is connected with the fact that emits alpha particles with relatively high energy of about 5.3 MeV. It is concentrated in the soft tissues such as mussel, liver and others, where significantly contributes to the internal dose. Beta emitter lead-210 (t 1/2 = 22.17 years) is the second highest radiotoxic radionuclide from uranium-238 decay chain and decays, through bismuth- 210 (t 1/2 = 5.01 d) into 210 Po. Therefore it is necessary to determine the 21P o in foods, especially in seafood, because of its accumulation capacity. 210 Po and 210 Pb were determined in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and fish (salmon, trout) from Slovenia market. Mussels were bought on the local market as well as from domestic producers. Fish of Slovenian origin were bought on the local market. Samples were freeze dried, homogenized and assayed for 210 Po and 210 Pb. First, radiochemical separation was performed, followed by alpha particle spectrometric measurement of 210 Po and beta counting of 210 Pb on a low background gas-flow proportional counter. The results obtained show that the activity concentrations of 210 Po in mussels varied from 0.9 to 191 Bq/kg of fresh mass and for fish from 0.3 to 2.12 Bq/kg of fresh mass, while for 210 Pb they varied from 1.5 to 6.9 Bq/k of fresh mass for mussels and in fish samples the activity concentrations were less than 1.9 Bq/kg of fresh mass. Combined annual ingestion doses due to 210 Po and 210 Pb for mussels and fish from the Slovenian market is assessed. (author)

  18. Effect of Chelator Conjugation Level and Injection Dose on Tumor and Organ Uptake of 111In Labeled MORAb-009, an Anti-mesothelin Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, I. S.; Lee, S.-M.; Kim, H. S.; Yao, Z.; Regino, C.; Sato, N.; Cheng, K. T.; Hassan, R.; Campo, M. F.; Albone, E. F.; Choyke, P. L.; Pastan, I.; Paik, C. H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Radiolabeling of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a metallic radionuclide requires the conjugation of a bifunctional chelator to the mAb. The conjugation, however, can alter the physical and immunological properties of the mAb, consequently affecting its tumor targeting pharmacokinetics. In this study, we investigated the effect of the amount of 2-(p-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-cyclohexyl-diethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (CHX-A″) conjugated to MORAb-009, a mAb directed against mesothelin and the effect of MORAb dose on the biodistribution of 111In labeled MORAb-009. Methods We used nude mice bearing A431/K5 tumor as a mesothelin-positive tumor model and A431 tumor as a mesothelin-negative control. To find the optimal level of CHX-A″ conjugation, CHX-A″-MORAb-009 conjugates with 2.4, 3.5, and 5.5 CHX-A″ molecules were investigated. To investigate the effect of injected MORAb-009 dose on neutralizing the shed-mesothelin in the circulation, the biodistribution studies were performed after the i.v. co-injection of the 111In labeled MORAb-009 (2.4 CHX-A″/MORAb-009) with three different doses, 0.2, 2, and 30 μg of MORAb-009. Results The tumor uptake in A431/K5 tumor was 4 times higher than that in A431 tumor, indicating that the tumor uptake in A431/K5 was mesothelin-mediated. The conjugate with 5.5 CHX-A″ showed a lower isoelectric point (pI) and lower immunoreactivity (IR) than the 2.4 CHX-A″ conjugate. These differences were reflected in biodistribution of the 111In label. The 111In labeled MORAb-009 conjugated with 2.4 CHX-A″ produced higher tumor uptake, and lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 5.5 CHX-A″ conjugate. The biodistribution studies also revealed that the tumor uptake was significantly affected by the injected MORAb-009 dose and tumor size. The 30 μg dose produced higher tumor uptake than the 0.2 and 2 μg doses whereas the 30 μg dose produced lower liver and spleen uptakes than the 0.2 μg dose. Conclusion This study

  19. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting in vivo effect levels for repeat-dose systemic toxicity using chemical, biological, kinetic and study covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lisa; Ouedraogo, Gladys; Pham, LyLy; Clouzeau, Jacques; Loisel-Joubert, Sophie; Blanchet, Delphine; Noçairi, Hicham; Setzer, Woodrow; Judson, Richard; Grulke, Chris; Mansouri, Kamel; Martin, Matthew

    2018-02-01

    In an effort to address a major challenge in chemical safety assessment, alternative approaches for characterizing systemic effect levels, a predictive model was developed. Systemic effect levels were curated from ToxRefDB, HESS-DB and COSMOS-DB from numerous study types totaling 4379 in vivo studies for 1247 chemicals. Observed systemic effects in mammalian models are a complex function of chemical dynamics, kinetics, and inter- and intra-individual variability. To address this complex problem, systemic effect levels were modeled at the study-level by leveraging study covariates (e.g., study type, strain, administration route) in addition to multiple descriptor sets, including chemical (ToxPrint, PaDEL, and Physchem), biological (ToxCast), and kinetic descriptors. Using random forest modeling with cross-validation and external validation procedures, study-level covariates alone accounted for approximately 15% of the variance reducing the root mean squared error (RMSE) from 0.96 log 10 to 0.85 log 10  mg/kg/day, providing a baseline performance metric (lower expectation of model performance). A consensus model developed using a combination of study-level covariates, chemical, biological, and kinetic descriptors explained a total of 43% of the variance with an RMSE of 0.69 log 10  mg/kg/day. A benchmark model (upper expectation of model performance) was also developed with an RMSE of 0.5 log 10  mg/kg/day by incorporating study-level covariates and the mean effect level per chemical. To achieve a representative chemical-level prediction, the minimum study-level predicted and observed effect level per chemical were compared reducing the RMSE from 1.0 to 0.73 log 10  mg/kg/day, equivalent to 87% of predictions falling within an order-of-magnitude of the observed value. Although biological descriptors did not improve model performance, the final model was enriched for biological descriptors that indicated xenobiotic metabolism gene expression, oxidative stress, and

  1. Comparison of the effects of three different Baccaurea angulata whole fruit juice doses on plasma, aorta and liver MDA levels, antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mikail, Maryam Abimbola; Ahmed, Idris Adewale; Hazali, Norazlanshah; Abdul Rasad, Mohammad Syaiful Bahari; Abdul Ghani, Radiah; Hashim, Ridzwan; Arief, Solachuddin Jahuari; Md Isa, Muhammad Lokman; Draman, Samsul

    2017-05-17

    Baccaurea angulata (common names: belimbing dayak or belimbing hutan) is a Malaysian underutilized fruit. The preliminary work on B. angulata fruit juice showed that it possesses antioxidant properties. Therefore, further work is needed to confirm the efficacy and proper dosage of B. angulata as a potential natural antioxidant. The present study was thus carried out to compare the effects of three different B. angulata whole fruit (WF) juice doses administered at nutritional doses of 0.50, 1.00 and 1.50 ml/kg/day on plasma, aorta and liver malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase) as well as total antioxidant capacity in rabbits fed high-cholesterol diet. Thirty-five male rabbits of New Zealand strain were randomly assigned to seven groups. For 12 weeks, group CH was fed 1% cholesterol diet only; group C1 was fed 1% cholesterol diet and 0.50 ml/kg/day B. angulata WF juice; group C2 was fed 1% cholesterol diet and 1.00 ml/kg/day B. angulata WF juice; group C3 was fed 1% cholesterol diet and 1.50 ml/kg/day B. angulata WF juice; group N was fed standard pellet only; group N1 was fed standard pellet and 0.50 ml/kg/day B. angulata WF juice; and group N2 was fed standard pellet and 1.00 ml/kg/day B. angulata WF juice. The three doses reduced the formation of MDA and enhanced the expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes. The highest dose used (1.50 ml/kg/day) was, however, seen as the most potent. Higher doses of B. angulata juice exerted better antioxidant activity.

  2. Application of conventional and FPG staining for the analysis of chromosome aberrations induced by low levels of dose in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R.; Schmid, E.; Bauchinger, M.

    1983-01-01

    Human peripheral lymphocytes were irradiated with 0.05-0.5 Gy of 220 keV X-rays. After application of either a conventional or the fluorescence plus Giemsa (FPG) staining technique, the dose response for dicentrics and acentrics was studied. The analysis of exclusively first-division cells (M 1 ), carried out by the FPG method, revealed significantly higher aberration yields as compared with the results of the conventional method. The data from M 1 cells support the assumption of a linear dose response for both dicentrics and acentrics. The results are discussed with regard to the application of chromosome analyses for a cytogenetic dosimetry after exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  3. Dose limits, constraints, reference levels. What does it mean for radiation protection?; Grenzwerte, Richtwerte, Referenzwerte. Was bedeutet das fuer den Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen (THM), Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2016-07-01

    The established concept of radiation protection with its basic principles justification, optimization, and limitation has proved its value and is going to be continued. In its deeper meaning, however, the concept is rather subtle and complex. Furthermore, in some aspects there remain some breaches or incons